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AUGUST 2021 Blues Vol 37 No. 8

AUGUST 2021 Blues Vol 37 No. 8 • FEATURE: Tim Miller, LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD • FEATURE: Texas EquuSearch • FEATURE: Stories of the FBI • FEATURE: Who wants to be a COP • FEATURE: Texas Sheriff's Convention • WARSTORY: Death of a Policeman's Dream • ISLAND TIME: Take a Trip to Galveston • OPEN ROAD: Hennessey Summons Exorcist • BADGE OF HONOR: Leadership Starts with You • DARYL'S DELIBERATIONS: What Does Liberty Look Like • LIGHT BULB AWARD: Seattle AGAIN • BLUE MENTAL HEALTH: Supporting the Mental Health of our Corrections Officers • CONCERNS OF POLICE SURVIVORS: Remembering Fort Worth Officer Henry "Hank" Nava, Jr. • JOB LISTINGS: Hundreds of New Job Openings Across the State

AUGUST 2021 Blues Vol 37 No. 8
• FEATURE: Tim Miller, LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
• FEATURE: Texas EquuSearch
• FEATURE: Stories of the FBI
• FEATURE: Who wants to be a COP
• FEATURE: Texas Sheriff's Convention
• WARSTORY: Death of a Policeman's Dream
• ISLAND TIME: Take a Trip to Galveston
• OPEN ROAD: Hennessey Summons Exorcist
• BADGE OF HONOR: Leadership Starts with You
• DARYL'S DELIBERATIONS: What Does Liberty Look Like
• LIGHT BULB AWARD: Seattle AGAIN
• BLUE MENTAL HEALTH: Supporting the Mental Health of our Corrections Officers
• CONCERNS OF POLICE SURVIVORS: Remembering Fort Worth Officer Henry "Hank" Nava, Jr.
• JOB LISTINGS: Hundreds of New Job Openings Across the State

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The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 1


<strong>AUGUST</strong> <strong>2021</strong><br />

FEATURES<br />

30 TIM MILLER, WINNER LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD<br />

36 TEXAS EQUUSEARCH, THE BEST OF THE BEST<br />

40 STORIES OF THE FBI<br />

50 WHO WANTS TO BE A COP<br />

76 TEXAS SHERIFFS CONVENTION<br />

OUR TEAM<br />

OUR CONTRIBUTORS<br />

On the Cover<br />

Tim Miller, President and<br />

Founder of Texas EquuSearch,<br />

has been chosen to receive<br />

a LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT<br />

AWARD from The BLUES. Read<br />

all about this incredible man<br />

and his quest to locate as many<br />

missing persons as humanly<br />

possible.<br />

68<br />

72<br />

84<br />

DEPARTMENTS<br />

4 Publisher’s Thoughts<br />

6 Editor’s Thoughts<br />

10 Guest Editorial - Passion for the Job<br />

12 Your Thoughts<br />

14 News Around the State<br />

20 News Around the Country<br />

80 Island Time - Galveston<br />

86 Healing our Heroes - John Salerno, Sam Horwitz<br />

90 Light Bulb Award<br />

92 Blue Mental Health with Dr. Tina Jaeckle<br />

94 Running 4 Heroes<br />

96 Remembering My Hero - Officer Hank Nava, Jr.<br />

100 Honoring our Fallen Heroes<br />

106 Outdoors with Rusty Barron/On Vacation with Rex<br />

108 Marketplace - Discounts for LEOs<br />

114 Parting Shots<br />

116 <strong>No</strong>w Hiring - L.E.O. Positions Open in Texas<br />

88<br />

DARYL’S DELIBERATIONS<br />

by DARYL LOTT<br />

92<br />

BLUE MENTAL HEALTH by TINA JAECKLE<br />

MICHAEL BARRON<br />

founder & publisher<br />

MICHAEL BARRON<br />

editor-n-chief<br />

REX EVANS<br />

contributing editor<br />

DIANE TRYKOWSKI<br />

creative editor<br />

RUSTY BARRON<br />

outdoor editor<br />

TINA JAECKLE<br />

contributing editor<br />

DARYL LOTT<br />

contributing editor<br />

SAM HORWITZ & JOHN SALERNO<br />

contributing editors<br />

DOUGLAS GRIFFITH<br />

HPOU contributing editor<br />

JANICE VANZURA<br />

sales mgr / austin<br />

CHRISTINA FRASER<br />

sales mgr / national<br />

T. EDISON<br />

contributing writer / light bulb<br />

CHIEF JOEL F. SHULTS<br />

guest editorial<br />

RANDY WALLACE<br />

contributing writer<br />

JAMES BARRAGAN<br />

contributing writer<br />

ADAM FERRISE<br />

contributing writer<br />

SARAH D. WIRE<br />

contributing writer<br />

SANDY MALONE<br />

contributing writer<br />

JIM DUDLEY<br />

podcast host / police 1<br />

LANE DEGREGORY<br />

contributing writer<br />

LAYLEIGH NAVA<br />

contributing writer / COPS<br />

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY<br />

JOHNNY HANSON<br />

houston chronicle<br />

The BLUES Police Magazine is published monthly by Kress-Barr, LLC, P.O. Box 2733, League City Texas 77574. The opinions<br />

expressed in articles, op-eds and editorials are those of each individual author and do not reflect the opinion of<br />

The BLUES or its parent company. Rebuttals or submission of news articles and editorials may be submitted to:<br />

The BLUES Police Magazine - bluespdmag@gmail.com. The entire contents of The BLUES is copyrighted© and may not be<br />

reproduced or reprinted without the express permission of the publisher. The BLUES logo is a Trademark of Kress-Barr, LLC.<br />

2 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 3


The BLUES presents<br />

Tim Miller, with LIFETIME<br />

ACHIEVEMENT AWARD.<br />

I can’t imagine what it feels<br />

like to lose a son or daughter.<br />

Even worse, having that son or<br />

daughter go missing and not<br />

know where they are or what<br />

happened to them. I can tell<br />

you that for 10 minutes of my<br />

life, I have felt that heart stopping<br />

anxiety of a missing child.<br />

When my daughter was 2 years<br />

old, she suddenly disappeared<br />

while we were shopping at<br />

Baybrook Mall. That was absolutely<br />

the most terrifying<br />

ten minutes of my life. There<br />

is simply no way to describe<br />

the heart pounding anxiety<br />

when you realize your beautiful<br />

daughter is gone. Just vanished<br />

- nowhere to be found. You find<br />

yourself screaming at anyone<br />

and everyone to find her. And<br />

then suddenly, out of the corner<br />

of your eye, you see her talking<br />

to a police officer in the middle<br />

of the mall. That sense of relief<br />

is also indescribable.<br />

Imagine living your entire<br />

life like those ten minutes. <strong>No</strong>t<br />

knowing where your child is.<br />

Are they alive or dead? Who<br />

has them and will I ever see<br />

them again? Or you find your<br />

baby girl’s body only to spend<br />

the next 30 years trying to find<br />

her killer.<br />

You either lose your mind and<br />

become totally lost in grief and<br />

sorrow, or you become the goto<br />

guy for thousands of mothers<br />

and fathers around the world<br />

searching for a missing loved<br />

one. Someone who can answer<br />

their prayers to bring their<br />

babies home safely or at least<br />

know what happened to them.<br />

They need a miracle and Tim<br />

Miller is that miracle. He IS the<br />

answer to their prayers.<br />

Tim Miller has channeled his<br />

grief and anger into bringing<br />

home as many sons and daughters<br />

as possible. In 2000 he<br />

founded EquuSearch and over<br />

the course of 21 years, Equu-<br />

Search has located hundreds<br />

of missing persons and recovered<br />

the bodies of dozens more.<br />

Countless families have Tim<br />

Miller and EquuSearch to thank<br />

for bringing them closure. Tim<br />

Miller is their hero.<br />

They say everything happens<br />

for a reason. That Tim’s loss<br />

of his daughter Laura brought<br />

about EquuSearch and had he<br />

not lost his daughter, Equu-<br />

Search most likely wouldn’t have<br />

MICHAEL BARRON<br />

been created. <strong>No</strong>thing I can say<br />

or write in these pages will ever<br />

make up for his loss. I can’t take<br />

away the pain, the sorrow, or the<br />

grief. But what I can do, is thank<br />

God that Tim Miller does what he<br />

does. His mission is to find every<br />

lost soul that comes across his<br />

desk at EquuSearch.<br />

He puts that mission ahead of<br />

his own health and wellbeing. Just<br />

a few weeks ago, Tim was hospitalized.<br />

I won’t go into the details,<br />

but suffice to say, had he not gone<br />

in when he did, Tim Miller might<br />

not be here to read this. And when<br />

he was lying in a hospital bed, he<br />

wasn’t thinking about his own life<br />

or whether he’d live another day.<br />

<strong>No</strong>, his only concern was what<br />

would happen to EquuSearch.<br />

Without him, who would carry<br />

on his mission and hold the hands<br />

of families who’s loved ones<br />

were missing. Who would lead<br />

the charge to bring those babies<br />

back home safe and sound? Who<br />

would drive the boat, organize<br />

the search teams and coordinate<br />

with law enforcement? So<br />

many thoughts racing through<br />

his mind, none of which were<br />

about himself. All about the<br />

wellbeing of others. That’s<br />

what makes Tim Miller, Tim<br />

Miller. He is truly an incredible<br />

man on an incredible mission.<br />

He is the light at the end of a<br />

dark tunnel. The rainbow at<br />

the end of horrible storm, and<br />

Texas EquuSearch is a non-profit organization<br />

and is operated 100% from donations. Each<br />

search & rescue operation cost thousands of<br />

dollars in fuel, transportation and other expenses.<br />

Please support this incredible organization<br />

with your donation today.<br />

Someday it may be your loved one who is<br />

missing and each of us needs to know that Tim<br />

Miller and his 1000+ volunteers have the funds<br />

necessary to go out and find them.<br />

CLICK ON THE PAY PAL FORM >>><br />

a loving hug when all seems<br />

lost. I can’t imagine a world<br />

without him, and by the grace<br />

of God, Tim Miller is back home<br />

and back at work. Within days<br />

of getting home from the hospital,<br />

he was leading his team<br />

in search of yet another missing<br />

person in Houston.<br />

To honor this hero of many,<br />

we present Tim Miller with The<br />

BLUES’s LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT<br />

AWARD. <strong>No</strong> one is more deserving<br />

of this award than Tim and<br />

we are pleased to feature him<br />

on this month’s cover. You can<br />

read more about Tim’s struggles<br />

and determination to find<br />

justice for his daughter Laura in<br />

this month’s feature story.<br />

Congratulations and God Bless<br />

you Tim Miller and God Speed<br />

to EquuSearch.<br />

4 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 5


Tim Miller, a True Texas Living<br />

Legend<br />

A living legend, or perhaps<br />

more importantly, a good man<br />

and a good friend. Tim and I first<br />

met many years ago when I was<br />

a young captain at the Liberty<br />

County Sheriff’s Office. We had<br />

been called to a missing child<br />

case near Tarkington Prairie.<br />

It was a very intense and chaotic<br />

scene. <strong>No</strong>ne of<br />

us, not even Tim,<br />

knew what was to<br />

follow over the next<br />

five very long, arduous<br />

and painful<br />

days. Liberty County<br />

back then was even<br />

more rural than it is<br />

today. Resources for<br />

an extended search<br />

of rough terrain was<br />

in very short supply.<br />

It was hot, humid,<br />

heavily wooded with<br />

multiple bodies of<br />

water and streams,<br />

all of which had<br />

to be search and<br />

cleared.<br />

I reached out to<br />

surrounding counties<br />

for assistance, as<br />

well as the Texas Department<br />

of Public<br />

Safety and the Texas<br />

Rangers. I called<br />

upon everyone I could. A missing<br />

four-year-old little boy needed<br />

to be found. There was no limit<br />

to what I would have done to ensure<br />

that was going to happen.<br />

Enter Tim Miller. I reached out<br />

to him and without a moment’s<br />

hesitation he was on his way.<br />

Little did I know, he had resources,<br />

equipment, and personnel to<br />

bring that none of us in Liberty<br />

County had seen before. And he<br />

was a humble gentleman who<br />

sincerely, only wanted to help.<br />

The following days, thousands,<br />

REX EVANS<br />

I mean literally thousands of volunteers<br />

would come<br />

from across the<br />

state and the nation.<br />

Local businesses and<br />

restaurants brought<br />

food, water and<br />

snacks. Numerous<br />

law enforcement,<br />

fire and EMS agencies<br />

sent personnel,<br />

equipment, and supplies.<br />

And Tim, Tim<br />

quietly rolled in with<br />

his teams of personnel,<br />

equipment<br />

and supplies. His<br />

now world-famous<br />

Texas EquuSearch<br />

established a command<br />

post just feet<br />

away from the main<br />

command post. In<br />

tandem, we worked<br />

together in a very<br />

strict, coordinated<br />

effort.<br />

I can tell you,<br />

Tim was especially helpful in<br />

working with everyone on this<br />

scene. Most particularly, with<br />

6 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 7


the parents of the missing child.<br />

He stood with me, time and<br />

time again as we spoke with the<br />

parents, witnesses and others,<br />

all the while he rarely spoke but<br />

rather, listened. Afterwards, we<br />

would regroup, and he would<br />

very quietly raise his tired eyes<br />

towards me and softly speak his<br />

mind as to what he recommended<br />

was to follow.<br />

As the days wore on, we were<br />

all exhausted. The first two or<br />

three days, I stayed there at the<br />

command post. I was fortunate<br />

enough to even obtain a nighttime<br />

fly over by Houston PD<br />

helicopters with spotlights and<br />

infrared technology. Even still to<br />

no avail, we continued our arduous<br />

search.<br />

It was the last day of the<br />

search. I had come to the grim<br />

determination that I was going<br />

to have to call the immediate<br />

active search and switch our<br />

resources to purely investigative<br />

processes. Tim asked me to allow<br />

one more new technology he<br />

had access to…...a drone. I admit,<br />

I was skeptical but, my heart<br />

hurt so at the thought of leaving<br />

without that little boy, I agreed.<br />

A very short time later, over a<br />

nearby body of water, the images<br />

from a drone revealed what<br />

fate and time had known all<br />

along, there was the body of a<br />

little four-year-old missing boy,<br />

Devon Davis; the very little boy,<br />

we had all been looking for.<br />

Working with men and women<br />

who I had known for years from<br />

various agencies, we entered<br />

and recovered the tiny, frail remains<br />

of Devon. As these dedicated<br />

professionals and amazing<br />

human beings completed that<br />

task, it was time for an official<br />

notification to the parents to<br />

occur.<br />

As I walked up the road towards<br />

the command post, Tim<br />

Miller walked right beside me.<br />

Devon’s mother saw us, and like<br />

all mothers, she knew. She hit<br />

the ground on her knees and<br />

began to loudly grieve like all<br />

mothers would do. I quietly knelt<br />

in front of her, Tim just off to my<br />

side and I told her that her son<br />

was gone but we have recovered<br />

his remains. <strong>No</strong>w, I don’t know<br />

how I held back the tears when<br />

I did that, but it wasn’t over yet.<br />

We walked over and I did the<br />

same with the boy’s father.<br />

Afterwards, there was such an<br />

awkward lull….and as Tim and<br />

I were just feet apart, we never<br />

said a word. Tears just streamed<br />

down our faces, and we hugged<br />

one another. It wasn’t the outcome<br />

anyone wanted, but we<br />

were at the very least, able to<br />

bring some semblance of “closure”<br />

to the family of little Devon<br />

Davis.<br />

Tim and his organization never<br />

got a dime for all that effort,<br />

hard work and equipment. They<br />

did all of it from the heart. Very<br />

few men walk this Earth with<br />

such compassion for others. Very<br />

few. This was the only missing<br />

persons case Tim and I would<br />

work together. As a captain at<br />

the Sheriff’s Office, we were to<br />

have multiple missing persons<br />

occur in a very short amount of<br />

time. And, in each case I called<br />

Tim and he never faltered or<br />

failed to answer. He and Texas<br />

EquuSearch always make the<br />

long trek to Liberty County, and<br />

they gave everything they had.<br />

I for one, am truly humbled<br />

to know and call Tim Miller my<br />

friend. He is most deserving of<br />

this Lifetime Achievement Award<br />

from the <strong>Blues</strong> Police Magazine.<br />

He has given so much, to so<br />

many, with so little for himself.<br />

He truly represents the kind of<br />

human being we should all be<br />

striving to be.<br />

Congratulations Tim, and thank<br />

you! You’ve lost and given so<br />

much of yourself. I sincerely<br />

hope and pray this token of our<br />

(my) appreciation somehow resonates<br />

with you as to just how<br />

important a role you have played<br />

in making this world a better<br />

place for us all.<br />

SUPPORT<br />

EQUUSEARCH<br />

WITH YOUR<br />

DONATION<br />

TODAY<br />

Ready To Serve You<br />

For information contact:<br />

Jim Rodriguez • Law Enforcement Sales Professional • 915-422-6446<br />

FT. WORTH<br />

6201 NE Loop 820<br />

HOUSTON<br />

10310 Wortham Center Dr.<br />

Shoot Point Blank Law Enforcement is a division of Shoot Point<br />

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8 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 9<br />

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Passion for the Job - ‘I didn’t kill him – and nobody cared.’<br />

Here’s how the prevalence of deadly force opportunity in<br />

ordinary police experience can inform training.<br />

Even with the proliferation of videos<br />

of police officers in action, there is a<br />

tremendous amount of drama in policing<br />

that never sees the light of day.<br />

I recall my closest encounter with<br />

deadly force involved a domestic call,<br />

a drunk with a large knife and my<br />

trigger squeeze being prevented by the<br />

appearance of a toddler in the line of<br />

fire. I remember finally getting behind<br />

the wheel of my patrol car and gaining<br />

control of my breathing. The report<br />

was filed at the station, and then I<br />

was on to the next call. Based on my<br />

research, similar scenarios happen<br />

routinely for law enforcement.<br />

My own survey of over 200 police<br />

officers that I reported at the 2009<br />

International Association of Chiefs<br />

of Police conference in Denver was<br />

confirmed by a report in the FBI Law<br />

Enforcement Bulletin (LEB) in 2010. As<br />

the LEB article reports “approximately<br />

70 percent of the sample of police<br />

officers had been in a situation where<br />

they legally could have fired their<br />

weapon during a critical incident but<br />

chose not to.”<br />

NO RESEARCH ON SUCCESS<br />

As I have lamented often, while the<br />

research on officers killed in the line of<br />

duty and on suspects killed by police<br />

is substantial, there is little data on<br />

near misses and shots not fired.<br />

Deaths in police shootings are,<br />

despite popular belief, rare events. As<br />

such they may not provide as much<br />

helpful information as studies of the<br />

much more frequent occurrence of<br />

officer survival and suspects’ live apprehension.<br />

The recent Chicago policy requiring<br />

officers to report by radio when they<br />

point a gun at someone has potential<br />

for helpful research. Although the<br />

policy is seen as potentially punitive,<br />

the opportunity to examine those in-<br />

cidents could provide valuable information<br />

to researchers for officer safety<br />

and training.<br />

TRAINING IMPLICATIONS OF DEADLY<br />

FORCE DECISIONS<br />

As part of firearms and deadly force<br />

training, most officers and cadets will<br />

hear that taking a life is a rare event<br />

that is unlikely to happen but that they<br />

must prepare for it. A more realistic<br />

narrative would be that an officer will<br />

make deadly force decisions multiple<br />

times in a career or even on a single<br />

shift.<br />

In recent decades, police firearms<br />

training has moved from mere target<br />

marksmanship to practice in<br />

decision-making to scenario-based<br />

integration of accuracy and decision-making.<br />

The good news about<br />

the frequency of shoot-don’t-shoot<br />

situations in real life is that almost any<br />

police department has enough incidents<br />

to develop the data for their own<br />

study. Answering the question of what<br />

factors tip the scales toward pulling<br />

the trigger is achievable for individual<br />

agencies.<br />

USING LOCAL RESEARCH TO GUIDE<br />

USE OF FORCE POLICY<br />

There is a growing emphasis on law<br />

enforcement agencies doing their own<br />

research. The days of small departments<br />

relying on studies from large<br />

agencies with the resources to pay<br />

for research or attract grants may be<br />

waning. Many officers and administrators<br />

have advanced degrees that<br />

required using research methods.<br />

Collaboration with area colleges or a<br />

sharp intern can yield helpful guidance<br />

on creating a viable study.<br />

Developing a comprehensive and<br />

ethically sound research program isn’t<br />

rocket science, but it is science. Getting<br />

a valid and supportable outcome<br />

and analysis of data may result in new<br />

policies or new training processes.<br />

The outcome might also cast doubt on<br />

current policy and training. Therefore,<br />

the documentation of methodology<br />

and analysis could end up being an issue<br />

in the legal defense of an officer’s<br />

actions. Subject matter expert review<br />

of the research will help validate the<br />

findings and guide policy makers.<br />

AFTER ACTION<br />

Shift briefings are routine in departments<br />

across the country but debriefs<br />

get much less attention. Debriefs<br />

mainly happen after an event when<br />

those involved just want to get their<br />

paperwork done and go home. There<br />

may be fears of discussing a case that<br />

may be controversial. Debriefs can<br />

degrade into an attaboy session or an<br />

embarrassing finger-pointing session.<br />

They are also too often saved for “big”<br />

events so the potential lessons to be<br />

learned for “ordinary” events go unexamined.<br />

As we now realize, deciding<br />

to point a firearm or pull a trigger is<br />

quite ordinary and should be examined.<br />

Even if there is no intentional research<br />

on how your officers navigated<br />

a deadly force situation with no shots<br />

fired, creating a culture of peer learning<br />

can bring individual experiences<br />

into the learning experiences of the<br />

entire department.<br />

Supervisors, leaders and trainers can<br />

benefit from the ordinary drama that<br />

no one else knows or cares about.<br />

About the author: Joel Shults operates<br />

Street Smart Training and is<br />

the founder of the National Center for<br />

Police Advocacy. He retired as Chief of<br />

Police in Colorado.<br />

This editorial will be rather difficult<br />

to write. I’m quite sure you’ll<br />

find it rather difficult to digest. But<br />

this needs to be talked about. It<br />

needs to be brought out into the<br />

light, from the darkness of hidden<br />

truth.<br />

When a law enforcement officer<br />

dies in the line of duty, he or<br />

she is provided a state funeral.<br />

21-gun salute, TAPS, bag pipes,<br />

everything. And that’s rightfully<br />

so. What I call your attention to<br />

is those officers who are seriously<br />

injured and survive their grievous<br />

injuries. Whether by gunfire,<br />

a blade, a violent and relentless<br />

assault or motor vehicle car crash.<br />

Those officers and their families<br />

are taxed with the steady influx of<br />

their “regular” bills, compounded<br />

by the arrival of all the medical<br />

bills. Then to add insult to injury,<br />

workers comp denies tests and<br />

medications time and time again,<br />

citing, not within their responsibility.<br />

Department heads defer to their<br />

city or county officials for “guidance”<br />

in such circumstances and<br />

are subsequently, released from<br />

all blame. Or are they? As a department,<br />

how can any of you just<br />

stand by and watch a member of<br />

your team, your family lay there,<br />

severely injured, doing exactly<br />

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A TRUE AMERICAN HERO<br />

While under fire in the middle of<br />

a mass casualty event, specialist<br />

Collin Jackson treated the wounded<br />

and performed CPR, then<br />

destroyed an ISIS position with a<br />

60mm mortar.<br />

On August 16th, 2017, SPC Jackson<br />

supported an Army Special<br />

Forces team patrolling with<br />

Afghan Commandos. The patrol<br />

came under attack and after 8<br />

hours of fighting, sought cover<br />

in a compound to wait out the<br />

night. An explosion rocked the<br />

compound as the team entered,<br />

wounding 30 and killing four. SPC<br />

Jackson dismounted his vehicle<br />

and ran toward the explosion. ISIS<br />

fighters resumed their attack with<br />

small arms and RPGs. Jackson<br />

ignored the heavy fire, consolidating<br />

the wounded in a casualty<br />

collection point and treating their<br />

wounds.<br />

At one point, he performed CPR<br />

on an American casualty in critical<br />

condition. When the wounded<br />

were staged for evacuation, Jackson<br />

ran back to his vehicle and<br />

pulled out his 60mm mortar. For<br />

over an hour, sitting in the open in<br />

front of the vehicle, Jackson fired<br />

mortars at ISIS positions surrounding<br />

the team. He dropped 6<br />

rounds on top of a key ISIS position<br />

pinning the team down, destroying<br />

the enemy and helping to<br />

end the ambush. Jackson’s actions<br />

enabled the successful evacuation<br />

of 13 critically wounded casualties.<br />

For his heroic initiative, SPC<br />

Jackson was awarded the Bronze<br />

Star with “V.”<br />

A PROUD AMERICAN<br />

HOUSTON POLICE OFFICERS’<br />

UNION ON THE JAN. 6 RIOTS<br />

There seems to be some confusion<br />

in the media and among paid<br />

law enforcement “experts” as to<br />

where the Fraternal Order of Police<br />

stands on the January 6, <strong>2021</strong>,<br />

riots. While no one has asked us<br />

directly, we offer the following for<br />

their information:<br />

Full text of Press Release<br />

Fraternal Order of Police<br />

Clears Up Confusion as to FOP’s<br />

Position on January 6 Riots<br />

WASHINGTON, DC – There seems<br />

to be some confusion in the media<br />

and among paid law enforcement<br />

“experts” as to where the FOP<br />

stands on the January 6, <strong>2021</strong>,<br />

riots. While no one has asked us<br />

directly, we offer the following for<br />

their information:<br />

The National FOP’s position on<br />

the January 6, <strong>2021</strong>, riot at the<br />

U.S. Capitol is contained in a<br />

statement released even as the<br />

lawlessness continued. Those<br />

who participated in the assaults,<br />

looting, and trespassing must be<br />

arrested and held to account.<br />

We continue to offer our support,<br />

gratitude, and love to our<br />

brothers and sisters in law enforcement<br />

who successfully<br />

fought off the rioters, and we will<br />

be with them as they grieve and<br />

recover, however long that may<br />

take.<br />

HPOU & FOP<br />

DEFUND THEN REFUND<br />

Watching the news nowadays<br />

has for me become an exercise<br />

in exasperated critical thinking. I<br />

often say to myself: “What the hell<br />

do they think is going to happen?”<br />

The propaganda expounded<br />

by the talking heads, pundits,<br />

pseudo-experts, and academics<br />

leaves one wondering what “big<br />

lie” will be next, and then they<br />

outdo themselves again. Since the<br />

Michael Brown shooting in 2014<br />

the drumbeat against American<br />

law enforcement has been growing,<br />

without facts to support the<br />

position and “the powers that be”<br />

have continued to demagogue<br />

and legislate their way toward<br />

a backward tribal society. Back<br />

when sociology was still a functional<br />

science, and not a progressive<br />

advocacy club, a sociologist<br />

named Mariano Grondona developed<br />

a typology for backward or<br />

progressive societies that should<br />

serve as a warning to the elites<br />

clamoring for “reimagining” law<br />

enforcement.<br />

In Grondona’s view, backward<br />

societies—those resistant to actual<br />

freedom and growth—made the<br />

law subservient to authority, an<br />

authority often achieved by force.<br />

In modern, free societies respect<br />

for the law is essential, and authority<br />

is subservient to the law.<br />

Pluralism, tolerance of opposing<br />

views, looking forward instead of<br />

backward, are traits of modern,<br />

freedom-oriented societies.<br />

I find myself growing more<br />

cynical about the motives of the<br />

ruling class who use their esoteric<br />

language and vague generalities<br />

to sway the masses to approve<br />

actions that seem to drag our<br />

country closer to what Edward<br />

Banfield described in his groundbreaking<br />

book, “The Moral Basis of<br />

a Backward Society,” as “the extreme<br />

poverty and backwardness<br />

… which is to be explained largely<br />

(but not entirely) by the inability<br />

of the villagers to act together for<br />

their common good.”<br />

Look, I’m not saying America is<br />

becoming a 1950’s town in southern<br />

Italy, but the point of Banfield’s<br />

research was to understand free,<br />

prosperous, diverse societies, and<br />

the traits of those that failed to<br />

achieve those goals. Undermining<br />

people’s trust in government,<br />

social institutions, the police, and<br />

each other seems like a toxic mix<br />

that creates the backward society<br />

Banfield found in his research.<br />

America has always been a<br />

society based on trust; trust first<br />

of each other, and then of our<br />

political leaders to adhere to the<br />

founding principles. In “Who Prospers:<br />

How Cultural Values Shape<br />

Economic and Political Success,”<br />

Lawrence E. Harrison explained<br />

that the United States flowered<br />

following World War II by displaying<br />

the four cultural factors<br />

he found essential for prosperity,<br />

diversity, and freedom: 1. radius of<br />

trust, identification, and sense of<br />

community 2. rigor of the ethical<br />

system 3. the exercising of authority<br />

4. attitudes about work, innovation,<br />

saving, and profit.<br />

All these attitudes were fully<br />

maximized following our remarkable<br />

ability to outproduce<br />

and outfight the Axis Powers,<br />

and America prospered like never<br />

before. Unfortunately, by the<br />

1990s, Harrison found much of this<br />

essential engine of success had<br />

been eroded by the civil strife and<br />

changing social attitudes about<br />

prosperity, success, and community,<br />

and he called for a cultural<br />

renaissance. Harrison was not<br />

some conservative, but a liberal<br />

who still demanded we reaffirm<br />

our basic principles to be “committed<br />

to the future, to education,<br />

to achievement and excellence, to<br />

a better life for all, to community,<br />

as well as to freedom and justice.”<br />

All the above is my way of<br />

saying, “What the heck are you<br />

thinking?” as I watch politicians<br />

and leaders make patently absurd<br />

policy decisions or fail to stand<br />

against those decisions. For example,<br />

defunding the police.<br />

Defunding the police has become<br />

a mantra chanted without<br />

an adult in the room.<br />

Civil society, free societies,<br />

flourishing societies, all have a<br />

functional constabulary, subservient<br />

to the law and not above it,<br />

and our cultural history of local<br />

control, not centralized control of<br />

that authority, has served to make<br />

us the most free and prosperous<br />

society in history.<br />

If we find trust in each other and<br />

our institutions are being eroded,<br />

we need to seek data-based,<br />

fact-based reasons for any policy<br />

or belief that encourages that<br />

erosion. Saying something “is so”<br />

is not reason enough to destroy<br />

long-standing traditions or institutions,<br />

and the major cities that<br />

have followed the “defund” path<br />

are quickly discovering that their<br />

streets are becoming unlivable<br />

and their ability to avoid accountability<br />

is becoming harder and<br />

harder. Refund the police is now<br />

becoming “a thing.”<br />

The American law enforcement<br />

community has been a key element<br />

in our nation’s success, and<br />

it is time for our leaders and our<br />

communities to demand better<br />

of the political class. Become an<br />

activist, get involved in your local<br />

political activities, demand excellence<br />

and, please, keep faith with<br />

each other. Freedom needs you.<br />

DAVE SMITH<br />

KENTUCKY GOING BLUE<br />

Yesterday, SGT McCoy met a<br />

man by the name of Dan Williams,<br />

age 57, sitting in front of Wendy’s<br />

in Horn Lake. He was down on his<br />

luck and was hungry. SGT McCoy<br />

walked him inside and offered to<br />

buy the man lunch. The Wendy’s<br />

Management would not let the<br />

deputy pay, because they covered<br />

Mr. Williams’ meal instead!<br />

SGT McCoy sat down and ate<br />

lunch with Mr. Williams. He found<br />

out that Mr. Williams had no money<br />

or phone and has been catching<br />

rides from Ohio to get down<br />

to Monroe, Louisiana to be with<br />

family.<br />

SGT McCoy could tell that Mr.<br />

Williams had a good heart and<br />

wanted to help him, so he got<br />

with Deputies Brea, Garrett, and<br />

Andrews. They all pulled money<br />

out of their own pockets and<br />

pitched in to buy Mr. Williams an<br />

$89.00 Greyhound bus ticket to<br />

get home, along with an additional<br />

$60.00 for some food and<br />

necessities. SGT McCoy later said<br />

that Mr. Williams broke down and<br />

cried as he was dropping him off<br />

at the bus station in Memphis, TN.<br />

Mr. Williams looked over to SGT<br />

McCoy and told him, “Out of all<br />

of the people that reached out to<br />

help me in my time of need, it was<br />

the cops. Thank you!!”<br />

This is not a onetime incident….<br />

these random acts of kindness<br />

happen every day across this<br />

county and our nation with law<br />

enforcement officers reaching out<br />

to help those in need, but most of<br />

these good deeds go unnoticed<br />

because that’s our job and that’s<br />

what we do. We are proud to protect<br />

and serve you!<br />

DESOTO COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPT.<br />

Have something on your mind?<br />

Send your thoughts to:<br />

bluespdmag@gmail.com<br />

12 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 13


Harris Co. Criminal Dist. Court Judge Morton repeatedly grants bond,<br />

frees convicted felon now with 14 bonds<br />

Serial burglar granted a total of 14 bonds<br />

By Randy Wallace,<br />

FOX 26 NEWS<br />

HARRIS COUNTY, Texas - “He’s<br />

a one-man crime spree,” said<br />

Andy Kahan with Crime Stoppers.<br />

38-year-old convicted felon<br />

Jeffery Robertson just keeps<br />

showing up over and over again<br />

in the 230th Criminal District<br />

Court.<br />

Every time Robertson gets a<br />

new charge, like burglary, Judge<br />

Chris Morton frees him from jail<br />

by granting him another bond.<br />

So far Robertson has racked up<br />

14 bonds.<br />

“Seven bonds were posted this<br />

month,” Kahan said.<br />

“I was a business manager and<br />

I came across break-ins at the<br />

business I managed,” said Garland<br />

Smith.<br />

As you can imagine, Smith<br />

questions why Judge Morton<br />

keeps granting bonds for Robertson.<br />

“It was crazy to us,” he said.<br />

“He would get arrested and it<br />

wouldn’t be long before he was<br />

back in our facilities doing the<br />

same thing again.”<br />

“Based on his track record,<br />

it’s a matter of days before he<br />

breaks into some other building<br />

or business and gets charged<br />

again,” Kahan said. “It simply<br />

defies logic.”<br />

Pictured above is the Thug and the Judge. Or is it the Judge<br />

and the Thug? Well either way, both are losers !<br />

In a Breaking Bond report last<br />

March, we told you how Judge<br />

Chris Morton granted bond for<br />

19-year-old Jose Perez 11 times<br />

Police call the teen a serial<br />

armed robber.<br />

“We now have members of the<br />

Judiciary that are absolutely not<br />

caring about victims,” then Police<br />

Chief Art Acevedo told us. “I<br />

don’t know what they are caring<br />

about because they are getting<br />

people killed.”<br />

As for Jeffery, the District Attorney’s<br />

Office filed a motion to<br />

revoke Robertson’s bond.<br />

It states, “Robertson is a true<br />

habitual offender. At this time,<br />

he has 10 pending charges. He’s got<br />

prior felony convictions. Based on<br />

the risk to community safety, I find<br />

clear and convincing evidence that<br />

no bond or conditions can safely<br />

assure the community he will not<br />

re-offend again.”<br />

When FOX 26 attempted to ask<br />

Judge Chris Morton about the repeat<br />

bonds, he said our facts were<br />

wrong. When we attempted to give<br />

him a chance to explain the situation,<br />

he hung up the phone on us.<br />

The BLUES attempted to reach<br />

Judge Morton and person who<br />

answered the phone, said they’ve<br />

never heard of The BLUES. <strong>No</strong>t Surprised.<br />

14 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 15


Gov. Greg Abbott orders Texas National Guard<br />

to help with migrant arrests at the border<br />

In a letter to the major general of the Texas National Guard, Abbott<br />

said “more manpower is needed” at the border.<br />

BY JAMES BARRAGÁN<br />

Gov. Greg Abbott has ordered<br />

the National Guard to assist in<br />

arrest of migrants at the border.<br />

Credit: Miguel Gutierrez Jr./The<br />

Texas Tribune<br />

Sign up for The Brief, our daily<br />

newsletter that keeps readers up<br />

to speed on the most essential<br />

Texas news.<br />

Gov. Greg Abbott on Tuesday<br />

ramped up his latest efforts to<br />

stem the increase of migrants<br />

coming into Texas, ordering the<br />

National Guard to assist law enforcement<br />

in arresting migrants at<br />

the border who break state laws.<br />

“To respond to this disaster<br />

and secure the rule of law at our<br />

southern border, more manpower<br />

is needed—in addition to the<br />

troopers from the Texas Department<br />

of Public Safety (DPS) and<br />

soldiers from the Texas National<br />

Guard I have already deployed<br />

there — and DPS needs help in<br />

arresting those who are violating<br />

state law,” Abbott said in a letter<br />

to Major Gen. Tracy R. <strong>No</strong>rris of the<br />

Texas Military Department. “I hereby<br />

order that the Texas National<br />

Guard assist DPS in enforcing Texas<br />

law by arresting lawbreakers at<br />

the border.”<br />

The move is the latest in Abbott’s<br />

efforts to control what he has de-<br />

clared a disaster in several border<br />

counties that he says has been<br />

brought on by the Biden administration’s<br />

lax immigration enforcement.<br />

Border authorities have<br />

stopped hundreds of thousands of<br />

migrants trying to cross into the<br />

United States through its southwestern<br />

border, including 188,829<br />

attempted crossings in June. That<br />

number was the highest of the<br />

year which beat the previous high<br />

of 180,641 set in May.<br />

The Texas Tribune thanks its<br />

sponsors. Become one.<br />

Local officials in some Texas<br />

counties say the increase in migrants<br />

trying to enter the country<br />

has stretched their scarce<br />

resources and a presence of<br />

drug and human smugglers has<br />

overwhelmed their small law<br />

enforcement agencies. Abbott has<br />

sent DPS troopers to border towns<br />

experiencing an increase in migrant<br />

crossings and has pledged<br />

to deliver more help to local law<br />

enforcement agencies.<br />

In June, Abbott declared an<br />

increase in illegal immigration<br />

through Texas a state disaster<br />

and ordered DPS to start arresting<br />

migrants on state offenses and<br />

holding them in state jails. Arrests<br />

started last week and as of Monday,<br />

30 immigrant arrestees were<br />

held at the Briscoe Unit in Dilley, a<br />

state prison that is being converted<br />

into a jail to hold arrested immigrants.<br />

Abbott has also pledged to build<br />

a state-funded border wall to slow<br />

migration through Texas’ southern<br />

border.<br />

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16 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 17


Austin Announces Finalists for Chief<br />

AUSTIN – Austin City Manager<br />

Spencer Cronk has announced the<br />

top seven candidates for the Chief<br />

of Police position out of a field of<br />

46 applicants, the city announced in<br />

a statement.<br />

Finalists for the position are:<br />

Joseph Chacon<br />

Anne Kirkpatrick<br />

Avery L. Moore<br />

Celeste Murphy<br />

Mirtha V. Ramos<br />

Gordon Ramsay<br />

Emada E. Tingirides<br />

The City Manager hopes to announce<br />

a new Chief of Police before<br />

the end of August.<br />

“I am excited about the diverse<br />

slate of individuals we have identified<br />

for this position,” said Cronk.<br />

“I look forward to discussing with<br />

them how we can accomplish the<br />

goals of the community and the City<br />

Council.”<br />

The Chief of Police will oversee<br />

1,809 sworn officers and 734 nonsworn<br />

professional staff and has a<br />

FY 20-21 budget of $240.8 million.<br />

Like many major cities in America,<br />

Austin is reimagining how it provides<br />

public safety services. Austin<br />

is approaching this process in a<br />

methodical and strategic approach,<br />

and the next Chief of Police will<br />

begin their duties during a period of<br />

intense change for the Austin Police<br />

Department (APD). The challenges<br />

and opportunities related to this<br />

initiative alone are many. The Chief<br />

of Police will help APD and the city<br />

adapt and emerge from reimagining<br />

law enforcement in a manner that<br />

improves public safety for all who<br />

visit, live, and work in Austin.<br />

In March, a survey was released<br />

to the public asking them to identify<br />

the skills and characteristics,<br />

background and experience, and<br />

top priorities they believed were<br />

most important for the next Chief of<br />

Police. The responses to the survey<br />

helped establish the selection criteria<br />

for the position.<br />

Cronk solicited additional feedback<br />

in April from community<br />

groups, including five online community<br />

input meetings and constituent<br />

calls from the City’s 311 service.<br />

“Thank you to everyone who participated<br />

and shared their thoughts<br />

throughout this process through<br />

online feedback, virtual meetings,<br />

or via 311,” said Cronk. “We received<br />

input that our community members<br />

want to see the next Chief<br />

have exceptional communication<br />

skills and create dialogue with the<br />

community. They want to see the<br />

Chief be reform minded and transparent<br />

and have a track record of<br />

fostering community involvement<br />

and accountability. The candidates<br />

selected show these characteristics<br />

in various ways.”<br />

Applications for the position<br />

opened April 26, <strong>2021</strong>.<br />

Interviews with the Chief of<br />

Police candidates will occur in the<br />

coming weeks, with several community<br />

input opportunities on the<br />

top finalists.<br />

Candidate Bios<br />

JOSEPH CHACON is the Interim<br />

Chief of Police with the Austin<br />

Police Department, a role he has<br />

served in for four months. Prior<br />

to his appointment, Chief Chacon<br />

served as an assistant chief for<br />

almost five years, overseeing patrol,<br />

special operations, specialized<br />

patrol, investigations, intelligence,<br />

professional standards, and training/recruiting.<br />

Chacon has a master’s degree in<br />

Public Administration and a bachelor’s<br />

degree in Applied Arts and<br />

Sciences. He is a graduate of PERF’s<br />

Senior Management Institute for<br />

Police, Texas State University’s Certified<br />

Public Manager Program, and<br />

MCCA’s Police Executive Leadership<br />

Institute.<br />

ANNE KIRKPATRICK started her<br />

policing career in 1982 in the Memphis<br />

Police Department. During her<br />

38 years in policing, she has been<br />

with 8 agencies, 4 as a Chief of<br />

Police. She has a BA in Business Administration,<br />

a master’s in Counseling,<br />

a law degree and she has been<br />

a licensed attorney for 30 years.<br />

Kirkpatrick is also a graduate of the<br />

FBI National Academy, the FBI’s Law<br />

Enforcement Executive Development<br />

School and the FBI’s National<br />

Executive Institute.<br />

uty Chief of the newly reorganized<br />

East Patrol Bureau. In 2019, Deputy<br />

Chief Moore earned his second star,<br />

becoming Assistant Chief of Police<br />

and assuming command of investigations<br />

and tactical. Currently,<br />

Assistant Chief Moore commands<br />

the investigations bureau.<br />

Moore holds a master’s degree in<br />

Management from the University of<br />

Phoenix – Dallas, a bachelor’s degree<br />

in Criminal Justice from Cameron<br />

University, and an associate<br />

degree in Psychology from Cameron<br />

University.<br />

CELESTE MURPHY is Deputy Chief<br />

of the Atlanta Police Department.<br />

She joined the Atlanta PD in 1997,<br />

and has served in every rank from<br />

patrol officer, detective, sergeant,<br />

lieutenant, captain, and major. Appointed<br />

to Deputy Chief in January<br />

2020, she manages the Community<br />

Services Division.<br />

She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree<br />

in Mathematics and a master’s<br />

in Criminal Justice. Chief Murphy is<br />

a graduate of the Police Executive<br />

Research Forum’s Senior Management<br />

Institute for Police and <strong>No</strong>rth-<br />

AVERY L. MOORE is a 30-year<br />

veteran of the Dallas Police Department<br />

and now an assistant chief.<br />

He began his career as a patrol<br />

officer in 1990, serving in various<br />

assignments, including an instructor<br />

at the Dallas Police Academy. As<br />

a Lieutenant, Assistant Chief Moore<br />

served in the Crime Scene Response<br />

Unit, Traffic, and SWAT. Later he<br />

was promoted to the rank of major,<br />

overseeing a patrol division<br />

where he implemented programs<br />

that reduced the crime rate for<br />

twelve consecutive months. In 2017,<br />

Assistant Chief Moore received his<br />

first star and was named the Depwestern<br />

University School of Police<br />

Staff and Command.<br />

MIRTHA V. RAMOS is Chief of the<br />

DeKalb County (GA) Police Department.<br />

Chief Ramos began her law<br />

enforcement career in 1997 with<br />

the Miami-Dade Police Department.<br />

She served in various assignments,<br />

including uniform patrol, investigations,<br />

emergency management,<br />

community policing, and police<br />

administration. She rose through<br />

all the civil service ranks until her<br />

appointment to police major and<br />

subsequently to division chief, managing<br />

the high liability functions of<br />

the department. On <strong>No</strong>vember 4,<br />

2019, Chief Ramos was appointed<br />

to Chief of the DeKalb County Police<br />

Department.<br />

She holds a master’s degree in<br />

Psychology of Leadership and is a<br />

graduate of the FBI National Academy<br />

in Quantico, Virginia.<br />

GORDON RAMSAY has been a<br />

police chief for 15 years and is nationally<br />

recognized for his work in<br />

community policing, mental health,<br />

victim services, race relations, and<br />

reconciliation. He currently serves as<br />

chief of the Wichita Police Department.<br />

He holds a B.A. in Criminology and<br />

Sociology, an M.A. in Management, is<br />

a graduate of the FBI National Academy,<br />

and serves on the Major City<br />

Chiefs Association Executive Board.<br />

EMADA E. TINGIRIDES is a Los<br />

Angeles Police Department (LAPD)<br />

Deputy Chief. In 1995, she joined the<br />

LAPD to serve the city her family<br />

called home for generations. Mayor<br />

Eric Garcetti and Chief of Police<br />

Michael Moore promoted Emada to<br />

deputy chief and she was named the<br />

commanding officer of the newly<br />

formed Community Safety Partnership<br />

Bureau (CSPB). The relationship-based<br />

public health approach<br />

policing model that defines CSPB<br />

was born to find new and innovative<br />

ways to build trust, relationships,<br />

and address quality of life issues in<br />

some of Los Angeles’ most underserved<br />

and challenging communities.<br />

Tingirides holds a B.S. in Criminal<br />

Justice and an M.A. in Criminology,<br />

Law, and Society.<br />

18 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 19


Feds: Member of Misogynist Group Plotted<br />

Mass Shooting at Ohio University<br />

Police found unlawful weapons at the man’s home and a manifesto stating he<br />

would “slaughter” thousands of women “out of hatred, jealousy and revenge.”<br />

By Adam Ferrise<br />

cleveland.com<br />

CLEVELAND, Ohio — An Ohio<br />

man and self-described “incel”<br />

plotted a mass shooting at Ohio<br />

State University, specifically targeting<br />

women living at sorority<br />

houses on campus, according to<br />

a federal indictment unsealed on<br />

Wednesday.<br />

Tres Genco, 21, of Hillsboro, is<br />

charged with attempting to commit<br />

a hate crime and unlawful<br />

possession of a machine gun. He<br />

pleaded not guilty to the charges<br />

Wednesday in U.S. District Court in<br />

Columbus. He is due back in court<br />

July 23.<br />

An incel, short for an involuntarily<br />

celibate person, is a member<br />

of an online community of men<br />

who harbor anger towards women<br />

because they believe women deny<br />

them romantic or sexual attention.<br />

The movement in recent years<br />

has grown online, radicalizing<br />

members of the group. Some<br />

incels have then gone on to commit<br />

violence against women and<br />

others.<br />

Genco began identifying as an<br />

incel in January 2019, bought an<br />

AR-15 rifle, scouted locations at<br />

Ohio State University and wrote<br />

two manifestos about wanting to<br />

kill women, according to court<br />

records.<br />

He enlisted in the U.S. Army,<br />

where he went through four<br />

months of basic training until the<br />

Army discharged him for poor<br />

performance and bad conduct,<br />

according to court records.<br />

In manifestos recovered by<br />

authorities after his May 12, 2020,<br />

arrest, he wrote about conducting<br />

a mass shooting on OSU’s campus<br />

on May 23 of that year, court<br />

records say. When asked if authorities<br />

notified Ohio State officials of<br />

the planned shooting, a university<br />

spokesman, Benjamin Johnson,<br />

declined to comment and referred<br />

questions to federal prosecutors.<br />

In his writings and online postings,<br />

Genco referred to women<br />

as “foids,” short for femoids, a<br />

dehumanizing term incels use to<br />

“maintain a delusion of superiority”<br />

over women, according to<br />

Samantha Kutner, an expert on<br />

violent extremism and gender<br />

dynamics of radicalization at the<br />

International Centre for Counterterrorism.<br />

“Incels believe men are subjugated<br />

by women and engage in<br />

over-aggressive performance of<br />

masculinity,” Kutner said. “Once<br />

you’ve adopted this idea, some<br />

self-destruct, and others project<br />

their problems onto others and<br />

blame them. It’s really a toxic<br />

combination of delusions of grandeur<br />

and the belief that they are<br />

victimized by these women. They<br />

believe they have no agency in the<br />

process.”<br />

Genco became a prominent<br />

poster on online incel forums and,<br />

in his postings, invoked the name<br />

of Elliott Rodger, an incel who<br />

killed six people and wounded 14<br />

others in a 2014 shooting at a University<br />

of California-Santa Barbra<br />

sorority.<br />

He wrote that he once shot a<br />

group of people with a water gun<br />

filled with orange juice, which<br />

Rodger did before the mass shooting.<br />

“Felt like I spiritually connected<br />

to the saint on that day,” Genco<br />

wrote in an online post, adding, “I<br />

suggest it to all incels, extremely<br />

empowering action.”<br />

The court records show Genco<br />

appeared to be planning a mass<br />

shooting for some time.<br />

In January 2019, he bought a<br />

bulletproof vest, a hoodie emblazoned<br />

with the word “revenge,” a<br />

skull mask and a bowie knife. He<br />

bought two guns in the next two<br />

months — a rifle and a handgun,<br />

according to court records.<br />

He wrote his first manifesto in<br />

August 2019, titled “A Hideous<br />

Symphony, a manifesto written<br />

by Tres Genco, the socially exiled<br />

Incel.” He wrote about how he<br />

planned to get military training to<br />

carry out a mass shooting.<br />

“(T)his training will be for the<br />

attainment of one reality, the<br />

death of what I have been deprived<br />

most, but also cherish and<br />

fantasize at the opportunity of<br />

having but has been neglected of<br />

women,” he wrote, according to<br />

court records. “I will slaughter out<br />

of hatred, jealousy and revenge.”<br />

About the same time, he wrote a<br />

note that said: “OSU, May 23, 2020,<br />

290 Days! M-16 optimal, covert or<br />

mil-spec…KC [short for kill count]<br />

needs to be huge! 3,000? Aim big<br />

then.”<br />

Genco researched gun modifications.<br />

He searched online for Ohio<br />

State University sorority houses<br />

and other topics, including the use<br />

of guns and explosives. Later that<br />

month, he attended Army basic<br />

training at Ft. Benning, Georgia,<br />

until his discharge in December.<br />

After he returned to Ohio, he<br />

wrote a second manifesto in January<br />

2020 titled: “isolated.”<br />

“If you’re reading this, I’ve done<br />

something horrible. Somehow,<br />

you’ve come across the writings of<br />

the deluded and homicidal, not an<br />

easy task, and for that I congratulate<br />

you for your curiosity and<br />

willingness to delve into such a<br />

dark topic,” he wrote, according to<br />

court records. He signed the document,<br />

“Your hopeful friend and<br />

murderer.”<br />

Four days later, he conducted<br />

surveillance at Ohio State University<br />

and searched online topics<br />

including: “planning a shooting<br />

crime” and “When does preparing<br />

for a crime become and attempt?”<br />

On March 11, 2020, he searched<br />

for police scanner codes for Columbus<br />

and campus police.<br />

The next day, someone who lived<br />

with him called Highland County<br />

Sheriff’s deputies and reported<br />

that Genco locked himself in a<br />

bedroom with a gun and that he<br />

threatened the caller. The caller<br />

told deputies Genco in recent<br />

months had become increasingly<br />

“erratic and violent.”<br />

Sheriff’s deputies surrounded<br />

the home and coaxed Genco to<br />

come outside. They found in his<br />

car an AR-15 with a bump stock,<br />

an attachment that allows the rifle<br />

to fire more rounds faster, and<br />

a handgun hidden in the heating<br />

vent in his bedroom, court<br />

records say. Neither had serial<br />

numbers.<br />

The caller said they uncovered<br />

Genco’s writings and that they<br />

believed he planned on hurting<br />

someone. Deputies searched the<br />

home and found the manifestos<br />

and other handwritten documents,<br />

court records say.<br />

Genco eventually pleaded guilty<br />

in Highland County Common<br />

Pleas Court to a fourth-degree<br />

felony charge of making a terroristic<br />

threat and was sentenced to<br />

17 months in prison. He is currently<br />

in the <strong>No</strong>rth Central Correctional<br />

Institution in Marion, state<br />

prison records say.<br />

Kutner said when incels turn to<br />

violence, it’s often up to friends<br />

or family members to report them<br />

to authorities, like family members<br />

and friends who identified<br />

those who to took part in the<br />

January 6th insurrection at the<br />

U.S. Capitol building.<br />

“Some people have in their extended<br />

networks people they don’t<br />

know how to address, that are<br />

growing increasingly more radical,”<br />

Kutner said. “Like the court<br />

records in this case say, someone<br />

noticed warning signs, and<br />

they can intervene faster than the<br />

average law enforcement officer.<br />

There’s a level of care and accountability<br />

that have to be part of<br />

this response.”<br />

Law enforcement action, however,<br />

should be the last step in<br />

the process, Kutner said. Ideally,<br />

friends and family members would<br />

have access to more resources —<br />

including teachers, counselors,<br />

psychologists, friends and family<br />

— earlier on to stop the extremism<br />

from turning into violence.<br />

“You want to create an environment<br />

where we’re not just<br />

continually responding to threats,”<br />

Kutner said. “There are a variety<br />

of things that people can do, but<br />

it’s hard to do that when you’re in<br />

the threat-detection and response<br />

mode. It’s very easy for people to<br />

get sucked into this worldview<br />

that’s toxic and self-destructive<br />

and a danger to others if left unchecked.”<br />

20 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 21


5 Things to Know About Incels<br />

Incels have been linked to multiple acts of mass violence over the past<br />

few years. Here’s what you need to know.<br />

With the report last month that<br />

an Ohio man had been foiled in his<br />

attempt to carry out a mass shooting<br />

at a local university, a dark<br />

corner of the internet was once<br />

again brought into the spotlight: the<br />

“incel” community.<br />

Here are five things to know about<br />

incels, who’ve been linked to multiple<br />

acts of mass violence over the<br />

past few years.<br />

1. WHAT IS AN INCEL?<br />

Incel is short for “involuntary<br />

celibate.” It isn’t an organized<br />

group, but an online congregation<br />

of mostly 20-something males who<br />

vent to each other about their lack<br />

of sexual relationships with women,<br />

sometimes describing violent fantasies<br />

or calling for violence outright<br />

against women. A subsection of the<br />

“red pill” men’s rights movement,<br />

the incel ideology mostly boils<br />

down to the belief that women<br />

(called “Stacys” in incel slang) have<br />

denied them (“beta males”) sexual<br />

experiences or romantic relationships<br />

in favor of more attractive<br />

“alpha males” (which incels have<br />

coined “Chads”).<br />

Some incels have called for rape,<br />

acid attacks and other violence<br />

against Stacys and Chads. As with<br />

most violent language on the internet,<br />

determining a serious threat<br />

can be challenging, but incels have<br />

carried out real-life violence on<br />

multiple occasions.<br />

2. WHERE ARE THESE COMMU-<br />

NITIES?<br />

Incels most commonly congregate<br />

on social media platforms and<br />

message boards like 4chan. Misogyny<br />

and racism often run rampant<br />

within these communities, which<br />

shouldn’t come as a surprise to<br />

anyone familiar with 4chan. The<br />

website’s archive-less “/b/” message<br />

board is notorious for being the goto<br />

place for the absolute worst of<br />

the internet. Anonymous users post<br />

everything from child pornography<br />

to murder confessions. In 2014, one<br />

member strangled his girlfriend and<br />

shared photos of her naked corpse.<br />

3. INCELS ARE RADICALIZED<br />

ONLINE<br />

The rise of the incel community is<br />

another example of the increasing<br />

frequency of online radicalization in<br />

the digital age.<br />

Tracking incel activity comes with<br />

all the same challenges as monitoring<br />

and investigating any radical<br />

ideology or criminal element on the<br />

web – the vastness of the internet<br />

and the impermanence of content<br />

posted on sites like 4chan makes it<br />

hard to thwart attacks or differentiate<br />

real violence from fantasy.<br />

Tech companies’ efforts to curtail<br />

this type of online behavior vary<br />

depending on the platform, as does<br />

their level of cooperation with law<br />

enforcement. But some attempts at<br />

progress have been made. In June<br />

2017, for example, major tech companies<br />

like Google and Facebook<br />

formed the Global Internet Forum<br />

to Counter Terrorism (GIFCT) – an<br />

initiative to combat violent content<br />

on their platforms. Even with<br />

the aid of artificial intelligence and<br />

increased manpower focused on<br />

the issue, the puzzle of how to best<br />

go about tamping down on extremist<br />

content on the internet remains<br />

mostly unsolved.<br />

4. INCELS HAVE BEEN LINKED<br />

TO MULTIPLE INCIDENTS OF MASS<br />

VIOLENCE<br />

Incel chatter on the internet has<br />

been a precursor to some very real<br />

acts of mass violence, including a<br />

2018 mass shooting at a Tallahassee<br />

yoga studio and a van attack in<br />

Toronto the same year that left 10<br />

people dead and 16 more injured.<br />

5. THE ‘BETA UPRISING’ AND THE<br />

CHURCH OF ELLIOT RODGER<br />

Shortly before the Toronto attack,<br />

the suspect, Alek Minassian, posted<br />

the following message on his Facebook<br />

account:<br />

The Incel Rebellion has already<br />

begun! We will overthrow all the<br />

Chads and Stacys! All hail the Supreme<br />

Gentleman Elliot Rodger!”<br />

The reference to Elliot Rodger,<br />

who carried out the 2014 Isla Vista<br />

mass shooting, isn’t unique to<br />

the Toronto attack. In fact, Rodger<br />

has become somewhat of a patron<br />

saint in the incel community. His<br />

misogynistic manifesto, “My Twisted<br />

World,” along with his equally<br />

disturbing video blogs, all cited his<br />

hatred of women (stemming from<br />

his inability to lose his virginity) as<br />

the reason behind his deadly “Day<br />

of Retribution.” This material has<br />

become oft cited in the incel community,<br />

with terms like “supreme<br />

gentleman” and talk of betas vs.<br />

alphas ripped directly from Rodger’s<br />

writings. Many posts praising him<br />

take on a religious tone, and the anniversary<br />

of his attack is celebrated<br />

by some as “Saint Elliot Day.”<br />

22 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 23


“January 6th isn’t over for me.”<br />

Four officers gave emotional testimony Tuesday during the first<br />

hearing of a new House committee investigating the attack.<br />

By Sarah D. Wire<br />

Los Angeles Times<br />

WASHINGTON — Four Capitol and<br />

Metropolitan Police Department<br />

officers on Tuesday recounted their<br />

experience fighting off the January 6th<br />

insurrection at the U.S. Capitol during<br />

the first hearing of a new House committee<br />

investigating the attack.<br />

“I recall thinking to myself, this is<br />

how I’m going to die, defending this<br />

entrance,” Capitol Police Sgt. Aquilino<br />

Gonell said. “I could have lost my life<br />

that day, not once, but many times.”<br />

Dressed in uniforms, the officers<br />

struggled at times to deliver the emotional<br />

testimony and graphic descriptions.<br />

At one point during a video presentation,<br />

Metropolitan Police Officer<br />

Daniel Fanone placed his hand on<br />

Gonell’s shoulder and whispered in his<br />

ear. Others dabbed their eyes with tissues,<br />

cleared their throats repeatedly<br />

and paused to drink water throughout<br />

their testimony.<br />

Gonell said he was more scared<br />

on January 6th than he was during<br />

his Army tour of duty in Iraq. He said<br />

when he arrived home at 4 a.m. on<br />

January 7th, he could not even hug<br />

his wife because his uniform was so<br />

soaked in chemical irritants he had<br />

been sprayed with. He faces multiple<br />

surgeries from his injuries and at least<br />

a year of rehabilitation.<br />

Tuesday’s hearing, which was meant<br />

to set the tone for what is expected<br />

to be a months-long investigation,<br />

focused primarily on the officers and<br />

what they experienced fighting off the<br />

melee for several hours. Some Republicans,<br />

including former President<br />

Trump, have sought to downplay the<br />

event as a largely peaceful protest<br />

that got out of control.<br />

“Even though there is overwhelming<br />

evidence to the contrary, including<br />

hours and hours of video and photographic<br />

coverage, there is a continuous<br />

and shocking attempt to ignore or<br />

try to destroy the truth of what truly<br />

happened that day and to whitewash<br />

the facts,” Gonell said.<br />

Speaking for more than three hours,<br />

officers discussed seeing protesters<br />

carrying knives and metal batons, and<br />

breaking apart barricades to use the<br />

pieces as weapons. They recounted<br />

people in the crowd trying to gouge<br />

out their eyes and threatening to kill<br />

them with their own gun. They recalled<br />

fighting the rioters despite<br />

concussions and broken bones, being<br />

shocked with cattle prods and sprayed<br />

with wasp and bear spray.<br />

Capitol Police Officer Harry Dunn<br />

said he received no warning of a<br />

threat from the chain of command<br />

when he took his post January 6th.<br />

“We expected any demonstrators to<br />

be peaceful expressions of 1st Amendment<br />

freedoms, just like the scores of<br />

demonstrations we had observed for<br />

many years,” Dunn said.<br />

Hours later, after hearing repeated<br />

racial slurs from the mob, Dunn, who<br />

is black, recalled performing CPR on<br />

one of the attackers, fighting to save<br />

her life in Majority Leader Steny Hoyer’s<br />

office.<br />

“More than six months later, January<br />

6th isn’t over for me,” he said.<br />

At least 140 officers were injured —<br />

some permanently — and five people<br />

died either in the melee or in the hours<br />

after, including a police officer. Two<br />

officers died by suicide in the days<br />

after the attack. Damage estimates<br />

exceed $1 million.<br />

J. Thomas Manger, Former Maryland Chief,<br />

Named Next Capitol Police Chief.<br />

WASHINGTON – J. Thomas Manger,<br />

who spent 21 years as a police chief<br />

in the wealthy Washington suburbs of<br />

Montgomery and Fairfax counties, was<br />

named Thursday to take over the U.S.<br />

Capitol Police as it tries to regain its<br />

footing in the aftermath of the January<br />

6th riot at the Capitol. More than 80<br />

Capitol officers were assaulted, two<br />

later died, and its commanders were<br />

found to have ignored warnings of a<br />

violent attack.<br />

Manger was selected by three members<br />

of the Capitol Police Board — the<br />

sergeant-at-arms of the House and the<br />

Senate, and the architect of the Capitol<br />

— as well as top congressional leaders,<br />

who oversee the police department. He<br />

succeeds Chief Steven A. Sund, who resigned<br />

days after the insurrection amid<br />

heavy criticism of the department’s<br />

lack of preparation, and interim chief<br />

Yogananda D. Pittman, who was head<br />

of Capitol Police intelligence before<br />

January 6th.<br />

“The Congress is fortunate to have a<br />

seasoned decision-maker,” the board<br />

said in a statement, “who will lead with<br />

integrity, draw on his regional experience<br />

in strengthening partnerships with<br />

law enforcement partners, and make<br />

intelligence-based security decisions.”<br />

Manger will start his new job Friday,<br />

the board said, overseeing a force of<br />

1,800 sworn officers.<br />

“When I was watching the events on<br />

January 6,” Manger said in an interview,<br />

“it was the first time since I had retired<br />

that I wished I wasn’t retired.” He said<br />

he had worked on preparing for numerous<br />

protests in Washington with other<br />

police chiefs, and “I felt like with the<br />

experience I had over the past 20 years,<br />

I could help.”<br />

Manger said he had read every official<br />

report written about the Capitol<br />

Police and January 6th, and “every one<br />

of them has recommendations, probably<br />

close to 100. I looked at every one<br />

of them, a lot of them having to do<br />

with intelligence, staffing, or training<br />

and equipment. My goal is to prioritize<br />

these things and work on as many as<br />

we can at a time.”<br />

The new chief said he wanted to<br />

assure the public that January 6th<br />

was “not typical of the work they do.<br />

They have protected that Capitol, the<br />

membership, and it all went smoothly.<br />

People might come to the wrong<br />

conclusion that the department is<br />

dysfunctional. It’s not. It’s a department<br />

of great men and women, and I’m confident<br />

going forward we’re going to be<br />

able to accomplish the things we need<br />

to accomplish.”<br />

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Boy battling cancer becomes honorary<br />

deputy for a day in Polk County Florida.<br />

Merrick Lloyd lived out his dream last week – with a uniform to match.<br />

A Florida preschooler who<br />

has cancer got to be “deputy<br />

for a day” after his teachers and<br />

the Polk County Sheriff’s Office<br />

decided to help make his dream<br />

become a reality.<br />

Carlton Palmore Elementary<br />

School teachers and administrators,<br />

as well as the sheriff’s<br />

office, worked to make Merrick<br />

Lloyd an “honorary deputy”<br />

on Tuesday at the request<br />

of his family, as WTSP, a local<br />

Tampa-based CBS station, first<br />

reported.<br />

“The world needs hope and<br />

goodness right now,” Carlton<br />

Palmore Elementary School Principal<br />

Badonna Dardis told Fox<br />

News in an email. “… We are so<br />

thankful that Merrick was able<br />

to get his wish and become a<br />

deputy for a day. Merrick is one<br />

brave preschooler!”<br />

Merrick has been undergoing<br />

radiation and chemotherapy<br />

treatment for about six months,<br />

Dardis wrote in a Thursday<br />

Facebook post.<br />

“When the school and community<br />

come together, beautiful<br />

things happen,” the principal<br />

said in her thank-you message<br />

to everyone who helped organize<br />

the event for Merrick.<br />

Merrick met with various<br />

members of the sheriff’s office,<br />

receiving his gifts, visiting the<br />

sheriff’s office, sitting in the<br />

cockpits of a helicopter and<br />

plane, listening in on dispatches<br />

and more.<br />

Dardis said the sheriff’s office<br />

“honored” Merrick with a uniform,<br />

a plaque and a “backpack<br />

full of gifts.”<br />

“He was excited to meet<br />

Sheriff Grady Judd, the 911 Dispatchers,<br />

and the Polk County<br />

SWAT Team! Thank you for your<br />

generosity and making one of<br />

our student’s dreams come<br />

true! You are the BEST,” she<br />

wrote.<br />

Judd shared his own message<br />

to Facebook on Thursday, writing:<br />

“ Dream big, Merrick! ”<br />

“It was wonderful getting to<br />

know you, your teachers, and<br />

your family this week.”<br />

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New Laws in WA Prevent Cops from<br />

Pursuing Most Suspects, Handling<br />

Mental Calls<br />

By Sandy Malone<br />

Olympia, WA – Law enforcement<br />

leaders have repeatedly warned<br />

citizens that things will not be<br />

business-as-usual for officers in the<br />

state after a slew of police reforms<br />

laws went into effect on Sunday<br />

that prevent police from chasing<br />

violent crime suspects and assisting<br />

with mental health calls.<br />

Sheriffs and police chiefs from<br />

numerous agencies and jurisdictions<br />

across the state released<br />

statements in days leading up to<br />

July 25 when Washington House<br />

Bills 1054 and 1310, and Senate Bill<br />

5476, went into effect, King reported.<br />

Officials wanted their community<br />

members to understand why<br />

officers wouldn’t be doing some<br />

basic things that they’ve been seen<br />

doing in the past, such as chasing<br />

bad guys or arresting people who<br />

are opening using illegal drugs in<br />

public.<br />

The Pierce County Sheriff’s Department<br />

explained some of the<br />

changes in a Facebook post on July<br />

23 and said, “The largest impact for<br />

our residents will be the changes to<br />

our ability to pursue after a suspect<br />

who is fleeing in a vehicle.”<br />

Snohomish County Sheriff Adam<br />

Fortney explained that prior to the<br />

implementation of the new laws,<br />

pursuit policies were determined by<br />

individual jurisdictions.<br />

Under HB 1054, all jurisdictions<br />

are subject to the same state legislature-determined<br />

pursuit policy<br />

which severely limits when a law<br />

enforcement officer can engage in<br />

a vehicle pursuit, Sheriff Fortney<br />

wrote.<br />

The new law only allows a vehicle<br />

pursuit if there is “probable cause to<br />

believe that a person in the vehicle<br />

has committed or is committing a<br />

violent offense or a sex offense,”<br />

according to the sheriff.<br />

“The key part of this legislation is<br />

the state has moved the legal bar<br />

to pursue for a violent offense to<br />

‘probable cause’ rather than ‘reasonable<br />

suspicion,’” Sheriff Fortney<br />

explained. “For example, if a deputy<br />

sheriff was to respond to an armed<br />

robbery and the suspect vehicle<br />

was described as a blue F150 and<br />

a deputy saw a blue F150 driving<br />

at a high rate of speed in the same<br />

area as the robbery occurred, a law<br />

enforcement officer could still try<br />

to make a traffic stop this vehicle,<br />

however if the suspect vehicle<br />

decides to flee we can no longer<br />

pursue it under House Bill 1054.”<br />

He said that under the new law,<br />

officers can’t pursue suspected<br />

violent offenders who have just<br />

committed an armed robbery until<br />

they take the time to first establish<br />

probable cause. For example, they<br />

may need to first contact the victim<br />

or a witness and confirm exactly<br />

what crime has been committed<br />

and what specific person is responsible<br />

in order to establish probable<br />

cause prior to engaging in the vehicle<br />

pursuit.<br />

“While this may seem like a small<br />

detail, it will have substantial impacts<br />

on the ability for law enforcement<br />

officers to pursue vehicles<br />

fleeing from the scene of a crime,”<br />

the sheriff wrote. “Often times, it is<br />

simply impossible to have all of this<br />

figured out while responding to a<br />

call and coming across a suspect<br />

vehicle fleeing.”<br />

And under HB 1310, the new useof-force<br />

law, law enforcement<br />

officers cannot detain possible<br />

suspects the see fleeing the area of<br />

a crime unless they have confirmed<br />

that the crime occurred, and they<br />

know that the person fleeing is the<br />

actual suspected offender.<br />

“For example, under the current<br />

law, if a man was to break into your<br />

house while you were inside, you<br />

confront him and he runs away, and<br />

you call 911 to provide a description<br />

of the suspect as ‘a white male,<br />

in his 30s, wearing a red shirt and<br />

black shorts, leaving on foot,’” said<br />

Sheriff Fortney.<br />

“It has always been considered<br />

reasonable that if a law enforcement<br />

officer arrived at the area<br />

and saw a suspect matching this<br />

description, that we had the legal<br />

authority to stop him and if he ran,<br />

we were allowed to use reasonable<br />

force to chase him and detain<br />

him. This would be allowed under<br />

the current ‘reasonable suspicion’<br />

threshold,” he wrote. “Under HB<br />

1310, this is no longer allowed.”<br />

“A deputy sheriff no longer has<br />

the authority to use force to apprehend<br />

the suspect in the above scenario,”<br />

the sheriff explained. “With<br />

the new threshold being ‘probable<br />

cause,’ a deputy sheriff will have to<br />

have articulable facts, that are confirmed<br />

by a victim or witness, that<br />

a specific crime has occurred and<br />

the person we are seeking is the one<br />

responsible.”<br />

“That means we can no longer<br />

stop and detain a fleeing suspect<br />

matching a description who is running<br />

from the area of a crime that<br />

just occurred,” he added.<br />

“We must first make contact with<br />

the reporting party or a witness,<br />

confirm the facts of the crime, develop<br />

probable cause and then we<br />

can go back and look for that individual,”<br />

Sheriff Fortney continued.<br />

“As you can imagine in the dynamic<br />

world of policing in <strong>2021</strong>, most of<br />

the time it is nearly impossible to<br />

have all of those facts sorted out<br />

while responding to the initial 911<br />

call, and this ultimately allows a<br />

suspect the ability to flee the area<br />

without being stopped.”<br />

“I want the community to know<br />

that this type of scenario is not a<br />

rarity in police work and the new<br />

legal standard of ‘probable cause’ to<br />

use force in an investigative detention<br />

will have substantial impacts.<br />

This type of similar scenario occurs<br />

regularly in Snohomish County, and<br />

this new standard is the same for all<br />

types of crimes, including violent<br />

crimes,” he added.<br />

Sheriff Fortney explained that the<br />

result would be countless hours<br />

of detective work to track down<br />

offenders and make arrests of suspects<br />

who fled the scenes of their<br />

crimes.<br />

Also under HB 1310, law enforcement<br />

officers won’t be able to help<br />

EMS detain a person having a mental<br />

health crisis.<br />

Sheriff Fortney said officers will<br />

not be able to use force to detain a<br />

person in crisis for transport to the<br />

hospital unless there is an imminent<br />

threat of bodily injury to a person.<br />

“As a result, sheriff deputies will<br />

have to walk away from many crisis<br />

incidents far more often than in<br />

the past,” he wrote. “This will also<br />

largely impact our ability to assist<br />

Fire/Aid and Designated Crisis Responders.”<br />

The sheriff also warned community<br />

members in another Facebook<br />

post on July 23 that deputies who<br />

responded to calls about people<br />

openly using drugs would no longer<br />

be making arrests until after two<br />

prior incidents where the suspect<br />

was offered documented referrals<br />

for recovery services.<br />

Those referrals could be as simple<br />

as a pamphlet or as complex as actually<br />

helping a person enter a detox<br />

program, Sheriff Fortney explained.<br />

Only on the third offense would<br />

deputies make an arrest and then the<br />

person would be offered services<br />

again inside the Snohomish County<br />

Jail.<br />

It was clear that law enforcement<br />

agencies wanted the community to<br />

understand that they didn’t choose<br />

these changes.<br />

“It is important that we share these<br />

significant changes with you,” the<br />

Pierce County Sheriff’s Department<br />

wrote. “This is not about what we<br />

WILL no longer do – this is about<br />

what we CAN no longer do under<br />

the new laws. Please know that if a<br />

crime has occurred, we will still respond<br />

to your call for help. The way<br />

we handle the call may be different<br />

than before, but the values and mission<br />

of our department will remain<br />

the same.”<br />

28 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 29


TIM MILLER<br />

President & Founder of Texas EquuSearch<br />

30 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 31


TIM MILLER<br />

2019 FBI Director’s<br />

COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP AWARD RECIPIENT<br />

Last February, before the world was locked down with COVID, Special Agent in<br />

Charge (SAC) Perrye K. Turner of the Houston Office of the FBI, announced that Tim<br />

Miller, founder of Texas EquuSearch (TES) would be receiving the 2019 FBI Director’s<br />

Community Leadership Award. Tim’s only daughter was abducted and murdered<br />

in 1984 in Galveston County, and subsequently founded TES in August 2000. Since<br />

forming the volunteer-based, nonprofit organization, Tim Miller has spent countless<br />

hours conducting horse-mounted searches and recovering lost and missing persons.<br />

In its press release of February 2020, the FBI stated: “As part of our mission to protect<br />

the communities where we serve, the FBI remains dedicated to recovering all<br />

endangered children. Tim Miller and the volunteers he leads through EquuSearch are<br />

invaluable allies in the FBI’s fight to assist law enforcement in reuniting missing persons<br />

with their families,” said SAC Turner. “Tim Miller is the epitome of an engaged<br />

citizen and community partner that deserves this type of recognition.”<br />

The release also said, “Through TES, Mr. Miller assists those who suffer the pain<br />

and agony he experienced 35 years ago when his daughter, Laura, never returned<br />

home. Laura is one of four young women murdered in the area by a serial killer in<br />

what’s known as the “Calder Road Murders.” In September 2019, the FBI website,<br />

www.fbi.gov, featured the four unsolved murder cases with the hope that public tips<br />

will lead to the identification of the killer. Through his life’s work, Miller brings hundreds<br />

of families the closure he is still waiting to receive with his daughter Laura”<br />

“Since its inception, Texas EquuSearch has worked closely with the FBI and assisted<br />

searching for missing and abducted persons when requested by law enforcement.<br />

The work of Texas EquuSearch and Tim Miller, however, spans far beyond the<br />

Houston Field Office area of responsibility. Texas EquuSearch has conducted more<br />

than 1,800 searches in 42 states in the U.S. and abroad. To date, they have located<br />

over 400 missing persons and brought them home. They have also recovered the<br />

remains of nearly 300 missing individuals.”<br />

The FBI Texas City Resident Agency also invited Tim Miller to be part of its inaugural<br />

FBI Citizens Academy in 2019. Completing the program did not deter Mr. Miller<br />

from maintaining his demanding schedule that often included participating in missing<br />

person searches before and after class. “Tim Miller’s dedication to his organization’s<br />

mission, and justice as a whole, is unparalleled,” said Texas City Resident<br />

Agency Supervisor, Richard Rennison. “He provides continuous aid to law enforcement,<br />

all in the interest of helping victims and their families.”<br />

The FBI created the Director’s Community Leadership Award (DCLA) in 1990 to<br />

honor individuals and organizations for their efforts in combating crime, terrorism,<br />

drugs, and violence in the United States.<br />

32 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 33


TIM MILLER<br />

<strong>2021</strong> BLUES Police Magazine<br />

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD<br />

The BLUES couldn’t have said it better than the FBI. Tim Miller is the epitome of<br />

an engaged citizen and community partner that deserves this type of recognition.”<br />

Tim Miller is what every citizen in this country should strive to be - a compassionate<br />

man driven to find every lost or missing person that comes across the desk at<br />

TES. <strong>No</strong> matter the circumstances, the risks, the costs, or the number of resources it<br />

takes, Tim Miller & TES will give 110% to finding your loved one. The outcomes may<br />

not always be positive, but as Tim knows first-hand, finding closure starts with the<br />

ability to bury your loved one and say goodbye. Seeking justice is the second hardest<br />

part when it comes to murder victims.<br />

But despite all the horrible, trying times Tim Miller has endured over the past 30+<br />

years, he still goes out every day and leads search, after search after search. Even<br />

when death was almost staring him in the face with his own health problems, Tim’s<br />

only thoughts were, “I have to get better to get back to EquuSearch. We have to<br />

continue to find missing loved ones and give families the closure they need and deserve.”<br />

TES posted to their Facebook after Tim was released from the hospital - Tim<br />

would like to thank everyone for their prayers, overwhelming support, and messages<br />

of hope. He believes, without a doubt, that he is doing well because of your<br />

continued prayers.<br />

“I am blessed beyond measure and cannot stress how enormously grateful I am to<br />

everyone,” Miller said in a statement. “Thank you!”<br />

As I stated in my editorial at the beginning of this issue:<br />

“Tim Miller is truly an incredible man on an incredible mission. He is the light at<br />

the end of a dark tunnel. The rainbow at the end of horrible storm. A loving hug<br />

when all seems lost. I can’t imagine a world without him. By the grace of God, Tim<br />

Miller is back home and back at work.”<br />

To honor this hero of many, on behalf of the entire staff here at The BLUES, we are<br />

proud to present Tim Miller with The BLUES’s LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD. We<br />

congratulate you as does every family you have helped, as well as every law enforcement<br />

agency in the US and around the world you have assisted. We are truly<br />

blessed to have Tim Miller here with us know. May God Bless You and Keep You Safe.<br />

34 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 35


TEXAS EQUUSEARCH<br />

The Best of the Best<br />

Tim Miller, the founder of Texas EquuSearch, has devoted his life to helping<br />

families all over the world. His drive and determination is what made Texas<br />

EquuSearch the best of the best when it comes to finding missing persons.<br />

A local reporter said, “It doesn’t matter if its 100 degrees outside, pouring<br />

rain, hurricanes, winter storms or a million mosquitos – Tim and his Equu-<br />

Search volunteers will go where the clues take them to search for a missing<br />

person.” In fact, Texas EquuSearch has become one of the largest search<br />

and rescue organizations in the U.S.<br />

36 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE <strong>37</strong>


TEXAS EQUUSEARCH<br />

“That determination, that ‘we won’t stop until we bring closure for the<br />

family’ is what drives each and every volunteer at EquuSearch.”<br />

Since its inception in 2000,<br />

Texas EquuSearch has been<br />

involved in 1,860+ searches<br />

in approximately 42 states<br />

in the United States, Aruba,<br />

Sri Lanka, Mexico, Jamaica,<br />

Dominican Republic and<br />

Nicaragua. EquuSearch has<br />

over 2000+ volunteers located<br />

across Texas and other<br />

states. They have successfully<br />

reunited over 400 missing<br />

people to their families safe<br />

and sound. Law enforcement<br />

agencies far and wide will<br />

flat out tell you that many of<br />

those 400+ missing people<br />

would have been deceased<br />

if not for Tim Miller and his<br />

volunteers. Texas Equu-<br />

Search is also responsible<br />

for recovering the remains<br />

of 238 missing loved ones,<br />

bringing closure to so many<br />

families. Many of the 238<br />

cases have resulted in criminal<br />

cases. At no time during<br />

any of the searches was evidence<br />

compromised by Texas<br />

EquuSearch. Therefore, the<br />

suspect(s) were brought to<br />

justice resulting in convictions.<br />

“Texas EquuSearch Mounted<br />

Search and Recovery<br />

Team was founded in August<br />

of 2000 with the purpose<br />

to provide volunteer horse<br />

mounted search and recovery<br />

for lost and missing persons.<br />

The team was originated in<br />

the <strong>No</strong>rth Galveston County<br />

area because of the high incidence<br />

of missing persons in<br />

the largely undeveloped area<br />

of south Harris and north<br />

Galveston Counties.” That’s<br />

on the organization’s website.<br />

The truth is, Tim Miller<br />

founded Texas EquuSearch<br />

when he saw the face of<br />

mother who was pleading<br />

with the public to please<br />

help her find her missing<br />

child. Tim didn’t want another<br />

mother or father to have<br />

to go through what he had<br />

experienced over the past<br />

16 years with his daughter<br />

Laura. Texas EquuSearch’s<br />

very existence and purpose<br />

is dedicated to the memory<br />

of Laura Miller. Laura was<br />

abducted and murdered in<br />

north Galveston County in<br />

1984.<br />

Tim will tell you that their<br />

organization is compassionate,<br />

dedicated and professional.<br />

“We believe that<br />

we can better ourselves by<br />

working together to help the<br />

community and people in<br />

need,” states their website.<br />

Many of the members are<br />

trained in various rescue and<br />

lifesaving skills such as CPR,<br />

advanced lifesaving skills<br />

and field craft. The members<br />

come from all walks of<br />

life, consisting of business<br />

owners, medics, firefighters,<br />

housewives, electricians,<br />

students, former FBI and law<br />

enforcement, current law<br />

enforcement, former and<br />

current U.S. Marshalls, Coast<br />

Guard and as well as all<br />

walks of military, both current<br />

and former.<br />

EquuSearch’s resources<br />

range from horse and rider<br />

teams to foot searchers and<br />

ATVs. They conduct water<br />

searches using boats, divers<br />

and sonar equipment. Additionally,<br />

the teams perform<br />

air searches using planes,<br />

helicopters and small drone<br />

airplanes with highly sophisticated<br />

cameras. They’ve also<br />

utilized infrared and night<br />

vision cameras, along with<br />

ground penetration units in<br />

some of the searches. Texas<br />

EquuSearch has more resources<br />

than most law enforcement<br />

agencies, which allows<br />

law enforcement to conduct<br />

their investigation, while<br />

Texas EquuSearch conducts<br />

organized searches. This<br />

has created a great working<br />

relationship between<br />

law enforcement and Texas<br />

EquuSearch. In fact, most<br />

law enforcement agencies<br />

across the nation now contact<br />

Texas EquuSearch to assist them<br />

in locating missing person cases in<br />

their area.<br />

EquuSearch is currently available<br />

to conduct searches nation and<br />

worldwide. EquuSearch is a nonprofit<br />

organization, which is funded<br />

solely by donations.<br />

38 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 39


FBI<br />

STORIES OF THE<br />

Each month, the BLUES will feature articles, interviews and<br />

actual case files of the FBI. This month we join Jim Dudley,<br />

Host of Police Matters as he speaks with former FBI Special<br />

Agent Katherine Schweit as she talks about her time at the<br />

bureau and her upcoming book: “Stop the Killing: How to End<br />

Mass Shooting Crisis.”<br />

Listen on Apple Podcasts, SoundCloud, Amazon Music, Stitcher, Spotify, and RSS feed.<br />

40 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 41


“The first person I would ask if I wanted to know how to stop the killing from mass shootings<br />

would be Katherine Schweit.” — Richard C. Hunt, MD, FACEP, Senior Medical Advisor U.S. Department<br />

of Health & Human Services and Former Director for Medical Preparedness Policy, National Security<br />

Council Staff<br />

If you review the FBI report on active shooter incidents from 2000-2019, you will find that in 277<br />

incidents, there were 2,430 casualties, including 1,546 wounded and 877 deaths. We have seen recent<br />

spikes in mass shootings in <strong>2021</strong> already. What is the answer? How can we limit or stop the increasing<br />

number of mass shooters?<br />

In this episode of Policing Matters, host Jim Dudley speaks with attorney Katherine Schweit, who<br />

spent 20 years with the FBI as a Special Agent executive. After the Sandy Hook massacre, she was<br />

assigned to head the FBI’s active shooter program where she authored the FBI’s seminal research, A<br />

Study of 160 Active Shooter Incidents in the United States, 2000-2013. Through her extensive experience,<br />

Schweit has become an expert in active shooters, mass shootings, and security policies and<br />

procedures. She is the author of the book, “Stop the Killing: How to End the Mass Shooting Crisis” set<br />

to be released by Rowman and Littlefield on August 15, and runs Schweit Consulting LLC, providing<br />

leadership counseling, security advice and safety training to hospitals, businesses, religious organizations,<br />

educators and government clients. Click here to read an excerpt from the book.<br />

Jim Dudley (00:05): If you<br />

take a look at the FBI report on<br />

mass shootings from the years<br />

2000 to 2018, you will find that<br />

in 277 incidents, there were<br />

2,423 casualties, including 1,546<br />

wounded and 877 deaths. We’ve<br />

seen spikes in mass shootings<br />

recently already in <strong>2021</strong>. What’s<br />

the answer? How can we limit<br />

or stop the increasing number<br />

of mass shooters? Do we create<br />

more gun laws? Well, Illinois<br />

has strict gun laws and yet the<br />

number of homicide rates are<br />

among the highest every year,<br />

especially in the Chicago area.<br />

Do we limit access to the mentally<br />

ill? How do we define mental<br />

illness? What about those<br />

who have not been diagnosed?<br />

Well, Katherine Schweit is a<br />

lawyer and former FBI executive<br />

who currently teaches law<br />

classes at DePaul and Webster<br />

universities.<br />

She spent 20 years with the FBI<br />

and prior to that post she was a<br />

prosecutor in Chicago. After the<br />

Sandy Hook massacre, she was<br />

assigned to the head of the FBI’s<br />

active shooter program, where<br />

she stayed for five years. She<br />

authored FBI seminal research,<br />

a study of 160 active shooter incidents<br />

in the United States from<br />

2000 to 2013. And through her<br />

extensive experience, Katherine<br />

has become an expert in active<br />

shooters, mass shootings, and<br />

security policies and procedures.<br />

She currently owns Schweit<br />

Consulting, LLC, providing leadership,<br />

counseling, security advice,<br />

and safety training to hospitals,<br />

businesses, religious organizations,<br />

educators, and government<br />

clients. She is the author of the<br />

book, “Stop the Killing: How to<br />

End the Mass Shooting Crisis.”<br />

Well, that is a tall task, and we<br />

can’t wait to hear what you’re<br />

going to say. Welcome to Policing<br />

Matters, Katherine Schweit.<br />

Katherine Schweit (01:09):<br />

Thank you so much. It’s an honor<br />

to be here. I appreciate you<br />

taking the time to listen to my<br />

points of view and hopefully I<br />

can provide your listeners with a<br />

little bit of insight. I know you’ve<br />

got a really sophisticated group<br />

of listeners, so I’m excited about<br />

this.<br />

Jim Dudley (02:28): Before we<br />

get started, can you give me and<br />

the audience an idea, get us on<br />

the same page if you will, with<br />

the definitions: active shooter<br />

versus mass shooter.<br />

Katherine Schweit (02:40):<br />

Great question. Because that is<br />

the question right now and when<br />

it comes to research. An active<br />

shooter, as your audience likely<br />

may know, is defined by the<br />

federal government – DHS, FBI,<br />

all the three-letter groups – as<br />

an individual, actively engaged<br />

in killing or attempting to kill<br />

people in a populated area. So,<br />

you know, the essential elements<br />

to that are that it’s in a populated<br />

area, meaning potentially<br />

civilians could be injured who<br />

are unengaged and that it’s an<br />

attempted kill or killing. So,<br />

it’s the threat itself. And so, it’s<br />

different than a mass shooting.<br />

Mass shooting, first of all, has<br />

no federal definition. Mass killing<br />

does, under federal law, is<br />

three or more killed, but mass<br />

shooting has no definition. So,<br />

researchers and a lot of us have<br />

been working with academics<br />

and practitioners to get an exact<br />

kind of definition for a mass<br />

shooting, that really will include<br />

things that are, as you know, domestic<br />

situations and gangs and<br />

other kinds of violence where it’s<br />

just an individual discharging a<br />

firearm with premeditation to kill<br />

several people, and what that<br />

number is. We know it’s more<br />

than two, but we haven’t quite<br />

come up with that exact number.<br />

Although researchers generally<br />

use three or four to have a cutoff<br />

on when they’re doing the research.<br />

Jim Dudley (04:06): So as<br />

an active FBI agent, what was<br />

your involvement in tracking the<br />

active shooters? I would venture<br />

to say that with a multitude<br />

of databases that track mass<br />

shootings, both government,<br />

non-governmental and for-profit,<br />

nonprofit, I like to use the FBI<br />

UCR database, but why do we<br />

have so many different numbers<br />

coming from all these other<br />

places? Is there one reliable collection<br />

source?<br />

Katherine Schweit (04:<strong>37</strong>):<br />

Well, actually that’s exactly the<br />

problem that we faced after the<br />

Sandy Hook massacre. I had been<br />

put in charge of and given a lot<br />

of tax dollars to find answers<br />

to that question. So of course, I<br />

reached out to our people who<br />

keep the stats on uniform crimes<br />

in our criminal division. And we<br />

were looking for different ways<br />

to find that data within our own<br />

data. The Bureau is working on<br />

that. They’ve come up with new<br />

ways to track their data and put<br />

their data together so that it’s<br />

more incident-related, but they<br />

were really tracking data. Initially,<br />

for a long time, the FBI would<br />

track its data and say, if you had<br />

an incident that occurred at a<br />

bank, you’d have a bank robbery.<br />

And that would be one tick<br />

mark in the uniform crime stats<br />

about bank robberies. But if<br />

there was a shooting at the bank<br />

robbery, someplace else there’d<br />

be another tick mark about a<br />

person killed, and it wouldn’t<br />

necessarily cross over. And then<br />

if there was a car crash and<br />

people were arrested and it was<br />

involved in drugs, then it’s all<br />

these tick marks and all these<br />

different databases, and none<br />

of them crossing over. After<br />

Sandy Hook, that’s exactly what<br />

we faced. <strong>No</strong> uniform system<br />

used by researchers; no uniform<br />

systems used by the government<br />

agencies. And I’ll just add<br />

on top of that, that we weren’t<br />

looking for all shootings and all<br />

killings and all deaths and all<br />

threats. We were looking for this<br />

weird vexing, subset of types of<br />

incidents that really were these<br />

public shootings. Think about<br />

Aurora and Columbine and Texas<br />

Towers, these very vexing, public<br />

shootings and saying who is<br />

doing this and why. And that’s really<br />

why we came up with such<br />

different numbers, such unique<br />

numbers. <strong>No</strong>w I think researchers<br />

are recognizing we really did<br />

get to that baseline data that<br />

researchers are using now. And<br />

they rely on it all the time.<br />

Jim Dudley (06:45): So, the<br />

data is more reliable now is as<br />

good as we can get.<br />

Katherine Schweit (06:49): The<br />

information that the FBI used<br />

for their research was based on<br />

police reports and nobody else<br />

is able to pull police reports, but<br />

what we did, and what I said to<br />

my team is, look, if we can go<br />

out and ask our agents to go out<br />

personally to the officers and<br />

the departments that worked<br />

42 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 43


on these cases and get these<br />

kind of 10 or 12 data points, we<br />

don’t need their whole reports<br />

and all the details, but we need<br />

these data points on every single<br />

shooting. And we went out one<br />

by one on 250 or so. And then<br />

we brought that data back in<br />

and sat together. And we knew<br />

we had accurate data, not some<br />

supposition, cause some neighbors<br />

said, and we heard, and<br />

then also somebody gets shot<br />

at a scene and they die later.<br />

Those numbers count. So, we<br />

wanted to get the most accurate<br />

information we could. So, I think<br />

we’re pretty good. And I think the<br />

Bureau has stuck with that. And<br />

so now they have a good solid<br />

20 years of data on activity.<br />

Jim Dudley (07:52): Nice. Yeah,<br />

the data’s important, right?<br />

We’re going to do some epidemiology<br />

and go back to the root<br />

cause of the shooting, the motivation,<br />

the access to firearms and<br />

mental illness and all that other<br />

stuff. I want to ask you about<br />

your book. I’m going to wait until<br />

after the break, because right<br />

now, so far, the national debate<br />

seems to land on two central<br />

issues. One is gun laws and the<br />

other being the mentally ill, and<br />

there’s a dichotomy of two sets<br />

of people on opposite sides, on<br />

both sides, on both issues. And<br />

so, we talk about people saying,<br />

“we want strict gun laws,”<br />

but we’ve seen them not be so<br />

efficient. And then we’ve seen<br />

people want to limit access to<br />

the mentally ill, but both NAMI,<br />

the National Alliance on Mental<br />

Illness, and the NRA are against<br />

creating a new list or a new<br />

category of people for fear they<br />

may not seek treatment because<br />

of such a list. So, what have you<br />

seen in your background of the<br />

biology of mass shootings or<br />

active shooters? Are you seeing<br />

trends in mental illness or are<br />

you seeing firearms as being the<br />

issue?<br />

Katherine Schweit (09:13): I<br />

mean, I love that you asked that<br />

question. Is it this or is it that?<br />

And of course, the answer is<br />

it’s all of those things, right? I<br />

mean, that’s the frightening part<br />

that we know. And the vaccine<br />

difficulty is that people really,<br />

we all innately want to kind of<br />

buttonhole and pick out one idea<br />

or one reason, so we can fix that<br />

reason. Right. That’s why we<br />

want one reason, but you raise<br />

what we know are some of the<br />

most preeminent concerns. You<br />

mentioned mental health and I<br />

can just address briefly some of<br />

the things that you spoke about.<br />

You’re spot on. So let me say this<br />

about mental health. After the<br />

FBI, after we did our research on<br />

the 160 active shooter incidents,<br />

we took those police records and<br />

we provided them. This was the<br />

intent in the FBI the whole time<br />

to do a two-part study.<br />

So, the first part was my study<br />

on a hundred active shooter<br />

incidents. The second part was a<br />

study that our behavioral experts<br />

did on 63 of those shooters<br />

because they were able to get<br />

enough information specifically<br />

about those particular shooters.<br />

And one of the things that they<br />

found is that every shooter and<br />

every killer involved had four<br />

to five, what they call stressors.<br />

Four or five things in their life<br />

that were stressing them out to<br />

the point that they – there’s kind<br />

of this concept of why did this<br />

person become a brittle individual<br />

and commit this heinous<br />

crime because they were under<br />

all these stressors, all these<br />

different things. And at the top<br />

of that list, mental health issues,<br />

not behavioral, you know, mental<br />

health where you’re worried<br />

that somebody is getting care<br />

for some highly critical situation,<br />

and the FBI found like 60% of<br />

those people had mental health<br />

as one of their stressors.<br />

Those things very often were<br />

anxiety. They weren’t necessarily<br />

what you think of as a more<br />

severe diagnosed mental health<br />

challenge, which I tell you that<br />

because, you know, the National<br />

Council of Behavioral Health has<br />

said, “Please don’t use this as a<br />

predictor.” Because the vast majority,<br />

the one half of the 1% of<br />

the 1000% – and so many people<br />

need to get mental health care<br />

for the most major and minor<br />

things. So, using mental health<br />

as a predictor is bad if it makes<br />

people not get mental healthcare<br />

because they’re worried about<br />

getting their clearances for instance,<br />

and things like that. It’s<br />

that whole concept of we have<br />

to de-stigmatize getting good<br />

mental health care.<br />

Plus, we also know that a lot<br />

of people who have had mental<br />

health concerns, they don’t<br />

get any mental health treatment.<br />

So, they’re not identified<br />

as a person who’s had mental<br />

health treatment. So mental<br />

health is absolutely a factor, but<br />

not necessarily a good predictive<br />

factor. That’s kind of where<br />

I land on mental health. Guns,<br />

a whole different issue, right? I<br />

teach at DePaul University at the<br />

law school. I teach a class on the<br />

culture of the second amendment.<br />

So, I have guns all over in<br />

my head about where we have it,<br />

why we have it and how people<br />

feel about it. And particularly for<br />

law enforcement. I answered the<br />

same question that probably a<br />

lot of people do when they say,<br />

we should just get rid of all the<br />

guns, which every one of us has<br />

heard a million times.<br />

And as I said to somebody<br />

recently, I’m not against guns,<br />

I’m against killing. But that said,<br />

I think that we are in the process<br />

now of having to, as a country,<br />

come to grips with things,<br />

because we do have, 300, 400<br />

million guns in the United States.<br />

Do we need to put into place<br />

some check systems? And there<br />

are slews of those on guns and<br />

different people support different<br />

ones, but red flag laws and<br />

trigger locks and more accountability<br />

for parents who let their<br />

kids get access to guns. I mean,<br />

most of the guns in these instances<br />

are legally purchased,<br />

legally owned.<br />

Jim Dudley (13:58): Okay. So,<br />

I want to get into some more<br />

measurements of active shooters.<br />

So oftentimes when we talk<br />

about the variables, the mental<br />

health or the condition of the<br />

shooter, or whether the guns<br />

were legal or illegal, or how<br />

many rounds, are we accurate<br />

in our measurements of active<br />

shooters? If the FBI defines a<br />

mass shooting as requiring three<br />

or more casualties, are we lumping<br />

them in with the domestic violence<br />

disputes or someone who<br />

carefully plans to rent suites on<br />

a high rise and start spraying<br />

an outdoor concert with thousands<br />

and thousands of rounds?<br />

I mean, aren’t we comparing<br />

apples to oranges sometimes?<br />

Katherine Schweit (15:09): You<br />

know, that’s a great question.<br />

And I’m really glad you asked<br />

that because I think it depends<br />

on what question you’re trying<br />

to find an answer to, right? So,<br />

if we’re looking for prevention<br />

methods and what are the prevention<br />

methods, for somebody<br />

who wants to go out in public<br />

and do these killings. When we<br />

were speaking amongst ourselves<br />

at the FBI, I actually was<br />

fortunate enough to bring in local<br />

law enforcement from Minneapolis<br />

and California, Texas.<br />

And they came in and worked<br />

on my team for nine months, a<br />

fantastic group of people. And<br />

so, I really had that very great<br />

local perspective all the time<br />

who were questioning us. One of<br />

the things that we talked about<br />

was if you are trying to identify<br />

who is going to do this, why<br />

we’re going to, why this is going<br />

to happen?<br />

What are we trying to, what<br />

are we trying to tell the public,<br />

how are we trying to help<br />

the public, or are we trying to<br />

help law enforcement? So, we<br />

researched active shooter incidents<br />

because we wanted to<br />

be able to focus on prevention<br />

and help the law enforcement<br />

community, who is always the<br />

last line of defense, find answers.<br />

When people come to them and<br />

say, “this neighbor of mine is<br />

doing X. This one this person I<br />

work with is doing Y,” a better<br />

understanding. The behaviors of<br />

concern give us the prevention<br />

44 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 45


capabilities. Certainly, somebody<br />

does something afterwards<br />

and a person shooting in a high<br />

rise is not the same as a person<br />

shooting in a house. But when<br />

you talk about predictors, we<br />

don’t necessarily need to research<br />

why a shoot goes bad<br />

in a drug house. We don’t need<br />

to research why that particular<br />

murder-suicide occurred with<br />

three or four children in the<br />

house, because it was a domestic<br />

situation that you look at<br />

those individual situations.<br />

When we made the decision<br />

at the FBI to do this research,<br />

what we wanted to do was to<br />

exclude things that we already<br />

did a lot of research on, that<br />

the community, academia and<br />

law enforcement had done a lot<br />

of research on. We know a lot<br />

about gun deaths and gun violence<br />

in gangs. We know a lot<br />

about gun violence in drugs. We<br />

know about a lot of gun violence<br />

when it comes to domestic<br />

violence. And even to some<br />

extent, workplace violence. But<br />

what we found is that when we<br />

dissected and we pulled out just<br />

these particular incidents, we<br />

found some fence fascinating<br />

patterns. So, for example, when<br />

you look at specific data and,<br />

in our research, we found that<br />

probably 10% of the time when<br />

a shooter came into this kind<br />

of scene, an unarmed civilian<br />

disarmed the shooter. 10% of the<br />

time. We never would see that if<br />

we were pooling in the data with<br />

domestic violence and guns and<br />

gangs and drugs. We wouldn’t<br />

see that.<br />

So that was part of the help,<br />

part of the great data research<br />

that comes out. When you look<br />

at the right numbers, we also<br />

found that half of the shootings<br />

occur in places in the workforce,<br />

that 25% of them occur in educational<br />

places, schools and<br />

stuff. We found amongst those<br />

two groups, when your shooter<br />

is shooting at a middle school or<br />

a high school, or your shooter<br />

is in a place of business that is<br />

closed to the public, like a shipping<br />

facility, a packing facility, a<br />

law office. When the shooter is<br />

from a closed place of business,<br />

that the public doesn’t transit,<br />

or a middle school, or a high<br />

school that shooters already inside<br />

shoots from there. So, when<br />

you look at whether you should<br />

put up more security locks and<br />

alarms magnetometers, if your<br />

shooter’s already inside, they<br />

already have badge access, more<br />

concerned about prevention, less<br />

concerned about putting people<br />

in a workforce environment.<br />

That’s like a prison. And that’s<br />

where the numbers helped us to<br />

dissect and why we thought it<br />

was valuable to do that.<br />

Jim Dudley (19:40): And that<br />

was certainly the case in Sandy<br />

Hook when it was the son of an<br />

employee, right. And the administrators,<br />

she wasn’t a teacher.<br />

Katherine Schweit (19:49): She<br />

wasn’t working at that school.<br />

He had gone to that school at<br />

Sandy Hook through the school.<br />

At Sandy Hook, most people I<br />

think don’t recognize or don’t recall,<br />

but as horrific as that situation<br />

was, those kids, there were<br />

about 550 people in the school<br />

at the time, 82 people working<br />

there at the time. And those people<br />

had just had active shooter<br />

training just a few weeks before.<br />

So, it wasn’t unknown. And<br />

that was back on December 14,<br />

2012. And there, if you look at<br />

the people who survived that<br />

shooting, there is heroic story<br />

after heroic story, after heroic<br />

story of people who properly<br />

barricaded themselves, who did<br />

the hide part of run hide fight,<br />

did that lockdown. And then<br />

there were also children who<br />

survived because they ran out of<br />

the classroom. And that’s something<br />

that helped to validate our<br />

findings. It is important to teach,<br />

run, hide, fight, not because you<br />

want people to do everything<br />

and you want kindergarteners to<br />

go running out of a building, but<br />

we know that first graders ran<br />

out of a room and they’re alive<br />

today because of it.<br />

Jim Dudley (20:59): Right.<br />

Survivability. So, okay. Your book<br />

is out, and we want to know the<br />

answer. You, the book title is<br />

“How to End the Mass Shooting<br />

Crisis.” So, how do we stop mass<br />

shootings in America?<br />

Katherine Schweit (21:18): I<br />

think we do more conversations<br />

about dispelling the myths, like<br />

the idea that these are all young<br />

kids in their parents’ basement<br />

playing video games. When in<br />

fact the data shows us that the<br />

bigger risk is between the ages<br />

of 30 and 40, the bigger risk<br />

is that kid’s dad upstairs in the<br />

living room, who’s frustrated at<br />

work. So first of all, we have to<br />

bust the myths. That’s really why<br />

I wrote the book. The first chapter<br />

is myth-busting basically.<br />

And then we have to be on the<br />

same page about definitions and<br />

the same page about numbers.<br />

I think I would say this to this<br />

audience, and maybe not to others,<br />

but I think we have to look<br />

realistically and individualistically<br />

in terms of states and local<br />

communities about what we<br />

can do in terms of kind of some<br />

potential regulations that might<br />

help in the gun world.<br />

I’m not as much as I know<br />

about guns. And even though<br />

I teach a class in that I’m not<br />

advocating one way or another<br />

specifically, but I will say that I<br />

think we need to do, we’d done<br />

a decimation, I think of ATF.<br />

And when they’re doing firearm<br />

searches on paper, that’s absurd<br />

in this day and age, the fact that<br />

their data isn’t in a database. And<br />

the fact that the ATF can’t track,<br />

very easily, gun dealers because<br />

you can go from store to store to<br />

try to buy your guns. So, there’re<br />

a lot of spots where I think if we<br />

tighten up, so the answer to your<br />

question, which I seemed like I<br />

was avoiding, but I’m not.<br />

The answer to your question<br />

is that this is a death by a thousand<br />

cuts. We’re only going to<br />

get rid of this. If we stopped<br />

saying when you and I speak<br />

and we’re having a beer, if I<br />

say, it’s all about mental health,<br />

and you say, no, it’s all about<br />

guns. And the next person says,<br />

it’s all about the ATF. And the<br />

next person says, it’s all about<br />

ghost guns. And the next person<br />

says, it’s all about suicide and<br />

domestic. My list of folders on<br />

my data for this subject area is<br />

probably 40 folders. And they’re<br />

all on different subjects because<br />

it is death by a thousand<br />

cuts. We’re only going to kill this<br />

trauma in the United States if<br />

we, if you think about what you<br />

can do, whether that’s training<br />

somebody, taking care of your<br />

employees. All these shootings<br />

occur in places of business close<br />

to the public.<br />

We had a third of those shootings<br />

occur where the employee<br />

was fired that day or the day<br />

before. What is happening in the<br />

HR departments? So, everybody’s<br />

got to figure out what they can<br />

do. And that’s really why I put the<br />

book together. It’s like, there’s a<br />

section on books. There’s a section<br />

on schools. There’s a section<br />

on churches. I am so passionate<br />

about this, that I wrote my entire<br />

training curriculum for run, hide,<br />

fight, and put it in the book. I’ll<br />

just give it away. I don’t care how<br />

46 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 47


to train for it. It’s there. Everybody<br />

has to be invested in it. And<br />

right now, they’re just not.<br />

Jim Dudley (24:43): Well, don’t<br />

give it all away right now. You<br />

want people to buy the book. So<br />

don’t spill all the beans. But what<br />

has been the feedback been<br />

like? Have you heard from DOJ<br />

or members of Congress saying,<br />

“Hey, help us implement these<br />

things.” Are you going to put the<br />

band back together? I volunteer.<br />

Katherine Schweit (25:06): I like<br />

it. I think the response so far has<br />

been fantastic on the book. And<br />

I would say the nice part about<br />

that is its people still in the business,<br />

people who are working in<br />

consulting now, who I know I can<br />

be part of that band and make<br />

it happen. And you know, I think<br />

that there are a lot of people<br />

talking about the gun issue, and I<br />

think that clouds everything. So,<br />

we’ll see. I mean, I think it clouds<br />

it only because we don’t talk<br />

about anything else.<br />

Jim Dudley (25:38): Yeah. And I<br />

don’t know if we’re going to see<br />

immediate benefits. I mean, with<br />

the reform movement, people<br />

are getting out of jail quicker.<br />

The chronic recidivous are not<br />

staying in jail for long terms. As<br />

harsh as some of the 1994 crime<br />

laws were, now with the reform<br />

and COVID, we’re letting these<br />

mass numbers of people who<br />

probably should be in prison out.<br />

And it’s not unusual to see someone<br />

involved in a gun-related<br />

crime who’s out early from a<br />

gun-related crime.<br />

Katherine Schweit (26:17):<br />

Yeah. I taught the Chicago police<br />

department as part of my work<br />

over at DePaul. And I completely<br />

agree with you about that.<br />

The gun issue is a bigger issue.<br />

I bleed for my law enforcement<br />

partners who are particularly<br />

my personal friends in Chicago<br />

who are dealing with what they<br />

struggle with every day. And I<br />

think this subset of what I was<br />

working on, I continue to work<br />

on is just that it is a subset of the<br />

gun issue. I say gun issue because<br />

that’s the way somebody<br />

else says it. And I don’t mean<br />

that what I mean is the violence<br />

issue. It’s a violence issue. And a<br />

lot of the other matters about,<br />

like you said, people getting out<br />

of jail and getting bonded out<br />

right away on things like that.<br />

I get that I was a prosecutor in<br />

Chicago. So that’s a kind of a different<br />

issue, these shooters and<br />

these mass shooting situations.<br />

I think one of the things that<br />

makes it so challenging is these<br />

gentlemen -- primarily gentlemen,<br />

that’s the only dataset we<br />

really have a clear demographic<br />

on is that they’re primarily men,<br />

98%, I think -- is that they don’t<br />

have bad criminal histories. They<br />

may have some criminal history,<br />

but they don’t have the kind of<br />

criminal history you think about<br />

that puts people in jail. You<br />

know, they have anger issues and<br />

court orders about domestic violence<br />

situations. They may have<br />

had brushes with the law, but<br />

we’re not going to find our mass<br />

shooters necessarily by looking<br />

at gun violence. And I think that’s<br />

an important message. I never<br />

phrased it that way before, but<br />

see, you’re good at this. So, you<br />

pulled that out of me.<br />

Jim Dudley (28:06): Well, I<br />

can’t wait to read the book. How<br />

can our listeners find it?<br />

Katherine Schweit (28:10):<br />

The easiest way is to pop onto<br />

my website, Katherineschweit.<br />

com. And on the buy the book<br />

link, there’s a link to every place<br />

where you can buy the book.<br />

Hint, if you sign up for my newsletter,<br />

you can get a substantial<br />

discount. I negotiated with the<br />

publisher. So, sign up for the<br />

newsletter and you’ll see the<br />

discount code.<br />

Jim Dudley (28:42): I’m doing<br />

it. Well, thank you so much for<br />

taking the time and talking about<br />

this really important issue and<br />

shedding light on research and<br />

data collection and listeners.<br />

We’re not going to talk about<br />

a novel and tell you who killed<br />

who at the end, so buy the book<br />

and see how you can lend a hand<br />

in stopping mass shootings in<br />

America.<br />

Katherine Schweit (29:12):<br />

Thank you so much for the time.<br />

And thanks for sharing the message.<br />

It’s so important.<br />

Jim Dudley (29:15): It is, and<br />

to our listeners. Thanks again<br />

for listening. I hope you found<br />

today’s show interesting. Let<br />

me know what you think. Are<br />

we on the right track to reduce<br />

mass shootings in America? Do<br />

you have an opinion? Do you<br />

have some ideas? Let us know.<br />

You can get in touch with me or<br />

someone from the Policing Matters<br />

team at policingmatters@<br />

policeone.com. Drop us a note,<br />

share your ideas, suggestions, or<br />

just say hello. Rate us on Apple<br />

Podcasts. Give us five stars if you<br />

like the show, it really helps us<br />

out. If you don’t like the show,<br />

don’t rate us. That’s my advice.<br />

Hey, thanks again for listening.<br />

Stay safe. Check back in soon.<br />

I’m Jim Dudley.<br />

48 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 49


WHO WANTS TO BE A COP?<br />

New series takes deep dive into St. Petersburg Police Academy<br />

50 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 51


By Suzie Ziegler<br />

TAMPA, Fla. — A new series from the Tampa Bay<br />

Times asks one simple question: In an age of police<br />

reckoning, who wants to be a cop?<br />

To find an answer, Times journalists spent nearly six<br />

months at St. Petersburg College’s Law Enforcement<br />

Academy. There they were given permission to observe<br />

training as cadets tackled physical challenges and<br />

grappled with a national attitude shift about policing.<br />

The result is an eight-part series that takes a deep<br />

and poignant dive into the police recruit experience in<br />

<strong>2021</strong>.<br />

(The first three chapters are printed in this issue of<br />

The BLUES and the remainder will appear in September)<br />

According to the paper, the academy director allowed<br />

Times journalists to drop into classes and<br />

training at any time. They were present for most of the<br />

scenes described in the series and interviewed other<br />

attendees when they were not. The coaches provided<br />

copies of cadets’ textbooks, tests and slideshows. The<br />

journalists also closely followed three cadets, who<br />

shared their essays, presentations and test scores.<br />

In the first installment, recruits explained in their own<br />

words why they chose to attend the academy.<br />

“I want to come home at the end of the day and<br />

know I made a difference,” said Hannah Anhalt, a<br />

25-year-old criminal justice major at the University of<br />

Central Florida.<br />

Another recruit described having positive interactions<br />

with police while growing up in a rough family.<br />

Others want to be heroes, find camaraderie, mirror<br />

their mentors and save juveniles from sex trafficking.<br />

These 30 recruits are mostly white and male, says<br />

the Times, but their class is still the most diverse yet:<br />

seven women, five black people, two Latinos. Their<br />

instructor, identified as Coach Saponare, says he expected<br />

applications to plummet after last year’s protests.<br />

Instead, more people than ever applied.<br />

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PART 1<br />

The New Recruits<br />

“I want to be the change.”<br />

By LANE DeGREGORY,<br />

Times Staff Writer<br />

They can’t get over the wall.<br />

It’s 6-feet tall, made of smooth<br />

wood. <strong>No</strong>thing to hold or stand<br />

on.<br />

Even the tallest men are struggling.<br />

“Run at it. Get a grip. Haul yourself<br />

up,” shouts a coach in a red<br />

shirt. “Don’t give them a huge<br />

target.”<br />

You never know when you’re<br />

going to have to chase a suspect<br />

over a wall.<br />

It’s a drizzly day in late September.<br />

The police recruits are lined<br />

up behind St. Petersburg College’s<br />

Allstate Center, between the rifle<br />

range and shoot house.<br />

Three weeks into training,<br />

they’ve learned to keep their eyes<br />

on the door, do push-ups on cadence,<br />

tell reasonable suspicion<br />

from probable cause, frisk someone,<br />

search a car and carry coffee<br />

in their left hand so they can grab<br />

their gun with their right.<br />

Brittany Moody is the first woman<br />

in her class to conquer the<br />

obstacle course. She played five<br />

sports growing up and works out<br />

every morning.<br />

This morning, they’re starting the<br />

obstacle course that’s designed to<br />

predict their perils: crawl under a<br />

fence, slither through a tube, hoist<br />

yourself into a make-shift attic.<br />

They’re slick with sweat, covered<br />

in dirt, cheering each other on.<br />

“You got it! Come on! Keep going!”<br />

If you fall, you have to start<br />

over.<br />

“You have three chances,” the<br />

coach says.<br />

In the real world, you might only<br />

get one.<br />

Class 219 is mostly white and<br />

male, but it is the most diverse<br />

yet, said Joe Saponare, who oversees<br />

recruit training at St. Petersburg<br />

College’s Law Enforcement<br />

Academy: seven women, five Black<br />

people, two Latinos. Half went to<br />

college. Six were in the military.<br />

The youngest, age 19, lives with<br />

his parents. One of the oldest is<br />

raising a son. She’s already earned<br />

a nickname, Mama Moody.<br />

Some registered for the academy<br />

last spring, before George Floyd<br />

was killed, before people took to<br />

the streets demanding that governments<br />

defund the police. They<br />

decided to attend anyway.<br />

Others applied because of those<br />

outcries.<br />

They know they will be insulted,<br />

targeted, hated — some critics<br />

are openly hostile. But 30 young<br />

people signed up for the first class<br />

since the pandemic closed the<br />

academy.<br />

Saponare, who cadets call<br />

Coach Sap, expected applications<br />

to plummet after the protests last<br />

year. Instead, he said, more people<br />

than ever applied.<br />

<strong>No</strong> agency tracks how many<br />

people apply to U.S. police academies,<br />

according to the National<br />

Police Foundation. Anecdotal evidence<br />

from the country’s 18,000<br />

law enforcement agencies is<br />

contradictory. Some departments<br />

are struggling to fill vacancies.<br />

And officers are quitting at record<br />

rates, many after only a few years.<br />

In September 2019, even before<br />

the protests, the Police Executive<br />

Research Forum released a report<br />

about the “workforce crisis.” It<br />

said the job of policing has become<br />

more challenging, as officers<br />

grapple with social issues<br />

like mental illness, and new types<br />

of criminals, like those who deal<br />

in cyberspace.<br />

St. Petersburg Police Chief Anthony<br />

Holloway, an officer for 35<br />

years, said last summer was the<br />

first time he questioned whether<br />

he still wanted to serve. “It felt<br />

like everybody was against us,” he<br />

said. “I’d like to see the naysayers<br />

see what our officers have to deal<br />

with every day.”<br />

54 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 55


The new batch of officers should<br />

be a hybrid of old-school meets<br />

new ideas, Holloway said. He<br />

wants recruits who want to be<br />

part of their community, not just<br />

bust bad guys. “I want us to be<br />

like the fire department: When we<br />

come into your streets, we’re here<br />

to help, not hurt you.”<br />

After lunch, on this September<br />

day, the recruits sit at long tables<br />

in the classroom, with highlighters<br />

and textbooks. A coach walks<br />

them through “Psychological<br />

Stressors for Veterans.”<br />

“So many of the people you deal<br />

with are in crisis,” says the coach,<br />

who was an officer for 32 years.<br />

“It’s hard for them to focus on<br />

what you need them to do, just to<br />

get them to answer questions and<br />

follow simple instructions.”<br />

He shows them a video of a<br />

veteran begging a cop to kill him,<br />

another of a drunk Marine attacking<br />

an officer. He encourages<br />

them to be empathetic but not put<br />

themselves in jeopardy. He warns<br />

them about PTSD and how they are<br />

going to see things not everyone<br />

sees.<br />

One officer he knew turned in<br />

his badge the first time his life<br />

was threatened. “If you have<br />

doubts, talk to somebody,” he<br />

says. “It’s not a sign of weakness.”<br />

He explains how to deal with juveniles<br />

— and their parents. Tells<br />

them some homeless people don’t<br />

want to go to shelters. He’s about<br />

to move on to the next chapter<br />

when he stops, closes the book<br />

and looks up.<br />

“I’m just curious,” the coach<br />

says. “With all the news all across<br />

the nation, with everything you’re<br />

seeing going on, why would you<br />

want to be a cop?”<br />

<strong>No</strong> one answers.<br />

“We used to get a lot of respect.<br />

But that’s all changed,” he says.<br />

“<strong>No</strong>w everything we do gets questioned<br />

and second-guessed.”<br />

The recruits stare at their laps.<br />

The coach says, “There’s no bad<br />

answer.”<br />

To get into the academy, candidates<br />

have to go through extensive<br />

background checks, physical<br />

and psychological exams, written<br />

tests and intense interviews.<br />

About 20 percent won’t make it to<br />

graduation. By the end of the first<br />

month, two cadets in Class 219<br />

will drop out and another will fail<br />

the first test.<br />

Some have been sponsored<br />

by the Pinellas County Sheriff’s<br />

Office, the St. Petersburg Police<br />

Department, Clearwater, Largo.<br />

Others paid $4,000 tuition, hoping<br />

an agency will hire them by<br />

graduation.<br />

Most of the training is mandated<br />

by the Florida Department of<br />

Law Enforcement, and at the end,<br />

recruits have to pass a state test.<br />

Individual academies can add to<br />

the curriculum, but not to the duration<br />

of the academy.<br />

In St. Petersburg, coaches revamped<br />

some training in October<br />

2019, having cadets focus more on<br />

defensive tactics than offensive<br />

moves, emphasizing de-escalation.<br />

But last summer’s protests<br />

didn’t really spark any changes,<br />

Coach Sap said. “We just reiterate<br />

that there’s a ban on chokeholds,”<br />

he said. “We teach them how to<br />

get out, escape, but not to do it<br />

on a suspect.”<br />

The academy has a team of<br />

40 coaches, mainly current and<br />

former police, all adjunct. Like the<br />

recruits, the coaches are mostly<br />

white men. Class 219 has six Latino<br />

instructors, five female coaches<br />

and two who are Black. During<br />

the training, coaches always wear<br />

red shirts.<br />

Classes are held in a blue,<br />

two-story building in south St.<br />

Petersburg, on a sprawling campus<br />

bounded by U.S. 19 and I-275.<br />

Training lasts almost six months,<br />

Monday through Friday, from 7:30<br />

a.m. until 4:45 p.m.<br />

Mornings start with the recruits<br />

raising the American flag to<br />

recorded bugle music. And every<br />

day, someone reads the name of<br />

an officer killed in the line of duty.<br />

In the classroom this afternoon,<br />

the coach calls on each recruit, in<br />

alphabetical order.<br />

A white woman whose brown<br />

hair is in a bun sits up straighter<br />

in the front row, then turns to<br />

address the room. “I want to get<br />

away from a desk job, do something<br />

more fulfilling,” she says. “I<br />

want to come home at the end of<br />

the day and know I made a difference.”<br />

Hannah Anhalt, 25, majored in<br />

criminal justice at the University<br />

of Central Florida, got a private<br />

investigator’s license, uncovered<br />

fraud for an insurance company.<br />

The job paid well, but she found it<br />

boring. When the pandemic shuttered<br />

her office, and she started<br />

working from home, she told her<br />

boyfriend she needed a new career.<br />

A former Marine wants to be a<br />

hero. A blonde woman wants to<br />

help strangers. A fair-haired man<br />

grew up with a rough family, lost<br />

both parents young. “Police were<br />

called to my house a lot. They<br />

really helped me,” he said. “I want<br />

to help people like me.”<br />

One recruit wants to take bad<br />

people off the streets. Another<br />

misses the camaraderie he’d<br />

had in the military. Someone else<br />

wants to save juveniles from sex<br />

trafficking.<br />

“My uncle and family friend are<br />

in law enforcement. And they’re<br />

great men,” says a muscular Black<br />

man. “There’s a lot of good people<br />

out there who want to do the right<br />

thing.”<br />

KeVonn Mabon, 27, was a wide<br />

receiver at Ball State University. In<br />

2017, he got picked up by the Tennessee<br />

Titans and played in four<br />

preseason games. He was playing<br />

football professionally in Germany<br />

last year. When the pandemic hit,<br />

he moved to Florida to live with<br />

his pee-wee football coach and<br />

got a job in a gym. Then that shut<br />

down. So he applied to work at<br />

the jail.<br />

A recruiter with the Pinellas<br />

Sheriff’s Office saw his application,<br />

offered to pay his tuition to<br />

the academy and, if he graduates,<br />

hire him as a deputy. Mabon<br />

thought about it for a few days.<br />

He didn’t tell any of his childhood<br />

friends. Most of them hate cops.<br />

Some are in prison.<br />

A Black woman wearing glasses<br />

tells classmates, “I grew up in a<br />

rough area outside of Baltimore,<br />

seeing drugs and alcohol abused.”<br />

Everyone she knew, she says, felt<br />

like the police only came to arrest<br />

and harass, not to help.<br />

Brittany Moody, 31, is the second-oldest<br />

recruit. She has a<br />

7-year-old son and helps parent<br />

her partner’s middle-schooler.<br />

She had thought about becoming<br />

a cop for years, but everyone<br />

around her tried to talk her out of<br />

it, asking, “Why would you want<br />

to become a pig?”<br />

For the last three years, she<br />

worked in the uniform department<br />

at the Pinellas County Sheriff’s<br />

Office and in the jail commissary.<br />

The summer’s Black Lives Matter<br />

protests strengthened her resolve<br />

to become a deputy.<br />

“As the mother of a Black son,<br />

I want to help make a change<br />

in policing — from the inside,”<br />

Moody says. If she had been one<br />

of the officers on the George Floyd<br />

or Breonna Taylor call, she says,<br />

she might have been able to save<br />

them.<br />

Over the next five months, the<br />

recruits will learn how to clear<br />

buildings and carry their partners<br />

out of harm’s way, how to respond<br />

to suicide attempts and school<br />

shootings, how to speed through<br />

slick U-turns, disarm suspects,<br />

revive overdose victims.<br />

They will have to pass 18 written<br />

tests and six “high-liability” proficiency<br />

exams, prove that they can<br />

master 28 defensive moves and<br />

spend 80 hours on the firing range.<br />

They will be indoctrinated to see<br />

threats everywhere. And they will<br />

be told — every day — that they<br />

might die in this job.<br />

The culture of policing, in <strong>2021</strong>,<br />

is still paramilitary, valuing aggression<br />

and machismo, dividing<br />

humanity into good guys and bad<br />

guys.<br />

These recruits will have to police<br />

communities that don’t trust<br />

them, and police each other.<br />

Coaches will reinforce the need<br />

for accountability, and how everyone<br />

is watching police nowadays,<br />

scrutinizing behavior. They’ll tell<br />

the cadets that they have to earn<br />

the public’s trust. And they will<br />

repeat, again and again, that the<br />

biggest problems are individual<br />

failings.<br />

Several recruits will struggle<br />

with the physical training. Others<br />

with the academic tests. Some<br />

will question their decision.<br />

Will they still want to do this<br />

job once they learn about the life<br />

they’re facing? Once they’ve been<br />

shot with simulated bullets and<br />

seen scenes of screaming, bleeding<br />

children, after a cop dies at<br />

the U.S. Capitol and a Hillsborough<br />

deputy is killed on his last<br />

shift before retiring?<br />

“To me, it sounds scary. You’re<br />

risking your life. You don’t even<br />

know what’s around the next<br />

corner,” says Anhalt, the woman<br />

who used to work at an insurance<br />

company.<br />

The book work will be easy,<br />

she says. She’s always been a<br />

good student. But she doesn’t<br />

know how to load a gun, and<br />

she’s never been in a fight — never<br />

even felt threatened.<br />

Of everything she’s facing at<br />

the academy, she says, all the<br />

trials and tests, the thing that<br />

freaks her out most: being blinded<br />

by pepper spray.<br />

“<strong>No</strong>body really wants me to do<br />

this,” she says. “Am I crazy?”<br />

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PART 2<br />

The Pepper Spray<br />

“This could happen to you.”<br />

By LANE DeGREGORY,<br />

Times Staff Writer<br />

Photographs by<br />

JOHN PENDYGRAFT<br />

“True story,” a coach tells the<br />

cadets. “This could happen to<br />

you.”<br />

The 27 recruits are lined up<br />

along the driving course behind<br />

the St. Petersburg police academy,<br />

wearing gym shorts and white<br />

T-shirts, sweating under the October<br />

sun.<br />

Several are wearing glasses. <strong>No</strong><br />

contact lenses today, they were<br />

told. Those will only make your<br />

eyes burn more.<br />

“<strong>No</strong>t too long ago, not too<br />

far from here, a state trooper<br />

pepper-sprayed a perp on the<br />

Howard Frankland Bridge,” the<br />

coach says. “Wind blew it right<br />

back into the cop’s face. The guy<br />

picked up the trooper to throw<br />

him into the water, but the trooper<br />

shot him. Justifiable homicide.<br />

“You need to know how incapacitated<br />

it can make you if<br />

someone uses it on you.”<br />

Don’t panic, he says. “Don’t go<br />

flapping your arms all around out<br />

there. We’ll laugh at you! When<br />

you get done, you’re going to<br />

shower. Don’t bend over or the<br />

contaminant is going to run down<br />

to parts of your body you don’t<br />

want to burn. And don’t come<br />

running down the hall naked.<br />

We’ve had that. It’s time to cowboy<br />

up and take a little pain.”<br />

An ambulance is standing by.<br />

Two paramedics watch the cadets<br />

crowd around an eye-wash<br />

station made from PVC pipes, a<br />

hose, and a shower head. Bottles<br />

of baby shampoo wait below.<br />

Around the asphalt, coaches<br />

have set orange cones — four<br />

stations the recruits must run to<br />

after being shot in the face with<br />

pepper spray.<br />

“You’ll have to pick a partner,<br />

someone to guide you. You won’t<br />

be able to see,” says the coach.<br />

“Hopefully, you’ll always have a<br />

partner. Or at least back-up.”<br />

As soon as the coach sprays<br />

them, they must define one of the<br />

“levels of resistance.” The coach<br />

yells: passive, active, aggressive<br />

or deadly force.<br />

Officers are allowed to respond<br />

with one level higher than the<br />

threat coming at them.<br />

At each station, they must<br />

perform a defensive technique<br />

they learned last week. At the<br />

last stop, while their eyes are still<br />

burning, they’re supposed to grab<br />

their gun and fire into a target.<br />

KeVonn Mabon, who played in<br />

the NFL, is ready, eager to get<br />

it over with. Brittany “Mama”<br />

Moody had meditated on it that<br />

morning, and found peace.<br />

Hannah Anhalt admits, “I’m<br />

terrified.”<br />

A recruit in uniform staring at a<br />

mock marijuana cigarette held by<br />

the instructor.<br />

Anhalt reacts to a fake joint<br />

used during a training class.<br />

After five weeks at the academy,<br />

the recruits have learned knee<br />

spikes and ankle kicks, how to<br />

unlock handcuffs and break up<br />

a party, to differentiate human<br />

trafficking from smuggling, when<br />

to read Miranda rights, how to<br />

de-escalate a situation with “verbal<br />

judo.”<br />

They’ve learned what not to<br />

do, too, from a cop turned lawyer.<br />

“Don’t be stupid,” he warned.<br />

Don’t be a pervert. Don’t molest<br />

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females. Don’t have sex on the<br />

hood of your cop car, even if<br />

you’re in a cemetery. Dead men<br />

don’t tell tales, but dash cams do.<br />

They’ve memorized the Law<br />

Enforcement Code of Ethics: To<br />

serve the community, to safeguard<br />

lives and property, to protect<br />

the innocent against deception.<br />

They’ve watched videos of a guy<br />

who killed his kids and stuffed<br />

them into barrels. Analyzed crime<br />

scene photos of a human head<br />

on a shelf, a shooting victim who<br />

bled out, a man who put a bomb<br />

in his mouth and exploded all<br />

over his bathroom.<br />

They’ve talked about how cops<br />

are targets, more than ever.<br />

One cadet was driving home<br />

with his uniform hanging in the<br />

backseat and a guy on a motorcycle<br />

flipped him off.<br />

Anhalt scraped the Blue Lives<br />

Matter sticker off her car.<br />

“I don’t know anything about<br />

defensive tactics. I think as I get<br />

more training, it will become<br />

less scary,” Anhalt said. “At least I<br />

hope so.”<br />

She grew up in Davie, just north<br />

of Miami, and trained as a gymnast.<br />

Her dad mostly raised her<br />

and her older brother. In high<br />

school, a friend’s mother, who<br />

worked for the Secret Service,<br />

invited Anhalt to shadow her<br />

on “Take your daughter to work<br />

day,” which sparked her enthusiasm<br />

for law enforcement.<br />

She’s always loved shows like<br />

48 Hours and true-crime podcasts<br />

like Sword and Scale. “My<br />

boyfriend is always saying, ‘You’re<br />

going to kill me, aren’t you?’”<br />

Tyler Dressel, 29, is a wine<br />

vendor. They met in college and<br />

have been together six years. He<br />

supports her but worries. She’s<br />

5-foot-3, 130 pounds. Could she<br />

hold her own against big guys<br />

and people with guns?<br />

“It’s a very dangerous job. That<br />

weighs on me,” Dressel said.<br />

“But I know she’ll be good at it.<br />

She can be intimidating. And she<br />

doesn’t take any BS. Other people<br />

will see her as a cop. But I know,<br />

deep down, she’s a sweetheart.”<br />

Over the summer, they got<br />

engaged and moved into a house<br />

in Dunedin with their two greyhounds.<br />

“Of course, I want to help people,”<br />

Anhalt said. “I’m a people<br />

person. I also need to do something<br />

for my future. I want to<br />

make myself proud.”<br />

She calls herself “pro-police,”<br />

though long before a jury decided<br />

on the George Floyd case, she felt<br />

he was murdered.<br />

“Something needs to change<br />

with the training,” she said. “You<br />

have to have other officers’ backs,<br />

but also be able to bring them<br />

down, de-escalate things. They<br />

need good cops out there now<br />

more than ever.”<br />

From the back of a darkened<br />

room an image of Martin Luther<br />

King, Jr. is seen between the silhouettes<br />

of seated students.<br />

Recruits have to give presentations<br />

to educate or inspire their<br />

classmates.<br />

The $50,000 salary will be<br />

enough to help support a family.<br />

She wants to have a family. And<br />

after 20 years on the force, she<br />

said, retirement benefits will be<br />

sweet. If you make it that long.<br />

“My dad keeps telling me, ‘You<br />

can still be a realtor,’” she said.<br />

He’s an optometrist, who fitted<br />

her for contact lenses when she<br />

was in fifth grade. All those years<br />

of wearing contacts, he said,<br />

might make her eyes extremely<br />

sensitive to pepper spray.<br />

“Okay, you ready?” a coach asks<br />

Mabon at 9:30 a.m.<br />

He’s by the eye-wash station,<br />

rocking in his sneakers. He’s<br />

always moving, bouncing like a<br />

boxer. “Hands behind your back,”<br />

says the coach. “Don’t touch your<br />

eyes.”<br />

Mabon takes a deep breath<br />

and throws back his shoulders.<br />

The coach, barely a foot away,<br />

squirts a stream of pepper spray<br />

into each of his eyes. He winces,<br />

shakes his head.<br />

“Okay, now look at me,” shouts<br />

the coach. “C’mon, c’mon, look at<br />

me.” He can’t open his eyes. “How<br />

many fingers am I holding up? You<br />

gotta look at me!”<br />

A man tries to open his eyes<br />

wide enough to count fingers on<br />

the trainer’s hand.<br />

KeVonn Mabon struggles to<br />

open his eyes so he can count a<br />

coach’s fingers.<br />

He squints, and can barely make<br />

out her hand. “Four?” he guesses.<br />

“Okay,” says the coach. “Go!”<br />

The other recruits watch, knowing<br />

now what’s coming.<br />

Mama Moody is up next and<br />

takes off her glasses. When the<br />

pepper spray hits her eyes, she<br />

stomps, slaps her thighs, tugs her<br />

shorts. “All right, active resistance,”<br />

yells the coach. Moody<br />

spits, shakes her hands, coughs.<br />

“Active resistance!” the coach<br />

calls.<br />

The face of a woman, eyes<br />

clenched tight and grimacing in<br />

pain, fills the photo.<br />

Brittany Moody tries to focus<br />

after being pepper sprayed.<br />

She spits out the definition, then<br />

takes off, eyes closed, running in<br />

the wrong direction. “This way!”<br />

calls her partner. “Follow my<br />

voice.”<br />

She makes it to the first punching<br />

bag, then doubles over,<br />

spitting. “Hit it! Hit it hard!” says<br />

Coach Joe Saponare. Moody<br />

keeps missing the bag. “They’re<br />

trying to hurt you!” the coach<br />

screams. “You wanna go home?<br />

You gotta fight like you mean it.<br />

It’s a life-or-death battle!”<br />

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She stands still for a second,<br />

shakes her head, tries to focus.<br />

Behind her burning eyes, she<br />

pictures her son waiting for her.<br />

She opens her eyes, tears washing<br />

away the pepper, and starts<br />

unleashing all her anger and fear<br />

on that bag, determined now,<br />

shouting, “Police, get back!”<br />

She just had to remember what<br />

she was fighting for.<br />

A woman punches at a heavy<br />

pad held by an instructor. Her<br />

eyes are clenched shut.<br />

Coaches keep shouting at<br />

Moody to fight through the pain.<br />

When it’s Anhalt’s turn, she tries<br />

to stay silent. But as the pepper<br />

hits her face, she whimpers. It<br />

takes her twice as long as anyone<br />

else to open her eyes. “Okay,<br />

go!” the coach finally shouts.<br />

“Go!” Anhalt veers to the left, way<br />

off course. Her partner calls her<br />

back, but Anhalt doubles over<br />

coughing. Snot is spewing from<br />

her nose, dripping off her chin.<br />

“Breathe!” says her partner.<br />

“Calm down! Open your eyes.”<br />

She punches at the first station,<br />

runs to the second, then steps<br />

back from the kick bag, gagging.<br />

“Get angry!” screams Coach Sap.<br />

Somehow, she makes it to the<br />

final stop, pulls out her gun —<br />

and fires straight into the bullseye.<br />

A woman tries to aim a pistol<br />

with the help of an instructor. Her<br />

eyes are shut.<br />

How do you shoot a gun when<br />

you can’t see? Anhalt cries as she<br />

tries.<br />

A woman holds her face over a<br />

spray of water, washing pepper<br />

spray from her eyes.<br />

If she makes it through the<br />

academy, and gets hired by a<br />

law enforcement agency, Anhalt<br />

might have to get pepper-sprayed<br />

again.<br />

“You did it! It’s over. Calm<br />

down,” her partner says, leading<br />

Anhalt to wash her face. She<br />

squirts baby shampoo into each<br />

eye, gasps as the water carries<br />

pepper spray down her neck.<br />

“I can’t breathe!” she cries.<br />

“Your face will cool down. You<br />

got this!” says Moody, putting her<br />

arm around Anhalt’s shoulder.<br />

“Get your hands off her!” shouts<br />

a coach. “Stop babying her! You<br />

can’t do that on the street.”<br />

Moody backs away. Anhalt<br />

swallows tears. “It feels like<br />

someone is cutting my eyeballs<br />

with glass,” she says. “Like my<br />

face is melting.”<br />

Two women try to recover from<br />

the effects of pepper spray, one<br />

with a towel wrapped around her<br />

head.<br />

Moody and Anhalt try to cool<br />

their aching eyes in front of a fan.<br />

In the classroom that afternoon,<br />

two former Marines say that was<br />

more painful than being gassed.<br />

Was it worse than childbirth?<br />

someone asks Mama Moody. “It’s<br />

right up there,” she says. “But<br />

there’s not the happy ending.”<br />

It makes me wonder, one female<br />

recruit says: Should police<br />

be allowed to gas protesters?<br />

“<strong>No</strong>w I feel bad for them.”<br />

At the end of the day, Anhalt<br />

still can’t open her eyes and must<br />

call her fiancé to drive her home.<br />

She can’t see the academy textbook<br />

to study for the next day’s<br />

exam, so he has to read to her.<br />

That night, for the first time<br />

since she started the academy,<br />

she breaks down. She had paid<br />

her own way to attend. She hasn’t<br />

been hired by an agency yet,<br />

doesn’t owe anyone anything.<br />

“What am I doing?” she cries<br />

to her fiancé. “Why am I doing<br />

this?”<br />

A woman leans over a table,<br />

holding her head with one hand,<br />

trying to recover from pepper<br />

spray as other recruits look on.<br />

Anhalt, in class after being<br />

pepper-sprayed, is one of the<br />

few recruits paying $4,000 tuition<br />

at the academy. Most of the<br />

other cadets already have been<br />

hired by local agencies.<br />

The day after being pepper-sprayed,<br />

Anhalt still can’t<br />

see. She has to catch a ride to<br />

school with another recruit and<br />

keeps leaving class to rinse her<br />

swollen eyes.<br />

She’s in the academy bathroom<br />

when Moody comes to get her.<br />

“The Clearwater PD is here to<br />

see you.”<br />

Anhalt dries her face and tries<br />

to blink back the pain as she<br />

greets the officer waiting in the<br />

hall.<br />

“We’ve been watching you,”<br />

the man says. He admired her<br />

drive, had seen progress in the<br />

physical training and been impressed<br />

by her problem-solving<br />

skills. “We want to offer you a<br />

patch.”<br />

Just like that — after one of<br />

the worst days of her life, one of<br />

the best. If she graduates from<br />

the academy, and passes the<br />

state exam, Clearwater police<br />

will refund her tuition. And hire<br />

her.<br />

First, she has to learn how to<br />

shoot a moving target, tackle a<br />

suspect, tie a tourniquet.<br />

And talk to strangers at<br />

Walmart. “That’s the part I’m<br />

dreading the most,” Moody says.<br />

“I’d rather be pepper-sprayed.”<br />

PART 3<br />

WALMART<br />

“What did you think this job was?”<br />

By LANE DeGREGORY,<br />

Times Staff Writer<br />

She doesn’t want to do this.<br />

“<strong>No</strong>t. At. All. I’m not ready,” she<br />

tells the other cadets.<br />

They’re wearing their uniforms,<br />

ties and shiny shoes, finishing<br />

lunch on this Friday in late October.<br />

They’re getting ready to<br />

move onto the next assignment<br />

at the St. Petersburg police academy:<br />

Interviewing.<br />

“I don’t know what people are<br />

going to say. If I’m shopping, I<br />

don’t want people bothering me.<br />

Especially a cop,” she says. “Especially<br />

now.”<br />

Brittany “Mama” Moody rarely<br />

complains.<br />

Recruits on their backs with<br />

their legs in the air.<br />

Moody keeps up with her<br />

classmates during the physical<br />

drills.<br />

<strong>No</strong>t when she got punched in<br />

the face during boxing, or kicked<br />

in the shin during a take-down,<br />

or thrown on her stomach and<br />

handcuffed.<br />

But she’s been dreading this<br />

day: The recruits must talk to<br />

strangers.<br />

“Is someone going to hit us?”<br />

Moody asks. “Will we have to<br />

use our defensive tactics?”<br />

For some people, this part is<br />

easy. Much better than having to<br />

run 1.5 miles in 100-degree heat,<br />

learn dozens of legal definitions<br />

or tackle a suspect on a gravel<br />

road.<br />

Moody sees it as torture.<br />

Coach Joe Saponare laughs<br />

at that. What did you think this<br />

job was? Most of your time, you<br />

spend talking to strangers. You<br />

gotta get used to this.<br />

62 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 63


It’s generational, he says. When<br />

he was coming up 30 years ago,<br />

people still talked to each other.<br />

Face to face. All the time. And<br />

phones were not for texting.<br />

Some of these millennials — or<br />

are they even younger than that,<br />

Gen Z’s? — anyway, they don’t<br />

talk even when they’re in the<br />

same room, Coach Sap says.<br />

“It’s getting worse every year,”<br />

he says. “That’s why we got to<br />

get them out there, practicing<br />

their communication skills.”<br />

Six weeks into their training,<br />

Class 219 has lost six recruits.<br />

One’s infant got sick. Someone<br />

caught COVID.<br />

The 24 who are left have<br />

learned how to fall and break<br />

falls, the difference between an<br />

interview and an investigation,<br />

how to holster a gun, approach<br />

a burglar, take fingerprints, collect<br />

evidence and handle a body<br />

when its skin is stuck to the<br />

floor.<br />

All but four already have been<br />

hired by local agencies. Everyone<br />

except the youngest is keeping<br />

up with the physical training.<br />

That affects them all. When one<br />

person doesn’t pump enough<br />

push-ups, they all must start<br />

over. Cadets started making the<br />

19-year-old work out at lunch,<br />

KeVonn Mabon drilling him as<br />

if he were training for the NFL.<br />

While others eat at the long<br />

tables, Mabon counts squats and<br />

sit-ups.<br />

“I’ll talk to anyone,” Mabon<br />

says that Friday as they clean up<br />

after lunch. He turns to Moody.<br />

“You got this.”<br />

Hands of a man wearing a<br />

uniform holding a pen and note<br />

paper.<br />

KeVonn Mabon isn’t worried<br />

about talking to strangers.<br />

Take really good notes, a coach<br />

tells the cadets.<br />

“<strong>No</strong>tice tattoos and piercings,<br />

write those down. After the interviews,<br />

you’ll all be up here at<br />

the podium reporting back to us.<br />

So, make sure you can read your<br />

notes. Get quotes. They have to<br />

be direct quotes. Get their first<br />

and last name and occupation.<br />

Use small notepads, don’t open<br />

your laptop in front of them.<br />

“Avoid generalizations. Ask<br />

follow-up questions. What does<br />

that mean? Every call you go<br />

on, you’re going to meet two or<br />

three people, at least. And you’ll<br />

have to talk to all of them. You<br />

can’t be shy.”<br />

Surely some of you have been<br />

face-to-face with strangers before,<br />

the coach says. “What other<br />

jobs have you had?”<br />

Security. Dog track. Receptionist<br />

at a chiropractor’s office.<br />

Army. Marines. Cable guy. Server.<br />

“You have to explain quickly<br />

why you’re out there, what you<br />

want,” the coach says. “Anybody<br />

have the heebie-jeebies?” Half<br />

the class raises their hands. “Just<br />

work through the fear. Today, our<br />

mission is to find out what their<br />

perception is of law enforcement<br />

officers.”<br />

Someone groans. Others exchange<br />

glances. Moody hangs<br />

her head.<br />

“If they’re anti-law enforcement,<br />

ask: What can I do to<br />

change your perception?”<br />

He projects a map of Walmart<br />

on the screen behind him. It’s<br />

right across the street from<br />

the police academy. “Try to get<br />

people approaching as opposed<br />

to leaving. They might want to<br />

get their groceries home. Don’t<br />

go inside Walmart,” he says.<br />

“And remember your interview<br />

stance: feet shoulder-width<br />

apart, gun leg back. Be nice. Be<br />

human. Try to make a connection.<br />

If someone gets in your<br />

face, back off.”<br />

Moody doesn’t have a notebook.<br />

Mabon needs a pen. They<br />

team up, and stake out a spot by<br />

the garden center.<br />

“Excuse me, Sir,” Mabon calls<br />

to a middle-aged Black man<br />

walking through the parking lot.<br />

The man doesn’t stop. Mabon<br />

catches up to him. “Can I ask you<br />

a question?” The man shakes his<br />

head. The next woman does the<br />

same.<br />

“We should’ve gone to Publix,”<br />

Moody says, “where people are<br />

happier.”<br />

It’s hot in the afternoon sun.<br />

The air smells like asphalt. The<br />

cadets are sweating in their<br />

long-sleeve dress shirts and<br />

polyester pants. “Excuse me,<br />

Ma’am,” Mabon says, approaching<br />

an elderly Black woman. “I<br />

just want to get your opinion on<br />

law enforcement.”<br />

“Well, that’s a big topic,” says<br />

the woman. “You mean, locally?”<br />

“How do you think the officers<br />

who’ve been deemed bad can be<br />

better?” asks Mabon.<br />

Police need to get out into the<br />

community, she says. Build relationships.<br />

Know who they serve.<br />

“Yes, Ma’am.” And you have to<br />

train them so their response<br />

isn’t excessive, she says, make<br />

them show some respect. “Yes,<br />

Ma’am.”<br />

And you’re in danger, too,<br />

she tells him. Protect yourself.<br />

Protect your partner, she says.<br />

“Thank you, Ma’am.”<br />

Moody puts on sunglasses,<br />

watches people slide by, gears<br />

up for rejection. When a Black<br />

man wearing a Vietnam vet ball<br />

cap nods at her, she nods back.<br />

“How are you doing, sir? Can I<br />

ask you a question?” The man<br />

stops. “I just want to get your<br />

opinion on law enforcement.”<br />

A uniformed woman recruit<br />

shares a laugh with a man she is<br />

interviewing.<br />

Be courteous. Make eye contact.<br />

Find a connection, a coach<br />

tells cadets. Here, Moody does --<br />

with Walter Canty, 73, who used<br />

to work near where she grew up.<br />

“I tell you what,” says the man,<br />

chuckling. “It’s a whole lot different<br />

than when I was in law<br />

enforcement.”<br />

“Oh, you were in law enforcement?”<br />

asks Moody.<br />

“Yep, 23 years, retired now,<br />

from Washington, D.C.”<br />

“That’s where I’m from!” Moody<br />

says. “Well, I’m from Baltimore.”<br />

For the first time all day, she<br />

smiles.<br />

She has wanted to be a police<br />

officer since she was 7, her son’s<br />

age. Her dad is a security guard<br />

at George Washington University,<br />

and as a girl, she loved watching<br />

him put on his uniform, felt<br />

proud that he protected people.<br />

“I wanted to do that,” Moody<br />

said. “Help people.”<br />

Moody’s parents were high<br />

school sweethearts, and she and<br />

her older brother grew up with<br />

them coming to her volleyball,<br />

softball, soccer and basketball<br />

games. She was 10 when they<br />

split up, which “took a huge<br />

toll on me,” she said. Her mom<br />

worked at the post office and<br />

took a transfer to Tampa when<br />

Moody was in seventh grade.<br />

In high school, Moody played<br />

sports, studied karate, hung out<br />

with kids who hated cops. Her<br />

grades started slipping, she was<br />

acting out, getting in trouble.<br />

Two images of the recruit at<br />

different ages and dress styles<br />

are projected on the wall.<br />

“Perception is everything,”<br />

Moody tells the recruits, sharing<br />

photos of how she transformed.<br />

During a presentation at the<br />

academy, she showed a photo<br />

of her back then — wearing<br />

a sleeveless navy undershirt,<br />

baggy khakis slung below her<br />

hips, a big, gold cross necklace.<br />

Then she showed a photo of<br />

her in shirt and tie. She talked<br />

about perception, how she’d had<br />

to change and cut off everyone<br />

around her, shut down social<br />

media. “You are what you put<br />

out into the universe,” she said.<br />

At the University of South<br />

Florida, Moody studied criminal<br />

justice but didn’t get her degree.<br />

64 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 65


She worked at Burger King, Cold<br />

Stone Creamery, Ikea.<br />

Her son was born when she<br />

was 23.<br />

He was a surprise; his dad is<br />

her best friend; they met bowling.<br />

They co-parent from separate<br />

homes. <strong>No</strong>w, she said, “we’re<br />

like brother and sister.”<br />

After Bryan was born, Moody<br />

decided it was time to pursue<br />

her passion. She applied to the<br />

academy, sailed through the<br />

physical tests but failed the<br />

written entrance exam. Twice.<br />

So, she took a job at the Pinellas<br />

County Sheriff’s Office handing<br />

out uniforms, learning what<br />

deputies do.<br />

In the driveway in front of an<br />

open garage, a child points out<br />

the holes in a silhouette target<br />

held by his mother.<br />

Moody proudly shows off her<br />

target practice, though she does<br />

not want her son playing with<br />

toy guns.<br />

Finally, last summer, she was<br />

accepted into the academy —<br />

and the Sheriff’s Office sponsored<br />

her. If she graduates, and<br />

passes the state exam, she’ll be<br />

a deputy.<br />

“Just because you fall down<br />

doesn’t mean you stay down,”<br />

she said.<br />

Moody lives in a townhouse in<br />

Brandon with her girlfriend, her<br />

girlfriend’s 12-year-old son, her<br />

boy and a friendly pit-bull mix<br />

named Maggie. Every morning,<br />

she gets up at 4 a.m., drinks a<br />

protein shake, packs lunch, meditates,<br />

then carries her sleeping<br />

son to her truck and drives to her<br />

mom’s house. She eases Bryan<br />

into bed beside his grandmother<br />

about 5:45, kisses him good-bye,<br />

then drives another 45 minutes<br />

to the academy to run three<br />

miles and do CrossFit training<br />

with Coach Sap.<br />

A child sits on a living room<br />

couch with one shoe on, the other<br />

being tied by his mother.<br />

Before she wakes her son,<br />

Moody meditates. Then she<br />

drives Bryan, 7, to his grandmother’s<br />

house and heads to the<br />

academy. After class, she takes<br />

him to basketball practice.<br />

After all day at school, she<br />

picks her son up and heads home<br />

by 6:30. Except twice a week,<br />

when she takes Bryan to basketball<br />

practice at the YMCA. She<br />

helps the second graders warm<br />

up, running drills and rebounding<br />

their shots. When practice<br />

starts, she sinks into a folding<br />

chair on the far side of the gym<br />

and takes out her basic training<br />

textbook, highlighter and flashcards.<br />

“I’m super exhausted all the<br />

time,” she said. “But there’s no<br />

doubt in my mind that I want to<br />

do this.”<br />

She doesn’t want Bryan to fear<br />

cops. She wants him to know<br />

they are here to help.<br />

Moody’s mom, Stephanie<br />

Johnson, said she was surprised<br />

when her daughter told her she<br />

wanted to be an officer, “especially<br />

in light of all the stuff<br />

going on right now.”<br />

After an exhausting day at the<br />

academy, Moody races home<br />

to grab her son for basketball<br />

practice. She seldom has time to<br />

herself, or to sleep.<br />

“She’s a Black female with alternative<br />

sexual orientation, raising<br />

a small son. I told her, ‘How<br />

many more things do you want<br />

stacked against you?’ But she<br />

won’t entertain a negative comment<br />

about what she’s doing.<br />

She’s very driven. And stubborn.”<br />

She doesn’t test well, her mom<br />

said, but she’s a good leader.<br />

“She’s going to impact lives,<br />

change perceptions. The Sheriff’s<br />

Office is lucky to get her.”<br />

As his mother sits on a bench<br />

studying, a child shoots a basketball.<br />

While Bryan is at basketball<br />

practice, Moody studies for an<br />

exam.<br />

Close up of a workbook and<br />

study notes.<br />

Moody has never been good at<br />

taking tests, so she makes flashcards<br />

to help study.<br />

Of course, Johnson is worried.<br />

She’s a mental health counselor<br />

now, well aware of the psychological,<br />

as well as physical risks,<br />

police face.<br />

Once her daughter is on the<br />

streets, Johnson said, “I’m going<br />

to have to be on prayer all day.”<br />

In the Walmart parking lot, the<br />

man in the Vietnam vet hat asks<br />

Moody about her dad’s work in<br />

security, how long she’s been at<br />

the academy, how she’s doing.<br />

She does most of the talking.<br />

Then she remembers her assignment.<br />

“So, you said law enforcement<br />

is a lot different than<br />

when you were in it,” she says.<br />

“How?”<br />

The man strokes his white<br />

beard and says slowly: “People<br />

in policing now, they come<br />

from an environment of bullying.<br />

They need training, someone to<br />

teach them to help and be kind.”<br />

Moody races to write down his<br />

words. “And when the police<br />

break the rules,” the man says,<br />

“you have to hold them accountable.”<br />

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Even if it’s not with us.<br />

They talk a little more, and<br />

Moody thanks him “so much”<br />

for his time. “I hope things will<br />

change with training, and whatever<br />

else it takes,” she says.<br />

“Good luck to you,” says the<br />

man.<br />

Back in the classroom, the cadets<br />

compare notes. Some shoppers<br />

praised law enforcement,<br />

or had officers in their families.<br />

Many refused to talk.<br />

A nurse told one recruit that to<br />

some people, her Black teenage<br />

son looks like a thug. But he isn’t.<br />

“Don’t be too quick to judge.”<br />

Instead of arresting autistic<br />

kids, cops need to learn to talk<br />

to them, a teacher said. A cafeteria<br />

worker told a cadet, “Don’t<br />

be trigger happy.”<br />

Moody tells classmates about<br />

the man she met. She was supposed<br />

to talk to at least two<br />

people but only interviewed him.<br />

“He said police need to grow up<br />

and take responsibility for their<br />

actions or fire them,” she says. “A<br />

lot of officers are getting in trouble<br />

and nothing’s happening.”<br />

A youth counselor told a female<br />

recruit that sheriff’s deputies<br />

have always been rude, then<br />

called her a “paramilitary a--<br />

hole.”<br />

“So, what have we learned today?”<br />

asks the coach.<br />

<strong>No</strong>thing they didn’t already<br />

know: Lots of people hate cops.<br />

It’s good to keep that in mind<br />

out in the field, when a suspect<br />

is holed up in a building, and<br />

you’re the only thing between<br />

him and jail.<br />

66 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 67


Death of a Policeman’s Dream<br />

It had always been my dream<br />

to become a policeman when<br />

I grew up. My dad was a cop.<br />

My grandfather and his father<br />

before him. It was a tradition<br />

in my family and one that I was<br />

happy to carry on. I remember<br />

my grandpa taking me to the<br />

range when I was only 12. And on<br />

career day, my dad and grandpa<br />

came to talk to our class along<br />

with my Uncle Jake who was a<br />

fireman. So, I was destined to<br />

continue the Jones legacy.<br />

I meet Joanie in the 5th grade.<br />

We were best friends from the<br />

minute we met. Our parents<br />

knew we were meant for each<br />

other and knew we would get<br />

married as soon as we graduated<br />

from high school, which<br />

we did. And we both went off<br />

to college and graduated on the<br />

same stage. Joanie went on to<br />

get her RN in nursing and I joined<br />

the police academy. Life was<br />

moving along just as planned.<br />

The academy was a lot different<br />

than I thought it would be.<br />

<strong>No</strong>t because the material was<br />

difficult, but because I pushed<br />

myself to be number one in<br />

the class. I had the Jones bar<br />

to maintain and I wasn’t about<br />

to let my family down. And on<br />

graduation day, they were all<br />

there. My grandfather gave a<br />

speech about dedication to the<br />

job and my dad pinned on my<br />

badge with Joanie by my side.<br />

It was the proudest day of my<br />

life and the saddest as well. See,<br />

my grandpa passed away that<br />

very night. He was almost 90<br />

and frankly I was surprised that<br />

he even made it to my graduation,<br />

much less got on stage and<br />

made a speech. But my dad said<br />

his goal was to live long enough<br />

to see me sworn in, and by damn<br />

if he didn’t do just that.<br />

My first week on patrol ended<br />

with my first funeral as a cop.<br />

Unfortunately, I had attended<br />

dozens with my dad and gramps<br />

before, but this was my first in<br />

uniform standing at attention<br />

with everyone else. All to honor<br />

my grandpa and all his years on<br />

the department. And even though<br />

I had been here so many times<br />

before, it was all so different<br />

when it’s your family lying up on<br />

that stage. Thankfully this funeral<br />

wasn’t because one of our<br />

blue family had been killed, but<br />

that didn’t make it any easier for<br />

my family. It did make me proud<br />

to see gramps all dressed up in<br />

his Class A uniform, even though<br />

it would be the last time I would<br />

ever see him.<br />

The following day, I resumed<br />

my FTO training and for the next<br />

few months I soaked up as much<br />

real world experience as possible.<br />

But this was all so much<br />

different than those ride-alongs<br />

with my dad back in the day. I<br />

couldn’t quite put my finger on<br />

what was different, but something<br />

was. When my six month<br />

training period was up and I<br />

walked into roll call on that final<br />

day, I was surprised to see my<br />

dad talking to the watch commander.<br />

As soon as we were<br />

called to attention, the watch<br />

commander announced my dad<br />

would be giving me my final<br />

inspection and riding with me to<br />

conduct my final signoff.<br />

Riding with my dad in the<br />

right seat was a bit strange. I<br />

had ridden with him many times<br />

and watched him interact with<br />

people, but this was way different.<br />

My dad was now watching<br />

ME do MY job and GRADING me.<br />

But it was actually a very busy<br />

shift and it went by really fast.<br />

Too fast. I was really enjoying<br />

working side by side with my<br />

dad and backing each other up.<br />

I had dreamed of this my entire<br />

life. Working with my dad and<br />

doing the job he loved so much.<br />

As we pulled into the station and<br />

parked the shop, I looked over<br />

and pretty sure I saw my dad<br />

tearing up. “Well ole man, how<br />

did I do? Did I pass?”<br />

“Yes son, you passed with flying<br />

colors. I wish your grandpa<br />

could be here with us today, but I<br />

know he’s watching over us from<br />

heaven and he’s as proud of you<br />

as I am.”<br />

As I walked over to the board<br />

and hung up the shop keys, my<br />

dad gave me a hug and said,<br />

“You’re on your own son, do us<br />

all proud.” The watch commander<br />

walked out of his office,<br />

talked with my dad for a minute<br />

and then motioned for me to<br />

come into his office.<br />

“Well Jones, I guess tomorrow<br />

you start the night shift with a<br />

new partner and chance to prove<br />

who the best Jones is at patrol.”<br />

I said, “Yes sir, see you tomorrow<br />

night.”<br />

As I drove home, for the first<br />

time in along time, I felt relieved<br />

that I had finally crossed all the<br />

bridges to becoming the officer<br />

I always wanted to be. Halfway<br />

home, I decided to stop by the<br />

hospital where my wife worked<br />

to give her the good news. It was<br />

in fact her first night in the ER on<br />

the night shift. New beginnings<br />

for both of us. But when I walked<br />

in the ambulance entrance, I<br />

knew right away her first night<br />

was going to be anything but<br />

normal. They had a shooting<br />

victim, several major accident<br />

trauma cases and the ER waiting<br />

room was packed. As I stood<br />

there watching my beautiful wife<br />

helping patients, I knew she too<br />

was doing what she loved. She<br />

saw me standing there, walked<br />

over, and said, “Are you here for<br />

the accident or the shooting?”<br />

I said, “<strong>No</strong>, I’m here to see you<br />

babe, but I see you’re busy, so I’ll<br />

see you when you get home.” I<br />

kissed her and drove on home.<br />

The next night at roll call, I<br />

was assigned a new partner who<br />

had just finished her final training<br />

as well. Officer Garza and I<br />

had graduated from the academy<br />

together and I was actually<br />

looking forward to working together….showing<br />

each other the<br />

ropes so to speak. After roll call,<br />

the watch commander handed<br />

me the keys to a brand-new<br />

shop and said, “She’s all yours<br />

Jones, take good care of her, she<br />

only has 20 miles on the clock.”<br />

Garza and I gathered all our<br />

equipment and loaded it into the<br />

shop and decided we’d get organized<br />

before we left the station.<br />

The MDT was new and needed a<br />

program update, so while Garza<br />

worked on getting it up and<br />

running, I checked my phone for<br />

emails and sent my wife a text<br />

and told her how much I loved<br />

her. Ten minutes later, as the<br />

update finished loading and the<br />

laptop rebooted, we both heard<br />

a loud bang.<br />

I looked over my shoulder to<br />

see where the noise had come<br />

from, I saw two, maybe three<br />

bright flashes of light right behind<br />

the shop. The next thing I<br />

heard was glass breaking along<br />

with the sound of gunfire and<br />

rounds hitting our shop. I yelled<br />

at Garza to get down but when<br />

I look over at her, I saw blood<br />

running down her neck and she<br />

was slumped over the dash.<br />

Then I felt a burning in my neck<br />

and right shoulder and knew I<br />

had been hit as well. That was<br />

the last thing I remember from<br />

inside the shop.<br />

The next thing I remember was<br />

bright lights and people yelling<br />

and screaming and seeing my<br />

wife standing over me. She was<br />

holding my hand, crying saying,<br />

“Baby hold on, please don’t die,<br />

we’ve got you.” There was more<br />

yelling, and people were moving<br />

so fast around me and then it<br />

was so quiet. Why did it get so<br />

quiet?<br />

When I woke up, I was sitting<br />

in a chair in the trauma bay with<br />

my gramps sitting next to me. He<br />

was wearing his uniform and he<br />

looked so much younger than the<br />

last time I saw him. He looked so<br />

much like my dad. “Gramps, why<br />

are you here? Why are we here?<br />

Is Joanie Ok?”<br />

“<strong>No</strong> son, she isn’t ok but eventually<br />

she will be. I am here to<br />

bring you home.”<br />

“I’m confused gramps.”<br />

As we walked out of the room,<br />

I saw my dad in a chair crying,<br />

he was holding Joanie and<br />

everyone from the station was<br />

there including my watch commander.<br />

Everyone was crying. As<br />

we walked outside, there were<br />

even more cops, fireman, news<br />

trucks, and the Chief was there.<br />

“Gramps what happened?”<br />

68 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 69


“God sent me to bring you<br />

back home to heaven. It wasn’t<br />

his plan to have you join me so<br />

soon, but sometimes the dark<br />

side steps in and interferes with<br />

our Father’s wishes. And when<br />

it does, God sends one of his<br />

angels to bring them home. This<br />

time he sent me.”<br />

“But gramps, I had just got<br />

started. I didn’t even get a<br />

chance to make you and dad<br />

proud of me for being the cop<br />

you both were, or to make Joanie<br />

proud of me. We hadn’t even<br />

started a family gramps. Why<br />

now, why me gramps. Why?”<br />

“Well I can’t answer the why<br />

part, but son you made your dad<br />

and I proud the minute you were<br />

born. And when you took your<br />

first step, graduated kindergarten,<br />

then high school, and college.<br />

We watched you on your<br />

first day at the academy and both<br />

cried when your dad pinned<br />

my badge on your brand new<br />

uniform. We were both proud<br />

of you from day one. Just like<br />

Joanie will be proud of your son<br />

when he’s born.”<br />

“Wait! Gramps, Joanie is pregnant?”<br />

“Yes, but she doesn’t know it<br />

yet. But soon after the service<br />

she will discover that you left<br />

her with the gift of a baby boy<br />

she will name after you. And that<br />

boy will grow up with the dream<br />

to be just like his dad.”<br />

So far in <strong>2021</strong>, over 179 police<br />

officers have lost their lives in<br />

the line of duty. Countless sons<br />

and daughters will grow up<br />

without their mother or father.<br />

It’s time to end the senseless killing<br />

of police officers in America<br />

and around the world.<br />

Dedicated to Arkansas Officer<br />

Stephen Carr, who was shot and<br />

killed while sitting in his patrol<br />

car in the parking lot of the<br />

Fayetteville Police Department<br />

in December of 2019, and every<br />

officer killed in the line of duty<br />

doing the job that they always<br />

dreamed of doing. God Bless<br />

the Peacemakers as they are the<br />

Children of God.<br />

Have a unique story you’d<br />

like to share with the<br />

BLUES readers?<br />

Send it to: bluespdmag@<br />

gmail.com. Please change<br />

all the names to protect the<br />

innocent and to avoid prosecution<br />

in the event that<br />

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70 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 71


When we think of the word<br />

or term “Aftermath” we tend to<br />

think in the darkest or most somber<br />

of terms. We think of bridges<br />

burned, lives destroyed and even<br />

lost. We might think of loved<br />

ones or friends who are gone, far<br />

too soon.<br />

However, there is another kind<br />

of “Aftermath” whereby we are<br />

exuberant and excited when<br />

whatever we just went through,<br />

is over. For example, a long,<br />

fast, and furious (no akin to the<br />

movie) pursuit whereby several<br />

cars are destroyed, the suspect<br />

is apprehended, and no one lost<br />

their lives. You might find officers<br />

rather excited at the end of such<br />

events and wonder, “What in the<br />

hell are they so happy about”<br />

or, from a supervisor’s/administrator’s<br />

point of view, “They<br />

wouldn’t be so happy if they<br />

knew just how much paperwork<br />

they’re about to have to do!”<br />

And yet, as anyone who has<br />

even been in a fight, a gunfight, a<br />

dangerous pursuit, or any other<br />

kind of critical incident/engagement<br />

can tell you, there is a real<br />

sense of relief and joy even when<br />

it’s all over. The smoke can still<br />

be lingering in the air, and you’ll<br />

WORDS BY REX EVANS<br />

be like “HELL YEAH!!!” Only those<br />

of us who’ve been there will truly<br />

understand and appreciate this<br />

form of “Aftermath.” For it is an<br />

anomaly reserved for those who<br />

only dare to go where we are<br />

called upon to go and do what<br />

we are called upon to do.<br />

Maybe it’s as simple as a D.A.<br />

telling you “Yeah, I’ll take that<br />

charge…” or as complicated<br />

as hearing the medics tell you,<br />

“You’re shot to s**t, bro. But<br />

you’re gonna be alright…. we got<br />

you!” Aftermath elation (I just<br />

came up with that newfangled<br />

term) is not a new phenomenon.<br />

Look at any old footage from<br />

any war, combat mission, police,<br />

fire or ems critical incident and<br />

you’ll see it. It is in fact, a normal<br />

human reaction to successfully<br />

surviving a serious series of<br />

circumstances. It is, inherently in<br />

our DNA.<br />

For those who criticize such<br />

behavior, I’d suggest you’ve not<br />

done much living, yet. I mean,<br />

stop and think a minute. How<br />

about this kind of “Aftermath?”<br />

You didn’t study for a test but,<br />

you by some divine intervention,<br />

pass the darn test anyway. You<br />

immediately experience a release<br />

of chemicals in your body<br />

which allow for elation, happiness,<br />

relief and wait for it…. excitement.<br />

Maybe you’ll remember<br />

as a kid, doing some crazy<br />

ass stunt on a bike, four-wheeler,<br />

horse or whatever and, somehow<br />

you survive said stunt (<strong>No</strong>w<br />

all you must do is survive your<br />

parents killing you).<br />

I can recall many an “Aftermath”<br />

moment in my lifetime.<br />

I reckon we all can if we really<br />

put our minds to it. Some great.<br />

Some good. Some, not so much.<br />

And yet I find I am grateful for<br />

them all. For I am still here…<br />

much to the dismay of a few<br />

around here, and that in a way,<br />

is a whole other “Aftermath” of<br />

sorts. Some folks will do their<br />

best to destroy you, hurt you,<br />

ruin you. Sooooo, when you<br />

successfully rise above whatever<br />

it is they’ve tried to do, there it<br />

is…that “Aftermath” moment of<br />

elation and relief. <strong>No</strong>t to mention<br />

the feeling of successfully<br />

out maneuvering the shot they<br />

(whomever they may be) took at<br />

you!<br />

This column is dedicated to<br />

the men and women who have<br />

been there. Who’ve experienced<br />

something dramatic, exciting,<br />

dangerous, timeless and above<br />

all, just about unbelievable to<br />

everyone who wasn’t there at<br />

the time. Why unbelievable?<br />

Easy……<br />

1. Because we were probably<br />

crazy to be there in the first<br />

place.<br />

2. Because we were probably<br />

crazy enough to recognize we<br />

shouldn’t be there, and we stay<br />

anyway.<br />

3. Because we were probably<br />

crazy enough to do whatever we<br />

had to do to survive and eventually,<br />

make it home.<br />

And finally, (you had to know<br />

this was coming) because we<br />

were just plain damn crazy!!!!<br />

So, next time you hear the term<br />

“Aftermath” or think about what<br />

all happened after that wild<br />

chase, fight or whatever it was<br />

you somehow (by the Grace of<br />

God) survived, try not to think<br />

inside the box about it. Be happy!<br />

Celebrate life. Let it all out and<br />

understand, the aftermath of any<br />

critical incident beckons the soul<br />

to celebrate just simply being<br />

alive.<br />

God bless. Be safe and as<br />

America’s Sergeant (Phil Esterhouse-Hill<br />

St. <strong>Blues</strong>) used to say,<br />

“HEY! Let’s be careful out there”<br />

Have a unique story you’d<br />

like to share with the<br />

BLUES readers?<br />

Send it to: bluespdmag@<br />

gmail.com. Please change<br />

all the names to protect the<br />

innocent and to avoid prosecution<br />

in the event that<br />

the statute of limitations<br />

hasn’t expired.<br />

72 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 73


74 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 75<br />

74 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 75


History of the Conference<br />

Sheriff ’s Association of Texas<br />

143rd Annual Training Conference & Expo<br />

Sunday August 1-Wednesday August 4, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Henry B Gonzalez Convention Center<br />

San Antonio, Texas<br />

The Sheriffs’ Association of Texas met for the first time on<br />

August 14, 1874, in the courthouse in Corsicana, Navarro County,<br />

Texas. The meeting was called to order by Sul Ross, Sheriff<br />

of McLennan County, who later became a notable part of Texas<br />

history.<br />

The Sheriffs began annual training conferences in 1878.<br />

These training conferences today are the largest composite<br />

gathering of law enforcement officers in Texas. Sheriffs and<br />

other county and local law enforcement officers, federal and<br />

state officers, and major industry security personnel attend.<br />

The Office of Sheriff in Texas was created by the Texas Constitution.<br />

There are 254 Counties in Texas, and each county has<br />

a Sheriff. By statutes, the Sheriff is a Texas peace officer, a conservator<br />

of the peace, enforces the criminal laws of the State,<br />

and is responsible for the county jail, bail bonds, civil process,<br />

and security of the courts. In some small counties the Sheriff is<br />

also the tax collector.<br />

The Office of Sheriff is one of the oldest offices known to our<br />

system of jurisprudence. Sheriffs are elected to office and serve<br />

for a four-year term. The size of Texas Sheriff’s offices are as<br />

diverse as the population of their counties.<br />

The preamble of the first meeting: “That we, as Sheriffs, have<br />

assembled in convention for no political purpose whatsoever,<br />

but for the purpose of more successfully aiding each other<br />

as officers, to execute the laws, in the discharge of our duties<br />

against criminals, and for the further and better protection of<br />

the citizens of our respective counties and the State at large.”<br />

The goal and mission of the Association remains the same<br />

today.<br />

76 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 77


<strong>2021</strong> Annual Conference Schedule<br />

Saturday July 31<br />

3-5 pm Board of Directors Meeting (Grand Hyatt-Bowie BC-2ndFl)<br />

Sunday August 1<br />

8 am Golf Tournament (Tapatio Springs Resort)<br />

Breakfast at 7 a.m., Lunch after tournament<br />

1-4 pm Early Registration (CC-Hall 4 West Registration Area)<br />

2 -4 pm Training Session (CC-Bridge Hall)<br />

5 -6 pm Cowboy Church (CC-Hemisfair Ballroom)<br />

Evening On Own (Suggest Saga at San Fernando Cathedral)<br />

Monday August 2<br />

8 am-5 pm Registration (CC-Hall 4 West Registration Area)<br />

9 am-5pm Exhibits, Silent Auction & Raffle (CC-Hall 4)<br />

Professional Individual Photos will be taken in the Exhibit Hall<br />

5-9 pm Youth Event @ Tower of the Americas (Meet in Youth Room CC-206)<br />

6 pm Welcome Dinner & Dance (CC-Hemisfair Ballroom)<br />

Sheriff ’s Association of Texas<br />

143rd Annual Training Conference & Expo<br />

Sunday August 1-Wednesday August 4, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Henry B Gonzalez Convention Center<br />

San Antonio, Texas<br />

Tuesday August 3<br />

8 am-12 pm Registration (CC-Hall 4 West Registration Area)<br />

8:30-12 pm Opening Ceremony/General Session (CC-Hemisfair Ballroom)<br />

8:30 am-5 pm Youth Event @ Natural Bridge Caverns (Meet in Youth Room CC-206)<br />

11 am-5 pm Exhibits, Silent Auction & Raffle (CC-Hall 4)<br />

Professional Individual Photos will be taken in the Exhibit Hall 12 pm<br />

Sheriffs Group Photo-Immediately following<br />

General Session (CC-Park View, Meeting Room Level)<br />

12 -1:30 pm Complimentary Attendee Lunch (CC-Bridge Hall)<br />

3 pm Blue Bell Ice Cream Social (CC-Hall 4)<br />

3 -5 pm Exhibitor Prize Drawings (CC-Hall 4)<br />

4:30 pm Conclusion of Silent Auction Must be present to win (CC-Hall 4)<br />

Evening On Own (Suggest Saga at San Fernando Cathedral)<br />

Wednesday August 4<br />

8:30 am-8 pm Youth Event @ Six Flags (Meet in Youth Room CC 206)<br />

8:30-12 pm General Session(CC-Hemisfair Ballroom)<br />

11 am-2 pm Spouse Event (CC-Room 006-River Level)<br />

12 -1 pm Complimentary Attendee Lunch (CC-Bridge Hall)<br />

1 -5 pm Training Sessions (CC-Rooms 213AB, 214A, 214B, 214C, 214D)<br />

6:30-9 pm Awards Banquet (CC-Hemisfair Ballroom)<br />

78 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 79


What to Do?<br />

Making the Most<br />

of Island Time<br />

Attractions<br />

Galveston Island is home to some of the<br />

best attractions Texas has to offer, including<br />

Moody Gardens, Schlitterbahn Waterpark,<br />

the Historic Pleasure Pier, unique<br />

museums, dazzling Victorian architecture,<br />

and 32 miles of sun-kissed beaches.<br />

Galveston Beaches<br />

With 32 miles of shoreline and a variety of<br />

parks, Galveston Island offers something for<br />

every kind of beachgoer.<br />

Sandcastle Building Lessons<br />

My name is Emerson and I’ve been a professional<br />

sandcastle builder for over 10 years. Join me every<br />

Saturday this summer at Stewart Beach and learn<br />

the fundamentals of sand sculpture (Yes, it’s sculpture!)<br />

We’ll cover the basics of making strong structures<br />

and how to carve them.<br />

Free sandcastle lessons are available at Stewart<br />

Beach on Saturdays at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., and 3 p.m.<br />

<strong>No</strong> reservation necessary. You can find me by the<br />

water’s edge, straight down from the pavilion. Private<br />

lessons are also available by appointment<br />

throughout the week at the beach of your choice.<br />

For more information, click here. Join me and learn<br />

how to have more fun at the beach forever!<br />

80 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 81


Katie’s Seafood House<br />

2000 Wharf Rd. (409) 763-65688<br />

Where to Stay?<br />

Casa Del Mar Beachfront Suites<br />

Be the hero of your family vacation! With<br />

a relaxed vibe, beautiful views of the Gulf<br />

of Mexico and steps from the beach,<br />

Casa del Mar is ideal for a family vacation<br />

or weekend getaway. Each suite offers a<br />

private balcony, a small living room with a<br />

queen sleeper sofa, a studio kitchen, private<br />

bedroom, and junior bunks for small<br />

kids.<br />

Famous as the Galveston restaurant<br />

industry’s busiest fresh-fish supplier,<br />

Katie’s Seafood Market is now providing<br />

stock for its own new establishment,<br />

Katie’s Seafood House. This<br />

brand-new “boat to table” restaurant<br />

is located at Pier 19, steps from The<br />

Strand Historic District, Pier 21, and<br />

the Galveston Cruise Ship Terminals.<br />

Owner Buddy Guindon, a local leader<br />

of the fishing business, has operated<br />

that family-owned wholesaler<br />

for roughly 40 years, and is thrilled<br />

to enter the burgeoning Galveston<br />

restaurant scene.<br />

Queen’s Bar-B-Que<br />

3428 Avenue S, Galveston, TX |<br />

Phone: (409)762-3151<br />

Tours & Sightseeing<br />

Whether you prefer to stroll down quaint<br />

alleyways by foot or trot through the streets<br />

in a carriage, all paths can lead you on an<br />

unforgettable journey back in time. You’ll<br />

be entertained and enlightened by knowledgeable<br />

guides giving tours on foot,<br />

carriage, shuttle or even boat. If you prefer<br />

to do you own thing, we’ve assemble<br />

self-guided tours of popular sights with<br />

maps designed for mobile devices.<br />

Explore the Ocean’s Depths<br />

MOODY GARDENS<br />

Dive into the oceans of the world in<br />

a 1.5-million-gallon aquarium teeming<br />

with creatures from tuxedo-clad<br />

penguins to seals, stingrays, sharks<br />

and more!<br />

Queen’s is family-owned and operated,<br />

and has been serving up oak and<br />

pecan-smoked favorites since 1966.<br />

The Island mainstay offers delicious<br />

barbequed beef, ribs, links, smoked<br />

turkey and ham, seasonal brisket Texas-style<br />

chili, and mouth-watering,<br />

finger-lickin’ sides and daily specials.<br />

Gaido’s Famous Seafood<br />

Restaurant 3828 Seawall Blvd,|<br />

Phone: (409)761-5500<br />

Gaido first opened his doors to the<br />

public in 1911, the same year air conditioning<br />

was invented. With an<br />

unwavering commitment to serving<br />

the freshest Gulf seafood, Gaido’s is<br />

a cherished tradition for thousands<br />

of both locals and visitors – offering<br />

only the freshest seafood prepared by<br />

hand and the some of very best service<br />

you’ll find anywhere.<br />

82 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 83


CLICK TO WATCH<br />

THE OPEN ROAD<br />

by Michael Barron<br />

Hennessey Celebrates Horsepower By<br />

Summoning Special Exorcist<br />

Exclusive Production Run Of 30 Individually Numbered Hennessey Exorcist Camaro<br />

ZL1 Muscle Cars Celebrates 30 Years of Hennessey Making Fast Cars Faster<br />

Sealy, Texas – Hell-raising Hennessey<br />

Performance Engineering<br />

will offer 30 customers extra-special<br />

versions of its iconic Exorcist<br />

Camaro ZL1. Celebrating three<br />

decades of making fast cars faster<br />

(1991-<strong>2021</strong>), the Texas-based<br />

high-performance vehicle specialist<br />

will complete its 100-car production<br />

run of The Exorcist with this<br />

ultra-exclusive set of muscle cars.<br />

Each Hennessey Exorcist 30th<br />

Anniversary Camaro will feature an<br />

anniversary logo on the car’s front<br />

flanks, set behind each front wheel.<br />

In addition, each of the 1,000 bhp<br />

models will be individually numbered<br />

with an anniversary edition<br />

chassis plate denoting each of the<br />

30 models’ build number.<br />

The Exorcist was created by Hennessey<br />

to ‘slay the Dodge Demon,’ a<br />

task it more than achieved thanks<br />

to its 217-mph top speed, 2.1 second<br />

0-60 mph time and 9.57 second ¼<br />

mile. Hennessey’s iconic enhancement<br />

of the stock Chevrolet Camaro<br />

ZL1 raised the bar on muscle cars<br />

with customers worldwide queuing<br />

up for its supercharged V8 thrills<br />

and 883 lb.-ft of torque.<br />

John Hennessey, company founder<br />

and CEO: “The Exorcist is the<br />

epitome of the American Muscle<br />

car and has the off-the-line performance<br />

to embarrass almost any car<br />

on the planet. We’ve been making<br />

fast cars faster since 1991, so our<br />

30th Anniversary Exorcist pools all<br />

we know into one ferocious supercar<br />

slayer.”<br />

Hennessey’s engineers upgrade,<br />

re-calibrate and improve almost<br />

every area of the Camaro’s powertrain<br />

from installing a high-flow<br />

supercharger and air induction<br />

system, to a custom Hennessey<br />

camshaft, ported cylinder heads,<br />

long-tube stainless steel headers,<br />

and high-flow catalytic converters.<br />

The upgrades and Anniversary Edition<br />

Exorcist is priced at $135,000<br />

(including the base Camaro ZL1)<br />

with the model benefitting from<br />

Hennessey’s two-year/24,000-mile<br />

warranty.<br />

Customers across the US and<br />

around the world can specify The<br />

Exorcist Anniversary Edition in<br />

coupe or convertible form with<br />

an automatic or manual transmission.<br />

Orders can be placed through<br />

authorized Chevrolet retailers or<br />

with Hennessey directly by calling<br />

979.885.1300 or visiting www.HennesseyPerformance.com.<br />

POWER:<br />

• 1000 bhp @ 6,500 rpm<br />

• 883 lb-ft torque @ 4,500 rpm<br />

PERFORMANCE:<br />

• 0-60 mph: 2.1 sec.<br />

• 1/4 mile: 9.57 @ 147 mph<br />

• Top speed: 217 mph<br />

THE EXORCIST UPGRADE INCLUDES:<br />

• High-Flow Supercharger Upgrade<br />

• High-Flow Air Induction System<br />

• Custom HPE Camshaft<br />

• Ported Cylinder Heads<br />

• Auxiliary Fuel System Upgrade<br />

• Upgraded Valve Springs and Retainers<br />

• Upgraded Intake valves & Exhaust Valves<br />

• Upgraded Lifters and Pushrods<br />

• Oversized Heat Exchanger Upgrade<br />

• Long-Tube Stainless Steel Headers<br />

• High-Flow Catalytic Converters<br />

• All Necessary Gaskets & Fluids<br />

• Professional Installation<br />

• HPE Engine Management Calibration<br />

• Dyno Tuning & Road Testing<br />

• Limited Edition Chassis Plate 1 of 30<br />

• Exorcist Exterior Graphics<br />

• 30th Anniversary Edition Exterior Graphics<br />

• Hennessey Premium Floormats<br />

• 2 Year / 24,000 Mile Limited Warranty<br />

84 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 85


Leadership Starts with You<br />

“We have the lowest morale ever,”<br />

said a commander from a police<br />

department in a large city.<br />

“There’s no accountability. Officers<br />

are afraid to act because they are<br />

now the target of our city’s politicians,”<br />

he continued.<br />

What do we do when it all seems<br />

to be falling apart? The once coveted<br />

job as a police officer is taking<br />

more from us than ever before. With<br />

our police chiefs caught up doing<br />

battle with local officials, and training<br />

budgets slashed, we are left to<br />

fend for ourselves, relying on supportive<br />

police associations, and the<br />

public to champion our cause.<br />

When it seems that there is no<br />

place to turn, how can we help<br />

ourselves? First, make the choice to<br />

lead. By our nature, we operate with<br />

excellence at our core. Our training<br />

helps build it. Once trained in our<br />

police duties, we sometimes only<br />

rely on that training to solve everything.<br />

There is a famous quote that<br />

says, “You will always fall to the<br />

level of your training.” By making<br />

the choice to lead, you choose to do<br />

more, to be more than what your<br />

training has provided to you.<br />

Next, create a plan to lead yourself.<br />

After all, if we simply try to<br />

be an excellent mom/dad, partner,<br />

spouse, supervisor, wearing lots of<br />

hats every day all the time, overwhelm<br />

and stress are typically the<br />

result because leaders want to be<br />

the best. When we try to wear a lot<br />

of hats all the time, typically we are<br />

not “engaged” or “present” in it. It<br />

becomes rote and robotic. So, what<br />

can you do to build a leadership<br />

plan for yourself so you can serve in<br />

all your roles effectively while also<br />

being “present?”<br />

First, go back to the beginning<br />

and define your why. Specifically,<br />

why did you decide to be a police<br />

officer? Author Simon Sinek says<br />

it best, “Your why is the one constant<br />

that will guide you toward<br />

fulfillment in your work and life.”<br />

Once you define it, write it down<br />

and put it in all the places you find<br />

yourself each day. Your office, your<br />

patrol car, your locker, your personal<br />

vehicle, and in a pocket in your<br />

uniform. When times get tough, and<br />

they will, you have your why as reminder<br />

of your excellence and why<br />

you chose to become an officer.<br />

Second, write out what is important<br />

to you right now, in the place<br />

you find yourself. Perhaps you are a<br />

new shift supervisor, and the most<br />

important thing right now is to be<br />

a good listener. Or maybe you are<br />

a veteran officer who has sought<br />

out some help because you cannot<br />

seem to separate job life from home<br />

life. For you, the most important<br />

thing may be to learn how to be dad<br />

or mom again when you walk in the<br />

door from work.<br />

Third, learn a strategy to delegate.<br />

We use control or the feeling of it to<br />

alleviate stress. Control can sometimes<br />

backfire however, often causing<br />

more stress in the end. While “in<br />

the moment” control makes us feel<br />

good, when things get quiet and we<br />

cannot turn off the control, however,<br />

we often find ourselves wound<br />

tighter than a rubber band, ready<br />

to “snap” at the next person who<br />

asks for something, or worse at our<br />

own family. Ask others to do certain<br />

things at work and at home which<br />

can help alleviate the feeling that<br />

you need to do everything and be<br />

everything to everyone.<br />

Another strategy is, take time for<br />

yourself. Make YOU a priority. This<br />

is one of the most self-LESS and<br />

important things you can do. Whether<br />

it is setting a specific gym time<br />

each day or making time for your<br />

favorite hobby. The more purposeful<br />

you are with things away from your<br />

job the better your brain’s function.<br />

You can “turn off” and be in moment.<br />

A note of caution here. Should you<br />

find yourself unable to “turn off” it<br />

may be a sign of hypervigilance and<br />

uncontrolled “fight or flight.” Please<br />

reach out for help.<br />

Make the choice to lead yourself<br />

first, so you can lead others more<br />

effectively. When things go sideways,<br />

or you get stressed remember<br />

your why. Be more effective at work<br />

and at home by putting yourself first,<br />

and delegate. By implementing these<br />

strategies, you will be able to be<br />

engaged with everything.<br />

Samantha Horwitz is a regular<br />

contributor to The <strong>Blues</strong> Police Magazine.<br />

She is a 9/11 first responder,<br />

former United States Secret Service<br />

Agent, speaker, and author. She<br />

and her business partner, ret. NYPD<br />

detective John Salerno created A<br />

Badge of Honor, a post-traumatic<br />

stress and suicide prevention program<br />

for first responders.<br />

John and Sam host MAD (Making<br />

a Difference) Radio each Wednesday<br />

7pm central live on FB @Makingadifferencetx.<br />

For more about<br />

Sam and the wellness and resiliency<br />

workshops for first responders, visit<br />

ABadgeofHonor.com.<br />

CLICK OR SCAN HERE<br />

86 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 87


What Does Liberty Look Like?<br />

In 1776 our country declared that<br />

it would begin a new life no longer<br />

bonded to Europe. We love freedom<br />

and long for all the citizens of<br />

the world to enjoy liberty. 1776 is<br />

the year that is revered by Americans<br />

as our birth year. We add the<br />

digits together 1+7+7+6 to find the<br />

sum 21, which is the most illustrious<br />

number in our nation’s treasury<br />

of symbols. We can’t fire salutes<br />

of 1,776 with rifles or cannon, but<br />

we can fire 21-gun salutes. The<br />

U.S. Army’s Old Guard Unit at the<br />

Tomb of the Unknowns in Arlington<br />

takes 21 steps back and forth in<br />

the endless march to venerate our<br />

honored dead. At the end of each<br />

21-step march, the soldier will turn<br />

and face east for 21 seconds, then<br />

turn and face north for 21 seconds.<br />

Twenty-one is our shorthand for<br />

1776 and freedom.<br />

This year I no longer take my<br />

freedom for granted. I can see liberty<br />

attacked around the world by<br />

those who would deny others basic<br />

human rights. Our army is being<br />

withdrawn from Afghanistan to<br />

the detriment of the peace-loving<br />

people who live there. I cherish my<br />

freedom, but can’t help feeling bad<br />

for those who will come under the<br />

whip and boot of the Taliban.<br />

The road from Kabul to Jalalabad<br />

is about 90 miles long. It’s a<br />

dangerous journey now and always<br />

has been. The harsh mountainous<br />

terrain is unfriendly to man and<br />

beast. The people who live there<br />

know how to survive. They are a<br />

very tribal population, and they<br />

engage in alliances that are ever<br />

changing. These fighting tribesmen<br />

are at home in the mountain passes<br />

and villages of the Hindu Kush. Their<br />

leaders have historically lived off<br />

the compensation (bribes) offered<br />

by western governments in exchange<br />

for their support.<br />

Sometimes the tribesmen come<br />

up against western armies. I’m<br />

thinking of one instance where one<br />

such army had to break out from<br />

Kabul in an attempt to get to Jalalabad<br />

or “J-Bad” as it is referred to<br />

by our military. The unit consisted<br />

of about 16,000 troops and civilians<br />

that came under immediate attack<br />

on the road. The commander was<br />

a major general who had a wealth<br />

of experience in the operations of<br />

armies in combat. The tribal attacks<br />

were heavy and became more brutal<br />

as the march wore on.<br />

The army came to a place on the<br />

road called Gandamak. The commanding<br />

general decided to make<br />

a stand there and then continue to<br />

J-Bad. This would go down as one<br />

of those “last stands” in history<br />

books that illustrate man’s courage<br />

in the face of devastating odds.<br />

The number of soldiers that finally<br />

reached Jalalabad was, well, one.<br />

One of the surgeons in the army,<br />

William Brydon, reached J-Bad after<br />

the last stand of his army. It has<br />

been said that the Afghans allowed<br />

Doctor Brydon to escape so that he<br />

could tell the world that Her Majesty’s<br />

44th Regiment of Foot, the Bengal<br />

Native Infantry, the Bengal 5th<br />

Light Cavalry, and other elements,<br />

commanded by a hero of the Battle<br />

of Waterloo, Major General William<br />

Elphinstone, had been wiped out<br />

by 30,000 Afghan tribesmen. The<br />

British Army had been killed or captured<br />

to the last man, save one—<br />

Doctor Brydon. January 1842 seems<br />

like a long time ago to us, but it’s<br />

not in a land that is timeless.<br />

General Elphinstone died in<br />

captivity, but the Afghans returned<br />

his body to the British garrison at<br />

J- Bad. He was buried in an unmarked<br />

grave in the city wall there.<br />

This British disaster was the worst<br />

since the Battle of Yorktown where<br />

General Washington defeated Lord<br />

Cornwallis and our liberty was won.<br />

The next British disaster would be<br />

the Fall of Singapore one hundred<br />

years later when the Japanese<br />

defeated an “impregnable fortress”<br />

and an entire British army entered a<br />

barbarous captivity.<br />

Afghanistan is one of those places<br />

where time, it seems, stands still.<br />

The rugged environment breeds a<br />

rugged people who are resistant<br />

and resilient. The U.S. Army has<br />

been there and supplied aid and<br />

support for the people who want<br />

freedom, but that army is leaving<br />

now. It is leaving under its own<br />

terms, unlike the British and Russians<br />

before it, but the real mission<br />

was never completed. Through no<br />

fault of the courageous American<br />

soldier, the Taliban is an enemy<br />

who can survive in the rocks, caves,<br />

and ice of the Hindu Kush. They are<br />

a cruel and patient enemy. They<br />

hide in the mountains of Pakistan<br />

coming out like cockroaches in the<br />

dead of night. They believe that they<br />

are doing the will of Allah. They<br />

have eternity to wait out western<br />

soldiers and more pressing, the<br />

mostly inept politicians that direct<br />

them. They have been trained<br />

to fight and survive in their native<br />

environment for generations. They<br />

trod the same trails their ancestors<br />

did centuries ago. General Elphinstone<br />

and his command provide an<br />

inspirational tale that modern Afghan<br />

fighters still tell around their<br />

campfires at night.<br />

My thoughts and prayers are for<br />

the young men and women who<br />

fight in our country’s name to come<br />

home from such an unforgiving<br />

place and be reunited with their<br />

families and friends. There have<br />

been 2,312 members of our military<br />

killed in Afghanistan, but they did<br />

not sell their lives cheaply. One estimate<br />

is that 35,000 Taliban fighters<br />

were killed in operations against<br />

our military. Of course, the war has<br />

also taken 71,000 Afghan civilian<br />

lives. Many of those were children<br />

who died because the infrastructure<br />

and health care system are<br />

not fully capable thanks to Taliban<br />

attacks. Many others were Afghan<br />

police officers who aided the U.S.<br />

mission and their fellow citizens<br />

manning the thin blue line between<br />

civilization and savagery. I’m sure<br />

the Taliban is especially proud of<br />

those numbers and their role in<br />

the destruction of Afghan national<br />

resources.<br />

The insurgency will no doubt<br />

return in force and claim an Allah-provided<br />

victory. As I pray for<br />

my own country’s young people,<br />

I also pray that the innocent people<br />

of Afghanistan will be able to<br />

survive and rebuild their country.<br />

It is my hope that one day they can<br />

enjoy the basic freedom that makes<br />

life a joy to live, but I understand<br />

that isn’t likely with the disengagement<br />

of our troops. Of course,<br />

when people get a taste of liberty,<br />

it is hard to return to oppression.<br />

The photos included here show<br />

what freedom and it’s naturally<br />

accompanying compassion look like<br />

to children who have known only<br />

war and hardship for their entire<br />

lives. If your red, white, and blue<br />

hearts aren’t bursting with pride<br />

in our nation’s sons and daughters<br />

who represent liberty wherever<br />

they go, you may have a different<br />

notion of what liberty looks like<br />

than I have. When I view the photos,<br />

I am reminded of what the Apostle<br />

advised the Christians in Corinth,<br />

“Where the spirit of the Lord is,<br />

there is liberty.”<br />

God bless all freedom loving people<br />

in a world gone mad.<br />

God bless the United States of<br />

America on this Fourth day of July<br />

in this its 245th year of sweet liberty.<br />

88 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 89


Photography<br />

Professional<br />

Video<br />

Professional<br />

- 3D Walk Through<br />

Matterport<br />

Showing<br />

Virtual<br />

Houses<br />

Open<br />

Tips<br />

Staging<br />

media marketing for<br />

Social<br />

extra Ah Ha!<br />

the<br />

Seattle Report Says Officers Could Have Defused<br />

Violence by Siding with Protesters & Taking a Knee!<br />

WAIT....WHAT?<br />

The Seattle Police Department<br />

needs to find a better way to<br />

interact with anti-police demonstrators,<br />

including allowing<br />

officers to express solidarity<br />

with protesters marching against<br />

police brutality and racism, according<br />

to the first in a series of<br />

detailed critiques of the department’s<br />

response to protests and<br />

riots. Are they serious?<br />

The city’s Office of Inspector<br />

General for Public Safety report<br />

on local demonstrations that<br />

arose after the May 25 death of<br />

George Floyd in custody of Minneapolis<br />

police, said the department<br />

needs to do more to ensure<br />

officers at protests don’t show<br />

contempt for the people whose<br />

rights they’re supposed to be<br />

protecting, regardless of fatigue<br />

and stress.<br />

The review committee, made<br />

up of SPD representatives and<br />

community members, found that<br />

officers who were sympathetic<br />

to the protesters and condemned<br />

Floyd’s death felt constrained<br />

from saying anything by the department’s<br />

code of conduct that<br />

requires political neutrality on<br />

duty. That silence was interpreted<br />

by the crowd “as an alignment<br />

with, or at least a refusal<br />

to refute, the police brutality that<br />

was the source of the protests,”<br />

the Seattle Times reports.<br />

“The panel felt that ‘taking<br />

a knee’ or standing publicly<br />

against police brutality … was<br />

a show of support for fair and<br />

just policing, and something SPD<br />

officers should do without reservation,”<br />

the OIG found.<br />

Take knee...in the middle of a<br />

protest? Seriously?<br />

In all, the OIG panel offered 54<br />

recommendations in a 122-page<br />

critique of the department’s<br />

response to the first of what the<br />

panel identified as five distinct<br />

waves of riots and protests that<br />

rocked Seattle during the summer<br />

and fall of 2020. The report<br />

focuses on the response to the<br />

first three days of demonstrations<br />

downtown, May 29-June 1, when<br />

officers used pepper-spray, tear<br />

gas, batons and other weapons<br />

against thousands of protesters<br />

after vandals in the crowd broke<br />

windows, looted, and stole guns<br />

from patrol vehicles before burning<br />

them.<br />

The OIG specifically stated the department<br />

should move away from<br />

the concepts of “crowd control”<br />

and “crowd management” to one<br />

of “crowd facilitation and crowd<br />

safety.”<br />

Ok these people are just frickin<br />

crazy. This OIG panel is comprised<br />

of a bunch of nut jobs that have no<br />

idea what it’s like to be surrounded<br />

by thousands of angry protestors<br />

and quite frankly they aren’t going<br />

to give a shit about whether or not<br />

you agree with their cause. If you’re<br />

wearing a police uniform, they hate<br />

you and they want to hurt you, because<br />

you stand for everything they<br />

are against. Once again Seattle, you<br />

win this month’s Light Bulb Award<br />

by a landslide. Keep up the good<br />

work and try for another.<br />

heelllloo nneeiighboor<br />

H I N K I N G S E L L I N G ?<br />

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JAMIE MCMARTIN GROUP?<br />

____________________________________________________________<br />

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281.505.4747<br />

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90 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 91


Supporting the Mental<br />

Health of our Corrections<br />

Officers: A Call to Action<br />

As the <strong>2021</strong> Annual Texas Sheriff’s<br />

Association Conference<br />

is held in San Antonio in early<br />

August, I am utilizing this month’s<br />

column as a call for action for<br />

correctional administrators in<br />

the state and across the nation<br />

to examine the need for more<br />

comprehensive mental health<br />

programs and support for their<br />

officers. According to a National<br />

Institute of Justice paper (Ferdik<br />

and Smith, 2017) titled “Correctional<br />

Officer Safety and Wellness-What<br />

We Learned from the<br />

Research Literature”, correctional<br />

officers experience high stress<br />

levels, burnout, and a variety<br />

of other mental health-related<br />

consequences as a result of<br />

their jobs. The combination of<br />

the negative physical and mental<br />

health for correctional officers<br />

can also have harmful effects on<br />

the wider jail institution. Between<br />

COVID and difficult working<br />

conditions, staffing shortages<br />

now consistently exist with low<br />

officer-to-inmate ratios and high<br />

turnover rates in staffing which<br />

can threaten a correctional facility’s<br />

ability to implement appropriate<br />

security measures.<br />

Both police and corrections<br />

officers experience similar issues<br />

including but not limited to<br />

constantly rotating work shifts,<br />

irregular sleep patterns, exposure<br />

to trauma and violence, and the<br />

challenges of family-work-life<br />

balance. These problems can<br />

contribute to increased stress<br />

levels, physical problems such as<br />

heart disease and diabetes, and<br />

the increased risk of suicide and<br />

domestic violence. However, far<br />

more law enforcement agencies<br />

have focused their attention and<br />

funding resources on assisting<br />

police rather than correctional<br />

officers. Many jail institutions lack<br />

appropriate mental health counseling<br />

for their correctional officers<br />

and much of this deficit can<br />

be attributed to difficulties in locating<br />

adequately trained clinical<br />

providers who are knowledgeable<br />

about best practices related<br />

to correctional mental health.<br />

Specialized training programs in<br />

corrections mental health should<br />

be developed and encouraged in<br />

graduate programs for mental<br />

health professionals. Additionally,<br />

both internal and external<br />

programs and policies designed<br />

to address these issues are absolutely<br />

critical in improving the<br />

overall psychological health of<br />

corrections officers and perhaps<br />

these lessons can be borrowed<br />

from police practices. Simply put,<br />

DR. TINA JAECKLE<br />

do not reinvent the wheel.<br />

One well known strategy that<br />

could be implemented to manage<br />

correctional officer stress is the<br />

establishment of peer support<br />

programs and it should be noted<br />

that there are a number of correctional<br />

agencies nationwide<br />

that have adopted this technique.<br />

Peer-support programs recruit<br />

workforce colleagues who can<br />

offer emotional and social support<br />

to those who may have experienced<br />

traumatic events, both<br />

on and off the job. These peers<br />

offer support and education to<br />

their colleagues to help them<br />

cope with the consequences of<br />

their stressors. However, in my<br />

experience over the last two decades<br />

training countless law enforcement<br />

critical incident stress<br />

management and peer support<br />

teams, I have directly observed<br />

that the emphasis for programs is<br />

often placed on the mental health<br />

needs of police rather than correctional<br />

officers. Although there<br />

are events that can occur in the<br />

jail setting that can be considered<br />

traumatic for most (inmate<br />

suicide, attack on an officer, etc.)<br />

some are frequently overlooked<br />

or not assessed as a reason to<br />

activate a peer support team.<br />

These policies must be re-evaluated.<br />

Recently I was provided the<br />

privilege to train a group of specially<br />

selected correctional officers<br />

who work at the Lake County<br />

Sheriff’s Office (Florida) jail<br />

facility. While we already have<br />

an established critical incident<br />

stress management and peer<br />

support team there was a glaring<br />

absence of members solely from<br />

corrections. Although one CISM<br />

team can be comprised of peer<br />

members from police, dispatch,<br />

and corrections, true peer to peer<br />

support is most effective when<br />

there is a more comprehensive<br />

understanding of the job responsibilities<br />

of each role. In other<br />

words, much like police to police<br />

peers, correctional officers supporting<br />

other corrections officers<br />

simply makes sense. With the<br />

assistance of Lake County Sheriff’s<br />

Office Chaplains Jason Low<br />

and Jim Cornell, we have now<br />

created a best practices model<br />

though a specific “jail” team to<br />

focus solely on corrections. It<br />

is important to note that these<br />

programs cannot exist without<br />

full endorsement and recognition<br />

of the administration and com-<br />

Congratulations to<br />

Alan Helfman<br />

on your<br />

Lifetime<br />

Achievement Award<br />

PROUD SUPPORTER OF THE BLUES<br />

FOR OVER 36 YEARS<br />

mand staff. Lake County Sheriff<br />

(FL) Peyton Grinnell shared his<br />

thoughts on the new team, “The<br />

purpose of this new peer support<br />

program is quite simple. We recognize<br />

the<br />

To<br />

inherent stress associated<br />

with the environment that<br />

our correctional officers work<br />

in, and we want to give them the<br />

tools and resources they need to<br />

effectively deal with that stress.<br />

Our goal is for them to stay<br />

healthy and enjoy a long, successful<br />

career here.” I encourage<br />

you to recognize that both police<br />

and corrections officers provide<br />

an essential role in our criminal<br />

justice system and should receive<br />

equally appropriate mental<br />

health support.<br />

HELFMAN’S<br />

RIVER OAKS CHRYSLER<br />

JEEP • DODGE • RAM • CHRYSLER • FORD<br />

FIAT • ALFA ROMEO • MASERATI<br />

92 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 93


unning 4 heroes<br />

Total Miles Run in <strong>2021</strong>: (as of 7/31/21): 190<br />

Total Miles Run in 2020: 401<br />

Total Miles Run in 2019: <strong>37</strong>6<br />

Overall Miles Run: 967<br />

<strong>2021</strong> Run Stats:<br />

Total Miles Run for <strong>2021</strong> fallen LEO’s (<strong>No</strong>n COVID-19): 91<br />

Total Miles Run for <strong>2021</strong> fallen Firefighters (<strong>No</strong>n COVID-19): 39<br />

Total Miles Run for <strong>2021</strong> fallen COVID-19 Heroes: 18<br />

Total Miles Run for <strong>2021</strong> fallen Canada LEO’s: 2<br />

Total Miles Run for <strong>2021</strong> <strong>No</strong>n Line of Duty Deaths: 0<br />

Total Miles Run for 2020 Fallen LEO’s: 24<br />

Total Miles Run for 2020 Fallen Firefighters: 6<br />

Total Miles Run for 2020/<strong>2021</strong> Fallen K9’s: 0<br />

Total Tribute Runs by State for <strong>2021</strong>: 10<br />

States/Cities Zechariah has run in:<br />

Zechariah<br />

Cartledge:<br />

a True American Hero<br />

Florida - Winter Springs, Lake Mary, Clearwater, Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, Orlando, Temple Terrace, Blountstown, Cocoa,<br />

Lakeland, Daytona Beach, West Palm Beach<br />

New York - New York City<br />

Georgia - Cumming, Augusta, Savannah<br />

South Carolina - <strong>No</strong>rth Myrtle Beach, Charleston, Sumter<br />

Pennsylvania - Monaca<br />

Illinois - Springfield, Naperville, Glen Ellyn<br />

Texas - Houston (2), Fort Worth, Midland, New Braunfels, Freeport, Madisonville<br />

Kentucky - Nicholasville<br />

Arkansas - Bryant<br />

Nevada - Henderson<br />

California - Mt. Vernon<br />

Arizona - Mesa<br />

<strong>No</strong>rth Carolina - Concord<br />

Tennessee - Bristol<br />

Delaware - Milford<br />

Minnesota - Arden Hills<br />

Indiana - Sullivan, Spencer<br />

Missouri - Springfield<br />

Iowa - Independence, Des Moines, Cedar Rapids<br />

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emembering my hero ...<br />

... Fort Worth Officer Henry Nava, Jr.<br />

Concerns of Police Survivors is an organization whose mission is to help rebuild the<br />

shattered lives of those family members and co-workers of law enforcement officers<br />

that are killed in the line of duty. KayLeigh Nava bravely recounts the tragic death of<br />

her father, Fort Worth Officer Henry “Hank” Nava, Jr.<br />

I vividly remember the moment<br />

when I was wrapped in my<br />

mom’s arms and was told that<br />

there had been an accident, my<br />

dad had been shot and they did<br />

not think he was going to survive.<br />

I remember darkness, tears,<br />

as my mom hugged me tighter.<br />

I describe that moment today<br />

as feeling like a lamb going into<br />

the slaughterhouse – receiving<br />

the news that would change that<br />

nine-year old’s life forever.<br />

Before that moment, the day<br />

seemed like any other in my<br />

childhood. I woke up for school<br />

and got ready, rushing around<br />

the house until it was time to<br />

leave, in a hurry so much that<br />

I did not walk to say goodbye<br />

to my dad who was still sleeping.<br />

The day went in the normal<br />

way until dismissal time where I<br />

went home with my best friend<br />

instead of another family that<br />

we carpooled with at the time.<br />

Something I didn’t think anything<br />

of, I was just excited to go play<br />

Barbies with my friend. When<br />

her mom got home, she later<br />

pulled me aside and said my dad<br />

had been in an accident and that<br />

we were going to the hospital<br />

to see him. I still remember not<br />

thinking anything of this news,<br />

not being worried, because my<br />

dad always had made through<br />

any other injuries, not grasping<br />

the fact that his fate would not<br />

be the same this time around.<br />

When we got to the hospital<br />

there were police lights<br />

and news cameras. Our family<br />

friend was waiting for us at the<br />

hospital doors. He scooped me<br />

up onto his shoulders and we<br />

rode the elevator up to the ICU<br />

unit. When the doors opened,<br />

it seemed like everyone I knew<br />

and loved was there. This is the<br />

moment when I felt like a lamb,<br />

incidentally, waiving and smiling<br />

at everyone, not knowing the<br />

news that I was about to get.<br />

My dad and his team went to<br />

the suspect’s home to arrest<br />

him on a parole violation warrant.<br />

They were greeted at the<br />

door by a female who invited<br />

them inside the residence. The<br />

female allowed them to enter<br />

and search the trailer for the<br />

suspect after telling them that he<br />

was not currently at the location.<br />

As they entered the trailer,<br />

she loudly announced that “the<br />

police are here and are going to<br />

search the house.”<br />

My dad opened a bedroom<br />

door, and rounds of gunfire came<br />

from the suspect that was in the<br />

bedroom. He was shot just above<br />

the left eye. After the shooting,<br />

the man fled to a nearby home<br />

where he took a hostage and<br />

hours later surrendered to the<br />

police.<br />

The next few days were spent<br />

at the hospital. I remember<br />

spending time with my dad in<br />

his hospital room. On December<br />

1, 2005, my dad, Officer Henry<br />

“Hank” Nava Jr. died from the<br />

gunshot wounds. The moments<br />

and months that followed his<br />

death seem like clear blur in my<br />

memory. Some moments stand<br />

out, like walking with the honor<br />

guard at his visitation, seeing the<br />

mass of people who attended<br />

his funeral, and getting so excited<br />

to make cheese sandwiches<br />

for the officers who patrolled<br />

outside of our house during<br />

that time. Other moments are a<br />

blur, lost in my memory in what<br />

seems like another lifetime.<br />

The impact of losing my dad<br />

has touched every thread of my<br />

life, from the way I grew up to<br />

what I do in my life today. My<br />

dad was my hero, and my heart<br />

breaks for the moments with him<br />

that were taken away from me.<br />

I’ll be forever appreciative to the<br />

community in the Fort Worth<br />

Police Department of people<br />

who have walked beside and invested<br />

in my family since losing<br />

my dad. They were there during<br />

school performances, teaching<br />

me how to drive, cheering me<br />

on at graduations, and even a<br />

birthday parade during COVID. I<br />

chose to attend college at Texas<br />

Christian University, a dream I<br />

had ever since I was a little girl<br />

with my dad. The plan was he<br />

was going to work for the department<br />

on campus, so that I<br />

could attend. While everything<br />

did not go according to the plan,<br />

I felt him there through the other<br />

officers at TCU.<br />

My teachers were an integral<br />

part of my grief journey as<br />

school was always a safe place<br />

for me after losing my dad. Because<br />

of their impact, I majored<br />

in elementary<br />

education and<br />

am now a firstgrade<br />

teacher<br />

hoping to love<br />

and impact my<br />

students the<br />

same way my<br />

teachers once<br />

did for me. As<br />

a family, we<br />

honor my dad<br />

during the anniversary<br />

of his<br />

death through<br />

a blood drive<br />

where we can<br />

impact hundreds<br />

of lives<br />

through blood<br />

donation each<br />

year. I have felt<br />

his energy and<br />

spirit through<br />

all these encounters<br />

and<br />

we still to this day, get to connect<br />

with people who knew my<br />

dad and get to hear new stories.<br />

I’ve started calling these encounters<br />

a God wink – and I am ever<br />

thankful for all the “winks” I’ve<br />

received over the years.<br />

Through the 15 years since<br />

losing my dad, there have been<br />

moments of painful sorrow and<br />

moments of indescribable joy<br />

but there has been one constant,<br />

as I have navigated my grief<br />

journey – C.O.P.S., Concerns of<br />

Police Survivors. My first experience<br />

with C.O.P.S. was attending<br />

kid’s camp a few years after my<br />

dad passed away. At camp, we<br />

were connected with a counselor<br />

there who later went on to<br />

help me go through a process to<br />

meet with the man who killed<br />

my dad. I had questions for him,<br />

but most importantly, I wanted<br />

to forgive him. While it might<br />

be a decision that not everyone<br />

agrees with, I was grateful for<br />

the peace it brought me in my<br />

grief journey. I’ve stayed connected<br />

with my local chapter,<br />

Metroplex C.O.P.S throughout the<br />

years going to events and volunteering<br />

alongside my mom. I now<br />

serve on the board for my local<br />

chapter and love the connections<br />

that I get to make with my “blue<br />

96 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE<br />

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family” – others who have<br />

lost a loved one in the line of<br />

duty. I believe where there is<br />

great grief, there was great<br />

love. There is an automatic<br />

connection, or maybe bond is<br />

the better word, when getting<br />

to talk with people who also<br />

walked a similar path to you.<br />

We always say when our blue<br />

family is together – it is a club<br />

that we never wanted to be<br />

a part of, but a club I am so<br />

thankful to have. There is hope<br />

and healing through connecting<br />

with others and sharing our<br />

stories, and C.O.P.S. provides<br />

opportunities for the connections<br />

and relationships to start.<br />

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Detective<br />

Greg Ferency<br />

Terre Haute Police Department, Indiana<br />

End of Watch Wednesday, July 7, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Age 53 Tour 30 Years Badge # N/A<br />

Detective Greg Ferency was shot and killed outside of the FBI Indianapolis<br />

Resident Agency near the intersection of Wabash Court and First<br />

Street in Terre Haute at about 2:15 pm. A subject drove to the gate of<br />

the building and threw a Molotov cocktail at it. The man then confronted<br />

Detective Ferency and shot him as he came out of the building. Despite<br />

being wounded, Detective Ferency was able to return fire. An FBI agent<br />

also rushed outside and shot the subject, who then drove himself to a<br />

local hospital where he was taken into custody.<br />

Detective Ferency had served with the Terre Haute Police Department for<br />

30 years and was assigned to the FBI Task Force. He is survived by his<br />

two children, parents, and sister. Detective Ferency was posthumously<br />

awarded the Medal of Honor and the Wounded in Combat medal by Terre<br />

Haute Police Department.<br />

Sergeant<br />

Joshua Blake Bartlett<br />

Lubbock County Sheriff’s Office, Texas<br />

Police Officer<br />

William Earl Collins, Jr.<br />

Doyline Police Department, Louisiana<br />

End of Watch Friday, July 9, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Age N/A Tour 10 Years Badge # N/A<br />

Police Officer Billy Collins was shot and killed while responding to a domestic<br />

disturbance call on Green Tree Street at about 6:00 pm. A subject in the home<br />

opened fire on him and two deputies from the Webster Parish Sheriff’s Office as<br />

they arrived on the scene. Officer Collins was struck in the head by one of the<br />

rounds. He was flown to Ochsner LSU Health where he succumbed to his wound<br />

about two hours later. The subject barricaded himself inside his home after the<br />

initial shooting. He was taken into custody at about 11:00 pm. The subject<br />

died on July 17, <strong>2021</strong>, from wounds sustained during the incident.<br />

Officer Collins served as a part-time police officer with the Doyline Police Department.<br />

He served as a full-time correctional supervisor with the Webster<br />

Parish Sheriff’s Office.<br />

Reserve Deputy Sheriff<br />

Tom Larry Hoobler<br />

Childress County Sheriff’s Office, Texas<br />

End of Watch Thursday, July 15, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Age 38 Tour N/A Badge # N/A<br />

Military Veteran<br />

Sergeant Josh Bartlett was shot and killed during a barricade at a home<br />

in the 1100 block of 10th Street in Levelland. Earlier in the morning, the<br />

subject had been stopped by a Texas Highway Patrol trooper for reckless<br />

driving and attempted to bait the officer into a confrontation. The subject<br />

returned home after the encounter and began walking around the neighborhood<br />

with a firearm at about 1:15 pm. When officers with the Levelland<br />

Police Department arrived, the man opened fire on him and then barricaded<br />

himself inside. The regional SWAT team was requested as the man randomly<br />

fired shots from the home. Sergeant Bartlett and three other members<br />

of the SWAT team were shot as they engaged the subject. Sergeant<br />

Bartlett was transported to Covenant Medical Center in Levelland where<br />

he succumbed to his wounds. Several other team members were wounded,<br />

one critically. Sergeant Bartlett was a U. S. Army veteran.<br />

End of Watch Saturday, July 17, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Age 74 Tour 18 Years Badge # 132<br />

Reserve Deputy Sheriff Tom Hoobler suffered a fatal heart attack shortly<br />

after directing traffic during an unusually hot and humid day at the Childress<br />

Old Settlers Rodeo parade.<br />

He had completed his traffic detail when he responded to assist with a<br />

disabled traffic trailer on U.S. 287 east of Childress. He passed away<br />

while sitting in his patrol car while waiting for a tow truck.<br />

Reserve Deputy Hoobler had served with the Childress County Sheriff’s<br />

Office for 18 years. He is survived by his wife, daughters, brother, grandchildren,<br />

and great-grandchildren.<br />

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Sergeant<br />

Jeremy Brown<br />

Clark County Sheriff’s Office, Washington<br />

End of Watch Friday, July 23, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Age 46 Tour 15 Years Badge N/A<br />

Military Veteran<br />

Sergeant Jeremy Brown was shot and killed while conducting surveillance<br />

at an apartment complex in the 3500 block of <strong>No</strong>rtheast 109th Avenue<br />

in Vancouver. He was approached by three people and was shot as he sat<br />

in his vehicle. Two subjects were arrested near the scene. The subject who<br />

shot Sergeant Brown was arrested by members of the United States<br />

Marshals Service on July 25th, <strong>2021</strong>, and charged with first-degree<br />

aggravated murder.<br />

Sergeant Brown had served with the Clark County Sheriff’s Office for 15<br />

years and was assigned to the Clark-Vancouver Drug Task Force. He was<br />

a U.S. Marine Corps veteran and had previously served with the Washington<br />

State Department of Corrections and the Missoula County Sheriff’s<br />

Office in Montana. Sergeant Brown was posthumously promoted to the<br />

rank of Sergeant.<br />

Police Officer<br />

Marquis Moorer<br />

Selma Police Department, Alabama<br />

End of Watch Tuesday, July 27, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Age 25 Tour N/A Badge #N/A<br />

Deputy Sheriff<br />

Phillip Campas<br />

Kern County Sheriff’s Office, California<br />

End of Watch Sunday, July 25, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Age 35 Tour N/A Badge # 1392<br />

Deputy Sheriff Phillip Campas was shot and killed during a barricade at a<br />

home near the intersection of 1st Street and Poplar Avenue in Wasco.<br />

Deputies had initially responded to the home for reports of a shooting<br />

at about 1:00 pm. A subject inside fired at the deputies and then barricaded<br />

himself in the home, prompting the agency’s SWAT team to be<br />

deployed. At about 3:00 pm the subject opened fire on members of the<br />

SWAT team as they approached the home. Deputy Campas and another<br />

deputy were struck by the gunfire. They were both transported to a local<br />

hospital where Deputy Campas succumbed to his wounds.<br />

The subject was shot and wounded when he exchanged more shots with<br />

the SWAT team at about 6:30 pm.<br />

Police Officer<br />

Ryan Bialke<br />

Red Lake Nation Police Department, Tribal Police<br />

End of Watch Tuesday, July 27, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Age <strong>37</strong> Tour 6 Years Badge 235<br />

Police Officer Marquis Moorer was shot and killed from ambush while<br />

stopping at his apartment for his meal break at about 4:00 am.<br />

He was approached by a subject who then opened fire on him outside of<br />

the building in the Selma Square Apartments. Officer Moorer suffered<br />

fatal gunshot wounds and his significant other was also wounded.<br />

Police Officer Ryan Bialke was shot and killed while responding to reports<br />

of a suicidal subject at home on Highway 1 one mile west of Redby. The<br />

subject opened fire and shot Officer Bialke as he arrived at the home. Officer<br />

Bialke was transported to the Indian Health Service Hospital where<br />

he succumbed to his wounds. The man then fled into the woods after<br />

shooting Officer Bialke but was apprehended a short time later.<br />

The subject fled the scene but was arrested the following day by members<br />

of the Alabama State Department of Investigation and the United<br />

Officer Bialke had served with the Red Lake Nation Police Department for<br />

States Marshals Service. The subject was subsequently charged with<br />

six years. He is survived by his wife and four children.<br />

two counts of capital murder and one count of attempted murder.<br />

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Trooper<br />

Micah May<br />

Nevada DPS- Nevada Highway Patrol, Nevada<br />

End of Watch Thursday, July 29, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Age 46 Tour 13 Years Badge # 6203<br />

Trooper Micah May succumbed to injuries sustained the previous day<br />

when he was struck by a fleeing vehicle on I-15 while deploying spike<br />

strips. Officers with the Nevada Division of Parole and Probation and<br />

other troopers had chased the stolen vehicle for approximately 20 miles.<br />

Trooper May was deploying spike strips on I-15, in the area of West<br />

Sahara Avenue in Las Vegas, when he was struck by the vehicle and went<br />

through the windshield. The subject was then shot and killed by other<br />

troopers as he reached for Trooper May’s service weapon. Trooper May<br />

was flown to University Medical Center where he succumbed to his injuries<br />

on July 29th, <strong>2021</strong>.<br />

Trooper May had served with the Nevada Highway Patrol for 13 years. He<br />

is survived by his wife of 13 years.<br />

Deputy Sheriff<br />

Courtney Couch<br />

Lane County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon<br />

Police Officer<br />

Lewis “Andy” Traylor<br />

Austin Police Department, Texas<br />

End of Watch Saturday, July 31, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Age N/A Tour 9 Years Badge # 7258<br />

Military Veteran<br />

Police Officer Andy Traylor succumbed to injuries sustained in a vehicle<br />

crash three days earlier while responding to an emergency call for service<br />

at about 2:10 am. He was traveling on FM 969 when a tractor-trailer<br />

attempted to make a U-turn in front of him at Decker Lane. Officer Traylor<br />

was unable to avoid a collision and his patrol car became pinned beneath<br />

the trailer. He was extricated from the vehicle and transported to a local<br />

hospital. He remained on life support and passed away on July 31st,<br />

<strong>2021</strong>, after his organs were donated.<br />

Officer Traylor was a U.S. Navy veteran and had served with the Austin<br />

Police Department for nine years. He is survived by his wife and five children.<br />

Supervisory Patrol Agent<br />

Daniel Cox<br />

Homeland Security - Customs and Border Protection -<br />

End of Watch Sunday, July 25, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Age 36 Tour 7 Years Badge #N/A<br />

Military Veteran<br />

Deputy Sheriff Courtney Couch drowned while attempting to rescue a<br />

child from Foster Reservoir in Linn County while off duty. She was paddle<br />

boarding with friends when she noticed a child, who was not known to her,<br />

in distress near the swimming area at Lewis Creek Park. She slipped off<br />

her paddleboard and went under the surface while attempting to rescue<br />

the child. Other bystanders were able to pull her from the water and performed<br />

CPR until medics arrived. She was pronounced dead a short time<br />

later. The child was rescued by other bystanders.<br />

End of Watch Saturday, July 31, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Age 52 Tour 24 Years Badge # B022<br />

Supervisory Border Patrol Agent Dan Cox was killed in a vehicle crash near<br />

milepost 128 on State Route 86 near Sells, Arizona, at about 12:20<br />

am.<br />

Agent Cox’s patrol vehicle and another vehicle collided head-on. Agent<br />

Cox and the driver of the other vehicle were both killed in the crash.<br />

Agent Cox had served with the United States Border Patrol for 24<br />

years.<br />

Deputy Couch was a U.S. Army veteran and had served with the Lane<br />

County Sheriff’s Office for seven years. She is survived by her husband<br />

and son.<br />

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Yes, you read correctly. Mr. Outdoors - Rusty Barron has checked out and left on<br />

vacation for the Colorado Mountains. But don’t despair, our own Rex Evans also<br />

stepped out on vacation and filed this report from the deck of Carnival Cruise Lines.<br />

We’ve all<br />

endured this<br />

previous 18-<br />

20 months<br />

together.<br />

Many of<br />

us, have<br />

lost family<br />

or friends.<br />

People we’ve known, worked with<br />

and grown up with have passed<br />

away.<br />

Our country and the entire world<br />

has suffered, sacrificed, and endured<br />

the trials, troubles, and<br />

tribulations each of us and our<br />

loved ones have endured, has been<br />

enormous.<br />

Most of us, never stopped working.<br />

We kept doing what had to be<br />

done. Because had we not, things<br />

would’ve been worse. Much worse.<br />

Thus, this Fourth of July, I saw<br />

that Carnival Cruise Lines was going<br />

to have their “Maiden Return Voyage”<br />

as the binds and layers of the<br />

past year began to peel away.<br />

Well friend, I’m on that very<br />

cruise. I knew history would be<br />

in the making and, being an avid<br />

“cruiser,” I desperately wanted to be<br />

a part of this historical event.<br />

I wanted to not only experience<br />

this journey, but I wanted to share it<br />

for those who could not. I wanted to<br />

express how humbled and grateful<br />

I truly am, to be here on this beautiful,<br />

completely brightly repainted,<br />

clean ship.<br />

The morning in Galveston at the<br />

Old Pier was truly “magical” in every<br />

sense. Bright smiles, tears of joy<br />

and embracing of one another was<br />

very emotional to witness.<br />

There was a press conference, of<br />

course. This was after<br />

all, a world history<br />

kind of story. Big news<br />

as it were and, it was<br />

not lost on anyone<br />

present.<br />

As we walked<br />

through the doors onto<br />

this beautiful ship, the<br />

smiles and welcoming<br />

demeanor of the<br />

crew made everyone<br />

feel truly, very special.<br />

We could all feel that<br />

this was a very special<br />

moment in time.<br />

This morning, July<br />

4th, <strong>2021</strong>, the profound,<br />

symbolic and dynamic<br />

emotion of “freedom”<br />

could be felt throughout<br />

this great ship.<br />

Everyone appreciated<br />

the fact that we were<br />

here. Reduced capacity<br />

made things a bit<br />

surreal, true enough.<br />

But one step at a time<br />

is probably a smart move.<br />

I’ll close with this; our Nation’s<br />

Freedom has been tested by fire and<br />

many a life has been lost since it’s<br />

very inception. This past year or so<br />

was no exception.<br />

We’ve watched our country and<br />

the world in fact, change. Whether<br />

for better or worse, is not for<br />

my debate today. For I know this<br />

fact for sure, for the first time in a<br />

long time, I was able to enjoy the<br />

“freedom” to step foot on this ship,<br />

leaving many a trouble and worry<br />

behind, even if for only a few days.<br />

Freedom has always had high<br />

price. What we’ve all sacrificed<br />

this past year was no different. Our<br />

freedom had never been tested in this<br />

way before, really.<br />

This cruise, this trip, this moment<br />

in time on this very special day was<br />

just one more re-affirming step forward<br />

to ensuring America isn’t going<br />

anywhere. We’re still here. We’re still<br />

strong. We’re still one of the greatest<br />

societies in World History.<br />

Much like this cruise, the things we<br />

once took for granted, aren’t taken so<br />

lightly, anymore. God bless our country,<br />

Texas, and our Thin Blue Line.<br />

May God above continue to watch<br />

over us and keep us safe underneath<br />

the beautiful canopy of Heaven above.<br />

Message from HPOU President<br />

As President of the organization, I<br />

get all the negative feedback from<br />

members regarding ever aspect of the<br />

department as well as the HPOU. I<br />

often get frustrated when people come<br />

in and make comments without knowing<br />

what we really do here. I recently<br />

had an officer come in and ask exactly<br />

what his dues go for every month?<br />

Believe it or not, I appreciate people<br />

coming in and asking questions, and<br />

actually take an interest in what the<br />

organization does for them. I could tell<br />

he was frustrated, and this interaction<br />

give me the opportunity to show what<br />

we actually do (and brag a little). We<br />

spoke for almost an hour, and I believe<br />

that he was satisfied with what I had<br />

to say and felt more comfortable when<br />

he left. But our conversation made me<br />

realize that we do not do a very good<br />

job talking about the good things we<br />

are doing here at YOUR union, but that<br />

is about to change…..<br />

I never expected to be in this position,<br />

but I believe that the good Lord<br />

puts you where he wants you when he<br />

wants you there. I am blessed to be<br />

here representing the members of the<br />

Houston Police Officers’ Union and will<br />

always do so to the best of my ability.<br />

This being said, it is important to note<br />

that the HPOU does not run the Houston<br />

Police Department. Our job is to keep<br />

the leadership in check and most often<br />

this is done through arbitration or negotiation.<br />

But both are always done after<br />

a decision is made and moved on by<br />

the leadership of the department. We<br />

will always fight the battles that we<br />

are legally able to fight. I do my best to<br />

always work with the leadership of the<br />

department but there are times when<br />

we will just not agree. I have had<br />

more than one shouting match with the<br />

Chief and I am confident that there will<br />

be more. As most know, we are not<br />

paid at the union, and we volunteer to<br />

do this job, so I can’t complain about<br />

dealing with people who don’t like us<br />

for whatever reason. I know that I will<br />

DOUGLAS GRIFFITH<br />

never make everyone happy but I will<br />

always do what’s best for the officers,<br />

the organization, and the department.<br />

<strong>No</strong>w back to what you get for your<br />

money from the HPOU. First is legal<br />

protection. We have four full time<br />

attorneys and 4 contract attorneys for<br />

conflict cases. (no you do not get to<br />

pick your attorney, as we have to fairly<br />

distribute the workload). You also get<br />

representation work done by me, Tim<br />

Whitaker, Ken Nealy, Tom Hayes, and<br />

our Executive Director, Ray Hunt. We<br />

often make deals that help officers with<br />

discipline, work issues, workers comp,<br />

and insurance issues. It should be noted<br />

that we have spent a lot of money to<br />

represent the Harding Street officers<br />

and the Gazin Street officers and will<br />

continue to spend whatever it takes to<br />

give them the proper representation.<br />

In July, I went out on 4 officer involved<br />

shootings, not because I have to,<br />

but because I believe that it is important.<br />

I worked 229 hours in the Month<br />

of July to further the mission of this<br />

organization, PIP meeting, town hall<br />

meetings, wherever I can talk about<br />

what we do or what we need. I keep<br />

detailed notes on time that I work and<br />

want people to know that I do not do<br />

it for recognition, I do it because I care<br />

about my brothers and sisters here in<br />

this department. Our officers are the<br />

best in the nation, and I do my best to<br />

let everyone know it!<br />

Other areas important to know is<br />

how we fight in Austin to kill bad bills<br />

what would affect our membership.<br />

We had no less than 20 bills this session<br />

that would have killed our ability<br />

to effectively do police work in Texas.<br />

Everything from removing qualified<br />

immunity, to making it a crime for<br />

an officer not acting against another<br />

officer who may have been accused of<br />

using excessive force on a scene. Ray<br />

worked in Austin during the entire session<br />

watching bills and meeting with<br />

legislators to stop these bad bills.<br />

Another area beneficial to membership<br />

is the insurance arm of the organization.<br />

Most are not even aware that<br />

as a benefit of membership, they can<br />

get partial reimbursement on Dr visits<br />

and prescriptions, and everyone has a<br />

disability benefit should you be out for<br />

over a week for an accident on or off<br />

duty. As a benefit of membership, you<br />

are a member of the State and National<br />

Fraternal Order of Police, and we<br />

have your membership card here at<br />

the HPOU. Another benefit that we are<br />

pushing is the Internet Scrubbing service.<br />

We pay for that service for each<br />

of our members and if you have not<br />

done it, please come down and sign up.<br />

I know that this is a lot of information,<br />

but I want members to know that<br />

the entire Board of Directors work hard<br />

for the membership. I have put it out<br />

that members can call me or email me<br />

anytime, as my number and email address<br />

is on the app, in the calendar, and<br />

on the website. Please do not hesitate<br />

to contact me if you have question or<br />

need some clarification on rumors. Also,<br />

start looking for our weekly “rumor<br />

control” emails to be coming out soon.<br />

I want to thank each and every one of<br />

you for your hard work. Stay safe and<br />

keep up the good work!<br />

106 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 107


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ADS BACK IN THE DAY<br />

112 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 113


114 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE<br />

The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 115


City of Onalaska Get Info Telecommunicator 09/12/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Prairie View A&M University Police Dept. Get Info Peace Officer 09/30/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Oak Ridge <strong>No</strong>rth Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 09/14/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Hemphill County Sheriff’s Office Get Info Peace Officer 09/10/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

La Porte Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 09/21/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Briscoe County Sheriff's Office Get Info Peace Officer 08/31/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Fair Oaks Ranch Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 10/10/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Haltom City Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/19/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Frisco Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 10/07/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Bruceville-Eddy Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/31/<strong>2021</strong> - 12pm<br />

Waco Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/31/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Cibolo Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 09/19/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Seagraves Police Department Get Info Chief of Police 08/27/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

City of Bay Get Info Peace Officer 08/15/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Highland Village Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/08/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

City of Center Get Info Peace Officer 09/23/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

City of Bryan Get Info Deputy City Marshal 08/08/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

City of Brownwood Get Info Peace Officer 09/15/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Ingram Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/08/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Kosse Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 09/24/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Plano Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 10/30/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Weatherford College Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/31/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

TSTC Get Info Peace Officer 08/07/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Sam Houston State University Police Dept.<br />

Eastland Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/07/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

The Woodlands Campus Get Info Peace Officer 09/20/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Walker County Sheriff's Office Get Info Peace Officer 08/09/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Sunset Valley Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 10/01/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Naples Police Department Get Info Chief of Police 08/09/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Denton County Water District Police Dept. Get Info Peace Officer 09/27/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

City of Texas City Fire Department Get Info Fire Marshal 08/05/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Sterling County Sheriff's Office Get Info Peace Officer 08/10/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

<strong>No</strong>rth Central Texas College Get Info Peace Officer 08/11/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Loving County Sheriffs Office Get Info School Resource Officer 08/11/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

NEW - STATEWIDE VACANCIES FOR JAILERS<br />

Daingerfield Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/14/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Denton County Sheriff's Office Get Info Jailer 12/20/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Salado Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/06/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Hunt County Sheriff's Office Get Info Jailer 08/08/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Hamilton County Sheriff's Office Get Info Peace Officer 09/15/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Mills County Sheriff’s Office Get Info Jailer 08/08/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Memorial Villages Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/16/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Dallas County Sheriff’s Departmen Get Info Jailer 08/21/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Cleveland ISD PD Get Info Peace Officer 08/16/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Polk County Sheriff's Office Get Info Jailer 08/27/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Alief ISD Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/13/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Bosque County Sheriff's Office Get Info Jailer 09/18/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Ingleside Police Department Get Info Patrol Captain 08/15/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Bell County Sheriff's Office Get Info Jailer 09/14/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Ingleside Police Department Get Info School Resource Officer 08/15/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Tarrant County Sheriff's Office Get Info Jailer 09/21/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Ingleside Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/15/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Ingleside Police Department Get Info Peace Officer (Motor) 08/15/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Clifton Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 07/31/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Killeen Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/22/<strong>2021</strong> - 11pm<br />

City of Denton Get Info Telecommunicator 08/22/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Attention<br />

JOIN OUR TEAM<br />

Horseshoe Bay Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 10/01/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

WALKER COUNTY<br />

Brazos River Authority Get Info Peace Officer 08/31/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Recruiters<br />

Stinnett Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/31/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

SHERIFF’S DEPT.<br />

South San Antonio ISD Get Info Peace Officer 08/30/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Swisher County Sheriff’s Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/30/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Run your<br />

Stratford Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/30/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

College of the Mainland Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/26/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Travis County Fire Marshal's Office Get Info Deputy Fire Marshal II 08/30/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm Recruiting Ad in<br />

Travis County Fire Marshal's Office Get Info Deputy Fire Marshal III 08/30/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Dalhart Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 08/30/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Polk County Sheriff's Office Get Info Deputy Sheriff Patrol 08/27/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm The BLUES for a<br />

The Walker County Sheriff’s Department is now accepting applications for the position of Patrol Deputy. We are a family based department that is dedicated to<br />

Wise County Sheriff’s Office Get Info Peace Officer 09/02/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

preserving the lives and property of the citizens of Walker County which is currently around 73,000 residents. As a Patrol Deputy within our department, you would<br />

be patrolling over 800 square miles of small towns, national forest and East Texas countryside. Our county seat is the town of Huntsville, Texas which has many of<br />

Port Houston Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 09/30/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

the comforts and amenities of larger city while still providing a small town atmosphere.<br />

One Time Fee of<br />

Childress County Sheriff's Office Get Info Peace Officer 09/07/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Perks:<br />

Kaufman Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 09/07/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

• Starting Salary: $55,160.00<br />

• Retirement: Vested after 8 years in TCDRS. Every $1 invested in retirement is matched 210%.<br />

TJC Police Department Get Info Peace Officer 09/05/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

• Insurance provider: Blue Cross Blue Shield<br />

ONLY $250.<br />

• Equipment: Uniforms & Patrol Equipment Provided. Currently issuing Glock 22’s and Colt SBR Rifles.<br />

Bosque County Sheriff's Office Get Info Peace Officer 09/18/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

• Vehicles: Take home Chevy Tahoe • Schedule: 12 hour shifts, every other weekend off.<br />

• Time Off: Paid Vacation / Holidays on a yearly basis. • Patrol Style: Proactive /Community Based Policing<br />

City of Hurst Get Info Peace Officer 8/26/<strong>2021</strong> - 5pm<br />

Requirements: Must be TCLOE Certified; Must have a valid Texas Drivers License;<br />

116 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE<br />

Must pass a written & physical test; Must complete a rigorous Field Training Program in a timely manner.<br />

The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 117<br />

APPLICATIONS CAN BE SUBMITTED ON THE WALKER COUNTY WEBSITE (WWW.CO.WALKER.TX.US) OR BY CONTACTING PATROL LT. JASON SULLIVAN (936) 435-2400.


JOIN OUR TEAM<br />

WALKER COUNTY<br />

SHERIFF’S DEPT.<br />

The Walker County Sheriff’s Department is now accepting applications for the position of Patrol Deputy. We are a family based department that is dedicated to<br />

preserving the lives and property of the citizens of Walker County which is currently around 73,000 residents. As a Patrol Deputy within our department, you would<br />

be patrolling over 800 square miles of small towns, national forest and East Texas countryside. Our county seat is the town of Huntsville, Texas which has many of<br />

the comforts and amenities of larger city while still providing a small town atmosphere.<br />

Perks:<br />

• Starting Salary: $55,160.00<br />

• Retirement: Vested after 8 years in TCDRS. Every $1 invested in retirement is matched 210%.<br />

• Insurance provider: Blue Cross Blue Shield<br />

• Equipment: Uniforms & Patrol Equipment Provided. Currently issuing Glock 22’s and Colt SBR Rifles.<br />

• Vehicles: Take home Chevy Tahoe • Schedule: 12 hour shifts, every other weekend off.<br />

• Time Off: Paid Vacation / Holidays on a yearly basis. • Patrol Style: Proactive /Community Based Policing<br />

Requirements: Must be TCLOE Certified; Must have a valid Texas Drivers License;<br />

Must pass a written & physical test; Must complete a rigorous Field Training Program in a timely manner.<br />

118 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 119<br />

APPLICATIONS CAN BE SUBMITTED ON THE WALKER COUNTY WEBSITE (WWW.CO.WALKER.TX.US) OR BY CONTACTING PATROL LT. JASON SULLIVAN (936) 435-2400.


ALDINE ISD POLICE DEPT.<br />

now accepting applications for<br />

Dispatch Supervisor<br />

Salary starting at $47,211<br />

Dispatchers<br />

Salary starting at $32,<strong>37</strong>3<br />

EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS<br />

• Paid Vacation<br />

• Sick Leave<br />

• Paid Holidays<br />

• Personal Days<br />

• Compensatory Days<br />

• Certification Pay<br />

TO APPLY VISIT<br />

WWW.ALDINEISD.ORG<br />

OR<br />

Contact the Personnel<br />

Department at<br />

281-985-7571<br />

OR<br />

Contact Sergeant R. Hall at<br />

281-442-4923<br />

HIRING PROCESS<br />

• Oral Board Panel Interview<br />

• Complete Personal History Statement<br />

• Psychological Evaluation<br />

• Medical Examination<br />

• Interview with the Chief of Police<br />

Memorial Villages Police Department<br />

Bunker Hill • Piney Point• Hunters Creek<br />

Police Officer<br />

EOE/M/F/D<br />

5+ Years Patrol Experience Required<br />

The Memorial Villages Police Department (Located on the West Side of Houston) currently has<br />

openings for experienced officers who are self- motivated and enthusiastic about community<br />

policing. We have overwhelming support of our communities and encourage our officers to be<br />

proactive and innovative.<br />

$1500 Sign on Bonus<br />

Starting Salary Range<br />

$71,179 – $82,808 (DOQ)<br />

• Healthcare Insurance, DHMO Dental, Vision – 100% paid for employee, 50% for<br />

spouse/dependents.<br />

• Paid long-term disability and life insurance for employee, with additional life insurance<br />

available for spouse/dependents.<br />

• Health Savings Account with departmental contributions up to $4200 annually<br />

• TMRS Retirement 2 to 1 match, 7% Employee ,14% Employer Contribution.<br />

• 457 Plan with employer contribution of 2% of annual salary<br />

• Bi-Lingual Pay (2.5% of Base salary)<br />

• Shift Differential Pay $3600 annually<br />

• Tuition reimbursement<br />

• Longevity Pay up to a max of $2400 annually at 10 years of service.<br />

• College Education incentive up to $3000 for a master’s degree<br />

• LEMIT or FBI NA pay $1200 annually.<br />

• ECA (Emergency Care Assistant) $1300 Annually, training provided to each employee.<br />

• 12 hour shifts with every other Friday, Saturday, and Sunday off.<br />

• Officer certification pay, Intermediate, Advanced, and Master up to 7.5% of Salary.<br />

To learn more or apply, visit our website at www.mvpdtx.org<br />

Or contact Sgt. Owens 713-365-<strong>37</strong>11 or lowens@mvpdtx.org<br />

Or Commander E. Jones 713-365-<strong>37</strong>06 ejones@mvpdtx.org<br />

11981 Memorial Dr. Houston, Texas 77024<br />

120 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 121


MAKE A<br />

DIFFERENCE<br />

IN YOUR<br />

COMMUNITY<br />

We are looking for outstanding individuals to<br />

join our team! As a Pearland Police Officer your<br />

mission will be to prevent crime and disorder, build<br />

partnerships within the community, and positively<br />

impact the quality of life for all our residents.<br />

CITY OF PEARLAND, TEXAS<br />

• Competitive Salary • Outstanding Training<br />

• Career Advancement • Exceptional Benefits<br />

The City of Pearland is one of the fastest growing<br />

communities within the region. Pearland is located<br />

approximately 20 minutes south of Downtown Houston<br />

and the current population is approximately 130,000<br />

residents.<br />

JOIN OUR TEAM<br />

HIRING POLICE OFFICERS AND CADETS<br />

$5,000 Hiring Incentive for T.C.O.L.E Certified Police<br />

Officers who qualify with at least 2 years of experience.<br />

TEST DATE:<br />

SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 8:30 A.M.<br />

Register by: April 12.<br />

Pearland Recreation Center & Natatorium<br />

4141 Bailey Road, Pearland, TX 77584.<br />

Doors Open: 7:15 a.m. <strong>No</strong> admittance after 7:45 a.m.<br />

Candidates must park in the north parking lot.<br />

SOCIAL DISTANCING MEASURES WILL APPLY<br />

• Attendance limited to first 150 arrivals<br />

• Mandatory temperature checks<br />

• Masks required, hand sanitizer available<br />

• Candidates seated 6 feet apart<br />

<br />

<br />

•Be a citizen of the nited tates able to read,<br />

write, and speak the English language<br />

• Have a high school diploma or equivalency certificate .E.. certified by<br />

the issuing agency with:<br />

0 credit hours with a cumulative PA of 2.0 or higher on a .0 scale from an accredited<br />

institute of higher learning or<br />

- Minimum 24 months of active duty service with an honorable discharge authenticated by<br />

a Member 2 or Member orm 21 or<br />

15 credit hours with a cumulative PA of 2.0 or higher on a .0 scale in addition to Basic<br />

Peace Officer Certification from TCOLE or<br />

An Intermediate Peace Officer Certification from TCOLE<br />

• Valid driver’s license with acceptable driving record<br />

• Must meet all legal requirements necessary to become a licensed Peace Officer by the Texas<br />

Commission on Law Enforcement TCOLE.<br />

• Be between 21 and 5 years of age at the time of the examination or<br />

• Be between 18 and 21 years of age if the applicant has received an associate’s degree or 60<br />

semester hours of credit from an accredited college or university or has received an honorable<br />

discharge from the armed forces of the nited tates after at least two years of active service.<br />

: Cadet $1. hourly Police Officer $2. hourly.<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

April 12, <strong>2021</strong>. Applications will not be accepted after this date.<br />

Submit applications online by visiting pearlandtx.gov/careers.<br />

THE CITY OF PEARLAND IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER<br />

pecial accommodations are available when necessary to aord equal opportunity to participate<br />

in testing. Please make request in writing, five business days prior to the test date to City of<br />

Pearland, HR Department, 3519 Liberty Drive, Pearland, TX 77581.<br />

or questions regarding the application process please contact Terene uddsohnson at<br />

281.652.1617 or hr@pearlandtx.gov.<br />

List will remain in eect for one 1 year or until exhausted, whichever is sooner.<br />

122 The For BLUES additional POLICE information MAGAZINE and to register for an upcoming Civil Service Exam, visit<br />

The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 123<br />

pearlandtx.gov/PDCareers


Montgomery<br />

County Pct. 4<br />

Constable's<br />

Office<br />

full-time<br />

&<br />

reserve<br />

COME JOIN US!<br />

great retirement &<br />

great insurance<br />

Advancement Opportunities: Criminal<br />

Investigations - Special Response Team - Honor<br />

Guard - Special Response Group - Swift Water<br />

Rescue Team - K9 - Mounted Patrol - Drone team<br />

overtime opportunities: step - dwi<br />

enforcement - special teams - evidence - jp<br />

security<br />

Stipend Pay: k9 - specialist - fto deputy<br />

paid time off: holiday - vacation - comp time -<br />

personal - paid training<br />

salary - step pay slotted based on tcole full-time years of<br />

service:<br />

Under 2 yrs - $48,755.20 9 Yrs - $59,508.80<br />

2 Yrs - $51,188.80 12 Yrs - $61,150.40<br />

4 Yrs - $53,726.40 15 Yrs - $65,270.40<br />

6 Yrs - $56,368.00 16+ Yrs - $68,536.0<br />

license certification (up to $3599) and longevity pay<br />

civil service protected<br />

LATERAL DEPUTY<br />

MORE INFO:<br />

Constable Kenneth "Rowdy" Hayden<br />

Pickup and complete applicant in 1.<br />

person.<br />

questionnaire<br />

Pct. 4 Constable, Montgomery County, TX<br />

assessment, 2.<br />

written exam<br />

Firearms qualification, fitness<br />

21130 personality Hwy assessment 59 scheduled.<br />

Ste. C New Caney, TX and 77357<br />

www.mcco4.org - 281.577.8985 -<br />

candidates 3.<br />

passing Successfully personal<br />

receive will<br />

@mcconstablepct4<br />

book.<br />

history<br />

124 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 125<br />

board.<br />

4. Oral


Come join the Plano Police Department<br />

Plano Police Department currently employs over 414 peace officers, who are dedicated individuals that<br />

work with the community to create and maintain a safe, secure environment for our residents and visitors.<br />

We are a diverse department, which is a reflection of the various cultures within the community, and offering<br />

many different opportunities to promote the safety of the citizens which we serve.<br />

Registration Deadline:<br />

Friday, July 30, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Register at:<br />

https://www.plano.gov/1183/Employment<br />

The Plano Police Department will conduct<br />

a Civil Service Examination in order to<br />

establish an eligibility list for the position<br />

of Entry-level Police Officer. The eligibility<br />

list is created as a result of this examination<br />

and application process will remain in effect<br />

for a period of (6) months (beginning<br />

on date of test) or until the list has been<br />

exhausted, whichever occurs first.<br />

For more information:<br />

Contact the Plano Police recruiter<br />

Officer Andrae Smith at:<br />

andraes@plano.gov<br />

or go to our website at:<br />

ppdrecruiting@plano.gov<br />

126 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 127


128 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 129

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