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GATEWAY TO THE<br />

<strong>Winter</strong><br />

2021 FREE


2<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


Table of Contents<br />

Welcome to the<br />

<strong>Winter</strong> <strong>2022</strong><br />

Edition of <strong>Gateway</strong><br />

Safford, Clifton<br />

Clifton Hotel offers a touch of the late 1800s ... ... ...4<br />

Adventure Awaits You in Clifton, Arizona ... ... ... ...5<br />

Safford Old Time Fiddle Contest returns.. ... ... ... ...7<br />

Ginaveve’s: From courthouse to coffee house.. ... ...8<br />

Apache Junction<br />

Superstition Mountain Museum’s Free Lectures .. .10<br />

Looking Back: Picturing the trail.. ... ... ... ... ... ... .15<br />

San Carlos<br />

Apache Clan Project continues . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .12<br />

Globe<br />

1916 Historic Globe Train Depot.. ... ... ... ... ... ... .17<br />

Sitting for the camera in early Globe ... ... ... ... ... .24<br />

Globe Rotary Dominion Royale ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .25<br />

Map ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...20, 21<br />

Queen Creek<br />

Golf Benefit for Queen Valley Fire Department ... .22<br />

Superior<br />

Boyce Thompson Arboretum ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .30<br />

Miami<br />

Bullion Plaza Museum exhibit.. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .32<br />

Roosevelt<br />

Building a destination spot on Roosevelt Lake. ... .34<br />

Young<br />

A bridge less traveled ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .36<br />

Local photographers submit winter images .. ...23, 37<br />

Antiques, art and more.. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .39<br />

Arizona Silver Belt<br />

PO Box 31<br />

298 N. Pine St.<br />

Copper Country<br />

News<br />

PO Box 1692<br />

298 N. Pine St.<br />

Globe, AZ 85502<br />

928-425-7121<br />

www.silverbelt.com<br />

Globe, AZ 85502<br />

928-425-0355<br />

www.coppercountrynews.com<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> Staff<br />

To advertise in the <strong>Gateway</strong> to the<br />

Copper Corridor, contact:<br />

~Publisher-GM, Monica Watson<br />

mwatson@silverbelt.com<br />

~Sales Representative, Kathy Riley<br />

kriley@silverbelt.com<br />

~Composing, Jon Cook<br />

~Editorial, Andrea Justice and David Sowders<br />

ajustice@silverbelt.com; dsowders@silverbelt.com<br />

Contributors:<br />

Paul Wolterbeek, Elizabeth Eaton, Deborah<br />

Yerkovich, Allie Tolman<br />

Cover photo:<br />

Deborah Yerkovich<br />

Who needs snow? Residents of the Copper Corridor agree that there<br />

is something enchanting about an Arizona winter with no snow. A slight<br />

frost clinging to the cacti along with low-bearing clouds assembled across<br />

a pastel sky, make up an ideal Arizona winter day. We have no need for<br />

snow shovels, just jackets.<br />

Cover photo was taken by Deborah Yerkovich<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong> 3


Clifton Hotel<br />

offers a touch of<br />

the late 1800s<br />

In 1890 Judge George Hormeyer built the Central<br />

Hotel in Clifton, Arizona. Hormeyer’s wife,<br />

Julia, ran the hotel until 1945. The first floor<br />

was built of slag block, a by-product of the mining<br />

process. The second floor, built of brick, was added<br />

in 1901. In its heyday the hotel was a destination<br />

for executives and dignitaries from both stateside<br />

and abroad, who came to the area for copper claims.<br />

After 1945 the hotel changed hands several times<br />

and eventually became an apartment building.<br />

During the devastating flood of 1983, the hotel took<br />

on over six feet of water and, sadly, was abandoned.<br />

Fast forward to 34 years later . . . In 2017, Matt<br />

and Karen Frye bought the Central Hotel and<br />

changed the name to the Clifton Hotel. They began<br />

renovating, with the intention of restoring the hotel<br />

to its former glory. From foundation to roof, and<br />

everything in between, the hotel was restored to its<br />

original beauty. There are eight rooms, each with a<br />

kitchenette and bath, some with clawfoot tubs. The<br />

wallpaper transports guests back to the late 1800s,<br />

and the rooms are appointed with antiques from the<br />

period. The Fryes added a commercial kitchen and<br />

a bar; the bar back is from a building on historical<br />

Chase Creek Street, and dates back to 1904.<br />

The hotel and bar are a wonderful destination for<br />

travelers and an ideal resting place for those traveling<br />

the Devil’s Highway on motorcycles. And it’s a<br />

great place to stop off and have a drink, play pool<br />

and enjoy some appetizers.<br />

Is the hotel haunted? Let’s just say there is a<br />

wealth of unexplained phenomena. Those who do<br />

have an experience always report that it was pleasant<br />

and that the hotel has a very positive feel.<br />

For more information on the Clifton Hotel, call<br />

(928) 215-6876 or email clifton.hotel.info@gmail.<br />

com.<br />

Courtesy photos<br />

4 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


Adventure Awaits You in Clifton, Arizona<br />

Clifton, Arizona<br />

is fortunate to be<br />

surrounded by<br />

spectacular natural beauty<br />

as well as copper, gold<br />

and molybdenum ore that<br />

has been extracted for<br />

over 145 years.<br />

The surprising thing is<br />

that it is such a well-kept<br />

secret. You might want to<br />

check the town out firsthand,<br />

as it is extraordinary.<br />

Here you can see a vast<br />

array of birds (hummers,<br />

neo-tropicals, eagles), Mexican<br />

grey wolves, brown<br />

bears, elk, rare Arizona native<br />

fish, bighorn sheep,<br />

ring-tailed cats, javelina,<br />

coatimundi - the list goes on<br />

and on.<br />

Visit the Clifton Museum<br />

as you peruse historic<br />

Chase Creek Street, with<br />

many old buildings restored<br />

and offering a wide selection<br />

of items; walk in the<br />

paths of famous spiritualist<br />

and healer Teresita (she<br />

lived and died in Clifton);<br />

travel the scenic Black Hills<br />

Back Country Byway; fish<br />

the streams; photograph<br />

the scenery; get locked in<br />

the cavernous Clifton jail<br />

(the tiny entrance belies its<br />

immensity); climb aboard<br />

the Copperhead rail engine;<br />

check out the old electric<br />

shovel - Clifton has something<br />

for everyone (did I<br />

mention the hot springs?).<br />

With the Gila River’s<br />

largest tributary, the San<br />

Francisco River, flowing<br />

through town, Clifton’s citizens<br />

are currently working<br />

towards establishing a kayaking<br />

and rafting experience<br />

with a town beach park adjacent<br />

to US Highway 191. At<br />

an elevation of 3,500 feet,<br />

the town’s highest temperatures<br />

average 10 degrees F<br />

cooler than Arizona’s major<br />

cities.<br />

Just six miles upriver, the<br />

Morenci Mine is the largest<br />

open-pit copper mine in all<br />

of North America at over<br />

100 square miles. There is a<br />

beautiful new mine overlook<br />

to enjoy at milepost 174 on<br />

your drive up Highway 191.<br />

Railroad buffs love to watch<br />

the intricate dance between<br />

the Morenci mine train and<br />

the Eastern Arizona Railroad<br />

at the historic Clifton<br />

transfer yard.<br />

For thrill seekers, Highway<br />

191 (formerly US 666<br />

- “The Devil’s Highway”)<br />

winds 75 miles through lush<br />

wilderness to Alpine. Prudent<br />

driving requires three<br />

hours to make the trip - one<br />

way! With all the surrounding<br />

hills, I have always<br />

wanted to try hang gliding,<br />

and hot air ballooning views<br />

have to be the best.<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong><br />

5


6 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


Safford Old Time Fiddle Contest returns<br />

Courtesy photo/David Bell<br />

Participants take the stage at one of Safford’s old-time fiddling contests.<br />

After a largely quiet year, the<br />

Agriculture Building at the<br />

Graham County Fairgrounds<br />

will once again ring with the sounds<br />

of fiddle and guitar as the Eastern Arizona<br />

Old Time Fiddlers Association<br />

brings back their annual contest, running<br />

from February 11-13.<br />

The Eastern Arizona Old Time Fiddlers<br />

Association held its first fiddle<br />

contest in Dragoon in 1979. It continued<br />

there for four years, then moved to<br />

Grandma’s Ballroom in Kansas Settlement<br />

for the next two years. The event<br />

has been held in Safford ever since,<br />

and has become one of the largest fiddle<br />

contests in Arizona.<br />

For more information on this year’s<br />

contest, contact the Graham County<br />

Chamber of Commerce at (928) 428-<br />

2511.<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor 2021 7


Courtesy photo/Graham County Historical Society<br />

An early 1900s photo of the Taylor’s Cyclone Store in downtown Safford’s<br />

Riggs Building<br />

Ginaveve’s:<br />

From<br />

courthouse<br />

to coffee<br />

house<br />

BY DAVID SOWDERS<br />

Assistant Editor<br />

In 1901 cattleman J.J. Riggs built what<br />

was then the highest two-story building<br />

in Safford, Arizona. A hundred<br />

and twenty years later, still standing on a<br />

corner of Main Street, that structure is the<br />

home of Ginaveve’s Marketplace and The<br />

Main Street Bean coffee house.<br />

The Riggs Building started out, in part,<br />

as a general store – Taylor’s Cyclone<br />

Store, which did business on the first floor<br />

from 1901 to 1904. Upstairs, the building<br />

housed a Masonic Hall. The first building<br />

in town to have concrete sidewalks around<br />

it, through the years it was home to such<br />

stores as Young & Ridgway and Settles<br />

Market. In 1915-1916 the Riggs Building<br />

even served as a temporary courthouse<br />

while the current Graham County Courthouse<br />

was being built, and was the site of<br />

county offices.<br />

In 2012 John and Jenny Howard bought<br />

the building and opened Ginaveve’s Marketplace<br />

on the ground floor. Starting out<br />

as a gift shop, two years later Ginaveve’s<br />

branched out to carry olive oils, balsamic<br />

vinegars, olives, flavored pastas and other<br />

gourmet foods - all of which they still<br />

offer. In 2016 the store’s kitchen was expanded<br />

to introduce panini sandwiches,<br />

and a variety of gelatos were added.<br />

David Sowders/Copper Corridor<br />

In 2021, the Riggs Building is home to Ginaveve’s Marketplace and The<br />

Main Street Bean. See GINAVEVE’S, page 9<br />

8 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


Continued from page 8<br />

Their next venture, The Main<br />

Street Bean – a place where friends<br />

gather to enjoy a wonderful venue,<br />

amazing coffee and paninis, and<br />

conversation – opened in 2018. The<br />

Main Street Bean features a variety<br />

of coffee and tea drinks, panini sandwiches,<br />

a range of homemade crepes<br />

on Saturday mornings, and indoor<br />

seating along with a recently installed<br />

outside parklet. Future plans include<br />

adding dinner nights and live music,<br />

and Jenny Howard also hopes to introduce<br />

wine and craft beer tastings.<br />

The business has been so successful<br />

they were recently able to open<br />

a drive-through coffee shop on US<br />

Highway 70, the Tiny Bean.<br />

Ginaveve’s Marketplace and The<br />

Main Street Bean are located at 401<br />

W. Main St. in Safford. Hours are<br />

Monday through Friday from 6 a.m.<br />

to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 7 a.m.<br />

to 6 p.m.<br />

David Sowders/Copper Corridor<br />

Top: Customers enjoy<br />

the coffee and atmosphere<br />

at Ginaveve’s<br />

Marketplace/The Main<br />

Street Bean in Safford.<br />

Left: Main Street Bean<br />

baristas prepare customers’<br />

drink orders.<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong> 9


Superstition Mountain Museum’s<br />

Free Lecture Series<br />

The Superstition<br />

Mountain Museum<br />

is pleased to<br />

announce that it will once<br />

again be hosting its free<br />

lecture series “Legends and<br />

Lore of the Superstitions<br />

and More.” These lectures,<br />

which run from January to<br />

April, bring together local<br />

scholars, personalities, historians,<br />

artists and authors<br />

to introduce attendees to<br />

the rich culture of our region.<br />

Lectures are held Thursday<br />

afternoons at 2 p.m.<br />

in the Museum’s outdoor<br />

amphitheater. To enjoy the<br />

presentations fully, attendees<br />

are requested to bring<br />

a lawn chair, hat and sunscreen.<br />

Attendees are reminded<br />

not to smoke or to leave<br />

their pets in a vehicle.<br />

Coffee and cookies will<br />

be available for purchase,<br />

with proceeds going to the<br />

museum for continuing educational<br />

programs. Come<br />

early and have lunch on the<br />

grounds; food will be available<br />

for purchase.<br />

Featured presenters and<br />

dates this year are:<br />

January 27 - Dutch Hunters<br />

Roundtable<br />

Wayne Tuttle and a panel<br />

of modern prospectors<br />

Listen in while these<br />

modern-day prospectors<br />

scratch the gold seeker’s<br />

itch.<br />

February 3 - Kurt Cava-<br />

no<br />

Arizona’s Four Peaks<br />

Amethyst Mine<br />

Mine owner Kurt Cavano<br />

shares the history of this<br />

mine and his adventures in<br />

working it.<br />

February 10 - Jay Cravath<br />

Honky Tonks, Brothels<br />

and Mining Camps: Entertainment<br />

in Old Arizona<br />

Jay Cravath shares stories<br />

and plays music of a<br />

time when performing live<br />

was the only way to enjoy<br />

the arts.<br />

February 17 - Native<br />

American Storytelling<br />

Featuring Members of<br />

Yellow Bird Productions<br />

In conjunction with our<br />

Native American Arts Festival,<br />

this lecture includes<br />

members of the world-renowned<br />

Yellow Bird Indian<br />

Dancers.<br />

February 24 - Bob Boze<br />

Bell<br />

Courtesy photo<br />

Tales of “True West”<br />

Magazine (Lecture sponsored<br />

by Museum Pros)<br />

Bob Boze Bell tells tales<br />

of his time with “True<br />

West” magazine, which<br />

he’s owned as a partner<br />

since 1999.<br />

March 3 - Christine Reid<br />

History of Snake Oil<br />

Salesmen, Scams and<br />

Hoaxes<br />

This lecture illustrates<br />

some of the most famous<br />

and some of the lesser<br />

known embarrassing scams<br />

and hoaxes that have found<br />

the gullible in Arizona.<br />

March 10 - Porfirio Gutierrez<br />

and others<br />

Mexican Artistry and<br />

Weaving Traditions<br />

Zapotec master weaver<br />

Porfirio Gutierrez discusses<br />

Zapotec weaving traditions,<br />

and potter Lila Silveira provides<br />

perspective on life in<br />

the village of Mata Ortiz.<br />

March 17 - Lisa Schnebly<br />

Heidinger<br />

How We Survived Prohibition<br />

(100 Years Ago)<br />

Hear stories of how places<br />

you can still drink at<br />

today made it through the<br />

speakeasy era, and what<br />

makes some of our other<br />

historic watering holes<br />

memorable.<br />

March 24 - Jan Cleere<br />

Nevertheless She Persisted!<br />

Women Who Made<br />

a Difference on the Arizona<br />

Frontier<br />

Meet an array of women<br />

who endured trouble<br />

and hardships, along with<br />

amazing feats and triumphs,<br />

during the territory’s<br />

early days.<br />

March 31 - Richard<br />

Lapidus<br />

Venomous Snakes and<br />

Treating Snakebites<br />

Richard Lapidus introduces<br />

attendees to the<br />

amazing world of venomous<br />

Arizona reptiles.<br />

April 7 - Vince Simpson<br />

Early Railroading in Arizona<br />

Vince Simpson talks<br />

about the role railroads<br />

played in the building of<br />

Arizona.<br />

For more information<br />

on the lectures, visit superstitionmountainmuseum.<br />

org or call 480-983-4888.<br />

The Superstition Mountain<br />

Museum is located at 4087<br />

E. Apache Trail (SR88) in<br />

Apache Junction.<br />

10 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


Nnee Bich’o Nii Services<br />

Apache Transit<br />

(928) 475-5023 or (928) 475-5024<br />

Safford to Globe Route<br />

Monday through Friday<br />

(except for Federal & Tribal Holidays)<br />

Do you need a ride from Safford to Globe? Or Globe to Safford? Or<br />

maybe you want to spend some leisurely time at the Apache Gold<br />

Casino. Let Nnee Bich’o Nii’s Apache Transit take you there and back<br />

again in their state-of-the-art buses. <strong>Winter</strong>, Spring, Summer or Fall,<br />

Apache Transit will get you their safely and comfortably. All buses are<br />

modified to meet Center for Disease Control regulations and Americans<br />

with Disabilities Act. Let the friendly drivers do the driving while you take<br />

in the sights.<br />

San Carlos Post Office No Stop No Stop 4:35 PM<br />

San Carlos Marketplace No Stop No Stop 4:38 PM<br />

Noline’s Country Store 6:40 AM 10:55 AM 4:45 PM<br />

Game & Fish No Stop No Stop *If Needed<br />

San Carlos Apache Healthcare Corp. 6:50 AM 11:00 AM 4:55 PM<br />

Navajo Point 7:10 AM 11:25 AM 5:15 PM<br />

Assembly of God 7:15 AM 11:28 AM 5:18 PM<br />

Mt. Turnbull Apache Market 7:20 AM 11:30 AM 5:20 PM<br />

Ft. Thomas High School 7:35 AM No Stop<br />

Pima Post Office *If Needed *If Needed<br />

Eastern Arizona College 7:55 AM 12:05 PM<br />

Safford D.E.S. Office *If Needed *If Needed<br />

Safford M.V.D. Office *If Needed *If Needed<br />

Mt. Graham Regional Medical Center *If Needed *If Needed<br />

Wal-Mart (Safford) 8:10 AM 12:20 PM<br />

Wal-Mart (Safford) 8:15 AM 1:20 PM<br />

Safford M.V.D. Office 8:20 AM 1:30 PM<br />

Safford D.E.S. Office *If Needed *If Needed<br />

Mt. Graham Regional Medical Center *If Needed *If Needed<br />

Eastern Arizona College 8:30 AM 1:35 PM<br />

Pima Post Office *If Needed *If Needed<br />

Mt. Turnbull Apache Market 9:05 AM 2:10 PM<br />

Assembly of God 9:07 AM 2:12 PM<br />

Navajo Point 9:10 AM 2:15 PM<br />

San Carlos Apache Healthcare Corp. 9:33 AM 2:40 PM<br />

Noline’s Country Store 9:40 AM 2:45 PM<br />

Basha’s 9:45 AM 2:55 PM<br />

Apache Burger *If Needed *If Needed<br />

Apache Gold Casino 10:15 AM 3:10 PM<br />

Globe Ready 2 Go 10:20 AM 3:20 PM<br />

Train Depot / Dollar General 10:25 AM 3:35 PM<br />

Apache Gold Casino 10:35 AM 4:00 PM<br />

Fares Elders (55 years and older) Ride for FREE!<br />

At the END of the afternoon<br />

route, the driver can drop<br />

off passengers at Basha’s,<br />

Noline’s or the Casino.<br />

*If Needed.<br />

Please call<br />

Apache Transit at<br />

(928) 475-5023 or<br />

(928) 475-5024<br />

to request a pick-up at<br />

If Needed locations only.<br />

Connects with Copper<br />

Mountain<br />

Transit.<br />

San Carlos Local $1.00 Bylas to Fort Thomas $1.00<br />

San Carlos to Apache Gold $1.50 Bylas to San Carlos $1.50<br />

San Carlos to Globe $1.50 Bylas to Safford $2.50<br />

San Carlos to Safford $3.50 Fort Thomas to Safford $1.50<br />

Bylas to Apache Gold $3.00 Noline’s Country Store to Fort Thomas $2.00<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong><br />

11


Apache<br />

Clan Project<br />

continues<br />

The Apache Clan Project continues from the<br />

San Carlos Apache Culture Center Museum.<br />

The Project involves taking tribal members<br />

back to their clan homelands, since most if not all<br />

tribal members were forced by the US government<br />

to come to the San Carlos area. The Project will<br />

also have Clan Workshops in all districts of the reservation<br />

and the last Clan Workshop is scheduled<br />

for February for the Seven Mile Wash district. It<br />

will end the Project with an Apache Clan Conference<br />

later in the spring in the San Carlos area, and<br />

T-shirts with the 30 larger clan names on them will<br />

be given to conference attendees. Vehicle stickers<br />

with clan names on them are also given to people<br />

who attend the workshops.<br />

Courtesy photo See APACHE, page 13<br />

12 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


Continued from page 12<br />

Clan Pilgrimages have been<br />

made to the Aravaipa area and to<br />

Camp Verde. The next Pilgrimage<br />

is to Apache Pass to honor the Chiricahua<br />

and Descheene clans/group.<br />

Since the Chiricahuas were close to<br />

us in location, they have been included<br />

in the Project. The last Pilgrimage<br />

will be to White River and<br />

that will be in the spring.<br />

It is important to Apaches to<br />

know their clans. From this they<br />

can better understand who they are,<br />

who their relatives are and how to<br />

function in the Apache Society. The<br />

Apache Clan system is based on<br />

your maternal lineage. You are what<br />

your mother and maternal grandmother<br />

are.<br />

The Apache Clan Project is funded<br />

by the Institute of Museum and<br />

Library Services, and gratitude goes<br />

to Tia Early for coordinating the<br />

Project.<br />

Courtesy photos<br />

Heritage & History on Display<br />

Find us near mp 272 on hwy 70<br />

Marlowe.cassadore@scat-nsn.gov • 928-475-2894<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong><br />

13


14 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


Looking Back: Picturing t he trail<br />

BY DAVID SOWDERS<br />

Assistant Editor<br />

Making their way<br />

over the Apache<br />

Trail, the travelers<br />

declared Roosevelt Dam<br />

“a very marvelous piece of<br />

work.” Their next stop was<br />

the “little mining town” of<br />

Globe, then to Phoenix and<br />

California – “A wonderful<br />

trip.” Somewhere along the<br />

way they bought a souvenir<br />

postcard of the Trail, mailing<br />

it to a relative or friend<br />

back east.<br />

It was mid-November<br />

1927; the Apache Trail was<br />

22 years old and the Globe<br />

& Bowie Railroad, aboard<br />

which their postcard was<br />

mailed, had been around for<br />

more than 30. But the card<br />

is also part of the story of an<br />

immigrant who made it big.<br />

Curt Teich was 19 when<br />

he came to the United States<br />

from his native town in<br />

Thuringia, now part of Germany.<br />

Coming from a long<br />

line of printers and publishers,<br />

he had worked as an apprentice<br />

printer. Teich landed<br />

in New York City in 1895,<br />

going to work as a printer’s<br />

devil. He soon moved on to<br />

Chicago, where the company<br />

he founded became the<br />

world’s largest printer of scenic<br />

postcards – like the one<br />

the travelers sent in 1927, depicting<br />

the Apache Trail and<br />

Superstition Mountain.<br />

The Apache Trail, initial-<br />

David Sowders/Copper Corridor<br />

Superstition Mountain and the Apache Trail, as seen on a vintage<br />

Curt Teich postcard<br />

ly called the Tonto Wagon<br />

Road, was built as a supply<br />

road to the Roosevelt Dam<br />

construction site. The road<br />

follows the course of a Native<br />

American foot trail. With<br />

Apaches providing much of<br />

the labor, it was finished on<br />

Sept. 3, 1905. After the trail’s<br />

completion, the Southern Pacific<br />

Railway Company started<br />

offering side trips down<br />

the scenic road to the dam.<br />

Around this time, Curt<br />

Teich brought a German<br />

postcard style to the United<br />

States, launching the colorful,<br />

large-lettered “Greetings<br />

From” cards that would become<br />

so well-known. Teich<br />

based them on the German<br />

“Gruss Aus” cards that started<br />

appearing in the 1890s.<br />

His firm, Curt Teich & Company,<br />

was also a pioneer in<br />

offset printing, which they<br />

started using in 1910.<br />

In 1905, as the Apache<br />

Trail was nearing completion,<br />

Teich crossed the country by<br />

train. Carrying a camera, he<br />

took photos of numerous<br />

small-town businesses along<br />

the way. From these pictures,<br />

he made his first sizable print<br />

run.<br />

“The frontier has passed,<br />

the cattle are vanishing, the<br />

west is changed,” wrote<br />

famed author Zane Grey in<br />

a Sept. 1927 letter to the Coconino<br />

Sun newspaper,<br />

published by the Sun the<br />

same month our travelers<br />

visited Roosevelt Dam and<br />

Globe.<br />

In November 1927, the<br />

Phelps Dodge mine at Morenci<br />

was producing an average<br />

of 3.75 million pounds of<br />

copper a month, but mining<br />

could still be dangerous<br />

work. In Superior, five men<br />

lost their lives in a fire at the<br />

Magma Mine; crews from<br />

the Globe and Miami mines<br />

helped battle the fire. On<br />

November 24, Globe High<br />

School ended its football season<br />

with a “fiercely fought”<br />

6-6 tie against Safford.<br />

During his 1905 trip, Teich<br />

personally took $30,000<br />

worth of postcard orders<br />

during this cross-country<br />

journey. As the company<br />

grew, he would employ hundreds<br />

of traveling salesmen/<br />

photographers. These men<br />

not only sold postcards to<br />

homes and worked with<br />

businesses to create advertising<br />

cards, but also took<br />

the pictures. Like the Apache<br />

Trail postcard – printed under<br />

the company’s C.T. American<br />

Art line – a number<br />

of pictures depicted scenes<br />

in Arizona, including the<br />

Globe-Miami area.<br />

In June 1928, Curt Teich<br />

& Company records show, a<br />

man named Henry (or Harry)<br />

Herz ordered a number<br />

of postcards featuring scenes<br />

around Globe and Miami;<br />

designs included the Gila<br />

County Courthouse, Bullion<br />

Plaza School, Broad Street,<br />

Sullivan Street, the Southern<br />

Pacific Depot and the Claypool<br />

Tunnel.<br />

Curt Teich & Company<br />

remained in business until<br />

1978, closing shop around<br />

four years after the passing of<br />

its founder. The Apache Trail<br />

remains, though much of that<br />

scenic road is now impassable<br />

due to fire-related flood<br />

damage in the last few years.<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong><br />

15


Experience the Ancient History of Arizona<br />

Ruins • Museum • Gardens • Gift Shop<br />

Daily 9:00am-4:30pm<br />

1324 S. Jesse Hayes Rd. Globe, AZ 85501<br />

925-425-0320<br />

www.globeaz.gov/visitors/besh-ba-gowah<br />

16 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


Courtesy photo<br />

1916 Historic Globe Train Depot<br />

Complex is available for events<br />

The Globe Downtown<br />

Association, a 501(c)<br />

(6) nonprofit, operates<br />

the 1916 Historic Globe<br />

Train Depot Complex. All<br />

the space rental fees go into<br />

the association’s overall operating<br />

and building restoration<br />

project budgets.<br />

Currently they offer both fullday<br />

rates and half-day rates for<br />

the depot’s main lobby space.<br />

The full day is six hours plus<br />

and flexible. Renters will be the<br />

only ones booked during their<br />

reservations. The rate for a full<br />

day is a nominal $250, which includes<br />

floor mopping and bathroom<br />

cleaning after the event<br />

along with flexibility for event<br />

setup and teardown. The halfday<br />

rate is for Sunday through<br />

Thursday, three-hour meetings<br />

and events. The three-hour period<br />

is from firm checkin to firm<br />

checkout for $150, and $40 an<br />

hour for each additional prebooked<br />

hour needed. Half-day<br />

renters must be willing to share<br />

the day with another event if requested,<br />

choosing either early<br />

or late time blocks.<br />

The main passenger station<br />

lobby space is very flexible.<br />

Our general rule of thumb is<br />

that it’s a comfortable sit-down<br />

venue for 50 to 75, for events<br />

using a buffet-style layout with<br />

both sitting/high bistro table<br />

Courtesy photo See TRAIN DEPOT, page 18<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong><br />

17


Continued from page 17<br />

standing space up to<br />

100, and mixer and open<br />

house style (less inside<br />

seating, more back patio<br />

seating) for events up to<br />

and over 200 guests.<br />

Our main passenger<br />

station has a caterer’s prep<br />

kitchen, with an additional<br />

exterior entrance. It includes<br />

a restaurant-grade<br />

platter refrigerator, a regular<br />

refrigerator/freezer, a<br />

deep chest freezer, a large<br />

microwave, double sinks<br />

and counter space.<br />

For the main lobby<br />

space there are also some<br />

folding tables and chairs<br />

on hand to comfortably<br />

seat 50 guests.<br />

Courtesy photos<br />

18 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


Gila County’s top ten spots for birdwatching<br />

Is Gila County a great<br />

place to strap on the<br />

binoculars and see<br />

birds? Ask ‘Tommy D’<br />

Debardeleben, author of<br />

a popular website frequently<br />

updated with his<br />

adventures seeking rare<br />

birds around the Grand<br />

Canyon State. Most of<br />

his days off work during<br />

2017 were spent birding<br />

Gila County - starting the<br />

year with 137 species he<br />

had found on prior visits,<br />

and doubling that already-impressive<br />

tally to<br />

275 before New Year’s<br />

Eve.<br />

Search posts at tommysbirdingexpeditions<br />

for anecdotes from across<br />

Gila County, from a rufous-winged<br />

sparrow singing<br />

at the southern tip of<br />

the county, just off Highway<br />

77 near Winkelman<br />

and the Gila River (where<br />

black vulture and Mississippi<br />

kite are also possible),<br />

to ‘chases’ northwards hoping<br />

for short-tailed hawk<br />

in the Pinal Mountains, to<br />

San Carlos Lake for hooded<br />

merganser, Bonaparte’s<br />

gull, and Franklin’s gull,<br />

and to Green Valley Park in<br />

Payson for Northern parula<br />

and rufous-backed robin.<br />

“I fell in love with the<br />

county,” he writes. “I saw<br />

how diverse it was, and<br />

how much potential it had<br />

for personal discovery. Before<br />

I knew it, I had spent<br />

a huge chunk of the year<br />

devoting my birding time<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong><br />

Red Breasted Nuthatch<br />

to Gila County . . . it was a<br />

fun ride.”<br />

Nature-lovers seeking<br />

narrative descriptions can<br />

spend hours reading Tommy<br />

D’s blog posts and be<br />

familiar with most of the<br />

10 spots in this list of great<br />

places to see and photograph<br />

birds. You’ll also want to<br />

bookmark ebird.org as a<br />

browser favorite and explore<br />

this exhaustive website<br />

– where easy-to-navigate<br />

maps pinpoint<br />

‘hotspots’ where birders<br />

have collectively reported:<br />

Winkelman Flats Park –<br />

158 species<br />

San Carlos Lake - 207<br />

Russell Gulch below the<br />

Pinal Mountains - 177<br />

Pinal Peak – 152<br />

Jones Water Camp<br />

ground north of Globe -<br />

120<br />

Roosevelt Lake - 203<br />

Tonto Creek Fish Hatchery<br />

- 115<br />

Green Valley Park in<br />

Payson - 174<br />

Pine Creek Canyon - 121<br />

Courtesy photo/Muriel Neddermeyer<br />

Parker Creek in the<br />

Sierra Anchas - 109<br />

Want a few more numbers?<br />

Consider these trip lists<br />

from Sulfide de Rey campground<br />

-- just one of sever-<br />

nuthatch, blue-gray gnatcatcher,<br />

Bewick’s<br />

wren,<br />

hermit thrush,<br />

phainopepla,<br />

olive warbler,<br />

lesser goldfinch,<br />

Grace’s<br />

warbler,<br />

black-throated<br />

gray warbler,<br />

painted<br />

redstart,<br />

Western<br />

tanager and<br />

black-headed<br />

grosbeak.<br />

See photos<br />

and read<br />

more at ebird.<br />

Courtesy photo/Muriel Neddermeyer<br />

Yellow Eyed Junco<br />

org. Connect<br />

with the author<br />

and sign up for<br />

updates about Tommy’s<br />

al ‘hot spots’ in the Pinals<br />

where sightings are posted<br />

on Ebird. Jay Taylor found<br />

acorn woodpecker, Western<br />

wood-pewee, Pacific-slope/<br />

Cordilleran flycatcher<br />

(Western flycatcher), Hutton’s<br />

vireo, white-breasted<br />

nuthatch, house wren,<br />

yellow-eyed junco, spotted<br />

towhee, orange-crowned<br />

warbler, Wilson’s warbler<br />

and mourning dove. A few<br />

weeks prior to that Dave<br />

Pearson reported Anna’s<br />

hummingbird, broad-tailed<br />

hummingbird, rufous hummingbird,<br />

turkey vulture,<br />

zone-tailed hawk, Cordilleran<br />

flycatcher, Cassin’s<br />

vireo, plumbeous vireo,<br />

common raven, bridled titmouse,<br />

bushtit, red-breasted<br />

nuthatch, pygmy<br />

treks at tommysbirdingexpeditions.blogspot.com.<br />

19


To Payson<br />

188<br />

Roosevelt<br />

11<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper<br />

13<br />

14<br />

12<br />

10<br />

7<br />

9<br />

To Phoenix<br />

60<br />

1<br />

3<br />

4<br />

Miami Globe<br />

5<br />

6 8<br />

Superior<br />

2<br />

Florence<br />

Kearny<br />

Winkelman<br />

79<br />

To Tucson<br />

77<br />

To Tucson


To Show Low<br />

60<br />

Corridor<br />

1<br />

2<br />

3<br />

4<br />

5<br />

6<br />

7<br />

8<br />

9<br />

Queen Valley Golf Course<br />

queenvalleygolfcourse.com<br />

Boyce Thompson Arboretum<br />

btarboretum.org<br />

Superior Chamber of Commerce<br />

superiorarizonachamber.org<br />

Bullion Plaza Museum<br />

bullionplazamuseum.org<br />

Globe-Miami Chamber of Commerce<br />

globemiamichamber.com<br />

Gila County Historical Museum<br />

gilahistoricalmuseum.org<br />

Cobre Valley Center for the Arts<br />

facebook.com/cvcarts<br />

Besh-Ba-Gowah Archaeological Park<br />

globeaz.gov<br />

Round Mountain Hiking Park<br />

globeaz.gov<br />

15<br />

16<br />

San Carlos<br />

19<br />

10<br />

11<br />

Old Dominion Park<br />

globeaz.gov<br />

Roosevelt Lake & Visitor Center<br />

fs.usda.gov/tonto<br />

18<br />

70<br />

To Safford<br />

17<br />

12<br />

13<br />

14<br />

15<br />

16<br />

Superstition Mountain Museum<br />

superstitionmountainmuseum.org<br />

Dolly Steamboat<br />

dollysteamboat.com<br />

Tortilla Flat<br />

tortillaflataz.com<br />

Apache Gold Casino & Resort<br />

apache-gold-casino.com<br />

San Carlos Rec. & Wildlife<br />

sancarlosrecreationwildlife.com<br />

17<br />

Mt. Graham Observatory<br />

mgio.arizona.edu<br />

18<br />

Graham County Chamber<br />

facebook.com/grahamchamber<br />

19<br />

Green Lee County Chamber<br />

visitgreenleecounty.com


Golf Benefit for Queen<br />

Valley Fire Department<br />

Court esy photo<br />

The Queen Valley<br />

Fire Auxiliary is<br />

hosting the Kayo<br />

Energy Charity Golf Tournament<br />

for QVFA on Saturday,<br />

March 12, <strong>2022</strong> at the<br />

Queen Valley Golf Course.<br />

This is the Auxiliary’s 32 nd<br />

year of hosting a tournament.<br />

The format will be a<br />

four-person scramble open<br />

to all teams; men, women<br />

and mixed. Teams will be<br />

flighted by handicap. Entry<br />

fees are $40 each for<br />

members and $60 each for<br />

non-members (this includes<br />

cart fees). The entry fee<br />

includes morning coffee &<br />

rolls, greens fees, specialty<br />

holes, lunch, team prizes<br />

and door prizes. This is an<br />

open air event. There will<br />

also be a silent auction at<br />

the luncheon.<br />

Businesses or individuals<br />

can donate to the event<br />

by sponsoring a Tee Box<br />

Sign for a $25 minimum<br />

contribution.<br />

These signs can be personalized<br />

with your name,<br />

pet’s picture, name of your<br />

business, in memory of a<br />

loved one, for your children/grandchildren<br />

or a<br />

club. Gold and Silver Level<br />

sponsorships are available<br />

for added benefits; if<br />

interested call the number<br />

listed below.<br />

Entry forms and Sponsor<br />

a Tee Box forms can<br />

be picked up at the Queen<br />

Valley Pro Shop or by calling<br />

Sally Salo at 520-463-<br />

2249. The deadline for<br />

these forms is March 7.<br />

All proceeds from the<br />

tournament benefit the<br />

Queen Valley Fire Department<br />

and are tax deductible.<br />

These firefighters<br />

and EMTs not only serve<br />

the community, but also<br />

respond to accidents and<br />

emergencies on nearby<br />

highways and in the mountains<br />

and desert areas.<br />

Mark your calendars –<br />

join us for a fun day of golf<br />

and prizes on March 12. .<br />

22 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


Local photographers submit winter images<br />

GLOBE-MIAMI<br />

Courtesy photo/Elizabeth Eaton<br />

Courtesy photo/Elizabeth Eaton<br />

La Casita Café<br />

Open:<br />

Thurs. - Mon.<br />

11 a.m.- 8 p.m.<br />

Closed:<br />

Tues. & Wed.<br />

To go orders -<br />

pick up and delivery<br />

470 N. Broad St. • Globe, AZ 85501<br />

928.425.8464<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong><br />

23


Sitting for the camera in early Globe<br />

BY DAVID SOWDERS<br />

Assistant Editor<br />

In late 2020, this faded<br />

picture of eight<br />

mounted cowboys in<br />

the streets of Globe was<br />

discovered in the Arizona<br />

Silver Belt offices. The<br />

photographer’s identity is<br />

unknown, but some of the<br />

men pictured became prominent<br />

Gila County ranchers.<br />

According to Guy and<br />

Donna Anderson’s 1976<br />

book, “Honor the Past…<br />

Mold the Future,” the photo<br />

was taken at the corner of<br />

Cedar and Broad Streets in<br />

1883.<br />

Among the eight cowboys<br />

was John C. Gibson,<br />

fourth from left in the photo.<br />

Born in Llano County,<br />

Texas in 1867, Gibson<br />

came from a ranching family<br />

who made the move to<br />

Globe around 1878. After<br />

cowboying for several area<br />

ranches and working for the<br />

Superior and Boston Mine,<br />

he bought several spreads<br />

including the JI Ranch east<br />

of Superior. By 1920 his<br />

land stretched from Pinal<br />

Creek to below Superior,<br />

and from Mineral Creek to<br />

Haunted Canyon.<br />

Marion Horrell, fifth<br />

from left, was part of another<br />

well-known ranching<br />

family that included his<br />

brothers Ed and C.W., with<br />

outfits north of Globe and<br />

in the Pinto Creek area.<br />

Behind the men stands<br />

Globe’s original Methodist<br />

church, St. Paul’s Methodist<br />

Episcopal (now St.<br />

Paul’s United Methodist). It<br />

all started in 1879 with Rev.<br />

J.J. Wingar, who walked 35<br />

miles from the town of Pinal<br />

to conduct services. A<br />

church building was dedicated<br />

in 1880 and served<br />

congregations until it was<br />

torn down in 1927. The<br />

current building was dedicated<br />

in 1928 and still holds<br />

the original bell, known as<br />

“God’s Alarm Clock.” In<br />

1883, when the cowboys<br />

posed for their photo, the<br />

church’s minister was Rev.<br />

William George.<br />

24 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


The Globe Rotary<br />

Club is excited to<br />

announce their 7th<br />

Annual Dominion Royale<br />

is a go for <strong>2022</strong>! Attendees<br />

are encouraged to dress the<br />

part for a Masquerade Ball<br />

theme on Saturday, February<br />

26, <strong>2022</strong> at the Cobre<br />

Valley Center for the Arts.<br />

Doors open at 6 p.m. and<br />

games start at 6:30 p.m.<br />

The annual fundraiser<br />

features casino style games,<br />

an auction, a liquor pull and<br />

refreshments catered by<br />

Vida e Caffe.<br />

Tickets are $25 per<br />

person available from<br />

any Globe Rotary Member.<br />

This is Globe Rotary<br />

Globe Rotary Dominion Royale<br />

coming February<br />

Club’s biggest fundraiser<br />

of the year! In the past, we<br />

have used the funds to support<br />

our youth: leadership<br />

camps, Spiritline, Wrestling,<br />

and the Cobre Valley<br />

Youth Club. The funds<br />

have helped support local<br />

organizations: Gila House,<br />

Gila County Food Bank,<br />

Globe-Miami Community<br />

Courtesy photo<br />

Concert Association, etc.<br />

We have also assisted with<br />

Round Mountain Park,<br />

beautification of downtown<br />

Globe, and Old Dominion<br />

Park.<br />

A big thank you to the<br />

sponsors that have already<br />

stepped up to help make<br />

this event a memorable one<br />

- Jackpot Sponsor Southwest<br />

Gas; other sponsors:<br />

Capstone, Western Reprographics,<br />

Dairy Queen,<br />

Bouquets on Broad, State<br />

Farm - Cami Lucero, Heritage<br />

Health Care, Mary<br />

Anne for MAM Resources,<br />

Haven Health Care, Great<br />

Western Bank, Dominion<br />

Firearms, Luna Olive Oil &<br />

More, Gila County Supervisor<br />

Tim Humphrey and<br />

Gila County Supervisor<br />

Woody Cline.<br />

It’s not too late to get in<br />

on the action, to sponsor<br />

or donate to this fundraiser<br />

contact Cami Lucero at<br />

928-425-4444 or Bryan<br />

Seppala at 928-812-0098.<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong><br />

25


Stop by Besh-Ba-Gowah before leaving Globe<br />

Andrea Justice/Copper Corridor<br />

26 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


Walking path opens<br />

near Miami Gardens<br />

Courtesy photo<br />

David Sowders/Copper Corridor<br />

Taking the first official stroll along the Miami Gardens<br />

Walking Path<br />

BHP, in partnership with Cobre Valley Regional Medical<br />

Center (CVRMC), invites the community and visitors<br />

to the Miami Gardens Walking Path.<br />

The walking path was built to create opportunities for<br />

hospital workers, patients, their loved ones and the community<br />

to take a leisurely stroll in nature and enjoy the<br />

scenery.<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong><br />

27


‘Explore The Wild’: Your GATEWAY<br />

Online is discovergilacounty.com<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> magazine<br />

is your quarterly<br />

update and invite<br />

to visit Gila County and<br />

explore scenic spots along<br />

the Copper Corridor.<br />

For the most up-to-date,<br />

thorough and comprehensive<br />

intel about where to stay<br />

and what to do while you’re<br />

here, bookmark discovergilacounty.com<br />

as a browser<br />

favorite, and connect on the<br />

award-winning website’s<br />

companion Facebook and<br />

Instagram pages to see enticing<br />

photos of cobalt-blue<br />

lakes, tree-lined hiking paths<br />

– and where to find local,<br />

family-owned restaurants<br />

for a unique taste of this region.<br />

Launched by Gila County’s<br />

Board of Supervisors<br />

two years ago, the stylish<br />

website’s a thorough portal<br />

to outdoor adventure ranging<br />

from the tall, cool pines<br />

of the Rim Country towns of<br />

Payson and Star Valley down<br />

through our Copper Corridor<br />

heritage here in Globe and<br />

Miami – including travel and<br />

tourism information about<br />

all three Apache Nations:<br />

San Carlos, Tonto and White<br />

Mountain. Wilderness areas,<br />

hiking trails, singular local<br />

restaurants -- and the area’s<br />

most comprehensive event<br />

calendar, too.<br />

Centrally-located Gila<br />

County is truly the heart of<br />

Arizona, with 53,500 residents<br />

and 4,796 square miles<br />

of desert, canyonlands and<br />

lakes. Bookmark discovergilacounty.com<br />

as a browser<br />

favorite; you’ll find planned<br />

itineraries for three-dayweekend<br />

trips that hit the<br />

highlights for shopping, relaxed<br />

hikes, Native American<br />

culture and history, and<br />

outdoor adventure.<br />

Gila County has seven<br />

wilderness areas: Hell’s<br />

Gate and the Mazatzal canyons<br />

and forests offer scenery<br />

that’s approachable yet<br />

remote enough for peace,<br />

quiet and solitude. Arizona’s<br />

majestic saguaro cacti? See<br />

and photograph these desert<br />

icons at our lowest elevations.<br />

Gila County includes<br />

Sonoran Desert at 2,000 feet<br />

above sea level, proceeding<br />

up to stately ponderosa pine<br />

forest (the largest stand of<br />

ponderosa pines on the planet!).<br />

Gila County lures outdoor<br />

enthusiasts choosing a<br />

place to live, work and enjoy<br />

the best mix of Arizona’s<br />

desert, mountains and lakes.<br />

Where to Stay?<br />

discovergilacounty.com<br />

lists our biggest hotels, of<br />

course – but gives equal<br />

space to bed-and-breakfast<br />

lodging in Pine-Strawberry,<br />

Payson, Globe and Young.<br />

Where to eat while you’re<br />

here? Restaurants are all listed,<br />

too; from family-owned<br />

Mexican restaurants of<br />

Globe-Miami to unique eateries<br />

in Hayden and Star<br />

Valley, a popular brewery in<br />

Pine, and vineyard-wineries<br />

in Young and Globe.<br />

Looking for a half-day<br />

hike, or a two-three day<br />

backpacking adventure? Explore<br />

the Mogollon Rim - a<br />

topographic and geological<br />

wonder that extends about<br />

200 miles across central Arizona.<br />

It forms the southern<br />

edge of the Colorado Plateau<br />

- providing outdoor adventure<br />

to campers, hikers,<br />

mountain bikers, photographers,<br />

bird-watchers and<br />

hunters; discovergilacounty.<br />

com is your guide to hiking<br />

trails, and nearby lodging.<br />

Don’t miss Tonto Natural<br />

Bridge, between the towns of<br />

Payson and Pine, which became<br />

an Arizona State Park<br />

in 1990; now thousands of<br />

visitors marvel each year at<br />

the largest travertine bridge<br />

in the world and the beauty<br />

of Pine Creek Canyon.<br />

The high desert community<br />

of Pleasant Valley is a serene<br />

scene of peace and quiet<br />

today – but in the 1880s it<br />

was the origin of a range war<br />

that’s among the most famous<br />

(and deadly) feuds in<br />

American history. The Pleasant<br />

Valley War, also called<br />

the Tonto Basin Feud or the<br />

Tonto Basin War, matched<br />

the cattle-herding Grahams<br />

against the sheep-herding<br />

Tewksburys.<br />

28 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


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<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong><br />

29


Restored greenhouses a highlight<br />

of Boyce Thompson Arboretum<br />

Completed on Aug.<br />

11, 1926, the<br />

3,600-square-foot<br />

stone structure served as<br />

Boyce Thompson Arboretum’s<br />

first administration<br />

building, visitor center,<br />

research laboratory and<br />

greenhouses. In 1979, it<br />

was named the William T.<br />

Smith Building after the<br />

longtime chair of the board<br />

and CEO, who served from<br />

1963 to 1986.<br />

The building’s original<br />

greenhouses were constructed<br />

by Lord & Burnham,<br />

a leading designer<br />

and manufacturer for public<br />

conservatories for 125<br />

years. Most of their original<br />

structure remained<br />

unchanged for 95 years,<br />

featuring cacti on one side<br />

and succulents on the other<br />

- primarily rare and<br />

frost-sensitive plants. Over<br />

time, however, the greenhouses<br />

had deteriorated so<br />

much that visitors couldn’t<br />

enter safely. Broken and<br />

missing glass covered the<br />

roofs; rusted steel was evident<br />

across the structures;<br />

the walls of the beds, made<br />

from native rock, had crum-<br />

See ARBORETUM, page 31<br />

ARBORETUM DISCOVERY TOURS<br />

Courtesy photo/Boyce Thompson Arboretum<br />

A 1926 photo of the Boyce Thompson Arboretum’s original<br />

visitor center and greenhouses, known today as the<br />

William T. Smith Building.<br />

Courtesy photos/Allie Tolman<br />

Discover Arizona’s first and oldest botanical garden. With collections from many of the worlds’ deserts, you will learn<br />

how this myriad of plants are crucial to our survival. Learn what makes desert plants unique and allows them to survive<br />

in regions with such low precipitation. This tour will last approximately one hour and cover 0.5 miles. This introduction<br />

to Boyce Thompson Arboretum is a great gateway to further involvement at BTA and is accessible for most everyone.<br />

Space is very limited so pre-registration is required.<br />

Please check in at the Visitor’s Center at least 10 minutes prior to the start of your tour. Unclaimed reservations will be<br />

released to other guests at that time.<br />

30 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


Courtesy photo/Boyce Thompson Arboretum<br />

After a 2021 renovation, the arboretum’s Smith Greenhouses are once again filled with succulent plants from around<br />

the globe.<br />

Continued from page 30<br />

bled in some areas. The<br />

plant collections housed<br />

within were in danger of<br />

irreversible damage; maintaining<br />

proper conditions for<br />

these fragile specimens was<br />

no longer possible.<br />

Restoration of the Smith<br />

Greenhouses got underway<br />

in January 2021, when demolition<br />

of the exterior began.<br />

Beforehand, starting in late<br />

2020, the plant collections<br />

were temporarily relocated<br />

– a process that took several<br />

weeks. The original greenhouse<br />

manufacturer, Lord<br />

& Burnham, is now part of<br />

Arcadia GlassHouse, and the<br />

updated structure was created<br />

in the same style as the<br />

original by using lightweight,<br />

energy-efficient, low-maintenance<br />

materials to replace<br />

the cypress wood, glass and<br />

steel. Throughout the renovation,<br />

several delays due to inclement<br />

weather and material<br />

shortages posed significant<br />

challenges.<br />

Jason Wiley, director of<br />

horticulture at Boyce Thompson<br />

Arboretum, designed<br />

a brand-new layout for the<br />

plant collections. You will<br />

now see succulents native<br />

to the Eastern Hemisphere<br />

in the East House and those<br />

native to the Western Hemisphere<br />

in the West House.<br />

Tiered succulent fountains<br />

in each house pay homage<br />

to the tiered fountains at the<br />

historical Picket Post House,<br />

former winter residence of<br />

Arboretum founder William<br />

Boyce Thompson. The fountains<br />

serve as a striking focal<br />

point as you enter. New pathways<br />

at least three feet wide<br />

line the greenhouses; these<br />

paths offer gentler curves, allowing<br />

wheelchair and stroller<br />

access. Built with repurposed<br />

rock from the previous<br />

walls, the gabion-raised beds<br />

have beautifully shaped contours,<br />

giving visual depth to<br />

the scene. Benches placed<br />

above the gabions provide<br />

a welcome place to rest and<br />

linger.<br />

Individual donors assisted<br />

Boyce Thompson Arboretum<br />

in repairing these unique,<br />

historic structures. Donors<br />

include friends and family of<br />

Bill Benson, who donated in<br />

honor of his 100th year. Bill<br />

was the Arboretum’s assistant<br />

director from 1948 to<br />

1962 and an emeritus board<br />

member. On Oct, 16, 2021<br />

Bill attended the greenhouse<br />

dedication ceremony; he<br />

passed a few weeks later, on<br />

Nov. 3. Thanks to the generosity<br />

of these individuals, the<br />

greenhouses are once again a<br />

place of refuge and a beautiful<br />

focal point of the Arboretum.<br />

Boyce Thompson Arboretum<br />

is located in Superior,<br />

Arizona, at 37615 E. Arboretum<br />

Way. The Smith Greenhouses<br />

are open to the public<br />

during regular operating<br />

hours.<br />

For hours, directions and<br />

admission info, visit btarboretum.org.<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong><br />

31


David Sowders/Copper Corridor<br />

A sample of the ceramic tile works created by Globe artists Robert and Charmion McKusick, depicting birds of the Southwest.<br />

Bullion Plaza Museum exhibit<br />

preserves local wildlife in art<br />

BY DAVID SOWDERS<br />

Assistant Editor<br />

For almost 50 years Globe, Arizona artists Robert<br />

and Charmion McKusick depicted birds and<br />

other animals of the Southwest in ceramic tile<br />

– and their work, among many other displays of area<br />

history, can be seen at Bullion Plaza Cultural Center<br />

& Museum in Miami, Arizona.<br />

In 1949 Robert McKusick, who grew up in Globe-Miami,<br />

enrolled at the University of Arizona to study ceramic<br />

engineering. While t here he met Charmion Randolph, and<br />

they were married two years later. He became a craftsman<br />

at Desert House of Crafts in Tucson, making ceramic tiles<br />

and ashtrays.<br />

Tucson was in a building boom at the time, and McKusick<br />

saw the Sonoran Desert disappearing. Working as<br />

a team, he and Charmion, an ethnozoologist, resolved to<br />

preserve desert wildlife in art for posterity. In 1954 the<br />

couple moved back to Globe, where Robert had patented<br />

a clay mine, the Weary Lode, at the base of the Pinal<br />

Mountains.<br />

From their studio in Kellner Canyon, the McKusicks<br />

produced ceramic tiles accurately depicting birds and oth-<br />

Continued to page 33<br />

32 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


Courtesy photo<br />

Artist Patty Sjolin at work on the mural<br />

that adorns Bullion Plaza Cultural Center<br />

& Museum’s McKusick Tile Exhibit.<br />

Bullion Plaza Museum exhibit continued from page 32<br />

David Sowders/Copper Corridor<br />

Standing beneath Sjolin’s finished work are Charles Beck and Victoria<br />

Carella, who together largely funded the mural; Bullion Plaza Cultural Center<br />

& Museum Executive Director Tom Foster; Robert and Charmion McKusick’s<br />

grandson, Thierry Condit; and their daughter, Kathleen Condit.<br />

er desert animals for 48<br />

years. Their work has been<br />

described as a unique product<br />

of Globe, which the<br />

couple formed and decorated<br />

by hand using an inlay<br />

process developed from the<br />

12 th Century Moorish glaze<br />

technique. Robert mined<br />

and prepared the clay, made<br />

the molds and fired the tiles<br />

in kilns; Charmion created<br />

the tile designs, cut them<br />

into the plaster molds and<br />

decorated the fired tiles.<br />

Their daughter Kathleen<br />

Condit, who grew up in the<br />

business, later took over<br />

sales and customer relations<br />

as well as designing some<br />

of the tiles. Before production<br />

ended in 1996, the<br />

McKusick Tile Studio created<br />

over 300 tile designs.<br />

Robert McKusick, who<br />

taught ceramics at Gila<br />

Community College for<br />

many years, helped design<br />

the tile exhibit at Bullion<br />

Plaza Cultural Center &<br />

Museum. The museum’s<br />

McKusick Tile Exhibit provides<br />

a multi-faceted display<br />

of the couple’s wildlife<br />

art, other ceramic works<br />

by the McKusicks and the<br />

equipment they used.<br />

In 2021, the exhibit was<br />

further enhanced by the<br />

work of another local artist.<br />

Gila County’s diverse<br />

and beautiful ecosystem<br />

is the theme Miami painter<br />

Patty Sjolin created for<br />

the McKusick Tile Exhibit<br />

– a work of art that complements<br />

the collection of<br />

birds, mammals and reptiles<br />

depicted in tile by Robert<br />

and Charmion McKusick.<br />

Stretching over three walls<br />

of the exhibit room, Sjolin’s<br />

work portrays local animals<br />

and plants – including endangered<br />

species - in their<br />

natural settings both above<br />

and below ground, including<br />

a riparian area. It also<br />

depicts area landmarks like<br />

the Pinal Mountains and<br />

Salt River. The project was<br />

inspired and largely funded<br />

by Victoria Carella and her<br />

partner Charles Beck, of<br />

Globe. The couple brought<br />

Sjolin the idea for this work<br />

and provided the majority<br />

of the mural project funding;<br />

the rest was supplied<br />

by Bullion Plaza through<br />

Gila County grants. Wildlife<br />

biologist Eric Herman<br />

served as a consultant on<br />

the mural. Bullion Plaza is<br />

also working to develop a<br />

coloring book and postcards<br />

based on Sjolin’s work.<br />

The McKusicks’ art,<br />

along with the accompanying<br />

mural and a wealth of<br />

other historical items from<br />

Gila County, is on view<br />

at Bullion Plaza Cultural<br />

Center & Museum. Visiting<br />

hours at the museum, located<br />

at 150 N. Plaza Circle<br />

in Miami, are Wednesday<br />

through Friday from 11 a.m.<br />

to 2 p.m.<br />

For more information,<br />

call (928) 473-3700.<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong><br />

33


Roosevelt Lake Marina<br />

Building a destination spot on<br />

Roosevelt Lake<br />

David Sowders/Copper Corridor<br />

BY DAVID SOWDERS<br />

Assistant Editor<br />

David Sowders/Copper Corridor<br />

Guests enjoy the lakeside atmosphere on Ffinch’s patio.<br />

Set against a lakeside backdrop that<br />

changes by the hour, Ffinch’s Waterfront<br />

Kitchen and Bar welcomes customers<br />

from all over. With its location at Roosevelt<br />

Lake Marina, its patio seating where<br />

guests can enjoy food, drinks and music, and<br />

its diverse menu, Ffinch’s manager, Mark Kie-<br />

See ROOSEVELT, page 35<br />

34 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


Continued from page 34<br />

ru, believes it will be a<br />

destination spot for years<br />

to come.<br />

“This has become extremely<br />

fun and exciting<br />

because we’re at grassroots<br />

level, and we’re developing<br />

something quite<br />

amazing,” said Kieru. “It’s<br />

not your typical, ordinary<br />

restaurant selling burgers<br />

and pizza,” he said, though<br />

those items are part of the<br />

menu – along with BBQ,<br />

steak and seafood dinners,<br />

chicken wings, salads,<br />

tacos and much more.<br />

“We’ve developed a pretty<br />

aggressive menu with a little<br />

bit of everything. Luckily<br />

for us we have some<br />

talented line cooks and a<br />

kitchen that’s able to pull<br />

this off, because it’s not<br />

easily done.”<br />

Kieru, a food industry<br />

veteran originally from<br />

New York, learned that the<br />

lakefront restaurant/bar<br />

was looking for a manager<br />

and came to check it out.<br />

“I saw the great possibilities<br />

and potential, spoke<br />

with the owners and ended<br />

up taking the job,” he said.<br />

“When I first made the trip<br />

here from Scottsdale, going<br />

up Highway 87, it was<br />

breathtaking. I went home<br />

via Highway 60; both trips<br />

were beautiful.”<br />

Along with its extensive<br />

menu and its views over<br />

Roosevelt Lake’s blue waters,<br />

Ffinch’s boasts several<br />

big-screen TVs where<br />

sports fans can catch a<br />

game, a game room, out-<br />

Staff at Ffinch’s serve indoor diners and bar customers.<br />

door heating and a walk-up<br />

order window. It has become<br />

an attraction for marina<br />

members and all kinds<br />

of other guests – from locals<br />

to winter visitors, and<br />

even wildland fire crews.<br />

“Many times they’d<br />

come in and have to leave<br />

right away before they got<br />

their food,” Kieru said of<br />

the firefighters. “When<br />

we could, we would take<br />

the food to them. We’re so<br />

proud of them and the job<br />

they’ve done for the community.”<br />

Kieru said his staff was<br />

another great asset, helping<br />

create an atmosphere<br />

he hopes will create family<br />

memories of trips to<br />

Ffinch’s. “We have people<br />

here who have been<br />

employed for almost two<br />

years, and I feel blessed by<br />

that. They’re very much a<br />

part of everything that happens<br />

here.<br />

“Our business has continued<br />

to grow because we<br />

were fortunate enough to<br />

have new faces show up<br />

and experience what we’re<br />

all about; the friendliness<br />

of the staff, the quality of<br />

the food, the beauty of the<br />

environment – whether<br />

you’re into sports or music,<br />

or just the dining. Because<br />

of the beautiful lake<br />

and our camping facilities<br />

here, this became a destination<br />

place for those who<br />

David Sowders/Copper Corridor<br />

needed and wanted to get<br />

out of the house.”<br />

Ffinch’s, located at<br />

28085 N. Hwy. 188 in<br />

Roosevelt, welcomes<br />

guests Monday through<br />

Thursday from 11:30 a.m.<br />

to 7:30 p.m., Friday from<br />

11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday<br />

from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.<br />

and Sunday from 8 a.m. to<br />

7 p.m.<br />

Both dine-in and takeout<br />

are available; for orders<br />

or information, call (602)<br />

977-7170.<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong><br />

35


The Salt River Bridge on State Route 288, the Globe-Young Highway<br />

BY DAVID SOWDERS<br />

Assistant Editor<br />

It may see less traffic<br />

than the Copper Corridor’s<br />

larger bridges, but<br />

in a box canyon near Roosevelt<br />

Lake stands a piece<br />

of Arizona transportation<br />

history.<br />

The scenic, largely unpaved<br />

road from Globe-Miami<br />

to the historic Rim<br />

Country town of Young,<br />

State Route 288, crosses one<br />

A bridge less traveled<br />

David Sowders/Copper Corridor<br />

of Arizona’s oldest bridges<br />

– still in its original location<br />

a century and a year after<br />

it opened. According to the<br />

ADOT bridge inventory, it’s<br />

one of the first bridges built<br />

after statehood.<br />

The Salt River Bridge on<br />

SR288 got its start back in<br />

1918 when the U.S. Bureau<br />

of Public Roads, just created<br />

that July, began work<br />

on a new road in the Tonto<br />

and Crook National Forest.<br />

The road would skirt Roosevelt<br />

Lake, then continue<br />

for 44 miles to Young – and<br />

the bridge would be a major<br />

part of it. BPR surveyors<br />

visited the site, a “box canyon<br />

a short distance above<br />

the old [Roosevelt] diversion<br />

dam,” that summer and<br />

engineered the road later<br />

that year. The agency, part<br />

of the Agriculture Department,<br />

was extensively involved<br />

with road and bridge<br />

construction in Arizona.<br />

The 220-foot bridge with<br />

a 215-foot main span was<br />

designed by BPR engineers<br />

in Denver. It is a long-span<br />

steel Parker truss (named<br />

after Charles Parker, a mechanical<br />

engineer with the<br />

National Bridge and Iron<br />

Works who patented the<br />

design in 1870), supported<br />

by concrete abutments on<br />

spread footings set into the<br />

solid-rock shoreline. According<br />

to ADOT’s bridge<br />

inventory, it’s one of only<br />

four Parker truss bridges to<br />

be found in the state.<br />

Construction drawings<br />

were finished on Sept. 1,<br />

1919, and soon approved by<br />

the Gila County Board of<br />

Supervisors. Work started<br />

in mid-December 1919 and<br />

the span was completed in<br />

1920, opening to traffic that<br />

September.<br />

Today the Salt River<br />

Bridge still serves traffic<br />

to and from Young, and<br />

has stood unchanged for<br />

101 years. It may be lesser<br />

known but it holds a<br />

place in Arizona history<br />

as the earliest and longest<br />

through-truss bridge still<br />

in its original spot, and the<br />

first documented bridge that<br />

BPR (a forerunner of the<br />

federal Highway Department)<br />

built in Arizona.<br />

36 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


TIMBER CAMP<br />

Local photographers submit winter images<br />

Courtesy photo/Paul Wolterbeek<br />

GLOBE-MIAMI<br />

Courtesy photo/Paul Wolterbeek<br />

Courtesy photo/Elizabeth Eaton<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong><br />

37


38 <strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong>


Antiques, art and more<br />

It’s amazing what you’ll<br />

find inside each one<br />

of these shops located<br />

throughout the Globe-Miami<br />

community.<br />

The Globe Antique Mall,<br />

171 W. Mesquite St. in<br />

Globe, is open Thursday,<br />

Friday and Sunday from 11<br />

a.m. to 3 p.m., and Saturday<br />

from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Their<br />

phone number is 928-425-<br />

2243.<br />

Hill Street Mall, 383 S.<br />

Hill St. in Globe, is open<br />

Friday and Saturday from<br />

10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday<br />

from noon to 4 p.m.<br />

Their phone number is 928-<br />

425-0022.<br />

The Pickle Barrel, 404 S.<br />

Broad St. in Globe, is open<br />

Thursday through Saturday<br />

from 10 a.m. to 5:45 p.m.,<br />

and Sunday from 11 a.m. to<br />

5 p.m. Their phone number<br />

is 928-425-9282.<br />

Simply Sarah, 661 S.<br />

Broad St. in Globe, is open<br />

Tuesday through Saturday<br />

from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.<br />

Their phone number is 928-<br />

425-3637.<br />

Splash of Copper, 656 N.<br />

Broad St. in Globe, is open<br />

Monday through Saturday<br />

from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and<br />

Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.<br />

Their phone number is 928-<br />

793-3148.<br />

Turn the Page Vintage<br />

and Western Apparel, 610<br />

N. Broad St. in Globe, is<br />

open Wednesday through<br />

Saturday from 10:30 a.m.<br />

to 5 p.m. Their phone number<br />

is 623-910-9033.<br />

Yesterday’s Treasures,<br />

209 W. Hackney Ave. in<br />

Globe, is open Monday<br />

through Saturday from 9<br />

a.m. to 5 p.m. Their phone<br />

number is 928-425-7016.<br />

Cowgirl Antiques, 416<br />

W. Sullivan St. in Miami,<br />

can be accessed through the<br />

entrance located at the Wild<br />

Horses Saloon.<br />

Donna by Design, 501<br />

W. Sullivan St. in Miami,<br />

is open Thursday through<br />

Saturday from 10 a.m. to<br />

5 p.m., and Sunday from<br />

noon to 4 p.m.<br />

Grandma’s House of Antiques<br />

and Treasures, 123<br />

N. Miami Ave. in Miami,<br />

is open Thursday through<br />

Monday from 10 a.m. to 5<br />

p.m. Their phone number is<br />

623-670-0717.<br />

David Sowders/Copper Corridor<br />

Miami Rose Trading<br />

Post, 401 W. Sullivan St.<br />

in Miami, is open Saturday<br />

and Sunday from 10 a.m. to<br />

5 p.m. Their phone number<br />

is 928-473-2949.<br />

Stewart’s Antique Nook,<br />

409 W. Sullivan St. in Miami,<br />

is open Saturday and<br />

Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.<br />

Their phone number is 480-<br />

993-8611.<br />

Sullivan Street Antiques,<br />

407 W. Sullivan St. in Miami,<br />

is open from 10 a.m.<br />

to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.<br />

<strong>Gateway</strong> to the Copper Corridor <strong>2022</strong><br />

David Sowders/Copper Corridor<br />

David Sowders/Copper Corridor<br />

39

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