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NetJets EU Autumn 2023

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TUSCAN HIGHS<br />

Latest happenings in<br />

Italy’s thriving region<br />

ON THE WALL<br />

Stencil art is making<br />

a mark with collectors<br />

IN THE ZONE<br />

Mayo Clinic’s guide<br />

to beating jet lag<br />

CLUB FANTASTIC<br />

Costa Navarino gets<br />

a golfing upgrade<br />

ANGLER’S DELIGHT<br />

Top resorts and lodges<br />

for fishing fanatics


TAKING OFF<br />

W<br />

ITH SEVERAL HOLIDAYS PEPPERED THROUGHOUT THE QUARTER,<br />

IT LEADS TO AN UPTICK IN TRAVEL – WHAT WE CALL OUR<br />

“PEAK PERIOD”.<br />

With many Owners taking the opportunity to spend time with<br />

family and friends, it’s a good reminder to do what we can to<br />

stay healthy throughout the season. We share this as we read the latest Mayo Clinic<br />

research on jet lag.<br />

On pages 38-40, Dr Vanichkachorn of Mayo Clinic’s Aerospace Medicine team estimates<br />

that it takes about one day per time zone you cross to adjust to your location. He also<br />

offers fantastic tips to lessen the jet lag when flying with us.<br />

This insight may have proven helpful for recent passengers on our longest flight ever<br />

in terms of time (a <strong>NetJets</strong> US Global 7500 flew from Hong Kong to Manchester,<br />

New Hampshire). That 15-plus hour flight might typically lend to a day’s-long recovery;<br />

however, we are hopeful that the comfort of <strong>NetJets</strong> – in addition to Mayo Clinic’s<br />

advice – can allow you to start your holidays (jet-lag free!) upon arrival.<br />

As you embark on your travels over the next couple of months, we wish you and your<br />

family a safe and healthy holiday season.<br />

Only <strong>NetJets</strong>!<br />

Adam Johnson<br />

Chairman and CEO<br />

CONTRIBUTORS<br />

JOSH SIMS<br />

The London-based<br />

writer delved into<br />

the world of the<br />

sketch artist for<br />

From Street Corner<br />

to Sotheby’s<br />

(page 56), and<br />

discovered why the<br />

most rebellious<br />

of art forms is<br />

gaining a veneer<br />

of respectability<br />

among collectors.<br />

CLAIRE WRATHALL<br />

For The Power of<br />

Art (page 10), the<br />

scribe investigated<br />

the work of the<br />

Arete Arts, a new<br />

charity that aims<br />

to bring African<br />

artists to the<br />

fore and support<br />

environmental<br />

and social<br />

causes around<br />

the continent.<br />

MATTHEW SHAVE<br />

Elegant fashions<br />

and must-have<br />

accessories, from<br />

high-end watches<br />

to the latest<br />

camera equipment,<br />

feature in A Man’s<br />

World (page 60),<br />

a timely guide<br />

for gentlemen<br />

as captured by<br />

the experienced<br />

photographer.<br />

NIGEL TISDALL<br />

With a keen<br />

interest in all<br />

things eco, the<br />

veteran journalist<br />

was drawn to the<br />

work of The Nature<br />

Conservancy,<br />

whose efforts to<br />

save our precious<br />

oceans and sealife<br />

he chronicles in<br />

Bonding with the<br />

Blue (page 64).<br />

IVAN CARVALHO<br />

Having been based<br />

in Italy since 2003,<br />

the American writer<br />

is well set to judge<br />

the latest Tuscan<br />

Triumphs (page<br />

14), as the fabled<br />

Italian region<br />

welcomes some<br />

fantastic new<br />

openings, while<br />

some old favourites<br />

offer that bit more.<br />

This symbol throughout the magazine denotes the nearest airport served by <strong>NetJets</strong> to<br />

the story’s subject, with approximate distances in miles and kilometres where applicable.<br />

4 <strong>NetJets</strong>


CONTENTS<br />

6 <strong>NetJets</strong>


DINE WITH A VIEW<br />

La Roqqa, Porto Ercole,<br />

page 14<br />

68 52 44<br />

AFRICA FORWARD<br />

Arete Arts is a new charity<br />

championing the best of<br />

African artists<br />

pages 10-13<br />

ON THE HOOK<br />

Fishing spots around the<br />

world that offer comfort<br />

and a great catch<br />

pages 44-51<br />

OMAKASE, OH MY<br />

Discreet venues and<br />

exceptional fare lead<br />

London’s Japanese scene<br />

pages 68-73<br />

IN THE NEWS<br />

Developments in Tuscany,<br />

audio excellence, the<br />

finest spirits, and more<br />

pages 14-31<br />

SWING TIME<br />

Costa Navarino continues<br />

to evolve as Greece’s<br />

golfing hot spot<br />

pages 52-55<br />

BUBBLING UP<br />

Grower champagnes are<br />

winning over even the<br />

haughtiest oenophiles<br />

pages 74-77<br />

NETJETS UPDATE<br />

Latest events, staff<br />

in profile, plus <strong>NetJets</strong><br />

and United Autosports<br />

pages 32-36<br />

STREET SAVVY<br />

How stencil art has moved<br />

from outside walls to<br />

inside auction houses<br />

pages 56-59<br />

TURKISH DELIGHT<br />

A spectacular new<br />

building houses Istanbul<br />

Modern’s treasures<br />

pages 78-85<br />

ALESSANDRO MOGGI, © MANDARIN ORIENTAL, JACOB SJÖMAN, © CASA DE CAMPO<br />

STAY ON TRACK<br />

Mayo Clinic’s guide to<br />

counter and deal with<br />

the effects of jet lag<br />

pages 38-40<br />

ALL ABOUT HIM<br />

Statement fashion and<br />

accessories for the man<br />

about town this season<br />

pages 60-63<br />

BLUE AND GREEN<br />

The Nature Conservancy<br />

is producing a plan to<br />

save the world’s oceans<br />

pages 64-67<br />

THE LAST WORD<br />

Architect Frank Gehry<br />

on his life away from his<br />

iconic drawing board<br />

page 86<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

7


NETJETS, THE MAGAZINE<br />

FRONT COVER<br />

Aerial view of the<br />

Epidaurus theatre, Greece<br />

(See page 52 for the<br />

best golf in Greece.)<br />

Image by George<br />

Pachantouris<br />

AUTUMN <strong>2023</strong> // VOLUME 23<br />

EDITOR IN CHIEF<br />

Thomas Midulla<br />

EDITOR<br />

Farhad Heydari<br />

CREATIVE DIRECTOR<br />

Anne Plamann<br />

PHOTO DIRECTOR<br />

Martin Kreuzer<br />

ART DIRECTOR<br />

Anja Eichinger<br />

MANAGING EDITOR<br />

John McNamara<br />

SENIOR EDITOR<br />

Brian Noone<br />

STAFF WRITER<br />

Claudia Whiteus<br />

CHIEF SUB-EDITOR<br />

Vicki Reeve<br />

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR<br />

Albert Keller<br />

SEPARATION<br />

Delnaz Loftimaragh<br />

WRITERS, CONTRIBUTORS,<br />

PHOTOGRAPHERS AND<br />

ILLUSTRATORS<br />

Ivan Carvalho, Jörn Kaspuhl,<br />

Larry Olmsted, Christiaan<br />

Porter, Julian Rentzsch,<br />

Matthew Shave, Josh Sims,<br />

Nigel Tisdall, Elisa Vallata,<br />

Claire Wrathall<br />

Published by JI Experience<br />

GmbH Hanns-Seidel-Platz 5<br />

81737 Munich, Germany<br />

GROUP PUBLISHER<br />

Christian Schwalbach<br />

Michael Klotz (Associate)<br />

ADVERTISING SALES<br />

<strong>EU</strong>ROPE<br />

Katherine Galligan<br />

katherine@metropolist.co.uk<br />

Vishal Raguvanshi<br />

vishal@metropolist.co.uk<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong>, The Magazine is the<br />

official title for Owners of <strong>NetJets</strong><br />

in Europe. <strong>NetJets</strong>, The Magazine<br />

is published quarterly by<br />

JI Experience GmbH on behalf<br />

of <strong>NetJets</strong> Management Ltd.<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong> Management Ltd<br />

5 Young Street<br />

London, W8 5EH England,<br />

United Kingdom<br />

netjets.com<br />

+44 (0)20 7361 9600<br />

Copyright © <strong>2023</strong><br />

by JI Experience GmbH. All rights<br />

reserved. Reproduction in whole or<br />

in part without the express written<br />

permission of the publisher is<br />

strictly prohibited. The publisher,<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong> Inc., and its subsidiaries<br />

or affiliated companies assume<br />

no responsibility for errors and<br />

omissions and are not responsible<br />

for unsolicited manuscripts,<br />

photographs, or artwork. Views<br />

expressed are not necessarily those<br />

of the publisher or <strong>NetJets</strong> Inc.<br />

Information is correct at time of<br />

going to press.<br />

8 <strong>NetJets</strong>


MADDOXGALLERY.COM<br />

DOWNLOAD OUR <strong>2023</strong> INVESTMENT GUIDE<br />

DAVID YARROW, MARSHLANDS


GOODWILL<br />

THE POWER OF ART<br />

Arete Arts is a remarkable new charitable venture that<br />

aims both to support African artists as well as contribute to<br />

environmental and social causes // By Claire Wrathall<br />

JAN KOENIG<br />

LEARNING YOUNG<br />

Children in La Palais de<br />

Lomé gardens look over a<br />

bronze sculpture by the<br />

Togo-born artist<br />

Amouzou Amouzou-Glikpa<br />

IT WAS AS colleagues, passionate about<br />

conservation, that Emilia Keladitis and<br />

Stephanie Sluka first met and discovered<br />

their shared love for African art and culture.<br />

Professionally, they were focused on funding<br />

conservation efforts aimed at protecting<br />

African natural habitats and biodiversity.<br />

They became friends and together began<br />

to discover emerging artists across the<br />

African continent, many of them themselves<br />

passionate about the environment. Africa<br />

is one of the lowest contributors to climate<br />

change and yet suffers some of the most<br />

dire consequences; drought, famine,<br />

flooding. “We believe in the transformational<br />

power of the arts” says Keladitis, who is<br />

based in Europe but grew up in Botswana.<br />

Sluka is American but has been based in<br />

Africa for the last 15 years. Both believe<br />

that “art is a powerful way to engage people<br />

emotionally and deepen the discourse<br />

around social and environmental topics”.<br />

The intention was to publish a coffee<br />

table book on African contemporary art,<br />

celebrating African natural landscapes,<br />

with all profits going to fund grassroots<br />

projects across the continent. But with<br />

every conversation, the opportunity to<br />

create positive social impact at scale just<br />

grew and grew. The result is Arete Arts, “a<br />

platform to amplify the voices and messages<br />

of contemporary African artists who are<br />

passionate about the environment and social<br />

justice. Profits support creative initiatives<br />

across Africa through a not-for-profit entity<br />

– the idea being that commercial profits fund<br />

the issuance of small grants of $5,000 to<br />

$20,000 to projects dedicated to advancing<br />

environmental and, in time, social causes.<br />

Registered as a limited company, the<br />

commercial arm, Arete Arts Community aims<br />

to raise money through events, private dinners<br />

and the sale of their inaugural publication,<br />

Afroprophetic: Art transforming minds and<br />

10 <strong>NetJets</strong>


GOODWILL<br />

TAKE A RIDE<br />

Motorcycle by<br />

Beninese artist<br />

Falhoun Ogoun<br />

nature, which features artists from across<br />

the continent, notably El Anatsui and Serge<br />

Attukwei Clottey (both from Ghana), Romuald<br />

Hazoumè (Benin), Abdoulaye Konaté (Mali),<br />

Wangechi Mutu (Kenya), Pascale Marthine<br />

Tayou and Barthélémy Toguo (both from<br />

Cameroon), as well as London-based Sir John<br />

Akomfrah RA, Sokari Douglas Camp CBE and<br />

Yinka Shonibare CBE RA.<br />

Arete Arts Community is also planning to<br />

offer bespoke travel experiences “to connect<br />

with African artists and art initiatives”.<br />

Any profits it generates will be donated to<br />

the Foundation, which is in the process of<br />

registering with the UK’s Charity Commission.<br />

Editor of Afroprophetic: Art transforming minds<br />

and nature, and Arete Arts Circle member,<br />

Sophie Braine, curated an inaugural exhibition<br />

for the benefit of Arete Arts Foundation at<br />

Christie’s in London, where Braine worked for<br />

10 years. Arete Arts funded the publication<br />

of the book and all profits from the sale will<br />

go to funding grassroots projects across the<br />

continent. “It’s too soon to tell what sort of<br />

sums it will raise but it is opening the door to<br />

conversations with like-minded people, who<br />

share our belief in the transformational power<br />

of the arts,” says Keladitis.<br />

What money they have raised to date has<br />

come mostly from art sales made at private<br />

events across the globe, including a dinner in<br />

Hong Kong, hosted by the collector Benjamin<br />

Sigg, nephew of the famed collector of Chinese<br />

art, Uli Sigg – from whose private collection<br />

more than 1,500 items are now on display at<br />

the M+ museum in Hong Kong.<br />

“Most of the dinners are funded by the<br />

people hosting them,” Keladitis explains, adding<br />

that the next ones will be held in the US and<br />

Kenya. “These are people who are passionate<br />

about wanting to buy art with a purpose. Like<br />

what we are seeing in the travel industry,<br />

people want to travel but also be educated<br />

and immerse themselves in a new culture. Art<br />

speaks to and from our deepest selves, artists<br />

are communicating a story about their view of<br />

the world. Collectors want to meet the artists;<br />

they want to understand their backgrounds.”<br />

There is a potential travel element to Arete’s<br />

offering. “We hosted an event at Chaminuka<br />

Lodge in Zambia,” she says, referring to Andrew<br />

and Danae Sardanis’s game lodge, which is also<br />

home to a substantial collection of African art,<br />

more than 1,000 pieces acquired over the past<br />

half-century that they display throughout the<br />

main house and 30 guest suites. “And we would<br />

love to host more events in Africa and are<br />

working with Le Palais de Lomé in the Togolese<br />

capital, an incredible project run by Sonia<br />

Lawson, a former management consultant and<br />

latterly curator of the Togolese stand at the<br />

Paris art fair Révélations biennale des métiers<br />

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND ARETE ARTS<br />

12 <strong>NetJets</strong>


“ passionate<br />

Arete Arts is a platform to amplify the voices<br />

and messages of contemporary African artists who are<br />

about the environment and social justice<br />

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND EVERARD READ GALLERY<br />

d’art et création, and another key member of<br />

the Arete Arts Community. “The Palais was<br />

the former German and French governor’s<br />

palace. It was derelict for 20 years when<br />

Sonia led the initiative to fund and refurbish<br />

it into a contemporary art museum set within<br />

11 hectares of natural biodiversity. It’s the<br />

first property of its type, a contemporary<br />

art museum devoted to biodiversity and<br />

raising awareness for the need to protect<br />

natural landscapes. They have a thousand<br />

schoolchildren come through the doors every<br />

week, to learn about art and about the natural<br />

habitat, to understand where their food comes<br />

from, and to discover new flora and fauna.”<br />

It’s an ambitious business model given<br />

the vicissitudes of the art world, but one<br />

cannot but applaud Arete’s ideals, not least<br />

in promising their artists “a minimum 70 per<br />

cent” cut of any sale. “So in that scenario<br />

we’re helping the artist too,” Keladitis adds.<br />

The key is growth, and they do know a lot of<br />

people: they have recruited an impressive<br />

community of supporters across Africa and<br />

beyond, among them the French-Nigerian<br />

opera singer Omo Bello (they’re as committed<br />

to the performing arts as to visual forms)<br />

and Tiphaine de Mombynes, Director of the<br />

Metis Fund for art and development, which is<br />

hosted by French development agency (AFD) to<br />

enrich dialogue and sustainable development<br />

impacts. And that is ultimately what Arete Arts<br />

hopes to do more of. “We could have formed<br />

a straightforward non-profit or found a niche<br />

within the collecting space,” Keladitis says, “but<br />

our mission is to weave those things together:<br />

to connect collectors and donors with those<br />

interested in social and environmental projects.<br />

And to use that money, and that awareness, to<br />

support grassroots initiatives.” aretearts.org<br />

AVIAN INSPIRED<br />

Proof by South African artist<br />

Colbert Mashile, courtesy of<br />

Everard Read Gallery<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

13


THE SMART GUIDE<br />

Our collection of the latest, the<br />

brightest and the best begins with<br />

developments in an Italian Eden<br />

TUSCAN TRIUMPHS<br />

A handful of new standout properties are bringing fresh<br />

life to the fabled Italian region // By Ivan Carvalho<br />

TUSCANY IS ADMITTEDLY a<br />

well-trodden region, with its<br />

travel offerings, gastronomy<br />

and cultural artifacts well<br />

ingrained in the minds<br />

of visitors. Yet amid the<br />

familiar columns of cypress<br />

trees and medieval stone<br />

towers punctuating the<br />

skyline in settlements from<br />

San Gimignano to Siena a<br />

new generation of wellheeled<br />

hotels has emerged<br />

for those eager to explore<br />

this privileged slice of the<br />

Bel Paese.<br />

Heading south from<br />

Florence, in the heart of<br />

Chianti, you find the newly<br />

inaugurated Pieve Aldina<br />

(lesdomainesdefontenille.com),<br />

the first Italian addition<br />

to the Les Domaines de<br />

Fontenille collection of<br />

luxury properties. Situated<br />

in the village of Radda, the<br />

hotel consists of a quartet<br />

of stone buildings, one a<br />

listed national monument,<br />

where once the bishops of<br />

Siena sojourned in summer.<br />

Its rich architectural<br />

SYLVIE BEQUET<br />

SUPERIOR INTERIOR<br />

Elegant design at Pieve Aldina<br />

14 <strong>NetJets</strong>


LIFE IN<br />

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With a unique blend of villas, townhouses, and apartments, complemented by an 18-hole championship golf course and<br />

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in perfect balance.<br />

GOLF PROPERTIES FOR SALE FROM €550 000 | +357 25 888 700 | LIMASSOLGREENS.COM


THE SMART GUIDE<br />

STEFANO SCATÀ<br />

COUNTRY CULTURE<br />

Borgo Pignano’s grounds<br />

and one of its art<br />

studios; below: the redhued<br />

Casa Newton<br />

heritage includes an<br />

impressive marble staircase,<br />

neoclassical frescoes and<br />

tiled roofs. Guests choose<br />

from 22 rooms and suites<br />

boasting high ceilings and<br />

an uncluttered contemporary<br />

interior design with<br />

furnishings from Gervasoni.<br />

MARK BOLTON<br />

Surrounded by olive<br />

groves, the bucolic setting<br />

features alfresco dining<br />

and a rustic-meets-modern<br />

indoor space where chef<br />

Flavio Faedi prepares<br />

mouthwatering moments<br />

with classic fare from chianti<br />

wine stew and chickpea<br />

cakes to pappa al pomodoro<br />

and fennel seed salami<br />

paired with a glass of robust<br />

Brunello di Montalcino.<br />

Another newcomer,<br />

which opened its doors in<br />

September, is Casa Newton<br />

(casa-newton.com), nestled<br />

in the rolling hills and amber<br />

fields of grain of Val d’Orcia.<br />

The heart of the hotel is a<br />

three-floor country manor in<br />

a red-brick hue hosting nine<br />

bedrooms together with two<br />

panoramic suites carved out<br />

of a renovated farmhouse.<br />

The property produces its own<br />

range of natural wines under<br />

the Fabbrica Pienza label,<br />

including a syrah vinified<br />

in conical wood fermenters<br />

ALESSANDRO MOGGI<br />

16 <strong>NetJets</strong>


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BY APPOINTMENT TO<br />

HRH THE PRINCE OF WALES<br />

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CROCKETT & JONES LIMITED, NORTHAMPTON<br />

MADE IN ENGLAND | SINCE 1879<br />

A best-selling Chelsea Boot<br />

Made using a durable, waxed suede<br />

with water resistant properties<br />

CROCKETTANDJONES.COM


THE SMART GUIDE<br />

GREEN SCENE<br />

The estate of<br />

Il Borro<br />

and a straightforward red<br />

made from whole clusters of<br />

sangiovese that undergo a<br />

long maceration.<br />

For those keen to wet their<br />

feet and experience another<br />

side of Tuscany, where<br />

fragrant Mediterranean<br />

maquis abound and<br />

flamingos stroll gracefully<br />

across the water, a move<br />

west to the coastal town<br />

of Porto Ercole finds you<br />

unpacking your bags<br />

at La Roqqa (laroqqa.<br />

com), the latest high-end<br />

accommodation on the<br />

Monte Argentario peninsula.<br />

Opened this August, this<br />

seasonal addition is a<br />

design-led project of 55<br />

rooms, all with private<br />

balconies or terraces, that<br />

was envisioned by Milanbased<br />

architects Ludovica<br />

Serafini and Roberto<br />

Palomba. Centrally located in<br />

Porto Ercole, guests can take<br />

in the view from its rooftop<br />

restaurant while perusing its<br />

all-Tuscan wine list before<br />

retreating to rooms sporting<br />

a curated mix of custom<br />

furnishings and Italian design<br />

from the 1960s and 1970s.<br />

After a sojourn at<br />

one of these newest<br />

accommodations, the pull<br />

of nostalgia might send you<br />

seeking a hostelry with a<br />

few years under its belt. In<br />

that case, a move towards<br />

Arezzo is in order, to spend<br />

a few days in the patrician<br />

surroundings of Il Borro<br />

© IL BORRO<br />

18 <strong>NetJets</strong>


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• A masterpiece of British design by Squire & Partners<br />

• Inspired by the timeless allure of Art Deco design<br />

• Magnificent views of the Westminster skyline<br />

• A flourishing new community below at Orchard Place<br />

• Indulge in world-class amenities<br />

• Dedicated 24hr security and concierge<br />

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enquiries@northacre.com<br />

+44 (0) 207 349 8000<br />

*Prices correct at time of publication


THE SMART GUIDE<br />

ALESSANDRO MOGGI<br />

(ilborro.it). This Relais &<br />

Châteaux property centres<br />

on an agricultural estate,<br />

farmed organically, which is<br />

managed by the Ferragamo<br />

family and produces wine<br />

SUN TRAP<br />

A terrace at La Roqqa;<br />

below: Pieve Aldina<br />

and olive oil. It counts 38<br />

chic suites in a medieval<br />

hamlet as well as the more<br />

recently added Aie del Borro<br />

collection of 18 rooms and<br />

suites divided across a<br />

quartet of centuries-old<br />

farmhouses reached via a<br />

long avenue of holm oaks<br />

in a bucolic setting marked<br />

by mulberry trees, lavender<br />

bushes and wild roses.<br />

For vacations extending<br />

weeks rather than days,<br />

or where large families or<br />

groups are concerned, Il<br />

Borro provides an impressive<br />

selection of villas. The<br />

same can be said for Borgo<br />

Pignano (borgopignano.<br />

com), owned by Welsh-born<br />

entrepreneur Michael Moritz,<br />

which offers a half dozen<br />

well-manicured residences<br />

immersed in the hills of<br />

Volterra suitable for big<br />

gatherings and reunions.<br />

Naturally, the pride of<br />

place at Moritz’s 300ha<br />

hotel is its stately 18thcentury<br />

villa flanked by<br />

a traditionally planted<br />

English garden. With its<br />

14 regal rooms and suites,<br />

all adorned with en-suite<br />

marble and travertine<br />

bathrooms, the villa is the<br />

centrepiece of a hospitality<br />

project that includes its<br />

own farm, where chefs from<br />

the property are able to<br />

source an extensive range<br />

of foodstuffs from cereals<br />

and honey to herbs and the<br />

organic flour used to make<br />

pizza in the hotel’s woodburning<br />

ovens. It’s a fitting<br />

farm-to-table capstone in<br />

a region that has long been<br />

known for its exceptional<br />

produce and even more<br />

exceptional cuisine.<br />

Florence or Pisa<br />

International Airports<br />

SYLVIE BEQUET<br />

20 <strong>NetJets</strong>


WHEN THEY ASK WHERE YOU’RE FROM.<br />

THE WORLD<br />

Each day aboard The World, you awaken in the most remarkable home you will ever<br />

own. As one of the few international adventurers who live this incomparable lifestyle,<br />

you explore each continent and sail every sea surrounded by unrivaled anticipatory<br />

luxury service on the planet’s largest private residential yacht.<br />

YOUR EXCLUSIVE INVITATION<br />

The World is extending a limited invitation for <strong>NetJets</strong><br />

members to join us for a private tour of the only yacht<br />

of its kind. Scan the QR code to learn more.<br />

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THE SMART GUIDE<br />

A GRAND COLLECTION<br />

The latest tantalising elixirs to raise the spirits<br />

1<br />

2<br />

3<br />

4<br />

5 6<br />

7<br />

9<br />

12<br />

8<br />

10<br />

11<br />

13<br />

1 BENROMACH CONTRASTS KILN DRIED OAK The Speyside distillery’s Contrasts range offers variations on the smoky Benromach style by<br />

maturing the spirit in different ways. The limited-edition release matured in kiln-dried virgin oak barrels makes for a sweeter, more malted<br />

biscuit nose. benromach.com // 2 BLADNOCH THE SAMHLA COLLECTION Three very special – and very limited – whiskies from the Lowlands<br />

form this selection of Bladnoch’s finest: The McClelland, distilled in 1966 (limited to 15 bottles, pictured); The Prior (1990, 50 bottles);<br />

and The Sage (2008, 100 bottles). bladnoch.com // 3 BOWMORE ASTON MARTIN Two centres of excellence collide as master blender of<br />

Bowmore Ron Welsh creates a unique whisky in tandem with chief creative officer of Aston Martin Marek Reichman and his team. The result<br />

is a symphony of flavours. bowmore.com // 4 LITTLEMILL THE VANGUARDS COLLECTION – CHAPTER ONE Dedicated to Robert Muir, who<br />

was granted the first ever licence by the government of King George III to “retail ale, beer and other excisable liquors” at Littlemill In 1773,<br />

this first in a four-part collection has a long finish of citrus and caramelizsed sugar flavours. littlemilldistillery.com // 5 GLEN SCOTIA 48<br />

YEAR OLD Also marking the past, this limited edition celebrates Campbeltown’s international trade links when it was known as the Victorian<br />

whisky capital of the world. The result is a whisky aged in bourbon barrels before maturing in two types of sherry casks – and a very special,<br />

complex taste. glenscotia.com // 6 TORABHAIG ALLT GLEANN BATCH STRENGTH This young Skye distillery brings an end to the first stage<br />

of its development with this release, which draws on the heavily peated grains of the area and tames them into an elegantly rugged dram.<br />

torabhaig.com // 7 JOHNNIE WALKER BLUE LABEL ELUSIVE UMAMI The enigmatic “fifth” flavour is the inspiration for this new whisky<br />

from the legendary brand, a remarkable collaboration between master blender Emma Walker and world-renowned chef Kei Kobayashi.<br />

johnniewalker.com // 8 LADYBURN EDITION THREE Operating for only nine years between 1966 and 1975, Ladyburn still helped define an era<br />

of whisky and style. This combines in the 210 hand-numbered bottles of this release, each featuring one of 11 iconic images from designer<br />

David Hicks (including Dressed for Dinner, pictured). williamgrant.com // 9 THE MACALLAN THE HARMONY COLLECTION AMBER MEADOW<br />

The third installment in a selection that celebrates the distillery’s deep connection with the land. Sisters Mary and Stella McCartney’s<br />

memories of their family home in the Scottish countryside inspire this citrus-flavoured release. themacallan.com // 10 THE GLENDRONACH<br />

GRAND<strong>EU</strong>R <strong>2023</strong> The annual release in the series dating back to 2010 was matured for almost three decades in Oloroso sherry casks. Each<br />

bottle of this limited edition is sealed by wax and numbered by hand. glendronachdistillery.com // 11 CASAMIGOS CRISTALINO Crisp and<br />

clean with an aroma of cocoa and caramel, the latest tequila from Casamigos takes an unusual twist on this most fashionable version of<br />

the spirit. Rather than being añejo-based, this cristalino is derived from Casamigos Reposado Tequila. casamigos.com // 12 COURVOISIER<br />

MIZUNARA <strong>2023</strong> The second iteration of this Franco-Japanese cognac (as Courvoisier’s master blender teams up with the House of Suntory<br />

chief blender Shinji Fukuyo) is a wonderful combination of jasmine and cherry blossom overlayed on the traditional rich fruit flavour.<br />

courvoisier.com // 13 TOMATIN PX CASK Beautifully aged in a Pedro Ximenez sherry butt, distilled in 2001 and bottled last year, this single<br />

malt has initial aromas of maple syrup and rum-soaked sultanas, transitioning into bitter aromas. tomatin.com<br />

ALL IMAGES COURTESY THE COMPANIES<br />

22 <strong>NetJets</strong>


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THE SMART GUIDE<br />

© GARAGE ITALIA<br />

A Return to<br />

the Good Life<br />

Synonymous with la dolce vita, the Fiat<br />

500 was a design icon of the last century<br />

– and is again now thanks to Garage Italia<br />

Customs, a leading light in the restomod<br />

industry. The Fiat 500 Spiaggina is a fully<br />

electric version of the classic car, which is<br />

rechargeable in just a few hours and from<br />

any domestic socket. Showing an awareness<br />

of the past, Garage Italia has teamed up<br />

with Bonacina, who were responsible for<br />

the original interior of the car. Then as<br />

now, rattan core seats are a key feature,<br />

though for the latest iteration multiple<br />

colour options are available to match or<br />

complement the vehicle’s exterior.<br />

garage-italia.com<br />

JASON BAX<br />

Back to Basics<br />

For its latest Land Cruiser, Toyota has taken a step back with some retro touches<br />

– and a return to the North American market. Stylistically, a 1958 trim with vintageinspired<br />

round LED headlamps and a Toyota heritage grille are distinctive, but this<br />

is a modern beast packed with Toyota’s latest technology. The Safety Sense 3.0 system,<br />

in particular, adds an extra layer of security to the driving experience. toyota.com<br />

24 <strong>NetJets</strong>


THE SMART GUIDE<br />

On the Waterfront<br />

The road meets the sea in this collaboration between motoring marque Porsche and Frauscher,<br />

the Austrian shipyard. Using technology developed for Porsche’s all-electric Macan, the duo has<br />

come up with the 850 Fantom Air. Built to the usual high quality, luxury standards of Frauscher,<br />

it also incorporates the carmaker’s pre-programmed driving modes from Docking to Sport Plus,<br />

and has a top speed of 85km/h. frauscherxporsche.com<br />

Material World<br />

Scent of the Season<br />

The US luggage manufacturer Tumi has raised the<br />

bar with a new high-performance material for its<br />

latest range of cases and bags. The new Alpha<br />

X luggage collection is made from PX6, its most<br />

abrasion-resistant fabric yet, and is exclusive to<br />

Tumi. The collection includes the international<br />

dual-access carry-on (below). tumi.com<br />

A beacon of Italian style and luxe, Acqua di Parma<br />

is always ahead of the curve when it comes to<br />

enlivening the senses – as its new range for<br />

Christmas proves. A collection of candles and<br />

diffusers that prompt thoughts of the wonders<br />

of winter with three themes: Bosco, redolent<br />

of the clean air of the mountains; Neve Fresca<br />

(diffuser, above left), which brings to mind a crisp<br />

winter morning; and Portafortuna (candle, above<br />

right), a gateway to luck and dreams coming true.<br />

acquadiparma.com<br />

ALL IMAGES COURTESY THE COMPANIES<br />

26 <strong>NetJets</strong>


THE SMART GUIDE<br />

Delicate Beauty<br />

Artist Rolf Sachs has an<br />

endless fascination with<br />

imperfection, which he explores<br />

in his collaboration with porcelain<br />

manufacturer Nymphenburg.<br />

The result is a collection of<br />

limited-edition candlesticks titled<br />

Berührung (German for “touch”).<br />

With Sachs’s emotional approach<br />

to moulding the pure white bisque<br />

porcelain, one-off pieces are<br />

formed in various shapes and<br />

sizes. “I have a love of flaws,”<br />

he says. “By nature, humans are<br />

not perfect and if we are, we are<br />

probably boring.” nymphenburg.com<br />

The Right Notes<br />

Having launched in the US last year,<br />

Steinway & Sons has brought its latest<br />

flagship model to Europe. The Gran Nichetto<br />

Model B Steinway is a collaboration with<br />

Italian designer Luca Nichetto. Born in<br />

Venice, Nichetto originally conceived the<br />

piano as a homage to his home city – the<br />

smoothness and dynamism of gondola a<br />

particular influence on the contours of the<br />

instrument. Steinway’s latest technological<br />

advancements, which allow for live<br />

performance capture and playback, also<br />

play a key feature in this remarkable piano.<br />

steinway.com<br />

© STEINWAY & SONS<br />

BRANDL UTZT<br />

28 <strong>NetJets</strong>


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THE SMART GUIDE<br />

WALL OF SOUND<br />

Audio equipment to switch on to<br />

Cool Option<br />

Individual Touch<br />

Promising a personal experience like<br />

never before, Denon’s latest earbuds are a<br />

game changer. Denon PerL (Personalized<br />

Listening) and PerL Pro use parent company<br />

Masimo’s Adaptive Acoustic Technology to<br />

produce a personal hearing profile for every<br />

user, meaning an individual experience<br />

tuned perfectly to each listener’s own<br />

hearing. The buds also offer active noise<br />

cancellation and a social mode, which<br />

allows you to dictate just how much you<br />

tune in and drop out. denon.com<br />

If you want glacier chic, the limitededition<br />

ice-blue versions of Audio<br />

Technica’s ATH-M50xIB and wireless<br />

ATH-M50xBT2IB might fit the bill. As<br />

the headphones of choice of many top<br />

audio engineers the ATH-M50xIB is<br />

known for its large-aperture drivers,<br />

sound-isolating earcups and robust<br />

construction. The wireless version is<br />

perhaps more suitable for the more<br />

casual listener, with its exceptional<br />

clarity and 50 hours of playtime on a<br />

single charge. audio-technica.com<br />

The Power of Red<br />

In many ways, it seems an odd collaboration.<br />

Audio pioneers Bang & Olufsen’s range of topclass<br />

speakers are generally designed to blend<br />

into people’s homes, visually neutral, while<br />

providing the ultimate aural experience. Ferrari<br />

aims to grab as much attention as possible, on<br />

the track and on the road. Yet there is much that<br />

unites them, from visionary founders to a passion<br />

for poise, power and precision. And the result?<br />

A reimagining of a series of the Danish brand’s<br />

headphones and speakers in the striking red of<br />

Ferrari. bang-olufsen.com<br />

ALL IMAGES COURTESY THE COMPANIES<br />

30 <strong>NetJets</strong>


Take it for a Spin<br />

The re-rise of vinyl continues apace, with the format outselling CDs<br />

for the first time in 30 years in 2022. And the response of top audio<br />

firms is to produce better and better turntables. The DP-3000NE<br />

from Denon is one of the latest and the finest. The craftmanship<br />

is exquisite – a dark ebony veneer over a sturdy wood cabinet –<br />

combined with the highest quality components to produce a crystalclear<br />

sound. denon.com<br />

Setting the Tone<br />

Designed<br />

to Shine<br />

The fusion of a sphere<br />

and a cylinder into one<br />

solid aluminium piece,<br />

the Beolab 8, the latest<br />

in Bang & Olufsen’s<br />

high-end speaker series,<br />

is visually distinct.<br />

The flexible speaker<br />

is as easily used as<br />

standalone equipment<br />

or part of larger sound<br />

system, guaranteed to<br />

produce a powerful,<br />

immersive sound.<br />

bang-olufsen.com<br />

The latest addition to Kef’s LSX II Wireless range is a new<br />

iteration in olive green. The creation of renowned industrial<br />

designer Michael Young, the range has garnered praise for the<br />

minimal design and inobtrusive way the speakers fit beautifully<br />

into the home, while providing a high-quality sound system. The<br />

olive green speakers join other shades such as cobalt blue and<br />

lava red in Kef’s collection. kef.com<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

31


NOTES FROM NETJETS<br />

Latest happenings, onboard updates, and profiles<br />

THE FAST TRACK<br />

Renowned motor racing team United Autosports’ partnership with<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong> for the World Endurance Championship is built to last<br />

JAKOB EBREY JEP<br />

ANDREW LOFTHOUSE<br />

TEAM GLORY Victory in<br />

Portimão’s LMP2 race; on<br />

the track in Le Mans<br />

FORMED IN 2009, by<br />

McLaren CEO Zak Brown and<br />

former racing driver Richard<br />

Dean, United Autosports has<br />

become one of the fastestgrowing<br />

motorsports teams<br />

in the UK, competing across<br />

a number of different racing<br />

categories around the globe.<br />

Among the drivers who have<br />

featured for the Yorkshirebased<br />

team are Fernando<br />

Alonso, Lando Norris and<br />

Juan Pablo Montoya – and<br />

the talent keeps on coming.<br />

As do the accolades, such as<br />

winning the 2020 FIA World<br />

Endurance Championship and<br />

the Le Mans 24 Hours (also in<br />

2020), among them.<br />

This level of sustained<br />

success is one of the<br />

reasons <strong>NetJets</strong> became the<br />

official airline partner for<br />

United Autosports for the<br />

<strong>2023</strong> FIA World Endurance<br />

Championship (WEC)<br />

campaign. “We are proud to<br />

32 <strong>NetJets</strong>


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NOTES FROM NETJETS<br />

“<br />

Phil<br />

support one of the fastestgrowing<br />

teams in motorsport<br />

with flight services that will<br />

allow them to maximise their<br />

time competing globally<br />

heading into the World<br />

Endurance Championship and<br />

beyond,” says Myra Perez,<br />

executive director sales and<br />

service for <strong>NetJets</strong> Europe.<br />

The FIA World Endurance Championship is the pinnacle<br />

of endurance racing – the pinnacle of my discipline in<br />

racing – and it really is a global spectacle<br />

Hanson, United Autosports driver<br />

The WEC is a perfect<br />

opportunity to offer<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong>’ support to<br />

the United Autosports<br />

ambitions. It is a series of<br />

seven races ranging from<br />

the 1,000 Miles of Sebring,<br />

Florida, to the eight hours<br />

of Bahrain in November<br />

(via the world-renowned 24<br />

hours of Le Mans, as well as<br />

Portimão in Portugal, Spa in<br />

Belgium, Monza in Italy and<br />

Fuji in Japan). It is a test of<br />

the stamina of drivers and<br />

endurance and technical<br />

abilities of the car on a global<br />

stage. It is the ultimate<br />

challenge for the United<br />

Autosports team and one<br />

they are doing well to live up<br />

to at the moment.<br />

As Phil Hanson, a fullseason<br />

driver in the #22<br />

United Autosports LMP2<br />

car says: “The FIA World<br />

Endurance Championship is<br />

the pinnacle of endurance<br />

racing – the pinnacle of my<br />

discipline in racing – and it<br />

really is a global spectacle.<br />

You visit countless circuits<br />

across three continents –<br />

next year, four continents –<br />

travelling to some incredible<br />

places, including Japan –<br />

where we’ve just come back<br />

from with a podium result.<br />

I flew into Tokyo, which is<br />

one of my favourite cities.<br />

Quite often, I don’t get the<br />

chance to explore the culture<br />

and cities themselves, I’m<br />

much more familiar with<br />

the airports and hotels by<br />

the tracks! But when we’re<br />

flying further afield, I try to<br />

make a trip of it. Next year<br />

the championship will go<br />

to Brazil for the first time.<br />

It’s great to be part of a<br />

championship that puts on<br />

a show in all regions of the<br />

world.” unitedautosports.com<br />

RACING HARD<br />

Clockwise from top:<br />

competing in Monza;<br />

and Portimão;<br />

driver Phil Hanson<br />

JAKOB EBREY JEP (3)<br />

34 <strong>NetJets</strong>


JULIAN RENTZSCH<br />

NETJETS BY THE NUMBERS<br />

PRESENTING<br />

THE EMBRAER<br />

PRAETOR 500<br />

INSIDE TRACK<br />

LUIS DE ALMEIDA<br />

Cabin Crew Program Manager<br />

YOUR ROLE AT NETJETS IS ... to oversee the Cabin Crew<br />

program, namely the Communication Strategy with crews, Crew<br />

Engagement to ensure that our colleagues are aligned with<br />

our company brand and values, to ensure that our Cabin Crew<br />

colleagues are aligned with the best practices and highest<br />

standards in Safety, Service and Training in the industry and,<br />

finally, to assist developing products and procedures to ensure<br />

our <strong>NetJets</strong> Signature flying experience is second to none.<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong> is expanding our midsize fleet – and your<br />

access to seamless, on-demand travel – with the<br />

addition of the extraordinary Embraer Praetor ® 500.<br />

Offering both best-in-class range and cabin altitude,<br />

the Praetor 500 enables you to fly in comfort to<br />

more destinations and arrive feeling refreshed.<br />

© NETJETS<br />

YOUR NORMAL DAY CONSISTS OF ... well, it depends<br />

on different factors! If I’m in the Lisbon office, then it’s a<br />

day with meetings, where I can discuss current procedures<br />

with the Leadership team, Managers and stakeholders, while<br />

benchmarking and seeking opportunities to improve our<br />

operational efficiency and product delivery. When I’m not<br />

in the office, I have the opportunity to spend time engaging<br />

with our crew colleagues and ground staff in certain hightraffic<br />

European FBOs, while also flying onboard our aircrafts<br />

to collect crew feedback to then refine and develop specific<br />

strategies for the crew and our operation.<br />

THE BEST THING ABOUT YOUR JOB IS to be able to<br />

make a difference! The fact that I’m constantly receiving<br />

feedback, while having the opportunity to speak with so<br />

many colleagues allows me to actively participate in laying<br />

foundations and to define strategies into the future, which is<br />

professionally and personally quite rewarding.<br />

THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE YOU FACE IN YOUR ROLE<br />

IS to be able to speak with colleagues from completely<br />

different areas and mindsets and to bring those views<br />

together to pave the way forward. In reality, it’s a challenge<br />

that I really appreciate.<br />

THE MOST UNUSUAL THING TO HAPPEN WHILE AT<br />

NETJETS WAS … a world tour in seven days. A full tour<br />

around the globe was a truly remarkable experience, from<br />

hot to freezing weather, while crossing numerous time zones<br />

and also with the unique opportunity to discover so many<br />

different cultures. Truly rewarding and all in seven days!<br />

UP TO 250 NEW PRAETOR 500S<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong> begins taking delivery in 2025<br />

UP TO SEVEN PASSENGERS<br />

Up to eight with the belted lavatory<br />

1.82M, FLAT-FLOOR CABIN<br />

Also the widest in our midsize fleet<br />

UP TO 7:45 HOURS’ ENDURANCE<br />

Fly nonstop from Washington, DC, to<br />

San Jose, California<br />

870KPH HIGH-SPEED CRUISE<br />

Travel at an industry-leading speed<br />

FOUR CUBIC METRES OF<br />

BAGGAGE CAPACITY<br />

Includes a one-cubic-metre internal closet<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

35


NOTES FROM NETJETS<br />

BEFORE JOINING THE NETJETS TEAM, I<br />

… had an amazing opportunity to fly fighter<br />

jets for the German Air Force in my home<br />

country, and be an instructor on them in the<br />

US. I was even able to fly the legendary RF-4<br />

Phantom in my early days of being a pilot.<br />

THE ONE DAY AT NETJETS I WON’T<br />

FORGET IS … one of many! There are<br />

countless days at <strong>NetJets</strong> which I’ll never<br />

forget; however, if I really had to pick one day,<br />

then this one would rank highest: last year I<br />

got to take my parents-in-law for a <strong>NetJets</strong><br />

flight. At the time they were in a fragile state<br />

of health, at the ages of 91, and 84 (there<br />

was also my brother-in-law, who has limited<br />

mobility). It was literally the last flight in their<br />

lives. It is a very touching moment in my own<br />

life when I look back at their cheerful faces.<br />

JULIAN RENTZSCH<br />

IN SERVICE<br />

ANDREAS “LUKAS” KRACH<br />

Captain, Citation XLS<br />

MY FIRST EXPOSURE TO AVIATION WAS<br />

… listening to the stories my dad told me of<br />

when he first became a pilot, flying gliders<br />

that were “bungee” launched off the sand<br />

dunes on the Baltic coast. Later, as a sevenyear-old<br />

boy, my grandpa and I would stand<br />

up on the visitors’ terrace of Düsseldorf<br />

Airport watching the planes take off. Even<br />

now, half a century later, I still remember this<br />

touching moment on each occasion I land in<br />

Düsseldorf.<br />

THE BEST PART OF FLYING IS …<br />

everything (I tend to say). But after flying for<br />

over 40 years, it has become very clear to me,<br />

the very best part of aviation by far is the<br />

great people we meet and the social factor.<br />

I most enjoy working together with all our<br />

colleagues from various backgrounds, sharing<br />

their abundance of experience, as well as<br />

working with a great team in the office, and<br />

then meeting all our exceptional Owners,<br />

whose individual lives are most interesting<br />

and inspiring.<br />

ONE THING OWNERS PROBABLY<br />

WOULDN’T GUESS ABOUT ME IS … that<br />

I enjoy doing a bit of artwork on the side.<br />

Besides designing and producing aircraft<br />

paint jobs, I try to catch our Owners’ special<br />

occasions, on the day of the flight, and come<br />

up with an original-drawing greeting card for<br />

them – if I get a chance.<br />

ON MY DAYS OFF … I drive my family crazy<br />

by being sort of hyperactive, doing a variety<br />

of things in the great outdoors – in the<br />

mountains and on the water.<br />

WITHIN THE NEXT YEAR, I WOULD LIKE<br />

TO … change the aircraft type from the one I<br />

have been on for the past 15 years at <strong>NetJets</strong><br />

to the latest type, so I have the opportunity<br />

to work with another group of the finest<br />

aviators you can find.<br />

WITHIN THE NEXT 10 YEARS, I WOULD<br />

LIKE TO … utilise our pre-retirement, parttime<br />

scheme, to make more use of the unique<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong> Gateway system (being able to work<br />

and travel from different gateways within<br />

Europe) and also use the ad hoc staff travel<br />

option on our fleets.<br />

MY PROUDEST MOMENT OF BEING A<br />

CREW MEMBER … comes each time I<br />

mention that I have worked for <strong>NetJets</strong> for 18<br />

years, and seeing the reaction of respect in<br />

people’s faces, either by other aircrews from<br />

a different company, but especially from our<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong> Owners.<br />

36 <strong>NetJets</strong>


LIVING WELL<br />

38 <strong>NetJets</strong>


STAYING<br />

IN SYNC<br />

Dr Greg Vanichkachorn, of Mayo Clinic’s Aerospace Medicine<br />

team, on the perils of jet lag and how to to deal with them<br />

JÖRN KASPUHL<br />

JET LAG IS a common complaint among those who travel long<br />

distances and can sometimes be so disruptive that a longawaited<br />

trip is practically ruined. Are there ways to combat<br />

or even beat jet lag? Dr Greg Vanichkachorn of Mayo Clinic’s<br />

Aerospace Medicine team offers advice on minimising the<br />

disruption of jet lag.<br />

“Jet lag isn’t just being tired after travel,” Dr Vanichkachorn<br />

says. “Here at Mayo Clinic, we call it jet lag disorder. It’s a<br />

state where your body’s internal clock isn’t in sync with the<br />

external environment.”<br />

Dr Vanichkachorn explains that, while symptoms of jet<br />

lag usually include fatigue, that’s not the only problem it<br />

can cause. Gastrointestinal issues, confusion, changes in<br />

cognitive levels, depression and anxiety can all be the result<br />

of jet lag disorder.<br />

“All jet lag isn’t equal,” Dr Vanichkachorn says. “It can be<br />

impacted by the direction of travel, how many time zones<br />

you’re crossing. It’s usually harder on your body when you’re<br />

traveling east because you’re losing time.”<br />

Dr Vanichkachorn estimates that it takes about a day per<br />

time zone you have crossed to adjust to the time at your<br />

new location.<br />

But what if you just don’t have the time to waste on several<br />

days of malaise due to jet lag? What if you need to be on top of<br />

your game for a presentation to a major client, or you’re taking<br />

your family on the trip of a lifetime? Can travel via <strong>NetJets</strong><br />

help with jet lag?<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

39


LIVING WELL<br />

“<br />

you’re<br />

All jet lag isn’t equal. It can be<br />

impacted by the direction<br />

of travel, how many time zones<br />

crossing<br />

JULIAN RENTZSCH<br />

Dr Greg Vanichkachorn is part of the Aerospace Medicine programme<br />

at Mayo Clinic. He and his team can provide specialty consultations to<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong> Owners as part of Mayo Clinic’s Executive Health programme.<br />

Dr Vanichkachorn thinks so, admitting, “Spending a long<br />

time in a commercial aircraft isn’t really the greatest thing<br />

in the world.”<br />

More than the discomfort, he says, the atmosphere inside<br />

the cabin can be unhealthy for some people.<br />

“The air isn’t pressurised to sea level, so it’s like sitting on<br />

a mountain at 2,500m. This can be problematic for those with<br />

underlying lung disease or breathing issues.” He also says the<br />

atmosphere in some aircraft cabins can be dry due to altitude<br />

and could lead to dehydration when flying long distances.<br />

Private air travel usually includes pressurising cabins to<br />

a lower altitude than commercial aircraft, decreasing the<br />

effects of fatigue and dehydration. The flexibility of flying<br />

by private jet means you can choose exactly when you take<br />

off and where from, offering more travel planning options to<br />

lessen symptoms of jet lag. Plus, private air travel is more<br />

comfortable due to more space and less noise within the<br />

cabin than a commercial flight, making it easier to rest while<br />

traveling and, depending on the time difference, helping<br />

to minimise effects of jet lag. Another perk of private jet<br />

travel, according to Dr. Vanichkachorn, is the ability to better<br />

regulate light and temperature, adding to your comfort and<br />

allowing for better strategic light exposure.<br />

While flying privately with <strong>NetJets</strong> can be helpful for<br />

lessening the effects of jet lag disorder, Dr Vanichkachorn has<br />

a few other tips to banish jet lag from your travel experience.<br />

- Use light exposure strategically. Being exposed to sunlight<br />

helps reset your internal clock, and it’s the most powerful<br />

natural tool for regulating the sleep-wake cycle. Morning<br />

light exposure can usually help you adjust to an earlier<br />

time zone after travelling east. Evening light helps you<br />

adapt to a later time zone after traveling west. This helps<br />

with circadian rhythm and melatonin production, both of<br />

which help to get on a day/night schedule. Sunglasses can<br />

help with blocking light when you’re trying to reset your<br />

internal clock.<br />

- Use melatonin to initiate a new sleep cycle but do so<br />

sparingly. Dr Vanichkachorn says most people need only<br />

3-5mg.<br />

- Start your adjustment process a few days before travelling.<br />

Dr. Vanichkachorn says there are several apps available that<br />

can help preemptively shift circadian rhythms.<br />

- Take care of yourself on your way to your destination.<br />

Drink plenty of water, even in the days before your flight,<br />

to avoid dehydration.<br />

MAYO CLINIC AND NETJETS<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong> is excited to partner with the Mayo Clinic Executive Health Program to bring expert<br />

medical, health, and wellness content that matters to you. With a focus on preventive health<br />

and wellness with timely, coordinated access to multidisciplinary care, including advanced<br />

diagnostics, state-of-the-art prevention strategies, and therapeutics, the Mayo Clinic Executive<br />

Health Program provides individualized, comprehensive care to meet the unique needs of<br />

business leaders in the demanding stages of their careers. The QR code will lead you to more<br />

thorough information about this world-class program, and your Mayo Clinic Executive Health<br />

liaison for <strong>NetJets</strong> Owners will be happy to answer your questions.<br />

40 <strong>NetJets</strong>


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OUTDOOR PURSUITS<br />

44 <strong>NetJets</strong>


GONE<br />

FISHING<br />

The world’s best spots for angling offer just<br />

the right combination of fertile waters and<br />

creature comforts // By Larry Olmsted<br />

ISTOCK<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

45


EDWARD C. ROBISON III<br />

© CASA DE CAMPO<br />

OUTDOOR PURSUITS<br />

LAND AND SEA<br />

Clockwise from top:<br />

Casa de Campo,<br />

Dominican Republic; Big<br />

Cedar Lodge, Missouri;<br />

Ashford Castle; Ireland<br />

“If you’re too busy to fish, you’re too busy,”<br />

says Johnny Morris, billionaire founder of the<br />

Bass Pro Shops retail fishing empire. Morris<br />

was repeating an old sportsman’s adage, but<br />

he knows what he is talking about firsthand. In<br />

addition to running the two biggest retailers<br />

in this field, Bass Pro and Cabela’s, as CFO –<br />

Chief Fishing Officer – he has personally set<br />

fishing records for multiple species, all around<br />

the world. He talks at length about the natural<br />

beauty of the settings, the bonding, the honing<br />

of skills, the heart-pounding excitement of<br />

© ASHFORD CASTLE<br />

hooking a big one and the fun you still have<br />

even when they are not biting. Most of all, he<br />

understands why thousands of his customers<br />

choose the same bumper sticker: “I’d Rather<br />

Be Fishing”.<br />

If you’d rather be fishing, the hardest part<br />

might be choosing which great place to go,<br />

because there are world-class lodges and<br />

resorts for every style of angler in every corner<br />

of the globe. Here are some of the very best.<br />

Ernest Hemingway’s Old Man and the<br />

Sea protagonist hooked a giant marlin, the<br />

largest of the billfish: marlin, spearfish,<br />

sailfish, and swordfish. Billfish remain the<br />

Holy Grail of deep sea sportfishing, and<br />

there may be no better place to complete<br />

the Billfish Grand Slam – three of the four in<br />

one day – than at Panama’s legendary Tropic<br />

Star Lodge (tropicstar.com). Sitting on the<br />

remote coast of the pristine Darien Jungle,<br />

more International Game Fishing Association<br />

(IGFA) records have been set here than at any<br />

other resort on Earth, 300-plus. Blue marlin<br />

of up to 350kg are regular occurrences.<br />

They also have tons of massive dorado and<br />

enormous schools of yellowfin tuna that can<br />

top 130kg. All billfish are catch and release,<br />

and like most top fishing lodges, packages<br />

are all-inclusive with daily fishing, gear,<br />

guides, lodging and all meals.<br />

46 <strong>NetJets</strong>


“ the<br />

After billfish, salmon are probably the quarry more<br />

anglers make bucket-list trips for than any others, and<br />

king salmon is practically synonymous with Alaska<br />

CATCH OF THE DAY<br />

From top: Bair’s Lodge, the<br />

Bahamas; Steamboat Bay<br />

Fishing Club, Alaska; Hawks<br />

Cay Resort, Florida<br />

The only reason to go to Tropic Star is to<br />

hook monsters, but it’s quite the opposite story<br />

at Casa de Campo (casadecampo.com.do) in the<br />

Dominican Republic. This luxury mega-resort<br />

is so famous for its golf, tennis, shooting,<br />

polo and other facilities that the fishing often<br />

gets overlooked. But it is home to the most<br />

advanced marina in the Caribbean, full of firstrate<br />

charter boats with excellent deep-sea<br />

fishing, and hosts one of the most important<br />

blue marlin tournaments in the world. While<br />

best known for these, guests also regularly<br />

catch other billfish, mahi mahi, wahoo, and<br />

especially big tuna, close to 225kg. The golf<br />

is ranked at the top of many lists charting<br />

Mexico and the Caribbean, and this year Casa<br />

de Campo opened The Premier Club, a new<br />

luxury boutique hotel and spa, now its highest<br />

accommodation tier. A more far-flung take on<br />

the iconic luxury hotel model can be found at<br />

Reid’s Palace, A Belmond Hotel (belmond.com)<br />

on Madeira. This remote Portuguese island<br />

well off the coast of Morocco was the last<br />

restocking point for sailors headed to the New<br />

World, and it remains the first feeding ground<br />

in thousands of miles for giant fish headed<br />

the other way. Its remoteness and deep water<br />

make it a haven for world record blue marlin,<br />

as well as a litany of other great targets: white<br />

marlin, swordfish, spearfish, bluefin tuna,<br />

© BAIR’S LODGE<br />

© HAWKS CAY RESORT<br />

© STEAMBOAT BAY<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

47


OUTDOOR PURSUITS<br />

© HAWKS CAY RESORT<br />

© RIFFLIN’ HITCH LODGE<br />

© BIG CEDAR LODGE<br />

WATER WORKS<br />

Clockwise from top:<br />

Hawks Cay Resort;<br />

Rifflin’ Hitch Lodge,<br />

Canada; Big Cedar Lodge<br />

Facing page:<br />

Steamboat Bay<br />

Fishing Club<br />

bigeye tuna, albacore, wahoo, red snappers,<br />

barracuda and more. After fishing, enjoy<br />

the island’s namesake fortified wines and<br />

exquisite cuisine. The historic luxury hotel sits<br />

on the same harbour in Funchal as the charter<br />

sportfishing fleet.<br />

After billfish, salmon are probably the<br />

quarry more anglers make bucket-list trips<br />

for than any others, and the biggest, the king<br />

salmon (also known as chinook), is practically<br />

synonymous with Alaska. For this reason,<br />

despite a short summer season, Alaska is<br />

full of destination salmon lodges, none<br />

swankier than Steamboat Bay Fishing Club<br />

(steamboatbay.com). It’s operated like a toptier<br />

African safari lodge, with a private boat<br />

and captain for each of the ten lodge rooms<br />

or the eight-person residence, and all meals,<br />

wines, top-shelf drinks, fish processing to take<br />

home, and seaplane transfers from Ketchikan<br />

are included. Cabin cruisers are custom made<br />

for the region, with full bathrooms, heated<br />

cabins, and stable rides with shock absorber<br />

seats. It’s hard not to catch your king salmon<br />

daily limits here, along with big halibut, cod,<br />

rockfish and silver (coho) salmon.<br />

In Alaska, Pacific salmon are commonly<br />

caught in deep water with conventional<br />

saltwater tackle, but Atlantic salmon are<br />

also one the biggest prizes for avid flyfishing<br />

junkies, and for that it is hard to beat<br />

remote and luxurious Rifflin’ Hitch Lodge<br />

(rifflinhitchlodge.com) on the famed Eagle<br />

River in Canada’s Labrador. There are no roads<br />

here, and guests arrive in Goose Bay and are<br />

flown in by the Lodge’s A-Star 350 helicopters<br />

or Cessna Grand Caravans. Guests are also<br />

flown daily to angling hot spots, including<br />

Rifflin’s satellite day lodge in a National Park<br />

Preserve to fish for jumbo trout. The main<br />

event is trophy-sized Atlantic salmon, but<br />

anglers also land huge brook trout and Arctic<br />

char. All fishing is catch and release, but the<br />

food is gourmet and there is no shortage of<br />

the local specialties, along with fine wines.<br />

There are just seven suites and a ratio of one<br />

guide for every two guests, much better than<br />

industry standards.<br />

Iceland is world famous for its fly-fishing<br />

because of some unique policies. While it has<br />

many pristine lakes and some of the best sea<br />

trout, char, and salmon streams in the world,<br />

all fishing rights are privately owned and<br />

mostly leased to outfitters. This means fishing<br />

is severely limited on all the best waters,<br />

48 <strong>NetJets</strong>


© STEAMBOAT BAY FISHING CLUB<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

49


“ much<br />

No place has as many luxury resorts on sporting estates<br />

as Britain and Ireland, but few are as opulent – or as<br />

fun – as the Emerald Isle’s Ashford Castle<br />

MATTIA AQUILA<br />

keeping quantity and quality of fish high.<br />

The only Orvis Endorsed company in Iceland<br />

is is the fly-fishing outfitter Fish Partner<br />

(fishpartner.com) whose guests get access<br />

to the Kaldakvísl and Tungnaá rivers and<br />

Lake Thingvallavatn. All-inclusive itineraries<br />

typically stay in two different locations on<br />

each trip to maximise angling variety, with a<br />

guest-to-guide ratio of 2:1.<br />

If you are looking to try fly-fishing for the<br />

first time, a remote lodge immersion might<br />

not be the best choice. No place has as many<br />

luxury resorts on sporting estates as Britain<br />

and Ireland, but few are as opulent – or as<br />

much fun – as the Emerald Isle’s Ashford<br />

Castle (ashfordcastle.com). The luxe resort<br />

features an almost 800-year-old castle that<br />

sits on 18,000ha Lough Corrib, known for its<br />

abundance of brown trout, salmon and pike.<br />

The property also has immediate access to<br />

the River Cong, world famous for salmon.<br />

Ashford employs its own full-time expert<br />

ghillies (guides) using traditional wooden<br />

boats. Instruction is offered, they’ll cook<br />

your catch, and it’s a great place for experts,<br />

novices, or families to fish. Ashford also has<br />

world-class golf, an equestrian centre, tennis,<br />

shooting, even falconry, along with a laundry<br />

list of bars and restaurants.<br />

SEA VIEW<br />

Fom top: Reid’s Palace;<br />

Madeira; fishing off the<br />

coast of Caso de Campo<br />

© CASA DE CAMPO<br />

50 <strong>NetJets</strong>


FLY FOR FISHING<br />

Clockwise from top left:<br />

Lizard Island, Australia;<br />

Turtle Island, Fiji; Futa<br />

Lodge, Chile<br />

Bass are much smaller than billfish and even<br />

salmon, but no form of angling is more popular<br />

in the United States than bass fishing, which<br />

has its own professional tour. The pros have<br />

an annual stop on 17,000ha Table Rock Lake<br />

in the Missouri Ozarks, also home to Johnny<br />

Morris’s Big Cedar Lodge (bigcedar.com). From<br />

George H W Bush to Tiger Woods, presidents,<br />

pro athletes and music A-listers have all<br />

fished here, and there is no better equipped<br />

freshwater angling resort anywhere. It has<br />

two full-service, state-of-the-art marinas<br />

with top-shelf gear, boat rentals, licenses and<br />

instruction, and lodging runs the gamut from<br />

hotel rooms to lakeside cabins to luxe private<br />

homes. The 1,800ha fantasy sporting resort<br />

also has five golf courses and a world-class<br />

shooting facility.<br />

While salmon, tuna and billfish can be found<br />

worldwide, there are a couple of much sought<br />

after but geographically limited specialty<br />

fish that serious anglers lust after. Pound for<br />

pound, many deep-sea sportfishers consider<br />

tarpon the most exciting quarry. The “silver<br />

king” of gamefish, they can dive more than a<br />

hundred feet in seconds, weigh up to 130kg,<br />

and are ferocious fighters that can take hours<br />

to reel in. Florida is tarpon central, and the<br />

top choice is Hawks Cay Resort (hawkscay.<br />

com) in the Florida Keys, an old fishing haunt<br />

of Hemingway himself. Guests land world<br />

record tarpon as well as billfish, barracuda<br />

and a little bit of everything.<br />

For zealous fly-fishing aficionados, the<br />

extremely challenging bonefish, found in<br />

shallow saltwater, is another much-catch.<br />

The Bahamas is the world epicenter of<br />

bonefishing, and for more than 30 years,<br />

Bair’s Lodge (bairslodge.com) has been the<br />

destination of choice. Bair’s has access to<br />

both coastal flats and an inland creek system,<br />

you can wade or use skiffs, there’s fishing<br />

right out the front door, and it has some of<br />

the world’s best guides. Protected by Andros’s<br />

West Side National Park, it enjoys some of<br />

the least pressured waters in the world’s<br />

bonefishing capital.<br />

© LIZARD ISLAND HOUSE<br />

FARTHER AFIELD: THE REEL DEAL<br />

LIZARD ISLAND RESORT, AUSTRALIA<br />

The only luxury resort directly on the Great Barrier Reef – the<br />

world’s largest – this private island sits within a national park<br />

and catch includes black marlin, mahi mahi, mackerel, sailfish,<br />

tuna and more, along with legendary diving and snorkelling.<br />

lizardisland.com.au<br />

TURTLE ISLAND PRIVATE ISLAND RESORT, FIJI<br />

With 12 private beaches and world-class diving, this is one of<br />

Fiji’s top luxury resorts. The island nation is one of the best<br />

fishing places in the world with the two top categories of<br />

saltwater gamefish, marlin (black, blue and striped) and tuna<br />

(yellowfin and skipjack), plus sailfish, barracuda, wahoo and<br />

mackerel. turtlefiji.com<br />

FUTA LODGE, CHILEAN PATAGONIA<br />

Patagonia is one of a handful of true fly-fishing bucket-list trips,<br />

and Futa is its best-known lodge, with miles of lightly fished<br />

pristine lakes and rivers for its guests, offering float rips and<br />

wading for record-sized brown and rainbow trout.<br />

futalodge.com<br />

© TURTLE ISLAND<br />

STEPHAN DOMBAJ<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

51


TEEING OFF<br />

HELLENIC<br />

GOLFING HAVEN<br />

Costa Navarino pairs exceptional Peloponnesian<br />

beauty with outstanding amenities – including two new<br />

championship courses // By Farhad Heydari<br />

JACOB SJÖMAN<br />

BAY OF PLENTY<br />

The Olympic<br />

Course at<br />

Costa Navarino<br />

52 <strong>NetJets</strong>


IN THE PANTHEON – forgive the pun – of Greek<br />

destinations, the Peloponnese might not have the same<br />

A-list cache as sun-soaked spots such as Mykonos or<br />

Santorini, to name just two. But this large peninsula,<br />

connected to the mainland by a narrow isthmus at Corinth,<br />

has quietly begun to make waves, thanks in large part to<br />

a singular masterplan destination called Costa Navarino<br />

(costanavarino.com).<br />

It was envisaged by a self-made shipping magnate named<br />

Vassilis Constantakopoulos back in the early 80s, with the<br />

businessman then spending the better part of the next 25<br />

years acquiring land – one parcel at a time – in his beloved<br />

and native Messinia, a historically significant region of the<br />

southwest Peloponnese. Today, Costa Navarino is ranked as<br />

one of the top holiday destinations in Europe.<br />

Why? Perhaps it’s because back in 2010, the resort’s<br />

first phase, Navarino Dunes, debuted with a pair of luxe<br />

hotels (The Romanos, a Luxury Collection Resort, and The<br />

Westin Resort) and a championship golf course designed by<br />

Bernhard Langer in partnership with European Golf Design.<br />

Or perhaps it’s because a couple of years later, despite the<br />

economic crisis in the region, the resort’s second phase<br />

kicked off with the debut of another 18-hole layout, the<br />

stunning Robert Trent Jones Jr-designed Bay Course.<br />

Now, however, another pair of new championship courses,<br />

the Hills and the International Olympic Academy Course,<br />

by two-time Masters champion and Ryder Cup legend José<br />

María Olazábal, as well as the sprawling beachside W Costa<br />

Navarino and an even newer Mandarin Oriental property,<br />

are adding further lustre to this expansive destination.<br />

Like the earlier courses, these latest offerings are a<br />

visually striking and challenging test, which are perched<br />

not at sea level as their earlier siblings are but rather<br />

200 metres up on a littoral plateau with views of box<br />

canyons, mountains and the azure coastline. “The<br />

two courses are distinct in character,” says Olazábal,<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

53


TEEING OFF<br />

remarking that it took no fewer than five years to spearhead<br />

them. “The Olympic Course is more polished in style and full<br />

of spectacular vistas across the Bay of Navarino, while the<br />

Hills Course offers more of a rural feel, where we take you<br />

out through the gently rolling hills.”<br />

He’s right: dotted with ancient olive trees and lined with<br />

native vegetation and scrubland, the par 72, 6,945-yard<br />

Olympic Course features mounded undulating fairways and<br />

greens with shallow bunkering. Playability is paramount with<br />

long arching par-5s (gettable if you’re in the right position),<br />

lengthy par-3s offset with those of the shorter variety, and<br />

fun par-4s, such as the stunning 384-yard-long 10th hole,<br />

the green of which is framed by mountains and the coastline,<br />

making for one of the most scenic holes in all of golf.<br />

The visual hits (and the corresponding challenges) keep on<br />

coming, including at the 187-yard par-3 12th hole, where a keyshaped<br />

green sits atop a massively vertiginous promontory,<br />

protected by a barranca-like hazard from short right to long left.<br />

The views from the elevated 15th tee are just as distracting,<br />

offering a wonderful look over Navarino Bay – a panorama that<br />

becomes more glorious the closer you get to the green.<br />

Then there is the 198-yard par-3 16th hole, where the<br />

stunning tableau distracts yet again but where the wind<br />

conditions require immediate refocus: depending on the<br />

direction, club selection can vary up or down by five or six<br />

clubs. The penultimate hole is a risk-reward, downhill par-5<br />

that can make or break your round, with players required to<br />

either fly their second shots over a meandering rock-lined<br />

54 <strong>NetJets</strong>


“<br />

José<br />

The Olympic Course is more polished in style and<br />

full of spectacular vistas across the Bay of Navarino,<br />

while the Hills Course offers more of a rural feel<br />

María Olazábal, course designer<br />

HIGH LIFE<br />

Costa Navarino’s<br />

Hills Course<br />

JACOB SJÖMAN<br />

ditch that crosses the fairway short of the green or to lay up.<br />

For its part, the par-72, 6,836-yard Hills Course, is no<br />

pushover. Far from it. Playing through mature mountainside<br />

vegetation (think garrigue shrubland, autochthonous trees,<br />

ancient rock walls and sheer ravines that carve deep into the<br />

Kinigou Hills), the course features large green complexes,<br />

with tightly mown rollaway areas inset by bunkers surrounded<br />

by spongey Bermuda grass overseeded with rye that are<br />

a challenge for even single-figure handicaps. The putting<br />

surfaces are equally devilish and boast significant contouring<br />

and subtle breaks that often require a second look.<br />

Five tee locations on each hole (one less than on the Olympic<br />

Course) enable all skill levels and age groups to both enjoy the<br />

round and to challenge themselves. Case in point the 4th: the<br />

first of four par-5s, this tricky 517-yard long specimen requires<br />

precision from a semi-blind tee shot that leads to a wide but<br />

shallow green that is positioned perpendicular to the line of<br />

play and perfectly framed by long views.<br />

The experience, which is rustic, playing sometimes around<br />

ancient rocky farming boundary walls, offers a good balance<br />

and variety, from doglegs to uphill and downhill holes, long<br />

par-5s, short par-4s and challenging par-3s. The 8th is a<br />

perfect example: a demanding 432-yard par-4 with fairway<br />

that is beyond a wooded canyon – find it and you’ll have a long<br />

iron approach into a green that slopes from front left to back<br />

right. The 9th is another downhiller with a split fairway short<br />

of the green while the 557-yard 11th is a brutal, gently sloping<br />

uphill par-5 with a ravine cutting into the fairway on the left<br />

and a lone tree that protects the right – the second shot is<br />

challenged by shallow bunkers.<br />

The challenges aren’t limited to the two courses. Should your<br />

game need a post-round tune-up, there is an expansive golf<br />

academy on-site that rivals anything on Tour. Most 36-a-daytypes,<br />

however, will head back to their quarters and, having<br />

had a dip in their own pool or one at the many beach clubs,<br />

decide which of the more than 30 dining venues they will avail<br />

for dinner and postprandials.<br />

The resort writ large also includes a Mouratoglou Tennis<br />

Center, an NBA Basketball School, opportunities for myriad<br />

other sporting activities, and several public open spaces or, in<br />

ancient Greek, agora, where restaurants and bars complement<br />

boutiques, piazzas and the like. Add the tasteful addition of<br />

the waterside Mandarin Oriental and the buzzy allure of the W<br />

hotel, complete with its chillout DJ, and golfers as well as other<br />

holidaymakers won’t be short of options: after all, that’s one of<br />

Costa Navarino’s major draws.<br />

Kalamata International Airport: 27miles/43km<br />

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55


CULTURE BOOK<br />

FROM STREET<br />

CORNER<br />

TO SOTHEBY’S<br />

The rapid rise of stencil art in the past<br />

decades draws on a rich heritage – and looks to<br />

have an even brighter future // By Josh Sims<br />

BLAME BANKSY. If most art finds its credibility – and<br />

collectability – in winning the unofficial stamp of approval<br />

from a prestige gallery, museum or investor, street art has<br />

gone straight from urban sprawl to penthouse wall. But<br />

not just any graffiti. It’s stencil art, specifically, that in its<br />

graphic directness and ready reproducibility, both from<br />

street to street and from street to T-shirt or mug, has become<br />

a 21st-century cultural currency and a new take, perhaps, on<br />

the Pop Art of yore.<br />

If the stencil proved the logistically most efficient<br />

way of getting art up on a street wall quickly – not least<br />

because most of the preparation could be done beforehand<br />

in a studio – that also helped define its bold, neat look, its<br />

leanings towards unfiltered sociopolitical relevance and,<br />

often, its droll placement; one of Banksy’s more recent<br />

works, Valentine’s Day Mascara, made entertaining use of an<br />

abandoned chest freezer.<br />

WALL FLOWERINGS<br />

Banksy’s “Choose Your Weapon”<br />

Facing page: An example of the<br />

pioneering work of Nick Walker<br />

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND NELLY DUFF GALLERY<br />

56 <strong>NetJets</strong>


COURTESY THE ARTIST AND NELLY DUFF GALLERY<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

57


CULTURE BOOK<br />

“<br />

John<br />

Part of its appeal now, as then, is that it’s simple and<br />

can be done quickly – it’s like that return to three-chord<br />

songs you get after music gets overly complicated<br />

Fekner, street art pioneer<br />

OUTDOOR SCENES<br />

DOT DOT DOT’s Handgun<br />

on Sunset Boulevard, LA<br />

Facing page: Wheels over<br />

Indian Trails, in New York City,<br />

by John Fekner<br />

“Given how economically disadvantaged [fledgling] artists so<br />

often are, the stencil has long been the ultimate low-cost tool for<br />

some kind of protest messaging, from the Berlin Wall to Ukraine<br />

today,” explains Cassius Colman, founder of Nelly Duff, in London’s<br />

East End, one of the first galleries to exhibit international street<br />

artists. “And the best of it is incredibly skilled – the minimum<br />

amount of mark making for the maximum impact.”<br />

That, technically, stencil art is illegal in most places has<br />

only added to its underground edginess, affording it the cool<br />

of controversy too. Or, perhaps, that used to be the case.<br />

“I heard that ‘street art’ was being called ‘urban contemporary<br />

art’ now, and that’s when you know the institutions have<br />

started to accept it as a genre, instead of fighting it,” laughs<br />

DOT DOT DOT, the Norwegian stencil-turned-conceptual artist<br />

whose street works are characterised by their large scale and<br />

often dark wit.<br />

COURTESY DOT DOT DOT<br />

58 <strong>NetJets</strong>


“The movement for the last 10 to 15 years has scaled up<br />

the interest in art for people in general, and maybe it has<br />

been important in terms of changing people’s perspective of<br />

everyday life,” he adds. “But certainly ‘street art’ is not only of<br />

interest to a certain type of person anymore. It’s for everyone.”<br />

But, warns Colman, that doesn’t mean it’s all any good.<br />

Beware the mimics. “Invariably, as with many successful art<br />

forms, its exponents have been imitated. And street art is easy<br />

to imitate,” he suggests. “The best of it requires a strong artistic<br />

statement and comes from artists who push their own style.<br />

They have a track record of progressive, independent thinking.<br />

I don’t think anyone needs to see another ‘Mickey Mouse with a<br />

machine gun’ type of image. There’s a lineage to stencil art now<br />

that brings some sober analysis [to the market].”<br />

Indeed, for all that Banksy may have become a household<br />

name – at least in neighbourhoods where, arguably, street<br />

art is least likely to be found on the actual streets – and<br />

commands record prices (his Love is in the Bin sold in 2021 for<br />

$23.5m) he was preceded by many lesser-known but genredefining<br />

stencil artists.<br />

Among them are the likes of the École des Beaux-<br />

Arts-trained Parisian street artist Blek le Rat – his work<br />

recognised by his signature rat motif – and Nick Walker,<br />

whose ironic, humorous images helped shape the influential<br />

graffiti scene that emerged out of Bristol, UK, both artists<br />

starting out inspired by stencilling’s early 1980s explosion.<br />

And before them was the poetry-loving John Fekner, often<br />

cited as the artistic pioneer of the medium, whose 300 or<br />

more conceptual works comprising official-looking symbols,<br />

dates and words, addressing the environmental hazards of<br />

living in New York, were at the core of the city’s creative<br />

energy from the late 1960s.<br />

“The phrase ‘street art’ didn’t really happen until later and<br />

was really about people from the community painting for<br />

the community, but stencilling came out of the ‘No Nukes’<br />

protest era, as a means of making a quick, striking message<br />

about something,” says Fekner, who explains that stencilling<br />

originated during World War Two, with the US forces employing<br />

it to catalogue equipment or create makeshift signs to direct<br />

troop movements.<br />

“Part of its appeal now, as then, is that it’s simple and can<br />

be done quickly – it’s like that return to three-chord songs you<br />

get after music gets overly complicated. It also represents a<br />

kind of ‘artisan connection’ to old printing techniques, cutby-hand,<br />

woodcutting, typesetting, sign painting, and so on.<br />

Sometimes you can make new art with old tools,” says Fekner.<br />

“But I think it also appeals because it’s still ‘de-labelled’<br />

– that you don’t know who made the work – which forces<br />

consideration of the message,” he adds. “That said, I do<br />

question how street art has become so commodified.<br />

Remember too that neighbourhoods have to live with these<br />

pieces and [unlike the art world] they don’t always like them.”<br />

COURTESY JOHN FEKNER<br />

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59


STYLE GUIDE<br />

A MAN’S<br />

WORLD<br />

Fashion and accessories<br />

for him that make a<br />

statement this season<br />

DUNHILL Prince of Wales wool<br />

Rollagas down blouson BRUNELLO<br />

CUCINELLI wool flannel leisure<br />

fit trousers with pince PATEK<br />

PHILIPPE 5235/50R watch with<br />

40.5mm rose gold case, two-tone<br />

graphite and ebony black dial,<br />

self-winding movement, regulatorstyle<br />

display, hour and seconds<br />

subdials, sweep minutes, day,<br />

date and month in apertures FOPE<br />

bi-coloured yellow and white gold<br />

Essentials Flex’it ring CHAUMET<br />

rose gold Alliance Liens Évidence<br />

band GIORGIO ARMANI dark grey<br />

deer leather gloves AU DÉPART<br />

Le Martin de Voyage Reflective<br />

Jacquard and leather fourwheeled<br />

carry-on E.B.MEYROWITZ<br />

The New Yorker sunglasses in<br />

black<br />

Photography by Matthew Shave // Production by Elisa Vallata<br />

60 <strong>NetJets</strong>


SERAPIAN slim briefcase Stepan Eclipse<br />

in Moss Green leather TOD’S sunglasses<br />

with black acetate frame and light<br />

brown/yellow lenses GIORGIO ARMANI<br />

black leather boots with micro-pleated<br />

nappa details (on the right) DUNHILL 1893<br />

Harness top handle bag in black leather<br />

(on the left) and hybrid plain Derby shoe<br />

RICHARD MILLE RM 72-01 Automatic<br />

Winding Lifestyle Flyback Chronograph<br />

with titanium case and black rubber strap<br />

MONTBLANC Meisterstück Selection mini<br />

bag in croc-embossed leather SERAPIAN<br />

Cachemire Eclipse pencil case in black<br />

leather MONTBLANC Writers Edition<br />

Homage to Brothers Grimm limited-edition<br />

fountain pen; Extreme 3.0 thin document<br />

case in embossed full-grain black leather<br />

(under the shoe)


62 <strong>NetJets</strong>


BRIONI Avio double splittable wool and cashmere Vagabond jacket SERAPIAN Secret Mosaico leather bag in coffee/<br />

khaki CHOPARD Alpine Eagle in Lucent Steel with 41mm case, pine green dial, self-winding movement and date-window<br />

between 4 and 5 o’clock BULGARI white gold B.Zero1 bracelet and ring<br />

Facing page: BRETT JOHNSON beige wool and silk bomber jacket with side pockets KITON white and beige cashmere,<br />

virgin wool and silk checked overshirt with snap buttons and breast pockets GIORGIO ARMANI straight trousers in double<br />

cashmere blend with Prince of Wales ivory pattern LEICA Q3 digital camera with triple resolution 60MP sensor, 8K Ultra<br />

HD video and new Hybrid AF system GIORGIO ARMANI pleated nappa backpack in extra soft lambskin AUDEMARS PIGUET<br />

Royal Oak Selfwinding Chronograph with 41mm pink gold case and brown dial with “Grande Tapisserie” pattern, pink gold<br />

applied hour-markers and hands with luminescent coating FOPE rose gold Flex’it ring set with black diamonds (left hand)<br />

NOEL Revolution rose gold Princess Black Diamond band (right hand.<br />

STYLE GUIDE<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

63


OUR WORLD<br />

BONDING<br />

Could the key to saving the oceans lie in<br />

the arcane world of debt refinancing? Nigel Tisdall<br />

takes a look at how The Nature Conservancy<br />

is leading the way across the globe<br />

ISTOCK<br />

64 <strong>NetJets</strong>


WITH THE<br />

BLUE<br />

STRETCHING FOR 300 kilometres between<br />

Mexico and Guatemala, the Belize Barrier<br />

Reef is a World Heritage-listed chain of some<br />

200 cays and atolls where travellers enjoy<br />

sensational snorkelling, diving and sailing.<br />

Its clear, warm and often uncrowded waters<br />

pulsate with richly coloured corals and<br />

myriad creatures from the endemic whitelined<br />

toadfish to mighty loggerhead turtles.<br />

Like many of our most impressive natural<br />

wonders, this is a fragile ecosystem facing<br />

multiple threats that range from rising water<br />

temperatures and beach erosion to illegal<br />

fishing, aggressive construction, plastic waste<br />

and, potentially, oil extraction. How can a<br />

small, tourism-dependent country like Belize,<br />

home to just 400,000 people, combat all this?<br />

One answer could lie in what is commonly<br />

known as the Blue Bond, an innovative<br />

financial arrangement in which developing<br />

coastal and island nations restructure their<br />

sovereign debt on more favourable terms<br />

as a way to release funds for marine and<br />

littoral conservation.<br />

“It’s similar to refinancing a home,”<br />

explains Julie Robinson, Belize programme<br />

director at The Nature Conservancy, the<br />

Virginia-headquartered non-profit behind<br />

the scheme. “In 2021 Belize repurchased<br />

$553m of its public debt at a 45% discount.<br />

This was on condition some of the funds<br />

released would go to create protected marine<br />

zones and guarantee long-term, sustainable<br />

financing for ocean conservation over the<br />

next 20 years.”<br />

WORTH SAVING<br />

Aerial view of the Belize<br />

Barrier Reef Reserve.<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

65


BRIGHTER FUTURE<br />

Marine life will benefit from<br />

the Blue Bond system<br />

ADOBE STOCK<br />

66 <strong>NetJets</strong>


Out on the water, this means balancing<br />

the requirements of fishing communities and<br />

tourism businesses with the urgent need to<br />

conserve mangrove forests and reefs. Money<br />

that would have disappeared in interest<br />

payments can now be put to work finding<br />

ways to protect a mini-paradise like the<br />

remote, jewel-like atoll Glover’s Reef, home<br />

to a tapestry of some 800 coral gardens. At<br />

present there are just six Fisheries Department<br />

staff here doing their best to tackle unlawful<br />

fishing in a marine reserve that stretches for<br />

32km. “Anyone caught is fined and has their<br />

boat and nets confiscated,” says manager<br />

Raphael Martinez, but his resources are<br />

extremely limited. On the more accessible and<br />

larger Turneffe Atoll radar is now being used<br />

to monitor its pristine waters, a measure that<br />

will hopefully be implemented here too.<br />

Support from larger, wealthier nations is<br />

clearly essential, and the Blue Bond offers<br />

some hope for our beleaguered oceans and<br />

their far-flung settlements. The first such<br />

debt swap was launched in the Seychelles<br />

in 2015 when the Indian Ocean archipelago<br />

refinanced $22m of borrowing in exchange<br />

for protecting 30% of its waters, a measure<br />

fulfilled in 2020. The initiative has since<br />

spread to the Caribbean where in September<br />

2022 Barbados completed a $150m Blue<br />

Bond debt conversion that will provide $50m<br />

of funding and see its marine protected areas<br />

expand from virtually zero to approximately<br />

30%. In May, Ecuador signed the largest “debt<br />

for nature” swap on record, worth $656m,<br />

that will see at least $12m a year channelled<br />

into conservation including help to protect<br />

the exceptional wildlife and landscapes of<br />

the Galápagos.<br />

The Nature Conservancy has identified 20<br />

countries that could benefit from the Blue Bond<br />

initiative and has a declared goal of seeing more<br />

than 10% of the world’s oceans under protection<br />

by 2030. While government debt negotiations<br />

are kept secret until confirmed, islands in the<br />

South Pacific could well be next in line. Fiji’s<br />

Blue Accelerator Grant Scheme, which is backed<br />

by the United Nations Development Programme,<br />

is already funding projects that support its blue<br />

economy such as the introduction of electrically<br />

powered boats, sustainable prawn farms and<br />

the country’s first mangrove eco-walk.<br />

Others in Fiji have not waited for<br />

governments, institutional investors and<br />

philanthropists to rescue our imperiled seas<br />

by juggling financial figures. On Vanua Levu,<br />

veteran French oceanographer Jean-Michel<br />

Cousteau has been involved for many years<br />

with an eponymous eco-resort that is a shining<br />

model of sustainability. Here education is<br />

seen as a vital way forward that is manifest<br />

in a kids’ club featuring a School Under the<br />

Sea where children are taught about the<br />

importance of sharks, go night snorkelling, and<br />

plant mangrove seedlings. Its resident marine<br />

biologist, Johnny Singh, sums up the situation<br />

bluntly: “We’re a small country and if we lose all<br />

this we’re gone.” As the 85-year-old Cousteau<br />

puts it: “Protect the ocean and you protect<br />

yourself.” nature.org<br />

OUR WORLD<br />

REDUCING OUR CARBON FOOTPRINT<br />

In 2015, <strong>NetJets</strong> launched Blue Skies By <strong>NetJets</strong> ® to offer our Owners a more environmentally friendly way<br />

to fly. Participating Owners can purchase an equivalent number of carbon offsets to the carbon footprint<br />

of their annual flight hours – calculated by multiplying the carbon offset hourly rate for their aircraft type<br />

by total share size. Because of our partnership with Climate Impact Partners, Blue Skies ® contributions go<br />

directly toward supporting global projects that protect forests, capture and destroy landfill gas, and scale<br />

up renewable energy distribution, to name a few benefits.<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

67


LONDON’S<br />

CULINARY ARTSCAPE<br />

68 <strong>NetJets</strong>


The hottest tables in the U.K. capital belong<br />

to a host of diminuitive Japanese spots where the chef’s<br />

vision leads the way. // By Farhad Heydari<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

69


GOURMET GUIDE<br />

70 <strong>NetJets</strong>


STEPHEN JOYCE; PREVIOUS SPREAD FROM LEFT: © MANDARIN ORIENTAL, © DORCHESTER COLLECTION<br />

IT ROUGHLY translates to “I’ll leave it up to you” – a nod to<br />

the all-knowing sushi chef on the other side of the spotless<br />

counter to whom you respectfully accede on matters of<br />

freshness and choice and whose largely pescatarian set menu<br />

is purveyed personally to a select few at each given seating<br />

and can in no way be altered or amended. For diners who may<br />

have special requests (“I’ll have the wasabi on the side,” for<br />

example) or are oftentimes tardy to their appointed reservation<br />

time or anticipate having a boisterous evening meal, omakase<br />

may not be for you.<br />

But if you are a diehard gastronome, these no-choice,<br />

multicourse Japanese affairs are the ultimate expression of<br />

excellence and are now burgeoning around the world. Omakase’s<br />

roots date back to Japan’s Edo period (1603-1868) when the<br />

purveyors of fish would serve their best and freshest catch to<br />

their most trusted customers, employing the Japanese spirit<br />

of omotenashi—the art of hospitality ingrained in the guest’s<br />

happiness. Today, we are as healthful and ichthyophagous as<br />

ever, and the demand for top-of-the-line, seafood-centred<br />

rations has never been more acute, which is why we are seeing<br />

the emergence of small, discreet, hole-in-the-wall eateries<br />

around the world, which have proliferated and are drawing au<br />

fait gastronomes in droves.<br />

That’s if you can get a reservation. Take London, for example.<br />

With myriad direct flights to Japan, and with the British Isles<br />

a bountiful aquatic larder for the freshest catch, top-tier<br />

sushi chefs are now showcasing their skills and creativity in<br />

spartan, often unmarked, intimate settings where tradition<br />

and authenticity come to the fore and the focus remains firmly<br />

on high-quality ingredients and expert preparation.<br />

Sushi Kanesaka (45parklane.com) is a perfect example.<br />

Hidden behind an unmarked door on the second floor of the<br />

Dorchester Hotel’s sister property, 45 Park Lane, it oozes<br />

the kind of zen “find” that diners crave. In fact, it’s a setting<br />

straight out of Ginza, which also happens to be where master<br />

chef Shinji Kanesaka’s two Michelin-starred original outpost is<br />

based. Like its sibling, napkins are delivered in hand-lacquered<br />

boxes, the ikebana floral arrangement is reassuringly front and<br />

centre, and guests are asked to “refrain from wearing perfume<br />

as the refreshing aroma of vinegar is an important part of the<br />

sushi experience—as is the natural flavor of the fish itself.”<br />

Those lucky enough to secure a reservation at the 13-seat<br />

sleek cedarwood counter will enjoy not only an 18-course<br />

masterpiece but they’ll also witness monk-like chefs working<br />

together in an elegant ballet in a cosy and polished space<br />

framed with soothing backlit washi screens.<br />

Another transportive portal is Taku (takumayfair.com), the<br />

16-seat brainchild of chef Takuya Watanabe, whose Parisian<br />

omakase restaurant Jin was the first to be bestowed with a<br />

Michelin star. Located behind noren curtains on fashionable<br />

Albemarle Street in Mayfair, the ever-changing, Edomae-style<br />

cuisine (a more traditional expression of sushi-making that<br />

involves laboriously curing fish, and a particular way with rice<br />

that allows the delicate umami notes to come to the fore),<br />

was lavished with a Michelin star in March <strong>2023</strong>, just four<br />

months after its debut. Diners at the pine bar have a choice<br />

of a 20-course menu or one with additional courses appended<br />

with ultra-premium ingredients such as caviar and truffle in a<br />

serene oasis of pale woods and natural stone.<br />

Mayha London (mayhalondon.com), meanwhile, is omakase<br />

for a less-formal breed, complete with a speakeasylike<br />

subterranean bijou bar and verdant courtyard where<br />

preprandials are crafted with as much care and attention<br />

as the fare that’s served up at the curved stone chef’s table<br />

superjacent, which has touches of an industrial test kitchen<br />

to it. Beneath an eye-catching bespoke light installation that<br />

recalls a tree of light or a beautiful canopy of illuminated<br />

flowers and with an eclectic soundtrack as the accompaniment,<br />

head chefs Jurek Wasio and Yuichi Nakaya craft a menu using<br />

meticulously sourced seasonal ingredients from a range of<br />

local and Japanese suppliers, the latter providing the finest<br />

seafood and specialty produce, at two seatings to 11 patrons<br />

each evening on chic Chiltern Street.<br />

Then there is Roketsu (roketsu.co.uk), a gloriously minimalist<br />

bilevel time-space threshold that instantly transports you<br />

to Kyoto, where, incidentally, all of the pared-back and<br />

streamlined interiors were fashioned by the craftsmen from<br />

Nakamura Sotoji Komuten, one of the world’s leading experts<br />

in the Sukiya style of architecture using Japanese hinoki wood,<br />

before being shipped to the UK and assembled on-site. The<br />

LIGHT FANTASTIC<br />

Mayha London’s bespoke<br />

installation and counter<br />

Previous pages, from left:<br />

Omakase at The Aubrey;<br />

chef Shinji Kanesaka at<br />

45 Park Lane<br />

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71


GOURMET GUIDE<br />

TASTE OF JAPAN<br />

From left: Endo<br />

Kazutoshi; place setting<br />

at Roketsu; The Aubrey’s<br />

fare; Sushi Kanesaka<br />

Marylebone eatery is situated in Portman Village, where chefowner<br />

Daisuke Hayashi, who brings decades of experience at<br />

Japan’s world-renowned Kikunoi Honten working as a protégé<br />

of the owner and chef Yoshihiro Murata, serves up a traditional<br />

kaiseki meal with dashi (the mystical Japanese dried fishbased<br />

broth) as its foundation, for 10 diners at two sittings<br />

each evening. The attention to detail is next-level – inspired by<br />

the wabi philosophy and aesthetic, even the tableware varies<br />

by season in accordance with its principles. Libations, which<br />

can also be enjoyed at the midcentury basement lounge, have<br />

been conceived by sommelier Ryosuke Mashio, who prior to<br />

Roketsu spent 13 years as head sommelier at Michelin-starred<br />

Umu. He has amassed an award-winning wine list where over 70<br />

sakes are on offer by the bottle, including two sakes imported<br />

exclusively for the restaurant – Kikunoi and Echigoryu – as well<br />

as more than 20 available by the glass.<br />

A similar fusion of omakase and kaiseki is on offer at the<br />

incredible eight-seat Maru (marulondon.com). Helmed by<br />

Yasuhiro Ochiai, previously head chef at two-Michelin-star<br />

Masato Nishihara’s esteemed Tsukumo restaurant in Nara,<br />

Japan, the restaurant offers a 20-course farm-to-fork, fishled<br />

daily-changing menu featuring primarily hyper-seasonal<br />

British ingredients in a petite space in Mayfair’s Shepherd<br />

FROM LEFT: TOM ASTERIADES, © ROKETSU<br />

72 <strong>NetJets</strong>


FROM LEFT: GIADA ZOSI, © DORCHESTER COLLECTION<br />

Market. The setting is serene with interiors (complete with an<br />

eye-catchingly fetching framed shūji calligraphy), floristry, and<br />

crockery (handmade by Maruyama himself) that complement<br />

the multisensory meal. A must-try is the king crab, served in a<br />

silver bowl cast from the shell itself.<br />

But not all omakase has to be of the break-the-bank variety.<br />

At TOKii (tokii.co.uk), the refined in-house restaurant of the<br />

petite Nipponese Marylebone hostelry The Prince Akatoki,<br />

one can indulge in an intimate blind-tasting experience<br />

that’s veiled in secrecy until you and five other guests are<br />

comfortably seated at the chef’s counter for your 11-course<br />

journey. The décor and service are unfaultable and the fleet<br />

of elegant dishes (think Otoro tuna belly temaki) are served<br />

with confidence and aplomb.<br />

Those unfaltering precepts have held Endo at the Rotunda<br />

(endoatrotunda.com) in good stead since April 2019 when it<br />

opened on the top floor of The Helios building in West London.<br />

Since then, it has garnered a Michelin star thanks to chef Endo<br />

Kazutoshi’s uncompromisingly fastidious attention to detail<br />

and ingredients – seafood, for example, is sourced from Endo’s<br />

personal relationship with just a handful of fishermen: clams<br />

from Dorset, monkfish from Devon, cuttlefish from Brittany,<br />

scallops from Orkney, and much more. And the rice, as another<br />

example, is from a dedicated farm in Fukuoka Prefecture,<br />

ensuring that it has the perfect PH when rendered. Patrons,<br />

just a dozen of them, sit transfixed around a meandering<br />

200-year-old hinoki wood counter and beneath a washiinspired,<br />

cloud light feature that levitates gracefully above,<br />

with expansive views of West London as accompaniment.<br />

But omakase as a concept isn’t limited to just exquisite<br />

rations. At The Aubrey (theaubreycollection.com), an eccentric<br />

Japanese izakaya experience at the Mandarin Oriental Hyde<br />

Park, bar director Pietro Rizzo and his team embrace the<br />

ancient principals of seasonal and elegant combinations, for<br />

a deeply immersive and ever-changing experience through<br />

the expansive world of Japanese spirits including everything<br />

from umeshu, shochu, sake, and a miscellany of Asian herbs<br />

and spices. The elusive ingredients are transformed into<br />

exciting elixirs that are served alongside a carefully curated<br />

selection of Japanese-inspired light bites to just six patrons<br />

per sitting, in a stunningly sultry space, with art inspired by<br />

the Japonisme movement, gilded finishings, and plush leather<br />

and velvet furnishings and fixtures, all tucked away behind a<br />

secret door. In the end, regardless of the particulars of the<br />

omakase experience, the remarkable blend of seasonality and<br />

intimate size ensures it will be a meal to remember.<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

73


LEIF CARLSSON<br />

TASTING NOTES<br />

74 <strong>NetJets</strong>


BOLD<br />

BUBBLES<br />

Grower champagnes are all the rage, focused on single-estate bottlings<br />

and small producers. But are these popular bubbles worth all the fuss?<br />

// By Christiaan Porter<br />

IN TIMES WHEN so many products are dubbed artisanal,<br />

when authenticity is a prized characteristic for many upscale<br />

goods and a heartwarming origin story all part of the pitch<br />

to ever more conscious consumers, it would be surprising if<br />

such a luxury product as champagne escaped the same buzz.<br />

Enter “grower” champagnes. Finding increased resonance<br />

over the course of the last two decades, they still qualify<br />

– in the slow-moving French region of Champagne – as the<br />

next big thing.<br />

These are the “récoltants manipulants”, or RM, as they’re<br />

designated on their bottles, indicating that at least 95% of<br />

the grapes used were grown on a single estate. Typically,<br />

they’re from small independent producers, maybe just one<br />

or two generations old who, being young, are evangelists for<br />

new, more radical methods. And so the bottles might also<br />

feature single vintage, single vineyard, single variety, or low<br />

intervention distinctions, often fashionably natural or organic<br />

in their approach in ways more common in Burgundy but rare<br />

in Champagne.<br />

Unbolstered by much in the way of reserves, these grower<br />

champagnes are unique and reflective of a very localised soil<br />

and climate – to the point that a single bottle may be a true<br />

one-off – and, indeed, some wine experts and producers have<br />

argued as early as the 1930s that truly great champagnes are<br />

always this singular.<br />

There are, of course, some grandes marques in Champagne<br />

that do trumpet their localism – Krug began producing<br />

single vineyard, single vintage blanc de blancs 44 years ago<br />

– but a renewed enthusiasm for the idea has seen the likes<br />

of champagne portfolio manager Terry Theise speak of the<br />

merits of “farmer fizz”, as distinct from champagnes that are<br />

– as he damningly puts it – “from a factory”. These are the<br />

“négociants manipulants” whose output is consistent year<br />

after year, a steady stream of consistent bubbles. In contrast,<br />

names like Vilmart & Cie, Egly-Ouriet, Ulysse Collin, Jacques<br />

Selosse, Benoit Marguet, Pierre Paillard, Philipponnat and<br />

Pierre Gimonnet have been trumpeted as grower Davids up<br />

against these multinational Goliaths. These growers lack<br />

access to marketing budgets, and their under-the-radar<br />

reputation is typically built by word of mouth. That they’re<br />

hard to find perhaps only adds to their appeal, especially for<br />

some wine investors.<br />

Certainly, it’s argued, grower champagnes have had a<br />

positive impact on the Champagne region. They are giving it<br />

a frisson of fresh energy, extending choice with something<br />

different, bringing a more personal, familial approach. Most<br />

importantly, they are helping with soil conservation in an<br />

industry that has relied heavily on pesticides and fertilizers<br />

and, indirectly, may be applying some pressure to move to<br />

more organic practises among the large negotiants that still<br />

represent the overwhelming major of Champagne’s production.<br />

The likes of Dom Pérignon and Louis Roederer are among those<br />

giants that have taken steps towards more organic and more<br />

terroir-specific products in recent years.<br />

“Historically, it’s been a marginal climate for viticulture,<br />

but the champagnois feel the changing climate more acutely,”<br />

explains Davy Zyw, wine merchant Berry Bros & Rudd’s<br />

champagne expert and senior wine buyer. “Recent growing<br />

seasons have tested the vines, the terroirs, and exposed the<br />

best farmers in the region, and there is increased division<br />

NEW VINTAGE<br />

The cellar at grower label<br />

Champagne Philipponnat<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

75


TASTING NOTES<br />

“<br />

Mark<br />

These small growers have control over their own grapes,<br />

will know each vine intimately, and will pick at optimum<br />

maturity for their own product<br />

Savage of Savage Selection<br />

between the vignerons who are responding correctly, and<br />

those who are not. It is the most sensitive vigneron who are<br />

making the best wines. And these are often the small growers.”<br />

Indeed, according to wine merchant Mark Savage of Savage<br />

Selection – one of the few specialists in grower champagnes –<br />

the grower market is now at the stage where it’s finding more<br />

widespread acceptance, while the dominance of the grandes<br />

marques and their centuries of tradition is less certain. For one,<br />

attitudes have changed. While they may be a minority, Savage<br />

argues that there are increasing numbers of people “who aren’t<br />

obsessed with the grandes marques, who recognise that these<br />

big names have huge marketing power – the strongest in the<br />

entire wine industry – but that maintaining that requires<br />

drinkers to pay a hefty premium”.<br />

Standards have improved massively too. If grower<br />

champagnes had little hope of matching the grandes marques’<br />

quality 50 years ago, says Savage, more recent years have seen<br />

improved insights as to which of them have the skills, vines,<br />

and location to compete, and the building of a reassuring track<br />

record of impressive champagnes to boot. “What’s more,” he<br />

says, “these small growers have control over their own grapes,<br />

will know each vine intimately, and will pick at optimum<br />

maturity for their own product. There isn’t the same incentive<br />

to take the same care if you’re just selling your grapes on to a<br />

grande marque.”<br />

Thirdly, grower champagnes are changing our ideas about<br />

what champagne is or should be. “Those few titanic grandes<br />

marques and their uniform cuvées have trained consumers to<br />

expect consistency in champagne styles. But this has only ever<br />

given us a binary view into a region that holds such wealth and<br />

diversity of terroir, style, winemaking talent and philosophy,”<br />

explains Zyw. “But now many small producers, often the younger<br />

generations, are not renewing contracts to sell grapes to the<br />

larger houses, and instead are looking to articulate their own<br />

VALENTIN PACAUT / THE EXPLORERS<br />

76 <strong>NetJets</strong>


ALL IN THE PROCESS<br />

Testing time<br />

at Champagne<br />

Philipponnat;<br />

facing page: among<br />

the vines<br />

at Champagne<br />

Marguet<br />

vineyards, in a way we would associate with, say, Burgundy. I<br />

think the Champagne region is at the cusp of climatic, cultural<br />

and commercial change, and there’s really never been a more<br />

exciting time for champagne enthusiasts.”<br />

This, however, isn’t to say that grower champagnes are<br />

exactly set to take over. It can be hard to cut through the hype.<br />

Some argue that they are still more a product of excitable overexuberance,<br />

driven by farm-to-table restaurants keen to offer<br />

ever more discerning diners wine lists of specific Champagne<br />

regions and styles. Likewise, grower champagnes have proven a<br />

boon to independent wine retailers, competing with the market<br />

forces of much larger retailers, in providing them with a more<br />

accessibly priced product that allows them to stand apart.<br />

And, as Alan Marginean of the International Sommeliers<br />

Union notes, grower champagnes are not without controversy<br />

in the wine world where it counts – in the taste. Some feel that<br />

their “racy acidity, with lots of mouthfeel” makes them a perfect<br />

accompaniment to many foods, one way in which sommeliers<br />

might convince diners to explore a singular champagne from<br />

a house they’ve likely never heard of. “But perhaps they are<br />

less good on their own, because they lack the ageing balance<br />

and the richness [of grandes marques champagnes],” he says.<br />

“Champagne has always struggled to find a market outside of<br />

celebrations and high-end restaurants. So even if awareness<br />

of grower wines is increasing, they’re going to be more for the<br />

wine geeks.”<br />

Indeed, these grower champagnes account for between just<br />

five and 10% of exports, according to Comité Champagne. Just<br />

5,000 of the estimated 19,000 independent growers across<br />

the Champagne region hold back some of their grapes – often<br />

from the best parcels of land – to produce their own wine, and<br />

then often only for local consumption.<br />

As far as the geeks go, the ones driving demand for grower<br />

champagnes, this is still very much a matter of caveat emptor<br />

– since, even with improved knowledge of what the market<br />

offers, both the thrill and the potential disappointment<br />

of grower champagnes is their very inconsistency and<br />

idiosyncrasy. That’s less an issue plumping for the never-tobe-repeated<br />

drinking experience of a bottle recommended<br />

by a sommelier. It’s trickier when you want to buy several.<br />

Shifts from the transcendent to the terrible in the same<br />

case might be expected. Think of grower champagnes, then,<br />

as independent films, relative to Hollywood blockbusters:<br />

always interesting if not always successful compared to the<br />

dependable if rarely surprising.<br />

MICHAËL BOUDOT<br />

Scale and historical background help to build stock levels<br />

and reserve wine levels that enable production of higher quality<br />

champagne over a longer period of time. The producer is less<br />

reliant on the quality of individual harvests. And it is true that<br />

some people’s interest is limited if they know they can enjoy<br />

a great bottle but never reorder it. If grower champagnes are<br />

a concept people love to like, then there is always reality. You<br />

can be a very small producer and make something terrible<br />

as much as the opposite can be true. People advanced in<br />

their wine knowledge are interested in grower wines but it’s<br />

important to take a balanced view. People want to find those<br />

golden nuggets – but there remain very few of those around.<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

77


INSIDE VIEW<br />

TURKISH<br />

TEMPTATION<br />

78 <strong>NetJets</strong>


The new home for Istanbul Modern,<br />

the country’s foremost repository of<br />

contemporary and modern art, entices<br />

both with its bold new structure and<br />

the sheer breadth of the work within<br />

CEMAL EMDEN<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

79


SAHIR UGUR EREN<br />

INSIDE VIEW<br />

80 <strong>NetJets</strong>


COURTESY THE ARTIST AND ISTANBUL MUS<strong>EU</strong>M OF MODERN ART MURAT GERMEN<br />

ABOVE<br />

From top: a hall in<br />

the exhibition Always<br />

Here; From the series<br />

Constructed_V2, by<br />

Zeynep Kayan, part of<br />

the exhibition<br />

FACING PAGE<br />

Hera Büyüktaşcıyan’s<br />

A Study on Endless<br />

Archipelagos, featured<br />

in Always Here<br />

PAGES 82-83<br />

Renzo Piano’s<br />

remarkable design<br />

for Istanbul Modern<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

81


INSIDE VIEW<br />

RISEN FROM<br />

THE WATER<br />

The confluence of the Bosphorus and the Golden Horn has an<br />

air of magic about it, and it is no surprise that on the banks<br />

of this mystical meeting place, one of the world’s greatest<br />

architects has conjured a masterpiece. The new home of<br />

Istanbul Modern, Turkey’s original museum of modern and<br />

contemporary art, covers 10,500sq m with an assortment of<br />

exhibitions, film screenings, educational programmes and, of<br />

course, a collection of more than 280 works by the country’s<br />

most renowned artists from 1945 to the present day, as well as<br />

international stars (Yüksel Arslan, Mark Bradford, Tony Cragg,<br />

Olafur Eliasson, Gülsün Karamustafa and Anselm Kiefer among<br />

them). The creator is Italian superstar architect Renzo Piano,<br />

who took inspiration from the watery surrounds to design a<br />

shimmering building of glass and metal. Of his creation, he<br />

says: “This museum building is like a creature of the sea, that<br />

has just jumped out from the water of the Bosphorus. We<br />

wanted to make a building to defy gravity and levitate above<br />

the ground, creating transparency with views towards the<br />

sea on one side and on the other the park and the medieval<br />

district of Galata.” The rota of recent exhibitions matches<br />

the building in ambition, among them Floating Islands, which<br />

pays homage to artists’ attachment to a specific place while<br />

also emphasising the impact of their thought and production<br />

beyond borders and geographies; Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s In Another<br />

Place, featuring 22 portraits taken around the world by the<br />

Turkish filmmaker; and Always Here, a collection of feminist<br />

works. istanbulmodern.org<br />

FACING PAGE<br />

The Floating<br />

Islands exhibition<br />

ENRICO CANO<br />

82 <strong>NetJets</strong>


XXXX<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

83


COURTESY THE ARTIST AND ISTANBUL MUS<strong>EU</strong>M OF MODERN ART<br />

INSIDE VIEW<br />

ABOVE<br />

Mud Boys, India, by<br />

Nuri Bilge Ceylan,<br />

from In Another Place<br />

FACING PAGE<br />

Olafur Eliasson’s Your<br />

unexpected journey, from<br />

Floating Islands<br />

84 <strong>NetJets</strong>


COURTESY THE ARTIST AND ISTANBUL MUS<strong>EU</strong>M OF MODERN ART<br />

ABOVE<br />

From top: scenes from<br />

Jenna Sutela’s weton-wet<br />

watercolour<br />

painting, which will<br />

be on display at the<br />

biennial; Red Forest’s<br />

Abandoned positions of<br />

the Russian Army in the<br />

Red Forest, Chernobyl<br />

Exclusion Zone<br />

FACING PAGE<br />

A stage in the design<br />

process of artist Adrián<br />

Villar Rojas, whose sitespecific<br />

installation, The<br />

End of Imagination, is on<br />

Vallisaari Island<br />

<strong>NetJets</strong><br />

85


THE LAST WORD<br />

JULIAN RENTZSCH<br />

FRANK<br />

GEHRY<br />

The legendary architect on life away from the drawing board<br />

TRAVEL<br />

Home comforts or reaching out?<br />

I travel a lot for work so I love to stay at home! But we are<br />

going to Morocco for a vacation in a couple of months. I’ve<br />

been there before but never to Marrakech. We love going to<br />

Berlin – we did a concert hall there for Daniel Barenboim. It<br />

turned out to be pretty damned good. I’m going to have my<br />

next birthday there. One place I’d like to go is Egypt. I’ve<br />

paid for trips to Egypt several times but for some reason<br />

they didn’t work out.<br />

FOOD<br />

Big names or hidden gems?<br />

I’m not very fussy about food, but I usually look for local<br />

fare. I remember in Paris that a chef opened up a place<br />

after her “job” and it was all very classical French. You<br />

could only see 15 people in this little room and there was<br />

old French cooking. That was very special. I like things like<br />

that – bistros and Paris.<br />

DRINK<br />

Classy cabernet or a contemporary cocktail?<br />

I love a good wine. I was offered the chance to design a winery<br />

for Marqués de Riscal. I said the job was too small but I<br />

visited anyway. They took me down to the cave and they asked<br />

me when my birthday was. I told them and they pulled out a<br />

bottle of 1929 red, took a sword, cut the top off, and poured<br />

the wine. It was so good. I said, “OK, OK, if you give me this<br />

kind of wine, I’m going to do the job.”<br />

ARTS<br />

Live entertainment or still life?<br />

Well, I’ve designed a few concert halls so I’ve been involved<br />

with them over the years. I’m on Herbie Hancock’s board so<br />

I’m very involved with his work. I mostly go out to see classical<br />

music and jazz. A little bit of opera. I used to listen to music<br />

when I was a young kid in architecture school. I used to listen<br />

to Bach constantly, playing always while I was working.<br />

FUTURE PLANS<br />

Taking it easy or keep on going?<br />

I love working on concert halls. If someone offers me anything<br />

related to classical music, I drop everything and go, wherever<br />

it is. It’s the fascination with connecting people. It does it so<br />

beautifully. I love that feeling.<br />

86 <strong>NetJets</strong>


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B Y A U D E M A R S P I G U E T<br />

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