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#30 / 2004

INTERVIEW HANI RASHID, ASYMPTOTE

#30 / 2004


2

COLOPHON

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FRONT COVER: MERCEDES-BENZ MUSEUM (2001) Photo: Asymptote

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CONTENTS

INTERVIEW

HANI RASHID, ASYMPTOTE

What is virtual architecture? According to Hani Rashid of the US-based architectural firm Asymptote, ‘Virtual

architecture has to do with the experience of the body, with perception and memory.’ Asymptote Architecture’s

achievements include experimental installations and computer-generated environments.

FOCUS ON INTERIORS

MULTIMEDIA CENTRE ARCHITECTURE

The library has changed from a refuge of scholarship into a public market place. It is broadening its horizons

and exploring new grounds. The consequences for library architecture are described on the basis of a study of

the interiors of the médiathèque in Vénissieux, the Seattle Public Library and the multimedia centre in Sendai.

PROJECTS

The interiors of several projects involving the use of floors and furniture surfacing from Forbo Flooring are

included as a form of inspiration. The projects are located in various parts of the world and show the many

possibilities provided by Forbo’s products.

SUMMARY

The summaries of the interview and article have been translated into 12 languages.

3


4

Hani Rashid:

‘VIRTUAL

ARCHITEC-

TURE HAS

TO DO WITH

THE BODY,

WITH PER-

CEPTION

AND TIME’

Photo: Alex Cao

‘In architecture we need a hook. We can’t do pure selfindulgent

architecture and hope people will understand

it,’ said the architect Hani Rashid, who, together with his

partner Lise Anne Couture, is director of the New York

based architectural office Asymptote Architecture.

‘However, symbolism shouldn’t be overt and figurative.’

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE, NEW YORK, NY, USA

(1997-2001)

Photo: Arc Photo Eduard Hueber

What is virtual architecture? Does it exist? Should architects

expand their territory to include virtual reality? These

questions arose when Asymptote Architecture was asked

by the New York Stock Exchange to design a virtual stock

exchange. Some time later, the architectural firm received

another such commission: the design of a virtual

Guggenheim Museum, which visitors enter through the

Internet. Thus, Asymptote Architecture became a pioneer

of virtual architecture. ‘It isn’t terra incognita, though,’

explained Hani Rashid. ‘Architects develop ideas about

spatiality and project them into the future. They virtualise

space. As such, virtual architecture has existed for a long

time. Architects like Piranesi and Ledoux were true architects.

They worked in virtual reality, on the other side of the

mirror. But the computer opened up the possibility to introduce

reactive and visceral space, which doesn’t exist in the

tangible, plastic world.’

-What’s the difference between virtual reality and

virtual architecture? Where does architecture come

in?

‘When the Stock Exchange asked us to do the project,

they’d already designed a virtual reality environment. But it

was meaningless. It was just an abstract field of numbers:

no form, no structure, no semblance to any physical reality.

They asked us whether we could do something with it.

We didn’t know anything about the stock exchange, but

realised that architecture is the architect’s best artillery.

So we brought in order and form and employed everything

we, as architects, traditionally do. No-one really scrutinises

such aspects of architecture as the movement through

space, what you look at, where you are in time and space.

In a physical space we take them all for granted. When you

design a house you don’t talk about how slowly you move

through the door, which colours or which surfaces attract

you, or how the light plays in the house and changes form

and space through the day. These aspects are the underlying

notes of our score, which had to be rediscovered in

virtual reality. We as a group felt it as a kind of awakening:

virtual reality taught us what architecture is really about.

‘A lot of people think that virtual architecture has to look

Hani

Rashid

5


6

like a real building. They expect us to put marble in a wire

frame on the computer. But that’s a proxy of a building, not

virtual architecture. Virtual architecture has to do with the

experience of the body, with perception and memory.’

-What did this mean for the virtual stock exchange?

‘We replaced about 40 monitors with data sheets in a

three-dimensional environment. It was like driving a car or

flying a plane. It was learning how to move through space

to get the essential information. It became a fully immersed

visceral place, where you find yourself inside information

and where you can correlate information through

memory and perception. The client had expected that we

would make it look better, add a little bit of design to it.

Had we done so, we wouldn’t have achieved the richness of

a three-dimensional environment. The same goes for the

Guggenheim. We could’ve built just a bunch of little cubes,

where you can go in to see the works of art. But we wanted

to create an architectural experience, as in the great

museums of the world. The keywords are perception and

time. And these bring into play memory, body and form. So

it’s far from creating a web page with easy access to

information. In the virtual Guggenheim it takes time to get

somewhere. You always return to the same kind of spaces.

The rooms are complex and the geometry is intriguing and

mystical. There’s a constant notion that it’s a foreign place

that needs to be discovered. And through the discovery you

get to appreciate it and get immersed in it. It becomes a

real experience. At that point it becomes architecture, as

opposed to a visual interface.’

Perception is the main interest of Asymptote Architecture.

In their early work they even used optical instruments in

order to deconstruct perspective thinking. Where does

their strong fascination with this theme come from? ‘It has

really been one of the key movements in our culture for the

last fifty years,’ said Rashid. ‘Post-Duchamp, post-surrealism,

post-abstract-expressionism. Views of the world in

terms of what happened to the object, to the space, to the

body. We want to be in this time and are interested in figuring

out what the next level in the creating of space for

human inhabitation will be. The other day, I sat in the train

for many hours. Throughout the journey a guy was SMS-ing,

writing as it were with the thumb. What a difference from

a hundred years ago, when people sat in the train writing

on a writing pad in a shaking carriage. To me this guy was

in an entirely different spatial envelope than his Proustian

counterpart. We want to understand this envelope. We

don’t believe in resurrecting the past to a post-modern

pastiche. We don’t like to live on a kind of stage. We’re not

convinced that simple problem-solving is pushing the new

buttons or envelopes.’

-What’s your aim?

‘We want to confront people with their spatial presence.

Think of the Hydrapier in the Netherlands. Here we got the

opportunity to do a garden pavilion. But by the same token

it had to be built in a remarkable place, that is, in a polder,

man-made, next to Schiphol airport. How do you embody all

that into a structure that can allow users to understand the

present state of their spatial condition and at the same

time have a forward trajectory? To inspire a sense of awe

that every artist is after? To raise questions about what a

pavilion is and what it means to build in the polder, next to

an airport?’

-You could’ve opted for a space that’s easy to comprehend,

a commodity.

‘I don’t think there’s such a thing as "easy to comprehend

spatiality". Unless you’re dealing with nostalgia and a

retrograde mentality. I think that resurrecting the past, like

in European urbanism, is wrong. The repeating of styles

from the Weimar Republic in Austria and Germany is completely

out of alignment with the condition in the urban

context. But people tend to feel more comfortable because

they recognise it. So the question is how important it is

to give people what they expect and want to see. I think

there’s something better on the horizon. I see ourselves as

being very responsible with our "playing around". And we

receive very positive reactions, even though our architecture

is questioning.’

- In your architecture you refer to themes and shapes

outside the field of architecture. Like the wing of an

airplane in the Hydrapier. Many architects are

against this kind of symbolism, stating that architecture

should be about architecture and nothing

else. Why do you opt for such symbols?

GUGGENHEIM VIRTUAL MUSEUM (2000)

Photos: Asymptote

Hani

Rashid

7


8

HYDRAPIER FLORIADE PAVILION

HAARLEMMERMEER, THE NETHERLANDS (2001)

Photos: Christian Richters

‘Our buildings are made for people, not for other architects.

We consider it a problem that architecture has become

something that only the architectural profession talks

about. I’ve sat through countless lectures, during which

architects showed how they handled their windows or floor

slabs, supposedly exciting other architects. However, the

question is: how do you get to that awe, that sense of wonder?

A term we like to borrow from advertising is the hook.

How do you get people interested in the story? In architecture

we also need a hook. We cannot do pure selfindulgent

architecture and hope people will understand it.’

-Why should it refer to something else? Perhaps

people will appreciate a building as it is.

‘Ultimately they will. History tells us that sooner or later

the architects shut up, time takes over and buildings are

talked about differently. This talking has more to do with

culture and time than with the architect’s opinions. When

we load up a building with so-called symbolism, we don’t

mean 19th-century symbolism but symbolism extracted

from the present time. The Hydrapier is a hybrid, a kind of

mutation. For a moment it looks like a wing, the next it all

of a sudden shifts into a pumping plant, then again into an

art piece. The symbolism is the result of hybrid, formal

exercises. It’s ambiguity opposed to outright symbolism.

‘Our first important work was the Los Angeles project.

DODGER STADIUM, LOS ANGELES, CA, USA (2000)

Photo: Asymptote

We were trying to tackle a project for an eighty story high

Marilyn Monroe statue on the Hollywood freeway. A kind of

post-modern symbolic architecture of the late 20th century.

But symbolism should not be overt and figurative. We

said, why can’t we make symbolism that relates to the

ephemeral, the ethereal, the non-visible, the information

age and data space? Our symbolism never has a singular

meaning, it will never become obsolete or anachronistic.’

- Many artists, writers and architects of your generation

are into ambivalence. Why not make a strong

statement, a clear gesture?

‘We came out of a very burdensome period of ideology. Too

much ideology and too much certainty about the future.

When I started teaching at Columbia University in 1988,

the notion of a master plan was tantamount to a criminal

act. That’s part of the thinking my generation has come out

of. We try to discover new territories, new possibilities, but

we don’t want to be authoritarian or deterministic about it.

It’s a healthy issue, it leaves a lot of stuff flowing.’

Asymptote’s work seems to refer to the designs of cars

and industrial artefacts: the same fluid forms, the same

strange, surrealist shapes and similar seductive qualities.

Rashid: ‘We try to figure out an alignment with the contemporary

state of culture. Within that we search for

9


CARLOS MIELE FLAGSHIP STORE, NEW YORK, NY, USA (2003)

Photo: Paul Warchol

Courtesy of: Carlos Miele

longevity, not for a moment of fad. All of a sudden all cars

look the same. So do the designs of shoes, watches, industrial

artefacts and furniture. Where does this ubiquitous

quality come from? Partly from the software being used.

Also it’s the mass market that drives these things. We run

a precarious line. In the I-scape and B-scape projects we

were targeting to unravel and reveal these tendencies. But

instead of making a new watch, a new shoe or a new house,

we made enigmatic, problematic objects. We skipped the

utility and focussed on the desired structures.’

- Do you want to put your architecture in resonance

with this kind of design?

‘No, we want to understand how these things are resonating

with the public realm. By surveying and scrutinising

them. By performing their weird surrealistic operations we

feel we can get a hand on it and react to it. We do that in

a critical way, but not in a sense of outright denial or by

creating a problematic counterproposal. It’s a dubious trajectory.

But I believe architects who simply deny it are far

deeper involved. There’re certain successful minimalist

architects who produce architecture that fits perfectly into

the pages of a magazine and becomes a perfect surrogate

B-SCAPE SERIES (1999)

Photos: Asymptote

KNOLL A3 FURNITURE SYSTEM (1999-2002)

Photo: Ramak Fazel

of an advertising campaign or a large company’s interest in

mass marketing. At the same time these architects maintain

a notion to be against it. I think there’s a lot of hypocrisy

here. We say: what of this is retrievable? What do

we want to continue? What gets left behind?’

- Rem Koolhaas once described the architect as a

surfer on the waves. Is your way of dealing with

commercialism a way of getting on the surfboard?

‘It goes back and forth. We get on the surfboard, but we

know the surf is going to make us crash. We’ll definitely

end up climbing back on our board. The Stock Exchange is

a good example. We had very high expectations for virtual

territories that were strange, problematic, almost esoteric,

and had a strange liquidity. But the Stock Exchange moves

around 18 trillion dollars’ worth of capital. They don’t have

time for games or theory. We don’t have to bow down in

defeat, because the project is loaded with possibilities for

the future. And that’s the moment of having to get back up

and resurface - resurface in a very noble way. And that part

is better than anything else you dreamed of at the beginning,

because it’s been tempered by the derailment.’

Hani

Rashid

11


FOCUS ON INTERIORS:

MULTIMEDIA

CENTRE

ARCHITECTURE

12

THE LIBRARY HAS BEEN TRANSFORMED WITHIN A VERY SHORT TIME, INTO A MARKET PLACE. What used to be a quiet

room, lit by subdued light, with books all around and reading tables neatly lined up, can now be best compared with a

supermarket. Unlike in the old days, when the books were kept in storerooms guarded by librarians, visitors can now stroll

around and take books and other information media from the shelves and displays. In addition, the book has lost its status

of exclusivity now that libraries also provide such information carriers as videos, CDs, CD-ROMs and DVDs, and have

computers that give visitors access to the Internet and to digital information available in other libraries. The library's key

activity - providing study material and loaning books - has been extended to include such services as auditoria, cafes

and playrooms for children, as well as facilities for exhibitions, films and workshops. Today’s library combines education

with pleasure.

The library has changed from a bastion into a public space, perhaps even the last public space where anyone can walk

in and where everything is almost free of charge. This, of course, has consequences for library architecture. It means that

architects have to deal with questions like, for example, how to give shape to the public nature of such buildings, and

how to best organise and provide access to the huge diversity of information, while leaving scope for flexibility. They also

have to decide how to give the construction material a function in expressing that the building stores dematerialised,

digitised information and that today images and digital data might be even more important than hardcopy information.

MÉDIATHÈQUE

VÉNISSIEUX, FRANCE (1997-2001)

Dominique Perrault’s médiathèque in Vénissieux (a

southern suburb of Lyons, France) is a perfect illustration

of the fact that basically the library is nothing

but a supermarket. This multimedia centre has been

located there to provide the dreary area of apartment

blocks with a heart. The principle of the building is

quite simple: a flat box, or rather an extensive roof

under which nearly all parts of the programme have

been assembled. The only protruding part is the offices

on top, placed above the internal central street.

Viewed from a distance, the building looks closed and

impenetrable, clearly meant to store and, just like a

book or a computer, not disclosing its content in any

way. ‘Médiathèque’ is printed in playful letters on the

sliding doors, the only transparent part of the building.

Commissioned by: City of Vénissieux

Architect: Dominique Perrault Architecte, Paris

Photos: Georges Fessy, André Morin, Perrault Projets

Inside, the building looks the opposite: an open, wide

landscape with bookracks, magazine displays, reading

tables and computers. That which blocks the view on

the outside, creates openness inside the building.

Perrault placed U-shaped metal panels between the

double-glazed walls in a random pattern, so that one

may face outwards and the other inwards, while top

and bottom may alternate. The panels are designed to

both admit and soften the sunlight. The construction

of the multimedia centre is open and honest - almost

rough, one would say. Concrete columns support the

roof, which is no more but no less than a covering -

functional and industrial - with a framework of steel

beams, and pipes entwining around them. In this

multimedia centre it’s not difficult to image oneself

pushing a shopping trolley or driving a forklift truck.

Multimedia

centre

architecture

13


SEATTLE CENTRAL LIBRARY (THE SEATTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY)

SEATTLE, WA, USA (1999-2004)

The principle that underlies the design of the Seattle Public

Library by Rem Koolhaas of OMA (Office for Metropolitan

Architecture) is the equivalence between books and digital

media. The building, which occupies a whole block in

Seattle’s city centre, is spectacular. It’s an awkward, exciting

combination of materiality and immateriality - an urban

icon amidst several anonymous skyscrapers. The staggered

layers, some transparent, others open, are stacked one

upon the other. The construction looks like a skyscraper

that has been pressed together. The metal lattice encasing

it seems to prevent it from springing back into its original

shape.

In response to the library’s diversity of functions, the team

at OMA opted for organisation. They deconstructed the

programme and rearranged it into clusters of related functions.

Each layer accommodates one such cluster. The new

organisation, which creates clarity and intensifies the programme,

prevents rooms from becoming clogged with

bookcases. It also helps to prevent chaos, to ensure openness

and to create an environment in which books and multi-

media facilities are truly equivalent. The various elements

strengthen one another instead of standing in each other’s

way.

The closed layers of the building differ in height. Because

each part of the programme is clearly distinguishable,

people do not get easily confused. These closed layers contain

popular reading matter and multimedia facilities

(store), meeting rooms and networking facilities (assembly),

the books on loan and - right on top - the offices

(headquarters). The layers in between are transparent so

that everything that occurs inside is clearly visible from the

outside through the metal lattice. They’re like trading floors

- open and public - where there’s room for interaction

between the various layers. Here people can find information

and stimulation. These floors also accommodate the

reception room, the café and the ‘mixing chamber’ for

information exchange and technical facilities. Further up

are the reading room and the terrace. The transparent

intermediate layers let in daylight and advertise the building

as the last bastion of public accessibility.

14 Architects: Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), Rotterdam,

The Netherlands in a joint venture with LMN Architects, Seattle

Landscaping: Inside/Outside, Petra Blaisse, The Netherlands

Jones & Jones, Seattle

Interior design: OMA/LMN Architects, Inside/Outside

Photos: Pragnesh Parikh, OMA/LMN Architects

Courtesy of The Seattle Public Library

Toyo Ito’s architectural approach is totally different. Ito is

not interested in the programme. His focus is on flexibility.

Even a short time before the completion of his multimedia

library in Sendai (Japan), the purpose of the centre was

still unclear and the discussion about the programme still

going on. With six multipurpose floors, the building permitted

that. All options had been left open - a plan libre, the

revitalisation of Maison Domino by Le Corbusier and the

extreme consequence of the library as a supermarket. The

building’s basic principle is familiar: six floors of different

heights, thirteen columns to support them and a transparent

skin. It’s not so much the architecture as the furniture

- desks, bookcases, tables, chairs and couches - which has

been given a role to play in determining the space, with

huge freedom for the interior as a result. Ito worked on

this project with other architects - Ross Lovegrove, Karim

Rashid, Kazuyo Sejima and K.T. Architecture - each of whom

designed a floor in order to provide it with a distinct signature.

Together, the layers are, as it were, city fragments,

one stacked upon the other.

SENDAI MEDIATHEQUE

SENDAI, JAPAN (1997-2000)

More than any other library, the Sendai multimedia centre

represents the immateriality of digital information.

Transparent, weightless and with floors seemingly suspended,

it looks more like a fata morgana than a building or an

object. It’s amazing that Ito has been able to deny the constructive

nature of architecture as much as possible, using

such materials as glass and steel. The skin, the floors and

the columns seem to exist separate from one another. The

skin is thin and graphic, and each facade has been given a

different character. The floors differ in height and have

been kept as thin as possible. The most striking features

are the thirteen hollow-tube columns: they are open, twisted,

distorted, honeycomb-like structures. Like trees, they

penetrate the floors and break through the roof. It’s as

though they’re there just for themselves, seemingly without

any supporting function. The columns accommodate

staircases and elevators, and they conduct light, air, cables

and people. The building’s programmic generosity in combination

with its ephemeral, immaterial appearance make

it a model and prototype of new library architecture.

Architect: Toyo Ito, Toyo Ito & Associates, Tokyo, Japan

Interior architects: Kazuyo Sejima, K.T. Architecture,

Karim Rashid, Ross Lovegrove

Photos: Hiro Sakaguchi

Multimedia

centre

architecture

15


PROJECTS

16

Marmoleum real 3146 Marmoleum real 3127

SIDDALL HALL

Dining Facility, University of Cincinnati

Cincinnati, OH, USA

Michael Schuster & Associates, Douglas Richards

Dupont Flooring Systems, Cincinnati, OH

Adam Dryer (Master Mechanic)

670 m2 Location

Architect

Flooring contractor

Installation

Flooring material Marmoleum real, and Marmoleum dual 2,5mm

Marmoleum dual 614

Photos: Ron Forth Photography

Marmoleum real 3048

Marmoleum real 3139 Marmoleum dual 766

Photos: Pierre Halmaï, Montreal

MONTREAL (DORVAL) INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

International Terminal - Jetée Transfrontalière

Montreal, QC, Canada

Association from Provencher Roy, Cardinal Hardy, Jodoin Lamarre Pratt, and Arcop

12.540 m2 Location

Architect

Flooring material

Marmoleum real, and Marmoleum dual 2,5mm

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18

Marmoleum real 3055 Marmoleum fresco 3846

Marmoleum real 3030 Marmoleum real 3126

GREAT WESTERN HOSPITAL

Swindon, UK

Adrian Hitchcock, BDP

Lee Cheong, BDP

Swindon & Marlborough Trust

Carillion / Building Economist: Jas Dhami

Tynedale

35.000 m2 Location

Architect

Interior architect

Commissioned by

General contractor

Flooring contractor

Flooring material

Marmoleum 2,5mm. Designs: Aquajet technique

ELISABETH KRANKENHAUS Hospital

Photos: David Barbour, BDP

Essen, Germany

Becker, Burgatz & Partner, Essen

Plan M, Niederkassel

Baustoffkontor Oberhausen, Oberhausen

1.500 m2 Location

Architect

Interior architect

Flooring contractor

Flooring material

Marmoleum real, Marmoleum fresco, Marmoleum dual, Marmoleum vivace,

Artoleum scala 2,5mm, and ColoRex EC

Marmoleum real 3125 Marmoleum vivace 3403

Architect Lee Cheong: "I started with an

impression, a vision in terms of design and

colours, but then it was important to consider

practical features, especially sustainability.

We vetted all our suppliers’ green policies and

questioned every aspect of the design to

ensure that we were employing the most

appropriate environmentally-friendly methods

and materials".

Photos: Christoph Leniger

Marmoleum real 3146

Marmoleum real 3136 Marmoleum real 3135

LIVING TOMORROW House and office of the future

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

UN Studio, Amsterdam

Studio Beliën, Heusden-Zolder, Belgium

Forbo Flooring, Design Studio

Büscher project service, Wormerveer

830 m2 Marmoleum, Marmoleum meets Mendini, Artoleum, and Corklinoleum

Designs: Aquajet technique. 680 m2 Arsenal, Symfonie and Granit, 60 m2 Eternal

140 m2 Location

Architect

Interior architect

Floor design

Installation

Flooring material

Material Bulletin Board and Furniture Linoleum

Photos: Fotostudio Van Wijk, Krommenie

19


20

Marmoleum real 3174 Marmoleum real 3164

Marmoleum vivace 3405

ZORGCENTRUM DE DIE

Elderly home

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Manon Hees, Forbo Flooring

Lykele de Vries, Amsterdam

520 m2 Marmoleum real, Marmoleum fresco, and Artoleum 2,5mm, 120 m2 Location

Floor designer

Installation

Flooring material

Eternal wood

Marmoleum fresco 3855

Eternal wood 11542

GREVELØKKA SKOLE School

Photos: Forbo Flooring

Photos: Arnfinn Johnsen

Hamar, Norway

Jacobsen og Reiten AS, Gjøvik

Inger Ingeberg

Hamar Kommune

Martin M. Bakken A/S

Malermester Morten Skancke A/S

2.000 m2 Location

Architect

Interior architect

General contractor

Building contractor

Flooring contractor

Flooring material

Marmoleum real, Marmoleum vivace 2,5mm, and Marmoleum acoustic

Artoleum graphic 5303

VÍKURSKÓLI Primary School

Reykjavik, Iceland

Sigurdur Gústafsson FAI

Reykjavik City Council

Sveinbjörn Sigurdsson Ehf

Kjaran Ehf

Gólfdúkur HH Gólf Ehf

3.100 m2 Location

Architect

Commissioned by

Building contractor

Flooring consultant

Installation

Flooring material

Artoleum graphic 2,5mm

Photos: Adalsteinn Birgisson

21


Artoleum graphic 5305 Artoleum graphic 5306

BIBLIOTECA CAMPUS UNIVERSIDAD REY JUAN CARLOS

University Library

Alcorcón (Madrid), Spain

Luis García Gil, Félix Garrido Morán, Francisco José Palancar Arranz

Construcciones San José

Inverna SA

13.500 m2 Location

Architect

General contractor

Flooring contractor

Flooring material

Marmoleum fresco 2,0mm, Artoleum graphic 2,5mm, and Corkment 2,0mm

BIBLIOTECA CAMPUS MÓSTOLES UNIVERSIDAD

REY JUAN CARLOS University Library

Marmoleum real 3030 Marmoleum real 3125 Marmoleum real 3127

Marmoleum real 3131 Marmoleum real 3133

Móstoles (Madrid), Spain

Francisco Rodríguez de Parte Arroyo, Francisco José Palancar Arranz

Dragados Obras y Construcciones

Korce SA

9.000 m2 Location

Architect

General contractor

NURSERY SCHOOL

Flooring contractor

Flooring material

Marmoleum acoustic 4,5mm, and Walton

Castello Sopra Lecco (LC), Italy

Arch. Piergiorgio De’ Flumeri, UniProItalia (BG) and Arch. Giorgio Conca (LC)

Lariana Linoleum snc, Lecco

Marmoleum acoustic 3055

350 m2 22 23

Location

Architect

Installation

Flooring material Marmoleum real, and Marmoleum dual 2,5mm


24

Walton 171 Desk Top eleganza 4023

NIKE DENMARK Head office

Location Kokkedal, Denmark

Architect Lauritzen 1968

Floor designer Arkitekt MAA Morten Lauritzen

Commissioned by Nike Denmark

Flooring contractor JELU Gulvbelægning, Hillerød

Installation (Furniture Linoleum) Spørring Møbler & Inventar

Flooring material Walton

Material (Furniture Linoleum) Desk Top eleganza

Photos: Tom Jersø

Marmoleum vivace 3408 Marmoleum vivace 3405 Photos: Bernt Brolin

Artoleum graphic 5302

Artoleum graphic 5303 Artoleum graphic 5304

RYDSKOLAN School

Skövde, Sweden

CH Arkitekter Skövde

Skövde kommun

Asplunds Bygg AB

R-Golv AB

1.500 m2 Location

Architect

General contractor

Building contractor

Flooring contractor

Flooring material

Marmoleum vivace 2,5mm

TRYGGHETSRÅDET

Office building

Göteborg, Sweden

Nordstrand & Rung Arkitektkontor AB

Granova Bygg

Golvet Göteborg AB

1.200 m2 Location

Architect

Building contractor

Flooring contractor

Flooring material

Artoleum graphic 2,5mm

Photos: Bernt Brolin

25


26

Artoleum graphic 5306

ALVALÁXIA

Bingo Sporting Club (ALVALADE XXI stadium)

Lisbon, Portugal

Projectório

Intergrau - Decoração de Interiores, Lda

900 m2 Location

Architect

Installation

Flooring material Artoleum graphic 2,5mm

Marmoleum real 3173 Marmoleum real 3146 Marmoleum real 3143 Photos: Kostas Zagas

MEDIA PRESS CENTER Olympic Games

Athens Marousi, Greece

K. Kyriakidis & Associates SA

J/V Michaniki SA - Athina AETB & TE

Christos Thanopoulos

Decofloor LTD

15.500 m2 Location

Architect

General contractor

Installation

Flooring consultant

Flooring material

Marmoleum real 2,5mm

Marmoleum fresco 3826

Tweeds & Crocodiles 3326 Tweeds & Crocodiles 3327 Tweeds & Crocodiles 3330 Tweeds & Crocodiles 3332

ALGEMEEN STEDELIJK ZIEKENHUIS AALST (ASZ)

Hospital

Aalst, Belgium

Raf Sterck

Tint NV

20.000 m2 Location

Interior architect

Flooring contractor

Flooring material

Marmoleum, Artoleum, Tweeds & Crocodiles, Step, and ColoRex

Photos: Jan Landau - Lighthouse

27


28

Marmoleum real 3181 Marmoleum real 3038

Marmoleum real 3137 Marmoleum real 3163

SHANGHAI DIAMOND EXCHANGE

Shanghai, China

SOM

Ms. Claire Xiang

Shanghai Lujiazui Import and Export Co Ltd

Shanghai Xiangfu Decoration Co Ltd

2.000 m2 Location

Architect

Floor designer

Flooring contractor

Installation

Flooring material

Marmoleum real 2,5mm

GUANGDONG CHINESE MEDICINE HOSPITAL

Location Guangzhou, China

Architect Guangzhou Space Survey and Architect Ltd

Interior design Mr. Chen Zhutang, Mr. Yang Hao

Floor designer Mr. Yang Hao

General contractor Guangzhou Living Building Construction Engineering Company

Flooring contractor Guangzhou Taize Construction Material Company

Flooring material 40.000 m2 Marmoleum real, and Marmoleum fresco 2,0/2,5mm

Photos: Mr. Wang Geng

Photos: Mr. Feng Xiao-tian

Marmoleum real 3032 Marmoleum real 3055 Marmoleum real 3030

RETAIL SPORT SHOP SPORT MASTER

Moscow, Russia

Ecoscan

Ecoscan Service

1.100 m2 Location

Flooring consultant

Installation

Flooring material

Marmoleum real 2,0mm

Marmoleum real 3131

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