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Open and Distance Learning for Sustainable Development

Open and Distance Learning for Sustainable Development

Open and Distance Learning for Sustainable

2 nd Lagos, Nigeria A C D E C o n f e r e n c e and G eneral A ssem bly Open and Distance Learning for Sustainable Development for Distance Education Organiser Tue sda y 8th - F rida y 11th, July 2008 Main Sponsor Supporting Intergovernmental Agencies WORK & LEARN Host

  • Page 2 and 3: AFRICAN COUNCIL FOR DISTANCE EDUCAT
  • Page 4 and 5: FOREWORD It was indeed a privilege
  • Page 6 and 7: SUB THEME I OPEN & DISTANCE LEARNIN
  • Page 8 and 9: Exploring Open and Distance Learnin
  • Page 10 and 11: Capacity Building Rehabilitation of
  • Page 12 and 13: SUB THEME V COLLABORATION AND PARTN
  • Page 14 and 15: Education Policy Implementation in
  • Page 16 and 17: To start with, Africa has to fully
  • Page 18 and 19: First, he believed in self-effort,
  • Page 20 and 21: usually subject to the educational
  • Page 22 and 23: point is that digital divides run w
  • Page 24 and 25: Connectivity The first barrier to e
  • Page 26 and 27: quality learning materials. Having
  • Page 28 and 29: INCLUSIVENESS - COMMUNITY, DISTANCE
  • Page 30 and 31: delivering education programming in
  • Page 32 and 33: 18 Opportunity to meet daily in bui
  • Page 34 and 35: allow us to use, exploit, develop e
  • Page 36 and 37: Much has been written about and dis
  • Page 38 and 39: Karnani, A. (2007). Fortune at the
  • Page 40 and 41: 26 • Progress has been made in ge
  • Page 42 and 43: (TESSA currently involves 9 countri
  • Page 44 and 45: 30 • Where many divides and dispa
  • Page 46 and 47: 32 OPEN AND DISTANCE LEARNING FOR S
  • Page 48 and 49: With a total land area of almost 4.
  • Page 50 and 51: The evolution of ODL in the region
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    mass media, online tutorials and on

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    capital, or rather knowledge capita

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    Open University (IGNOU) in India an

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    I foresee the next step for SEA and

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    TEACHER EDUCATION THROUGH DISTANCE

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    the physical capacity of institutio

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    50 • Self-report data by teachers

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    Woolfolk (2006:88) point to US rese

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    54 that are more effective in raisi

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    are likely to end up in authoritari

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    After a lengthy process of national

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    60 • What technologies are best s

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    62 ... Each section has a case stud

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    the joint ILO/UNESCO Committee of E

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    Annexure Activity 6 Problem-Solving

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    68 LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTIC FACTORS

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    Education and National Development

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    articulated in appropriate doses at

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    74 - Updating teachers skills in th

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    Leopold S. Senghor, an exemplary pr

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    A compulsory university bilingual t

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    While English is rivaled considerab

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    Mendo Ze G. 199 Le français langue

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    84 • Assist governments in decisi

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    86 • Life expectancy and access t

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    It is also based on information sub

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    agenda, such as South East Asian co

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    ABSTRACT 92 OPEN AND DISTANCE LEARN

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    Birdsall, et al (20015) found that

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    3. CHALLENGES FACING ODL IN AFRICA

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    • More research orientated studie

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    what is taken for education in Afri

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    knowledge domain and how best to ut

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    5. CONCLUSION: THE ROLE OF COMMUNIT

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    Glennie, J., & Bialobrzeska, M. (20

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    Peters, O. (2002). Distance educati

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    “THE MISSING PIECE”, SOCIAL- EM

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    viewed as growing plants that need

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    appropriate for this study since it

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    Administration of Research Instrume

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    statistics analysis, it was found o

  • Page 134 and 135:

    Tobin, J.J., Wu, D.H. & Davidson, D

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    On the average, less than 12 per ce

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    g) Monitoring: There should be syst

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    4. Affordability. Since it is not r

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    However, open and distance educatio

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    Introduction In th e l a s t d e c

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    O D L I n it ia t iv e s in N ig e

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    P u r p o s e o f t h e s t u d y T

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    D a ta a n a ly s i s D a ta in v o

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    I t e m S /N T a b l e 3 : C o m p

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    T a b le 4 a b o v e s h o w s th e

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    l i f e in teractiv e in s tructio

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    U n i la g r e s p o n d en ts b e

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    in s t i tu t ions. I mp l ic itly,

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    148 STRATEGIES FOR PREVENTING HIV/A

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    Methodology Survey method was emplo

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    Involvement of students in programm

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    The counsellor uses his/her profess

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    TEACHER EDUCATION IN OPEN AND DISTA

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    This shortfall assumes an annual in

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    In NOUN, students interact more wit

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    It is important to note that the sa

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    References Adesola, A.O. (2002).

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    Introduction Education plays a very

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    members of academic staff of the th

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    References Distance Education Stude

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    Introduction This presentation focu

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    Table 1: DEED 618: Program Outcomes

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    In order to achieve good pedagogy,

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    Course Requirements as Related to C

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    180 Course design - Instructors sh

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    Developing countries are left with

  • Page 198 and 199:

    Abstract 184 OPEN AND DISTANCE LEAR

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    The External Study Programme (ESP),

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    In order to make good planning deci

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    190 In 2001, National Open Universi

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    192 SUSTAINABILITY INDICES AS MEASU

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    (3) Suggest ways by which ODL insti

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    196 situation, creativity, innovati

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    198 Possible Patterns of School Per

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    Indicators are as varied as the typ

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    5. Internal Efficiency Unit √ √

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    NTI By now, delivery of instruction

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    EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN THROUGH DISTAN

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    Scope of Distance Education Distanc

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    Objectives of the Study The objecti

  • Page 226 and 227:

    References AIOU (1999).25 years of

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    Annexure-1Table 1: Total public and

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    Annexure-6: Table 6 Gender Wise, Le

  • Page 232 and 233:

    Annexure- 10:Table 10 Gender Wise,

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    Annexure -15: Table 15 Gender Wise,

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    humaines, mais qui se sont fixés d

  • Page 238 and 239:

    These objectives have been undersco

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    education and training. The program

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    training. Egerton University and ot

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    Introduction I n t h e l as t d e c

  • Page 246 and 247:

    N i geri a h a s w i t n e s s ed p

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    S a m p l e a n d s a m p l i n g t

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    T a b l e 2 c o m p a r i s o n o f

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    I t e m S / N T a b l e 4 R a t i n

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    T a b l e 6 A p p r a i s a l of m

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    R e s u l t s o f t h e I n t e r v

  • Page 258 and 259:

    A no t h e r d i mensi on t o t h i

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    R e f e r e n c e s A d e goke, K .

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    PSYCHOLOGICAL PREPAREDNESS OF DISTA

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    The break from the routine of every

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    students felt they had adequate inf

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    Recommendation 253 i.) To improve o

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    A critical aspect of the programmes

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    Methodology Guided by critical theo

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    eviewers at a time. Due to financia

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    should make it very clear that ICT

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    Abstract 263 USING AUTHENTIC TEXTS

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    such as being able to read to their

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    ODL institutions in collaboration w

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    269 SUB THEME II MEETING THE CHALLE

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    Introduction In the year 2000, all

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    good quality decision and thus lowe

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    Connections (2007).Learning for Dev

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    The concepts of masculinity and pow

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    unavailable to the mass of his peop

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    identity to those goblins from oute

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    parataxis relations, which define u

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    This aspect of the study focuses on

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    Dignity - indignity Human virtues -

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    Fairclough, N. (2001). Language and

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    education is the key that unlocks a

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    dispersed enrollment, making best u

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    Specifically, the above illustrates

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    EXPLORING OPEN AND DISTANCE LEARNIN

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    emphasis on the heterogeneity of th

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    Information and Communication Techn

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    Khalid, S. 1997. A socio-economic s

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    for sustainable results, especially

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    An important dimension, and as infe

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    theory argues that learning should

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    Suffice it to say that before the a

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    undergraduate level but be engaged

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    Mentee/Learner Academic/Program fac

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    Qualité dans le domaine de l’Ens

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    lasting relationships between stude

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    Student advisory service is one of

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    Conclusions From the above findings

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    Venkaiah, V. (1995). Quality Assura

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    Deductions from scholars’ submiss

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    As a result, with more experts bein

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    Recommendations From the deductions

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    According to UNESCO (2002), represe

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    institutions and their location do

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    337 The government should subsidis

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    Abstract 339 OPEN FLEXIBLE LEARNING

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    and secondary levels” tend to exc

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    access to education in formal unive

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    providing accessible education is c

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    Abstract 347 IMPACT OF SOCIO-CULTUR

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    The concept of Science, Technology

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    member of society while he live, hi

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    OPEN AND DISTANCE LEARNING AS A STR

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    direction despite the ‘apartness

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    357 i Objectives of farmers trainin

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    359 The small scale farmers can be

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    361 economics. This competency is e

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    ii. Strategies for enhancing SSFs e

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    The methods of small farmer product

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    PROVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION

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    Functions of Agricultural Extension

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    technology to them. Feedback from t

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    REFORMS IN NURSING EDUCATION: THE N

  • Page 390 and 391:

    The General Nursing programme is th

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    learning to solve the enormous chal

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    Introduction Entrepreneurship is a

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    381 (5) has the twin advantage of i

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    383 (v) Enhance and facilitate work

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    385 • student assessment procedur

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    Dana, L. P. (1995). Entrepreneurshi

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    ROLE OF OPEN / DISTANCE LEARNING IN

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    The objectives of instructional met

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    5 EDUCATIONAL TV AND RADIO PROGRAMM

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    III Internet-based Education Progra

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    References Adekanmbi, G. 1993. Sett

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    traditional education which caters

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    There were also the satellite campu

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    Garrison (1990: 45) states that: Di

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    were enrolled in schools. These chi

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    S/N 1 discussion method) and suppor

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    38 It provides access for learners

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    Hypothesis 1 There is no significan

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    Discussion of results Looking at th

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    References Adeyemi, T.O. (2007). Te

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    417 SUSTAINABLE HUMAN DEVELOPMENT T

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    Country Data People living with HIV

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    Conclusion The facts about HIV/AIDS

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    Abstract 423 CHANGING ROLE OF HIGHE

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    Emerging Kenyan learner characteris

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    An interesting task for distance ed

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    Why ODL at Moi University With the

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    References Agalo. J. (2002). Approa

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    Societies often impose physical res

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    Distance education provided a ray o

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    encouraged her and helped her keep

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    Recommendations 439 The access to

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    WOMEN IN PURDAH: THE CHALLENGES OF

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    to education once they become seclu

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    The Population Crises Committee (20

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    447 (a) free, compulsory and univer

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    449 No. of Students Total Populatio

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    References Bay, B. (1982). Dependen

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    453 TRAINING OF UNTRAINED TEACHERS

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    Number of batches: 5 of 20 teacher-

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    36 05130 497 248 249 50.10 0 497 10

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    Introduction The University of New

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    However, O’Donnell (2005: 1) ques

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    However, it is notable that Faculti

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    Another outcome of the open policy

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    cohort university teaching: A case

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    RE-THINKING THE INTERNAL QUALITY AS

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    greater degree of emphasis on syste

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    counselling at various stages of th

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    C o n c l u s i o n For any course

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    CAPACITY BUILDING REHABILITATION OF

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    1961. The African Charter, 1981 aff

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    abiding member 14 . Also that un-co

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    increases sharply 21 . This in part

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    8. Miscellaneous 9. Did not answer

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    Conclusion The National Open Univer

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    Reform and rehabilitation programme

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    Recommendations In this paper, we r

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    ISSUES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF ACADEMI

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    Nicholson (1984) had argued that oc

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    In this study, not all these staff

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    What policies/strategies can distan

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    TRAINING NEEDS OF TUTORIAL / INSTRU

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    Identifying Training Needs Training

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    provided, the institution is ready

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    For the facilitators to discharge t

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    A PROPOSED OPEN DISTANCE LEARNING M

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    511 cheaper than using the few prof

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    513 undergraduates in relevant fiel

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    ASSESSING THE DIFFICULTY INDEX OF C

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    elationship that exists between the

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    Presentation of data Table 2 Percen

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    Table 5 Presentation of difficulty

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    Table 8 523 RE Value Description of

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    Hiebert, E. H. & Fisher C. W. (2005

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    Introduction Quality assurance in t

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    529 COLLABORATION WITH THE PEOPLES-

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    degrees, we feel it essential to de

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    Introduction The whole world is now

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    University of Nigeria recruited and

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    537 b) if it enables the counselee

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    ENHANCING QUALITY IN OPEN AND DISTA

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    The Concept of Open and Distance Ed

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    Quality of inputs This involves qua

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    i) e-mail ii) Facsimile (Fax) iii)

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    547 and hard-wares are costly. Succ

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    Matthew, A.G. (2007). Open and Dist

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    Online interactivity Interactivity

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    Situated learning • experiential

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    Step 555 Table 1 Steps involved in

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    has probably aided a small shift to

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    Conclusion One of my teaching objec

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    Salmon, G. (2000b). E-moderating: t

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    563 higher education, unlike the cl

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    565 • The VICC is a centralised o

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    567 • The second kind are the Cop

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    (iv) Secretaries:- Officials of the

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    571 background, they still find it

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    PROCESSES OF EXAMINATION AND ASSESS

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    learning. This is what we call ‘A

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    vii. Cost and efficiency: focuses o

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    INCORPORATING RELATIONSHIP MARKETIN

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    Students regularly come into contac

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    Records clerk 2 6.7 ICT Technician

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    commitment of the management. The q

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    IEC (2005). Makerere University Dis

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    Abstract 589 SOLVING THE PROBLEM OF

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    It has to be noted, however, that t

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    Information Technology 54 Human Res

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    Cause Percentage Institutional proc

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    Appendix 1 Structured Interview Que

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    III) to identify suitable counterpa

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    with the necessary hardware and sof

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    Abstract 603 STUDENTS’ RATING OF

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    orne out of the fact that OD learne

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    References Adams, J.V. (1997). Stud

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    Training and Corporate (Industrial)

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    THE POLICY CHALLENGES OF OPEN AND D

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    (Bates, 2000). Now anyone is potent

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    education. Alternative ways of prov

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    Recommendations To address the chal

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    Factors affecting quality education

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    Count 621 7000 6500 6000 5500 5000

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    Work- Place Experience of NOUN Stud

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    References Fjortoft, N. (1996,16).

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    COLLABORATION BETWEEN OPEN AND DIST

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    - the re-establishment of the Natio

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    Areas of Need The respondents ident

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    ODL institutions and conventional i

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    Introduction 635 comparaison, de di

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    in order to address their shortcomi

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    uild a new differentiated and artic

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    learning is usually ‘mediated’

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    Conclusion This paper, while very m

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    Kim, S.; Gilani. Z.; Landoni, P.; M

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    of China’s radio and TV universit

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    3. Strengthening collaboration with

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    Introduction 651 GUIDE ASSOCIATION:

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    The final result will be the draft

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    elationship. The financial resource

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    ICT AND QUALITY ASSURANCE IN 657 OD

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    well as physical learning) is being

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    offers professional development pro

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    female participation. Efficient use

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    and anticipated drop in the price o

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    667 HOW OPEN AND DISTANCE EDUCATION

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    success of the distance education p

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    671 SUB THEME VI E-LEARNING AND ODL

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    steadily finding acceptance and ado

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    uses it to power the microchip's ci

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    FACING THE CHALLENGES IN DESIGN & I

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    Technology Policy and strategy guid

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    Technology Cellular subscribers 0.8

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    Most eLearning situations use a com

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    685 • On-demand access means lear

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    IBADAN OPEN DIGITAL VILLAGE (IODIV)

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    Very few percentage of young people

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    • Promote access and develop conf

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    693 668 The student experience of d

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    Table 2 SMS Applications SMS applic

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    697 and issues. Cambridge, MA: Broo

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    Specifically, semiconductor technol

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    As an experimental approach to test

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    The meaning of M-learning M-Learnin

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    - To encourage internationalisation

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    References Attewel, J. (2005). From

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    Developing the Concept of Learning

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    - if possible, activities have to p

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    - Approaches derived from the theor

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    Figure 2 Learning field Time-guidel

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    Conclusion and a Critical Appreciat

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    Kremer, H.-H., Sloane, P.F.E. Lernf

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    The LTSC and IMS Global Learning Co

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    Figure 2 - Conversational Framework

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    the multimedia learning objects. Ac

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    The multimedia packaging tools were

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    use of learning standards makes it

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    Introduction Events in the world ed

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    Source: Adapted from (JAMB 1998-200

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    While elearning has a lot of opport

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    in carrying out technical assignmen

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    Institutional Level All higher inst

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    VIDEOCONFERENCING AS A VERITABLE IN

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    Project Goals/Objectives The primar

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    VISIBILITY IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIE

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    Implementation Resources: These are

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    Figure 2.3 CSLA Model Codification

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    Figure 2.5 SPS Model Codification P

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    EDUCATION POLICY IMPLEMENTATION IN

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    Consequently, open learning on one

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    757 To achieve the objectives, the

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    Table 3 Distribution of Students’

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    that for ODL to have its place as e

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    Middle East 196,767,614 3,284,800 4

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    school teachers. The institute prod

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    Question 9 sought to know the kinds

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    Table 9: Factors affecting use of I

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    10.2% for video conferencing. The o

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    773

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