february-2010

jetstar.australia.magazine

february-2010

EMPIRE OF THE SUN

A WONDERFUL WEEK IN NZ

Seven days of free fun

in Queenstown

Australia’s pop darlings on sweeping the

ARIA Awards, family and fame

FREAKY FASHION

We try on the top 25 labels showing

at Tokyo Girls Collection

WOK’S COOKING?

WOK’S COOKING?

Taste-test Melbourne’s Chinatown

with Elizabeth Chong

FEBRUARY 2010

YOUR FREE COPY


40

contents.

features

22 star struck

We talk to the brightest star of them all, Empire of the Sun

30 go guide

Head to the surf city this month as the champs take on the

Quiksilver and Roxy Pros

34 adrenaline

Find out how to enjoy all of Queenstown’s riches while

holidaying like a pauper

40 hub

We go backstage with the Adelaide Festival’s artistic director

44 hot spot

For a fabulous holiday for all, check out Phillip Island’s

new attractions

50 people

We catch up with footballer Preston Campbell and his

latest star-studded project

54 in focus

Two matchmakers reveal how to show single life the door

58 eat beat

Take a bite of Chinatown this Chinese New Year with

Melbourne’s celebrity chef Elizabeth Chong

64 retail therapy

We prowl the catwalk for a fashionista’s best buys at

Tokyo Girls Collection

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: TV host Julia Zemiro talks

music; local hero Preston Campbell; join celebrity

chef Elizabeth Chong for lunch in Chinatown

50

Photo: Cormac Hanrahan

regulars

2 ceo’s welcome note

4 events

7 10 minutes with...

Sarah Wilson

8 style fi le

11 cheers

12 good taste

14 the word

16 how to

18 information desk

20 fi t to go

68 brain teasers

in the air with jetstar

77 jetstar news

78 starkids

81


88 where we fl y

90 your wellbeing onboard

92 international adventures

COVER ILLUSTRATION:

DEBASER

58

98 introducing our

domestic airports

103 domestic destinations

focus

105 gift ideas

106 have a bite

110 entertainment

CONTENTS

FEBRUARY 2010

FEBRUARY 2010 1


2 FEBRUARY 2010
















CEO’S WELCOME NOTE

Welcome aboard, kick back and enjoy this issue of

Jetstar Magazine

This

month around the Asia region our passengers are celebrating the Lunar New

Year, Chinese New Year, or Tet as it is known in Vietnam. It’s a fantastic time to

grab one of Jetstar’s every day low fares to visit friends and family over this festive period.

In Australia and New Zealand, as the peak school holiday period comes to an end,

bargain airfares are available to more than 50 destinations around our network. I’d highly

recommend the east coast of Tasmania as an ideal destination at this time of year, with

great food, beautiful beaches and spectacular walks. You can fl y with Jetstar to either

Hobart or Launceston from a range of Australian capital cities.

And don’t forget, next month we take off to Nadi in Fiji. You can book tickets now at

Jetstar.com.

Safe and happy travels from all the team at Jetstar.

Bruce Buchanan

CEO Jetstar Airways

EDITORIAL

EDITOR

Rachel Farnay Jacques

DEPUTY EDITOR

Anne Loh

ART DIRECTOR

Suadi Nur Effendy

SENIOR PHOTO EDITOR

Katie Ackerman

SUB-EDITORS

Sally Wilson, Heather Millar

JAPANESE EDITORIAL CONSULTANT

Yoshino Kyoko

JETSTAR MANAGING EDITOR

Louise Laing

PUBLISHING DIRECTOR

Simon Leslie

EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Michael Keating

DESIGN DIRECTOR (ASIA)

Peter Stephens

ASSOCIATE DESIGN DIRECTOR

(SINGAPORE)

Terence Goh

FEBRUARY 2010

ADVERTISING

PUBLISHER

Michelle Kavanagh

INFLIGHT MEDIA SPECIALISTS

Naomi Cranswick, Jeen Poh,

Niky Sakhrani, Faith Lau, Philip McCluskey

PRODUCTION MANAGERS

Sandy Fong, Serene Wong

CREATIVE SOLUTIONS

CREATIVE SOLUTIONS DIRECTOR

Duane Thia, tel: +65 6302 2473

MANAGING DIRECTOR

Gerry Ricketts

CEO

Jeffrey O’Rourke

JETSTAR MAGAZINE is published for

Jetstar Airways by Ink Publishing Pte Ltd,

97B Amoy Street, Singapore 069917,

tel: +65 6324 2386, fax: +65 6491 5261.

Australia Free Call: 1800 202 901

Advertising: jetstar.ads@ink-publishing.com,

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carrier’s access code before this number)

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USA 1866 397 8170

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Web: www.jetstar.com

©Ink Publishing. All material in

JETSTAR magazine is strictly

copyrighted and all rights are

reserved. Reproduction without

permission of the publisher is strictly

forbidden. Every care has been taken in compiling

the contents of this magazine, but we assume no

responsibility for the effects arising therefrom. The

views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily

those of the publisher or Jetstar Airways.

All information is correct at press time.

MICA (P) 060/02/2009

Printed by Webstar Sydney: 1/83 Derby St.,

Silverwater, NSW 2128, AUSTRALIA.


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dfo.com.au


TRUE BLUE

Th e fi rst ever Australian Film Festival is in

the spotlight this month. We speak to festival

director Barry Watterson, who’s no stranger

to directing successful fi lm festivals having

helmed Australian Film Week and the Coogee

Arts Festival. He’s also a playwright, creative

producer and professional fi refi ghter.

Why is the time right to launch the

Australian Film Festival (AFF)?

Australian fi lmmakers turn out great fi lms

that get lost among the huge marketing

machines of other countries. We want to

showcase Australian fi lm content with a view

to building long-term audiences. We hope

to establish the AFF as a major screening

event, and reconnect Australian audiences to

Australian fi lms.

What can we expect from the fi rst AFF?

Lots of fun! Th ere’s a series of street festivals,

indoor/outdoor screenings, fringe events, fi lm

education, the Australian Film Walk of Fame

inductions and, of course, we’ll be awash with

Australian fi lm stars.

What makes Australian fi lms/visual

productions stand out from the rest?

Australians have an unusual take on the

world, a unique voice with a distinctive sense

of humour. Our fi lmmakers are some of the

best in the world and work on projects all over

the globe.

Which are some of your favourite works?

Happy Feet appearing right on Clovelly Beach

is a very special free event for everyone.

Th e Popcorn Taxi opening-night fi lm event

and closing-night Australian Short Film

Festival. Birthday is a gripping psychological

thriller starring Kestie Morassi (Wolf Creek,

Satisfaction), Girl Clock is a hilarious take

on turning 40, and Penelope is the fi rst

Australian/Croatian fi lm production.

What else is on your plate in 2010?

We launch into a series of fi lm development

projects, there’s a few theatre projects in the

pipeline, and we’ll be creating some fun events

for everyone to take part in.

Th e Australian Film Festival is on 24 Feb – 7 Mar

at Ritz Cinema Randwick, 43-47 St Pauls St,

Randwick, Sydney,

tel: +61 (2) 9399

5722 for info.

4 FEBRUARY 2010

Summer

Sizzlers.

Make the most of the warm

weather with red hot festivals

and art, wine and surf events

Franz Ferdinand

(Future Music Festival)

WORDS ANNE LOH

27 FEB–8 MAR BRISBANE PERTH

SYDNEY MELBOURNE ADELAIDE

Future Music Festival

Gathering the best performers in electronic

music, hip hop, pop and indie rock, the Future

Music Festival brings 10 hours of live music

across the nation. Expect Empire of the Sun,

The Prodigy and more to rock the house.

Tickets from Ticketmaster on 136 100.

23 FEB–21 MAR BRISBANE

Brisbane Comedy Festival

Laugh yourself silly at this year’s bigger

and better Brisbane Comedy Festival at the

Brisbane Powerhouse. With Aussie favourites

Adam Hills, Wil Anderson, Frank Woodley and

Peter Hellier, as well as Irish boys Jason Byrne

and David O’Doherty, it’s sure to be a laugh a

minute. Tickets from +61 (7) 3358 8600.

Wolf and Rabbit

(Experimenta Utopia Now)

12 FEB–14 MAR MELBOURNE

Experimenta Utopia Now

Free your mind at this International Biennial

of Media Art where 25 works from around the

world poke fun at boundaries. Akousmafl ore is

a garden of living musical plants and You Were

in My Dream draws you into an enchanted

forest with fairytale creatures. BlackBox, The

Arts Centre, 100 St Kilda Rd; free.

23–28 FEB HOBART

Clarence Jazz Festival

One of Tasmania’s favourite music events will

see festival ambassador and saxophonist Paul

Williamson jamming with special guests, the

Janet Seidel Trio, as well as every other band

performing. Don’t miss the three day-three

night concert series. Outdoor concerts are

free. Tel +61 (3) 6245 8600 for a program.


Josh Thomas

(Brisbane Comedy Festival)

Lyttelton Summer Festival

19–28 FEB CHRISTCHURCH

Lyttelton Summer Festival

Now that the Festival is expanding from a

weekend to 10 days, get ready for a Puppetry

Picnic, a brunch in the Lyttelton Rose Garden

featuring local produce, wine tastings, coffee

tours, a Swap-O-Rama-Rama for up-cycling

your old clothes, photographic exhibitions and

band performances; it’s for the whole family.

’TIL 27 MAR SYDNEY

Twilight at Taronga Zoo

Take advantage of long summer days by

packing a picnic for the weekend concerts

at the zoo. There’s the Choir of Hope and

Inspiration (12–13 Feb) and Saint-Saëns’

Carnival of the Animals with an additional

Australian verse. Tickets from Ticketek at

132 849.

Photo: Mark Watson @ Highlux

Gass

John

Often I Find That I Am Naked

(The Garden of Unearthly Delights) Photo:

12–28 FEB ADELAIDE

The Garden of Unearthly Delights

Part of the Adelaide Fringe, this outdoor

festival is home to venues featuring comedy,

magic, music, art, cabaret and other acts

bound to delight. Don’t miss Fiona Sprott’s

Often I Find That I Am Naked about the state

of dating for Australian women. Rundle Park

– East Terrace, tickets from 1300 374 643.

26–27 FEB PHUKET

Phuket International Blues

Rock Festival

Popular crowd faves Charlie Musselwhite from

Memphis, Tennessee, Richard Clapton from

Sydney and The Prodigal Sons from Norway

return for yet another sell-out event. Proceeds

go to children’s education causes. Tickets

available from www.thaiticketmajor.com.

Photo: Nauska

Lepisto & Lehti

(WOMADelaide)

BOOK NOW!

5–8 Mar

WOMADelaide

Four days and three nights, 500 artists,

27 countries — that’s the scale of this

year’s WOMAD in Adelaide’s Botanic Park

that’s bound to send world music lovers over

the moon.

6–7, 13–14 Mar

Tastes of Rutherglen

Over two weekends, 20 wineries in North-

East Victoria will throw open their doors with

a special entrée and local wine combo, wine

dinners, produce markets and live bands.

11–14 Mar

Heart of Gold International Film Festival

Th ose in need of some loving feeling should

fi nd their way to Gympie on the Sunshine

Coast for the country’s most signifi cant

feel-good festival of uplifting fi lms.

Chicken of God

12–14 Mar

Boost Mobile Surf Sho

Th e fi rst international surf competition

on Bondi Beach in over 20 years has surf

superstars Kelly Slater, Taj Burrows and Mick

Fanning showing their best moves, as well as

live music and beach activities… all free!

FEBRUARY 2010 5

EVENTS


Sarah

Wilson.

Congratulations on your new gig —

what’s this channel about?

It’s a new channel geared towards those

interested in learning about the world via

the way other people live — like a good

chat over tea! It covers relationships,

health, fashion, and general wellness and

happiness. I love shows such as Twiggy’s

Frock Exchange, where women come and

swap their clothing and get a wardrobe

makeover. Then there’s Four Weddings,

where four women review each other’s

weddings and, in the process, reveal how

different women tick under pressure.

You also have a pretty funny blog. Why

did you decide to become a blogger?

Journos and media personalities, these

days, can’t just work with one medium. We

have to have work across TV, radio, print and

online if we’re to remain relevant. Blogging

allows me to communicate with people who

care about my message, which is about

checking out ways to make life better. I’m on

a mission to fi nd out!

What feedback do you get?

Interestingly, a lot of the comments are

from blokes in their 20s and 30s who feel

the same way I do about relationship issues,

the meaning of life and happiness. I fi nd this

extraordinarily refreshing!

You’re also a columnist with Sunday

Life magazine, how does writing one

infl uence the other?

Blogging gets you in a good writing vibe, so

it makes the column an easier ride — I angst

about writing for its broad readership…

Am I revealing too much? Coming across

too weird? Does anyone care what I think?

Blogging is more personal, so I can explore

things with a more esoteric bent.

Has hosting the hugely successful

Masterchef inspired culinary

greatness in you?

I’ve always cooked

because I love to eat.

Also, I fi rst entered

journalism as a

restaurant reviewer in

Melbourne’s Sunday

Magazine 10 years ago.

I’ve probably cooked

less since the show. It’s

a bit like how plumbers

have dripping taps…

You’ve become an ambassador for FebFast,

a campaign asking Australians not to drink

alcohol for the month of February. Tell us

the reasons behind your support.

I’ve worked in and around health and women

much of my career and it upsets me greatly

to see how young women, in particular, are

abusing their health with alcohol. I think we

need to talk about this, about why we drink,

why we need the distraction and the comfort.

I really think we need to start thinking about

other ways to socialise that don’t revolve

around drinking. I love wine, and I love the

ritual of catching up with friends over a

glass of pinot gris on a hot night. But

recently I’ve realised how even one

glass of alcohol affects my health.

It taxes our liver and our skin,

our weight and our hormones.

Because I’m recruiting pretty

much all my friends to join

FebFast it won’t be tough

abstaining. We’ve planned a

list of non-booze activities

for the month.

What will you do

with the money

saved from not

buying alcohol?

My friends and

I are putting it

towards renting

a house up

the coast for

a weekend

where we’ll eat

super well and

do morning

yoga and surf

all day.

After being in the eye of the Masterchef storm,

the former Cosmopolitan editor returns to our

TV screens as the host of Lifestyle YOU

INTERVIEW RACHEL FARNAY JACQUES

How does it work to raise money?

People register via www.febfast.com.au

and get a fundraising page where friends

and family can donate. You kick-start the

donations by paying a AU$25 registration

fee, which also gives you heaps of discounts

and free offers. The money raised goes

towards helping young people with serious

alcohol and drug problems.

What do you do in Sydney to

relax and fi nd inspiration?

Most mornings I head to

the beach and meditate

as the sun comes up.

I head out of town

for a bushwalk on

weekends. Rocks,

trees and galahs

make me very

happy!

FEBRUARY 2010 7

10 MINUTES WITH...


Heart Felt.

SURE BET

Now there’s a way to

take the guesswork

out of gift-giving. The

Smartbox gift certifi cate

concept exceeds expectations by putting the power to choose

in the hands of the recipient. Each gift certifi cate comes with

at least 50 choices nicely explained in a glossy guidebook.

There are seven booklets to consider — from Temptations

for Two (AU$69.95) where couples can choose a trip to a

chocolate lounge or Belgian beer cafe, to Smartbox Extreme

(AU$349.95) where he can choose a drive in a Lotus or a

helicopter ride. Call 1300 825 112 to order.

8 FEBRUARY 2010

This Valentine’s Day, fi nd the

perfect love token

WORDS ANNE LOH

ANIMAL ATTRACTION

Support Animal Lovers by Neo Tokyo,

a Melbourne-based fashion label which

gives a minimum of 20% of proceeds

to the World Society for the Protection

of Animals (WSPA). With three active

campaigns on the books — bear bile

farming, whaling and orangutan

Displacement — you’ll be helping to

end animal suffering everywhere.

Go to www.neotokyo.com.au for

more information.

THE SMELL OF ROMANCE

There’s nothing like a sweet scent to

put you in the mood for love, and

the new range of “fragrances

of passion” by Ecoya

Soy Candles, such as

Forbidden Fling and Sweet

Madness, will do just that.

Available in travel tins with a burn

time of 15 hours (AU$14.95; call

1300 730 180 for stockists). Or

give the gift of “love”, the certifi ed

organic botanical perfume by

Miessence, which has been handblended

in the traditional way with

fl oral notes like Indian frangipani,

Egyptian jasmine and Indian

Ambrette seed (AU$138 for 10ml;

call +61 (7) 5539 2011 for stockists).


GIRL’S BEST FRIEND

If it has to be diamonds, let it be Daintree

— A Touch of Diamonds from The Natural

Source. This light moisturising body

whip contains real Australian diamonds

from Western Australia’s Argyle mine

region, which have been crushed and

made into perfect spheres. They’re then

blended into the cream which is made

using naturally derived organic and

naturopathic plant active ingredients.

AU$65; call 1300 889 008 for stockists.

HEART TO HEART

There’s no better

way to show you’re a

couple than with

his-and-her jewellery sets.

Check out the Be My Sweet

Heart necklace set from Inori (AU$87

and AU$77; stockists on

www.inori.com.au), makers of stainless

steel jewellery. Or give her your heart

— symbolised by this

hand-painted enamel heart pendant

by Moi Moi Fine Jewellery (AU$100;

call +61 (2) 9261 0200 for stockists).

HORSING AROUND

Stone Men has made it cool for grown men to

wear galloping horses as a design motif again.

Or try koi fi sh, a forest or a balmy sunset. In

a comfortable blend of 90% cotton and 10%

elastine with a soft cotton waistband in white,

these square-cut jockeys ensure comfort

where it counts. AU$35 from stonemen.com.

PLAY TIME

Think it’s time the both of you take off

on a holiday? Give a not-so-subtle hint

by purchasing Jetstar vouchers, which

can be used towards fl ights and come in

denominations of AU$25–500. Imagine the

excitement when the voucher arrives! Order

on Jetstar.com.

LIFE AS ART

Does your man fancy himself an art collector? Artist and owner of The Big

Cactus gallery Tania Iggulden can be commissioned for special projects such as

portraits or even an artwork depicting the moment you both met. How’s that for

a grand romantic gesture? Prices start from AU$150 (71x36cm). 64 Darley St,

Mona Vale, New South Wales, tel: +61 (2) 9940 0212, www.thebigcactus.com.au.

NAUGHTY AND NICE

Sally Jones is an Australian lingerie designer

whose collections are stocked throughout

Australia and around the world. She dishes up

lingerie-buying tips to men looking for a romantic

gift and talks about her latest collection.

What advice can you give to men buying

lingerie as a romantic gift for the fi rst time?

If the man is a novice when it comes to buying

lingerie for his beloved, I always suggest a

nightdress or babydoll with matching briefs —

ensuring it’s not too sheer and noting that briefs

are often better than a g-string. Full or half briefs

can be extremely sexy, especially with lace. Soft

lace indicates high quality and comfort.

What’s the one thing men always get wrong?

Th e biggest mistake can be to buy what you want

to see her in but something she’d never buy

herself such as a half-cup bra if she’s a full bust, or

mini g-string if she always wears briefs. Again, a

safer option would be to buy beautiful lace briefs

which look sexy yet fl atter at the same time. And

never attempt an underwire bra if you do not

know her exact size — a better alternative could

be a soft cup bra or camisole. Girls love to wear

camisole sets as pajamas either before bed or even

around the house.

What’s a lingerie trend in 2010?

People are starting to wear lingerie to be seen,

whether as practical silky slips worn under sheer

JUICY MOMENTS

Let these seduberries do the talking.

In an Australian world-fi rst, these

Tasmanian strawberries grown in a

heart-shaped mould will defi nitely

create memorable sweet talk and

make your wooing all the more…

er, delicious. First harvest will be

available in time for Valentine’s Day.

Could a punnet of seduberries be

the new long-stemmed roses?

Tel: +61 (0) 448 417 857.

dresses, or sheer

baby dolls to be

worn over other

layers. Th is can be

a very fl oaty and

feminine look

and means girls

can show their

lace off outside

the bedroom.

Full briefs have

also returned

as the more

popular option to

a g-string as they’re pretty and feminine, and

often more fl attering.

Tell us about your 2010 collection.

Made with stunning combinations of French

laces, embroideries, silks and tulles, my Parisian

Romance collection features 10 stories, each

refl ecting a diff erent romantic mood through

unique colour and material pairings. We’re also

launching a new honeymoon collection called

Vintage Bride which features bras, suspenders

and briefs, babydolls and kimonos in French lace

and silk and untraditional colours such as dusty

pink and blue, trimmed with traditional pearls

and cameos.

Prices range from AU$40 for a lace g-string to

AU$400 for a silk nightdress. Tel: +61 (7) 5576 7317

FEBRUARY 2010 9

STYLE FILE


Fizzy Occasion. CHEERS

Add some pop to your Valentine’s Day

with one of these new sparkling wines

WORDS ROBERTA MUIR

Croser 1999 Late Disgorged

has just been released after nine

years on yeast lees, giving it a

creamy complex palate. The subtle

fruit and freshness, good acidic

backbone and dry, savoury fi nish

are due to the cool, humid climate

of South Australia’s Piccadilly

Valley. One of Australia’s great

sparklers. RRP AU$50.

Jacobs Creek 2006 Reserve

combines a hint of creaminess

from extended bottle age with the

fresh fruit fl avours and aromas

of cool-climate chardonnay and

pinot noir. This wine delivers the

value-for-money we’ve come to

expect from the Jacobs Creek

label. RRP AU$20.

Brown Brothers 2008 Limited

Release Prosecco from Victoria’s

King Valley (Australia’s home of

Italian varietals and wine styles)

is this popular producer’s fi rst

prosecco. With a fresh acidity,

hints of pear and green apple

and lingering citrus notes, it’s

a perfect aperitif.

RRP AU$18.90.

BUBBLE TALK

Matt Skinner is an

international wine writer,

consultant and educator

who believes that wine is

for everyone, and enjoying

it is a right, not a privilege. His

book, Th irsty Work, has been published in 17

countries and 10 languages. We ask him for his

take on the world of bubbles.

What non-traditional varietals are you

seeing in good sparkling wines lately?

Locally we’re starting to see some great examples

of the Italian grape prosecco such as Dal Zotto’s

and Brown Brothers’. Th ere’s also more and more

quality Spanish cava being imported.

Preece Moscato 2009 with just

6% alcohol, is the perfect natural

“light” wine. Intensely fragrant with

explosions of tropical fruit and a

gentle spritz, it’s great with fruit

desserts, Asian fl avours or blue

cheese. RRP AU$15.99.

Aja (pronounced Asia) Blush

is a simple, slightly sweet,

Moscato-style wine designed

specifi cally to match Asian

fl avours. When the occasion calls

for something other than beer

(the natural accompaniment

to spicy food) this vibrant pink

fi zz with rose, musk and Turkish

delight aromas, and raspberry

fl avours may be just the thing.

RRP AU$20.

What foods do you like to match

with bubbles?

Japanese food, where the delicate textures

and range of fl avours — sweet, sour and

salty — are a great match. I’m also a huge fan

of great sparkling wine with fi sh and chips, as the

bubbles and high acidity cut through the oil of

fried foods.

What do you think are the best value

Aussie sparklers?

Either Banrock Station Brut NV or Jacobs Creek

Reserve Pinot Chardonnay NV for sheer value at

around AU$10 a bottle, and then Yarra Burn Pinot

Noir Chardonnay NV and Brown Brothers Prosecco

2008 for amazing value and style around AU$20.

Tim Knappstein NV Sparkling

Shiraz from South Australia’s

Clare Valley has an aroma of rich

berry fruit over yeasty characters

from 18 months spent on lees in

the bottle. It has fi rm, fi ne tannins

from aging in old barrels and a

great balance of sweetness on the

fi nish. RRP AU$23.99.

Veuve Clicquot NV Rosé in a

limited edition Sakura ice jacket

is bound to impress. Pinot noir

gives this wine depth, intensity and

power, while chardonnay adds a

soft elegance and pinot meunier

contributes fruity roundness. The

neoprene sheath keeps the bubbly

at an ideal temperature for up to

two hours — perfect for a romantic

picnic! RRP AU$110.

And what bubbles do you drink when

money’s no object?

Louis Roederer Cristal 1990. It’s tough to get now

and costs a bomb, but on the few occasions I’ve had

to drink it, it was close to perfection in a glass.

Any tips for getting the most from

sparkling wine?

Drinking sparkling from the right glass enhances

the aromas and fl avours; one of my favourite

sparkling wine glasses is Plumm’s vintage

sparkling glass.

What’s your favourite “champagne” cocktail?

A classic Bellini — great white peach purée

and prosecco.

FEBRUARY 2010 11

CHEERS


Whether you’re a sweet

tooth or the savoury type…

WE DON’T PLAY

FAVOURITES

12 FEBRUARY 2010

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Available in selected Woolworths Supermarkets,

health food stores, gyms and pharmacies.

www.slimsecrets.com.au

SLM106

GOOD TASTE

More Th an

a Meal.

CAFFÈ SOSPESO

Six-month-old Caffè Sospeso is a café with

a conscience. It serves only free-range

chicken, eggs and pork; certifi ed

fair-trade coffee, organic teas and

chocolate; and it’s committed to the use of

cruelty-free animal products and organics

wherever possible. Its benevolence extends

to helping disadvantaged members of

Eat well, feel great

at these benevolent

Melbourne eateries

WORDS ROBERTA MUIR

the local community too by involving the

generosity of others. In Naples, caffè sospeso

is a tradition whereby a customer pays for

two coffees, receives one and leaves the other

“in suspense”, then when someone down on

their luck wanders in, they can ask if there

are any sospesos available. 428 Burwood Rd,

Hawthorn, tel: +61 (3) 9819 1515.

LENTIL AS ANYTHING

This vegetarian restaurant, started in

2000, now has three outlets (including the

Collingwood College canteen). A non-profi t

business mostly staffed by volunteers, Lentil

asks customers to decide what their meal was

worth (or what they can afford) and donate

anonymously into a box on the counter. They

also provide support and training for new

migrants, refugees, youth and others looking

for a break in the hospitality industry. 41

Blessington St, St. Kilda, tel: +61 (3) 9534

5833 and 1 St Heliers St, Abbotsford,

tel: +61 (3) 9419 6444.


FROM TOP: Help Mission Australia’s

youth hospitality program by going

to Charcoal Lane; try its duck dish;

spread some cheer at Caffè Sospeso

CHARCOAL LANE

Charcoal Lane, in Fitzroy’s eclectic Gertrude

Street, is a modern Australian restaurant

in every sense of the word. Part of Mission

Australia’s hospitality training program for

disadvantaged and unemployed youth, with

a focus on young indigenous Australians, it

offers training in front of house and kitchen

skills delivered by the William Angliss

Institute of TAFE. Menu items include native

Australian ingredients, such as kangaroo

fi llet with native peppers and bush tomato

tart with rosella jus. Best of all, all profi ts

from the restaurant go back into the

program. 136 Gertrude St, Fitzroy,

tel: + 61 (3) 9418 3400.

A TASTE OF

SUCCESS

Talented kids

from the KOTO

Hospitality Training

College for street

kids in Vietnam and the

Sunrise Children’s Village

in Cambodia, many of whom have known real

hunger, are now being given the opportunity

to study hospitality in Australia. Le Cordon

Bleu Australia general manager Nick Gurner

tells us about the scholarship program that

has made this possible.

When does the program start?

We off ered the fi rst scholarships in 2009

— with the two recipients commencing study

in 2010.

Why did you choose these two

organisations to work with?

Both KOTO and the Sunrise Children’s Village

do so much for disadvantaged children in

their respective countries; this was a chance

for Le Cordon Bleu Australia to recognise

their achievements and give students who

demonstrate a real desire to pursue a career in

hospitality the opportunity to continue their

education to a tertiary level.

Where in Australia will these kids

be studying?

Narith Horm, from Sunrise, will be at our

Adelaide campus and Nguyen Th uy Ha, from

KOTO, will be at our Sydney campus.

What will they be learning?

Narith will undertake a Bachelor of Business

in International Hotel Management. Ha will

study for an Advanced Diploma in Hospitality

Management, which includes signifi cant

practical training in cuisine or pâtisserie.

How long do the courses take?

Both take around three years and include

signifi cant portions of placement with Le

Cordon Bleu industry partners. Th is ensures

that our graduates complete their studies

ready for their career.

What happens when they graduate?

Th ey’ll return home to work in the hospitality

industry. Th e qualifi cations are recognised

internationally though, so they could work

anywhere in the world.

What are the goals of the

scholarship program?

To assist and provide an opportunity to

talented hospitality trainees who otherwise

would not have the chance to progress their

careers, and by doing so promote hospitality

as a career in countries all over the world.

Eat at KOTO, 59 Van Mieu St, Hanoi, Vietam,

tel: +84 (4) 3747 0338

FEBRUARY 2010 13


14 FEBRUARY 2010

THE WORD

Jump-Start

Ready.

Entrepreneur

Peter Sheahan is putting his multi-million

dollar experience — he founded two

successful companies before he was

30 years old — into his book Making It

Happen, telling it like it is and how it should

be done. We pick his brains.

Tell us about your new book Making

It Happen?

This book is for people who have an idea

and want to turn it into reality. We’re not

short of good ideas, we’re short on people

who know how to execute them. My new

book is a step-by-step guide to executing.

In a nutshell, how did you “make it

happen” for yourself before you hit 30?

I had intelligent risk-taking as my

foundation. Not all the risks I took paid

off, but I kept taking them nonetheless.

Next comes commercial savvy. I started

talking about my services and generally

approaching everything I did from the

Learn how to take a

good business idea and

make a success out of it

WORDS ANNE LOH

Peter Sheahan also wrote

Flip and Generation Y

perspective of what value it would bring to the

people I was trying to engage. The fi nal thing

would be my obsessive attention to my craft

and the work ethic which supported it.

What are three steps people should take to

make their good idea a reality?

One: take the time to think about, further

develop and make some very rough plans

about your idea and what you want to do with

it. Two: you need

to language your

idea as an offer. In

other words, what

will your business

be selling and why

is that valuable

to someone

else? Three:

do something,

anything to start.

The action will

generate clarity,

opportunity and

momentum.


MAKE BUSINESS SENSE

IN EVERYDAY LIFE


Five books show you how to grow your

personal wealth or start a small business.

SIX PIXELS OF SEPARATION

Th e internet is indeed the future and with this

book by Mitch Joel, who’s been called “the

rock star of digital marketing”, get the tools,

tactics and insights you need to reach

a global audience and tap into an online

market. Hachette Australia, AU$35,

ISBN 9780446559386.

STEVE MCKNIGHT’S FROM 0 TO 130

PROPERTIES IN 3.5 YEARS

For those with a dream of becoming a real

estate mogul, here is Steve McKnight’s updated

book on how you too can grow your property

investment portfolio. Th e advice on how to

get started is even for those with little or

no capital. Wrightbooks, AU$32.95,

ISBN 9781742169675.

THE NAKED ENTREPRENEUR

A true account of how Maria Elita, aka Th e

Spiritual Dominatrix, turns the life of

What’s new about the behavioural research

in your book?

The research into how we form our sense of

identity and how we’re attracted to people,

products and brands which support that

identity. This area of research is not new, but

the use of MRI machines is bringing new light

to it and offering all of us a much greater

insight into how we can use it.

Which is your favourite case study?

Tom’s Shoes. Blake Mycoskie, a former

contestant on The Amazing Race, was

shocked by the poverty and the inability of

Argentinean children to afford basic footwear,

burnt-out businessman Troy Hazard around

through “soul whipping”. Find out what her

message of love and light is. Wiley & Sons,

AU$29.95, ISBN 9781742169323.

GETTING STARTED IN SMALL

BUSINESS FOR DUMMIES

Always fancied yourself as a business wizard?

Well, this book will tell you how you can start

your own small business and all the minutiae

involved in getting it off the ground and

rolling. Wiley & Sons, AU$19.95,

ISBN 9781742169627.

REAL MONEY ADVICE

FOR FAMILIES

With the GFC, we’ve all been hearing about

“fi nancial literacy, getting out of debt and

creating wealth”, this book has condensed

it all down to four steps targeted at families

and have called it “Th e Family Survival Plan”.

Particularly useful for those facing a change

in their lives, such as redundancy or a new

addition to the family. Luna Group, AU$24.95,

ISBN 9780980628401.

and they were not allowed to attend

school without shoes. He made over the

Argentinian shoe, the alpargata, and for

every pair sold, he donated a pair to the

poverty-stricken children. He used

social-networking sites to make it easy for

fans to spread the word. He got massive

coverage, not just in print but TV as well.

He was featured in an AT&T ad. And he had

designer Ralph Lauren create a special line

of Tom’s Shoes.

Making It Happen is published by

Random House Australia, AU$34.95,

ISBN 9781741667264


















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FEBRUARY 2010 15


Chris Bray says: “This Cradle Mountain in

Tasmania photo won TIME magazine’s ‘My

Australia Photography Competition’. By putting

someone in the shot, not only do they provide a

sense of scale, but looking at the photo you can

immediately imagine what it must be like being

there. And it obeys the ‘rule of thirds’, has good

depth of fi eld, and features red!”

Snap Happy.

Which came fi rst, photography or

adventure expeditions?

Adventure. I grew up sailing around the world

with my family on our homemade yacht for fi ve

years but I was soon taking photos of all the

cool experiences along the way.

You’re a member of ‘The Society for Human

Performance in Extreme Environments’,

which examines the effects on the body of

jobs like astronauts and polar explorers, but

how do extreme cold and hot conditions

affect photographic equipment?

Almost as much as it does the photographer!

Cold shortens battery life so you have to bring

spares and even re-warm them in your jacket.

Hot and humid conditions can make your

lenses fog over; rain and snow sticks to lenses;

and volcanoes — stay away from them — the

16 FEBRUARY 2010

Adventurer Chris Bray, Australian

Geographic photographer and Canon’s

Australian ambassador for digital

photography, offers some tips for

taking great photos

INTERVIEW RACHEL FARNAY JACQUES

ash that rains down is actually fi nely ground

rock and scratches glass and gets

into everything!

When it comes to chasing that spectacular

photo or fi nishing the expedition goal,

which wins out?

If an arctic wolf or a polar bear pops out from

behind a rock, it doesn’t matter how far behind

schedule we are, I’ll pull out the camera and

keep taking pictures! Usually though it’s a

balance — tempting as it is to spend hours

trying to get the perfect shot, sometimes I have

to remind myself that getting to the end safely

before food runs out is the main thing.

How did you learn photography?

The slow, hard way: reading books, practising,

trial and error. I got my fi rst camera at a garage

sale when I was about eight, and I’ve been

inspired to try and take better photos ever

since I got that fi rst roll of fi lm back.

What is your preferred tool for action

adventure photography, versus landscapes?

I fi nd the 10-sec “self timer” on cameras

limiting, so to get those awesome “isolation

shots” — where my partner and I are both off in

the distance — I always bring a timer remote.

You can set it to take 20 photos, 1 second apart,

starting in four minutes — pretty cool. And for

landscapes, it’s all about getting a wide-angle

lens to fi t in those sweeping vistas!

Which is your favourite place

to photograph?

Anywhere that’s new, preferably wilderness

with animals running around, all drenched in


glorious morning lighting. Snow or ice never go

astray either!

What photography gear do you never leave

home without?

Spare memory cards and batteries! And, even

though I bring a serious digital SLR camera, I

always try to bring a trusty little compact pointand-shoot

style camera — ideally waterproof

and shockproof like the Canon Powershot D10

— for those moments you’d otherwise miss.

Your fi ve tips on how to take better

holiday snaps?

1. Rule of thirds: Avoid putting your subject in

the middle — mentally divide your scene into

thirds (both horizontally and vertically) and

position key parts of your photo on these

division lines.

2. Anything but eye-level: Crouch down low and

look up, climb high and point down. Try weird

and wonderful angles!

3. Fill-fl ash outdoors: Don’t be afraid to use

your fl ash in daylight. It can lighten shadows

under someone’s hat, add a sparkle to their

eyes, and so on.

4. Leading lines: Strong lines or curves fl owing

into a photo help lead the viewer’s eye

through the scene to your subject. A fence

line, a trail of footsteps, a pathway — it’ll draw

their gaze into your photo.

5. Depth of fi eld: If you’re using a compact

camera, use ‘landscape mode’ if you want the

foreground and the background in focus (for

a mountain scene), and use ‘portrait mode’

to help your subject stand out against a

blurry background. You control this effect on

your DLSR camera by setting the aperture:

Smaller F# = smaller depth of fi eld.

Five common mistakes people make when

taking photos?

1. Wonky horizons: Check your camera isn’t

crooked before you take the photo!

2. Camera shake: The slightest bit of camera

movement can turn a photo blurry, so hold

the camera properly, rest on something, or

use a tripod.

3. Distracting backgrounds: Position yourself so

that your subject is in front of a simple, plain

background — not busy colours or with poles

seeming to protrude out of people’s heads.

4. Too many, too boring: Before you take a

photo, think to yourself “Why am I taking

this photo?” Too often we come home from

holidays with several hundred mostly useless

photos. After you decide a scene is worth

capturing, rather than taking 60 photos in 60

seconds, spend a minute carefully setting up

one nicely composed photo.

5. Using fl ash on distant objects: Built-in, or

‘pop-up’ fl ashes can’t reach beyond about

fi ve metres. So unless you’re trying to

illuminate something in the foreground,

you’re better off turning the fl ash off, and

making the camera use the ambient light if

you want a properly exposed photo — keep

the camera steady though!

CHRIS BRAY ONE-DAY

PHOTOGRAPHY COURSE:

MELBOURNE @ Melbourne Zoo

• Saturday 6 March

• Sunday 7 March

BRISBANE @ Conrad Treasury

• Saturday 13 March

• Sunday 14 March

ADELAIDE @ Adelaide Zoo

• Sunday 21 March

SYDNEY @ Taronga Zoo

• Saturday 27 March

AUCKLAND @ Butterfl y Creek

wildlife park

• Saturday 10 April

PERTH @ Perth Zoo

• Saturday 24 April

• Sunday 25 April

What does your one-day photography

course cover?

I combine practical and theory sessions,

covering everything from basic composition

through to depth of fi eld, lighting, lenses,

histograms and pro tips. All fully catered

and held in amazing locations around

Australia, our small, friendly groups allow

plenty of one-on-one time. It’s perfect for

beginners right through to keen enthusiast

photographers looking to get serious. Go to

www.ChrisBray.net.

FEBRUARY 2010 17

HOW TO...


INFORMATION DESK

Tune Into

Life.

Re-charge your batteries and inspire

better living at these retreats

WORDS RACHEL FARNAY JACQUES

Darlington Beach Holiday Park

Kids and parents will love the huge variety of

fun and free activities on offer at this holiday

park. Nestled within 110 hectares of beautiful

bushland and beside the beach, it’s just two

hours south of New South Wales’ Ballina Byron

airport. From night wildlife spotting, Dreamtime

stories and didgeridoo lessons to BMX bike

trails, circus and hip hop dance classes, they’ll

be spoilt for choice. Accommodation ranges

from luxury cabins to authentic camping

experience. 104–134 Eggins Drv, Arrawarra,

NSW, tel: +61 (2) 6640 7444.

Seaspray Resort & Spa

Offering kids of all ages a memorable

holiday is the one-year-old Seaspray, 40

minutes’ drive from Rockhampton Airport on

Queensland’s Capricorn Coast. Junior chefs

will love the Kids in the Kitchen program

(AU$35 per child) while the adventurous

can run away to Circus School (AU$20 per

child). On 24–26 Feb, they’re introducing

Girlfriends Time Out — three days of surfi ng

and bellydancing lessons, yoga and tai chi, a

makeover and plenty of yummy meals (from

AU$367 per person, a fi ve-share room) — so

mum feels special too. 6 Lakewood Plc, Zilzie,

QLD, tel: 1800 077 768.

18 FEBRUARY 2010

Peninsula Hot Springs

Melt stress away with a visit to Australia’s only

natural thermal mineral springs and day spa

centre, an hour from Melbourne, on Mornington

Peninsula. After three years of development,

it now offers up to 39 delectable bathing

experiences and a smorgasbord of pampering

treatments to revitalise body and soul. Take a

dip in the health-giving waters, choose from

massages, facials, mud and salt treatments,

foot and hand treatments, and ancient healing

stone therapy, then visit the café. Springs Ln

(formerly Devonport Drv), Rye, Mornington

Peninsula, Vic, tel: +61 (3) 5950 8777.

The Spa at Noosa Springs

Put some rocket in your pocket with the NASA

technology now available at Spirit Spa within

The Spa at Noosa Springs. In just two hours

(AU$200), therapist Maggie Cairns guides

the Eternale system — based on decades of

research conducted in the fi eld of bioenergetic

technology — to detect emotional and

physical imbalances, then fi xes them using

micro-current pulse stimulation on the wrists,

ankles and forehead. Cairns attests: “It’s a

truly life-changing experience for the modern

world.” Links Drv, Noosa Heads, QLD, tel: +61

(7) 5440 3355.

Kids in the Kitchen

at Seaspray Resort Spa

INSET: Pool fun at Darlington

Beach Holiday Park

SAMUDRA RETREAT

When you combine surfi ng lessons and yoga

sessions with 100% organic vegetarian food,

you just know you’re going to go home feeling

diff erent. And sure enough, this was the

outcome after three days at one of Samudra’s

new yoga-surf retreats in Dunsborough,

in south Western Australia. With retreats

ranging from one day to a month, passionate

couple Lisa (surf coach) and Sheridan (yoga

teacher) guide attendees, from beginners to

more experienced levels, through daily surf

lessons and twice-daily yoga sessions.

Samudra Café, winner of the Best

Vegetarian Restaurant – WA in the Lifestyle

Food Channel’s I Love FOOD Awards in

2009, has a delicious, innovative vegetarian

menu for the most part sourced from its own

biodynamic garden. After the day’s lessons,

head back to your luxurious accommodation

at Smiths Beach Resort, overlooking the

famed Yallingup surf breaks.

Sheridan says their philosophy is: “To

pass on our experience — to give people the

opportunity to see beyond what they’re doing

every day — so when you go back to your life,

you can integrate what you’ve learnt at the

retreat to live a more sustainable life.”

Th eir all-inclusive package of AU$1,495 per

person includes all lessons, surf gear, meals

and twin-share accommodation. Upcoming

retreats on 5–12 Feb, 12–19 Mar, 30 Apr

– 7 May and 4–11 Jun. 226 Naturaliste Tce,

Dunsborough, WA, tel: +61 (8) 9779 9977.


FIT TO GO

White Out.

JONO BRAUER (28)

Sport: Alpine skier

(slalom and giant slalom specialist)

After winning gold, silver and bronze

in the giant slalom at the World Cup in

March 2009, you promptly tore an anterior

cruciate ligament. Tell us about your

recovery plan immediately after?

Recovery started the morning after my crash;

post surgery I had one goal in mind and that

was getting to the [Olympic] Games healthy.

I’ve been battling with some pain in my knee

but recently I had some treatment from the

world-renowned Steadman Hawkins Clinic in

Vail, Colorado, which, coupled with some rest

and a new knee brace courtesy of DonJoy,

seems to be doing the trick. I really just have

to manage my knee and the load that I put

it through.

With injury an almost annual occurrence

since 2006, what kind of work can be done

in the gym to perfect your technique?

There’s a multitude of things I do in the gym

including power lifting, strength training, cardio,

anaerobic training, co-ordination and core

work. It’s impossible to completely replicate

skiing in the gym but we try and train similar

movements to replicate it as best as possible.

20 FEBRUARY 2010

Photo: www.heading4.com.au

Left to right: Lachlan Hay, Jono Brauer

INSET: Nate Johnstone

We meet three Australian athletes keeping fi t and our

hopes for 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympic burning bright

INTERVIEWS JURIS GRANEY

NATE JOHNSTONE (19)

Sport: Snowboard half-pipe

In just one season you’ve leapt from 27th

in the World Cup to become Australia’s

best half-pipe exponent in more than a

decade — what’s your secret?

It’s just hard work and training and riding with

the best snowboarders in the world, which

brings out the best in you and pushes you to

ride at their level. While I’m home I go to the

gym every day and surf whenever I can. When

overseas I try to get down to the gym most

days but we usually do little sessions, focusing

more on recovery and stretching so we don’t

get tired for training the next day.

Murphy’s Law states that now the

Olympics beckons, the chance of injury

escalates — how do you block out

thoughts of injury?

I just have to think it’s not a problem and

there’s no injury factor to what I’m doing. But

it can be hard sometimes because the tricks

that we’re doing have a high risk of injury, so

there’s always that thought in your head that

if you don’t land a certain trick, it can be make

or break.

LACHLAN HAY (23)

Sport: 1,000m speed skater

Just what does a speed skater’s training

regime look like?

I warm up for an hour before ice training for

1.5 hours, go home for a sleep, food and to

recover. Then it’s to the gym for a weight

session or an imitation session where we

focus on technique on the land and try

imitating what we do on the ice. Those

sessions are about 2.5 hours, sometimes

seven days a week. So it’s pretty hard; there’s

not much time for running around shopping or

going anywhere because, as you can imagine,

recovery is pretty important.

Last season started with an ankle injury

but ended with you establishing a new

Australian record for the 1,000m. Tell

us about your injury management and

prevention program.

Yeah, I had an ankle injury where I cut it open

just nicking the tendon, there was a lot of

strengthening work which was backed up

with regular physio and stretching sessions. It

worked and got me back on the road.

Photo: Red Bull Photofi les/Mark Watson


22 FEBRUARY 2010

It’s

Following a year of blinding success, we talk to

Empire of the Sun’s Australian frontman Luke

Steele about making music and chasing dreams

always diffi cult to measure success

and the perilously subjective waters

of the music industry are especially murky.

But, when the monolithic U2 strutted on stage

in Paris to “Walking on a Dream” in late 2009,

Australia’s pop superforce Empire of the Sun

received an undeniably golden nod. A wordless

invitation into the inner circle.

In hindsight, that recognition proves little

more than a bookend for a project that has

pursued everything on the grandest of scales.

The bold, the brash, the ecstatic. Yet, for all

of the fantastical video clips, genre-bending

soundscapes and unabashedly eccentric

couture, the beginnings of Empire of the Sun

were decidedly more low key.

Two of Australia’s up-and-coming

WORDS ADAM BAIDAWI

songwriters, Luke Steele (then of Sleepy

Jackson fame) and Pnau’s Nick Littlemore

were introduced at a bar by a mutual contact

and instantly bonded. Writing together

whenever they could fi nd themselves on

the same side of the country (Steele was

based in Perth, while Littlemore worked out

of Sydney), Empire of the Sun was a labour

of love and collaboration.

In the 18 months since the release of their

debut album, Walking on a Dream, frontman

Luke Steele has transformed from a promising

local songwriting talent into an enigmatic,

globetrotting, larger-than-life curator of

electro-pop aesthetic. Littlemore’s story is

much the same: he’s busy recording a new

Pnau studio album — with Elton John’s help.


STAR STRUCK

EMPIRE OF THE SUN

Illustration: DEBASER

FEBRUARY 2010 23


STAR STRUCK

EMPIRE OF THE SUN

24 FEBRUARY 2010

Luke Steele seizes

the day after

Empire of the

Sun won Best Pop

Release and Best

Group at the 2009

ARIA Awards

Photo: Getty Images

It’s a late Tuesday morning in Perth

when we sit down, the kind of predictably

picturesque day when the city smiles like

the relaxed, bronzed beauty she is. When

we spoke a few months earlier, Steele and

his musical partner in crime were riding

a high: “Walking on a Dream” the single

was charting in innumerable countries,

including Japan and New Zealand, while

shoring itself as a multi-platinum cult hit

in their homeland. More notably, the duo

were about to make their long-awaited

live debut at the 2009 Parklife festival

in Brisbane. The landscape has shifted

dramatically since.

It’s been two months since they

cleaned up at the ARIA Awards (taking out four

categories, including the coveted Album of

the Year). In rather affable (though not wholly

unsurprising) fashion, I fi nd that Steele has

retained his authentically Perth-tinged downto-earth

charisma. “What happened there?”

he grins wryly. “It’s funny: you go to the shops

and like, middle-aged mums and truckies are

coming up just going, ‘Good on ya!’”

Modesty aside (did I mention that Steele

was also named GQ’s Man of the Year?), it’s

clear that the ARIAs rubber-stamped the duo’s

domination of the Australian music scene.

They had scaled the mountain and that night,

they reached the summit. Yet, infamously, it

was Steele alone who was there to take it in.

Illustration: DEBASER


STAR STRUCK

EMPIRE OF THE SUN

Rumours of a tiff between Steele and

Littlemore began circulating after the latter

inexplicably disappeared just before their

debut tour. Steele readily admitted that he

was missing for months, and that he was

somewhere overseas. The whispers reached

fever pitch at the ARIAs, with Littlemore still

nowhere to be seen, and Steele noticeably

lost for words when asked about it at his press

conference. “We never had a fi ght,” he shrugs

as I ask again, “but we had different plans on

touring. Nick didn’t want to tour for three or

four years. I’m more rapid — the show needs

to stay on the road. You want to play these

songs that everyone was singing all summer,

you know?”

So what of the future of the band? Who are

Empire of the Sun? “It’s still me and Nick,” he

assures. “It’s part of the journey. But, I guess,

only the future knows.”

So, for the time being, Steele is steering

the ship himself, performing and promoting.

Littlemore is accredited with producing.

They’ve just released the deluxe edition

vinyl box set of Walking on a Dream and

the single“Half Mast”, yet another pop song

destined to become an anthem. Indeed, terms

26 FEBRUARY 2010

like “anthemic” and “iconic” have all too often

been cited when it comes to this group.

So what was different about Empire of

the Sun for Steele who boasts an impressive

musical CV — he grew up in a musical family

(sister Katy fronts indie rockers Little Birdy);

he’s been signed to a major record label

for the better part of a decade; and

he’s contributed to numerous bands

and collectives?

He pauses, pensive: “Chemistry. I think

Nick and I have always had this pretty rare

chemistry. Empire of the Sun didn’t have

any timeframe. It just happened when it was

meant to happen. I’ve never really done that.

With an album, you usually strangle the life

out of it, and tie it up in the corner and go,

‘You’re fi nished, alright?!’” he grins waving a

stern fi nger.

When he’s not keeping impossibly busy

— current projects: a “highly mechanical”

heavy blues solo album, a closing song for

an upcoming Australian fi lm and Sleepy

Jackson’s new album — Steele’s focus lies

fi rmly on his family.

He met his wife Jodi, a former glossy

magazine editor, after commenting on

Luke Steele plays live

with dancers and backing band

on the water stage at the

Parklife Festival, Melbourne

her “rather eccentric” cocktail at a Perth

nightspot. His pet name for her is “Snappy

Dolphin”. “She’s so effi cient and professional

— snappy — she gets things done pretty

quick. And being such a beautiful woman

— she’s kind of like a dolphin.” The couple had

their fi rst child in 2008, a daughter named

Sunny Tiger.

FUTURE MUSIC FESTIVAL

TOUR DATES:

SAT 27 FEB: CITY PACIFIC DOOMBEN

RACECOURSE, BRISBANE

SAT 28 FEB: WELLINGTON SQUARE,

PERTH

SAT 6 MAR: RANDWICK RACECOURSE,

SYDNEY

SUN 7 MAR: FLEMINGTON RACECOURSE,

MELBOURNE

MON 8 MAR: RUNDLE & RYMILL PARKS,

ADELAIDE

Photo: Corbis


STAR STRUCK

EMPIRE OF THE SUN

“It’s amazing how much it [parenthood]

makes you become an adventurer. You can’t

pull out the same trick each day. You have

to invent. I’ve invented so many things: the

fl ying dummy, the tiger that comes out of the

kitchen… it’s the greatest thing to happen to a

guy and a girl.”

2010, he tells me, will fi nally see the family

move overseas, a plan which fell through two

28 FEBRUARY 2010

years ago, “when Snaps fell pregnant”. In March,

they’ll likely fi nd themselves in New York. “I’ve

always felt very at home there. I feel it’s the

right time to work with people that are a lot

better than me, who have been to a lot more

places and seen a lot more things than me.”

And so, Steele fi nds himself once more

on the verge of big things, only on a scale

infi nitely more grand. He’s just striving to keep

Photo: Getty Images

L to R: Tony Mitolo, Luke Steele and

Surahn Sidhu of Empire of the Sun

arrive with Jodi Steele (Luke’s wife)

at the 2009 ARIA Awards at Acer Arena

LUKE STEELE’S

FAVOURITE DESTINATION

Coromandel, New Zealand:

“It’s where all of my cousins live. Skiing,

fi shing, surfi ng, writing songs, drinking nice

New Zealand wines and teas — all of the

good things.”

up with his own mind.

“All of the visions and the imagination have

turned into this ocean. It’s great when you’re

months and months behind your mind, but

when it turns into years — you’ve got a lot

of work to do each day, you know?” He sits

up straight suddenly, eyes bright. “You wake

up thankful to talk and walk and you’re ready

to go.”


STAR STRUCK

EMPIRE OF THE SUN

“It’s amazing how much it [parenthood]

makes you become an adventurer. You can’t

pull out the same trick each day. You have

to invent. I’ve invented so many things: the

fl ying dummy, the tiger that comes out of the

kitchen… it’s the greatest thing to happen to a

guy and a girl.”

2010, he tells me, will fi nally see the family

move overseas, a plan which fell through two

28 FEBRUARY 2010

years ago, “when Snaps fell pregnant”. In March,

they’ll likely fi nd themselves in New York. “I’ve

always felt very at home there. I feel it’s the

right time to work with people that are a lot

better than me, who have been to a lot more

places and seen a lot more things than me.”

And so, Steele fi nds himself once more

on the verge of big things, only on a scale

infi nitely more grand. He’s just striving to keep

Photo: Getty Images

L to R: Tony Mitolo, Luke Steele and

Surahn Sidhu of Empire of the Sun

arrive with Jodi Steele (Luke’s wife)

at the 2009 ARIA Awards at Acer Arena

LUKE STEELE’S

FAVOURITE DESTINATION

Coromandel, New Zealand:

“It’s where all of my cousins live. Skiing,

fi shing, surfi ng, writing songs, drinking nice

New Zealand wines and teas — all of the

good things.”

up with his own mind.

“All of the visions and the imagination have

turned into this ocean. It’s great when you’re

months and months behind your mind, but

when it turns into years — you’ve got a lot

of work to do each day, you know?” He sits

up straight suddenly, eyes bright. “You wake

up thankful to talk and walk and you’re ready

to go.”


The best board riders on the

planet are gathering to tackle the

Gold Coast’s famed Snapper Rocks

30 FEBRUARY 2010

WORDS BILL PALMER


Kelly Slater competes

during the fi nal of the

2008 Quiksilver Pro

Photo: Getty Images

Surfing

on the Gold Coast is

not just a pastime — it

borders on being a religion. Indeed, it even has

a suburb to celebrate the fact that it’s paradise

for surfers. And while Surfers Paradise itself is

more famous for its funparks than its surf, the

beaches to the north and south are home to

some of the best surfi ng in the country. This

month they’ll be home to the best surfers in

the world.

The point break of Snapper Rocks, on the

Queensland/New South Wales border, will

be transformed into a temporary surfi ng city

as it plays host to two of the world’s premier

surfi ng contests, the men’s Quiksilver Pro and

the women’s Roxy Pro.

With more than 60km of picture-perfect

coastline stretching from South Stradbroke

Island in the north to the Tweed Coast in the

south, surfi ng is the lifeblood of the region. So

it comes as no surprise that surfers from the

Gold Coast dominate the world rankings.

The world’s top three men’s surfers all live

within a few minutes of Snapper’s famed

waves: world number one Mick Fanning,

second-ranked Joel Parkinson and number

three Bede Durbidge. Three-time women’s

world champ Steph Gilmore is also a local.

There are no entry fees to watch the

Quiksilver or Roxy Pros — just park yourself

on a sand-dune or hill overlooking the beach

and soak up the action. While the contests

are offi cially held at Snapper, there is a roving

commission for organisers to chase the waves.

If Snapper isn’t fi ring, the competition can

be staged anywhere from North Stradbroke

Island to Cabarita in northern NSW.

Most of the time, organisers make an

early-morning decision whether to move the

event and, if the surf really sucks, there’s the

Photo: Courtesy of Quiksilver

GO GUIDE

QUIKSILVER PRO

potential for organisers to call a day off

as long as they still have reserve days up

their sleeves. You can keep up with any

developments by listening to local radio

stations or checking on-line.

However, if the Surf God Huey is

smiling, most of the action should be staged at

Snapper, just a short stroll around Greenmount

Headland from dozens of accommodation

options in the surfi e suburb of Coolangatta.

During the contest each year Coolangatta

goes into party mode, building to a crescendo

on fi nals night when the winner traditionally

shouts the bar. Organisers have worked hard

to turn the event into a festival of surfi ng and

summer living, with a music festival added to

the entertainment line-up.

To the uninitiated, the scoring system for

competitive surfi ng is similar to that of diving

or gymnastics. Judges give surfers a score

out of 10 for each wave they catch during the

competition, which pits surfer against surfer

in a knockout format like a tennis tournament.

The best two waves of each heat count.

Perfect 10s are rare but they do happen

— last year’s Quiksilver Pro winner Joel

Parkinson chalked up two on a pulsating fi nal

day as Kirra Point was lashed by cyclonic

3m seas. For Parkinson, the world number

two, the event holds a special place. As a

Coolangatta local, it’s his home event and one

he has won twice.

Home ground advantage is a huge boost

for Parkinson and the other locals. Fanning

has won here in 2005 and 2007; Parkinson

won in 2002 and 2009. After leading the world

ratings for much of last year, Parkinson is

desperate to win the world title which has so

far eluded him and can think of no better place

to start than Snapper Rocks.

Spectators line the beach

during competition

INSET: Meet new Aussie

young gun Julian Wilson

FEBRUARY 2010 31


GO GUIDE

QUIKSILVER PRO

“There’s always something special for me

about this fi rst event of the year,” he says.

“For starters, it’s in my backyard and I get to

have all my family and friends on the beach

supporting. You can hear the crowd when

you’re out there competing so you always

know if you’ve got a good wave. And it has

turned into a festival-like event with so many

things to see.”

On the women’s side, Gilmore should again

start as favourite. The girl nicknamed “Happy”

grew up a short drive down the road on the

32 FEBRUARY 2010

Stephanie Gilmore surfs to

victory during a tough quarterfi

nal match-up against former

ASP World Champion Australian

Chelsea Hedges during the 2009

Roxy Pro Gold Coast

Tweed Coast, but

even outside of

competition you

can fi nd her carving

up out the back

with the boys

at Snapper. Not

surprisingly she

rates the Roxy Pro,

an event she fi rst

won as a teenager,

as her favourite.

“I’m probably

a little bit biased

because it’s my

home break,” she admits. “Overall, it’s one of

the best-run contests and it’s a great set-up

for the fans. You can get up to 10,000–15,000

people on the beach at any one time and it’s

just an awesome atmosphere.

As she succinctly puts it: “The Gold Coast

really is one of the meccas of surfi ng.”

Photo: Getty Images

Jetstar flies to the Gold Coast from

Adelaide, Cairns, Melbourne, Newcastle and

Sydney, and from Tokyo, Osaka, Auckland

and Christchurch; JetSaver light fares from

AU$75. Book online at Jetstar.com

SANDBOX

• Th is year’s Quiksilver Pro is held on

27 February – 10 March.

• Snapper Rocks is just south of Coolangatta

and less than 10 minutes’ drive from Gold

Coast Airport.

• Best accommodation options are at

Coolangatta, Tweed Heads and Kirra

— advance bookings are essential and can

be made at Jetstar.com.

• Visit www.quiksilverpro.com.au or

www.roxypro.com.au for more info.

• To learn more about the history of

surfi ng, visit the Surf World Gold Coast

surfi ng museum, located at 35 Tomewin

Street, Currumbin.

DID YOU KNOW?

In Quiksilver Pro history, every winner has

been Australian except one — surfi ng legend

Kelly Slater.


GO FURTHER FOR LESS, VISIT THE BUDGET DESK

Budget always has great rates and deals exclusively for Jetstar passengers. Just present your Jetstar boarding

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NEED DIRECTIONS? ADD GPS TO YOUR RENTAL

Frequent Flyer program. A joining fee applies. BUDG766


ADRENALINE

QUEENSTOWN

34 FEBRUARY 2010

Take our one-week tour of Queenstown

for a great holiday of freebies and bargains

WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY JOANNE LANE


Queenstown’s

snow-capped peaks are famed for being

home to bungy jumping, zorbing and other

shrieking adventures. But if you want a holiday

where you don’t have to pay for every highoctane

moment, then consider this guide to

discovering the mountains’ best-kept secrets.

Jet boating and bungy might be off the menu,

but there’s still enough mountain biking, gold

panning and fl y-fi shing on crystal clear lakes

to raise your thrill barometer on one of the

world’s great natural stages.

Day1

CLOCKWISE: Cycling Lake Wakatipu;

wander the Frankton Arm Walkway

around Lake Wakatipu; hiking the

Saw Pit Gully track

Walking Lake

Wakatipu

Queenstown lies on an inlet of

Lake Wakatipu, a spectacular 80km

S-shaped expanse that starts at the tiny town

of Glenorchy, stretches south-east towards

Queenstown and then south to Kingston.

Photo: Lonely Planet Images

The lake is part of the geology that has

formed much of Queenstown’s adventure

tourism character. The high mountains on

its shores provide access to activities such

as skiing, biking and hiking while the rivers

draining it are used for jet boating and

bungy jumping.

An ideal way to explore the lake is to

walk or bike the tracks along its shores. A

particularly popular route is the Frankton

Arm Walkway, from Park Street through the

pretty Queenstown gardens to Frankton (8km,

60–90 mins).

Southland farmer David Dumbleton has

holidayed in Queenstown for 30 years on the

Frankton Arm of Lake Wakatipu and never tires

of these tracks. “One can spend a whole lifetime

walking around the edges of Lake Wakatipu and

never exhaust the magic of the place,” he says.

“And it’s all for free!”

If you prefer to bike (NZ$30/50; AU$24/40

ADRENALINE

QUEENSTOWN

a half-/full-day), consider extending as far as

you dare along the gorgeous lakeside stretch

to Kingston (48km). This is the terminus of

the historic Kingston Flyer steam train and

you can look around it or even board for a

ride (children free; adults NZ$44/AU$35, 90

mins). The train is currently under receivership

but it’s hoped operations will restart soon.

Day 2

Free Skyline views

The Skyline Gondola complex

dominates Bob’s Peak (790m)

overlooking Queenstown, and is a

must for some of the best views you’ll ever

see. I choose to see them for free, so I skip the

NZ$23/AU$18 cable-car ride from Brecon

Street and follow the Ti Ki Trail to the top.

After a 45-minute walk through tall Douglas

fi r trees, I feel I’ve more than earned the views.

There’s a restaurant, Maori shows and some

adrenaline-charged activities up here — the

FEBRUARY 2010 35


Luge cart-ride, the Ziptrek Flying Fox and

AJ Hackett’s Ledge Bungy and Sky Swing.

Again, I feel no need to pay, as I get an

empathetic adrenaline rush just watching

people throw themselves off the ledge 400m

above Queenstown.

The other place to enjoy free bungy

madness is at the original Kawarau Bridge site,

60km away near Cromwell. English tourist

Lucinda Carling, at 65, is not too old to bungy

— the oldest jumper was 94 years — but is

happy just watching from the viewing deck.

“Bungy jumping at Kawarau Bridge is a

thrilling ‘must see, don’t have to do’ experience.

Just watching provides enough of an adrenaline

rush for me, and it’s a free day’s entertainment.

A variety of viewing positions, especially from

behind the take-off, allows for close audience

participation,” says Carling, as another die-hard

plunges the 43m into the gorge.

Day 3

Hiking in The

Remarkables

In winter, these mountain

slopes buzz with paying skiers

but in summer, mountain bikers and walkers

take over. Watching the play of light across

their fractured peaks is fascinating but getting

into them is even better, particularly on the

SPLURGE

Spoil yourself with our top picks.

JUMP: With AJ Hackett to leap off a bridge at

the Kawarau Bridge (43m), Nevis Bungy (134m),

Nevis Arc (300m swing), Ledge Bungy (47m) or

Ledge Sky Swing (400m over Queenstown).

Tel: +64 (3) 442 4008.

EAT: Splurge on local food and wine at Gantley’s

Restaurant. 172 Arthur’s Point Rd, Arthurs

Point, tel: +64 (3) 442 8999.

FLY: A scenic fl ight will reveal views of the peaks,

fi ords, glaciers, forest and tussock lands. Contact

The views from Bob’s Peak

are free, or sign up for the

Skyline Gondola ride

INSET: Watch as the hardy

throw themselves

off Kuwarau Bridge

2.5km hike to pretty Lake Alta (1,800m).

The track starts at The Remarkables’ ski

fi eld base facility (1,586m), although the 28km

road from Queenstown is part of the fun, with

the last bumpy 14km on an unsealed section.

It’s possible to extend the trek past Lake Alta

to the Double Cone summit (2,300m). Look

out for fl owering alpine plants during the

summer months.

Arrowtown

Travel just 20km from

Queenstown to step back into

the 1860s gold-mining era. Quaint

Arrowtown is a world away from the extreme

adventure hype, with period buildings such

as post offi ces and stables dotting the main

street along with shops and cafés. It’s a great

place to buy souvenirs, enjoy local wine or see

a fi lm in the boutique cinema.

Day 4

Air Wakatipu, tel: +64 (3) 442 3148, or Sunrise

Balloons, tel: +64 (3) 442 0781.

DRINK: Enjoy a frosty drink at the Minus Five

Bar. Steamer Wharf, Queenstown, tel: +64 (3)

442 6050.

SLEEP: Blow your budget with a night at the

Remarkables Lodge. 595 Kingston Rd, tel: +64

(3) 442 2720.

SHOP: Decorate yourself with funky designs

from Th e Bead Shop. 2b Shotover St, tel: +64 (3)

441 8466.

ADRENALINE

QUEENSTOWN

You can learn about local history at the

Lakes District Museum (NZ$5/AU$4) or get

recommendations for local activities. Museum

director David Clarke says there are plenty of

low-cost things to do, but a shopping highlight,

particularly for families, is the Remarkables

Sweet Shop. It’s “an Aladdin’s cave of jars full

of the old traditional sweets like blackballs,

humbugs and aniseed balls,” he tempts.

I get in touch with the town’s multicultural

past at the Chinese mining settlement by the

Arrow River and then head out on one of the

area’s hikes. The Sawpit Gully trail (2-3 hrs)

passes through forest daubed with profusions

of wild strawberries, daisies and dandelions

and then crosses tussock-covered slopes to

an old stone miner’s hut before dropping back

down to the Arrow River. Other fun, low-cost

activities here include gold panning, fi shing,

reading under a waving willow or fl oating

downstream with the local kids in inner tubes

procured from a garage.

Day 5

Day tramps

Glenorchy at the head of Lake

Wakatipu is a scenic 48km

drive from Queenstown. It’s

surrounded by glacier-fed rivers that are great

for fi shing and ancient forests for hiking, such

as in the Fiordland and Aspiring National Parks

that provide access to some of New Zealand’s

most famous multi-day tracks. These include

the Routeburn (32km, 3 days), Greenstone

(37km, 2-3 days), Caples (23km, 2-3 days)

and Rees/Dart (57km, 4-5 days) hiking trails.

To undertake a full hike you must pay

a booking fee with the Department of

FEBRUARY 2010 37


ADRENALINE

QUEENSTOWN

Conservation for overnight accommodation

on the way, however day hikes on all these

tracks are free. While you won’t get up into the

heights and passes for views of glacial lakes

and snowy peaks, the wire rope bridges along

the Caples River are fun to bounce across and

there’s plenty of easy walking for kids on the

lowland areas.

Mountain biking

to Macetown

I head back to Arrowtown’s

Chinese settlement today on

a mountain bike (NZ$50;AU$40/day) to

Day 6

tackle the 13.1km off-road track to Macetown,

an abandoned gold mining settlement 21 river

38 FEBRUARY 2010

Tackle off-road

trails to Macetown

on a moutain bike

crossings upstream. One of these was used to

fi lm the Lord of the Rings scene when Arwen

stops the Nazgûl fording the river, so I feel like

I’m riding into the movie itself. Unfortunately

I don’t see Arwen, but there are other riders,

4WDers and the occasional runner tackling

the bumpy route.

Fly-fi shing

at Glenorchy

On my last day I go fl y-fi shing

(licences NZ$21/AU$17 for

24 hours) near Glenorchy for rainbow and

Day 7

brown trout. It’s magic to watch the fl y fl ash

across the water and as dusk falls, it becomes

achingly beautiful. It seems a fi tting end to a

FIND IT

Queenstown i-SITE

Visitor Centre

Clocktower Building, cnr

Shotover and Camp Sts,

Queenstown,

tel: +64 (3) 442 4100

Outside Sports

Bike Hire

36 Shotover St,

Queenstown,

tel: +64 (3) 441 0074

Skyline Gondola

Brecon St, Queenstown,

tel: +64 (3) 441 0101

Arrowtown Visitor

Information Centre

and Lakes District

Museum

49 Buckingham St,

Arrowtown,

tel: +64 (3) 442 1824

Department of

Conservation

Queenstown Regional

Visitor Centre

38 Shotover St,

Queenstown,

tel: +64 (3) 442 7935

Glenorchy Information

Centre

Mull St, Glenorchy,

tel: +64 (3) 409 2049

week in which I’ve hardly spent a cent

and left only footsteps, ripples, bike tracks

and exclamations.

Jetstar flies out of Australia to Queenstown

via Christchurch and Auckland; JetSaver

Light fares from AU$179. Domestic New

Zealand flights from NZ$49. Book online

at Jetstar.com.


Give them something they will treasure.

Blundstone footwear – available at leading retailers

or contact customer service on 03 6271 2222.

An Australian Tradition


This

year’s 2010

Adelaide

Festival of Arts features

a heart burning brightly

on the cover of its

program, refl ecting

artistic director Paul

Grabowsky’s belief

about the arts “going

straight for the heart”.

“It’s a commanding

image for me of what makes

me an artist: the opportunity to

move people, to make them feel things,” says

the jazz performer and former Steve Vizard

sidekick. “My vision for 2010 has been to

create a festival that captures the hearts and

minds of the people of Australia.”

It’s the 50th anniversary of this biennial

event, and the jam-packed program is one

of the largest in its history with more than

250 performances, events and exhibitions

across 33 venues throughout Adelaide from

26 February to 14 March.

There’s something for everyone, from the

opening pyrotechnics of Groupe F’s A Little

More Light — a free community event at

8.45pm on Saturday, 27 February in Adelaide’s

Victoria Park — to the exhibition A Brilliant

Tradition which celebrates the achievements

and events of the Festival’s 50 years’ history,

from 26 February in the Festival Theatre foyer.

40 FEBRUARY 2010

We speak with the man

tasked with creating

the 50th anniversary

line-up of Australia’s

largest multi-arts festival

WORDS HEATHER MILLAR


The Australian premiere of Hungarian

composer Gyorgy Ligeti’s only opera, La Grand

Macabre, is being performed on and inside a

giant naked sculpture of a woman on 26 and

28 February and 3 and 4 March, in the Festival

Theatre. The co-production between opera

companies from Belgium, Rome, London and

Barcelona is directed by controversial Spanish

theatre group La Fura dels Baus, which

produced the opening ceremony for

the 1992 Olympics.

“I saw this ingenious production in Rome

earlier this year and I simply knew we had to

have it for Adelaide,” explains Grabowsky. “Le

Grand Macabre is Ligeti’s only light opera and

in my opinion, the most important opera of

the late 20th century. And the stagecraft is like

nothing we’ve seen before in Australia.”

Then there’s US jazz great, 76-year-old

saxophone player Wayne Shorter, who

Grabowsky describes as “one of my favourite

musicians in the world” and “the greatest jazz

musician of them all”. The nine-time Grammy

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Jin Xing

Dance, Wayne Shorter, London

Sinfonietta, Julia Zemiro, Groupe F

HUB

ADELAIDE FESTIVAL

award-winner will perform with his quartet

for one night only on 6 March in the Festival

Theatre. “Personally, I couldn’t be prouder.

He’s been an infl uence on my music since

I was a teenager. It’s a dream come true!”

says Grabowsky.

Elcho Island’s Chooky Dancers, who found

fame on the internet with their version of

the Zorba dance, will perform a new work,

Wrong Skin — a Yolngu tale of forbidden love,

skin and clan — directed by Nigel Jamieson.

“I found them on YouTube, like about 10

million other people,” says Grabowsky. “This

new work explores the pressures faced by

remote Indigenous communities determined

to maintain their identity and culture, while

fi nding a place for their children in the

contemporary world.”

The London Sinfonietta is presenting two

programs exclusive to the Adelaide Festival.

Chief executive Andrew Burke says that the UK

contemporary music ensemble “is excited to

be exploring new collaborations and supporting

new composing and performing talent”.

One such collaboration is with the Young

Wagiluk Group, from East Arnhem Land,

who will perform the manikay song cycles

— “one of the great treasures of Indigenous

Australian culture,” according to Grabowsky.

The collaboration, called “Tract”, is part of the

group’s second program Wind & Glass on 28

February in the Adelaide Town Hall.

For Grabowsky, the Aboriginal works are

a signifi cant part of the festival. “A lot of the

work that I have commissioned involves, in

various ways, Aboriginal people... theatre,

dance, music, visual art. To bring together the

people who represent the oldest music on the

planet, together with the cutting-edge of new

music today, is a very important moment in

Australian music history,” he says.

FEBRUARY 2010 41


HUB

ADELAIDE FESTIVAL

Throughout much of the festival,

RocKwiz host Julia Zemiro will hold court

inside the Famous Spiegeltent in Elder

Park, where she will interview secret

musical guests. “We’ll be interviewing a

different musician every night, hearing

them play... two songs that infl uenced them,

three of their own songs and a mystery song,”

explains Zemiro.

“In this new show, Julia will lead the audience

into the inner working life of a performer, why

they do what they do, and what their processes

are,” adds Grabowsky. Julia Zemiro’s Comfort

Zone is on 26–28 February, 3–7 March, and

10–13 March 2010.

Want more? The Spiegeltent will also feature

the return of burlesque show La Clique and jazz

band The Necks. Other performances not to

be missed include Shanghai Beauty by China’s

Jin Xing Dance Theatre, and Good Morning Mr

Gershwin, a fusion of video technology, hip-hop

moves and classic George Gershwin songs by

France’s Montalvo-Hervieu Company.

Jetstar flies to Adelaide from across

Australia. JetSaver Light fares to Adelaide

start from AU$59. Book online at

Jetstar.com.

42 FEBRUARY 2010

Chooky Dancers

ONE FOR THE FAMILY:

CIRCUS OZ

Th e exhilarating

new show from Circus

Oz opens in a ballroom.

However, in true Circus

Oz style, this elegant scene

soon descends into a manic

comic knockabout cyclone

of absurd acrobatics

and non-stop action.

Expect rubberlimbed

tumbling,

duo juggling, chair

balancing, teeterboard,

hoop diving, group bike and

amazing aerial

rope performances.

Barely Contained is on 24

February–14 March at

Torrens Parade Ground.


summer time is...

harbourside

Award winning restaurants & cafes, amazing

harbour and city skyline views, latest fashion

boutiques, bars, bowling...What more do you need?

For more information visit harbourside.com.au

Shop. Dine. Play.

Darling Harbour, Sydney

Shop. Dine. Play.

Darling Harbour, Sydney


HOT SPOT

PHILLIP ISLAND

44 FEBRUARY 2010

Phillip Island offers much more

than just birds and motorbikes

WORDS ELIZABETH QUINN

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: You won’t believe

your eyes in The Shrinking Room; peer into

tidal pools for surprises; meet David at Panny’s

Factory; come face to face with the residents of

Churchill Island Heritage Farm; say hello to the

natives at the Koala Conservation Centre

The

once-sleepy holiday destination

of Phillip Island is well and truly

waking up. The nightly penguin parade and the

annual Grand Prix are still the biggest shows

in town, but visitors to this stretch of coastline

are discovering the other face of the island,

with its promise of fun for everyone from

families and foodies to adventurers.

The new Koala Conservation Centre

features an interactive visitor education foyer,

while elevated boardwalks provide close

encounters of the furry kind, sign-posting the

presence of individual treetop inhabitants as

they sleep peacefully in the breeze.

Churchill Island Heritage Farm at

Newhaven has its share of loveable residents.

This working farm, with its heritage buildings

and gardens, provides daily demonstrations

of old-style farming practices, and its animal

nursery is a magnet for children of all ages.

Don’t miss the farmers’ market held here on

the fourth Saturday of the month. A ‘3 Park

Pass’ is an economical option for families and

includes a visit to the Penguin Parade.


CHURCHILL ISLAND HERITAGE

FARM’S ANIMAL NURSERY

IS A MAGNET FOR CHILDREN

OF ALL AGES

For a new perspective on family-friendly

attractions on the island, stop by at A Maze’N

Things fun park on the road to Cowes. From

the moment you enter the Anti-Gravity Room,

your view of the world is turned on its head.

Optical illusions play games with your mind

in the Mirror Maze with its seemingly endless

twists and turns, while the Shrinking Room

sees children become giants and adults turn

into oompah loompahs.

Take the Rhyll-Newhaven Road to the

Rhyll Trout and Bush Tucker Farm where

Paul Mannix has spent the past seven years

designing, building and adapting his vision of

a family- and environmentally-friendly tourist

destination. First,

catch your fi sh: the

hard part is deciding

whether to take

it home and cook it yourself or have it

cooked for you while you wander through

the newly established Bush Tucker Trail,

featuring more than 6,000 native plants and

22 different species.

From the indigenous to the indulgent: the

mouth-watering range of chocolates at the

famous Panny’s Phillip Island Chocolate

Factory is made from the fi nest Belgian

Callebaut chocolate. Gaze in awe at the

life-sized depiction of Michelangelo’s David

HOT SPOT

PHILLIP ISLAND

(with strategically placed spearmint leaf). An

interactive exhibition educates and prepares

the taste buds for the chocolate rush

beyond its doors. Visitors learn that good

quality chocolate should never be chewed

but will melt within 60 seconds, while poor

quality chocolate will take fi ve minutes to melt

in the mouth. And, as Panny rightly asks, “why

test your patience on an inferior product?”

FEBRUARY 2010 45


CLOCKWISE: Chef Patrick

O’Grady; tuck into the fresh

seafood on offer; buy seafood

and cook it yourself

Those who appreciate the fi ner things in

life will fi nd much to love about Phillip Island.

Take a detour to The Purple Hen winery in

Rhyll, with its distinctive avian logo on display

on the tasting room-cum-café wall. A small

but stylish grazing menu encourages visitors

to settle in as they admire the fl oor-to-ceiling

view of Westernport Bay and ponder the big

questions… such as which award-winning

Purple Hen wine to take home.

Stock up on homemade provisions at The

Island Food Store in Cowes, tucked away

in a cul-de-sac next to Coles’ car park: just

follow the aroma of freshly baked muffi ns

and good coffee. A short drive to Ventnor

will take you to The Island Primary Produce

Store, an old-fashioned butchery that only

sells meat produced on the property. For

butcher-turned-farmer Ted Walsh, meat “is my

passion: it’s what I do.”

Passion is a word used often by the

residents of Phillip Island. “We want people to

know we’re here, to know there’s good food in

Phillip Island,” says Patrick O’Garey of Infused

Restaurant and Wine Bar in Cowes. Offering

modern Australian cuisine in elegant yet casual

surroundings, Infused is the place for a special

night out or all-day grazing. The alfresco wine

bar area is a magnet for passing beachgoers

on their way home. Oysters are a house

speciality: in summer, more than 100 dozen

DEPENDING ON

HOW WET YOU

WANT TO GET,

YOU CAN SURF OR

EXPERIENCE A JET

BOAT RIDE

per week are shucked on the premises and

are served in a variety of ways, from natural

through to tempura style with chilli jam.

Now that you’re fed and watered,

it’s time for those with an adventurous

streak to experience the excitementfuelled

activities Phillip Island has to offer.

Depending on how wet you want to get, you

can learn to surf, experience the sea spray

in a jet boat ride, or strap yourself in with an

experienced racing driver for a taste of the

Grand Prix circuit. (Go 26–28 February to

catch the Superbike World Championship,

when Aussie lads Troy Corser and Chris

Vermeulen do battle with Noriyuki Haga and

James Toseland.) Or for an eye-popping point

of view, board a Phillip Island Helicopter for

a scenic joyride — doors are optional!

FIRST LOVE

Due for release in April 2010, First Love is a

documentary about three young girls from

Phillip Island and their journey towards

becoming professional surfers. One of the girls,

India Payne, lists Flynns and Woolamai as her

favourite surfi ng spots on the island. When

she’s not training at the local gym or away from

home competing, she likes to do what most

15-year-old girls do: spend time at the beach

hanging out with friends. “I just love being by

the water,” she says.

HOT SPOT

PHILLIP ISLAND

FEBRUARY 2010 47


HOT SPOT

PHILLIP ISLAND

At the end of the day, Phillip Island’s

accommodation is as diverse as its range of

visitors. The Waves Apartments in Cowes are

situated across the road from the foreshore

and feature a spa bath, kitchenette and

two bedrooms that sleep up to fi ve. Recent

renovations include premium accommodation

for couples with 180-degree bay views.

Holmwood Guesthouse is situated just

around the corner, nestled among the

eucalypts. Guests can choose one of three

beautifully appointed ensuite rooms in the

guesthouse, or one of two self-contained

cottages that sleep up to four people. Freshly

48 FEBRUARY 2010

squeezed orange juice and a cooked breakfast

are provided for guesthouse residents, while

cottage dwellers get a breakfast hamper.

Whatever you’re after, the Phillip Island

experience can be all things to all people. As

residents Eric and Serena van Grondelle of

Holmwood Guesthouse, reveal: “We came for a

day and stayed for a lifetime.”

Jetstar flies to Melbourne from across

Australia, and from Bangkok, Bali and

Christchurch. Book online at Jetstar.com.

Earn points to pay for your flights with

every purchase on your Jetstar MasterCard.

Daily pelican feeding

at San Remo

FIND IT

Koala Conservation

Centre

1810 Phillip Island

Tourist Rd,

tel: +61 (3) 5952 1610

Churchill Island

Heritage Farm

Newhaven,

tel: +61 (3) 5956 7214

Penguin Parade

1019 Ventnor Rd,

Ventnor,

tel: +61 (3) 5951 2830

A Maze’N Th ings

1805 Phillip Island Rd,

Cowes,

tel: +61 (3) 5952 2283

Rhyll Trout and Bush

Tucker Farm

36 Rhyll-Newhaven Rd,

Rhyll,

tel: +61 (3) 5956 9255

Panny’s Phillip Island

Chocolate Factory

930 Phillip Island Rd,

Newhaven,

tel: +61 (3) 5956 6600

Th e Purple Hen

96 McFees Rd, Rhyll,

tel: +61 (3) 5956 9244

Th e Island Food Store

2/75 Chapel St, Cowes,

tel: +61 (3) 5952 6400

Th e Island Primary

Produce Store

511 Ventnor Rd, Ventnor,

tel: +61 (3) 5956 8107

Infused Restaurant

and Wine Bar

115 Th ompson Ave,

Cowes,

tel: +61 (3) 5952 2655

Phillip Island

Helicopters

1340 Phillip Island

Tourist Rd, Newhaven,

tel: +61 (3) 5956 7316

Th e Waves Apartments

Th e Esplanade, Cowes,

tel: +61 (3) 5952 1351

Holmwood Guesthouse

37 Chapel St, Cowes,

tel: +61 (3) 5952 3082


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PEOPLE

INDIGENOUS RUGBY LEAGUE

50 FEBRUARY 2010

When the Indigenous All

Stars vs NRL All Stars match

takes the fi eld, it will be more

than just a thrilling game

WORDS CRAIG TANSLEY

Front row (L to R):

Jamie Soward, PJ Marsh,

Nathan Merritt, Preston Campbell,

David Gallop (CEO of the NRL)

Second Row (L to R):

William Johnstone, Jharal Yow Yeh,

Justin Hodges, Scott Prince,

Neil Henry (Indigenous All Stars Coach)

Third row (L to R): Greg Inglis, Carl Webb


might be the proudest night

“This for our people on a sports

fi eld since Cathy Freeman won her Gold

Medal at the Sydney Olympics in 2000,”

forecasts Preston Campbell, full back with

the National Rugby League’s (NRL) Jetstar

Gold Coast Titans.

On 13 February, 17 of Australia’s fi nestever

Indigenous rugby league stars will do

battle with the greatest non-Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander players from

Australia and New Zealand on the second

anniversary of Prime Minister Kevin

Rudd’s apology to Australia’s Indigenous

people. The brainchild of Preston

Campbell, this game will rank as one of

the great sporting moments in Australia’s

history. But that’s only a small part of it;

this game promises to go far beyond the

realms of any sporting fi eld.

“We’re hoping that this game helps

Indigenous communities,” Campbell

says. “We’ve been looked at as a

minority group for a long time, but we’ll

be able to hold our heads very high

that night. We’ve been working to raise

awareness of our culture to Indigenous

people themselves. Growing up I

didn’t know much at all about my own

people, so we want to make young kids

proud of who they are. We also want to

promote harmony across all cultures

and better understanding.”

All money raised from the game

will go to community projects and

the game will represent the start

of a week-long initiative by the NRL to help

Indigenous communities.

The game, to be played at Gold Coast’s

Skilled Park, will feature the best Indigenous

team ever assembled, many of whom are the

biggest stars in the NRL competition. Players

include Melbourne’s Greg Inglis, Australian

halfback Jonathan Thurston, dual football

international crowd-pleaser Wendell Sailor

and Jetstar Gold Coast Titans’ co-captain

Scott Prince. They’ll take on the best players

from Australia and New Zealand, including

Australian captain Darren Lockyer and

vice-captain Cameron Smith, New Zealand

captain Benji Marshall and vice-captain Adam

Blair, and the most favoured non-Indigenous

player from every one of the 16 NRL clubs.

For most Indigenous players picked,

the game will be the fi rst time they’ve ever

represented their people, something

they say ranks up alongside any other

sporting achievement.

Left to right: Scott Prince,

Sid Domic and Preston Campbell

with Sid’s jersey artwork

IT’S IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER

WHERE YOU COME FROM AND HOPEFULLY

WE’LL HELP YOUNG INDIGENOUS KIDS

TO BELIEVE IN THEIR CULTURE, THEIR

ABILITIES AND THEIR IDENTITY

PEOPLE

INDIGENOUS RUGBY LEAGUE

“Anybody who knows me knows how

passionate I am about my people,” Manly star

George Rose says. “This rates with any other

honour in the game.”

For Wendell Sailor, “It’s important to

remember where you come from and hopefully

we’ll help young Indigenous kids to believe in

their culture, their abilities and their identity.”

“Every time I play I’m not only representing

my team, I’m also representing my family

name and my Aboriginal culture,” Greg Inglis

says. “They represent who and what I am.”

Campbell says playing for a team

representing his race for the very fi rst time

means more to him than anything. “It’s hard

to compare playing for your football team

in the NRL with playing on behalf of all the

Indigenous people in Australia,” he says. “Each

week you’re playing for two points in the NRL,

but here it feels like you’re playing for more

— it’s almost like it’s life and death for many

of our people. It’s trying to show Indigenous

FEBRUARY 2010 51


PEOPLE

INDIGENOUS RUGBY LEAGUE

people there’s options out there,

that we all come from the same

place, that we’re all in this together.”

Campbell had long dreamed of

uniting the game’s elite Indigenous

players together in the same team

to represent their people, but he’d

never dreamed they’d be playing such a

formidable opponent. “When I fi rst came up

with the idea I thought maybe we could play

the Cook Islands or Papua New Guinea, but

I’d never even contemplated playing a team

like this,” he says.

But what makes the concept even more

exciting is that for the fi rst time ever, the

public have actually picked the teams

themselves. Fans have been asked to vote for

their favourite players on-line, meaning for

the fi rst time in Australian sporting history, the

fans themselves choose the national teams to

represent them.

The Indigenous team will wear artwork

and logos on their playing jersey designed

by former NRL star Sid Domic, whose design

incorporates boomerangs, the Southern Cross

and symbolic elements representing the

coming together of cultures and communities.

“To think that arguably the best Indigenous

side ever put together on a rugby league fi eld

to represent their people will take the fi eld

52 FEBRUARY 2010

Preston Campbell

shielded in my design is such a big honour,”

Domic says. “It’s the biggest highlight in

both my rugby league and art careers.”

Oh, and as to who might win this contest,

well, the players are being awfully tactful

about it. “There’s so much more at stake

than the game,” Campbell says. “It’s about

the communities we’re going to be helping,

but ah, gee, it’d be the icing on the cake to

beat them, wouldn’t it? Yeah, we’d love to beat

them, but as long as it’s competitive. They’ll

have a killer team but then I wouldn’t want to

have to tackle some of our blokes either.”

Karl Webb

Jetstar flies to the Gold

Coast from across Australia, and from

Tokyo, Osaka, Auckland and Christchurch.

JetSaver Light fares to the Gold Coast

from AU$75. Book online at Jetstar.com


BOOK YOUR TICKETS ONLINE

NOW. DON’T MISS OUT!


IN FOCUS

VALENTINE’S DAY

Photo: Photolibrary

54 FEBRUARY 2010


Photo: Photolibrary

If you’re ready to change your

single status, read on for tips and

tricks from two dating experts on

romance (and how to hook up) in 2010

WORDS UTE JUNKER

fi nding love is high on your list of

If new year’s resolutions, here is some

fresh advice from two people for whom

matchmaking is their profession. Here’s

what Trudy Gilbert of Elite Introductions

and Dan Bacon, the creator behind

themodernman.com, have to say about

how to meet someone special.

How to meet someone

and break the ice

Trudy: There are available people

everywhere. It’s all about your attitude.

Every day is an opportunity to potentially

meet someone — it could be in the lift, or

where you get your coffee every morning.

Dan: If you want to fi nd a girlfriend, simply

have fun with humour

start talking to women everywhere you go.

You’ll be surprised at how open (and how

fl attered) most women are that you had the

confi dence to walk up and start talking to

them. Women really aren’t as scary and mean

as many think they are.

Creative fi rst dates

Trudy: Today, people don’t want to be seen

making too much of an effort — they prefer

a low-key approach. Organising an activity

— rollerblading, sailing, a coastal walk — is a

lot more interesting than the standard dinner

and drinks.

Dan: The innovative part of the fi rst date

should come from your personality, not where

you go. We tell men to use their charm to get

their date to laugh, talk about herself and

enjoy the date. Catching up for a coffee, a

drink, or a bite to eat at a casual restaurant is

a good idea. Trying too hard will scare a lot of

women off.

creative first dates are a hit

Photo: Dreamworld

DAN BACON’S

7 DATING SECRETS

1. Realise that

women do

want to be

approached:

You’ll be

surprised at

how receptive

most women

are when you

walk up to start a

conversation.

2. Focus on being social,

rather than trying to pick up: Women

can smell desperation a mile away.

3. Be real: If you put on a false persona,

women will notice and it will turn them off .

4. Read her signals of interest: If a woman

is continuing to talk to you, chances are,

she likes you. If she didn’t like you, she’d

excuse herself and leave.

5. Use fl irting: If you think a woman is

interested in you while chatting to her, give

her a smirk and squint your eyes at her

for about 1-2 seconds. She’ll immediately

understand that you’re saying, “You like

me… and you know that I know it.

Th is is fun!”

6. Get her talking: One of the secrets to

keeping conversations going is to get the

other person talking about their life, their

stories and their opinions. Don’t just

reply politely — make her laugh, by

playfully making fun of some of the things

she talks about.

7. Move things forward: As well as

approaching in the fi rst place, it’s also the

man’s role to move things forward to a

phone number, a kiss or a second date.

IN FOCUS

VALENTINE’S DAY

FEBRUARY 2010 55


IN FOCUS

VALENTINE’S DAY

Most romantic places

to take a date

Trudy: Somewhere by the water; a cosy,

out-of-the-way wine bar; a beautiful park

— take a gourmet picnic.

Dan: Sunset dates are very romantic. If you

can fi nd a great bar, restaurant or café that

overlooks a nice beach, take your date there

for some relaxed conversation and laughs

about an hour before sunset.

How to guarantee

a second date

Trudy: Understand that the fi rst date is not

the time to reveal everything about yourself.

I compare a fi rst date to a job interview — it’s

about a controlled release of information. Be

careful how much you disclose: you want to

leave them wanting to know more about you.

Don’t share all your bad habits — people need

to appreciate the positive fi rst.

Dan: To get a second date, the woman needs

to be attracted to you — and the easiest way to

ensure that is to be confi dent and use humour.

Most romantic

destinations

Trudy: Anywhere with great atmosphere,

good food and the chance to be romantic.

Staying at one of those beautiful lodges in

(Tasmania’s) Cradle Mountain, where you

have great views and a fi replace, is lovely.

Dan: Experiencing new and exciting

things is an ideal way to form a unique

bond with your partner. So try something

different. If you’re from a cooler state,

a tropical destination like Phuket or

Honolulu is perfect. Otherwise, an exotic

destination like Japan can be great.

Jetstar flies to Hobart, Launceston,

Phuket, Honolulu, Tokyo and Osaka.

Book online at Jetstar.com

SINGLES TOGETHER

Try some new ways to meet other singles

Fit 2 Date brings single people together for

outdoor workout sessions. “Over the four-week

course, you expand your social network, create

new friendships and get an awesome workout,”

says Fit 2 Date founder, Erica French. Fit 2 Date

runs in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, the Gold

Coast and Perth. Visit www.fi t2date.com.au.

Dream Date is a Valentine’s Day party (on

February 13) for singles — with a diff erence.

“Our thrill rides are guaranteed to kick-start

conversation,” says Jennifer Neville, events

manager at the Gold Coast’s Dreamworld theme

park. She’s confi dent that the mix of rides, live

entertainment and games will lead to a romantic

rush. More details are at www.dreamworld.com.au.

56 FEBRUARY 2010

Cradle Mountain Lodge at the

entrance to Lake St. Clair National

Park is romantic all year

make friends at Koala

Adventure Island

Skyecandy is a video dating service that operates

via Skype. Launching on 3 February, the service

operates 24 hours a day. “It’s not a long process,

like a lot of dating services,” say founder Melonie

Ryan. “You see straight away what they look like,

so you’re not being misled by a photo.” Visit

www.skyecandy.com.

Koala Adventure Island is designed as a place

for the over-18s to make new friends. Ben Malin,

operations manager of the Whitsunday Islands,

says, “We run a lot of group activities, including

volleyball and nature walks, and it’s such a

friendly atmosphere,” he says. Visit

www.koalaadventureisland.com.

TRUDY GILBERT’S

7 DATING SECRETS

1. Be comfortable

with yourself:

Know you

have a lot

off er, and

believe you’re

a good catch.

2. Practise the

four Cs: Be

curious, courteous,

confi dent and (for men)

chivalrous. Old-fashioned manners are in.

3. Be genuinely interested in getting to

know your date.

4. Understand what you want in a

partner, so you can recognise it when

you see it: Focus on essential qualities —

reliability, honesty, genuineness — rather

than superfl uous stuff like their height or

how much they earn.

5. Don’t underestimate the importance of

body language and eye contact.

6. Learn the delicate art of attraction, or

fl irting: Th ere’s nothing wrong with letting

someone know you like them.

7. Don’t be negative — don’t complain

about problems or talk about your ex.

Photo: Tourism Tasmania/Cradle Mountain Lodge


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EAT BEAT

MELBOURNE CHINATOWN

58 FEBRUARY 2010

Celebrity chef Elizabeth Chong takes us to

her favourite Melbourne Chinatown eateries

WORDS VANESSA MULQUINEY PHOTOGRAPHY CORMAC HANRAHAN


CLOCKWISE: Elizabeth Chong in

the heart of Chinatown; the rustic

Hutong Dumpling Bar; Shoya’s exquisite

sashimi; Hutong Dumpling Bar’s

delectable xiao long bao

Knowing

I’m about to spend

the day sampling

the best dishes in Melbourne’s Chinatown with

one of Australia’s most loved celebrity chefs

as my guide, I have a light breakfast and, given

my track record with chopsticks, don’t wear

white. As I spot a petite and smiling Chong

confi dently walking up Little Bourke Street, I

can’t help but notice her chic white shirt. This

is one lady who knows her way around a pair

of chopsticks and has no fear.

While Chong is instantly likable, warm and

the ideal dinner party guest, when it comes to

food, there’s no nonsense about her. I know

I’m in experienced hands when she pulls

out a schedule which lists chronologically

the restaurants we’re visiting, the time and

duration at every restaurant, and the dishes

we’ll be sampling. I’m only too happy to oblige.

While walking to our fi rst restaurant, she

tells me she came to Australia from her native

Guangzhou when she was three years old

and inherited a love of food and cooking from

her father, who was a well-respected foodie

in Melbourne. She reminisces about her old

stomping ground. “From age three, this really

was my home away from home,” she says,

pointing out the church she attended with her

family on Sundays before tagging along with

mum to do the food shopping.

There are traces of her family throughout

the heritage-listed Chinatown streets. We

pass Celestial Lane, which in the 1840s was

known as Celestial Alley and mainly occupied

by European tradesmen. By 1860, the Chinese

had moved in and set up lodging houses which

were quickly fi lled with new Chinese arrivals

(including, later, Chong’s father).

Our fi rst restaurant is Hutong Dumpling

Bar, famous for its xiao long bao or soup

dumplings (AU$8.80). Dedicated dumpling

chefs stand behind glass and effortlessly

sculpt enough tasty morsels for the lunchtime

crowd, who watch on in anticipation.

Raymond Lee, the manager, says the

dumplings are a must-try menu item — that

is providing you can get them in your mouth.

“Very gently pick up the xiao long bao with

chopsticks, dip it into the vinegar sauce

and ginger, and place it on the spoon,”

instructs Chong. “Nibble the side of the

dumpling and suck the broth out and pop

the whole thing in your mouth.” The result

is a very hot (don’t forget to blow on it),

fl avoursome meaty taste. How does the

broth get inside the dumpling? Chong

explains: “A frozen block of stock is placed

inside the dumpling, they’re then steamed

and the stock melts.” Genius.

Next stop is Melbourne’s yum cha legend,

Shark Fin House. Not usually a fan of

Cantonese delicacies, I’m hesitant to bid

farewell to the delicious xiao long bao, but

who can say no to Chong? “It’s the busiest

yum cha in Melbourne,” she claims. With

four restaurants dotted around the city that

EAT BEAT

MELBOURNE CHINATOWN

FEBRUARY 2010 59


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serve up more than 140 items, this is the

place to come for a Sunday yum cha fi x.

The atmosphere rivals any Hong Kong

yum cha joint: loud and chaotic. Chong

comes for the deep-fried pork dumplings

(hum sui gok, AU$4.10). The literal

translation is “salt water dumpling”, but

there’s no salt water in sight. Regulars

affectionately request “footballs”, given the

dumplings’ shape, and the staff know exactly

which dish they want.

As with many yum cha dishes, the pork

stuffi ng is quite rich with a heavy sauce.

Chong recommends eating the football

without dressing or sauces. “Chilli sauce

is too overpowering, but if you must, add a

little XO sauce which goes quite nicely.”

And don’t forget to keep chugging bo li

cha (black tea); the Chinese believe that so

long as you drink tea, you can eat as much

as you like. No yum cha visit is complete

without dessert: egg tarts (AU$4.10).

“They’re made with a traditional puff pastry,

not a short crust like some nearby bakeries.”

What results is a crunchy explosion of

sweetness and an empty plate.

We leave the Shark Fin’s cacophony for

the subdued interior of Japanese restaurant

Shoya. “I admire the precision of Japanese

chefs; every dish they serve is a piece of

art,” says Chong. “Shigeo [executive chef

and director] is amazing.” And many would

agree with her, including Iron Chef master

Kandagawa, who said of his Shoya visit,

“Out of the Japanese restaurants all over

the world I’ve visited, Shoya is amazingly

authentic and makes me feel like I’m

at home. It’s not inferior to any quality

restaurants in central Tokyo.”

THE CHINESE

BELIEVE THAT

SO LONG AS YOU

DRINK TEA, YOU

CAN EAT AS MUCH

AS YOU LIKE

CLOCKWISE: Chong tucks

into hum sui gok; zucchini

fl owers; egg tarts

INSET: Sashimi too

pretty to eat

Chef Shigeo remains modest when the Iron

Chef is mentioned. “The master chef’s visit

was unannounced; he simply walked up to me

at the end of the meal and praised my style

and the quality of the food saying he would

return,” says chef Shigeo. “And he did; every

day of his Melbourne stay.”

As our sashimi moriawase (AU$19.80

entrée, AU$42.80 main) arrives at the table,

all eyes are on us. For the past 15 minutes the

other patrons have watched Shigeo cut every

piece of fi sh with surgical precision. “Wow.

Japanese really is the most visually exciting

food,” says Chong.

Sitting on a bed of shaved ice are carefully

arranged pieces of king fi sh, tuna, salmon, king

dori and a single sea urchin with a gold leaf. It’s

really too beautiful to eat, but we must. If raw

fi sh isn’t your thing, there are plenty of rice and

noodle dishes to choose from. Special lunch

and dinner sets are good value; prices start

from AU$24.80.

Ready to be rolled out the door, I look at

the schedule. We have two more places to

visit and the next is my favourite restaurant.

Well, I’m pretty sure it would be my favourite

if I could get a table. The award-winning

Flower Drum’s reservation list is dotted

with local and international celebrities, and

is as famous as its baked mud crab in shell.

I thought this dish was a myth, but it turns

out it actually exists.

We take our fi rst bite with eyes closed and

a collective “Mmm” fi lls the table; a sound

the waiters are used to hearing. “The crab

meat is cooked in turmeric sauce together

with a hint of onion and garlic then baked

in a blue swimmer crab’s shell and topped

EAT BEAT

MELBOURNE CHINATOWN

FEBRUARY 2010 61


EAT BEAT

MELBOURNE CHINATOWN

with a touch of curry cream,” says our

waiter, who adds that a glass of Coldstream

Hills Reserve Chardonnay is the perfect

drop to accompany the crab. For all its

celebrity fans and awards, including being

62 FEBRUARY 2010

Bamboo House’s smoked

duck sirloin presented with

a fl ourish

recognised as one of the world’s

top 50 restaurants by Restaurant

magazine for four consecutive

years, the Flower Drum comes

up trumps — there’s little

pretension here, they’re too busy

dishing up high quality food.

Although the a la carte menu

is pricey, there’s a fi ve-course

lunch banquet (including baked

mud crab) from AU$88.

Our fi nal stop is the legendary

Bamboo House, where Alex

Tseng was the fi rst to include

regional Chinese dishes on the

menu. The secret to his 28year

success? “Keeping our

regular customers happy, dishes

reasonably priced and, of course,

the food,” says Tseng. He joins

our table like a long lost friend

and says we’ll be eating tea

smoked duck sirloin (AU$36 for

half a duck), Chong’s favourite.

I muster up space for some

pieces inside a steam bun. “The

duck is marinated and steamed with ginger,

star anise and ‘secret’ ingredients, left to cool

and then smoked using tea leaves, pine needles

and rice,” explains Tseng. He has also prepared

some steamed zucchini fl owers. There’s an a la

carte menu as well as four banquet options

(AU$48–$70 and all include Peking duck).

With full tummies we bid farewell.

Although Chong’s shirt is still crisp and white,

I’m glad I wore black.

Elizabeth Chong is a chef with more than 34

years’ experience, TV personality and author.

She conducts culinary and heritage tours of

Melbourne’s Chinatown and her 2010 tours

commence in March. Tel: +61 (3) 9819 3666

or (0) 419 889 570.

Jetstar flies to Melbourne from across

Australia, and from Bangkok, Bali and

Christchurch. Book online at Jetstar.com

FIND IT

Hutong Dumpling Bar

14–16 Market Ln,

tel: +61 (3) 9650 8128

Shark Fin House

131 Little Bourke St,

tel: +61 (3) 9663 1555

Shoya

25 Market Ln,

tel: +61 (3) 9650 0848

Flower Drum

17 Market Ln,

tel: +61 (3) 9662 3655

Bamboo House

47 Little Bourke St,

tel: +61 (3) 9662 1565


Reward Yourself

Earn points at more than 4,000

Best Western hotels worldwide

and reward yourself.

Join now for free at

www.bestwesternrewards.com

For more information or to book, visit

bestwestern.com.au or bestwestern.co.nz

or call 131 779 (Aust) or 0800 237 893 (NZ)


Japan

has become one of the

world’s fashion meccas

thanks to the worldwide recognition of

giants such as Comme des Garçons, Issey

Miyake and Kenzo.

It was back in 1982 that Japanese

design fi rst made a real impression on the

fashion world, when some 12 designers

showed their collections in Paris at the

prêt-a-porter shows. Their unique aesthetic

combining monochromatic minimalism with

unusual angles had a huge impact on the

contemporary fashion world.

However, ask anyone who has walked

around the trendy Harajuku, Shibuya,

Daikanyama or Naka-Meguro districts on the

weekend where the most impressive place

64 FEBRUARY 2010

Fashionistas looking to nourish all their senses at once

can head to Tokyo’s outrageous biannual fashion show

WORDS MANAMI OKAZAKI

to see fashion is and they’ll tell you it’s on the

streets, not in the high fashion boutiques.

The average Japanese girl is so incredibly

style-conscious that the streets are like a live

catalogue of creative experiments, from the

sophisticated to the eccentric, representing

everything from androgynous skater-style

street labels to the ultra chic and sexy

glamour look.

Given that the biannual Tokyo fashion week

is closed to the public, and usually restricted

to industry buyers and press, it comes as

welcome news that there’s a show that

incorporates the energy and fl amboyance of

Japanese female youth fashion. Best of all,

it’s open to the public. Tokyo Girls Collection,

held on 6 March at Yokohama Arena, is an

event that features 25 of Tokyo’s most popular

youth-orientated fashion labels and is a

carnival-styled extravaganza that pulls in over

23,000 attendees.

The entertainment includes everything from

singers and local celebrities to over 70 of the

most popular models, actresses and idols.

It’s also unusual in that it gives attendees

the chance to buy the outfi ts being paraded

down the catwalk, by labels such as Double

Standard, Alba Rosa and Cecil McBee, by

tapping away into their phones. The clothing

ordered via mobile internet arrives nicely

packaged on doorsteps the next day.

This event features clothing that currently

adorns the racks of numerous malls and

boutiques, in all their pastel-coloured glory,


THE AVERAGE JAPANESE GIRL IS

SO INCREDIBLY STYLE-CONSCIOUS

THAT THE STREETS ARE LIKE A LIVE

CATALOGUE OF CREATIVE EXPERIMENTS

and even if you have no intention of furiously

making purchases over your mobile phone,

the raucous and choreographed shows are a

true spectacle to watch.

Yukiko, an attendee of the 2009 Autumn/

Winter event — an LCD-backlit extravaganza

featuring drag shows and live make-up demos

— buzzes with excitement.

“Sugoi tanoshikatta! So much fun!” she

glows with a post-shopping adrenaline buzz

— without a single bag in sight. “Japanese girls

have so much energy and creativity, and we

love to buy clothes. It’s the best fashion event

for girls who like funky and fresh fashion!”

“I’m not really interested in haute couturestyle

fashion or business wear, I just want to

see the kind of clothes that I like. And I like the

models — they are the girls I look up to.”

Most of the models on show are the

“cute-type” girls with names such as

Angelababy, Melody and Coco often seen

in magazines and the Japanese media,

refl ecting the national obsession with all

things adorable and kitschy.

The show itself is run by girlswalker.com,

a mobile phone portal fashion site with

seven million users, conceived by an

enterprising start-up called Xavel branding

inc., and it enables shoppers to buy trendy,

affordable clothing from each of its partner

labels. Tapping into the formidable consumer

force of the young, female technologically

savvy shopper, its users are mainly women

aged 20 to 34.

Tokyo Girls Collection glittering fi nale

INSETS: Jill by Jill Stuart modelled

by Angelababy; Lip Service

RETAIL THERAPY

TOKYO GIRLS COLLECTION

FEBRUARY 2010 65

Photos: ©TOKYO GIRLS COLLECTION by girlswalker.com 2009 AUTUMN/WINTER


RETAIL THERAPY

TOKYO TOKYO GIRLS COLLECTION

The concept is not exclusively Japanese.

There are other m-commerce companies

springing up elsewhere, such as Shoptext in

the US which enables text-message shopping.

Condé Nast’s Lucky magazine experimented

with the idea of selling products via text

in its September 2006 issue. Polo Ralph

Lauren, keeping an eye on Japanese

trends, opened a mobile site in August

2008, making it the fi rst luxury retailer to

veer in the m-commerce direction.

Milkfed, a cute and casual women’s

clothing range based in Japan and

founded by fi lm director Sophia Coppola

with best friend Stephanie Hayman and

Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon, is one of the

brands that regularly shows at Tokyo

Girls Collection.

Milkfed representative, Ms Ito,

considers the event successful on

many levels: “I think Tokyo Girls

Collection is a ground-breaking

method of buying clothes, where you

can instantly purchase items that you

see at a fashion show.

“I think initially, it’s people that

live in rural or provincial areas who

utilise Girls Walker. Also, people

come to Girls Walker to look for

things that have sold out in the

stores. Using this event, there can be a

synthesis between the ‘real clothes’ (i.e. casual

and affordable brands) that are representative

of Japan, the image and the products. Because

it widens the image of Milkfed, we were able to

broaden the range of new customers.”

Other brands on show are top casual girls

labels such as the surfer-inspired clothing

label Alba Rosa, Another Edition and Topshop.

Beams, founded by Yo Shitara, is a

high-quality, casual brand with a cult following.

Known for its logos and T-shirt designs, Beams

sets fashion trends internationally, with shops

in New York, Paris and London.

Also showing is Cecil McBee, an ultra-girly

66 FEBRUARY 2010

CLOCKWISE: Kitson; Milkfed

modelled by Juliana; Rope

brand that takes the aesthetic of femininity

to the max. It’s the most popular shop in the

Shibuya 109 department store, and emulates

the latest trends in Tokyo.

Conservatism has no place in the young

Japanese girl’s wardrobe, and the show is a

real representation of what happens on street

level, before the girls inevitably lose their pink

frilled, bedazzled ways.

Besides witnessing a new shopping

phenomenon that has taken Japan by storm,

Tokyo Girls Collection is the best place to

see incredible fashion trends and Japanese

female youth culture in a completely

over-the-top spectacle.

The March Spring/Summer 2010 event is

the 10-year anniversary, and promises to be

the most extravagant, outrageous yet.

Tokyo Girls Collection — Spring/Summer

Yokohama Arena, ¥5,000–7,000 (AU$58–81)

for tickets at http://gw.tv/tgc/

Jetstar flies to Tokyo from Cairns,

the Gold Coast and Sydney, and from

Auckland and Christchurch. Jetstar Light

Fares from AU$329 one-way.

Aren’t you entitled to a little Star

Treatment? Fly StarClass to Tokyo.

Book online at Jetstar.com

Photos: ©TOKYO GIRLS COLLECTION by girlswalker.com 2009 AUTUMN/WINTER


BRAIN TEASERS

SUDOKU

Sudoku.

The objective of Sudoku is to fi ll in the missing

squares so that each row, column and 3x3 box

contains the numbers 1 through to 9. To get

you started, here are a few tactics...

Scan each horizontal and vertical band

consisting of three 3x3 boxes. It’s often

easiest to start in a spot with the most

numbers already given. If you can fi nd the

same number in two rows, you know that

number must be in the third (the same goes

SUDOKU EASY SUDOKU MODERATE

1

5 3

8 7 5

9 5 3 2

5 6 7

8 3 4 5

4 7

6 9 8 2 4

9 3 2 8

68 FEBRUARY 2010

Grab a pencil, put on your thinking

cap and join the craze!

for columns). Now see which intersecting

rows and columns can be eliminated because

they also contain that number. (This method

is called slicing and dicing.)

Some Sudoku fans like to pencil in possible

answers in the corners of individual squares.

Once you have a few numbers fi lled in, you

may also fi nd it handy to jot down a list of

missing numbers for each row, column and

box. Good luck! See page 71 for answers.

6 2

2 5 1

4 8 9 6

9 1 2 4

5 9

6 3 7

2 3 8 1

9 4

5 6 4 8


1. Who plays Nelson Mandela in the new

Clint Eastwood fi lm Invictus?

2. What colours are the fi ve Olympic rings?

3. What is the name of Robbie Williams’

latest album?

4. In Indian cuisine, which vegetable is

referred to as “aloo”?

5. Flying Jetstar, which city would you be

visiting if you fl ew into Suvarnabhumi

International Airport?

6. Which Hollywood starlet helped design

a heavily criticised fashion collection for

Emanuel Ungaro last year?

7. Peter Lalor was the central fi gure

during which signifi cant Australian

historical event?

8. On the geologic time scale which

period comes fi rst, the Cretaceous or

the Jurassic?

9. Which actress, who won an Oscar

for Monster’s Ball, is named after

a now-defunct chain of US

department stores?

10. The new movie The Road, starring Viggo

Mortensen and Guy Pearce, is based on a

book by which American author?

11. In relation to the government’s carbon

legislation, what do the initials ETS

stand for?

12. Which famous sportswear brand

was founded by and named after

Adolf Dassler?

13. In the fi lm The Sound of Music, how

many von Trapp children were there?

14. Which ARIA Award-winning band

comprises Luke Steele and

Nick Littlemore?

15. English soccer star Robbie Fowler was

signed as a marquee player by which

A-League team for the current season?

16. Who wrote the children’s books Possum

Magic and Where Is The Green Sheep?

17. Which healthy food was pioneered

by the Swiss physician Maximilian

Bircher-Benner?

18. What is the more common name for the

Union of Myanmar?

19. Who is the celebrity husband of actress

Tasma Walton?

20. What is the name of the largest living

species of lizard, native to Indonesia?

21. Igor Sikorsky is most famous for

pioneering which form of transport?

22. What is the common name for the

aurora borealis?

23. Flying Jetstar, which city would you be

visiting if you took a stroll along the

banks of the River Torrens?

24. Which super-model is mother to Leni,

Henry, Johan and baby Lou?

25. What is the name of the shaved-scalp

haircut worn by monks?

26. Who plays Edward Cullen in the

Twilight movies?

-question

quiz.

27. Which birds were traditionally used in

coalmines to detect dangerous gases?

BRAIN TEASERS

TRIVIA QUIZ

28. Who wrote the medical works Beyond the

Pleasure Principle and The Ego and the Id?

29. Which part of the human body is

affected by gingivitis?

30. Love apple is another name for which

common food?

31. Which Shakespeare play features the

characters Prospero, Ariel and Caliban?

32. Who provides the voice for Mr Fox in

the new Wes Anderson movie Fantastic

Mr. Fox?

33. What is the collective term for helium,

neon, argon, krypton, xenon and radon?

34. Who is coach of the new Western Sydney

Football Club, due to join the AFL in 2012?

35. Which two alcoholic drinks are

used to form the basis of a

Manhattan cocktail?

36. What is the name of a word that imitates

the sound of the word it describes,

such as “meow”?

37. The musical Cats is based on Old

Possum’s Book of Practical Cats by

which famous US poet?

38. In the Gospel of John, whom does Jesus

miraculously bring back to life four days

after his death?

39. What was a Trabant?

40. This month marks the start of the

Chinese New Year. Which animal presides

over 2010?

FEBRUARY 2010 69


7 4 9 6 5 1 3 8 2

6 3 8 9 7 2 5 1 4

1 5 2 4 8 3 9 7 6

9 8 1 2 6 7 4 5 3

3 7 5 1 4 9 6 2 8

2 6 4 5 3 8 1 9 7

4 2 3 8 9 5 7 6 1

8 9 7 3 1 6 2 4 5

5 1 6 7 2 4 8 3 9

Sudoku Moderate

9 4 5 2 1 3 7 6 8

8 2 7 6 5 9 4 1 3

6 3 1 8 4 7 9 5 2

4 1 9 7 8 5 3 2 6

5 6 3 1 2 4 8 9 7

2 7 8 3 9 6 1 4 5

3 8 2 4 6 1 5 7 9

1 5 6 9 7 8 2 3 4

7 9 4 5 3 2 6 8 1

20. Komodo dragon

21. Helicopters 22. Northern lights

23. Adelaide 24. Heidi Klum

25. Tonsure 26. Robert Pattinson

27. Canaries 28. Sigmund Freud

29. Gums 30. Tomato 31. The

Tempest 32. George Clooney

33. Nobel gases 34. Kevin Sheedy

35. Whiskey and sweet vermouth

36. Onomatopoeia 37. TS Eliot

38. Lazarus 39. East German car

40. Tiger

Sudoku Easy

ARROW CROSSWORD

Preliminary

rounds

Proverbially

industrious

insect

Bestow

__ Stravinsky,

composer

1. Morgan Freeman 2. Blue, yellow,

black, green and red 3. Reality

Killed the Video Star 4. Potato

5. Bangkok 6. Lindsay Lohan

7. Eureka Stockade rebellion

8. Jurassic 9. Halle Berry

10. Cormac McCarthy

11. Emissions Trading Scheme

12. Adidas 13. Seven 14. Empire

of the Sun 15. North Queensland

Fury 16. Mem Fox 17. Muesli

18. Burma 19. Rove McManus

Trivia Answers

K A F G

HEATS L W

R M P O R E

ANT OWEN

AWARD G

I G O R D I P

H SCHEME

TABOO MEG

N N Y L O N S

Arrow Crossword

ANSWERS

Lee __,

country

singer

Duo

Intrigue,

plot

Prohibited Pantyhose

Incendiary

crime

Cash dispenser

(inits)

__ over, read

carefully

__ Wilson,

Marley &

Me star

Flirtatiously

modest

Move

smoothly

Seed case

Plunge

__ Ryan,

You’ve Got

Mail actress

Political

protest

march

__ Stefani,

Hollaback

Girl singer

Course of

treatment

Clothespins

BRAIN TEASERS

CROSSWORD & ANSWERS

FEBRUARY 2010 71


BRAIN TEASERS

AUSTRALIA ZOO

Australia Zoo

turns 40.

We’ve been busy building Steve Irwin’s

dream — so come check out the size of it!

Decorate a birthday card to Australia Zoo

You can send your completed birthday card to us here at the Zoo!

Steve Irwin Way, Beerwah, QLD, Australia, 4519

72 FEBRUARY 2010

CHECK OUT

our cute new binturong!

This brother and sister pair

now call Australia Zoo home

and you can adopt them.

For details, visit

www.australiazoo.com.au

FUN FACTS!

• When Australia Zoo first opened in

1970, it was only four acres — now

it’s over 70 acres!

• There are over 1,000 animals that

live at Australia Zoo, including

animals from Australia, South-East

Asia, Africa and even Madagascar!

• The oldest animal that lives

at Australia Zoo is a freshwater

crocodile named Mr Freshy. He is

134 years old!


market place.

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The Veronica George Gallery represents a large

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In addition to the wide selection of tasteful gifts and

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As well as the magnificent variety of original handblown

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OPEN 7 DAYS

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To advertise your business in market place, please contact the Jetstar Magazine sales team:

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FEBRUARY 2010 73


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74 FEBRUARY 2010


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Unwind in our tropical 14 acre rainforest setting, on the tourist side of Cairns, nestled at the base

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To advertise your business in market place, please contact the Jetstar Magazine sales team:


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FEBRUARY 2010 75


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IN THE AIR

WITH

77 Jetstar news

78 StarKids

81


88 where we fl y

90 your wellbeing onboard

92 international adventures

98 domestic airports

103 domestic destinations focus

105 gift ideas

106 have a bite

110 entertainment

ALL ABOARD FOR GOOD TIMES AND

THE LOWEST FARES TO FIJI!

At

Jetstar, we’re excited to take off to the South Pacifi c holiday

destination of Fiji from 29 March 2010* with new four-times

weekly A320 services between Sydney and Nadi,* with connecting

fl ights from other cities.

To help you out with low fares and good times for your next holiday,

Jetstar will commence our inaugural fl ights to the South Pacifi c timed

to coincide with the peak Easter holiday period.

Jetstar Holidays is also offering a range of special sale packages

to Fiji up to 20% less than existing competitor offerings, combining

Jetstar’s low fares with accommodation to suit any budget.

* subject to regulatory approval

All Jetstar fares and Jetstar Holidays packages to Fiji are covered

by the Jetstar Price Beat Guarantee, whereby Jetstar will beat any

competitor by 10%.

Jetstar’s everyday fares between Sydney–Nadi* are now available

from AU$229 (JetSaver Light) on Jetstar.com. That’s well below

competitors on the same route offering lead-in fares of at least

AU$289 one-way.

So what are you waiting for? Book now at Jetstar.com!

FEBRUARY 2010 77

Photos: www.fi jime.com


starkids

Generous Christopher

donated his birthday

money to StarKids

78 FEBRUARY 2010

A young Aussie’s generosity

helps vulnerable kids

in Thailand

WORDS WORLD VISION

Christopher,

an 11-year-old from Brisbane, had been

saving his birthday money in the hope that

he would “see something special”.

Onboard a Jetstar fl ight with his

grandparents and younger siblings, Jordan

and Rebecca, Christopher read a story

about StarKids in Jetstar Magazine. He

then asked Geraldine, his grandmother,

if it would be all right to give his birthday

money to the children who “needed it

more” than him.

Christopher told his grandmother it

was something he really wanted to do,

especially when he realised how much

difference just one Australian dollar

can make in some countries in Asia.

Geraldine has always encouraged

Christopher, Jordan and Rebecca to

care for people less fortunate than

themselves, so she was extremely

Children of all ages can begin

to recover from trauma and

rebuild their lives at a World

Vision education centre

proud of Christopher for donating his

birthday money to such a worthy cause.

The Jetstar crew on the fl ight were also

inspired by Christopher’s generous act. They

invited Christopher and his grandfather, a

retired airline pilot, to visit the cockpit, as a

small way of showing their appreciation and

admiration for Christopher’s selfl ess act.

Christopher said he was surprised people

thought so much of his gesture. He said he

thought all kids would offer up their pocket

money or birthday money if they knew what a

difference it might make. But he also thought

going to see the pilots in the cockpit was

“really cool”.

Since the fl ight, Jetstar’s CEO Bruce

Buchanan has written Christopher a letter,

and included a certifi cate of appreciation

and a Captain Jetstar teddy, to say “thank

you” for Christopher’s support of StarKids.

Christopher is looking forward to fi nding out

how his birthday money donation has helped


JETSTAR STAFF CATCH THE

STARKIDS FUNDRAISING BUG!

Late last year, Jetstar staff from the Melbourne

and Avalon offi ces took part in the 2009 Great

Australian Run around Albert Park, raising over

AU$1,700 for the StarKids program. Th e Sunday

event, opened by Olympic gold medallist and

middle-distance champion Cathy Freeman,

saw more than 3,000 people brave the soggy

Melbourne weather, chasing their best times for

the 15km run. Head offi ce staff in Melbourne

Jetstar staff gearing up for the Great

Australian Run INSET: Almost there...

children supported by StarKids on projects

like the Assistance Support and Protection

(ASAP) project in Thailand. ASAP works

to provide a range of support services and

education programs to vulnerable women

and children, to help keep them from falling

prey to human traffi ckers in this part of Asia.

Jetstar staff are supportive and genuinely

passionate about the StarKids projects in the

region, and in Australia. They’re doing their

bit to ensure this partnership with World

Vision is having a positive impact on the lives

of vulnerable children in the areas where

Jetstar works.

Recently, staff have been hard at work,

fundraising for StarKids and helping to raise

its profi le.

StarKids is a partnership between Jetstar and

World Vision raising money for projects in

Australia and South-East Asia that positively

impact children and families living in poverty.

also held a fundraiser barbecue recently,

donating the proceeds raised from lunchtime

sausages and drinks to StarKids.

Jetstar staff are genuinely passionate about

the impact being made through StarKids, and

hope that this is one bug their passengers also

catch! Passengers are always welcome to donate

to StarKids via the envelope in your seat pocket

which can then be passed to cabin crew.

YOU CAN HELP

Vulnerable children need our help.

The StarKids partnership between

Jetstar and World Vision was

formed to help children enjoy a

brighter future.

You can support StarKids by

donating loose change in the

donation envelope located in your

seat pocket.

Let your small change

create change!

ABOUT STARKIDS

Tim Costello, CEO World Vision

How did StarKids come about?

StarKids is a humanitarian partnership

between World Vision Australia and Jetstar.

Th e partnership supports community-based

development projects in Australia and across

Asia and aims to improve the lives of families

living in poverty. It’s about giving children a

brighter future.

What does StarKids aim to achieve?

StarKids aims to raise AU$3 million

in three years. Th e support given to

World Vision through StarKids will

go towards transforming the lives of

vulnerable children.

How can Jetstar passengers help?

Your donations would be most welcome!

Please place your small change (all currencies)

in the StarKids envelope located in your seat

pocket. Th e money collected from Jetstar

passengers will be given to World Vision

Australia for community development

projects in Australia and Asia. You can also

donate online at www.jetstar.com/starkids

Where can I get more information about

World Vision projects?

Visit www.worldvision.com.au

or www.jetstar.com/starkids for

more information.

FEBRUARY 2010 79


FEBRUARY 2010 81


84 FEBRUARY 2010


100ml

FEBRUARY 2010 85


Photo: Tourism New South Wales/Pierre Toussaint

A

86 FEBRUARY 2010

Photo: Tourism Queensland


Photo: Tourism Queensland

Photo: Tourism Queensland

FEBRUARY 2010 87


88 FEBRUARY 2010

MYANMAR


Jakarta

Shantou

Hong Kong

Macau

Haikou

Taipei


Yangon


Bangkok

Manila

Siem Reap


Phnom Penh

Ho Chi Minh City

Phuket

Kota Kinabalu

Penang



Medan Kuala Lumpur

Kuching










JAVA Surabaya

Bali (Denpasar)

Perth

Darwin

Osaka



Tokyo

Melbourne

(Tullamarine)

Cairns

Brisbane

Gold Coast

Sydney

Auckland


Christchurch


Fiji

Honolulu

Perth

WESTERN

AUSTRALIA

Darwin

NORTHERN

TERRITORY

SOUTH

AUSTRALIA

Adelaide

Melbourne

(Avalon)


Cairns

Whitsunday Coast

(Proserpine)

QUEENSLAND

Melbourne

(Tullamarine)

Townsville

NEW SOUTH WALES

VICTORIA

TASMANIA

Launceston

Hobart

Queenstown

Auckland

Wellington

Christchurch

Hamilton Island

Mackay

Rockhampton

Newcastle

Sydney

Sunshine Coast

Brisbane

Gold Coast

Ballina Byron

FEBRUARY 2010 89


your wellbeing onboard

SAFETY, SECURITY & COMFORT

Jetstar is a wholly owned subsidiary of Qantas Airways Limited and places the

same emphasis on achieving standards of excellence in safety and security.

QANTAS GROUP SECURITY

The risk-management challenges facing

today’s airline industry remain complex. We

are continually addressing assessed security

threats and risks to minimise vulnerability. The

application of risk-management principles,

innovation and a commitment to excellence

all contribute to creating an effective security

environment. A dedicated Qantas Group

Security Operations Centre monitors global

security 24 hours a day.

Many of our security measures are not

apparent to the public. However, during

check-in and boarding you may have noticed

security measures such as:

• Random explosive trace detection of

passengers and their carry-on luggage.

• Laptops and aerosols being subjected to

enhanced inspection at screening points.

• Increased vigilance at passenger screening

points and increased guarding of our

aircraft and terminals.

Further measures apply to flights to the

United States:

• Additional carry-on baggage searches just

prior to boarding.

• Random baggage searches at check-in

and boarding.

• Passengers selected at random for patdown

inspections, including the removal and

checking of shoes.

CARRY-ON BAGGAGE

Rules are needed to protect you from the

threat of liquid explosives. Liquids, aerosols

or gels in your carry-on baggage must be 100

millilitres/grams or less and must be sealed

in a transparent independently resealable,

one-litre plastic bag. You are only allowed

one plastic bag. You may still carry on board

prescription medicines. Baby products and

non-prescription medicines that you need for

the flight are also allowed. Proof of need may

be required. Please Note: These restrictions do

not apply to checked-in baggage.

SAFETY FIRST

Seatbelts must be fastened during take-off,

landing and when you are seated in case your

aircraft encounters turbulence. Luggage

must be stored in the overhead locker or

under the seat in front of you. The back of

your seat must be upright and the tray table

fastened when the aircraft is taking off and

landing. Please remain seated after landing

until you are invited to leave the aircraft.

Sleeping on the aircraft floor is not permitted.

Please read the safety instruction card in

your seat pocket, noting emergency exits

and location of life jackets. Please watch

90 FEBRUARY 2010

the safety demonstration prior to take-off.

In an emergency, the crew will give specific

instructions. They may speak assertively and

will require your cooperation.

SMOKING

Government regulations prohibit smoking on

all flights operated by Australian-registered

aircraft. There are smoke detectors in all

toilets and penalties for regulation breaches.

THE IMPORTANCE OF BLOOD

CIRCULATION AND MUSCLE

RELAXATION DURING FLIGHTS

If you have concerns about your health and

flying, Jetstar recommends you seek

medical advice before flying. When you’re

sitting upright and are inactive for a long

period, several things can happen:

• The central blood vessels in your legs can

be compressed, making it harder for the

blood to get back to your heart.

• Muscles can become tense, resulting

in backaches and a feeling of excessive

fatigue during and even after the flight.

• The normal body mechanism for returning

fluid to the heart can be inhibited and

gravity can cause fluid to collect in your feet,

resulting in swollen feet after a long flight.

• Some studies have concluded that

prolonged immobility may be a risk factor

in the formation of blood clots in the legs

– Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT). Particular

medical conditions may increase the risk

of formation of blood clots if associated

with prolonged immobility. Medical

research indicates that factors which may

give you an increased risk of DVT include:

• Personal or family history of DVT

• Recent surgery or injury, especially to the

lower limbs or abdomen

• Blood disorders leading to increased

clotting tendency

• If you are older than 40

• Oestrogen hormone therapy, including

oral contraceptives

• Pregnancy

• Tobacco smoking

• Former or current malignant disease

• Obesity

• Dehydration

• Heart problems

• Varicose veins

Compression stockings can assist in

preventing swelling of the ankles and feet

and they may improve the blood return

to the body from the lower legs. These

stockings can be purchased from medical

and surgical supply companies and

need to be individually fitted to your leg

measurements. During your flight, move

your legs and feet three or four minutes per

hour while seated and move about the cabin

occasionally.

CABIN PRESSURE

If you are suffering nasal congestion, an ear

infection or allergies, Jetstar recommends

seeking medical advice before flying.

A cold, flu or hay fever can impair your

sinuses. Swollen membranes in your nose

could block the Eustachian tubes between

your nasal passages and your middle ear

chamber. This can cause discomfort during

changes in cabin pressure, particularly

during the aircraft’s descent.

• To “clear” your ears, try swallowing and/or

yawning. This helps open your Eustachian

tubes, equalising the pressure between

your middle ear chamber and your throat.

• When you are flying with an infant, give

them a dummy or feed them during the

aircraft’s descent. Sucking and swallowing

will help the infant equalise the pressure in

their ears.

CABIN HUMIDITY / DEHYDRATION

Humidity levels of less than 25% are

common in the aircraft cabin. This is due

to the low humidity levels of the outside

air supplied to the cabin. Low humidity can

cause drying of the nose, throat and eyes

and it can irritate wearers of contact lenses.

We recommend that you:

• Drink water frequently during flight.

• Drink coffee, tea and alcohol only in

moderation – these drinks act as diuretics,

increasing dehydration.

• Remove contact lenses and wear glasses if

your eyes are irritated.

• Use a skin moisturiser to refresh the skin.

MOTION SICKNESS

This ailment is caused by a conflict between

the body’s senses of vision and equilibrium.

Air turbulence increases its likelihood

because it can cause movement of fluid in

the vestibular apparatus of the inner ear.

If you have good visual cues (keeping your

eyes fixed on a non-moving object), motion

sickness is less likely to occur.

JETSTAR SECURITY POLICY

Jetstar has a strict policy on denying

boarding to any passengers who are

inappropriate in flight or on ground in

comments or behaviour. Jetstar does not

accept any inappropriate comments as

“jokes”. All matters are referred to relevant

authorities for prosecution. Jetstar will seek

to recover all costs incurred as a result of

inflight incidents from those involved.

MORE INFORMATION ON IN-FLIGHT

HEALTH ISSUES CAN BE FOUND AT:

www.qantas.com.au/info/flying/InTheAir/

yourHealthInflight


find your spirit of pleasure

Tourism Authority of Thailand – Sydney

Suite 2002, Level 20, 56 Pitt Street, Sydney, NSW 2000, Australia

T: (61 2) 9247 7549 | F: (61 2) 9251 2465

info@thailand.net.au | www.thailand.net.au

TAKE A FLYING LEAP!

CAIRNS

• 50m Bungy

• 16 Different

Jump Styles

• Giant Swing

• Gravity Bar

BALI

• 45m Bungy

• Home of the

World’s best

sunset &

motorbike

jump

MACAU

• 233m Bungy

• The World’s

highest bungy

• Sky Jump

• Sky Walk

• Mast Climb

at the Worlds Highest Bungy Jump 233m/764ft

Normandie Germany

Bali

Macau

Cairns

Auckland

Queenstown

CHECK OUT OUR AMAZING ASIA/PACIFIC BUNGY &

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JUMP ONLINE: AJHACKETT.COM


international adventures

INTRODUCING OUR DESTINATIONS

Let us give you a head-start

Kecak dance

(fi re dance), Bali

BALI & JAKARTA

INDONESIA

For one of Asia’s best holiday

islands, you can’t go past

Indonesia’s Bali. It’s got sun,

sea, and mountains, plus a rich

traditional culture. Indonesia’s

capital Jakarta is the 11th

biggest city in the world with a

bustle to match.






FROM THE AIRPORT

Bali CBD 15km from Denpasar’s

Ngurah Rai Airport

Travel time Kuta Beach is around

10 mins by car

Taxi Approx IDR30,000 (AU$3.50)

Shuttle Bus Most hotels offer

complimentary pick-up

FROM THE AIRPORT

Jakarta CBD 20km

from Soekarno–Hatta

International Airport

Travel time Around 30 mins by car

Taxi Approx IDR120,000 (AU$14)

DAMRI Bus IDR15,000 (AU$1.80)

to any city bus station

ON THE GO

1. Bali and Jakarta Taxis

Get your hotel to order one for you

and for the return trip too.

92 FEBRUARY 2010

TRACY KIDD

Event specialist,

Bali Bliss Weddings

BALI

Great place for dinner: Head

to Arena Pub in Sanur. It’s

where all the expats and locals

eat when they want fantastic

fare at a reasonable rate. Bring

your appetite!

Best place to party with the

gang: Try something different

at the newly opened Blue

Eyes nightspot to experience

both local and international

bands and DJs. Lots of fun and

dancing are guaranteed.

Must-buy gift: Good ol’ thongs

and sarongs. Don’t roll your

eyes, you know everybody loves

them really.

Survival tip for tourists:

Hire a personal driver for your

holiday, it’s the best way to

travel and helps support a

local person.

Must-eat: Go local and enjoy

a dish of delicious nasi goreng

(fried rice) with a cold Bintang

beer to wash it down.

Best idea for a family outing:

A fun day on Nusa Lembongan

Island — there are lots of great

activities ranging from water

sports and local village tours to

just chilling out by the pool.

Most romantic spot: Villas

Sungai and Sungai Gold are the

perfect sanctuary for wedding

couples, honeymooners and

small families seeking luxury

accommodation, privacy,

on-call service and a high

standard of cuisine. They’re

a welcome retreat.

BANGKOK &

PHUKET

THAILAND

Thailand is a fascinating

country with beautiful

landscapes and spectacular

monuments. Bangkok bustles

with energy while Phuket is a

beach-lover’s paradise.













FROM THE AIRPORT

Bangkok CBD 30km from

Suvarnabhumi International Airport

Travel time Bangkok CBD is around

40 mins by car

Taxi Approx THB300 (AU$10)

Airport Express THB150 (AU$5)

and taking around 60 mins

FROM THE AIRPORT

Patong Beach 32km from Phuket

International Airport

Travel time Patong Beach is

around 45 mins by car

Taxi Approx THB400 (AU$13.30)

Shuttle Bus Every 30 mins at

THB52 (AU$1.80); takes 60mins

ON THE GO

1. BTS Skytrains Will get you to all

the major points in Bangkok.

2. Tuk Tuk For short distances only.

Tuk-tuk public transport

JULIAN MOSS

CEO of ASM Liquor

BANGKOK

Great place for dinner:

Experience dinner in the sky

at Vertigo (Banyon Tree) or

Sirocco (State Tower Hotel).

The rooftop views, atmosphere

and food are all outstanding.

Best place to party with the

gang: Go to Nana Plaza, check

out Carousel or Anglewiteh

followed by the Long Gun in Soi

Cowboy. These venues have

fantastic atmosphere and are

lots of fun for the whole gang.

Must buy (money no object!):

Visit the River City shopping

complex. This is the largest art

and antique centre in South-

East Asia and is full of original

and authentic art works.

Insider’s tip: Be aware of taxi

scams. When you arrive at the

international airport, go up to

level two for a taxi that will cost

around THB300 into the city.

Unusual fact: Bangkok is in

the Guinness Book of World

Records as the longest place

name in the world (163 letters).

The offi cial name for Bangkok

is: Krungthepmahanakornamo

rnratanakosinmahintarayuttha

yamahadilokphop nopparatraj

athaniburiromudomrajaniwes

mahasatharn amornphimarna

vatarnsathitsakkattiyavisanuk

amprasit.

Must-eats: Chicken feet soup,

khao pad (Thai fried rice) and

pad thai (rice noodles pan-fried

with fi sh sauce, peanuts, egg

and chicken or seafood).


Open everyday 9:00am – 9:00pm

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS

INTERNATIONAL DENTAL COSMETIC CENTER

WORLD CLASS DENTAL CARE

All kinds of Dental Treatment

Laser Tooth Whitening Dental Implant

Crown, Bridges and Veneers in 24 Hrs.

Fluent English, Japanese, Indian, Arabic,

Thai Speaking Doctors

Free Limo Pick up Service

LASER WHITENING

7,200 Baht (US$230)

14,000 Baht (US$450) for couple

Sukhumvit Soi 71, Soi Preedeepanomyong 14

Phrakhanong, Bangkok 10110 (BTS Phrakhanong-E8)

Tel: 0-2314-6238, 0-2714-6441

Mobile: 08-1648-5780

Email: oberoibkk@yahoo.com

www.drsunildental.com


international adventures

CHRISTCHURCH

& AUCKLAND

NEW ZEALAND

Christchurch is billed as New

Zealand’s “most English” city,

with fabulous gardens while

harbourside Auckland is the

most cosmopolitan with the

largest Polynesian population.











94 FEBRUARY 2010

Great Barrier I.





FROM THE AIRPORT

Christchurch CBD 11km from

Christchurch International Airport

Travel time CBD is around

20 mins by car

Taxi Approx NZ$32 (AU$25.60)

Shuttle bus NZ$12 (AU$9.60),

taking 20–30 mins

FROM THE AIRPORT

Auckland CBD 20km from

Auckland International Airport

Travel time CBD is around

45 mins by car

Taxi From NZ$60 (AU$48)

Shuttle bus NZ$30 (AU$24),

taking 45–60 mins

ON THE GO

1. The Shuttle Free seven-day

central Christchurch bus.

2. Jafa Cabs A bicycle with bench

seats for two; free in the Auckland

central business district.

Cathedral Square,

Christchurch

RICKI HUDSON

Marketing,

Backpacker

Campervans & Cars

CHRISTCHURCH

Best breakfast: For great eggs

Benedict, yummy bagels and

the best cup of coffee in town,

check out C4 on High Street.

Best night out: The Dux de

Lux, between Hereford and

Worcester Streets, is a great

place to meet people, chill out

in the garden bar with a locally

brewed award-winning beer and

have a boogie with live music.

Unusual fact: Hagley Park

in the central city is the fourth

largest central city park in

the world.

Local delicacy: The Fudge

Cottage in the Arts Centre

makes the best homemade

fudge in the country. Have a

free taster, you’ll see the girls

walking around town with trays

in colonial attire.

Most romantic spot:

Anywhere along the Summit

Road on the city’s Port Hills.

During the day you’ll see

the Canterbury Plains, the

Southern Alps, the Kaikoura

Ranges, the Pacifi c Ocean, the

city and Lyttelton Harbour,

depending where you stop.

At night, the city lights are

amazing and seem to mirror

the stars.

I love Christchurch

because: It’s one of the few

metropolitan cities that you

can go for a surf or a swim with

the dolphins in the morning,

ski in the afternoon, stop at

hot springs and a world class

winery on the way back, and

then have a fantastic night out

at the end of the day.

HO CHI

MINH CITY

VIETNAM

The largest city in Vietnam,

this is the country’s

economic capital and cultural

trendsetter with a population

of high-energy people who

effortlessly meld tradition with

the contemporary.















FROM THE AIRPORT

CBD 7km from Tan Son Nhat

International Airport

Travel time CBD is around

20mins by car

Taxi A taxi voucher from Visitor

Information for US$12 (AU$13.10)

Shuttle Bus Most hotels offer

complimentary pick-up

ON THE GO

1. Taxi Ask the drivers to turn

the meters on; there are

taxi-motorbikes as well.

2. Walking The best way to dash

up alleys and down one-way streets

but we only recommend this for

District One.

3. Cyclos A one-person seat

powered by a cyclist; you’ll be

nose-level with the exhaust fumes

and action.

The General Post Offi ce was built

by the French in the 1880s

NADINE VRINS

Senior project

manager, Altus

Page Kirkland

Great places for dinner: The

Temple Club, located on the

second fl oor of a colonial villa

in the city centre, serves nice

Vietnamese food. For a more

local experience, go to the

rooftop of the same building

to fi nd the 3T barbecue

restaurant. It has a large menu

of meat, fi sh and vegetarian

dishes ready for you to prepare

at your table.

Best night out: La Habana

club. This Cuban-Spanish

bar/lounge in District 1 is

well known for its Cuban

cocktails and Friday night live

entertainment from Juram and

his band. Afterwards, go around

the corner to the famous

nightclub Apocalypse Now.

Favourite local festival: Tet,

the Lunar New Year, is the

most important festival for

Vietnamese people. Festivities

may continue for a week or

more with every effort made to

indulge in eating, drinking and

enjoyable social activities.

Survival tip for tourists: If you

want to cross the road, just start

walking and ignore all traffi c

around you. Don’t hesitate or

you’ll be there all day!

For history: The Cu Chi tunnels

are one of the most famous

battlegrounds in Vietnam; they

hid fi ghters and villagers.

VISA REQUIREMENTS

Passengers are advised to make

themselves familiar with the relevant

visa requirements for international

travel and that visa requirements

may differ between countries.


The Blue Pearl - Uniquely New Zealand

Blue Pearl Gallery

746 Colombo Street

Christchurch

Ph: +64 (3) 366 4567

pearls@nzbluepearls.co.nz

www.nzbluepearls.co.nz

A U C K L A N D

EXPLORER BUS

See the BIG 14 attractions!

HOP ON, HOP OFF sightseeing all-day bus pass!

Auckland Museum

SKYCITY

Mission Bay Victoria Park Market

Auckland Zoo, Kelly Tarlton’s Antarctic

Encounter & Underwater World...

plus many more!

Parnell Village

CENTRAL CITY DEPARTURE TIMES EVERY 30MINS!

Ferry Building Civic Theatre Sky Tower:

9am – 4pm 9.40am – 4.40pm 9.45am – 4.45pm

FULL TIMETABLE IN YOUR LANGUAGE AVAILABLE FROM DRIVER

$35 $80

FAMILY PASS

ALL DAY BUS PASS $15

$55 $20

CHILD

2 DAY 1 HOUR

PASS TICKET $24 GROUPS OF

10+

FREEPHONE FOR PICK UP

0800 439 756

Email info@explorerbus.co.nz

Web www.explorerbus.co.nz

COMPLIMENTARY CITY, SOUTH AUCKLAND & AIRPORT MOTELS/HOTELS (Phone BY 8.30am)

See Auckland’s beautiful harbour with full commentary


international adventures

HONOLULU

HAWAII

Honolulu, on the island of

Oahu, is one of the world’s

most exotic capital cities.

Encapsulating a modern

vitality with the delightful

charm of old Hawaiiana, it

reverberates with Aloha, the

spirit of welcome.







FROM THE AIRPORT

CBD 14km from Honolulu

International Airport

Travel time CBD is around

15 mins by car

Taxi Approx US$40 (AU$43.70)

VIP Stretch Limo From US$70

(AU$76.40) for two people

Airport shuttle US$9 (AU$9.80)

and taking around 20 mins

Bus Every 30 mins at US$2

(AU$2.20) for bus number 19 and

taking around 1hr 10 mins

ON THE GO

1. Buses Hotel shuttle buses, public

buses and quaint open-air trolley

buses — Oahu has an excellent

bus network. For a fl at fee of US$2

(AU$2.20) you can travel any

distance, including bus changes, to

all attractions.

96 FEBRUARY 2010



Statue of Duke Kuhanamoku,

founder of surfi ng

ETHAN CHANG

Events & activities

manager, Outrigger

Waikiki on the Beach

Best breakfast: Boots and

Kimo’s in Kailua has great

pancakes with macadamia

nut and haupia (coconut)

sauce. Don’t forget the

Hawaiian-style pulehu ribs.

Great place for dinner: Duke’s

restaurant at the Outrigger

Waikiki is right on the beach and

has the best views in Waikiki. It

offers great food, reasonable

prices and an all-you-can-eat

salad bar. The signature hula pie

dessert is a must.

Best place to party with the

gang: Mai Tai bar at the Ala

Moana shopping center on a

Friday night. There are happy

hour prices all night, plus great

music and no cover charge in a

safe and friendly atmosphere.

Insider’s tip: If you’re

travelling with three or more,

consider catching a limo from

Honolulu International Airport

and arrive at your hotel in

Waikiki in comfort and style.

The limos waiting outside with

taxi signs on their roofs charge

the same as regular taxis

(about US$40 per trip to and

from the airport) and can seat

about seven, while shuttles

stop by every hotel until you

reach your destination and

charge per person.

Unusual fact: Traditional

Hawaiian leis were made by

weaving leaves together, not

fl owers. Flower leis were fi rst

made by visiting cattle men who

found beautiful fl owers growing

in the mountains and then

strung them together to impress

their wives and girlfriends.

OSAKA & TOKYO

JAPAN

Osaka is home to modern

architectural wonders and a

prolifi c creative scene.

Tokyo is Japan’s largest city

and capital with many intimate

and fascinating suburbs.










FROM THE AIRPORT

Osaka CBD 38km from Kansai

International Airport

Travel time 50 mins by car

Taxi Approx ¥17,000 (AU$200)

Limousine bus Every 45 mins at

¥880 (AU$10.30), takes 50 mins

Nankai Express Train Every

30 mins from ¥1,390 (AU$16.30),

takes 30 mins

FROM THE AIRPORT

Tokyo CBD 66km from Narita Airport

Travel time 60–90 min by car

Taxi Approx ¥20,000 (AU$234.40)

Limousine Bus ¥3,000 (AU$35.20),

takes 60–90 mins

JR Narita Express Every 30–60 mins

at ¥3,000 (AU$35.20), takes 60 mins

ON THE GO

1. The subway Easy to use,

effi cient and takes you everywhere

you want to go.

2. Bicycle Many Kansai hotels offer

bicycle hire due to the easy terrain.

Annual Danjiri

festival in Osaka

CHRIS ROWTHORN

Lonely Planet Japan

author and travel

consultant

OSAKA

Best night out: The Dotombori

area of Osaka’s Minami

district has one of the world’s

thickest concentrations of

bars, clubs and restaurants on

the planet. You won’t believe

the characters you see in the

nightly human parade through

the narrow streets of the area.

Survival tip for tourists: On

Fridays and the 20th of every

month, you can get unlimited

rides on city subways and

buses for only ¥600 (AU$7.50).

This is part of the city’s

“No-My-Car-Day” campaign

to encourage people to use

public transport.

Unusual fact: Osaka Aquarium

has the world’s best collection

of sharks in its main tank. There

are two whale sharks, leopard

sharks and even a tiger shark.

Must eats: You can’t

visit Osaka without trying

okonomiyaki (savoury

pancakes) and tako-yaki

(octopus dumplings). The best

place to try these delights is in

the Dotombori area.

Best place to hang out

with the locals: Head to the

Amerika Mura area of Minami

to check out what the kids of

Osaka are up to. You can join

the fray in the famed Triangle

Park — it’s the eye of Osaka’s

fashion hurricane.

Favourite local festival: Head

to the Tenjin Matsuri festival on

25 July to see festival barges

on the river and mobs of rowdy

Osakans carrying portable

shrines and fi reworks.


Kayaking in Kallang Basin

SINGAPORE

An island nation with a multicultural

society, Singapore is

a sophisticated microcosm of

Asia. This garden city buzzes 24

hours a day with dining, nightlife

and shopping options.




FROM THE AIRPORT

CBD 20km

Travel time 20–30 mins by car

Taxi Approx S$20 (AU$15.60)

with a surcharge of S$3–$5

(AU$2.40–$3.90)

Airport Shuttle Services Most

hotels S$9 (AU$7) one way

MRT train Every 10–15 mins from

Terminal 2 and 3 from 5.30am–

11.18pm, takes 27 mins to reach the

city for S$1.70 (AU$1.30)

ON THE GO

1. The Hippo An open-top

double-decker bus that allows you

to hop on and off whenever you like.

S$23 (AU$18) for a

one-day pass.

2. MRT Air-conditioned

subway throughout the island.

3. Trishaw A three-wheeled bicycle

with carriage from the old days.

A 45-min ride is S$25–45

(AU$19.50–$35.10).

4. Buses A user-friendly network

with route maps at every bus-stop.

98 FEBRUARY 2010





JASON DELL

Group executive chef,

The Society Group

Best breakfast: I enjoy Sunday

brunch at The Fullerton Hotel.

The selection is impressive,

the freshness of the food

is magic and the service is

faultless. Highly recommended!

Great place for dinner: The

Cliff restaurant at Sentosa

Resort is a true highlight,

offering meals that are to die for.

Best buy for under AU$50:

A famous Singapore Sling

cocktail from the Long Bar at

Raffl es Hotel to savour colonial

history from a bygone era. It’s

a magical setting and you can

enjoy crushing the shells of the

peanuts beneath your feet on

the wooden fl oor.

Survival tip for tourists:

Sand fl y repellant, water, a hat,

sunglasses and an umbrella will

all come in handy.

Must-eat: Fresh fruit from the

local hawker stalls.

Local delicacy: Chilli crab,

especially from the original

seafood restaurant on East

Coast Road. I crave those little

fried buns they serve with it to

soak up the delicious juices.

I love Singapore because: It’s

always warm, there’s plenty of

sunshine, the streets are clean,

there are lots of green parks

and the choice for eating out is

just fantastic.

VISA REQUIREMENTS

Passengers are advised to make

themselves familiar with the relevant

visa requirements for international

travel and that visa requirements

may differ between countries.

INTRODUCING OUR

AIRPORTS

Let us give you a head-start

ADELAIDE

CBD 6km

Travel time CBD is around

15 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$18

Skylink Bus Every 30 mins–1hr:

AU$8.50 adult, AU$3.50 child,

and taking around 35 mins

Airport parking AU$4–$90

(30 mins–72 hrs)

AVALON

Geelong CBD 20km

Melbourne CBD 55km

Travel time 15 mins (Geelong);

40 mins (Melbourne) by car

Taxi Approx AU$45 Geelong;

approx AU$80 Melbourne

Avalon Airport Shuttle Meets all

fl ights. From AU$17 adult, AU$14

child (Geelong); AU$20 adult,

AU$10 child (Melbourne).

Airport parking Short-term from

AU$3; long-term from AU$20,

additional days from AU$5

BALLINA-BYRON

CBD Byron Bay is 23km, Ballina

is 5km

Travel time Byron Bay is

20 mins by car. Ballina is

7 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$10–$15

to Ballina, approx AU$65 to

Byron Bay

Saddle up for a spin around

South Bank, Brisbane

upon your arrival

Airlink Bus Meets most fl ights:

AU$20 adult (AU$35 return),

AU$12 children under 13

years (one-way), and taking

around 35 mins

Airport parking AU$2-AU$12

(1 hr–24 hrs)

BRISBANE

CBD 16km

Travel time CBD is around

25 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$33

Bus Every 15–30 mins: AU$14

adult, AU$8 child, under 4 years

free and taking about 30 mins

AirTrain Every 20 mins to CBD:

one-way AU$14.50 adult, return

AU$27 and taking around 22 mins

Airport parking AU$5–AU$30

(30 mins–24 hrs)

CAIRNS

CBD 8km

Travel time CBD is 10 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$15

Australia Coach Shuttle Every

hour: AU$10 adult, AU$15 couple,

AU$5 child and taking around

20 mins

Airport parking AU$3–16

(2–24 hrs)

Photo: Tourism Queensland/Barry Goodwin


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Enormous swimming pools – Lushly landscaped tropical water

gardens – Staff that continues to be the epitome of kindness

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upon your arrival

DARWIN

CBD 13km

Travel time CBD is 15 mins

by car

Taxi Approx AU$22

Darwin Airport Shuttle

Meets all fl ights: AU$10 (adult)

and taking around 20 mins

Airport parking AU$3–12

(up to 24 hrs); AU$10 (weekly)

GOLD COAST

Surfers Paradise 20km

Travel time Surfers Paradise is

around 30 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$40

Con-X-ion Shuttle bus Booking

required +61 (7) 5556 9888:

AU$22 adult, AU$13 child (4–13

years), children under 4 years

travel free, and taking around

45 mins

Airport parking AU$3–AU$36

(30 mins–24 hrs)

Airport Lounge Check in for free

movies, newspapers, snacks and

drinks when you book and pay

online at jetstar.com

HAMILTON ISLAND

Travel time from airport to

accommodation is a few minutes

Shuttle bus Complimentary for

hotel guests

HOBART

CBD 17km

Travel time CBD is around

20 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$36–$42

Airporter shuttle bus Meets all

fl ights: AU$12 adult, AU$5.30

child aged 4–15 years, children

under 4 years free, and taking

around 30 mins

Airport parking AU$2–$13

(24 hrs)

LAUNCESTON

CBD 16km

Travel time CBD is around

10 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$30

100 FEBRUARY 2010

Airporter Shuttle bus Meets all

fl ights: AU$14 adult, AU$5 child,

children under 4 years free, and

taking around 15 mins

Airport parking AU$2–$15

(25 mins–24 hrs)

MACKAY

CBD 6km

Travel time CBD 15 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$18

To Airlie Beach Take a taxi to

the bus terminal in Wellington

Street and then a bus service by

Greyhound or Premier; approx

AU$22 one way adult

Airport parking AU$2–$20

(24 hrs)

MELBOURNE

CBD 23km

Travel time 35 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$55

SkyBus Every 10 mins: AU$16

adult, AU$6 child (4–14 years ),

takes 20 mins

Airport parking Short-term

from AU$3; long-term

from AU$29

NEWCASTLE

CBD 20km

Travel time CBD is around

25 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$60

Shuttle Bus Door-to-door

service (from AU$35) through

Newcastle Information Services

at +61 (2) 4928 9822. Port

Stephens Coaches (public bus)

every hour: AU$6.50 adult,

AU$3.50 concession taking

35 mins

Airport parking AU$2–$25

(1 hr–24 hrs)

PERTH

CBD 12km (domestic terminal)

and 17km (international terminal)

Travel time 30 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$26 (domestic)

and AU$33 (international)

Perth Airport City Shuttle

Explore Cockle Bay,

Sydney

Every 30 mins (domestic) and

45 mins (international):

AU$15 adult (domestic),

AU$20 (international); taking

15–35 mins

Fremantle Airporter AU$35

(booking required)

Transperth Bus 37 From

domestic terminal to Kings Park

via the city AU$3.20

Airport parking Short-term

carpark from AU$3.70; long-term

carpark from AU$17

ROCKHAMPTON

CBD 5km

Travel time CBD 5 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$12

Airport parking Free (24 hrs)

SYDNEY

CBD 8km

Travel time CBD around

15 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$50

Bus Every 20–30 mins: AU$8

adult, AU$4 child and taking

around 30 mins

Trains Every 10 mins

(weekdays) AU$15 adult and

taking around 13 mins

Airport parking AU$7–AU$52

(30 mins–24 hrs)

SUNSHINE COAST

Travel time Noosa is

30 mins, Maroochydore

is 10–15 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$56 to Noosa;

approx AU$28 to Maroochydore

Henry’s Bus Service Meets all

fl ights: AU$20 adult, AU$10 child,

children under 4 years free, and

taking around 45 mins to Noosa

Airport parking AU$4–$18

(2–24 hrs)

TOWNSVILLE

CBD 5km

Travel time CBD around 10 mins

Taxi Approx AU$16

Airport shuttle Booking required

+61 (7) 4775 5544 to the Strand

and city, Sunferries, the Transit

Centre and Coral Princess: AU$8

(adult), and taking around

10–15 mins

Airport parking Short-term

carpark, AU$4–$24

(2 hrs–12 hrs). Long-term

carpark, AU$12–$72 (1–6 days);

thereafter AU$10 per 24-hour

period or part thereof

WHITSUNDAY COAST

CBD 30km from

Proserpine airport

Travel time CBD around

35 mins

Taxi Approx AU$72

Whitsunday Transit AU$15

adult share-ride (one way; AU$28

return), AU$9 child (one way;

AU$16 return), children under

4 years travel free. Meets all

fl ights. For information, call

+61 (7) 4946 1800

Airport parking Free (24hrs)

Photo: Tourism New South Wales/Pierre Toussaint


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Every day’s a

beach holiday in

Surfers Paradise

INSET: Rides galore

at Dreamworld

GOLD COAST

EMMA (8) AND

LOUISE (4)

The Jetstar staff

member I’m related

to is my cousin,

Louise Laing,

managing editor of

Jetstar Magazine

The one thing we always pack for the fl ight is:

Our DS with the game Fashion Dogz.

The best way to stay entertained on the

plane is: Watching kids shows on the DVD player,

especially the latest release ones.

The kids of the Jetstar

team share their favourite

domestic destinations

The place to eat the yummiest breakfast is:

Pancakes in Paradise, Surfers Paradise. We really

love the hot chocolate with whipped cream on top

and also the pancakes with hot chocolate fudge.

The coolest place to go with your whole

family is: Movieworld. I really like the Batwing

Spaceshot and my sister Louise loves getting wet

on the Wild West Falls.

Don’t go home without trying: The Giant Drop

at Dreamworld. But be warned, it’s very fast

and scary.

The best spot to take a star-jump photo is:

Jumping into the pool at the hotel where we

stayed. The pool was so deep it was even over

dad’s head.

australian focus

We love going for walks to: The beach at

Surfers Paradise. All of my family walks along the

beach collecting things and playing in the sand.

The best place to visit to see animals is:

Defi nitely Australia Zoo. It’s great because you get

to pat the koalas.

Holidays with my family are fun because: We

go to the water parks as a family.

If I had to describe the Gold Coast in three

words I would say: Fun, exciting, adventurous.

FEBRUARY 2010 103

Photo: Tourism Queensland/Amber Toms

Photo: Tourism Queensland/Dreamworld


australian focus

The best thing about Byron Bay is: It’s on

the beach. The best places to chill out are the

beaches and cafés. But if you’re up for a drive, the

theme parks like Movieworld and Wet’n’Wild are

not too far away.

The one thing I always pack on a fl ight is: My

iPod — I think it’s really important to have music

on the plane; it makes you feel relaxed and gets

you in the mood for your holiday.

The coolest place to go with my family is:

The theme parks — there’s fun for everyone,

mum and dad, even my little sister who is not as

adventurous as me. She goes on the safe, smooth

rides that make you feel like you’re going to fall

asleep, like the merry-go-round. I go on the really

wild rides that give you butterfl ies in your tummy

— the crazier and scarier the ride, the better! The

really fast ones are my favourite.

Don’t go home without trying: The seafood

— so delicious and fresh. I love prawns but I make

someone else peel the shell off for me!

104 FEBRUARY 2010

BYRON BAY

JADE (11)

The Jetstar staff

member I’m related

to is my aunt, Denise

Renny, product delivery

manager — commercial

services

BRISBANE

ELLIZA (2)

The Jetstar staff

member I’m related

to is my mum Fiona

Demetriadis, cabin crew

The coolest place to go with your whole

family is: To the Suncorp Stadium, not far from

the city centre. We went to watch my uncle

Labinot Haliti play in his A-League soccer team

the Newcastle Jets against the home team

Brisbane Roar — he scored the fi rst goal of the

nail-biting match which ended 1–1. It was a fun

and exciting night.

The best spot to go swimming is: Streets

Beach at South Bank Brisbane — it’s Australia’s

only beach in the middle of the city. It overlooks

the brilliant Brisbane River and has a sparkling

clean, crystal clear lagoon with white sand

beaches and palm trees. It’s safe for me to swim

because there are no waves or rips, and it’s

patrolled by professional lifeguards seven days a

week. And it’s free!

The one thing I always pack for the fl ight is:

A big packet of lollies, which I share with all the

other kids onboard!

Kayaking around the front of the

Cape Byron lighthouse in Byron Bay

The best spot to go swimming is: Byron

Bayside Beach — the water is so clear and clean,

and it’s not cold like it is at home in Melbourne.

I saved my pocket money for: The theme park

and to buy a snow globe because I collect them

from all the places I visit. I also bought heaps of

lollies and a few showbags.

Pool at South Bank, Brisbane

Don’t go home without trying:

A mouth-watering delicious steak at the

Breakfast Creek Hotel, a 15-minute drive from

Brisbane Airport, in Breakfast Creek. People in my

family say the Breakfast Creek Hotel is the most

famous watering hole in Queensland.

Holidays with my family are fun because:

We get to see and explore different places around

Brisbane, like hopping onto the CityCat Ferry.

Holidays with my family are: Fun, because we’re

all together but not at home. Everyone is relaxed

and not stressed. The most fun we had together

other than the theme parks was walking around

the market in Byron.

If I had to describe Byron Bay in three words I

would say: Beach, sun, fun!

CityCats operate from 5.35am until 12.30am

every day and the entire fl eet is fi tted with WiFi

technology. (You need only one ticket to use

buses, trains and ferries within the zones printed

on your ticket). I love the Brisbane River!

The best spot to take a star-jump photo is:

In front of the South Bank Wheel of Brisbane

(Brisbane Eye).

Photo: Tourism New South Wales/Sharyn Cairns

Photo: Tourism Queensland/Barry Goodwin


Aircraft Model

1:200 scale (by Rise Soon)

$40.00

Airbus A330-200

Coffee Mug

$9.50

Boeing 717-200 1:130 scale

Aircraft Models

(by Rise Soon) $38.00 ea

Captain

Jetstar

$15.00

Golf Balls

$39.50 per doz

gift ideas

Backpack

$22.00

Baseball

Cap

$12.00

Airbus A320 1:150 scale

Tucson Watch

$59.90

(men & ladies)

Merchandise available for purchase only through

Jetstar.com/jetshop. Please note that these prices do not

include postage and handling. All prices are in AUD. Prices

subject to change without notification. These are just some of

the items available.

To see our full range visit Jetstar.com/jetshop

HOLLYBANK TREETOPS ADVENTURE

Open seven days 9am – 6pm

To book your adventure visit

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or phone (03) 6395 1390

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FEBRUARY 2010 105


have a bite Jetshop.cafe

Domestic Australia & To/From New Zealand

Sunrise Choices

Breakfast Cereal with Milk 3.00

(Only on flights to/from New Zealand)

Snack Choices

Mainland “On the Go” Cheese & 4.00

Crackers

Pringles 4.00

Sanitarium Up & Go 3.50

(choc ice or banana & honey)

While’s Nibbles Assorted Nuts 3.50

Brookfarm Cranberry & 3.00

Macadamia Bar (gluten-free)

Authentic Nissin Cup Noodles 5.00

(Hot chicken soup filled with yummy noodles)

Meal Choices

Classic Fresh Sandwiches 6.50

St. Dalfour Gourmet & Healthy Meal 6.00

(Served room temp: Pasta & Vegetables – vegetarian,

Wild Salmon & Vegetables – gluten-free, Chicken &

Vegetables – gluten-free)

Gourmet Chicken Wrap 7.00

(Chicken mixed with basil pesto, mayonnaise and

sundried tomatoes with lettuce in a soft tortilla.

Served cold)

Meat Pie & Sauce 6.00

(Available only on selected flights over 2.5

hours, please ask your cabin crew member)

Hot Meal of the Day 10.00

(On flights to/from New Zealand)

Sweet Choices

Oven-baked Gourmet Muffin 4.00

Domestic New Zealand

Snack Choices

Sanitarium Up & Go 3.50

(choc ice or banana & honey)

Brookfarm Cranberry & 3.00

Macadamia Bar (gluten-free)

Authentic Nissin Cup Noodles 5.00

While’s Nibbles Assorted Nuts 3.50

Pringles 4.00

St. Dalfour Gourmet & Healthy Meal 6.00

(Served room temp: Pasta & Vegetables –

vegetarian, Wild Salmon & Vegetables –

gluten-free, Chicken & Vegetables – gluten-free)

Sweet Choices

Cookie Time Chocolate Fix 3.00

Oven-baked Gourmet Muffin 4.00

Cadbury Dairy Milk Chocolate Bar 3.00

The Natural Confectionery 3.00

Please ask your crew member for today’s choices. Products and prices

may vary on some services.

Jetstar apologises should your choice not be available

on this flight.

Warning: Products may contain traces of nuts.

Note: Credit card facilities may not be available on all flights.

Jetstar apologises for any inconvenience.

Australian Domestic: We accept AUD, Visa, MasterCard and

American Express. Credit cards are accepted for purchases up to

AU$50 per flight per card. Minimum credit card charge AU$5. (You

may be asked to provide photographic identification to use a credit

card.) AU$0.50 surcharge for all credit card payments.

106 FEBRUARY 2010

Byron Bay Cookie Bar 3.00

(White choc chunk & macadamia nut –

gluten-free or triple choc fudge)

Cadbury Dairy Milk Chocolate Bar 3.00

The Natural Confectionery 3.00

Company Mini Dinosaurs

M&Ms 3.00

Beverage Choices

Non Alcoholic

Coke or Diet Coke 3.00

Lemonade 3.00

Solo 3.00

Orange Juice 3.00

nudie Cloudy Apple Juice 3.50

NutrientWater 3.50

Still Spring Water 3.50

Café

Jasper Coffee – Fairtrade and 3.00

Organic

Company Mini Dinosaurs

M&Ms 3.00

Beverages (Non Alcoholic) NZ$

NutrientWater 3.50

Still Spring Water 3.50

L&P 3.00

Orange Juice 3.00

Apple Juice 3.00

Coke or Diet Coke 3.00

Lemonade 3.00

Café

Nature’s Cuppa Tea – Fairtrade and 3.00

Organic

Jasper Coffee – Fairtrade and Organic 3.00

While’s – Café style Hot and Creamy 4.00

Cappuccino

Nestle Hot Chocolate 4.00

New Zealand Domestic: We accept NZD only. We regret we do not

accept credit cards.

To/From New Zealand: We accept AUD, NZD, Visa, MasterCard

and American Express. Credit cards are accepted for purchases up

to AU$50 per flight per card. Minimum credit charge AU$5. AU$0.50

surcharge for all credit card payments.

International: We accept AUD, USD and the currency of the country

you are travelling to/from — notes only. Credit cards including Visa,

MasterCard and American Express are also accepted for purchases

up to AU$75 per flight per card. Minimum credit card charge AU$10.

(You may be asked to provide photographic identification to use a

credit card.)

Unless otherwise stated, all prices are in Australian Dollars.

Nature’s Cuppa Tea – Fairtrade 3.00

and Organic

Nestlé Hot Chocolate 4.00

While’s – Café style Hot and 4.00

Creamy Cappuccino

Beer

Heineken 7.00

Pure Blonde – Low Carb Beer 7.00

Victoria Bitter 6.00

Wine

Hardys Nottage Hill Sauvignon Blanc 6.50

Hardys Nottage Hill Shiraz 6.50

Yellow Sparkling NV 7.00

Spirits Pre-mixed 7.50

Bundaberg Rum & Cola

Slate Bourbon & Cola

Gordon’s Gin & Tonic

Smirnoff Vodka Ice Red

Johnnie Walker Scotch & Cola

Beverages (Alcoholic)

Beer – Speights Gold Medal Ale 6.00

Hardys Nottage Hill Sauvignon Blanc 6.50

Hardys Nottage Hill Shiraz 6.50


International

Snack Choices

Pringles 4.00

Sanitarium Up & Go 3.50

(choc ice or banana & honey)

While’s Nibbles Assorted Nuts 3.50

Brookfarm Cranberry & 3.00

Macadamia Bar (gluten-free)

Mainland “On the Go” Cheese & 4.00

Crackers

Authentic Nissin Cup Noodles 5.00

Miso Soup (Japan flights only) 3.00

Meal Choices

Classic Fresh Sandwiches 6.50

Light Meal (ex-Cairns) 6.00

Light Meal (not available on all flights) 10.00

Full Meal 15.00

Please ask your crew member for today’s choices. Products and prices

may vary on some services.

Jetstar apologises should your choice not be available

on this flight.

Warning: Products may contain traces of nuts.

Note: Credit card facilities may not be available on all flights.

Jetstar apologises for any inconvenience.

Australian Domestic: We accept AUD, Visa, MasterCard and

American Express. Credit cards are accepted for purchases up to

AU$50 per flight per card. Minimum credit card charge AU$5. (You

may be asked to provide photographic identification to use a credit

card.) AU$0.50 surcharge for all credit card payments.

An alternative menu may be offered on some fl ights. Please ask your cabin crew.

Sweet Choices

Byron Bay Cookie Bar 3.00

Cadbury Dairy Milk Chocolate Bar 3.00

The Natural Confectionery

Company Mini Dinosaurs 3.00

M&Ms 3.00

Beverage Choices

Non Alcoholic

Coke or Diet Coke 2.50

Lemonade 2.50

Ginger Ale 2.50

Solo 2.50

Soda Water 2.50

Tonic Water 2.50

Orange Juice 2.00

Apple Juice 2.00

Still Spring Water 600ml 3.50

NutrientWater 3.50

Oolong Tea (Japan flights only) 3.00

Café

Jasper Coffee – Fairtrade and Organic 3.00

Nature’s Cuppa Tea – Fairtrade 3.00

and Organic

New Zealand Domestic: We accept NZD only. We regret we do not

accept credit cards.

To/From New Zealand: We accept AUD, NZD, Visa, MasterCard

and American Express. Credit cards are accepted for purchases up

to AU$50 per flight per card. Minimum credit charge AU$5. AU$0.50

surcharge for all credit card payments.

International: We accept AUD, USD and the currency of the country

you are travelling to/from — notes only. Credit cards including Visa,

MasterCard and American Express are also accepted for purchases

up to AU$75 per flight per card. Minimum credit card charge AU$10.

(You may be asked to provide photographic identification to use a

credit card.)

Unless otherwise stated, all prices are in Australian Dollars.

Nestlé Hot Chocolate 4.00

While’s – Café style Hot and 4.00

Creamy Cappuccino

Beer

Heineken 7.00

Victoria Bitter* 6.00

Pure Blonde – Low Carb Beer* 7.00

Asahi Beer (Japan flights only) 7.00

Wine

Hardys Nottage Hill Sauvignon Blanc 6.50

Hardys Nottage Hill Shiraz 6.50

Yellow Sparkling NV 7.00

Sake 180ml (Japan flights only) 6.00

Spirits

Straight up: 6.00

With mixer: 7.00

Bundaberg Rum

Gordon’s Gin

Smirnoff Vodka

Johnnie Walker Red

Jim Beam Bourbon

DID YOU KNOW?

You can pre-pay your meals and enjoy

unlimited non-alcoholic drinks, such as

water, juices, soft drinks, tea and coffee

(cappuccino excluded) during your

international fl ight?

It’s easy! Just select the FEED ME option

for $30 each way when booking at

Jetstar.com

FEBRUARY 2010 107


have a bite Jetshop.cafe

Recommended Combinations (Not available on domestic New Zealand flights)

Sandwich Combo 1

Sandwich, Pringles and a can of

soft drink only

$ 13.50

Jet Snack Combo

Gourmet Snack, Byron Bay cookie bar and

a can of soft drink only

$ 12.00

Wrap Combo

Chicken wrap and a can of

soft drink only

$ 10.00

Please ask your crew member for today’s choices. Products and

prices may vary on some services.

Jetstar apologises should your choice not be available

on this flight.

Warning: Products may contain traces of nuts.

Note: Credit card facilities may not be available on all flights.

Jetstar apologises for any inconvenience.

Australian Domestic: We accept AUD, Visa, MasterCard and

American Express. Credit cards are accepted for purchases up to

AU$50 per flight per card. Minimum credit card charge AU$5. (You

may be asked to provide photographic identification to use a credit

card.) AU$0.50 surcharge for all credit card payments.

108 FEBRUARY 2010

Sweet Treat

Coffee or tea (excludes cappuccino &

hot chocolate), muffin

$ 7.00

New Zealand Domestic: We accept NZD only. We regret we do not

accept credit cards.

To/From New Zealand: We accept AUD, NZD, Visa, MasterCard

and American Express. Credit cards are accepted for purchases

up to AU$50 per flight per card. Minimum credit charge AU$5.

AU$0.50 surcharge for all credit card payments.

International: We accept AUD, USD and the currency of the

country you are travelling to/from - notes only. Credit cards

including Visa, MasterCard and American Express are also

accepted for purchases up to AU$75 per flight per card. Minimum

credit card charge AU$10. (You may be asked to provide

photographic identification to use a credit card.)

Unless otherwise stated, all prices are in Australian Dollars.

Sandwich Combo 2

Sandwich, chocolate bar and

a can of soft drink only

$ 12.50

Thirst Quencher

Premium or low-carb beer

(excludes VB & Speights), nuts

$ 10.50

International

Combo

Wine (excludes sparkling),

cheese and crackers

$ 10.50


TimeOutSingapore.com

100% INDEPENDENT

110% SINGAPORE

100% INDEPENDENT. 110% SINGAPORE.

MAY 2009 TIMEOUTSINGAPORE.COM

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AUGUST 2009 TIMEOUTSINGAPORE.COM

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PLUS:

• NINE

INCH NAILS

• BAYBEATS

• TRUE

BLOOD

TRAVEL

SPECIAL

PACK YOUR BAGS:

TRIPS WITH A TWIST

SPIN OFF

Top DJs give a glimpse of

what to expect at Gilles

Peterson’s Worldwide Festival

PLAY TIME

Eight classic toys we

want to see make it

onto the big screen

Peek-a-boo

TAG ALONG AS WE TAKE SNEAK PEEKS INTO THE

HOTTEST PADS ON THE ISLAND

Fashion Find the perfect

PLUS:

Festival

Liam Gallagher

cocktails for

Shakespeare

Dave Weckl

in the park our local snacks Fischerspooner

Final CoverMay-V3.indd 3 4/20/09 2:21:07 PM

HOLES IN

HISTORY

Digging up odd spots

that time forgot

QUIT

STALLING?

The family wet markets

facing a dry spell

THERE WAS A TIME…

We made it! TOS traces our city’s

transformation, from shophouses to skyscrapers

Final CoverAugust-V2.indd 3 7/22/09 1:41:04 PM

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70

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PLUS: Homegrown digital art • Vintage clothing stores

Cover NOV 09 final-V5.indd 2 10/16/09 12:57:48 PM

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SHACK UP

IN SHIBUYA

TOS trawls through Tokyo’s

classiest Love Hotels

ALSO

BREAKING

BARRIERS

The Substation

powers on

MUSIC AND THE

TWITTER CULT

GLEN GOEI:

The director’s cut

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2010

PREVIEW

THE BEST OF

ART

FILM

FOOD

MUSIC

CLUBS

EVENTS

PEOPLE

FESTIVALS

AND MORE!

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JUNE 2009 TIMEOUTSINGAPORE.COM

RATED (SE)X

The dirty dozen: Saucy

scenes for the sofa

Upgrade your love life or

fi nd a new server – we’ll

show you how and

where to click

PLUS: UGLY BETTY + CHIPTUNES + ANDY BUTLER

Final June Cover-ver5.indd 3 5/19/09 7:52:42 PM

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52

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BEYONCE

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PAIN

OR

pleasure?

Organ massage, cupping,

leeching… TOS probes a world

of alternative treatments

MECHANICS

OF THE PLOT

Three Kranji farmers

in a fi eld of their own

WHET YOUR

PALETTE

Foodie femmes who

whip up edible artwork

The top tastes that make our city drool,

from crab beehoon to

kiwi martinis

Final CoverJuly v2.indd 3 6/16/09 12:03:45 PM

EXCLUSIVE!

THE KILLERS

Turn to page 14

for details

69

FREE EVENTS

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INSIDE!

KISS ’N’ TELL

Gene Simmons

talks musicals

GOOD

BURGERS

The juiciest

buns in town

Cover Oct 09-V4.indd 3 9/17/09 8:53:36 AM

FREE

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DJS, ACTORS,

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The brightest

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to shine in 2010

PLUS: GREEN DAY + YEAH YEAH YEAHS + CAT POWER

Cover Jan 2010 On The Up FINAL_T3 3 12/21/09 8:25:13 PM

Your monthly guide to entertainment,

lifestyle and culture in Singapore

Time Out Singapore is published by Ink Publishing Pte Ltd, 97A, Amoy Street, Singapore 069917.

www.ink-publishing.com Tel: +65 6324 2386 Fax: +65 6491 5261


MOVIES – All Flights

SELECTED MOVIES &

AUSTRALIAN FAVOURITES,

PLUS OTHER ENTERTAINMENT

AVAILABLE ON DOMESTIC / TO AND

FROM NEW ZEALAND / A320 / A321

SHORT HAUL INTERNATIONAL

FULL ENTERTAINMENT

SELECTION AVAILABLE

AVAILABLE ON LONG HAUL

INTERNATIONAL

WHIP IT!

PG-13 110mins

Starring Ellen Page, Drew Barrymore,

Marcia Gay Harden

A teenage girl escapes her small-town

life and fi nds adventure when she

joins the Roller Derby.

MOVIES – International Long Haul Flights

LAW ABIDING CITIZEN

R 108mins

Available with Japanese subtitles

Starring Gerard Butler, Jamie Foxx

A man decides to take justice into his

own hands after his family’s killer is

set free.

110 FEBRUARY 2010

WHERE THE WILD

THINGS ARE

PG 101mins

Starring James Gandolfi ni,

Max Records, Forest Whitaker

Max runs away from home and

travels to an imaginary world

inhabited by strange creatures.

GENTLEMEN BRONCOS

PG-13 89mins

Starring Michael Angarano,

Jemaine Clement, Jennifer Coolidge

A teenage writer’s story is stolen by a

professional author and turned into a

sci-fi novel and movie.

TINKERBELL AND THE

LOST TREASURE

G 80mins

Available dubbed in Japanese

Voiced by Mae Whitman, Lucy Liu

Tinkerbell leaves Neverland to restore

fairy dust to the world.

MOVIES TV

MUSIC GAMES

ON YOUR PORTABLE MEDIA PLAYER

Not available on all fl ights. All movies indicate Australian ratings. Currency quoted is AUD.

AMELIA

PG 104mins

Available in closed captions

Starring Hilary Swank, Richard Gere

Aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart, set

out to be the fi rst person to fl y solo

around the world.

Australian Favourites

BRIGHT STAR

PG 119mins

Starring Abbie Cornish,

Ben Whishaw

An unlikely romance inspires a

poet’s work, but can love conquer all

obstacles in their way?

Japanese Films

THE HOVERING BLADE

PG-13 120mins

Available with English subtitles

Starring Akira Terao

A father is determined to hunt

down the men responsible for his

daughter’s brutal murder.

LOVE HAPPENS

PG-13 109mins

Available dubbed in Japanese

Starring Jennifer Aniston,

Aaron Eckhart

A self-help guru falls for a fl orist —

can they give love a second chance?

KENNY

M 99mins

Starring Shane Jacobson,

Eve von Bibra

Kenny Smyth is an unappreciated

porta-loo delivery guy juggling life

and sewage with charm and humour.

ROOKIES

PG-13 138mins

Available with English subtitles

Starring Ryuta Sato

A high school teacher teaches his

baseball team the importance of

having a dream.


TELEVISION

Jetstar’s Escape

Jetstar’s Escape

The A-Team

Plus…

Wonder Woman

Knight Rider

Burn Notice

Plus...

CSI

Lie To Me

The Closer

Drama

Reality & Comedy

Classic Teen Kids Tv

MUSIC CHANNELS

NOVA NEW MUSIC FIRST

A320: Channel 1

A330: Channel 3

VEGA PLAYING THE 70S

80S & BEST NEW SONGS

A320: Channel 2

A330 and A321: Channel 4

JETSTAR TITANS RADIO

A320 and A321: Channel 3

A330: Channel 5

NOVA LOOSE ITEMS

A320: Channel 4

A330: Channel 6

A321: Channel 9

LOTS OF LOVE

A320 and A321: Channel 5

A330: Channel 7

Gossip Girl

Plus…

90210

Let’s Get Inventin’

Vampire Diaries

TOP SHELF

A320 and A321: Channel 6

A330: Channel 8

ROCKSTAR

A320 and A321: Channel 7

A330: Channel 9

STAR STRUCK

A320 and A321: Channel 8

A330: Channel 10

MADE IN JAPAN

A330: Channel 11

NOSTALGIA JAPAN

A330: Channel 12

The Gruen Transfer

Plus...

The Big Bang Theory

Ben 10

Plus…

Dexters Lab

Ed, Edd & Eddy

GAMES

Flight Of The Conchords

Plus...

We Can Be Heroes

The Simpsons

The Powerpuff Girls

Plus…

Foster’s Home For

Imaginary Friends

Johnny Bravo

Cave Crunch, Timon &

Pumbaa’s Burper, Solitaire,

Tetris, Sudoko, Caveman,

and Invasion.

NEXT TIME

SAVE 20%

BY PRE-BOOKING AT

JETSTAR.COM*

*Pre-booking only available for long haul international A330 services

FEBRUARY 2010 111


HOW I MET YOUR

MOTHER

A smitten Robin gets back together

with an old fl ame who hurt her in the

past. After she gets crushed again,

Barney, in his own style, helps her

realise she is awesome.

THE MENTALIST

Patrick Jane goes head to head with

a “psychic” he suspects of murder.

Intent on proving the so-called

psychic is a fraud, Jane arranges a

séance to expose him.

BACK TO YOU

Chuck has a date with a sexy realtor,

Marsh helps Gary get the station’s

weatherman job and Ryan gets

mistaken for a murder suspect.

CHEESE SLICES

Will travels to Cyprus to see the

making of traditional haloumi and

discovers a fresh whey cheese called

Anari. Find out how to cook with

this cheese.

112 FEBRUARY 2010

MOVIES TV

ON YOUR CABIN SCREEN

TV – Flights from Australia (excludes all short haul international services)

THE NEW ADVENTURES

OF OLD CHRISTINE

After Christine convinces Matthew to

let her come with him to his friend’s

party, she learns about her brother’s

world outside of their home. She

decides to meddle in his love life.

ROCKWIZ

This special is hosted by Julia Zemiro

and shot in The Gershwin Room at

St Kilda’s Esplanade Hotel in

Melbourne with guest stars Tina

Arena and Jeff Martin.

MERCURIO’S MENU

Paul Mercurio is your tour host and

resident cook as he escorts viewers

around Australia, visiting farms and

fresh food producers in some of the

most idyllic locations.

TV – Flights to Australia (excludes all short haul international services)

THE REAL…HONG KONG

Hong Kong is a unique fusion of

Western and Eastern cultures where

the ancient and the ultra-modern sit

side by side.

PUSHING DAISIES

The assistant to renowned scent

expert Napoleon LeNez is found

dead after a scratch-and-sniff book

explodes, and Ned et al try to fi nd out

who the bomb is intended for.

BOARDING PASS

EP.1

Your ticket to the action sports world

of surf, skate and snow featuring

some of the best names in the most

exotic destinations.

THE BIG BANG THEORY

Koothrappali’s parents arrange a

blind date for him but complications

arise when his date shows more

interest in Sheldon.

BOARDING PASS

EP.2

Your ticket to the action sports world

of surf, skate and snow featuring

some of the best names in the most

exotic destinations.

Get your headsets onboard with a bonus

protective case and tune into channel 1 for

English and channel 13 for Japanese.

THE SIMPSONS

Homer buys the 1,000,000th ice

cream cone at a local shop, he

ends up on Kent Brockman’s news

program. Ned Flanders wants to

clean up Springfi eld’s airwaves.

Movie

UP

An elderly man decides to fulfi l a

lifelong dream and sets off on an

adventure to South America when

he fi nds a young stowaway named

Russell onboard his fl ying house.

MYTHBUSTERS

The team tests theories about prison

escapes, including a blast from the

criminal past. Hang on for a heck of

a ride.

Movie

JULIE & JULIA

A woman who is feeling lost and

unfulfi lled, reinvigorates her life by

spending a year cooking her way

through Julia Childs’ French recipe book

and blogging about the experience.


MK0674

Europcar now gives you an extra day to enjoy the adventure. Rent for 3 days or more and get

an extra day FREE*. Simply quote promotional code JETFREEDAY when making your booking.

Reservations: 13 13 90 europcar.com.au.

New Zealand customers, please check www.europcar.co.nz for the latest deals and special offers.

europcar.com.au

*Offer and vehicles subject to availability. Available for rental pick ups from 1 Feb – 31 Mar 2010. Bookings must be for a minimum of 4 days to

receive offer. Available at participating locations in Australia, excludes Tasmania. Offer applies to all passenger vehicles. Europcar standard age,

credit card and driver requirements apply. Refuelling service charge, miscellaneous charges and GST on these items are not included


MK0674

Europcar now gives you an extra day to enjoy the adventure. Rent for 3 days or more and get

an extra day FREE*. Simply quote promotional code JETFREEDAY when making your booking.

Reservations: 13 13 90 europcar.com.au.

New Zealand customers, please check www.europcar.co.nz for the latest deals and special offers.

europcar.com.au

*Offer and vehicles subject to availability. Available for rental pick ups from 1 Feb – 31 Mar 2010. Bookings must be for a minimum of 4 days to

receive offer. Available at participating locations in Australia, excludes Tasmania. Offer applies to all passenger vehicles. Europcar standard age,

credit card and driver requirements apply. Refuelling service charge, miscellaneous charges and GST on these items are not included

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