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1 Front&Jump RECYCLE - Radiate Media

www.portsmouth-dailytimes.com SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 2010 Vol. 158 • No. 312 • 50 cents daily/$1.25 Sunday

Closing Up

Weather

Obituaries

DOW JONES

11,2204.28 +70

■ STOCKS, A5

SPORTS

Day Two Of NFL Draft

Bengals take Florida DE

Dunlap in second round

■ SPORTS, B1

PARADE

Tom Petty:

He won’t slow down

■ COMING SUNDAY

Today T-storms High 75

Tonight Showers Low 59

High Low Outlook

SUN 71 51 Showers

MON 60 41 Showers

TUE 61 41 Showers

WED 65 41 M. Clear

• Geraldine Bowles

• Catherine Buckle

• Gertrude Deaubler

• Theodore Elkins

• Larry Fisher Sr.

• Jonathan Fraley

• Genevieve Fry

• Carole Griffith

• Melvin Harper

• Christopher Krannitz

• Hazel Nolen

• Carol Ramsey

• Anna Remy

• Millard Russell Sr.

• Martina Silcott

• Jack Sparks

• Homer Wilson

Index

Advice ........B5

Calendar ....A2

Class ........B6-7

Comics ......B4

Editorial ......A4

Printer dpi: 2400

See Page A2

Local ......A2-8

Lotteries ....B2

Puzzles ......B4

Sports......B1-3

TV ..............B5

BY RYAN SCOTT OTTNEY

PDT STAFF WRITER

New Boston Superintendent Mike

Staggs said all did not go as he had

hoped following the April meeting

of the Ohio School Facilities Commission,

in Columbus, on Thursday.

Now Staggs is accusing the OSFC

of discriminating against lowincome

school districts, wasting

taxpayer dollars and playing politics

to delay construction of New

Boston’s new K-12 school building.

Staggs last met with employees of

the OSFC on April 12, along with

four other local school districts. He

said OSFC Director Rich Murray

told him a decision about the proposed

New Boston school building

site would be made during their

next meeting scheduled for April

SERVING THE OHIO VALLEY SINCE 1852

Doing The Right Thing: Students Help Rescue Child

BY FRANK LEWIS

PDT STAFF WRITER

Students at Portsmouth East High

School were off on an adventure to the

laser light show at the Clark Planetarium

on the campus of Shawnee State

University, when another adventure

delayed their trip.

As the bus driver was coming over

Rosemount Road, coming down the

U.S. 23 side by the Apostolic Church,

a little boy was spotted.

Leah Baughman, a teacher at East,

who was leading the field trip, said,

“This little boy, a little tiny guy,

maybe 2 or 3, in his pajamas and dia-

OSFC Still Has No Answer For NB School

BY FRANK LEWIS

PDT STAFF WRITER

Investigators with the Division of

State Fire Marshal and the

Portsmouth Fire Department are

continuing to search for information

on two arson cases.

“We are particularly concerned

about the April 2, 2010, arson fire on

20th Street,” Shane Cartmill, public

information officer for the State Fire

Marshal’s Office said. “Based on the

information we’ve received, we

believe there are more witnesses in

this case and it is our hope they will

come forward and share information

with investigators. We are seeking

information about the circumstances

surrounding the fire or the three men

who were seen near the home at the

time of the incident.”

That fire, at 1913 20th St. was followed

five hours later by a stabbing

incident at the same location that

claimed the life of Clifton Miller, 32,

who had lived in Columbus.

per, just ran across the road, and our

bus driver had to stop suddenly. When

he got to the other side of the road,

you could see that he was just standing

there. We pulled in, and my

teacher’s aide ran down to see if he

was alright.”

“When Herb pulled the bus over, I

immediately jumped out and went to

get the kid because I was worried about

him going across the road, and I kind of

lost sight of him,” said teacher’s aide

Lance Davis. “I found him down over

a little hill in a backyard, so I picked

him up and just tried to make sure that

See RESCUE, A3

file ■ Daily Times

Sun and Funland pool buildings in New Boston were razed in November 2009 to prepare the site for the new K-12 New

Boston school.

Superintendent Staggs Charges

Discrimination And Wasteful Spending

22. Sources inside the OSFC, however,

indicated as early as last week

that they might not have an answer

ready for the meeting, but at least

expected to establish a timeline for

New Boston Schools.

The site in question — the former

Sun and Funland Pool on Lakeview

Avenue — was purchased by

the school in October 2008 for

about $24,000. One month later,

voters passed a 7.61 mill tax levy to

provide 17 percent of the cost to

build a new K-12 school building

on that site. The remaining 83 percent

would be paid by the OSFC.

Now it’s almost two-years later.

Voters have been paying for the tax

levy and many are beginning to

wonder when they’ll see that new

school they were promised.

The OSFC became concerned

Two Arson Fires Remain

Unsolved; Help Sought

Cartmill said the Fire Marshal is

also seeking tips and details on last

weekend’s warehouse fire off Spring

Street, behind King’s Daughters

Medical Center.

“Like the 20th Street arson, we

have received tips from the public

but we believe there is more information

out there,” Cartmill said. “We

want to know more about the young

man who was seen near the warehouse.”

That fire broke out early Saturday

afternoon, April 16. Neighbors said

the building had stood vacant for a

long time. The building was gutted

but firefighters kept the fire from

spreading to adjacent structures. No

one was injured.

Cartmill said anyone with information

should contact the Division

of State Fire Marshal or the

Portsmouth Fire Department.

FRANK LEWIS can be reached at

(740) 353-3101, ext. 232 or flewis@heartlandpublications.com

“In my opinion throughout

this whole process two things

are quite obvious. No. 1,

OSFC has no oversight and

can spend taxpayer dollars

however they want. No. 2,

New Boston is not wealthy

enough or doesn’t possess

the political clout to merit

immediate attention.”

Mike Staggs, New Boston superintendent

with the current site after it was discovered

that they would need to

build a $700,000 retaining wall

along the hillside. They have asked

the school to instead explore the

possibility of building in Millbrook

Park, across from the New Boston

Stadium. The commission has even

ordered a hydrology study of the

See SCHOOL, A3

A group of students

from East High School

found a small child in a

diaper and pajamas

wandering across a city

street in Rosemount.

The students included

Zack Russell, Ryan

Skaggs, Brittany Webb,

James Cottle, Brandy

Coldiron, Emmy Francis,

Tyler Kilgore, Justin

Phillips, Callie Tindall,

Chris Craft and Brandon

Gray.

Baby Dies

After Shooting

Incident

PDT STAFF REPORT

Wayne Allen ■ Daily Times

A shooting incident at about 3:30

a.m. Friday has left a 19-month-old

child dead.

According to a release from the

Portsmouth Police Department,

officers responded to a call at about

3:30 a.m. Friday to Southern Ohio

Medical Center Emergency Department.

Upon arrival, officers

received information that Destiny

Cook, 18, and her child were victims

of a shooting, which reportedly

occurred at 1301 Grandview Ave.,

the residence of the victims.

Cook was treated and released,

but the child died and was transported

to the Montgomery County

Coroner’s Office for an autopsy. No

other details were available at press

time and the case remains under

investigation.

Stimulus Jobs Rid

Forests Of Foreign

Invader Species

BY G. SAM PIATT

PDT STAFF WRITER

The tree of heaven is heck to contend

with once it gets a head start in

Ohio’s forests.

The fast-growing Asian tree, known

officially as ailanthus, hinders timber

growth. It is one of a number of invasive

species of bushes and plants

being attacked by workers with the

Ohio Woodland Job Corps.

Others include the buckthorn,

autumn olive, bush honeysuckle and

elephant ear trees.

From October through March, 66

workers with the corps cleared more

than 700 acres in seven state forests,

including Shawnee State Forest,

where more than a dozen workers

were employed under the program.

Seventy more jobs in the corps will

open up June 21 and already the divi-

See FOREST, A3

Wayne Allen ■ Daily Times

Spring Has Sprung In West Portsmouth

A landscaping project three years ago is paying off for Jerry Hart of Stockham Hill Road in

West Portsmouth. This 14-by-93 foot area is covered with creeping phlox, a dazzling spring

flower that covers the slope that Hart mowed for about 35 years, but then decided to plant

with groundcover. Hart said he started out with about 70 plants and 40 bags of mulch that

he put down by hand. He also has a watering system he devised by putting holes into a garden

hose to irrigate the spring flowers.

C M Y K


A2 Saturday, April 24, 2010 Portsmouth Daily Times

Obituaries

Geraldine Bowles

Geraldine Bowles, 83, of

Lucasville, died Friday, April

23, 2010, at Southern Ohio

Medical Center.

She was born Nov. 5, 1926,

in the McCullough Community,

a daughter of the late

Charles and Louella Covert

Emmons.

Geraldine was a homemaker

and of the Baptist Faith.

She was also preceded in

death by her husband, Russell

Edman Bowles, Jan. 7, 2006;

one son, Stephen Bowles;

brothers, Warnie, Marvin, and

Raymond Emmons; and two

sisters, Mary Lou Thurman

and AnnDora Emmons.

Geraldine is survived by one

son, Timothy (Susan) Bowles

of Lucasville; one daughter,

Jody (Wayne) Crabtree of

Lucasville; grandson, T.R.

Beery; special relative, Connor

Webb whom she dearly loved;

one brother, Charles Emmons

Jr. of Lucasville; one sister,

Wanda Reynolds of

Lucasville; and daughter-inlaw,

Julie Bowles of

Portsmouth.

Funeral services will be conducted

at noon Tuesday, April

27, 2010, at the McKinley

Funeral Home in Lucasville,

with Bob Davis officiating.

Burial will follow in Rockwell

Cemetery. Friends may call

from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday and

from 11 a.m. to noon Tuesday

at the funeral home.

Carol Ramsey, 60

Carol Jean Ramsey, 60, of

Otway, Ohio, died Wednesday,

April 21, 2010, at her residence.

She was born April 30,

1949, in Newberry, Mich., a

daughter of the late James

Arthur Hobbs Sr. and Daisy

Francis Hamlin Hobbs.

Surviving are her former

husband and very special

friend, Phillip J. Ramsey of

Ironton, Ohio; six children,

Tami (Thomas) Lute of Otway,

Ohio, Sherry (John) Dixon of

Pataskala, Ohio, John (Debbie)

Ramsey of Otway, Ohio,

Tommy (Kym) Ramsey of

Lucasville, Ohio, Bonnie

Ramsey of Pataskala, Ohio,

and Julie Ramsey (James

Adamson) of Pataskala, Ohio;

11 grandchildren, Heidi

(Nick), Justin (Emily), Kyle

(Eliza), Luke, Jeromy, Corey,

Morgan, Jarrod, Brandi

(Michael), Joshua (Amanda),

and Tyler; seven great-grandchildren,

Lily, Kaylee, Lucy,

Nevaeh, Leah, Cayden, and

Gage; eight brothers, Don,

Ronald, Roger, Larry, Dave,

James Jr., William, and Randy

Hobbs; and three sisters, Linda

Barbara, and Nancy.

She was preceded in death

by one brother, Mike Hobbs.

Mrs. Ramsey enjoyed

spending time at the Morgan

Township Senior Center.

Memorial services will be

held at the convenience of the

family. Calling hours will not be

observed. Arrangements are

under the direction of the

Botkin Funeral Home in Otway.

www.botkinfuneralservice.com

Jonathan Fraley, 27

Jonathan Tyler Fraley, 27, of

Portsmouth, died Wednesday,

April 21, 2010.

Born on Aug. 1, 1982, in

Portsmouth, he was a son of

Brian and Gail Hall Fraley of

Minford, and a 2001 graduate

of Minford High School and

VoTech.

Also surviving are a son,

Jonah Tyler Fraley of

Sciotoville; a sister, Emily Fraley

of Minford; and grandparents,

Betty Fraley of Wheelersburg

and Bob and Betty

Hall of Minford.

A gathering will be 2 to 4

p.m. on Sunday at the Brant

Funeral Home in Sciotoville.

Interment will be in Vernon

Cemetery.

Gertrude Antonetta

Bensman Deaubler

Gertrude Antonetta Bensman

Deaubler, 91, of Bellefontaine,

passed away on

Monday, April 19, 2010, at her

daughter’s residence in Zanesfield.

She was born in Putnam

County, Ohio, on Aug. 22,

1918, to the late Henry J. and

Odelia C. Miller Bensman. A

brother, Hebert Bensman, and

a sister, Hildegard R. Bensman,

also preceded her in

death.

Surviving are a son, Carl R.

(Patricia “Lynn”) Deaubler of

Minford, Ohio; three daughters,

Carol M. (Mark) Elliott of

West Mansfield, Jo Ann

Richards of Zanesfield, Ohio,

and Janet R. Houser of Casa

Grande, Ariz.; three sisters,

Geraldine H. Houck of Holgate,

Ohio, Agnes M. Shadle

of Fort Wayne, Ind., and

Bernadine M. Houck of Continental,

Ohio; a sister-in-law,

Bernadette Bensman of Bellefontaine;

six grandchildren,

Donna, Penny, Stephanie,

William, Natalie, and Mathew;

and six great-grandchildren,

Ashley, Malia, Arionna, Clint,

Alissa, and Kaylyn.

A member of St. Patrick

Catholic Church in Bellefontaine,

Gertrude once

worked as a waitress at Mount

Victory restaurant, managed a

restaurant in East Liberty and

had worked at Harding

Machine.

Visitation is scheduled for

Friday, April 23, from 5 to 8

p.m. at the Eichholtz Funeral

Home, 321 North Main St.,

Bellefontaine. A celebration

of life will be held at 10 a.m.

on Saturday, April 24, at St.

Patrick Catholic Church in

Bellefontaine, with Father

Patrick Sheridan officiating.

Burial will be in the Hathaway

Cemetery in West Mansfield.

Memorial contributions may

be made St. Vincent dePaul

Society, c/o St. Patrick

Catholic Church, 328 E. Patterson

Ave., Bellefontaine, OH

43311, or to St. Patrick

Catholic Church.

Condolences to the family

may be expressed at:

www.eichholtzfuneralhome.com.

Hazel Nolen, 95

Hazel Nolen, 95, of Vanceburg,

Ky., died Friday, April

23, 2010, at a Vanceburg care

center.

Services will be 1 p.m. Sunday

at Dickerson Funeral

Home in Vanceburg, with

interment in Morgan Cemetery.

Friends may call 5 to 8

p.m. Saturday and 8 am. to 1

p.m. Sunday at the funeral

home.

Larry Fisher Sr., 76

Larry Joe Fisher Sr., 76. of

Raceland, Ky., died Thursday,

April 22, 2010, at an

Ashland, Ky., hospital.

Services will be 2 p.m.

Sunday at Reed Funeral

Home in Greenup, Ky., with

interment in Bellefonte

Memorial Gardens. Friends

may call 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday

and 1 to 2 p.m. Sunday at the

funeral home.

TOM LORE

11/3/54 - 4/24/09

We love and miss

you Dad. You are in our

hearts and minds

everyday.

Love always,

Your Kids

Martina Silcott

Martina Silcott, 84, of

McDermott, peacefully closed

her eyes to this life and awoke

in her Heavenly Home on

Thursday, April 22, 2010. Our

loving wife, mother, and

grandmother leaves behind a

family and friends who will

forever be blessed by the gifts

of her love and presence.

Born May 22, 1925, Martina

was the daughter of the late

Duke-James Copas and Cora

L. Adams Copas.

In addition to her parents she

was preceded in death by all of

her siblings, Maybelle Byars,

Pearlie Copas, Pauline Copas,

Marie Crabtree, Ora Lee

Copas, Marjorie Copas, Virgil

Copas, Geneva Nelson, and

most recently by her brother

Fred Copas, Feb. 5, 2007.

In her absence, Martina

leaves her husband, Harold

Silcott, whom she married

Nov. 7, 1949, in Lucasville;

three daughters, Margie (Jerry)

Lute, Debbie (Bill) Vest, and

Vickie (Daniel) Howard, all of

McDermott; five grandchildren,

Brian (Janelle) Lute,

Ryan (Stacie) Lute, Bill Vest,

Michelle (Quinn) Vest-Crabtree,

and Brandon Howard; 12

great-grandchildren; one

great-great-granddaughter;

one nephew, Gary (Beth) Silcott;

and one niece, Myra Lou

(Dave) Weaver.

Martina was a homemaker

and lifelong member of the

Lucasville Community of

Christ. Throughout her life she

was known for her beautiful

voice and her talent for playing

the piano which she shared

gladly in church services and

countless funerals. Martina

was humble and soft-spoken,

always wore a smile, and

showed others through her

own example to look for the

positives in life and to see only

the positive attributes of others.

Her life was a blessing to

all who knew her.

Funeral services will be conducted

at noon Monday, April

26, 2010, at the Lucasville

Community of Christ on

Thomas Hollow Road, with

Paul Crabtree officiating. Burial

will follow in Mount Joy

Cemetery. Friends may call 3

to 6 p.m. Sunday at the

McKinley Funeral Home in

Lucasville and for an hour

before the funeral Monday at

the church.

Jack Sparks, 79

Jack B. Sparks, 79, of

Wheelersburg, died Friday,

April 23, 2010, at Southern

Ohio Medical Center.

Arrangements are pending

at Swick-Bussa-Chamberlin

Funeral Home in Wheelersburg

— www.swickbussachamberlin.com.

Homer Wilson, 87

Homer J. Wilson, 87, of

Wheelersburg, died Thursday,

April 22, 2010, at a West Jefferson

care center.

Arrangements are pending at

Swick-Bussa-Chamberlin

Funeral Home in Wheelersburg,

where friends may call 6 to 8

p.m. Monday — www.swickbussachamberlin.com.

www.genisisoxygen.com

Genesis Oxygen & Home Medical Equipment

740-456-4363

FACTORY

DIRECT POOLS

Pool Packages

Start at

$ 995 00

Clay Overpass Business Park,

in Rosemount, One mile

north of Portsmouth (Next to UPS)

Phone 740-354-6232

Cell 740-464-3625

LOCAL

Anna Remy, 94

Anna Kathryn Remy, 94, of

Beaver, died Wednesday, April

21, 2010, at Pike Community

Hospital.

She was born Oct. 15, 1915,

in Beaver, a daughter of the

late Joseph and Lottie Schrader

Scheutle.

She was a graduate of

Beaver High School and a

member of Faith U.B Church

in Beaver. Anna was very gifted

and talented and was able to

capture her love for sewing in

the beautiful quilts she would

make. Many of these could be

seen at the Dogwood Festival

each year, while others would

be given to a friend or neighbor

for a special occasion.

She was preceded in death

by her husband, Lesley Scott

Remy, in 1968.

Anna is survived by three

sons, John J. (Carol) Remy of

Columbus, Ronald E. (Carolyn)

Remy, and Gerald W.

(Linda) Remy of Waverly; one

sister, Edna Grace Lansing of

Waverly; four grandchildren;

11 great-grandchildren; and

three stepgrandchildren.

She was preceded in death

by one sister, Ruth Voelkeer;

and an infant brother.

Funeral services are planned

for 2 p.m. Sunday at the Cox

Funeral Home in Beaver, with

Pastor Ronald Hines officiating.

Burial will follow in Beaver

Union Cemetery. Friends may

call at the Cox Funeral Home in

Beaver Saturday 5 to 8 p.m.

Catherine Buckle, 80

Catherine R. Buckle, 80, of

Waynesville, Ohio, formerly

of Portsmouth, passed peacefully

Wednesday, April 21,

2010, in Lebanon.

Born March 1, 1930, in

Portsmouth, Ohio, the daughter

of Henry and Martha Howerton

Reinhardt, she was a loving

wife, mother and grandmother.

She loved gardening and

enjoyed refinishing antiques.

She was preceded in death

by her parents, husband Jesse

Buckle and brother John E.

Reinhardt.

She is survived by sons, Phil

(Rebecca) Buckle of Waynesville

and Jay Buckle of Lebanon;

daughters, Leah (Ed) Rogerson of

Maineville, Ellen (Marcus)

Southard of Grove City and Allison

(Steve) Ruzicka of Oregonia;

sisters, Phyllis Miller of Kentucky

and June Bartlett of North

Carolina; seven grandchildren

and six great-grandchildren.

Funeral services will be noon

Saturday, April 24, 2010, at

Stine Kilburn Funeral Home,

801 Monroe Road, Lebanon.

Memorial are requested to the

American Lung Association.

Online condolences may be

expressed to the family at

www.stinekilburnfuneralhome.com.

Christopher

Krannitz, 29

Christopher Brandon Krannitz,

29, of Jackson, died

Wednesday, April 21, 2010, at

his home.

Services will be 1 p.m. Monday

at Eisnaugle-Lewis Funeral

Home in Jackson, with

interment in Memorial Burial

Park in Wheelersburg. Friends

may call 2 to 8 p.m. Sunday at

the funeral home.

Theodore Elkins, 62

Theodore F. Elkins, 62 of

New Boston, died Friday,

April 23, 2010, at Southern

Ohio Medical Center.

Arrangements are pending

at Botkin Funeral Home in

Otway.

Scott Puckett

When you remember me, it means

that you have carried something of

who I was with you, that I have left

some mark of who I was on who

you are. It means that you can summon

me back to your mind even

though countless miles stand between

us. It means that when we

meet again someday, you will know

me. It means that even after death

you can still see my face, hear my

voice and speak to me in your heart.

For as long as you remember me, I

am never entirely gone.

Remembering you today,

tomorrow, and always, Mom,

Penny and Donna

Making Your House A Home

7958 OHIO RIVER RD., WHEELERSBURG, OH (across from Lowes)

Genevieve Fry, 80

Genevieve Irene Woodrum

Fry, 80, of Jackson, died Friday,

April 23, 2010, at a Jackson

nursing facility.

Services will be 1 p.m.

Tuesday at Kuhner-Lewis

Funeral Home In Oak Hill,

with interment in C.M.

Cemetery. Friends may call 4

to 8 p.m. Monday at the

funeral home.

Melvin Harper, 63

Melvin Eugene “Gene”

Harper, 63, of Ray, died Thursday,

April 22, 2010, at a Jackson

hospital.

Service will be 11 a.m. Tuesday

at Eisnaugle-Lewis Funeral

Home in Jackson, with

interment in Evergreen Cemetery.

Friends may call 4 to 8

p.m. Monday at the funeral

home.

Service Schedule

• Charlotte Pauley — 10:30

a.m. Saturday at Central Christian

Church, 1541 South Seventh

St., Ironton, with callers 9:30 to

10:30 a.m. Saturday. Interment

in Woodland Cemetery.

Arrangements by Phillips

Funeral Home in Ironton

• James Bellamy — 11 a.m.

Saturday at Roberson Funeral

Home in South Shore, Ky.,

with callers 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday.

Interment in Friendship

Cemetery.

• Dick Bruce — Graveside

services 11 a.m. Saturday at

Sunset Memorial Gardens in

Franklin Furnace. Arrangements

by Harrison-Pyles

Funeral Home in Wheelersburg.

• Gladys Wolf — Memorial

service 1 p.m. Saturday at

Morton Funeral Home in

South Shore, Ky., with callers

noon to 1 p.m. Saturday.

• Jarred Bennett — 2 p.m.

Saturday at Reed Funeral

Home in Greenup, Ky., with

callers 1 to 2 p.m. Saturday.

Interment in South Branch

Cemetery.

• Rawland Rickey —

Memorial services 2 p.m. Saturday

at Rubyville Community

Church Fellowship Hall,

Ohio 139, Rubyville. Arrangements

by Steen Funeral

Home-Central Avenue, Ashland,

Ky.

Meetings

Monday

• Portsmouth City Council,

meeting, Council Chambers,

Second Floor, City Building,

728 Second St., 6 p.m.

• Sciotoville Community

School and Sciotoville Elementary

Governing Board,

special meetings for purpose

of considering business that

would have come before the

board at the regular April 12

meeting, annex, East High

School, 224 Marshall Ave.,

Sciotoville, 6 p.m.

• Wheelersburg Local School

Board of Education, meeting,

board office, 620 Center St.,

Wheelersburg, 6:30 p.m.

Tuesday

• Scioto County Board of

For all of Your

Silk Floral Needs

740-574-0777

Millard Russell

Sr., 69

Millard Preston Russell Sr.

69, died Wednesday, April 21,

2010, at a Russell, Ky., hospital.

Services will be 1 p.m. Monday

at City Mission Church in

Ironton, with interment in Woodland

Cemetery. Friends may call

noon to 1 p.m. Monday at the

church. Arrangements are under

the direction of Phillips Funeral

Home in Ironton.

Carol Griffith, 76

Carol Sue Dalton Griffith, 76,

of Ironton died Thursday, April

22, 2010, at her residence.

Services will be noon Monday

at Tracy Brammer Funeral

Home in Ironton, with interment

in Woodland Cemetery. Friends

may call 10 a.m. to noon Monday

at the funeral home.

• Eugene Adkins — 3 p.m.

Saturday at Brant Funeral

Home in Portsmouth, with

callers 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday.

Interment in Scioto Burial

Park.

• Donald Smith — Memorial

service 4 p.m. Saturday at

Stockdale United Methodist

Church, 449 Ohio 335,

Beaver, with callers 3 to 4 p.m.

Saturday. Arrangements by

Swindler and Currin Funeral

Home in Covington, Ky.

• Jim Mitchell — 1 p.m.

Sunday at Peebles Church of

God, with callers 11 a.m. to 1

p.m. Sunday. Interment in

Evergreen Cemetery. Arrangements

by Wallace-Thompson

Funeral Home in Peebles.

• June Price — Memorial

service 1:30 p.m. Sunday at

Center Street United

Methodist Church in

Lucasville. Callers 5 to 7 p.m.

Saturday at McKinley Funeral

Home in Lucasville.

• Juanita Kammer — 2

p.m. Sunday at Roger W.

Davis Funeral Home in West

Portsmouth, with callers 5 to 8

p.m. Saturday and 1 to 2 p.m.

Sunday. Interment in Scioto

Burial Park.

• Brittany Shaw — 11 a.m.

Monday at Botkin Funeral

Home in Waverly, with callers

4 to 7 p.m. Sunday. Interment

in Mound Cemetery.

Bible Verse

Psalm 91:14

“Because he loves me,” says the LORD, “I will rescue him; I

will protect him, for he acknowledges my name.”

Commissioners, meeting,

Room 107, Scioto County

Courthouse, 602 Seventh St.,

9:30 a.m.

Wednesday

• Clay Local Board of Education,

special meeting for the

purpose of conducting business

concerning the OSFC

project, etc., treasurer’s

office, Clay High School, 44

Clay High St., 8 a.m.7

• Portsmouth City Health

Department, regular session,

first floor conference room,

health department, 605

Washington St., 6 p.m.

• Washington-Nile Local

Board of Education, meeting,

Portsmouth West Elementary

School, 15332 U.S.

52 West Portsmouth, 7 p.m.

In Loving Memory

SIDNEY “LEE” STAGGS

ON HIS 27 TH BIRTHDAY

APRIL 24, 1983 - OCTOBER 22, 2005

We Love & Miss You!

Mom & Dad, Caleb & Thad,

Family & Friends


AAPL NASDAQ NM APPLE INC 270.83 +4.36

ASH NYSE CONSL ASHLAND INC 63.28 +2.65

T NYSE CONSL AT&T 26.25 -0.02

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BBT NYSE CONSL BB&T CORP 34.28 -0.06

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DUK NYSE CONSL DUKE ENERGY 16.25 +0.04

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KR NYSE CONSL KROGER CO 23.70 +0.02

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LOW NYSE CONSL LOWES COMPANIES 28.22 +0.69

MRO NYSE CONSL MARATHON OIL 33.08 +0.60

MWE NYSE CONSL MARKWEST ENERGY 31.80 +0.05

MEE NYSE CONSL MASSEY ENERGY 44.45 +1.52

MCD NYSE CONSL MCDONALDS CORP 71.15 +0.12

From Page A1

he was OK. He came right to

me. He was a good little kid. I

don’t know where his parents

are, but I hope everything

works out for him.”

Baughman praised the

efforts of bus driver Herb

Roe, saying he was determined

to be proactive and do

the right thing.

“He was going up and

down the street knocking on

doors trying to arouse help,

while Mr. Davis comforted

the child,” Baughman said.

“My role was just to sit with

these guys.”

The students’ itinerary was

to go to the planetarium, then

have lunch at Wendy’s on

Scioto Trail in Portsmouth

before returning to school and

be dismissed for the day.

“They didn’t get to go to

lunch at Wendy’s … because

they spent so much time waiting

for the Sheriff’s Department

to come and get the

baby,” a spokeswoman for

Portsmouth East High School

said shortly after the child

was found. “So they had the

baby on the bus a long time.”

The school then made plans

for the students to have lunch

at Giovanni’s on Harding

Avenue in Sciotoville when

they got back.

“This worked out so well.

It’s a great story about great

kids doing the right thing,”

the spokeswoman said.

After the sheriff’s office

and Children Services took

possession of the child, a

search began for the parents.

The students then continued

on with their trip to the planetarium,

had lunch at Giovanni’s,

and returned to the

school where they gathered in

a room and discussed the

experience.

“From what everyone was

saying, the little boy came

running out of the woods,”

student Emmy Francis said.

“The little boy was so cute.”

How did it feel to have the

baby on the bus?

“It was so cool. It made me

feel like home,” Emmy said.

What kind of an experience

was finding the baby for stu-

dent Zachary Russell?

“Unexpected, random,” he

said. “I was in the back of the

bus, and I saw this little kid

about to get hit by the bus. He

was just squirming around

like crazy, like it was nothing.

He just ran out of the woods.

He was a nice kid though. He

had no idea where he lived,

but he was a nice kid.”

Student Ryan Skaggs

summed it all up while he sat

in a classroom waiting for the

final bell of the day.

“It was quite a surprise. It

isn’t every day that you see a

kid sliding down a hill.”

Meanwhile, deputies and

detectives continued searching

for a parent, and say they

FROM A1

located the mother late in the

afternoon.

Captain Shawn Sparks later

said Tara J. Collett had been

arrested and charged with

child endangering.

As she reflected on the days

events, Baughman did not hesitate

to praise the bus driver, her

teacher’s aide and her students.

“These kids were cooperative.

They hugged and comforted

the little boy and talked

to him. They had him on the

bus with us,” Baughman said.

“I enjoyed going on a field

trip with this group of kids.”

FRANK LEWIS can be reached

at (740) 353-3101, ext. 232 or

flewis@heartlandpublications.com

Portsmouth Daily Times Saturday, April 24, 2010 A3

Saturday, April 24, 2010 THE MARKET IN REVIEW Sponsored by Edward Jones

DOW Jones

11,2044.288 +700

S&P 500

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Stocks of Local Interest

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School

From Page A1

proposed Millbrook Park site

to determine whether it poses

a flood risk to a new school

building. The study will

reportedly cost the state of

Ohio about $17,000.

The park is owned by the

Village of New Boston, and

Staggs did take the OSFC’s

request to the New Boston

Village Council on April 6. It

was rejected on April 20 by a

council vote of 3-to-1, with

one vote abstained and one

Forest

From Page A1

sion has received 1,200 applications

for those positions,

according to Andy Ware,

assistant chief of the Division

of Forestry. Ware said 15 of

them will be assigned to

Shawnee State Forest for a

period of six months.

Forestry officials created

the corps with $4.4 million in

federal stimulus money.

Workers are paid $13.44 an

hour.

The corps came into being

after the U.S. Forest Service

announced that it had $250

Rescue

member absent.

The fated OSFC then meeting

came on Thursday, but no

decision was made about New

Boston’s building site, and no

timeline was created. Staggs

said he was told it would

instead be discussed at their

meeting on May 25.

Also during the meeting the

commission said they still

would move forward with

their hydrology study of the

land. Staggs accused them of

wasting taxpayer dollars to

study a site which the school

has already been told they

cannot have.

million in stimulus money for

state and private forestry programs.

February’s snows slowed

the work but the corps, in

some areas, concentrated on

removing grapevines and

other invasive plants that can

choke out saplings fighting to

get a start in the forests.

“We focused on woodland

improvement, speeding up the

process nature eventually

takes care of,” said Nate

Jester, manager of Shawnee

State Forest. “We used the

science we’ve learned from

studying these natural

processes to speed it up a little

and be a little more selec-

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TESIX MUT SHARES A 20.57 0.00

TEQIX FRNKLN MUT QST A 18.19 -0.01

FKCGX FRNKLN FLX CAP A 44.47 +0.11

CAIBX CAP INC BUILD A 48.35 -0.21

AMECX INCOME FD AM A 16.04 -0.02

AIVSX INVEST CO AM A 27.33 -0.06

AGTHX GROW FD AMER A 29.16 +0.05

ABALX AMRCN BALACED A 17.10 -0.02

VIFSX VANGRD 500 INDX 92.05 +0.21

PTTAX PIMCO TOT RET A 11.09 -0.01

DODFX DODGE COX INTL 33.19 -0.34

DODGX DODGE COX STK 104.73 -0.12

OSFC Executive Director

Rich Murray explained that

the land study was contracted

two weeks ago, long before

the council made its ruling.

He said in addition to the Park

site, the study also will reexamine

flooding concerns at

the current building site.

“We’re looking through

that entire area to make sure

we understand where the

floodway is, because the

floodway cannot be built on,”

Murray said. “This sense that

we should have known weeks

ago what we know today just

doesn’t work for me. It may

tive in the trees we would like

to see. The harsh winter kept

us from doing all we would

liked to have done with that.”

The princess tree, scientifically

called paulowfia, an oriental

tree that people plant in

their yards, threatened to

crowd out more desirable

trees in the forest.

“We used a certified herbicide

at the base of the trees,

and hopefully that will kill

them out. We will follow up

on this with the new group

coming in in June,” Jester

said.

He said workers in the

corps helped foresters clear

the wilderness trail, using

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work for the superintendent,

but it doesn’t work for me.”

The site study is expected

to be complete within two

weeks, and Murray said it will

give the commission more

information to discuss the

issue during its May meeting.

“In my opinion throughout

this whole process two things

are quite obvious. No. 1,

OSFC has no oversight and

can spend taxpayer dollars

however they want. No. 2,

New Boston is not wealthy

enough or doesn’t possess the

political clout to merit immediate

attention,” Staggs said.

hand tools, since power tools

are forbidden in that area.

Most of the workers, he

said, were from the

Portsmouth area, young people

“filled with vigor and

energy.”

Clark Distel, 23, of West

Portsmouth, is one of them.

He has a degree in wildlife

and recreation and forestry

works in as a part of that. It

being a tough job market last

fall, he jumped at the chance

for a job with the corps.

“It was a chance to get

some experience in my field

and to make some money as

well,” Distel said.

“They received quite a bit

sponsored by

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MSFT NASDAQ NM MICROSOFT CP 30.99 -0.40

MS NYSE CONSL MORGAN STANLEY 31.94 +0.04

NSC NYSE CONSL NORFOLK SOUTHERN 60.88 +0.34

NST NYSE CONSL NSTAR 36.99 +0.32

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PFE NYSE PFIZER INC 16.91 +0.43

PM NYSE CONSL PHILIP MORRIS 51.14 -0.10

PG NYSE CONSL PROCTER & GAMBLE 63.54 -0.05

RIMM NASDAQ NM RSCH IN MOTION 70.62 -0.78

SLE NYSE CONSL SARA LEE CORP 14.13 -0.04

STFC NASDAQ NM STATE AUTO 18.29 -0.01

VLO NYSE CONSL VALERO ENERGY 19.88 +0.43

VZ NYSE CONSL VERIZON COMMS 29.05 -0.23

WMT NYSE CONSL WAL-MART STORES 54.53 +0.04

DIS NYSE CONSL WALT DISNEY CO 36.79 +0.01

WFC NYSE CONSL WELLS FARGO & CO 33.48 -0.10

WEN NYSE CONSL WENDYS INTL 5.50 -0.01

WSBC NASDAQ NM WESBANCO 18.60 -0.03

YUM NYSE CONSL YUM! BRANDS INC 43.44 +0.26

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BAC 18.43 -0.11

PFE 16.80 -0.19

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Most Active

The most active issues Friday on The New York Stock Exchange as of 3:10 p.m. Central

Time were:

According to the Ohio

Department of Education,

New Boston is the second

poorest district in the state.

“I am not an attorney but

this seems to be a violation of

our students civil rights and

discrimination against those

less fortunate,” Staggs said.

Staggs said he plans to consult

with the school’s attorney

— Jack Rosati, of Bricker and

Eckler Law Offices in Columbus

— for advice about making

contact with civil rights

groups to pursue the issue of

economic discrimination.

Murray offered no com-

of training in forestry. That’s

part of what the program is all

about,” Jester said.

“I received the basics of

forestry and learned about

good forest management,”

Distel said. “The one I took

special notice of was the royal

plunioa, commonly called

elephant ear trees. It takes

over in a clear-cut area and

shades out everything else

that’s trying to come on. We

sprayed herbicide. We did a

lot of work in trying and hoping

to eradicate this plant

from the forest.”

Ware said the division is

sorting through applications

and he’s looking forward to

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Information courtesy Edward Jones

ment in response to Staggs’

accusations of discrimination.

“I’ve had several complaints

from New Boston residents

and why they’re paying

taxes and nothing is being

done. I can’t answer that

question. I think they should

probably ask somebody else,

like our state representatives

and state senators or the governor’s

office,” Staggs said.

RYAN SCOTT OTTNEY can be

reached at (740) 353-3101, ext.

235, or e-mail rottney@heartlandpublications.com.

interviews to fill the 70 positions

of workers who will be

starting in June and working

through the remainder of the

year.

He said the idea of creating

the corps with stimulus

money was to help clear invasive

species from forests like

Shawnee State Forest immediately,

while at the same time

training workers who could

improve woodlands for years

to come.

Those workers being hired

to begin in June will work in

nine state parks all together.

G. SAM PIATT can be reached

at (740) 353-3101, ext. 236.

Got news?

If you have community,

education or items of local

interest, send a news tip to

pdtnews@portsmouthdailytimes.com

or call

(740) 353-3101 today.

LIVESTOCK PRICES

COLUMBUS — The Eastern Cornbelt Daily Direct Summary

from Thursday as reported by the U.S. Department of

Agriculture’s Agriculture Marketing Service:

Barrows and gilts on a carcass basis: 8 cents higher.

BASE MARKET

On a carcass basis plant delivered (54-62 pct. lean)

69.00-82.00, weighted avg. 80.08.

Actual pricing with lean premiums added

0.8-0.9 inches backfat: 69.00-85.78.

0.6-0.7 inches backfat: 71.50-88.66.

Total prior day negotiated sales: 3,805.

Thursday’s total movement: 75,332.

RESULTS FROM UNITED PRODUCERS AUCTION

Market trends for Friday:

Hogs steady; cattle 1.00 higher; sows 1.00 higher.

Summary of Thursday’s auction at Bucyrus:

Hogs: Market 61.00-63.75; light 58.00-59.00; heavy 59.75

and lower.

Sows: Light 50.00-59.00; heavy 60.00-64.25.

Boars: Light 43.75 and lower; heavy 14.50-19.50.

Cattle: Choice: steers 90.00-100.00; heifers 88.00-99.75.

Select: steers 84.00-89.00; heifers 84.00-89.00.

Holsteins: steers 81.00-92.00; heifers 76.00-81.00.

Cows: Commercial & Utility 50.00-60.00.

Canner/Cutter 50.00 and lower.

Bulls: All bulls 52.00-72.50.

Feeder cattle: Yearlings: steers 80.00-85.00.

Calves: steers 95.00-126.00; heifers 80.00-95.00.

Holstein steers: 550 lbs. and down 77.00 and lower.

Sheep and lambs: Choice: wools 120.00-144.00; clips

138.00-141.00.

Lite fats 140.00-145.00.

Roasters 130.00-180.00.

Feeder lambs 40.00-132.00.

C M Y K


C M Y K

A4 Saturday, April 24, 2010 Portsmouth Daily Times

OHIO

U.S. Senator George Voinovich (R)

Washington D.C. Office

524 Hart Senate Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20510

(202) 224-3353

Cincinnati Office

Phone: (513) 684-3265

Fax: (513) 684-3269

http://voinovich.senate.gov/

U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown (D)

713 Hart Senate

Office Bldg.

Washington, DC 20510

Phone: (202) 224-2315

Fax: (202) 228-6321

Cincinnati Office

p (513) 684-1021

LETTER POLICY

Letters to the editor should be less than 400 words. All letters

are subject to editing, must be signed, and include address and

telephone number. Letters should be in good taste, addressing

issues, not personalities. Letters of appreciation will be considered

for publication, but lists of names or organizations will not

be accepted. Guest commentaries are at the discretion of the

managing editor. Send letters to: Portsmouth Daily Times, c/o

Letters to the editor, P.O. Box 581, Portsmouth, OH 45662 or

pdtnews@portsmouth-dailytimes.com

GUEST COMMENTARY

During National Volunteer Week

the American Cancer Society

acknowledges its volunteers

BY ROBERT PASCHEN

National Volunteer Week has been

under way this week and the American

Cancer Society acknowledges the more

than 3 million volunteers nationwide

who are working every day to help create

a world with less cancer and more

birthdays.

“The success of everything we do is

attributed to the incredible volunteer

base,” said Yvette Livers, regional vice

president of the American Cancer Society,

Ohio Division. “Our special events,

programs for cancer patients, and all of

the other areas we work in would not be

successful, or possible, if we did not get

the continuous support from volunteers.”

Volunteers are the foundation of the

American Cancer Society. They have

been important because they have

enabled the American Cancer Society to

help save lives, while fulfilling their

own. Volunteers impact the community

in ways that could not be done without

their personal commitment.

National Volunteer Week is an annual

celebration to recognize and thank

America’s volunteers and call public

attention to all they do to improve communities

nationwide. It began in 1974

when President Richard Nixon signed an

executive order establishing the week as

an annual celebration for volunteering.

The occasion is sponsored by the Points

of Light Foundation and Volunteer Center

National Network.

This one week is celebrated annually

during the third full week of April, unless

Easter or Passover occurs, then the week

is moved to the fourth week of April.

Volunteers assist the Society in a number

of different ways. Some of them

include:

Relay For Life — More than 3.5 million

people, including 500,000 cancer

survivors, participate in the world’s

largest movement. Funds raised benefit

the American Cancer Society’s work to

end cancer. Volunteers from teams take

turns walking laps during this overnight

community event. Relay honors those

who have battled cancer, remembers

those who lost the battle and gives

f (513) 684-1029

http://brown.senate.gov

U.S. Representative

Jean Schmidt (R — 2nd District)

Washington D.C. Office

418 Cannon House Office Building,

Washington, D.C. 20515

Phone: (202) 225-3164

Toll Free: (800) 784-6366

Fax: (202) 225-1992

Portsmouth Office

601 Chillicothe St.

Portsmouth, OH 45662

Toll Free: (877) 354-1440

Fax: (740) 354-1144

http://www.house.gov/schmidt/

everyone the opportunity to fight back

against this disease.

Making Strides Against Breast Cancer

— As the Society’s premier event to

raise funds and awareness to fight breast

cancer, 500,000 people across the country

participate in this inspiring, non-competitive

walk each year. This event

unites communities to honor and celebrate

breast cancer survivors, educate

women about the importance of early

detection and prevention and raises

money to fund lifesaving research and

support programs to provide hope and

help save lives from breast cancer.

Patient programs and services —

Dedicated Society volunteers provide

direct assistance and service to people

facing cancer in a variety of ways. Look

Good Feel Better, Reach to Recovery,

Road to Recovery, Man to Man prostate

cancer support groups and a number of

breast cancer support groups are some of

the many programs that volunteers provide

help with.

Legislative advocacy — The Society’s

advocacy affiliate, the American

Cancer Society Cancer Action Network,

has a grassroots volunteer network of

hundreds of thousands of volunteers who

successfully work to send strong messages

to lawmakers about issues that

matter to people.

Office volunteers — These devoted

volunteers are responsible for mailings,

compiling packets and kits, inputting

data into the computer, organizing materials

for health promotion and special

event activities and ensuring memorials

are processed properly. Throughout the

year they gladly complete a variety of

tasks.

Founded in 1913 and with national

headquarters in Atlanta, the Society has

13 regional divisions and local offices in

3,400 communities, involving millions

of volunteers across the United States.

For more information anytime, call toll

free 1 (800) 227-2345, or visit www.cancer.org.

ROBERT PASCHEN is with the American Cancer

Society and may be reached at (888) 227-6446,

ext 3800, (614) 214-0095 or Robert.paschen@

cancer.org.

Charlie Wilson (D — 6th District)

Washington Office

226 Cannon HOB

Washington, DC 20515

ph: (202) 225-5705

fx: (202) 225-5907

Ironton Office

202 Park Ave.

Suite C

Ironton, OH 45638

ph: (740) 533-9423

fx: (740) 533-9359

http://www.charliewilson.house.gov/

Ohio Senator Tom Niehaus (R)

Senate Building

1 Capitol Square, 2nd Floor

Columbus, OH 43215

OPINION

PORTSMOUTH DAILY TIMES

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Phone, (740) 353-3101

Business fax, (740) 353-7280; News fax, (740) 353-4676

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Casinos in Columbus —

Vote no on Ballot Issue 2

Vote no on Issue 2; stop butchering/bloating

the Constitution of the State of Ohio!

An open letter to Sens. Goodman and Hughes,

State of Ohio legislature:

If the Honorable Mr. Goodman, and the

Honorable Mr. Hughes, members of the Ohio

Senate, had analyzed the situation properly,

they could have devised a ballot issue that

would clean up the situation, rather than the

one they did present, that simply sweeps the

crumbs under the edge of the carpet.

A proper ballot issue would have repealed

the constitutional amendment that voted in

casinos last November — it would have

expunged Section 6 of Article XV, to the

extent that it applies to casinos, and at the

same time, it would have enacted suitable legislation,

if required, to direct members of the

gambling industry to build casinos in a manner

suitable to any community selected and

approved for such a facility. Authority should

be granted for any community to negotiate

directly with any gambling casino.

A constitution is a document wherein grand

statements of policy are memorialized — to

guide legislators in their efforts to formulate

laws.

The use of amendments, as permitted by a

section of the constitution, is for modifying a

part of the constitution that has been shown by

experience to need some change; or to add a

new, general policy that is needed because

new circumstances have evolved.

The current situation, involving an immediate

attempt — through Issue 2 — to amend an

amendment, is certainly additional evidence

that the question — casino or no casino? — is

a question that should not now, or ever, be elevated

to a section of the Constitution of the

State of Ohio.

Phone: (614) 466-8082

Email: SD14@senate.state.oh.us

Ohio Representative

Todd Book (D — 89th District)

77 S. High St

11th Floor

Columbus, OH 43215-6111

Phone: (614) 466-2124

Fax: (614) 719-6989

Email: district89@ohr.state.oh.us

KENTUCKY

U.S. Senators

Mitch McConnell (R)

Washington Office

361-A Russell Senate Office Building

Washington, DC 20510

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Phone: (202) 224-2541

Fax: (202) 224-2499

Jim Bunning (R)

Washington Office

316 Hart Senate Office Building

Washington, DC 20510

Main: 202.224.4343

Fax: 202.228.1373

U.S. Representative

Geoff Davis (R — 4th District)

Washington Office

1108 Longworth

House Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20515

T (202) 225-3465

F (202) 225-0003

Deborah Daniels

Managing Editor

Matters such as gambling, which a casino

facilitates, might be included in general terms

in a constitution — to permit gambling, or to

prohibit gambling.

Prior to Issue 3, which was on the ballot in

November 2009, there was no article or section

of the Constitution of the State of Ohio

that prohibited gambling in general; therefore,

there was no need to amend the constitution in

any way to permit it, in a casino or otherwise.

An earlier amendment, that had authorized

the state lottery and presented some specific

limitations on bingo games, was the only content

of section 6 of Article XV.

The Ohio Revised Code (ORC) to date has

not included any section or chapter that covers

casinos in any way. There are a few items in

the ORC regarding particular situations related

to gambling in municipalities, but none of

those items is related at all to construction or

operation of casinos. The ORC is the document

that should be used for legislation that

gives particulars about casinos.

The members of the gambling industry, able

and willing to spend millions of dollars,

pushed for the casino amendment, certainly to

insure that, by getting it into the constitution,

the difficulty of modifying or curtailing the

construction of casinos, by making a change to

the constitution, would prevent any but a

strong, serious effort from those opposed to

casinos.

Vote no on Issue 2 in May 2010! We need to

go back to the “drawing board;” the casino

issue must be obliterated from the constitution,

not simply smeared around therein.

An injunction may be obtained from the

appropriate court, if necessary, to bring action

to a halt pending the transfer of the complete

wording on casinos out of the constitution and

into appropriate legislation.

William H. Sims

Columbus

John Clark

Publisher

State Senator Robin Webb

(D — 18th District)

404 W. Main Street

Grayson KY 41143

Frankfort Address(es)

702 Capitol Ave

Annex Room 229

Frankfort KY 40601

Home: (606) 474-5380

Annex: (502) 564-8100 Ext. 676

Kentucky Representative

Tanya Pullin (D — District 98)

1026 Johnson Lane

South Shore KY 41175

Phone Number(s)

Annex: (502) 564-8100 Ext. 678

Work: (606) 932-2505

John Stegeman

Sports Editor

Our View editorials are the express views of the Portsmouth Daily Times.

Opinions appearing elsewhere on this page are the view of the author

and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Portsmouth Daily Times.


Church News

Sisters celebrate

Diamond Jubilee

On May 13, a Liturgy will

be held in the Chapel of Our

Lady of Lourdes at Assisi

Heights, Rochester, Minn., to

celebrate the Golden and Diamond

Jubilees of 17 Sisters of

Saint Francis. Two of these

Sisters of Saint Francis has

served the Portsmouth area.

Sister Alice Ann Campion

will mark 60

years of religious

life.

Sister Alice

Ann Campion,(formerly

Sister

Mary Jacinta),

is a

Sister Campion

daughter of

A l i c e

Mitchell Campion and Cornelius

(Neil) Campion

(deceased), and entered the

Rochester Franciscans from

St. Joseph Parish in Owatonna,

Minn. She received a

bachelor’s degree in the arts

with a major in music from the

College of St. Teresa. In addition,

she received a master’s of

science in education from

Moorhead State University,

centering on contemporary

music in music classes. Sister

Alice Ann taught choral and

instrumental music as well as

diocesan and parish liturgical

music in Austin, Minn.;

Portsmouth; Chicago, Ill.;

Rocky Ford and Pueblo,

Colo.; St. Joseph, Mich.;

Bogota, Colombia, SA. In

2003, a music school in Bogota

was named in her honor.

She was a member of the

National Catholic Music Educators,

the National Pastoral

Musicians, and the American

Guild of Organists. Now

retired at Assisi Heights, she

ministers through prayer and

the arts.

Sister Severin Duehren will

mark 50

years of religious

life.

Sister Severin

Duehren

entered the

Rochester

Franciscan

Congrega-

Sister Duehren

tion from her

home parish

of Our Lady of Perpetual Help

in Concordia, Kansas. She

earned a bachelor of science

degree in the field of medical

technology from the College

of St. Teresa in Winona, and a

master of science from Ohio

State University in Columbus

in clinical pathology. Sister

Severin also earned an MHA

from St. Louis University in

hospital administration. Her

CORNETT BUILDING

SUPPLY

New Boston, Ohio

primary career was in the field

of health, serving at Mercy

Hospital in Portsmouth,, in

Tyler, Minn., and at St. Margaret’s

Hospital in Spring Valley,

Ill. She was part of her

congregational leadership

from 1972-75, 1979-82, and

1998-2005. She served on the

Samaritan/Bethany Foundation

Board and Committee,

2002-2010. At present, she is

retired and serves as a volunteer

in Rochester.

Festival choir

presents worship

concerts

The Scioto County Festival

Choir will present worship concerts

this week in Portsmouth

and Ironton. The program entitled

“Heaven on My Mind,”

will be presented in Ironton

today at 7 p.m. at Ironton First

United Methodist Church and

in Portsmouth at Cornerstone

United Methodist Church at 3

p.m. Sunday. There is no admission

charge for either event.

This spring’s worship concerts

have a strong southern

gospel flavor with the title

coming from Mosie Lister’s

classic “I’m Feeling Fine.” The

choir will again be under the

direction of Gail Thornton and

accompanied by Rebecca

Climer and Dan Ross. Dr.

Rhoni Maxwell-Rader will be

feature soloist on the old gospel

quartet standard “Just a Little

Talk with Jesus,” and Penny

Emnett will be soloist on the

old gospel hymn “I’ll Meet You

in the Morning.” Chris Nourse

will sing the lead on another

gospel classic, “Sweeter as the

Day Goes By,” and Dan Ross

will add emphasis vocally to

the gospel message “We Sure

Do Need Him Now.” The

choir’s ensemble group will

present a favorite from a recent

Gaither recording, “He’s a Personal

Savior,” and the whole

choir will lift your spirits with

arrangements of “It Will Be

Worth It All,” “My Savior First

of All,” and “Everybody Will

Be Happy.” The service closes

with the Choir’s testimony,

“Until then my heart will go on

singing,” from the great old

gospel song “Until Then.”

If your spirit could use a lift

be sure to worship with the

Scioto County Festival Choir

this weekend.

Seminar

begins Friday

Central Church of Christ,

1211 Grandview Ave., will

host the “Final Things” seminar

with Robert Ford, Ph.D.,

on Friday and May 1 and 2.

Ford will be discussing

“Signs,” “The Judgment,” and

“The New Earth.”

Donnie Martin

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For is a member of the Sack

School of Bible and Ministry at

Kentucky Christian University

in Grayson, Ky. He had spent

many years in the preaching

ministry before going to KCU.

For more information call

the church at (740) 353-5846.

Revivals

• New Boston First Church

of the Nazarene, 3962 Rhodes

Ave., New Boston — Revival

services at 7 p.m. Friday and

May 1 and 10:30 a.m. and 6

p.m. May 2; Brittany Coleman-Ison

as evangelist.

She earned her bachelor of

arts in religion from Mount

Vernon Nazarene University in

2004 and served as youth past

for the Sciotoville Church of

the Nazarene upon graduation.

In September 2006 she served

as a volunteer missionary and

did mission in Ljubljana,

Slovenia, from September

2006 to August 2007. Now she

is attending Ashland Theological

Seminary earning a Master

of Arts in Clinical Counseling.

She and her husband currently

serve in a cross-cultural ministry

to Chinese students.

• Portsmouth First Church of

the Nazarene, Third and Brown

streets — Revival services at

10:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m.

Monday through Wednesday;

Nick Jones as evangelist.

Jones, who played college

football, saw it all go to ruin

because of sin. During a mission

trip to Costa Rica, the

direction of Jones’ life was

changed. Jones was called to

full-time ministry and his

focus was to be an evangelist.

• Rush Free Baptist Church,

Duck Run Road, Lucasville —

Revival services at 7 p.m. Tuesday

through May 1, with Curtis

Jones, former pastor from

Maryville, Tenn., preaching.

• South Shore First Church of

the Nazarene, 357 SM Roberson

Drive, South Shore, Ky. —

Revival services at 7 p.m. Friday

with Randy Crisp preaching

and Mike Salyers providing

special music and 7 p.m. May 1

with Bob Fessel preaching and

Kevin and Faye Pistole providing

special music.

Upcoming events

• Bigelow Church, 415

Washington St. — Deacons

meeting 6:30 p.m. Monday;

prayer group meeting at 10

a.m. Tuesday at home of

Ginny Cook, with lunch at

noon followed by preparation

of candy packs for Operation

Christmas Child boxes; elders

meeting at 8 a.m. May 1.

• Central Church of Christ,

1211 Grandview Ave. — Children’s

Ministry meeting and

softball meeting after morning

worship Sunday.

• Christ United Methodist

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Wheel Alignment • Wheel Balance

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Church, 5731 Gallia St.,

Sciotoville — Rebekah Circle

group meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday

at Dick’s Pizza in Sciotoville;

ladies attending Women of Faith

Friday and May 1 at Nationwide

Arena in Columbus.

• First Christian Church, 843

Third St. — Pastor David Garshaw’s

last day with worship at

9:30 a.m., fellowship at 10:30

a.m. and Sunday school at 10:45

a.m. Sunday; helping with Meals

on Wheels, Disciples and Friends

meeting at 3 p.m. Monday at Hill

View Retirement Center.

• First Church of Christ, 1224

Dogwood Ridge Road, Wheelersburg

—Youth’s Opening

Day Fundraiser Dinner for $5

each at 11:45 a.m. Sunday with

competitions for the best hot

dog sauce and the best BBQ

sandwich and proceeds used

for church camp this summer;

COLTS trip Tuesday to Ohio

Amish Country with Shawnee

Trails.

• First Presbyterian Church,

221 Court St. — Celebrating

Fourth Sunday of Easter on

Sunday with Youth Task Force

at 12:15 p.m.; Presbyterian

Women gathering for annual

birthday dinner Tuesday at

Second Presbyterian Church.

• North Moreland Christian

Baptist Church, 1910 Harrisonville

Ave. — Serving

breakfast from 8:30 to 9:30

a.m. Sunday.

• Rosemount Road Church of

Christ in Christian Union, 1313

Rosemount Road —Youth

Spirit Rally at 7:30 p.m today.

• Sciotoville Christian

Church, Third and Bloom

streets, Sciotoville — Dodge

Ball Lock-in at 10 p.m. Friday.

• Second Presbyterian

Church, 801 Waller St. — Celebrating

Fourth Sunday of

Easter on Sunday.

Benefit songfest

• White Gravel Community

Church — Songfest beginning

at 6 p.m. May 1 with proceeds

going to a mother who is

expecting four daughters

Fundraisers

• Christ United Methodist

Church, 5731 Gallia St.,

Sciotoville — Annual spaghetti

dinner from 4:30 to 6:30

p.m. Monday; tickets available

for $6 for adults and $3 for

children; menu including

spaghetti, slaw, garlic t7oast

and dessert; for more information

call (740) 776-1870.

• First Christian Church, 843

Third St. — Annual Spring

Salad Smorgasbord sponsored

by Christians Women’s Fellowship

from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday;

tickets for $6 each; take

out available; Special Trash and

Treasure Room open at 10 a.m.

• Lucasville Emmanuel United

Methodist Church, Scioto

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Portsmouth Daily Times Saturday, April 24, 2010 A5

Here in

Ohio we

have four

seasons. In

the land

w h e r e

D a v i d

lived, they

have two:

the rainy

season and

the dry. The

rainy winter

months

produce lush, green fields

form November to April. During

the usually rainless summer

from May to October, the

plants go dormant and the

landscape turns brown. During

the summer, most shepherds

must search hard to find

decent grazing for their flocks.

The best land is used by

farmers for crops and is

strictly off-limits to sheep

and goats. They must graze

in marginal land where good

food is not abundant, and

sometimes travel long distances

to find even that.

I wonder when David wrote

Psalm 23 — “The Lord is My

Shepherd.” Maybe it was in

the rainy season when he

could actually see the green

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grass and still waters. Sitting

outside and looking at wide

open spaces with green grass

right before you helps you to

understand God’s glory and

God’s love. God has created

this beautiful, pleasant world

for us to enjoy!

But then again, maybe

David wrote the song during a

long trek through brown fields

and across dry, rocky creek

beds. Could David believe in

those difficult months that the

Lord is our shepherd? Oh,

yes! “The Lord is my shepherd,

I shall not want” is a

statement of faith. This is a

song we can sing when we are

far away from the grass we are

looking for. It is a song we can

sing when the green pastures

are right there. The song of

faith is ours to sing all year

long. We say, “the Lord is my

shepherd” no matter what is

happening in the world

around us. All year long, in

good times and bad, we have

God with us. And we have

the joy of following God!

The REV. STANLEY N. WEB-

STER is the pastor of Morning

Star Presbyterian Parish in

Portsmouth and may be reached

at (740) 353-4259 or (740) 353-

4159 or pastorstan@verizon.net.

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Sun. Morn. Services 10am & 11am

Sun. Eve. 6pm - Wed. 7:00pm

Pastor Gary Newman

& Congregation invite you

740-821-0766

Your

church

can

advertise

here,

phone

353-3101

ask for

Wilma.

Street, Lucasville — Yard sale

featuring toys, books, housewares,

etc. starting at 9 a.m.

Friday and May 1; proceeds

going to Relay for Life.

• Serenity Acres Christian Outreach,

five miles on AAHighway

from Jesse Stuart Bridge —

Rummage sale with hot dogs and

fudge available beginning at 9

a.m. Friday and May 1 and 3; for

more information call Rachel at

(606) 932-6698.

Deadline

• Pastors and church secretaries

in the Portsmouth area

are asked to submit news

items for the Religion Page by

From the Pulpit

Rev. Stanley

Webster

Contributing

Columnist

D.W. Davis Funeral Home

65 North Jackson Street, P.O. Box 387

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Jack D. Davis Owner

Phone: (740) 778-2030

1-800-482-1921

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OUR SUNDAY SCHEDULE INCLUDES:

Morning Worship and Junior Church 9:30 am • Broadcast over WXIC Waverly AM 660 Kl 9:45-10:45

• SUNDAY SCHOOL FOR ALL AGES 11:00 a.m. • SENIOR YOUTH MEETING - 6:15 P.M.

• CHILDREN’S MEETINGS - 6:45 • EVENING EVANGELISTIC SERVICE 7:30 P.M.

4 p.m. Wednesday. Please

include church name and the

name and telephone number

of the person providing the

information. If the information

for the free religion news is

mailed, use this address:

Portsmouth Daily Times,

Church News, P.O. Box 581,

Portsmouth, OH 45662-0581.

The e-mail address is pdtnews@portsmouth-dailytimes.com.

Please do not call

the information in to the paper.

Ministers and pastors who

write a “From the Pulpit” column

should submit the column

by Monday for the following

Saturday’s edition.

Watch our newscast daily at

www.portsmouth-dailytimes.com

Melcher

Funeral Home

1417 Offnere Street,

Portsmouth, Ohio 45662

740-353-2808

(Fax 740-353-4589)

2828 Gallia St, Portsmouth 353-1765

Open Sundays 11 am-4pm

LIFE

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354-5433 • 354-LIFE

24 Hours A Day!

Your

church can

advertise

here, phone

353-3101 ask

for Wilma.

C M Y K


C M Y K

A6 Saturday, April 24, 2010 Portsmouth Daily Times

With spring just around the

corner, that familiar anticipation

of warmer weather and

long Sunday drives with the

windows down has returned.

After a long winter of cold

temperatures and likely snowfall,

getting outside and driving

in the warm sum is a luxury

drivers across the country

have earned.

But as enjoyable as that first

Sunday drive can be, it can

also prove disastrous for vehicle

owners who don’t prepare

their cars or trucks before hitting

the open road.

An industry leader in motor

oil, offers the following tips to

drivers about to ready their

ride for that first warm weather

road trip of the season.

• Give your car a fresh

start. Many men, women and

children feel rejuvenated once

the warm air of spring finally

arrives. Vehicle owners can

give their cars and trucks a

similar fresh start with a few

simple changes to their vehicle

maintenance routine.

One way drivers can make a

profound impact on their vehicles

this season is to address

In the world of tires, “low

rolling resistance” is a lot like

health care. It’s a topic that

affects nearly all adults, but

the majority of consumers are

not very well versed about the

subject.

This is partly because tires

have long been put on the back

burner. Consumers know their

tires are round and have tread

patterns, but most don't want

to think about them until those

treads start to wear or there's a

flat.

Well, as Bob Dylan sort of

sang, “The Tires, They are a-

Changin.’” And a lot of this

metamorphosis is directly

related to environmental

issues. Nearly every hybrid

vehicle now comes equipped

with low rolling resistance

(LRR) tires, which are

designed to minimize the ener-

Though the issue has largely

stopped grabbing headlines

and has simply become a fact

of life, the cost of fuel is likely

to be on the rise again in this

year. So says the United States

Energy Information Administration

(EIA), whose Short-

Term Energy Outlook expects

the price of crude oil to substantially

increase in 2010 and

2011. Crude oil averaged $62

per barrel in 2009, a figure

While everyone wants to

conserve fuel, many drivers are

still driving in ways that make it

difficult to do. The following

are some of the common mistakes

vehicle owners make:

• Idling. Cars get zero miles

per gallon when idling, so make

sure the car isn’t motionless

when the engine is running.

• Choice of tires. Some tires

promise high performance and

deliver just that. However, such

tires can require more energy to

move on the road (which is

known as rolling resistance)

than regular tires, wasting fuel

in the process.

• Choice of fuel. If the vehicle

manual recommends using

the lubricants they use to keep

their car running strong. Unbeknownst

to many vehicle owners,

conventional motor oils

slow starting rpm while

restricting oil flow to critical

engine parts and increasing

wear on bearings and rings.

However, synthetic motor oils

provide significant performance

benefits over their conventional

counterparts thanks

in large part to their superior

resistance to varnish and

sludge development. That

superior resistance enables

engines to run cleaner with

synthetics, providing better

fuel economy for those long

Sunday drives while offering

more wear protection in the

meantime.

• Routinely check tire

pressure. Poorly inflated tires

are often a silent assassin.

While nearly everyone can

hear a clunky engine or notice

smoke coming out from

underneath a vehicle’s hood,

few people ever recognize that

their tires are poorly inflated.

That’s unfortunate, as poorly

inflated tires force the engine

to work harder, decreasing fuel

gy wasted as heat while the

tire rolls down the road. A

wide array of manufacturers

are also developing LRR tires

(in lieu of standard models) for

gas-powered cars and trucks.

The overall result: better

fuel efficiency. In fact, says

Mark Chung, director of corporate

planning and strategy

for a major tire company, studies

have shown that for a vehicle

averaging 15,000 miles a

year, fuel savings (figured at

$3 per gallon) on LRR tires

will be approximately $100

annually.

“Think of a bicycle,” says

Chung. “It takes more energy

to pedal a bike when the tires

have less air because more

rubber is hitting the road. The

same theory applies to your

car. A lot of energy is used to

overcome rolling resistance,

EIA expects to escalate to

roughly $80 and $84 per barrel

in 2010 and 2011, respectively.

The escalating cost of crude

oil figures to hit the nation’s

drivers at the pump, where the

EIA predicts a substantial

increase in the price of regular

grade gasoline. While the cost

of fuel averaged $2.35 per gallon

in 2009, the average gallon

fuel could cost drivers $2.84 in

2010 and $2.96 in 2011. While

a higher octane fuel, use it.

Using lower octane fuel might

cost less at the pump, but that

lower octane fuel will often

force the engine to work harder

to achieve the same performance.

SPRING ON THE ROAD

Add length to your automobile’s life

With the economy on the rebound

after the country’s worst financial

times in decades, many a smart vehicle

owner is looking to get more bang

for their vehicle buck. In lieu of quick

trade-ins, more and more vehicle

owners are applying the lessons they

learned from the recession to their

vehicles and trying to make their purchases

last longer.

According to the automotive

experts at the non-profit National

Institute for Automotive Service

Excellence (ASE), today’s vehicles

are designed with long-lasting reliability

in mind, making it easier for

vehicle owners to get more and more

out of their vehicle purchase. To do

just that, consider the following tips

courtesy of ASE.

• Find a repair shop that suits your

needs. Motorists often cite the difficulty

in finding a reliable mechanic

they feel they can trust. A courteous

staff that’s willing to answer your

questions is a good starting point, as

Get your ride ready

for spring road trips

efficiency and taxing the

engine as a result. But keeping

tires properly inflated is a

snap. Simply consult your

vehicle manual for recommended

tire pressure, and keep

the tires at the recommended

level. Though it might not

seem like much, drivers will

instantly notice a difference in

their vehicle’s performance,

particularly when they hit the

open road and put the pedal to

the metal.

• Stick to your maintenance

schedule. Drivers tend

to drive more once the weather

starts warming up. With no

snow on the ground and warm

air to fill up the car, a road trip

is far more attractive in the

warmer months than it is when

winter is rearing its ugly head.

Vehicle owners can keep

their cars running strong this

spring by strictly adhering to

their vehicle maintenance

schedule. This has even gotten

easier in recent years, as many

vehicle manufacturers are suggesting

longer intervals

between tune-ups and oil

changes, resulting in less trips

to the mechanic.

so gas mileage suffers (and

more C02 is emitted) as a

direct result. This is the reason

properly inflated LRR tires,

which provide the least

amount of resistance against

the road, are gaining acceptance

across the U.S.”

According to Chung, manufacturers

of LRR tires adhere

to the same federal guidelines

used to control the traction,

treadwear and temperature

resistance of every other type

of tire. So for eco-conscious

and budget-conscious drivers

who truly want to maximize

their mileage, the shift to low

rolling resistance tires is a popular

upgrade.

Some manufacturers have

mastered the LLR art while

others are still learning. And

many original equipment and

replacement tires still lack

this might seem like a tough

pill to swallow, the EIA notes

these figures take the country’s

ongoing economic recovery

into consideration. So while

the higher cost of fuel might

cause some to cringe, the

economy’s recovery might just

make those costs easier to handle.

• Home Insurance • Auto Insurance • Life Insurance • Free Quotes

is a shop that’s displaying the ASE

sign or logo, which indicates the shop

employs certified technicians. Also,

check the shop walls for any past

commendations, including civic,

community or customer service

awards.

It’s also a good idea to check what

vehicles the mechanics are currently

working on. If the vehicles in the

parking lot are equal in value to your

own, that’s a good sign.

• Do the small things to save fuel.

Sticking to the maintenance

schedule can also make those

Sunday drives more enjoyable.

• Give your car a good

wash. Every vehicle owner

wants their car to look good,

especially when warm weather

arrives and jaunts to the beach

become the norm. But a car

wash can not only benefit a

car’s appearance, it can also

help boost its performance.

rolling resistance labeling,

warns Chung. “Therefore,

consumers should consult

their tire dealers before making

any low rolling resistance

purchase,” he says.

Also, Chung reminds consumers

that low rolling resistance

tires are but one way

drivers can help the environment

and save money. He

offers these additional tips:

• Keep your tires properly

inflated. Once a month, when

the tires are cold (at least three

to four hours after the vehicle

has been driven), check tire

pressure with a reliable tire

gauge. Be sure that the valve

stems have a plastic or metal

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The cost of fuel is among the highest

costs associated with owning a vehicle.

But small things like ensuring

tires are properly inflated, replacing

misfiring spark plugs and even clearing

the trunk of clutter can all

increase fuel efficiency and help your

bottom line in the process.

• Give your engine a break. Cars

aren’t all that different from the

human body in that everything is

directly or indirectly connected as a

system. Just like a body can over-

Over the course of a typical

winter, salt, slush, dirt, and

grime tend to buildup the more

a vehicle navigates its way

through snow- or ice-covered

roads. A thorough car wash

can remove these unwanted

deposits, while also clearing

away break dust that can erode

wheel surface. Removing

these uninvited guests can also

help a car run more smoothly,

cap to keep dirt out and seal

against leakage.

• Replace your air filter. A

clogged air filter blocks the air

needed to burn fuel efficiently

which wastes gas.

• Keep your car tuned-up

according to the manufacturer’s

recommended schedule

and you’ll keep all systems in

good working order, which

can optimize your mileage.

• Slow down. For every five

miles per hour you go above

60 mph, you’re lowering your

gas mileage and, ultimately,

paying even more for each gallon

of gas.

Courtesy of ARAcontent

compensate in one area when another

area is injured, a car’s engine will be

forced to overcompensate when there

are deficiencies in other areas. For

example, a clogged air filter or fouled

spark plug makes combustion less

efficient, which reduces power —

and wastes fuel as well. Motorists can

give their engine a break by replacing

clogged filters, sticking to their vehicle

maintenance schedule and routinely

checking fluid levels.

Source: Metro Editorial

A few simple maintenance tips can prepare your car for the spring and summer road trip season.

Your tires can save you money: secrets of low rolling resistance

Gasoline prices on the rise this year

Common ways we waste fuel

Got news?

If you have community,

education or items of local

interest, send a news tip

to pdtnews@portsmouthdailytimes.com

or call

(740) 353-3101 today.

Metro Illustration

improving fuel efficiency and

saving drivers money along

the way.

Source: Metro Editorial

AUTO Stylz Inc.

Phone:

740.353.7807

1026 Findlay St.

Portsmouth

Cell: 740.464.7670

Email:

autostylz@

gmail.com

• ASE Master

Certified Tech

• Insurance &

Frame Work

• Custom Paint

• Auto Glass

• A/C Service

• Brakes,

Rims & Tires

• Shocks

• Welding

Now offering

professional

installation of

security•Remote

Start•Audio and

Video Products•

Window Tinting


Calendar

Today

• Distribution for Angel Food orders,

Cornerstone United Methodist Church,

808 Offnere St., 9:30 -11 a.m.; Potter’s

House Ministries, 5409 Winchester

Ave., Sciotoville, 9:30-11 a.m.

• Portsmouth Public Library, open,

1220 Gallia St., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Wheelersburg

Library, 10745 Old Gallia Pike,

Wheelersburg, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.;

Lucasville Library, 103 Ohio 728,

Lucasville, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

• ArtAffects, open, 607 Chillicothe St.,

10 a.m.-4 p.m.

• Elks City Club, Keno, games,

socializing, 544 Fourth St. entrance, 1

p.m. until closing.

• Movie, Flatwoods Branch, 1705

Argillite Road, Flatwoods, Ky., 3 p.m.

• Narcotics Anonymous, open, the

New Strength, Hope and Freedom

Group, All Saints Episcopal Church,

Fourth and Court streets, 6:30 p.m.

• Square dance with John Simon

Band, Trinity Hall, junction of Ohio 73

and Pond Creek Road, 7-10:30 p.m.

• Bingo, Our Lady of Sorrows basement,

2215 Galena Pike, West

Portsmouth, 7 p.m.; doors open, 5 p.m.

• Bingo, Beaver Firefighters Association,

7000 Ohio 335, Beaver, 7 p.m.;

doors open, 5 p.m.

Local Briefs

Cruise-in is May 6

Northwest Elementary will

be hosting a Classic Car

Cruise-In from 4:30 to 7:30

p.m. Thursday, May 6, at the

school, 4728 Henley Deemer

Road, McDermott. The

cruise-in will promote Family

Night at the book fair and

Evening with the Arts. The

book fair will be held in the

Northwest Elementary library,

and the theme this year will

be “Book Fair Diner” (1950’s

theme). Cars will be on display

before and during

Evening with the Arts and the

Book Fair.

If you have a car (1984 or

older) to show off, contact

Alyssa Bach-Enz at Northwest

Elementary at (740) 259-

2250.

All proceeds will do to the

elementary library fund.

Angel Food hours

are announced

Cornerstone United

Methodist will begin taking

orders for May at the April’s

distribution today. Orders will

be taken every Tuesday and

Thursday 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.

and Wednesday from 5:30 to

7:30 p.m. beginning Tuesday.

The last day to order at Cornerstone

will be May 13 at 2

p.m. with May’s distribution

being on May 22. Those who

wish can order online now

until May 13. Note that the

evening hours have changed

from Tuesday to Wednesday

from 5:30 until 7:30 and will

remain these hours until fall.

LOCAL

By FRANK LEWIS

PDT Staff Writer

If you put off that yard

work until the weekend,

you may just be out of

luck.

The National Weather

Service in Wilmington is

calling for hazardous

weather beginning today.

Showers and thunderstorms

with locally moderate

to heavy rainfall will

Portsmouth Daily Times Saturday, April 24, 2010 A7

be possible today into

tonight.

This will continue the

threat for some isolated

flooding.

In addition, the atmosphere

may become unstable

enough this afternoon

and evening for some

storms to become severe.

Going into the weekend,

the main severe weather

threat appears to be damaging

wind. However, the

NWS says there is still

quite a bit of uncertainty

with regards to instability.

Kim Carver, executive

director of the Scioto

County Emergency Management

Agency said forecasts

should be monitored

into the weekend for those

planning outdoor events.

FRANK LEWIS can be

reached at (740) 353-3101, ext.

232 or flewis@heartlandpublications.com

Hey Moms and Dads, Grandmas and Grandpas and Aunts and Uncles...

This is your chance to ‘Show ‘Em Off!’

In the Daily Times

Baby Edition‘10

A special supplement to highlight babies born between

MAY 1, 2009 AND APRIL 30, 2010

Baby Edition ‘10

to be published

Sunday, May 16

• Narcotics Anonymous, Honestly

Dedicated Group, in the arts and craft

room, Bellefonte Behavioral Health Center,

St. Christopher Drive, Russell, Ky., 7

p.m.

• Alcoholics Anonymous, United

Group, open lead, All Saints Episcopal

Church, Fourth and Court streets, 8 p.m.

• Russell D. Williams Post American

Legion, karaoke, 950 Gallia St., 8:30

p.m.-12:30 a.m.

• Campbell Sisters Late Nite Band,

Ironton Eagles, Third Street, Ironton,

8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.

• Dogwood Festival in Piketon:

8 a.m. — Cyclist Dogwood Tour, old

Piketon High School

9 a.m. — 5k run and 5k walk, new

Piketon High School

10 a.m.-3 p.m. — Trail ride, new

Piketon High School

Noon — Cornhole tournament, grade

school; Anchor of Hope Church of God,

Village Green

1 p.m. — Chainsaw contest, Main

Street; Pike’s Past Slide Presentation by

Jim Henry, Dogwood Headquarters,

Main Street

2 p.m. — Children’s games Grade

School

2–4 p.m. — Bobby Jo’s Cloggers, Village

Green

2:30–4:30 p.m. — Gypsy Jug Band,

Also, The distribution hours

have changed to 9:30 until 11

a.m.

Angel Food is available to

all with no income requirements

or restrictions. Angel

Food is brand name quality

items with the Signature box

being about $60 to $70 dollars

of food for $30. This

month’s signature box contains

ribeye steaks, lasagna,

breaded fish, ground beef,

country fried steaks, sausage,

fresh and frozen vegetables

and fruits, eggs, milk and

always a dessert. There are a

wide variety of especially

nice meat specials, a steak

box, a seafood box with

shrimp, crab, clams, fish, flavored

chicken breast box,

family meal box, two new

“after school” boxes with kid

friendly items like chicken

nuggets, corn dogs, pizza,

sandwiches and more, and

also, kid friendly fruit and

snack box. There is a totally

new item call “Bits of Blessings”

that is an assortment of

all kinds of items. Of course,

there is the ever-popular fruit

and veggie box, all of these

at prices to save your family

money. To see pictures of all

that is available and to order

online go to

http://www.angelfoodministries.com.

Only cash, money orders,

and food stamps will be

accepted. Those who order

online may use a debit or

credit card.

Volunteers will accept

donations and make sure a

Want more photos?

Visit

www.portsmouth-dailytimes.com

Click the link at the top to view or buy

pictures that have appeared in the Portsmouth Daily Times —

as well as additional photos!

Only

$ 11 00

Today, why not try ...

Trout Derby, sponsored by

Portsmouth Area Jaycees,

fishing license required,

Roosevelt Lake, Shawnee

State Park 4404 State

Route 125, 6 a.m.-5 p.m.

grade school stage

4:30 p.m. — Arm wrestling tournament,

Village Green

5–7 p.m. — Lewis Brothers, grade

school stage

7– 9 p.m. — Thomas Dirk, grade

school stage

8 –10 p.m. — Sod Busters, Village

Green

To submit items, mail at least a

week in advance of meeting to Calendar,

Daily Times, 637 Sixth St.,

Portsmouth, OH 45662-0581. Items can

be e-mailed to pdtnews@portsmouthdailytimes.com.

Include in writing the

names of the club or sponsoring

organization, time, day, date and complete

address of event planned. For an

item to be repeated in the Calendar, a

new notice must be mailed in for each

meeting date. The Times will not hold

items for repeated use. Please do not

call in items.

box goes to a local family in

need.

Anyone who has a question

can call Sharyl Teeters at

(740) 352-4776 or e-mail at

wickytee@roadrunner.com.

More information may be

obtained by visiting online

http://www.angelfoodministries.com

or http://www.cornerstoneofportsmouth.org.

Search engine

helps charity

Supporters of Potter’s

House Ministry Center who

are using GoodSearch and

GoodShop, are raising money

with every search of the Internet

and every purchase online.

GoodSearch.com, a new

search engine powered by

Yahoo, donates 50 percent of

its revenue, approximately a

penny per search, to the charities

designated by its users.

Similarly with GoodShop.com,

consumers are helping their

favorite causes by shopping at

hundreds of well known retailer.

By going through Good-

Shop, up to 30 percent of the

purchase price is donated to the

user’s favorite cause!

Potter’s House Ministry

Center of Sciotoville recently

registered with the sites, giving

its supporters a chance to

raise money for the cause

every time they search the

Internet or shop online. The

goal is to earn $300 through

the site this year, which will

be used to buy food to give to

those in need.

From PDT Staff reports

Mason Avery Hatfield

June 4 th 2010

Parents:

Jeremy & Julie Hatfield

Weather forecast not good

for weekend gardeners

In recognition of all the caring men and women

in the nursing field, the

Portsmouth Daily Times will

be publishing a special

section on May 8th in print

and online.

This is a great way for

• Hospitals • Nursing Homes

• Home Medical Suppliers

• Clinics • Doctor’s Offices

• Health Departments

• School Nursing Programs, etc. to salute our

hard-working nurses

Baby’s Name

Birth Date

Parents

To advertise, please call

The Portsmouth

Daily Times

Ad Department

740-353-3101

Deadline is May 3rd

VISIT THE TIMES ONLINE: www.portsmouth-dailytimes.com

Address

Phone

Credit Card #

Exp. Date:

Address will not be published.

Mail or deliver to:

BABIES! Portsmouth Daily Times

P.O. Box 581, 637 Sixth Street

Portsmouth, Ohio 45662

Deadline for submission, Monday, May 10

Simply send your baby’s photograph along

with the coupon to the left with your

payment of $11.00 (per baby) check or credit card,

and we’ll do the rest.

* If your child does not bear the father’s last name a consent

form will need to be signed by the father in order for his name to be published.

637 SIXTH STREET, PORTSMOUTH

C M Y K


C M Y K

A8 Saturday, April 24, 2010 Portsmouth Daily Times

About 187,000

Ohio homes get

heating cost help

COLUMBUS — The state

says about 187,000 lowincome

households received

help with heating costs from

November through March,

about 7,000 more than the

previous year.

Ohio Department of Development

Director Lisa Patt-

McDaniel said Friday that the

state spent roughly $45 million

on the Home Energy

Assistance Program for winter

2009-2010, an average of

about $240 per household.

The program provides help

once per heating season to

low-income residents whose

heat has been disconnected or

is close to being disconnected

or who are low on bulk fuel.

Ohio, Michigan

tie in governors’

census wager

COLUMBUS — The governors

who made a contest

out of it say people in Ohio

and Michigan have been

equally good about returning

their 2010 U.S. Census forms.

Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland

and Michigan’s Jennifer

Granholm on Friday declared

a tie in their bet to see which

state would have a higher

mail-in participation rate for

the census. Census officials

say 75 percent of households

in both states completed and

sent back their surveys by

Thursday, the Earth Day

deadline set by the governors.

The winning state was supposed

to donate its official

tree for planting in the loser

on Arbor Day, April 30. The

governors now say they’ll

each plant their own tree on

that day.

Strickland says both states

are winners, beating the 71

percent U.S. average response

rate for the census.

Man arrested

for daughter’s

1983 killing

SAN BERNARDINO,

Calif. — A man has been

arrested in Ohio on suspicion

of smothering his 5-year-old

daughter 27 years ago in

Southern California.

Cold-case detectives arrested

56-year-old Charles

Austin on Wednesday night

at a bar in Middletown, Ohio

— one day after he was

charged with murder in San

Bernardino County.

He was being held in Ohio

pending an extradition hearing.

Prosecutors claim the

divorced Austin smothered his

daughter, Kelly, in March

1983 while she visited the

home he shared with his parents

in Highland.

Austin told investigators he

discovered the girl in his bed

with a pillow over her head.

At the urging of Kelly’s mother,

Joyce, investigators revisited

the case in 2001 and 2003.

They concluded the girl was

smothered but couldn’t find

Austin until this week.

Justice: Technology

challenges control

of jury members

COLUMBUS — An Ohio

Supreme Court justice says

judges’ control of the jury

process faces serious challenges

from smart phones,

social media and constantly

updated websites.

Justice Judith Ann

Lanzinger said Friday it’s

more difficult to maintain

what she calls pristine jurors

because people are used to

tweeting, updating Facebook

and telling the world what

they’re doing.

Lanzinger says the judicial

system may be losing a generation

of potential jurors

who won’t serve because they

can’t abide by rules restricting

their technology use during

a trial.

The justice, speaking at

the annual meeting of the

Ohio Jury Management

Association, says judges

need to address these issues

to continue to ensure defendants

receive fair and impartial

trials.

Acquittal in

case of gates

stolen from crypts

COLUMBUS — An Ohio

jury has found a man not

guilty in the theft of 100pound

bronze gates from a

historic mausoleum.

Forty-one-year-old Mark

Mitchell was arrested by

Columbus police in October

after he sold scrap metal dealers

pieces of the gates from

Green Lawn Abbey, which

was built in 1927. He spent

58 days in jail until he was

able to post bond.

Mitchell testified he discovered

the metal bars and

ornamental parts inside a

duffel bag thrown in a trash

bin and was unaware they

were stolen items.

A jury in Columbus

acquitted him on Thursday

of a charge of receiving

stolen property.

Mitchell says he’s relieved

but feels some bitterness. He

now lives in Nolanville, Texas.

Police to

consider charges

in disappearance

XENIA — Authorities say

they’ll discuss whether there

should be criminal charges in

the aftermath of their search

for a 31-year-old Ohio

woman found in Florida with

a male friend.

Police in Xenia in southwest

Ohio will consult with

prosecutors. Police Capt.

Scott Anger says that Tiffany

Tehan and Tre Hutcherson

took actions that impeded the

search and should have left

word to let people know they

were safe.

Police say their search cost

more than $5,000 in overtime

alone.

The married mother of a 1year-old

daughter was

reported missing Saturday.

Friends and family handed

out fliers, used social media

and went on national television

to ask for help.

Police announced Thursday

she was in the Miami Beach

area at a hotel with Hutcherson.

Tweeting

considered to

announce executions

DAYTON — A spokeswoman

says Ohio’s prison system

has contemplated using

Twitter to announce when an

execution has been completed.

However, Communications

Director Julie Walburn at the

Department of Rehabilitation

and Correction says she’s

concerned that tweeting about

an inmate’s time of death may

be considered in poor taste.

She says the department

still hasn’t decided how to use

Twitter and other social media

to disseminate news.

Walburn says she’s focused

on trying to get the word out

about executions quickly.

When condemned inmate

Darryl Durr died by lethal

injection at 10:36 a.m. Tuesday,

a news release was emailed

to media outlets one

minute later.

No charges for

cops who thought

body was deer

CLEVELAND — A prosecutor

has decided no criminal

charges will be filed against

two Cleveland police officers

who drove by a woman’s body,

mistaking it for a dead deer.

Mayor Frank Jackson’s

office said in a statement

Thursday that City Prosecutor

Victor Perez determined the

case was a matter of police

performance and not a violation

of criminal law.

The officers’ actions will

now be reviewed by public

safety officials. Safety Director

Martin Flask says the investigation

should be finished next

week, following a hearing.

A highway crew sent to

Interstate 90 where the officers

thought they’d seen a

deer carcass discovered the

body of 28-year-old Angel

Bradley-Crocket on April 5.

Police have charged two people

in her strangulation death.

Turnpike says

fix made for cars

with roof racks

CLEVELAND — The

Ohio Turnpike says it has

fixed toll plaza scanners so

cars with bikes or luggage on

the roof won’t be charged the

higher toll for taller trucks

and vans.

New toll rates that took

effect last fall took into consideration

how tall vehicles

are. But laser scanners used

to measure vehicle height

caused the toll plazas to spit

out the more expensive tickets

to cars carrying items on

top, and motorists complained

about the price difference

of up to $10.

Toll collectors had been

recalculating the tolls when

cars with roof racks came

through with the higher tickets.

Turnpike Commission

Executive Director George

STATE

‘Green’ becomes more than just a marketing pitch

By DAN SEWELL

AP Business Writer

CINCINNATI — Going green

has become good business.

Just look at store shelves:

Sales of “green” products,

such as organic foods and natural

personal care items, have

jumped 15 percent since 2006,

according to research firm

Mintel International.

A wave of promotion is hitting

consumers during this

week’s 40th anniversary Earth

Day observances: Hanes says

it can put you in eco-friendly

underwear, Frito-Lay offers

Sun Chips from a bag you can

toss in a compost pile, and Target

stores invite you to use

their recycling bins.

Some promotions sound

more like image-buffing than

Earth-saving, and big companies

still have a long way to go

to significantly reduce their

impacts on air, water and other

resources. But environmentalists

say the drivers of American

consumer culture are starting

to make real strides.

“It’s a far cry from where we

were,” said Elizabeth Sturcken,

who manages corporate

State Briefs

partnerships for the Environmental

Defense Fund. “Companies

are seeing the economic

value of going green.”

It’s not just products. Cutting

lighting and heating costs,

using less packaging, streamlining

transportation to save

gas, recycling more instead of

throwing away — those all

help both the environment and

the bottom line.

“It would be easy to say that

companies really care about

the environment only in the

third week of April,” said Joel

Makower, a consultant and

executive editor of Greener

World Media Inc. “But most

big companies have been taking

significant steps. ... The

fact is, they’re doing it for all

the right business reasons.”

The behemoth that might

drive even more serious

improvements is retailer Wal-

Mart Stores Inc. It’s urging its

suppliers to reduce 20 million

metric tons of greenhouse gas

emissions by the end of 2015,

on top of its own moves to build

more energy-efficient stores,

use more alternative fuels in its

trucks, and reduce packaging.

Shopper Jim Farmer, 68,

voiced his approval while looking

through Earth Day-themed

aisles recently at a West

Chester, Ohio, Supercenter.

“I think Wal-Mart is trying

to help, and that’s great,”

Farmer said. “I have children

and grandchildren, and we

want to make the Earth a better

place for them.”

While surveys show that

many consumers want to buy

environmentally friendly products,

the Great Recession made

them reluctant to pay more for

them, dampening what had

been rapid sales growth.

Mintel International says

sales of natural and organic

foods and beverages rose 24

percent in 2006-’08, then

slowed to less than 2 percent

last year; sales of green personal

care products jumped 18

percent in ‘06-’08, but only 1.2

percent last year.

Wal-Mart tells shoppers in

promoting its environmental

moves that the cost savings

are passed on in low prices:

“not just Earth-friendly, we’re

also being wallet-friendly.”

And P&G’s current “Future

Friendly” campaign touts

both the environmental and

“It would be easy to say that companies really care about the

environment only in the third week of April. But most big companies

have been taking significant steps. ... The fact is, they’re doing it for

all the right business reasons.”

Joel Makower, consultant and executive editor of Greener World Media Inc.

financial benefits of products

such as Tide Cold Water

detergent, which curtails the

toll on utility bills of heating

washer water. The consumer

products giant also is giving

coupons for its green products,

and pledges to reach 50

million households with educational

information.

That’s only part of a sustainability

drive that P&G has

made companywide. In one

effort, it created a unit three

years ago to find new uses for

byproducts and leftovers that

would otherwise go into incinerators

and landfills.

So now, Clairol hair coloring

ingredients help make tires

shine, Duracell batteries help

make bricks, and materials

from Pampers diapers and

Always maxi pads absorb

industrial leaks and spills.

Scott Burns, who heads the

Distel said Thursday the scanners

have been adjusted in

time for the busy summer

travel season so the correct

tolls are charged.

Ohio hometowners

rally to keep

Grant on $50

CINCINNATI — Folks in

southern Ohio are mounting a

counterattack against a congressional

proposal to replace

native son Ulysses S. Grant

with Ronald Reagan on the

$50 bill.

Politicians have passed resolutions,

businesses put up

signs, and there’s a Facebook

page for the cause of leaving

the image of the Civil War

general and president as it is.

A bill in the U.S. House seeks

to put Reagan — the late 40th

president and conservative

icon — on the 50.

Grant’s backers will drum

up more support today with

events to celebrate his April

unit, said the program has

reduced waste disposal by 30

percent, saving money and

increasing recycling revenue.

One area where product

makers still need to improve,

activists say, is in telling consumers

in detail about ingredients

so they can make their

own decisions.

Chris Haack, a Mintel

consumer market analyst,

adds that many products that

claim to be green, natural or

organic might have only one

ingredient or material that

fits the bill. And there aren’t

consistent standards for

what qualifies as environmentally

helpful.

“There is still a lot of what’s

called greenwashing out

there,” Haack said. “There are

a million labels ... consumers

are befuddled. They just don’t

know what to trust.”

27, 1822, birthday at his Point

Pleasant birthplace and his

boyhood hometown of

Georgetown east of Cincinnati.

A North Carolina congressman

wants to honor Reagan

for the 100th anniversary of

his birth next year.

Pitt tells Ohio

school to lose logo

TOLEDO — The University

of Pittsburgh says an Ohio

high school committed a foul

on the football field — where

the school has a panther logo

that Pitt says is too similar to

its own.

The university earlier this

month ordered Whitmer High

School in Toledo to stop using

its panther emblem.

Washington Local Schools

Superintendent Patrick Hickey

doesn’t argue that the logo

looks pretty much the same as

the one Pitt owns and says the

district plans to trademark a

new panther image.

With the explosion in green

promotional claims, the Federal

Trade Commission is

reviewing its guidelines for

environmental marketing.

Meanwhile, Wal-Mart says it

has been working with suppliers

to develop a “Sustainable

Product Index” to help

guide consumers.

David Steinman, a consumer

health advocate and

author, urges consumers to

push companies harder for full

disclosure and to vote with

their pocketbooks.

And Sturcken says the companies

can do more than just add

the occasional green product.

“Ideally, I certainly would

like to see that every product

these companies offer is

green,” she said. “So there are

no trade-offs with effectiveness

and pricing and being

environmentally friendly.”

But he’s asking the university

for a break, saying it

would cost “enormous dollars”

to remove the current

logo from facilities including

the Whitmer football field,

where the panther is built into

the artificial turf.

A Pitt spokeswoman says

the university can’t comment

on the matter.

From AP Wire reports

Do you have

a story idea?

If you know of someone

or something that would

make a good story,

please call (740) 353-

3101 or e-mail

pdtnews@portsmouthdailytimes.com.


SECTION

B

Saturday, April 24, 2010

SPORTS

INSIDE

Clay tops

Eastern in 5

inning game

Pages B2

TE Gresham made right choice: football

By JOE KAY

AP Sports Writer

CINCINNATI — Only a

sophomore in high school,

Jermaine Gresham had a tough

decision to make, one that

would direct his life.

Basketball? Or football?

The tall, muscular athlete

loved basketball. He'd already

led Ardmore High School to

the Oklahoma state title game

twice already, losing both

times even though he dominated

inside as a 6-foot-4 center.

Surely, he could get a free ride

to college by playing hoops.

His football coach saw it differently.

Mike Lloyd sat down with

Gresham and told him that

he'd be just another good basketball

player if he decided to

go that way. Put him on a football

field with his size,

Jones finishes in

top 100 at Boston

Marathon

By JOHN STEGEMAN

PDT Sports Editor

Baseball players aspire to

play in the World Series, football

players dream of playing

in a Super Bowl and soccer

players yearn for the World

Cup.

Every sport has its Mecca

and for runners the penultimate

experience is the Boston

Marathon.

Blake Jones, 27, of

Portsmouth competed in the

2010 Boston Marathon on

Monday and finished 94th out

of 22,540 runners with a time

of 2:32.02.

If you've ever seen groups

of young men in Shawnee

State apparel running through

town, you've likely seen Jones

before. Jones has been an

assistant coach for SSU's

nationally-ranked cross country

program for five years and

before that he ran four years as

a member of the team, competing

in the NAIA national

championship meet in 2004.

Jones said running for SSU

in college and remaining

involved with the team helped

fuel his interest in running

marathons.

"It definitely got me in the

motion, for sure," he said. "I

definitely train more now than

I did (in college). I guess it's

just getting wiser with age and

learning that you have to put a

little more effort in to be better."

For those interested in competing

in Boston, registration

is not as simple as filling out

and card and paying an entry

fee. To run in the world's oldest

annual marathon, competitors

must first qualify.

Prospective entrants must

complete a standard marathon

course certified by a national

See MARATHON, B2

Inside:

Check out

our coverage

of the

NFL draft

on page B8.

strength and

hands —

well, that

might get

him even

further.

"My coach

told me, 'You

know what?

Your future's going to be in

football,'" Gresham said

Friday. "I could see the

changes happening, and he

“I don’t even

know why I

wanted to do it.

I just decided

one day I’d try

it and went and

tried it...”

Blake Jones

Boston Marathon runner

was right. I finally realized

football was my calling. What

I could do on the football field

compared to what I could do in

basketball was rare, in his

eyes."

Good advice. It got him to

the NFL as a first-round pick

— the Cincinnati Bengals

chose him 21st overall on

Thursday night.

A day later, he got on a plane

in Oklahoma City, flew to

Cavs say give Shaq time

By ANDREW SELIGMAN

AP Sports Writer

CHICAGO — It's not easy

to fade into the crowd when

you're 7-foot-1, 325 pounds,

and your name is Shaquille

O'Neal.

Yet, "The Big Aristotle" has

been "The Big Invisible" the

past two games for the

Cleveland Cavaliers.

After a solid playoff opener

against the Chicago Bulls,

O'Neal has just 14 points and

11 rebounds in limited minutes

over the past two games.

To that, the Cavaliers said,

give the big man some time.

After all, he missed the final

23 regular-season games

because of a torn ligament in

his right thumb.

"I'm not concerned,"

LeBron James said. "I think

we know we need him to pick

up his play and he knows that

also. No matter who you are

— no matter if you're the best

player in the world — if you

have an eight-week layoff, it's

definitely going to take a toll

on you to start. But we're looking

for him to try to be productive

as much as he can with

that layoff, be a force in the

interior and help us win these

games."

The Cavaliers are bent on

delivering Cleveland its first

pro sports championship since

1964, and they're a good bet to

do just that after going a

league-best 61-21.

If they're going to get by the

Bulls, though, they'll have to

work for it.

With a chance to go up 3-0

in their first-round series, the

Cavaliers fell behind by 21 in

Game 3 on Thursday and lost

108-106 after pulling within

one in the closing seconds.

Browns pick Haden,

a big LeBron fan

By TOM WITHERS

AP Sports Writer

BEREA — Fashionable in a

black jacket with matching

dress shirt and tie, first-round

draft pick Joe Haden handled

every question like a seasoned

professional during his introductory

news conference as

the newest member of the

Cleveland Browns.

Haden was polished. Calm.

Cool. Poised.

Until he was asked about

LeBron James.

"Oh my goodness," Haden

gushed. "I love LeBron."

The No. 7 overall pick is an

unabashed fan of James, the

NBA superstar and reigning

league MVP, who is currently

in Chicago chasing a championship

with the Cavaliers.

Haden has followed James for

years and can't bear the

thought that his idol could

leave this summer a free agent.

"I was so excited about

Cleveland," Haden said. "I

was like this, 'Now he can't go

anywhere because it might

break my heart.' I'm trying to

figure out how to get in touch

with him and text him or

something and take him out to

eat and make sure he doesn't

leave."

The Browns were thrilled to

land Haden, a two-time All-

American who was originally

recruited as a quarterback by

Florida coach Urban Meyer.

But when Haden arrived on

campus, he quickly learned

there was another QB ahead of

him on the depth chart — Tim

Tebow.

"This Tebow dude is always

involved in everything,"

See HADEN, B8

Detroit, then took a connecting

flight to join his new team,

which went out of character

when it decided that the

Oklahoma tight end was the

best fit. It's only the second

time in franchise history that

the Bengals took a tight end in

the first round.

Gresham, now 6-foot-6 and

258 pounds, is being counted

on to open up a one-dimensional

passing game that

depends almost entirely upon

the receivers. The running

backs and tight ends combined

for only two touchdown catches

last season, both by tight

end J.P. Foschi.

Gresham caught 66 passes

for 950 yards and 14 touchdowns

at Oklahoma in 2008.

By that point, he already was

ranked among the nation's top

Michael Dwyer ■ Associated Press

Runners cross the start line in Hopkinton, Mass., for the 114th running of the Boston Marathon on Monday. Portsmouth resident and SSU assistant cross country

coach Blake Jones finished 94th out of more than 20,000 competitors.

"I think right now we should

be really confident, really

loose," Chicago's Joakim

Noah said. "I like our

chances."

The Cavaliers, meanwhile,

vowed to put forth a better

effort at the start in Game 4 on

Sunday and do a better job on

Derrick Rose, who's averaging

27.3 points after scoring 31 on

Thursday. James even said

some adversity could be a

good thing, considering they

swept their way to the Eastern

Conference finals last year

before losing to Orlando.

Even so, they're in good

position.

James is averaging 34.3

points after scoring 40 and

then 39 the past two games,

although he was whistled for a

charge and stripped late in

Thursday's game.

Mo Williams is averaging

17.3 and hit the late 3 that

pulled the Cavaliers within

one. And they're getting 16.0

points and 8.3 rebounds from

Antawn Jamison in this series.

As for O'Neal?

Well, he's been quiet since

the opener and did not make

himself available for comment

on Friday.

"I've got to get him more

involved," coach Mike Brown

said.

At 38 and a 15-time All-

Star, O'Neal may be past his

prime, but he can still be a

force. He played well during

the regular season, averaging

12 points and 6.7 rebounds in

53 games and helped the

Cavaliers go 4-1 against the

Magic and Lakers — two big

championship obstacles and

two teams that have given

them trouble in the past —

with him in the lineup.

See SHAQ, B2

Gary Green ■ MCT

Florida's Joe Haden (5) and Janoris Jenkins (1) celebrate a fumble on

fourth down by Troy at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in Gainesville, Florida,

Saturday, September 12, 2009.

Mark Duncan ■ AP photo

Cleveland Cavaliers' Shaquille O'Neal, left, fouls Chicago Bulls'

Joakim Noah (13) in the third quarter of Game 1 in the first round of

the NBA basketball playoffs Saturday, April 17, in Cleveland.

Buckeyes set for

Scarlet-Gray game

By RUSTY MILLER

AP Sports Writer

COLUMBUS — Psst! It's

just a scrimmage.

Just don't say that out loud

to the mammoth crowds that

turn out every year for Ohio

State's Scarlet-Gray game,

the 77th edition of which

will take place on Saturday

afternoon at Ohio Stadium.

A year ago, 95,722 fans —

a national record for a spring

game — showed up to

watch.

Coach Jim Tressel happily

welcomes the Buckeyes' fervent

faithful. And he knows a

lot of it has to do with

Northerners itching for a reason

to get outside after being

locked away all winter.

Thunderstorms and temperatures

around 70 degrees

See GRESHAM, B8

are forecast for Saturday's

scrimmage, which will be

preceded by a men's lacrosse

game.

There's a buildup to the

Scarlet-Gray showdown that

does mirror that of something

much bigger than a

mere scrimmage. Ohio

State's seniors were split up

into two teams, and then they

selected the sides, taking

turns by position, in a special

spring draft Wednesday.

Scarlet captain Dane

Sanzenbacher stopped just

short of declaring his team

would win.

"Looking at the board, we

got a pretty good draft. We're

excited to see what's going to

happen," the starting receiver

said. "We can't guarantee

See BUCKS, B2

C M Y K


C M Y K

B2 Saturday, April 24, 2010 Portsmouth Daily Times

Clay tops Eastern in 5 innings

PDT Sports Report

Holly Hempill hit 3-for-4

with an RBI and was just a

home run shy of hitting for the

cycle as Clay picked up

another SOC I win, defeating

Eastern 12-2 in five inning.

Lyndsey Mader struck out

six to pick up a win from the

circle. Alison Castle hit 3-for-

4 with two RBI and four other

Lady Panthers had two hits in

the victory.

"We played really well,"

Clay coach Dick McCleese

said. "The kids are really hitting

the ball good. We've had

good pitching and the kids are

playing really well right now."

Clay, which is tied with

Symmes Valley for the SOC I

lead, will play second-place

Notre Dame at Clay on Monday.

Clay 113 70 — 12 16 1

Eastern 002 00 — 2 4 5

WP: Mader 6k LP: Pack

Clay — Messer 2-4 3B, Hempill 3-4 2B 3B

RBI, Osborne 2-3 2B 3RBI, Tackett 2-3 2B

3RBI, Craft 2-4, Castle 3-4 2RBI

Eastern — Staker 2-3 2RBI

Record — Clay 15-4 (10-1)

Shaq

Baseball

From Page B1

Against the Bulls, O'Neal

was solid in the opener with

12 points and five rebounds

in about 25 minutes. In

Game 2, he had eight points

and seven boards in 15 minutes

and delivered six and

four while playing 20 minutes

in Game 3, although

Brown insisted he could

have scored more.

"He had great looks last

night, but it just popped

out," Brown said. "But

those will go down as the

series goes on. He's going to

be a factor for us, a big factor

for us. A big factor. So

I've got to do a better job

trying to find some minutes

for him."

Brown said there are no

physical limitations, that the

Cavaliers can push O'Neal

"as hard as we want to push

him."

"Obviously, he hasn't

played in a while," Brown

said. "We're not giving him

consistent minutes right

Scoreboard

TODAY’S GAMES

Baseball

Minford at Piketon (DH)

Peebles at Northwest (DH)

South Webster at Green (DH)

Portsmouth at Wheelersburg

Clay at Oak Hill (DH)

Softball

Portsmouth, Adena at Northwest Tournament

Tennis

Wheelersburg at Ironton

ON THE AIR

ATHLETICS

8 p.m.

ESPN2 — The Penn Relays, at Philadelphia

(same-day tape)

AUTO RACING

11:30 a.m.

SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying

for Aaron's 499, at Talladega, Ala.

2 p.m.

SPEED — Rolex Sports Car Series, Bosch

Engineering 250, at Alton, Va. (same-day tape)

3 p.m.

ABC — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Aaron's

312, at Talladega, Ala.

BOXING

11:15 p.m.

HBO — Junior middleweights, Alfredo Angulo

(17-1-0) vs. Joel Julio (35-3-0); heavyweights,

Cristobal Arreola (28-1-0) vs. Tomasz Adamek

(40-1-0), at Ontario, Calif.

COLLEGE BASEBALL

3 p.m.

FSN — Kansas St. at Missouri

GOLF

9:30 a.m.

TGC — European PGA Tour, Ballantine's

Championship, third round, at Jeju Island,

South Korea (same-day tape)

1 p.m.

CBS — Champions Tour, Legends of Golf,

second round, at Savannah, Ga.

TGC — PGA Tour, Zurich Classic of New

Orleans, third round

3 p.m.

CBS — PGA Tour, Zurich Classic of New

Orleans, third round

6:30 p.m.

TGC — Nationwide Tour, South Georgia Classic,

third round, at Valdosta, Ga. (same-day

tape)

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

4 p.m.

FOX — Regional coverage, N.Y. Yankees at

L.A. Angels or Seattle at Chicago White Sox

7 p.m.

WGN — Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee

MOTORSPORTS

2 a.m.

SPEED — MotoGP World Championship, at

Motegi, Japan

NBA BASKETBALL

2 p.m.

TNT — Playoffs, first round, game 3, Orlando

at Charlotte

4:30 p.m.

TNT — Playoffs, first round, game 4, Phoenix

at Portland

7 p.m.

ESPN — Playoffs, first round, game 4, Atlanta

at Milwaukee

9:30 p.m.

ESPN — Playoffs, first round, game 4, L.A.

Lakers at Oklahoma City

NFL FOOTBALL

10 a.m.

ESPN — Draft, rounds 4-7, at New York

NHL HOCKEY

3 p.m.

NBC — Playoffs, Western Conference, quarterfinals,

game 5, Nashville at Chicago (if necessary)

7 p.m.

VERSUS — Playoffs, Eastern Conference,

quarterfinals, game 6, Pittsburgh at Ottawa (if

necessary)

10 p.m.

VERSUS — Playoffs, Western Conference,

quarterfinals, game 6, San Jose at Colorado (if

necessary)

SOCCER

9:55 a.m.

ESPN2 — Premier League, teams TBA

Northwest 12, Oak Hill 2

5 innings

Jared DeLong earned a

five-inning victory over Oak

Hill on Friday courtesy of

strong offensive support.

DeLong helped his own

cause by hitting 3-for-4 with

four RBI. Chaise Hall hit 3for-3

as well in the win.

Northwest will host Wheelersburg

on Monday.

Oak Hill 011 00 — 2 6 1

Northwest 070 14 — 12 13 1

WP: DeLong CG 5k LP: Fulk

Hitting leaders

Northwest — C. Hall 3-3 3R, Delong 3-4 4RBI,

Simon 2-4, Shirey 1-3 3RBI

Record — Northwest 5-11

Thursday

Waverly 17, Portsmouth 4

Portsmouth avoided the

mercy-rule but not the loss

against Waverly on Thursday.

Harrison Martin was one of

two Waverly players with

three hits in the win and

Derek Roback was 1-for-2

with a home run.

Jeremy Scott took the loss

for PHS but batted 3-for-4.

Len Collins and Adam Bray

now so he may still have a

little bit of rust on him, but

right now, he's good to go

for as long as we need him."

The Cavaliers were eyeing

a championship when

they made the offseason

trade with Phoenix, hoping

O'Neal could help them get

by Dwight Howard and the

Magic and, ultimately, capture

the title.

At the moment, Brown is

having a tough time working

Shaq back into the rotation.

"If I feel like if there's a

group out there that's playing

well and he's not part of

that group, I'll let that group

run," Brown said. "I'll let a

group that's playing well

run for as long as they can

before making changes so

I'm not going to get him out

on the floor if I think it's

going to hurt the team. But I

need to try to figure out

ways to get him some longer

stretches on the court."

NOTES: James reiterated

that he should not have been

called for a charge late in

Thursday's game. "I think I

was in the right," he said.

BASEBALL

American League

KANSAS CITY ROYALS_Released RHP Juan

Cruz. Designated RHP Luis Mendoza for

assignment. Selected the contracts of LHP

Bruce Chen and RHP Brad Thompson from

Omaha (PCL).

MINNESOTA TWINS_Placed INF Nick Punto

on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 16.

TAMPA BAY RAYS_Agreed to terms with

INF/OF Ben Zobrist on a three-year contract

extension through 2013.

TEXAS RANGERS_Purchased the contract of

1B Justin Smoak from Oklahoma City (PCL).

Optioned 1B Chris Davis to Oklahoma City.

Recalled RHP Omar Poveda from Oklahoma

City and placed him on the 60-day DL.

National League

LOS ANGELES DODGERS_Placed OF Manny

Ramirez on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF

Xavier Paul from Albuquerque (PCL).

PITTSBURGH PIRATES_Optioned SS Argenis

Diaz to Indianapolis (IL). Recalled RHP Chris

Jakubauskas from Indianapolis.

WASHINGTON NATIONALS_Assigned RHP

Jason Bergmann outright to Syracuse (IL).

Recalled RHP Luis Atilano from Syracuse (IL).

American Association

GRAND PRAIRIE AIRHOGS_Acquired RHP

Jeff Williams from Southern Maryland (Atlantic)

for future considerations.

LINCOLN SALTDOGS_Signed OF Justin

Jacobs and LHP Ryan Miller.

PENSACOLA PELICANS_Released OF Kevin

Reynolds.

SHREVEPORT-BOSSIER

CAPTAINS_Released RHP Gustavo Mata.

Traded RHP Robert Romero to Evansville

(Frontier) for future considerations.

Can-Am League

BROCKTON ROX_Signed RHP Josh Papelbon,

RHP David Erickson and OF Chris Valencia.

NEW JERSEY JACKALS_Signed RHP Mike

Pontius and LHP Evan Teague.

PITTSFIELD COLONIALS_Released OF

Edward Ovalle and RHP Lucas Ledbetter.

WORCESTER TORNADOES_Traded INF

Mark Minicozzi to Camden (Atlantic) for a player

to be named.

Frontier League

WASHINGTON WILD THINGS_Signed C Billy

O'Conner and OF Luis Rivera.

United League

EDINBURG ROADRUNNERS_Traded OF Selwyn

Langaigne to Laredo for future considerations.

Signed RHP Aaron Guerra, INF Jeff

Brewer and OF Ambiorix Concepcion.

FOOTBALL

National Football League

CINCINNATI BENGALS_Signed PK Mike

Nugent.

Canadian Football League

CALGARY STAMPEDERS_Announced the

retirement of OL Jeff Pilon.

WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS_Signed WR

Chris Davis.

HOCKEY

National Hockey League

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS_Signed G Jussi

Rynnas to a two-year contract.

COLLEGE

CORNELL_Named Bill Courtney men's basketball

coach.

FLORIDA STATE_Announced sophomore C

Solomon Alabi will enter the NBA draft.

IOWA STATE_Named Jeff Grayer men's assistant

basketball coach.

SAN FRANCISCO_Named Jennifer Azzi

women's basketball coach.

FIRST ROUND

(Best-of-7)

(x-if necessary)

Saturday, April 24

Orlando at Charlotte, 2 p.m.

Phoenix at Portland, 4:30 p.m.

Atlanta at Milwaukee, 7 p.m.

L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m.

Sunday, April 25

Boston at Miami, 1 p.m.

Cleveland at Chicago, 3:30 p.m.

Dallas at San Antonio, 7 p.m.

Denver at Utah, 9:30 p.m.

Monday, April 26

Orlando at Charlotte, 8 p.m.

Atlanta at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.

Portland at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.

each had two hits.

"We're hitting the ball well

but we're just not making the

routine plays," Portsmouth

coach John Tipton said.

"Every infielder and two outfielders

had errors so it's not

just one person. Once we start

making the routine plays we'll

be alright."

Portsmouth plays at Wheelersburg today at 11

a.m. and faces Columbus Grandview Heights

at 1 p.m.

Waverly 720 102 5 — 17 14 2

Portsmouth 010 030 0 — 4 1112

WP: French LP: Scott

Hitting Leaders

Waverly — Martin 3-5, Halterman 3-4,

Deweese 2-4, Underwood 2-5, Roback 1-2

HR.

Portsmouth — Bray 2-3, Collins 2-3, Scott 3-4

Record — Portsmouth 9-6

Wednesday

Northwest 13, Minford 1

5 innings

Northwest scored multiple

runs in every inning it took to

the plate to defeat Minford on

Wednesday.

Joey Shaffer hit 3-for-4,

Jared DeLong his 4-for-4 and

Cory Miller hit 2-for-3 with

four RBI in the win.

Minford 000 10 — 1 6 3

Northwest 443 2x — 13 16 0

A complete box score was unavailable

"There's a lot of fines going on

in the league right now. I like

my money. My family likes

my money, too, so I'll hold

onto it." James charged into

Luol Deng with 1:18 remaining,

negating a basket. ... James

also is amused when he hears

opposing crowds chant "MVP!

MVP!" for one of the home

team's players, as Chicago fans

TRANSACTIONS BASKETBALL

NBA Playoff Glance

Tuesday, April 27

x-Miami at Boston, 6, 7 or 8 p.m.

Chicago at Cleveland, 7, 8 or 8:30 p.m.

San Antonio at Dallas, 8, 8:30 or 9:30 p.m.

Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 9 or 10:30 p.m.

Wednesday, April 28

x-Milwaukee at Atlanta, 7:30 or 8 p.m.

x-Charlotte at Orlando, 8 p.m.

x-Utah at Denver, 9 or 10:30 p.m.

Thursday, April 29

x-Cleveland at Chicago, TBD

x-Boston at Miami, TBD

x-Phoenix at Portland, TBD

x-Dallas at San Antonio, TBD

Friday, April 30

x-Orlando at Charlotte, TBD

x-Atlanta at Milwaukee, TBD

x-Denver at Utah, TBD

x-L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, TBD

Saturday, May 1

x-Chicago at Cleveland, TBD

x-Miami at Boston, TBD

x-San Antonio at Dallas, TBD

x-Portland at Phoenix, TBD

Sunday, May 2

x-Charlotte at Orlando, TBD

x-Milwaukee at Atlanta, TBD

x-Utah at Denver, TBD

x-Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, TBD

HOCKEY

NBA Playoff Glance

FIRST ROUND

(Best-of-7)

(x-if necessary)

Wednesday, April 21

Washington 6, Montreal 3, Washington leads

series 3-1

Boston 3, Buffalo 2, 2OT, Boston leads series

3-1

Vancouver 6, Los Angeles 4, series tied 2-2

Thursday, April 22

Philadelphia 3, New Jersey 0, Philadelphia

wins series 4-1

Chicago 3, Nashville 0, series tied 2-2

Ottawa 4, Pittsburgh 3, 3OT, Pittsburgh leads

series 3-2

San Jose 5, Colorado 0, San Jose leads series

3-2

Friday, April 23

Montreal at Washington, 7 p.m.

Boston at Buffalo, 7 p.m.

Los Angeles at Vancouver, 10 p.m.

Detroit at Phoenix, 10 p.m.

Saturday, April 24

Nashville at Chicago, 3 p.m.

Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 7 p.m.

San Jose at Colorado, TBD

Sunday, April 25

Phoenix at Detroit, 2 p.m.

Vancouver at Los Angeles, TBD

Monday, April 26

x-Washington at Montreal, 7 p.m.

Buffalo at Boston, 7 p.m.

Colorado at San Jose, TBD

Chicago at Nashville, TBD

Tuesday, April 27

x-Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.

x-Los Angeles at Vancouver, TBD

x-Detroit at Phoenix, TBD

Wednesday, April 28

x-Montreal at Washington, TBD

x-Boston at Buffalo, 7 p.m.

x-Nashville at Chicago, TBD

LOTTO

CLEVELAND — These Ohio lotteries were

drawn Friday:

Mega Millions

Estimated jackpot: $166 million

Midday 3

4-8-1

Midday 4

1-2-0-9

Powerball

Estimated jackpot: $20 million

Ten OH Midday

03-05-16-21-28-30-33-34-35-45-46-47-49-50-

61-73-74-75-78-79

NIGHT

Pick 3

1-8-1

Pick 4

SPORTS

Marathon

From Page B1

governing body affiliated

with the International Association

of Athletics Federations

within a certain period

of time before the date of the

Boston Marathon they

choose to run.

Jones qualified by finishing

16th in the Columbus

Marathon, the first and only

marathon he competed in

before Boston.

"I don't even know why I

wanted to do it," Jones said.

"I just decided one day I'd

try it and went and tried it. I

qualified so I figured I'd better

go run cause I didn't want

to qualify again."

After building confidence

in Columbus, Jones had high

hopes for Boston but even he

never believed he would finish

in the top 100.

"My goal going in was just

to finish in the top 1,000...,"

he said. "When I rounded the

corner on mile 22 someone

told me I was in 85th and I

just kind of looked at him

did for Rose in Game 3. "It's an

all-league thing these days," he

said. "Everyone's an MVP

when they get to the free throw

line." ... Bulls backup G Acie

Law was helped off the court

after suffering an apparent

ankle or Achilles tendon injury

in a pickup game after practice.

He has not played in the postseason.

Got news?

If you have community,

education or items of

local interest, send a

news tip to

pdtnews@portsmouthdailytimes.com

or call

(740) 353-3101 today.

0-5-2-0

Rolling Cash 5

02-07-14-20-30

Ten-OH

06-10-13-15-18-19-24-27-32-33-34-38-39-47-

59-61-63-67-69-74

Classifieds

work!

(740) 353-3101

like, 'Yeah right, dude. There

ain't no way.'"

Along with his solid finish,

the third fastest of any

Ohio runner competing,

Jones said the experience

was unique.

"There wasn't a point

where there wasn't a spectator,"

Jones said. "There were

just spectators going nuts

and probably 90 percent of

them may not even have a

clue what running is. They

just know you're out there

doing something they probably

can't do so they come out

and yell for you."

Jones also hoped to finish

in under two hours and 30

minutes but acknowledged

Boston's course is as difficult

as it is famous.

"I don't know if the course

would be so difficult if it was

only a 5k course," he said.

"But all the hills start at

about mile 18 so you've got

18 miles under your belt and

then you start rolling

through the hills. It definitely

bites you... The hill they

call Heartbreak Hill starts

around 19 and a half (miles)

Bucks

From Page B1

victory, but we'll see — I

mean, the board speaks for

itself."

Scarlet won the coin flip to

determine which side had the

overall No. 1 pick. Then

Sanzenbacher, after much

deliberation, said he would

take a quarterback and

picked two-year starter Terrelle

Pryor, a strong early

contender for national

awards in the fall.

It wasn't as momentous as

the St. Louis Rams taking

Oklahoma's Sam Bradford

No. 1 on Thursday night, but

it had about as much drama.

"Nothing surprises you

when guys 20-year-olds are

picking," Tressel said later.

"There was nothing earthshaking."

Pryor threw two long

touchdown passes in the

span of 30 seconds a year

ago in the Gray's 23-3 win

over the Scarlet. This year,

he'll be wearing the other jersey.

Sort of. In honor of the

memory of the wife of for-

and goes to 21. It definitely

holds up to its name.

"I improved a little over

seven minutes (from Columbus)

and I don't see my self

improving too much more

than that. I'll probably try to

break 2:30 once, maybe

twice but I don't think I'll

probably try more than two

more times."

Jones isn't sure when he'll

make his next attempt at

marathon running, for now

he's focused on recovering

from the effects of running

26.2 miles in a fairly short

time.

"I couldn't walk," he said.

"It took a couple days until I

until I was walking normal

again. Going up stairs was

almost impossible. It hurts."

The pain will dissipate for

Jones but etched permanently

in the records of the 2010

Boston Marathon will be the

following notation:

94, Blake Jones,

Portsmouth, Ohio, 2:32:02.

JOHN STEGEMAN can be

reached at jstegeman@heartlandpublications.coms

mer Buckeye and current

ESPN analyst Chris Spielman,

both teams will wear

uniforms with pink numbers

in the 77th annual

spring game. Then the jerseys

and the hats worn by

the coaches will be auctioned

off to raise money

for the Stefanie Spielman

Fund for Breast Cancer

Research.

Pryor was asked last week

what he hoped to get out of

the Buckeyes' last game until

kicking off against Marshall

at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 2.

"You've just got to have

fun. I don't know how long

I'll play, but when I play I'm

going to look to get the ball

to whoever's open," Pryor

said.

Tressel said the three main

objectives of the game are

staying healthy, letting the

players have a good time and

providing entertainment for

fans who are paying $5 a

ticket instead of the $70 for a

reserved seat in the fall.

"I think people just like to

get out and get their blood

going," he said. "They think

about football around here

every day of the year."


Rolen sparks Reds’ rally

in 8-5 win over Dodgers

CINCINNATI — Mike

Leake was pretty laid-back

for a guy who had just

earned his first professional

win.

The Cincinnati rookie

lasted seven innings and

benefited from a go-ahead,

two-run double by Scott

Rolen late in the Reds' 8-5

victory over the Los Angeles

Dodgers on Thursday

night.

Drafted eighth overall out

of Arizona State last year,

Leake was making his third

pro start — all in the major

leagues this season. He

became the first Cincinnati

starter to win in 2010, but

his postgame demeanor suggested

somebody waiting

for a bus.

"Not a lot gets to me,"

said the 22-year-old pitcher,

barely old enough to drink

the beer his teammates

showered him with in celebration.

"I'm excited. I just

don't show it too much. It

feels good, not necessarily

for my first one, but for the

starters and the team."

Reds manager Dusty

Baker was happy to see a

starter last that long after

his first two in the series

couldn't get through the

sixth.

"Leake gave us everything

you can ask for, and

we got some big runs late in

the game," Baker said.

Jay Bruce hit a two-run

homer in the sixth for the

Reds, who came from

behind twice for their seventh

victory of the year.

Dodgers left fielder

Manny Ramirez left in the

sixth after straining his right

calf while running out a single.

Los Angeles manager

Joe Torre said the slugger

would be out at least two

days and possibly the entire

weekend series at Washington.

Andre Ethier and pinchhitter

Garret Anderson each

had a two-run homer for

Los Angeles.

The Dodgers were leading

5-4 when Rolen smacked a

two-run double off the leftcenter

wall with two outs in

the seventh. Drew Stubbs

and Ryan Hanigan added

run-scoring singles as the

Reds sent nine batters to the

plate against Los Angeles

relievers Hong-Chih Kuo

(0-1) and Ronald Belisario.

"Four runs with any outs

is good," Rolen said. "I don't

want to get too theoretical

about this, but it probably

means we're swinging at

strikes and being aggressive

in the zone."

Leake (1-0) allowed eight

hits and five runs with one

walk and five strikeouts.

Francisco Cordero pitched

the ninth for his sixth save

in seven opportunities.

Los Angeles Cincinnati

ab r h bi ab r h bi

Furcal ss 5 0 1 1 Dickrsn lf 5 1 1 0

Kemp cf 3 1 1 0 OCarer ss 4 1 3 1

Ethier rf 4 1 1 2 Votto 1b 3 1 1 1

MRmrz lf 3 0 1 0 Phillips 2b 5 1 1 0

RJhnsn pr-lf 1 0 0 0 Rolen 3b 5 1 1 2

Loney 1b 4 0 1 0 Bruce rf 3 2 1 2

Blake 3b 4 0 0 0 Stubbs cf 4 1 2 1

DeWitt 2b 3 1 1 0 Hanign c 4 0 3 1

Martin c 4 1 2 0 Leake p 2 0 0 0

Padilla p 2 0 0 0 Cairo ph 1 0 0 0

GAndrs ph 1 1 1 2 Rhodes p 0 0 0 0

Kuo p 0 0 0 0 Corder p 0 0 0 0

Belisari p 0 0 0 0

Sherrill p 0 0 0 0

Troncs p 0 0 0 0

Bellird ph 1 0 0 0

Totals 35 5 9 5 Totals 36 8 13 8

Los Angeles 200 010 200 — 5

Cincinnati 100 012 40x — 8

E_Padilla (1). DP—Cincinnati 1. LOB—Los Angeles 5, Cincinnati 9. 2B—Phillips (5), Rolen (2).

HR—Ethier (5), G.Anderson (1), Bruce (3). CS—Re.Johnson (1). S—Leake. SF—Votto.

IP H R ER BB SO

Los Angeles

Padilla 6 8 4 3 0 8

Kuo L,0-1 H,1 1-3 1 2 2 1 0

Belisario BS,1-1 2-3 3 2 2 1 0

Sherrill 1-3 1 0 0 1 0

Troncoso 2-3 0 0 0 0 2

Cincinnati

Leake W,1-0 7 8 5 5 1 5

Rhodes H,4 1 0 0 0 0 2

Cordero S,6-7 1 1 0 0 1 1

Umpires—Home, Tim McClelland; First, Mike Everitt; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Adrian Johnson.

T—2:47. A—13,261 (42,319).

Calf strain sends

Dodgers’ Ramirez to DL

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Los

Angeles Dodgers slugger

Manny Ramirez was placed

on the 15-day disabled list

with a strained right calf.

Ramirez was injured running

out a single during

Thursday's game at Cincinnati

and removed for a pinch

runner.

It's the same problem that

caused the 37-year-old

Ramirez to miss two starts

last weekend.

"It's a recurrence of the

calf, and we just have to get

this thing fixed. ... The rationale

is, if he's better in a week

or 10 days, we might as well

do this," Dodgers manager

Joe Torre said.

The 12-time All-Star is hitting

.415 with two homers

and 12 RBIs. He reached

1,800 RBIs on Wednesday,

after recording his 2,500th

career hit on April 10 at Florida.

Ramirez is tied with Hall of

Famer Mike Schmidt for 14th

on the career list with 548

home runs.

Torre informed Ramirez of

the move after finding him

hitting taking indoor hitting

practice before Friday's game

against the Washington

Nationals.

"He was in the cage hitting

today and I told him to pick

up a book," Torre joked.

Torre said Ramirez understood

the reason the Dodgers

weren't waiting to see if the

injury improved in a couple

of days.

"When he came in to talk to

me I said, 'We got to get it

better.'" Torre said.

It's the fourth time in his

18-year career that Ramirez

has been placed on the DL,

and the first time since 2002,

when he fractured his left

index finger while playing for

Boston.

To replace Ramirez on the

25-man roster, the Dodgers

recalled outfielder Xavier

Paul from Triple-A Albuquerque

before Friday's game

at the Nationals. Paul was hitting

.361 with three home

runs and nine RBIs in 15

games for the Isotopes.

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

NATIONAL LEAGUE

East Division

W L Pct GB

Philadelphia 10 5 .667 —

Florida 9 7 .563 1.5

Atlanta 8 7 .533 2

Washington 8 8 .500 2.5

New York 7 9 .438 3.5

Central Division

W L Pct GB

St. Louis 10 5 .667 —

Milwaukee 8 7 .533 2

Pittsburgh 7 8 .467 3

Cincinnati 7 9 .438 3.5

Chicago 6 10 .375 4.5

Houston 5 10 .333 5

West Division

W L Pct GB

San Diego 9 6 .600 —

San Francisco 8 7 .533 1

Colorado 8 8 .500 1.5

Los Angeles 7 8 .467 2

Arizona 6 9 .400 3

Thursday's Games

Milwaukee 20, Pittsburgh 0

Colorado 2, Washington 0

N.Y. Mets 5, Chicago Cubs 2

Cincinnati 8, L.A. Dodgers 5

Philadelphia 8, Atlanta 3

Florida 5, Houston 1

Friday's Games

L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 7:05 p.m.

Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.

San Diego at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.

Pittsburgh at Houston, 8:05 p.m.

Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.

Florida at Colorado, 9:10 p.m.

Philadelphia at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.

St. Louis at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

Saturday's Games

L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 1-0) at Washington

(Stammen 1-0), 1:05 p.m.

Atlanta (Jurrjens 0-1) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 0-

1), 1:10 p.m.

San Diego (LeBlanc 0-0) at Cincinnati (Cueto

0-0), 1:10 p.m.

Pittsburgh (Hart 0-0) at Houston

(W.Rodriguez 0-2), 7:05 p.m.

Chicago Cubs (Lilly 0-0) at Milwaukee

(D.Davis 0-1), 7:10 p.m.

Florida (N.Robertson 2-0) at Colorado (Cook

0-2), 8:10 p.m.

Philadelphia (Figueroa 1-1) at Arizona

(I.Kennedy 0-1), 8:10 p.m.

St. Louis (Wainwright 3-0) at San Francisco

(Zito 2-0), 9:05 p.m.

Sunday's Games

San Diego at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.

L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 1:35 p.m.

Pittsburgh at Houston, 2:05 p.m.

Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.

St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.

Philadelphia at Arizona, 4:10 p.m.

Florida at Colorado, 5:05 p.m.

Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 8:05 p.m.

Monday's Games

L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.

San Diego at Florida, 7:10 p.m.

Washington at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.

Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.

Atlanta at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.

Arizona at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.

Philadelphia at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS

BATTING

G AB R H BA

Rodriguez, WAS 13 49 10 22 .449

Prado, ATL 15 60 10 25 .417

Braun, MIL 15 60 13 25 .417

Ramirez, LAD 13 41 7 17 .415

Ethier, LAD 13 49 9 19 .388

Polanco, PHL 14 60 15 23 .383

McGehee, MIL 15 57 10 21 .368

Headley, S-D 15 57 11 21 .368

Gonzalez, COL 12 51 9 18 .353

Furcal, LAD 15 64 15 22 .344

HOME RUNS

Kemp, LAD 7

Pujols, STL 6

Utley, PHL 6

Ethier, LAD 5

Braun, MIL 5

Rasmus, STL 5

Reynolds, ARI 5

Stewart, COL 4

Rolen, CIN 4

Heyward, ATL 4

McGehee, MIL 4

Cantu, FLA 4

Holliday, STL 4

RUNS BATTED IN

Braun, MIL 20

Kemp, LAD 20

Cantu, FLA 18

Pujols, STL 16

Howard, PHL 16

Heyward, ATL 16

Ethier, LAD 16

Young, ARI 15

Reynolds, ARI 14

Utley, PHL 14

McGehee, MIL 14

STOLEN BASES

A. McCutchen, PIT 9

Furcal, LAD 7

Wright, NYM 6

Headley, S-D 5

Gomez, MIL 5

Bourn, HOU 5

Braun, MIL 4

Stubbs, CIN 4

Votto, CIN 4

Theriot, CHC 4

Morgan, WAS 4

SLUGGING PERCENTAGE

Braun, MIL .733

Utley, PHL .732

Kemp, LAD .730

Ethier, LAD .714

Rasmus, STL .705

McGehee, MIL .684

Johnson, ARI .667

Ramirez, LAD .659

Pujols, STL .639

Stewart, COL .636

ON-BASE PERCENTAGE

Ramirez, LAD .500

Utley, PHL .479

Prado, ATL .478

Braun, MIL .478

Weeks, MIL .473

BASEBALL

Standings and stats

Rodriguez, WAS .472

Willingham, WAS .470

Ethier, LAD .455

Martin, LAD .446

Gonzalez, S-D .446

RUNS SCORED

Kemp, LAD 20

Utley, PHL 17

Weeks, MIL 16

Polanco, PHL 15

Furcal, LAD 15

Maybin, FLA 15

Braun, MIL 13

Stewart, COL 13

A. McCutchen, PIT 12

Francoeur, NYM 12

Uggla, FLA 12

Willingham, WAS 12

Cantu, FLA 12

HITS

Braun, MIL 25

Prado, ATL 25

Polanco, PHL 23

Rodriguez, WAS 22

Furcal, LAD 22

Kemp, LAD 21

McGehee, MIL 21

Headley, S-D 21

Uggla, FLA 21

Loney, LAD 21

Wright, NYM

BASES ON BALLS

19

Utley, PHL 15

Dunn, WAS 14

Jones, PIT 14

Willingham, WAS 14

McCann, ATL 13

Soto, CHC 13

Gonzalez, S-D 12

Ibanez, PHL 12

Lee, CHC

DOUBLES

11

Werth, PHL 9

Johnson, ARI 8

Zimmerman, WAS 7

Edmonds, MIL 7

G. Sanchez, FLA 7

Rodriguez, WAS 7

Prado, ATL 6

McGehee, MIL 6

Cantu, FLA 6

Byrd, CHC 6

Soriano, CHC 6

Hawpe, COL 6

Morgan, WAS

TRIPLES

3

Escobar, MIL 3

Inglett, MIL 2

Venable, S-D 2

Fowler, COL 2

43 tied

TOTAL BASES

1

Kemp, LAD 46

Braun, MIL 44

Utley, PHL 41

Pujols, STL 39

McGehee, MIL 39

Cantu, FLA 37

Howard, PHL 36

Weeks, MIL 36

Ethier, LAD 35

Stewart, COL 35

Uggla, FLA 35

EARNED RUN AVERAGE

Hernandez, WAS 0.75

Halladay, PHL 0.82

Pelfrey, NYM 0.86

Lincecum, S-F 0.90

Silva, CHC 0.95

Jimenez, COL 0.95

Penny, STL 1.29

Wainwright, STL 1.50

Sanchez, S-F 1.86

Zito, S-F 1.86

WON-LOST

Halladay, PHL 4-0

Jimenez, COL 4-0

Clippard, WAS 3-0

Wainwright, STL 3-0

Lincecum, S-F 3-0

Pelfrey, NYM 3-0

Lowe, ATL 3-1

19 tied 2

GAMES PITCHED

Nieve, NYM 11

Troncoso, LAD 10

Weaver, LAD 9

Marshall, CHC 9

Mejia, NYM 9

Sherrill, LAD 9

Ondrusek, CIN 9

Grabow, CHC 9

Cordero, CIN 9

21 tied 8

SAVES

Capps, WAS 7

No Age Limit

Cordero, CIN 6

Franklin, STL 5

Bell, S-D 4

Lindstrom, HOU 4

Marmol, CHC 3

Morales, COL 3

Madson, PHL 3

Dotel, PIT 3

Hoffman, MIL 3

Nunez, FLA 3

INNINGS PITCHED

Halladay, PHL 33.0

Jimenez, COL 28.1

E. Jackson, ARI 26.0

Haren, ARI 26.0

Carpenter, STL 25.0

Wolf, MIL 24.1

Santana, NYM 24.1

Duke, PIT 24.0

Hernandez, WAS 24.0

Wainwright, STL 24.0

STRIKEOUTS

Haren, ARI 28

Halladay, PHL 28

Sanchez, S-F 27

Carpenter, STL 27

Zambrano, CHC 26

Gallardo, MIL 25

Jimenez, COL 25

Lincecum, S-F 24

Padilla, LAD 23

Johnson, FLA 22

Santana, NYM 22

Dempster, CHC 22

Wainwright, STL 22

COMPLETE GAMES

Halladay, PHL 2

Jimenez, COL 1

Nolasco, FLA 1

Hernandez, WAS 1

Wainwright, STL 1

SHUTOUTS

Hernandez, WAS 1

Jimenez, COL 1

Halladay, PHL 1

Portsmouth Daily Times Saturday, April 24, 2010 B3

AMERICAN LEAGUE

East Division

W L Pct GB

Tampa Bay 12 4 .750 —

New York 11 4 .733 .5

Toronto 9 7 .563 3

Boston 6 10 .375 6

Baltimore 2 14 .125 10

Central Division

W L Pct GB

Minnesota 11 5 .688 —

Detroit 9 7 .563 2

Cleveland 7 8 .467 3.5

Kansas City 6 9 .400 4.5

Chicago 5 11 .313 6

West Division

W L Pct GB

Oakland 10 7 .588 —

Seattle 9 7 .563 .5

Los Angeles 8 9 .471 2

Texas 6 9 .400 3

Wednesday's Games

Kansas City 4, Toronto 3, 10 innings

Boston 8, Texas 7, 12 innings

Minnesota 6, Cleveland 0

Tampa Bay 12, Chicago White Sox 0

Detroit 4, L.A. Angels 3

N.Y. Yankees 3, Oakland 1

Seattle 4, Baltimore 1

Thursday's Games

Cleveland 8, Minnesota 1

Oakland 4, N.Y. Yankees 2

Texas 3, Boston 0

Tampa Bay 10, Chicago White Sox 2

Detroit 5, L.A. Angels 4

Friday's Games

Baltimore (Guthrie 0-2) at Boston (Lester 0-

2), 7:10 p.m.

Toronto (Cecil 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Garza 3-0),

7:10 p.m.

Detroit (Scherzer 1-1) at Texas (Feldman 1-

1), 8:05 p.m.

Minnesota (Pavano 2-1) at Kansas City

(Meche 0-1), 8:10 p.m.

Seattle (Rowland-Smith 0-1) at Chicago

White Sox (Floyd 0-2), 8:10 p.m.

Cleveland (Westbrook 0-1) at Oakland (Duchscherer

1-0), 10:05 p.m.

N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 2-0) at L.A. Angels

(E.Santana 1-2), 10:05 p.m.

Saturday's Games

Cleveland (Carmona 2-0) at Oakland

(Bre.Anderson 1-1), 4:05 p.m.

N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 2-0) at L.A. Angels

(Pineiro 2-1), 4:10 p.m.

Seattle (Fister 2-1) at Chicago White Sox

(F.Garcia 0-2), 4:10 p.m.

Toronto (Romero 1-1) at Tampa Bay (Niemann

1-0), 6:10 p.m.

Baltimore (Matusz 2-0) at Boston (Lackey 1-

1), 7:10 p.m.

Minnesota (Blackburn 1-1) at Kansas City

(Hochevar 2-0), 7:10 p.m.

Detroit (Willis 0-1) at Texas (Harden 0-1),

8:05 p.m.

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DEADLINE: April 26, 2010

637 Sixth Street, Portsmouth

Sunday's Games

Baltimore (D.Hernandez 0-3) at Boston

(Wakefield 0-1), 1:35 p.m.

Toronto (Morrow 1-1) at Tampa Bay (Price 2-

1), 1:40 p.m.

Seattle (J.Vargas 2-1) at Chicago White Sox

(Danks 2-0), 2:05 p.m.

Minnesota (Slowey 2-1) at Kansas City (Bannister

0-1), 2:10 p.m.

Detroit (Porcello 1-1) at Texas (C.Lewis 2-0),

3:05 p.m.

N.Y. Yankees (Vazquez 1-2) at L.A. Angels

(Kazmir 1-1), 3:35 p.m.

Cleveland (Masterson 0-2) at Oakland

(G.Gonzalez 1-1), 4:05 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS

BATTING

G AB R H BA

Podsednik, K-C 13 49 6 22 .449

Gutierrez, SEA 16 61 6 24 .393

Guillen, K-C 15 61 13 23 .377

Cabrera, DET 16 63 10 23 .365

Morneau, MIN 16 56 13 20 .357

Kendall, K-C 14 54 2 19 .352

Posada, NYY 12 46 8 16 .348

Mauer, MIN 15 52 10 18 .346

Crawford, T-B 16 59 14 20 .339

Wells, TOR 16 59 14 20 .339

HOME RUNS

Cruz, TEX 7

Wells, TOR 7

Guillen, K-C 6

Gonzalez, TOR 5

Konerko, CHW 5

Wigginton, BAL 5

Pedroia, BOS 5

9 tied 4

RUNS BATTED IN

Cabrera, DET 19

Pena, T-B 17

Cruz, TEX 17

Pedroia, BOS 13

Upton, T-B 13

Cuddyer, MIN 13

Guillen, K-C 13

Longoria, T-B 13

Kotchman, SEA 12

Crawford, T-B 12

Wells, TOR 12

Choo, CLE 12

STOLEN BASES

Davis, OAK 8

Podsednik, K-C 7

Pierre, CHW 7

Gardner, NYY 7

Crawford, T-B 7

Cruz, TEX 5

Andrus, TEX 5

Granderson, NYY 4

Span, MIN 4

Zobrist, T-B 4

Suzuki, SEA 4

Borbon, TEX 4

Figgins, SEA 4

SLUGGING PERCENTAGE

Cruz, TEX .827

Wells, TOR .797

Guillen, K-C .738

Cabrera, DET .667

Cano, NYY .649

Posada, NYY .630

Gonzalez, TOR .627

Rodriguez, NYY .593

Pedroia, BOS .591

Matsui, LAA .587

ON-BASE PERCENTAGE

Podsednik, K-C .526

Morneau, MIN .493

Barton, OAK .493

Cabrera, DET .452

Mauer, MIN .444

Rodriguez, NYY .439

Gutierrez, SEA .433

Damon, DET .431

Choo, CLE .431

Wells, TOR .426

RUNS SCORED

Crawford, T-B 14

Wells, TOR 14

Longoria, T-B 14

Guillen, K-C 13

Ordonez, DET 13

Davis, OAK 13

Morneau, MIN 13

Cano, NYY 12

7 tied 11

HITS

Gutierrez, SEA 24

Cabrera, DET 23

Guillen, K-C 23

Podsednik, K-C 22

Cuddyer, MIN 21

Jackson, DET 20

Crawford, T-B 20

Morneau, MIN 20

Wells, TOR 20

Jeter, NYY 20

Suzuki, SEA 20

Celebrate the

Sacrament of

The First Holy

Communion.

Actual Size 1x3

My Name:

My Address:

City: Telephone:

Greeting to Read:

Credit Card # Exp. Date

m

C M Y K

S

S


2 8 1 7

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, April 24, 2010:

This year, you develop a new talent. Not only will

you find it rewarding, but it also might become an

excellent second source of revenue. Often, you hold

★★★★ You beam, and others might wond

You might not know exactly, but you feel toge

child or budding relationship plays a strong ro

upcoming events. You cannot run away from

THE FAMILY CIRCUS

Bil Keane

CONCEPTIS SUDOKU

by Dave Green

Jacquelene Bigar’s HOROSCOPE

C M Y K

THE LOCKHORNS ® By Bunny Hoest

SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 2010 COMICS & COMICS ENTERTAINMENT

B4 Saturday, April 24, 2010 Portsmouth Daily Times

BLONDIE Dean Young/Denis Lebrun

BEETLE BAILEY Mort Walker

FUNKY WINKERBEAN Tom Batiuk

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE Chris Browne

HI & LOIS Brian and Greg Walker

MUTTS Patrick McDonnell

MUTTS Patrick McDonnell

THE FAMILY CIRCUS

Bil Keane

DENNIS THE MENACE

Hank Ketchum

CONCEPTIS SUDOKU

3

2

Difficulty Level

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by Dave Green

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2010 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Difficulty Level

MONDAY 04-19-10

TUESDAY 04-20-10

SATURDAY 04-24-10 FRIDAY 04-23-10 THURSDAY 04-22-10 WEDNESDAY 04-21-10

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, April 24, 2010:

This year, you develop a new talent. Not only will

you find it rewarding, but it also might become an

excellent second source of revenue. Often, you hold

yourself back and don’t risk, but this is not a risk. You

are developing a gift. Your creativity swells when you

are out of your environment. If you are single, go exotic,

and you could be delighted by the type of relationship

you form. If you are attached, plan on that special

trip you have always talked about. VIRGO understands

you much better than you think.

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic;

4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19)

★★★★ You have your hands full. If you can visit

and chat with someone while clearing out a project or

two, it would be much nicer. If asked, be frank about

how you feel. The other party wants to know. Tonight:

Do your own thing.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20)

★★★★★ Where others are stymied by situations,

you aren’t. In fact, your imagination seems to take off in

many unanticipated directions. Let go of old grievances.

Open up to new thoughts and styles. Tonight: If

you are a charming Bull, it might be very hard to say

“no” to TUESDAY you.

04-20-10

GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

★★★★ Though you might not want to dignify the

role of couch potato with your presence, you run

around so much that some heavy downtime fits the

bill. A partner is changing, and you are adjusting. Venus

enters your sign today, adding to your allure. Tonight:

Be with a favorite person.

CANCER (June 21-July 22)

★★★★★ Keep talking about what is on your mind.

If someone doesn’t get it with one set of words and

expressions, try another style. Eventually, you will get

through. In the next few weeks, walk away from being

overly sensitive. Tonight: Hang out with favorite people.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)

★★★★ Be aware of the hidden costs of a purchase

or an agreement. Discuss feelings later in the day, when

you see that another person’s attitude was a passage

rather than a reality. Tonight: Treat others to dinner or a

scrumptious dessert.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Ad goes here

Today’s Answers

WEDNESDAY 04-21-10 THURSDAY 04-22-10

FRIDAY 04-23-10 THE LOCKHORNS SATURDAY 04-24-10 William Hoest

SATURDAY 04-24-10 FRIDAY 04-23-10 THURSDAY 04-22-10 WEDNESDAY 04-21-10

ZITS Jerry Scott and Jim Bor

HI & LOIS Brian and Greg Walker

FRIDAY 04-23-10 THE LOCKHORNS SATURDAY 04-24-10 William

637 Sixth Street, Portsmouth, Ohio 45662 Phone 740-353-3101

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE Chris Browne

®

Answers for

today’s crossword

puzzle

can be found at

the bottom of

the page.

ZITS Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

FUNKY WINKERBEAN Tom Batiuk

BEETLE BAILEY Mort Walker

Jacquelene Bigar’s HOROSCOPE

★★★★ You beam, and others might wonder why.

You might not know exactly, but you feel together. A

child or budding relationship plays a strong role in

upcoming events. You cannot run away from this one!

Tonight: Just don’t be alone.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

★★ Just say “no” or cancel plans if you would like

to. It is wonderful to be reliable, but sometimes even

you need to be flaky. A partner comes through with

more understanding than anticipated. Tonight: Screen

your calls.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

★★★★★ Where people are is where the happy

Scorp can be found. As you meet people, you also sense

the many possibilities that you have yet to entertain. If

you are attached, your mate looks at you through new

eyes. If you are single, someone clearly admires you.

Tonight: Where the party is.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

★★★ Many might look to you as an authority figure.

Just don’t step up to the plate unless you really

know what you are doing. Use care with your funds, as

you might suddenly notice that your accounts are

lower. Tonight: Out at a concert or ballgame.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

MONDAY ★★★★★ 04-19-10 Sometimes you hold yourself back too

much. Don’t today. Let your mind take off like a magic

carpet. Whether you decide to plan a vacation or just

plan a wild party is your call. Let go of constraints, certainly

self-imposed ones. Tonight: Be free as a bird. You

can do it. Try it once!

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

★★★★ You are such an independent, free spirit that

once in a while you can accommodate a partner or

loved one and do exactly what he or she wants to do

for a day. Both of you could be delighted by the outcome

and the strength of the feelings. Tonight: Bend

and go with someone else’s plans.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)

★★★★★ March to the beat of another person’s

drum. You might trip, but you feel enlightened to live

another’s life from his or her perspective. A family

member or roommate shares his or her respect for the

way you continue to open up. Tonight: Out and about.

Jacqueline Bigar is on the Internet

at http://www.jacquelinebigar.com.

Today’s Answers

BLONDIE Dean Young/Denis Lebrun

THE LOCKHORNS ® By Bunny H

WEDNESDAY 04-21-10 THURSDAY 04-22-10

COOMMIICCSS && EENTTERTAAINNMMEENNTT


SATURDAY DAYTIME APRIL 24, 2010

Dear Dr. Brothers: My

mom is in her 60s, but she

swears she feels not a day over

40. I sometimes worry that

she’s overestimating her abilities

and is just covering up to

make me feel better for living

far away. On the other hand,

she does seem to be doing better

than some of her friends

who are her age — she’s able

to do a lot more, and she does

spend time with a younger

crowd. I know people age differently,

but can her feeling

young really be keeping her

young? — P.K.

Dear P.K.: Surprisingly, the

old mantra “You’re only as old

as you feel” may be close to

the truth. Although chronological

age does matter, how your

mother feels about her age

does have implications for her

aging process. According to a

recent study in the Journal of

Gerontology: Social Sciences,

the downsides we associate

with aging accompany the

feeling of being older than

your years. If, like your mother,

you feel and act younger,

then it can be easier to maintain

the abilities of a younger

person and have confidence in

those abilities.

This sense of feeling young

that your mother has goes

hand in hand with her happiness

and wellness, but it’s hard

to say whether her feeling

young is causing her to hold

on to her cognitive and social

functions, or vice versa.

Regardless, though, you can

now trust your mother when

she says that she feels young.

Keeping up with new trends

and invigorating activities certainly

can contribute to that

feeling of youthfulness, especially

via new technologies. So

encouraging your mother to

embrace new activities and

continue to spend time with

younger friends can only help

her live a happier and more

fulfilled life. Learning new

technologies and challenging

herself also can help your

mother improve her cognitive

abilities and maintain that

younger feeling longer.

Dear Dr. Brothers: I’m

retired and live alone, and until

recently my dog Riley was my

constant companion. He lived

a long, happy life, but sadly

was diagnosed with cancer last

year and died just recently. I

haven’t been able to talk to

anyone about it, but I’m truly

grieving his death. I’m worried

that people will think I’ve lost

it, being this sad about the

death of a dog, but he was my

only close family. How can I

get over this grief? — A.H.

Dear A.H.: Many people are

unwilling or unable to talk

about the death of a pet

because the pain is too unbearable.

They, like you, hope the

pain will dissipate over time.

But like any grieving process,

if you can discuss it more

openly, maybe you’ll be able

to get through the pain and

sorrow a little more easily. You

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C M Y K

B6 Saturday, April 24, 2010 Portsmouth Daily Times

CLASSIFIEDS

www.portsmouth-dailytimes.com

sell - buy - rent - hire - find

Yard Sale Ads - 1 Day $15.90 - 2 Days

$26.50 - 3 Days $36.99

(up to 4 lines)

4 DAYS/4 LINES - $27.50

6 DAYS/4 LINES - $41.25

45 DAYS/4 LINES - $48.75

18-20 characters per line up to 4 lines.

PREPAID PRIVATE PARTIES ONLY.

Office Hours: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

DEADLINES: SUNDAYʼS PAPER @ 4 P.M. FRIDAY • TUESDAYʼS PAPER @ 4 P.M. MONDAY WEDNESDAYʼS PAPER @ 4 P.M.

TUESDAY • THURSDAYʼS PAPER @ 4 P.M. WED. • FRIDAYʼS PAPER @ 4 P.M. THURSDAY

• SATURDAYʼS PAPER @ 3 P.M. FRIDAY VISA - MC - AMEX - CHECK - CASH

The Best Way To Write An Ad:

• Begin with a key word (item for sale, etc.)

• Use descriptive words to identify your items

• State your price or terms • Include a phone number and/or e-mail address

NAME:

ADDRESS:

PHONE #

100 Legals

NOTICE FOR BIDS

Notice is hereby given

that sealed bids will be

received at the Office of

the Porter Township

Trustees, P.O. Box 427,

1535 Dogwood Ridge

Rd., Wheelersburg, Ohio

45694, until 4:00 p.m. on

Monday, May 3, 2010 for

a New Emergency Generator

for the Porter

Township Fire Station.

Plan and specifications

may be obtained by contacting

the Office of the

Porter Township

Trustees at 740-574-

42345 and submitting a

$25.00 non-refundable

deposit. The Board of

Trustees reserves the

right to waive informalities

and to reject any or

all bids. Board of

Trustees of Porter Township,

Ted Adams, Fiscal

Officer

Adv. April 17, 24, 2010

PUBLIC NOTICE

The following applications

and/or verified complaints

were received

and the following draft,

proposed, or final actions

were issued, by the Ohio

Environmental Protection

Agency (OEPA) last

week. “Actions” include

the adoption, modification,

or repeal of orders

( other than emergency

orders); The issuance,

denial, modification or

revocation of licenses,

permits, leases, variances,

or certificates;

and the approval or disapproval

of plans and

specifications. “Draft Actions”

are written statements

of the Director of

Environmental Protection’s”

(Director’s) intent

with respect to the issuance,

denial, etc. of a

permit, license, order,

etc. Interested persons

,may submit written comments

or request a public

meeting regarding draft

actions. Comments or

public meeting requests

must be submitted within

30 days of notice of the

draft action. “Proposed

Actions” are written

statements of the Director’s

intent with respect

to the issuance, denial,

modification, revocation,

or renewal of a permit, license,

or variance. Written

comments and

requests for a public

meeting regarding a proposed

action may be

submitted within 30 days

of notice of the proposed

action. An adjudication

hearing may be held on

a proposed action if a

hearing request or objection

by the OEPA within

30 days of issuance of

the proposed action.

Written comments, requests

for public meetings,

and adjudication

hearing requests must

be sent to: Hearing

Clerk, Ohio Environmental

Protection Agency,

P.O. Box 1049, Columbus,

Ohio 43216-1049 (

Telephone: 614-644-

2129). “Final Actions” are

actions of the Director

which are effective upon

issuance or a stated effective

date. Pursuant to

Ohio Revised Code Section

3745.04, a final action

may be appealed to

the Environmental Review

appeals commission

(ERAC) by a

person who was a party

to a proceeding before

the Director by filing an

appeal within 30 days of

notice of the final action.

Pursuant to Ohio Revised

Code Section

3745.07, a final action issuing,

denying, modifying,

revoking, or

renewing a permit, license,

or variance which

is not preceded by a proposed

action, may be appealed

to the ERAC by

filing an appeal within 30

days of issuance of the

final action. ERAC appeals,

accompanied by a

$70 filing fee which the

commission in its discretion

may reduce if by affi-

100 Legals

davit the appellant

demonstrates that payment

of the full amount

of the fee would cause

extreme hardship, mist

be filed with: Environmental

Review Appeals

Commission, 309 South

Fourth Street, Room

222, Columbus, Ohio

43215. A copy of the appeal

must be served on

the Director within 3 days

after filing the appeal

with the ERAC.

Final Approval Of Plans

Ans Specifications

Northwest Regional

Water District

123 Smith Street

McDermott OH

Action Date: 04-21-2010

Identification No.:

756304

This final action not preceded

by proposed action

and is appealable to

ERAC. Detail plans for

PWSID: OH 7300003

Plan No. 756304 REgardmtunger/Bracken

Ridge Rds Water Line

Extension.

Adv. April 24, 2010

200 Announcements

Lost & Found

REWARD !!!

So. Webster Area

Brown & White Boxer.

Answers to the name

of Diesel. 778-2242

300 Services

Other Services

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WHEEL DEALS

Write your

ad here:

(18-20 characters

per line)

CREDIT CARD:

Our CLASSIFIEDS Will WORK For You!!!

MOTOR ROUTES

NOW AVAILABLE

• Eden Park/Rt. 139

Swauger Valley area

• Wheelersburg/Minford

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• Houston Hollow/ Candy Run

CALL OLIVE

353-3101 EXT. 231

Carrier Routes Available

Must have Reliable Transportation

Shawnee,

Grandview,

27th,

Willow Way,

Dorman,

Circle

$ 258.50/mo.

Sunrise, Kent,

28th, Ruhlman, 29th,

Buena Vista, Cedar,

Cypress, Sherman,

Gilbert, Orchard &

Sheridan

$ 259.74/mo.

Professional Services

Power washing Free

est. Lawn Care Free

Est. 740-464-5305

Security

ADT

Free Home

Security

$850 Value

with purchase of

alarm monitoring

services from ADT

Security Services.

Call 1-888-274-3888

Tax / Accounting

AMERICAN TAX

RELIEF

Settle IRS Taxes for

a fraction of what

you owe. If you owe

over $15,000 in back

taxes call now for a

free consultation. 1-

877-258-5142

400 Financial

Financial Services

CREDIT CARE

RELIEF

Buried in Credit Card

Debt?

Call Credit Card

Relief for your free

consultations.

1-877-264-8031

500 Education

600 Animals

Horses

Kid broke horse, Call

740-574-4534

Male Mini Stallion, 3

years old, $300 OBO

Call 740-533-1230

Livestock

5 Black Cows & calves

2nd Calf. Black Reg. 2

yr old Bull & 15 Feeder

Calves. Lost lease on

farm. 740-935-9545

Pets

AKC Reg. Labs

Chocolate & Yellow 8

wks. shots & wormed.

$150. 778-2787

Boston Terrier pups

reg, 1st shots &

wormed $250 & $350

740-532-7456

Reg Boxer pups, tails

docked, first shots, 7

wks old, $300 ea

P.O.P. 740-961-9448

or 740-876-8234

Shih Tzu puppies 1

fem. 2 male Born

12/22/09 $200 ea Call

740-876-9991

700 Agriculture

Farm Equipment

4 Wheel Drive 510

Long Farm Tractor

1600 hrs. Runs great!

$8900 Inquiry's Call

740-352-6605

Kubota small farm

tractor, diesel, 710

hours, family owned

since new, good cond,

259-5297

MF 245 w/loader, 451

mower, roto digger,

269 baler, rake, bush

hogs, NH hay bine,

fin mower 574-8540

CALL CIRCULATION 353-3101

West End

From Front St

to 11th Street

to Lincoln

Street, Down

Offnere Street to

2nd Street

Appr. $ 394.03/mo.

North Hill,

Coles Ridge,

Michigan, Indian,

Seneca, Old Post,

Sandstone area

$ 285.12/mo.

900 Merchandise

Bargain Basement

1 pair of guineas, $25

for both Call 259-

5798

Beautiful oriental

rug, 6 ft by 8 ft.,

$49.99 Call 456-8544

Breezy Rider Exerciser

bike $25 Kitchen

table $24.99 Call 259-

2310 before 10 PM.

Cabbage Patch Doll

$9.99 2 African American

Dolls $20 ea.

456-6000.

Good working computer,

high speed internet,

$49.99 Call

354-3748

Hay Bales - Round

stored in barn 2 for

$49.99. Brown eggs

$1.75 doz. 858-4006

I Phone look-a-like

New in box $49.99

Call 464-6719

Pair of Louvered

wood folding closet

doors 72" w x 78 1/2 "

H. $49.99 574-2690

Miscellaneous

08 Yamaha golf cart,

gas driven, excellent

cond, $3,200 firm,

858-4485

Birds Salvage

Buying junk cars running

& not, Prices vary

574-6915 or 776-6896

Brown egg laying

hens for sale, Call

740-820-3540

East End

From Offnere

Street to

Overpass, 8th

Street to the

Ohio River

$ 354.48/mo.

Sciotoville

$ 342.24/mo.

New Boston

$ 116.64/mo.

Over 30,000 Readers every issue!

5 Easy Ways to place your ad:

1. Call: (740) 353-3101 2. Fax: (740) 353-7280

3. E-mail: pdtclassified@portsmouth-dailytimes.com 4. Stop by: 637 6th Street,

Portsmouth 5. Mail: P.O. Box 581, Portsmouth, Ohio 45662

“BARGAIN

BASEMENT”

900 MERCHANDISE

$3.75 for items selling

for up to $49.99

5 LINES, 18-20 CHARACTERS PER LINE

For Items Valued at

$50-$500 7 Days/4 Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.99

$501-$1000 10 Days/4 Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22.25

$1001-$5000 14 Days/4 Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$31.50

Miscellaneous

Callaway X18 irons

$240. Callaway FT5

Driver, new $120. Callaway

X 7 wood new

$80 353-0451

Feeder Pigs, $45 ea

hay & straw Hileman

Farm Call 858-3276

Golden Comet &

Rhode Island red

hens 12-13 mos old

laying good, $7 ea

740-259-4447

Good fridge off white

$100. LP gas range off

white $50 Floral love

seat $40. 259-2683

464-2394

Marlin Rifle 39A

w/scope ex cond.

$300 firm. 820-4187

Remington Model 31

-12-GA 30” full, w/

checkered wood, early

3 digit serial # 63X,

rare gun, 95% $695

740-533-3870

Sz 12 Tangerine prom

dress. Sz 2 Choc. &

Turquoise $150 ea. Sz

6 Turquoise $75 464-

6719

Yard Sale

Rummage Sale Sat.

April 24th 9-1 Mens &

womens clothes,

shoes, lots of misc.

Valley United

Methodist Church

4720 Old Scioto Trail

Rosemount

No Age Limit

1000

Send a greeting to your

•Child

•Grandchild •Niece

•Nephew

First Communion

to be published on

Sun., May 2nd

Only $ 11 per ad

(payable in advance)

Send photo with check , money order

or credit card information and your

personal greeting and self addressed,

stamped envelope to:

Portsmouth Daily Times,

637 Sixth St., P.O. Box 581

Portsmouth, OH 45662

DEADLINE: April 26, 2010

Recreational

Vehicles

ATVs

01 Honda 400 EX

runs great, looks

sharp, after market

parts $2700 obo 740-

352-3754

2 Can-Am 4 wheelers

2007 models 4 wd,

wenches, 2 up, 1 red 1

yellow $6500 ea or both

$12,000 357-9728

2000 Honda 250

Recon Utility 2x4 red

& black, good shape

fresh motor. $1500

obo 372-5038

Boats / Accessories

1985 Imperial V190

19' seats 6 w/4 cyl inboard

w/easy load

trailer $3000 obo 740-

981-6254

Campers / RVs &

Trailers

1990 Innsbrook, 32 ft

fully loaded, awning,

great shape, $5,199

Call 456-5645

1995 32 ft. Holiday

Rambler Aluminite Gr.

Shape, Elec. awning,

road ready $6500 858-

5278

1996 Winnebago

motor home, runs &

looks great, may take

pull trailer on trade

$11,500 353-1070

29' Jayco Lite w/ 10'

slide out nice cond.

priced well below book

$10,900. 259-5057

637 Sixth Street, Portsmouth

EXP. SIGNATURE

Campers / RVs &

Trailers

96 Dutchman pop up

camper sleeps 8

$1200 obo 858-5370

97 Fleetwood Wilderness

TT, 33’, w/super

slide out, 1 yrs old

awning, C/h&a, excel

cond, $6,900 OBO

357-0970

Motorcycles

07 Red R6 Yamaha

6,398 mi. like new

Asking $5000 Great

Shape 357-6646

2002 Yamaha YZF R1

Silver & black w/

power commander

$5000 obo. Call Chris

740-727-2366

2005 Honda 1300 R

5,000 mi perfect cond.

extras, $5500 372-

5083

2005 Honda CR250R,

2 stroke, great shape,

$1,900 OBO Call 456-

5867

2006 Honda Elite 80cc

Scooter ex. cond.

great in town street

Portsmouth Daily Times

is now accepting

applications for

Motor Route Drivers

Must Apply in Person.

PORTSMOUTH DAILY TIMES

637 Sixth Street Portsmouth, Ohio

Celebrate the

Sacrament of

The First Holy

Communion.

CONGRATULATIONS

ELIJAH COLLINS

Love, Mom

Actual Size 1x3

My Name:

My Address:

City: Telephone:

Greeting to Read:

Credit Card # Exp. Date

Motorcycles

bike 100 mpg reg. gas

$1490 821-4875

2007 Buell Blast,

black 950 mi. $4200.

357-7063

2008 H.D. Knightster

700 mi. extra accs. &

security $8500 obo.

2006 Pontiac Soltice

conv. all options 3,000

mi. never been wet.

$15,500 obo 259-5860

2008 Yamaha R6

7,631 mi. yellow w/

black flames, lowered,

extras. $6,700 neg.

776-6471 464-2701

2009 H.D. 1200 C like

new 1200 mi. over

$1,000 accs. $8500

740-352-5496 740-

259-3737

Harley 03 Deuce

100th Anniversary

Edition, black, ex.

chrome, must see

$9500 606-232-6319

Harley 95 Ultra Classic,

loaded, Must See

$7995 606-232-6319


www.real estategallery.com www.real estategallery.com www.real estategallery.com www.real estategallery.com www.real estategallery.com www.real estategallery.com www.real estategallery.com www.real estategallery.com

Motorcycles

Harley 04 Roadking

Classic, 5000 1 owner

miles, like new

$11,500 606-232-6319

Harley 2000 Roadking,

Loaded, Must

See $8500 606-232-

6319

Harley 96 Heritage

Soft Tail, black, Must

See $7995 606-232-

6319

Harley Sporster, 03

Custom 883, 100th

Anniv. Ed, $4,995 Call

740-357-2962

Harley, 05 Fatboy,

15th Anniv Edition,

must see, $9,950 Call

606-232-6319

Harley, 2000 Dyna

Wide glide, loaded

w/extras, must see,

$8,500 606-232-6319

Harley, 98, Sporster,

low miles, loaded,

$3,200 606-232-6319

REALTY GROUP

C M Y K

www.realestategallery.com

REAL ESTATE GALLERY, INC.

740-574-9902 OR 740-355-1990

380 PATRIOT RIDGE DR.

Corner, level lot in Patriot

Ridge Estates. Custom ash

cabinets in kitchen, bathrooms,

and utility room.

Solid wood blinds; new stainless

steel appliances and granite

countertops in kitchen. Peachtree windows. Den

could be Dining Room. Upstairs BR could be family

room. Separate heating and cooling system for 2nd floor.

Remote controlled gas logs with custom mantle. Call

Nancy Hawk@821-7344. W135771

VIRTUAL TOUR

Custom Victorian Style Home

with wrap around porch, large

deck and kidney shaped

heated pool; 20' ceilings in

entry foyer and living room, 9'

ceilings on rest of main level;

Custom oak hardwood floors & trim; custom draperies;

Antique chandelier in entry & dining room; Custom

kitchen cabinets with center island and breakfast nook. 3

car garage with heating and cooling; main floor laundry

room with built in ironing board. Call Nancy Hawk

@821-7344. W135785

VIRTUAL TOUR

666 HAVENWOOD

731 HERMS HILL

Immaculate and ready to move

into. Ceramic tile starts in the

foyer and wraps through the dining

room into the recently remodeled

kitchen. Kitchen

(2007) features toffee maple

cabinets, easy close drawers with double silverware tray.

Newer furnace (2009), garage door (2009), windows, roof

(2002). The full walkout basement has wood burning fireplace

in the family room. Also, in bsmt is a full kitchen, utility

room, rec room and ample storage. Beautiful backyard

and patio and outbuilding for more storage. Call Wyatt

Bates@352-6204. W135766

1613 MOHAWK DRIVE

Nice 2 bedroom ranch on .5

acre close to School. Call Bob

Taylor @357-4564. J135788

420 JISCO WEST ROAD

Large rooms, contemporary

feel. Situated on over an acre.

3 Bedrooms 2 full baths. Call

Kathy Howard @285-1849.

W135791

1225 MAIN ST.

Feeling Fenced In? Need Convenient

Location To

Portsmouth? See This 1&1/2

Story Home (Altered Salt Box

Style) With Fantastic Fenced

Yard! 300' X 125' Space! Old

Grape Arbor, Just Minutes To Town. Some Updates Including

Nice Kitchen.Call Ruth Arnett @574-1114 W13789

Custom built by current owners

this beautiful tudor style home is

situated on over 2 acres conveniently

located close to Wheelersburg

School. Every attention to

detail can be seen throughout this

spacious home. Beautiful pecan cabinets highlight the kitchen

which is open to the great room. Natural light fills the home

from the 20 ft. floor to ceiling windows. Front and back staircase

for easy access to the upper level leading to the 4 bedrooms

and baths. Call Nancy Hawk @821-7344 for appointment.

VIRTUAL TOUR

www.realestategallery.com 24 Hours A Day - Every Day www.realestategallery.com

REAL ESTATE GALLERY, INC.

NANCY HAWK - BROKER/OWNER

www.realestategallery.com

8811 Ohio River Road,

WHEELERSBURG

Office: 740-574-9902

NEW LISTINGS

2000 Automotive

Autos

99 Mazda MX5 Convertible

SE 5 spd, air,

CD, pw windows, alum

whls, loaded, 60K nice

$4,650 352-8343

04 Jeep Liberty 98k,

$5200. 02 Sunfire 2 dr.

5 spd $2200. 858-

4664 464-4525

05 Ellis Modified

Chasy Complete roller

minus body $2,500

Call 740-357-2929

07 Chevy Tahoe LTZ

black, fully loaded 46k

mi. $34,000 obo 2000

Olds Alero 100k+ mi.

$1,800 obo 250-3202

07 Ford Fusion 30k,

4 cyl., rebuilt title

$7400 937-509-1993

07 PT Cruiser

Convertible Black

18k mi. Sharp, $9500

obo 606-932-6386

1999 Olds Intrigue

88k, 3800 v6 motor,

$2995. 740-574-1229

353-2525

2220 SCIOTO TRAIL

www.exsellrealtygroup.com

OPEN HOUSE

SUNDAY, APRIL 25TH - 1 TO 3

3590 MACKLETREE RD.

Country ranch home with 4 bedrooms and 2 baths. This

home sits on 3.30 acres that joins Shawnee State Forest.

This is a very spacious home and is in move

in condition. Don't miss this home. $127,500.

HOST: DANIEL GLEIM

(740) 352-0091

DIRECTIONS: SR 52W to SR 125 for 5

miles turn onto Mackletree on left go 1.5

Miles home sits on left.

367 GLEIM ROAD

Licensed in Ohio and Kentucky

www.realestategallery.com or e-mail at hawknj@realestategallery.com

www.realestategallery.com

1902 25th Street

PORTSMOUTH

Office: 740-355-1990

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www.realestategallery.com www.realestategallery.com www.realestategallery.com

Autos

09 Lincoln MKS, new

$50,000. $28,500 Rebuilt

title. 937-509-

1993

1966 Dodge

Coronett, 81,500

miles, solid, $3,200

OBO 740-709-1675

1970 Cadillac Eldorado

500 C.I. motor

needs restored hard to

find hear it run low mi.

$1500 456-6227

2000 Mustang Conv.

V6, 5 spd. 100k, runs

great, $3100 leave

msg. 727-9933

2000 Pontiac Grand

AM a/c, c/d ,cruise,

p/w, high mileage.

Runs good $1,200

740-935-2736

2008 Ford Escape

XLT, leather heated

seats, extras, V6, 3.0

liter 4WD, 30K,

$19,000 740-464-7317

2008 Pontiac G6 GT,

4 dr. loaded 29k mi.

Asking $9495 obo

352-1422 353-8832

2008 Toyota Yaris 3

dr, gas saver, nice,

$9,500 Call 858-6459

05 Suzuki Firenza

real nice, $7000 464-

3707

92 16' Box Truck

165k Mi $1,500 obo,

07 18' Trailer Enclosed

8 1/2 ft wide

$4,000 obo 464-7678

97 Grand AM $1000.

93 Camry $700

87 Ford F-150 $700

96 Windstar $1000.

858-5201 464-2222

Buying Some Junk

Cars comp. $150 &

up Non comp. less

776-2886 776-AUTO

www.century21empire realty.com •

VIRTUAL TOUR

3008 WILLOW WAY

PORTSMOUTH

Amazing size! You'll have room to spread out in this

2858-SF home in a quiet neighborhood. This spacious

floor plan delivers 4 BRs, 3.5 BAs, intimate formal

LR/DR w/fireplace, impressive great room w/fireplace,

skylights, galley style kitchen, and partially finished

basement w/rec room. Huge master suite with his & her

closets, dual sinks, standing shower, and

whirlpool tub! Cozy front porch and nice size

back patio. Certified Diamond Property!

$219,000. MLS#135778 List agent Debbie

Gambill 354-2112 357-2112.

Hostess Molly O’Bannion

Directions: From Coles Blvd., turn onto

Dorman Drive then left onto Willow Way.

REDUCED!

1431 THOMAS HOLOW -

VALLEY

Enjoy the summer in the pool of this 3-BR,

2100-SF home! Offers a classic DR, intimate

formal LR with fireplace, roomy family room,

first-floor laundry, family-friendly kitchen w/

breakfast area, and 2 car attached

garage. Home also has an EXTRA

LOT, pool house, and covered patio

w/ceiling fans. Certified Diamond

Property! $199,900. MLS#134121

Hostess: Debbie Gambill

Directions: From Lucasville-Minford

Road turn left onto Pleasant Drive then

right onto Thomas Hollow. Sign in yard.

www.century21empire realty.com

www.realestategallery.com

REAL ESTATE GALLERY, INC.

740-574-9902 OR 740-355-1990

NEW BOSTON

OPEN HOUSE

SUN., APRIL 25 TH 1-3 PM

703 LAKEVIEW AVE.

You will be amazed at the lovely interior of this spacious custom

built home featuring

9 rooms, 3 bedrooms

2.1/2 baths, formal living

and dining large

family or rec, room, spaciopus

new sun room

with cathedral ceilings

and lots of windows ceramic

tile.., private rear

yard.. beautiful kitchen with ceramic tile. This beautiful well

maintained property has it all. Make it a must to see!

HOSTESS: Janet Lodwick - 354-6641

DIRECTIONS: Lakeview Ave. in New Boston signs in yard.

www.realestategallery.com 24 Hours A Day - Every Day www.realestategallery.com

REAL ESTATE GALLERY, INC.

NANCY HAWK - BROKER/OWNER

www.realestategallery.com

8811 Ohio River Road,

WHEELERSBURG

Office: 740-574-9902

Autos

99 Volvo Wagon,

AWD, V70XC, loaded,

sun roof, 3rd seat,

134K, $4,300 Call 776-

7657 or 820-2697

Antique Lincoln Continental

Mark 4 1976

68k, Exceptionally gd

cond $10,000 1 owner

574-6004 456-5136

Sports Utility

2005 Chevy Trail

Blazer LS $WD,

loaded, 70K, $6,950

352-8343 or 858-3077

04 Explorer 4x4,

silver, 3rd row seat

and reese hitch

$8000, but books for

more.

Ask for Josh 740-357-

8514

1996 Chevy Suburban,

1/2 Ton rebuilt

title, low mileage, exceptional

good condition

$5,399 456-5645

Trucks

1998 Dodge Ram

Truck Black, 4x4 in

good condition with

sport package.

Asking $5,000. 357-

6304

2002 Chevy S-10 4x4

Crew Cab short bed,

Asking $5000 740-

821-1973

2002 F-150 XLT ext.

cab, pwr windows,

locks, cruise, ac,

$5200. 821-6119

97 Flagstaff popup

sleeps 6, $2,500 97

F350 dually, 7.3 liter

turbo crew cab, $2,800

776-6203 858-7900

Vans

2003 Chevy Venture

Van, loaded, remote

start, good cond.

Asking $4995 obo

352-1422 353-8832

OPEN HOUSE

SUNDAY, APRIL 25

LAST CHANCE FOR

$ 8,000 TAX CREDIT

TH , 1-3 PM

354-2112

935-3522

354-2112

357-2112

EMPIRE REALTY, SE

354-2112

Owner: Debbie Gambill

www.century21empirerealty.com

SERVING ALL SCIOTO COUNTY!!

1902 25th Street

PORTSMOUTH

Office: 740-355-1990

Licensed in Ohio and Kentucky

www.realestategallery.com or e-mail at hawknj@realestategallery.com

www.realestategallery.com

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3000

Real Estate

Sales

For Sale By Owner

5731 Kentland,

Sciotoville, all new

kitch, bath, carpet,

wiring & plumbing

great buy at $69,900

354-6609

Arion Rd McDermott

2 bdrms, 2 bath, 2240

sq ft finish basement

w/kit $175,000 740-

372-3895

Houses For Sale

* 7548 Canterbury

Burg, 4 BR, 3 bath

$199,000 * Comm

Bldg 429 Ctr St Burg

1818 sq ft with parking

$99,000 * Lot Green

St Burg $12,320

*1619 Rocky Fork

128 ac. log home

$329,000 * Cook St

2128 sq ft 4 BR 2,

bath, asking $119,000

* Joe Bihl Real Estate

740-574-0056

For Sale 2 Story

Nicely remodeled 3

bd 1 1/2 ba. new

kitchen, deck w/hot

tub 2 car det. gar. on 1

1/3 acres in W. Ports.

area, also incl. nice 2

bd apartment w/ 2 car

gar. Nice income property.

All for $139,000

740-858-5724

3 bdrms, 1 1/2 bath

for sale, $54,0000

Call 740-357-0408

3 Fixer uppers, 1445

Wash Blvd, W. Ports,

$8,000 1229 & 1219

St. Patricks Ct $6,000

ea 574-2456 250-3206

For Sale or long

lease, office building,

5 rooms & bath down,

2 room & bath up, ful;l

basement, Central air,

gas forced air. fce,

some office furniture

included, new roof,

bldg good clean condition,

located at Rosemount

Shopping mall.

New location of Lute’s

Supply. Call 354-1177

$159,900 Deposit - references.

Lucasville 5-6 bdrm.

3 ba. Pool, hot tub, grt.

neighborhood, Behind

Valley middle school.

$199,000 821-9544

Riverfront 2 br 1 1/2

bath, ex lots avail, 845

Meadows Ln, Burg

740-357-7421 or 456-

4313

Sale or Rent, 258

Clay Drive Rubyville,

off 139, 3 bdrms, bath

1/2, AC & heat, 1 car

gar $40K 285-5835

West Portsmouth 8th

St 2 bedroom Cottage

Well Maintained

$30,000 858-6482

Land (Acreage)

Wooded building site

1-31 acres, utilities

avail. will consider land

contract 259-0969 or

259-2059

3500

Real Estate

Rentals

Apartments/

Townhouses

Apartments &

Houses For Rent

(740)353-2147

Burg Lg. 2 Bdrm

Townhouse apt. $425

mo. Ref & dep req'd

No pets 574-5314

Candlewood

Apartments

Efficiency, 1 & 2

Bedrooms in Wheelersburg's

finest apartment

community. No

application fee, reduced

security deposit

with good credit.

Laundry & pool on 18

acres of rolling hills.

740-574-8665.

PGS Rentals

Quality Apts. For

Rent Office

Located at 1037

Kent St. Ph: 353-

1443 or 877-353-

1443

Houses For Rent

2 Bdrm. Stove &

Fridge. Gas furn. Call

Osborne Cleaners 9-

5:30 354-2440

2 bdrms, 1.5 bath,

Cottage close to Life

Center, $500 mo, avail

June 1st, 354-1487

Houses For Rent

2 bdrms, remodeled

trailer, in county,

Otway area, $400 mo

+ $400 dep, heats with

gas, access to fishing,

Call 740-372-2509

3 Bdrm house in

Careys Run area $425

mo. Ref & dep req’d

740-645-5402

4 Bdrm House 2

blocks from college.

Remodeled. Call 352-

1407

Hilltop 3 bdrms, 2

baths, utility room,

central air, forced air

gas furnace, garage,

fenced back yard,

clean, good condition,

$475 mo, dep + ref’s.

354-1177

Houses

& Apartments For

Rent 740-352-4091 or

352-3232

Nice, 2 bdrms, 1 bath

house, $500 mo, utilities

not included, 130

Roby St, W. Ports 740-

821-1061

So. Webster 4 bdrm,

1 1/2 ba, basement,

appl. incl. gar., on 2+

acres. $700/mo 740-

357-2944

4000

Manufactured

Housing

5000 Resort Property

6000 Employment

Help Wanted - General

Ashland area multiphysician

practice

looking for a full time

Medical Assistant.

Send resumes to

missy-snyder@roadrunner.com

or fax to

(606) 833-9760

Driver Needed for

Truck & Fork Lift At 84

Lumber Class D CDL

required. Call 740-

779-3217

STNA Positions

available. Apply at

Fountainhead Nursing

Home 4734 Gallia Pike

Franklin Fce. 740-354-

9113

CALL THE EXPERTS!

Your Reference Guide To Quality Products And Professional Business Service!

637 SIXTH STREET

740-353-3101

Concrete

T’s Masonary

20 yrs. exp. brick, block,

stone, concrete & more

Ins. & bonded free est.

259-3970

Creative Concrete &

Grading Co.

740-820-4440

740-357-8055

Driveways, Sidewalks,

Patios, Garages, Pole

Barn floors, etc.

Free Estimates!!!

Bill Alley & Son

Masonary

Brick, block and

stone work of all

kinds, 36 yrs. exp.

820-3540 or

464-9288

Home Improvement

D. L. Binion Contracting

Specializing in drywall

& plaster repair For all

your new construction

or remodeling needs.

Installation of windows,

doors & vinly siding.

574-5725 for free est.

Roger’s Home Imprv.

Windows, Siding, Decks,

Plumbing, Roofing Fully

insured. 574-9555

DW’s HOME

MAINTENANCE

Leaky faucets to

siding & windows.

Bonded and Insured.

Free Est.

352-4235

Construction

___________________

Brinley Construction

Remodels, kitchen &

baths, decks. We do it

all! Free Est. 740-970-

0424

___________________

Quality Home Imp.

siding, roofs & more

740-574-8175

For Free Est.

Pools

___________________

Ellis Pools

12 Yrs. Experience

For all pool needs

740-372-3736

Portsmouth Daily Times Saturday, April 24, 2010 B7

Help Wanted - General

Local mfg. plant is

seeking Maintenance

Supervisor. Applicants

must have a degree in

Electrical or Mechanical

Engineering or

equivalent job related

expertise with a min. of

4 yrs. mfg. maintenance

and/or machine

shop experience.

Other requirements:

Working knowledge of

equip. preventative

maintenance systems:

ISO principles; mechanical

aptitude &

troubleshooting skills;

computer operation

skills (MS applications,

Maintenance Management

Software); supervising

Maintenance &

Electrical personnel.

Competitive

wages/benefits. Qualified

applicants may

send resume to

NARCO, Attention:

Maintenance, P.O. Box

457, South Shore, KY

41175

Looking for that energetic

self motivated

multi-tasker, to mange

local market store.

This is your opportunity

for you to bring

your experience and

team up with a fast

paced growing company.

Apply on line at

1ststopinc.com or

send resumes to P.O.

Box 175 Winchester

Ohio 45697 Attn: Mike

LPN

Per Diem Position

* Six months of longterm

care experience

preferred.

Submit Resumes or

apply at

Hill View Retirement

Center

1610 28th Street

Portsmouth, OH

or

e-mail at cindym@

hillviewretirement.org

E.O.E.

Hempstead Manor

727 8th Street

Portsmouth, Ohio

45662

Licensed Practical

Nurses

Full & Part Time

Please apply at the

Personnel Office at the

above address at

kholbrook@

hempsteadmanor.com

E.O.E.

Drywall

EVERMAN DRYWALL

Hang, Finish, Texture

Work Guaranteed

740-354-6923

Construction

___________________

D&P Construction

Roofing, siding, comp.

home improvement! Exp.

fully insured. Over 40

yrs. 740-464-8393 or

820-3463

___________________

Quality Contracting

Bobcat, Backhoe, Dump

truck services. Top soil,

limestone.

Jim Scherer 776-7335

Dan Scherer 456-4059

Painting

Pennington Painting

for int. & ext. painting,

wallpapering, maintenance

& remodeling of all

kinds. Call Jeff 740-820-

8230

Roofing

___________________

All Types Of Roofing

Special on metal.

Rubber, insured Jerry

Osborne 740-456-5288

___________________

J&J Roofing

For all your roofing

needs, fully insured, 25

years exp. 820-3718

J&M Painting & Maint.

Shingle Roofing, Interior

& Exterior Painting, Concrete

walks & Drives,

740-357-9404 Fully Ins.

City Certified.

Handyman

A-Z Handyman

20 Yrs. Exp. roofing &

plumbing, etc. Free est.

Call Dave 357-4583

Lawncare

____________________

Wagner Lawn Care

Free Estimates, Comm &

Res. fully Ins. Call 740-

935-0966

Help Wanted - General

Maintenance person

needed. Must have

own tools. Call 740-

941-7368

Notre Dame High

School is looking for a

Full Time Girls Varsity

Basketball Coach.

Send letter of interest

and resume to: Notre

Dame High School

2220 Sunrise Ave,

Portsmouth, OH 45662

Attn: Mike Sammons

Resident Helper

Part Time and Per

Diem Positions

NEW WAGE SCALE

Direct Resident Care

with Assisted Living

Residents

Previous professional

caregiving experience

strongly preferred.

Apply at

Hill View

1610 28th Street

Portsmouth, Oho

E.E.O.E.

RN LPN

$16 - $22

Full Time Position

3-11 & 11-7

Apply in Person

Resthaven

McDermott, OH

Carol Boyd RN DON

Secretary position

Open, Shift work.

Guaranteed 40 hours

574-2725

Server

Part Time Positons

Submit Resumes or

apply at:

Apply at

Hill View

1610 28th Street

Portsmouth, Ohio

or e-mail at

cindym@

hillviewretirement.org

E.O.E.

E-Edition

Everything cover to cover

for 25 cents daily on your

computer.

portsmouthdailytimes.com

Lawncare

Crider’s Lawn Care

You grow it we’ll mow it.

Free est. *Lawn Care

*Expert Landscaping

*24/7 Snow Removal

740-464-7462

___________________

Brodies Lawn Care

Free Estimates Lots

go for $15 - $20 per ot

Fully Ins. 981-7302

___________________

T&T Lawn Services

Free Est. 858-6019 or

464-5737

____________________

S&T Lawn Mowing

Free Esitmates 259-5395

or 464-0623

___________________

Ron’s Lawn Care

Comm. & Residential

Free Est. Same Day

Service 740-370-5578

___________________

A Cut Above Lawn Care

Comm & Res Free Est.

Call 574-2288

___________________

Mike’s Mowing

Full service grass

cutting. Free Est.

740-464-6693

___________________

Murray Landscaping

Shrubs, trees trimmed.

All general landscaping.

Metal roofs, painting.

Lawn service, etc.

Insured. 740-778-4233

Plumbing

J&M Services

Plumbing, drains, gas

lines, free ests.

456-6073 or 357-6221

Handyman

A-1 Hauling &

Clean up

Houses, garage, yards,

tree work odd jobs

353-3247

Tree Care

Certified Tree Care

Insured - Free Est.

Pruning & Removal

Reasonable Rates

820-8489 or 285-2606

Help Wanted - General

State Tested

Nurse Aide

Part Time Positions

*Excellent Benefit

Package

*State Testing Paid

*No mandatory Overtime

*Structured Orientatation

*Free Meals

Accepting Applications

At Hill View

1610 28th St.

Portsmouth, OH

E.E.O.E.

STNA

$ 21 58 34

Reach Over 30,000 40,000 People Everyday!

PER DAY FOR

*Based on a 3 month commitment. YOUR 4-LINE Reg. AD

$70.00 per month. 4 lines, $175/90 days.

* Based 50¢ per on a 3 line month for commitment. each additional Reg. $57.98 per line. month

&

DIETARY

POSITIONS

AVAILABLE

Apply in Person

Resthaven

McDermott, OH

Sales

Adv / Sales 35K-

63K

Sports

National sports advertising

and PR firm is

now hiring for the

Southern Ohio area.

Call Tina at 1-888-835-

1118

9000

Service / Bus.

Directory

Lawn Care

Rons’ Lawn Care

Comm & Res, Free

Ests. Same day

service 740-370-5578

Misellaneous

D. L. Binion

Contracting

Specializing in drywall &

plaster repair. For all

your new construction or

remodeling needs. Installation

of windows, doors

& vinyl siding. 574-5725

for free est.

Roger’s Home Imprv.

Windows, Siding, Decks,

Plumbing, Roofing Fully

insured. 574-9555

Roofing

D&P Const. Roofing,

siding, comp. home improvement

Over 40 yrs.

exp. Fully insured 740-

464-8393 or 820-3463

J & J Roofing

For all your roofing

needs, fully insured,

25 yers exp 820-3718

Miscellaneous

Birds Salvage

Buying junk cars running

& not. Prices vary

574-6915 or 776-6896

CRB Hauling

Bobcat work, dump truck

load firewood $120.

Gravel & Top soil,

cleanup work.

606-757-3031

740-464-9565

Buying Some Junk

Cars comp. $150 & up.

Non comp. less

776-2886 776-AUTO

___________________

Portable Sawmill

Custom sawing 20¢ a

___________________

board ft, 937-587-3792

Pressure Washing

+ all types home repair

40 yrs exp. Free est.

___________________

PH 370-4722

J&S Recording Studio

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C M Y K

B8 Saturday, April 24, 2010 Portsmouth Daily Times

NFL DRAFT

Bengals add Florida DE Dunlap

By JOE KAY

AP Sports Writer

defensive end missed the

Southeastern Conference title

"Right now, I'm just taking all

that in as motivation and lookdle,"

Zimmer said.

Dunlap had to convince the

CINCINNATI — Carlos

Dunlap insisted he's learned

from his costly DUI arrest.

The Cincinnati Bengals

believed him.

The Bengals chose the

defensive end from Florida in

the second round Friday, looking

to get another lineman who

can rush the quarterback.

They're aware this one must

grow up before he can grow

into a regular role with one of

the league's emerging defenses.

"He's going to know from

when he comes in here tomorrow

what kind of guy we want

in this program," defensive

coordinator Mike Zimmer

said. "He'll know right off the

get-go."

The 6-foot-6, 277-pound

game following a drunken

driving arrest on Dec. 1.

Gainesville police found him

passed out behind the wheel at

an intersection, prompting the

school to suspend him. He was

reinstated three weeks later

and had two sacks in a Sugar

Bowl win over Cincinnati.

Dunlap pleaded no contest

to driving under the influence

on Jan. 29, got a year's probation

and 50 hours of community

service.

The court case, his practice

habits and a penchant for easing

up during games gave

teams pause and had analysts

rating him as no better than a

second-round pick.

"Hey, they're going to talk

about a lot of things," Dunlap

said, after going to Cincinnati

with the 54th overall pick.

ing forward to my NFL career

and proving everyone wrong."

Dunlap led the SEC with 9?

sacks in 2008 and blocked

three kicks, including one during

a 24-14 win over Oklahoma

in the BCS title game.

He had nine sacks last season,

when he started at left defensive

end.

The Bengals won the AFC

North last season with a young

defense that finished fourth in

the league. One of its few

weaknesses was an inability to

get much pressure on the quarterback

from the middle of the

line. Zimmer plans to use

Dunlap at a tackle spot initially.

"One of the things I've

talked about in the offseason it

getting more pressure on the

quarterback from up the mid-

Bengals that he wouldn't be a

problem in Cincinnati, which

repeatedly got burned by taking

high-risk draft picks in the

mid-2000s.

"That was the only incident

on my record," Dunlap said.

"Pretty much, I told them that

was my first and last incident.

I learned from it. I apologized

to everyone."

The Bengals believed him.

"The people that we talked

to said the kid is a tremendous

kid," Zimmer said. "He's a 3.0

student. His Wonderlic test

was off the charts high. And

everyone we talked to said —

'this is a one-time shot, the kid

made a mistake, he's not this

type of guy at all.' So we really

feel from the information

we gathered — he made a mistake."

Haden

From Page B1

Haden said.

Haden switched to wide

receiver but found himself sitting

behind Percy Harvin. That's

one the coaches suggested cornerback,

a position Haden

played as well as anyone in college

football the past two years.

The 21-year-old knows he

still has a lot to master before

he's ready to challenge NFL

wide receivers.

"That's a big plus in my

game," he said. "I've only had

three years of experience. The

ceiling is still so high for me as

a corner. I have so much more I

can learn, so much more I want

to learn."

Haden has begun studying

New York Jets All-Pro defensive

back Darrelle Revis, considered

the game's premier coverage

corner.

"I honestly didn't watch too

much NFL football, but when I

heard what Revis was doing and

In Honor of our Mother

BETTY L.

FRALEY

Love,

Jeri, Peggy & Bud

From Page B1

tight ends because he could

block as well as catch.

"It gives us more options

right out of the shoot at tight

end," offensive coordinator

Bob Bratkowski said. "There

hasn't been very many of

them to come out over the

past few years that you think

are going to be really efficient

in both areas."

The Bengals' history with

tight ends hasn't been inspiring

lately.

They took Bob Trumpy

with one of their 12th-round

picks as an expansion team in

1968 — not a bad start. They

took Al Chandler out of Oklahoma

in 1973. Dan Ross, a

second-round pick in 1979,

helped them reach their first

Super Bowl two years later.

Rodney Holman went to

Cincinnati in the third round

in 1982 and helped them

reach their other Super Bowl

in 1988, when they lost to

San Francisco again.

They'd drafted only six

tight ends in the previous 16

years — Marco Battaglia,

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how he was locking down one

side of the field and they didn't

want to throw it that way at all, I

definitely started watching

him," he said. "I love the way he

nails receivers on the line. That's

what I want to do."

Haden is expected to start as a

rookie, sliding into the secondary

opposite corner Eric Wright,

who sent his new teammate a

text message welcoming him to

the Browns. Cleveland needs a

ball-hawking back and dependable

corner to handle some of

the AFC North's top wideouts

such as Chad Ochocinco, Hines

Ward and Anquan Boldin.

Browns president Mike

Holmgren believes Haden help

make an immediate impact.

"I really believe we hit a

home run," Holmgren said.

"There has been a lot of speculation

on what our approach to

the draft was, what we'd decide

to do and all that. This young

guy was in our sights from a

while ago."

Haden, who has four younger

brothers — one currently

enrolled and playing football at

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Florida — all with first names

that begin with the letter "J,"

said the past 24 hours have been

a whirlwind. He was at Radio

City Music Hall for the draft,

and while in New York he got a

chance to meet former NFL

greats Deion Sanders and Barry

Sanders.

Haden said he connected with

Tennessee Eric Berry, who was

high on the Browns' draft board

but was taken by Kansas City at

No. 5.

"I just love that dude," Haden

said. "He's just so nice. Me and

him we get along real well.

That's one of my really good

friends."

Haden next would like to

strike up a friendship with

James.

"I love his game and his personality,"

Haden said. "He's a

people person, making people

laugh on the sideline and having

a good time. I feel that's what I

like to do. He doesn't take himself

too seriously. He's a great

player out there balling and having

a good time. That's what I

want to do."

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Gresham

Joe Rimkus Jr. ■ MCT

Florida's Carlos Dunlap (8) celebrates after blocking a filed goal in the 2009

BCS National Championship game. Dunlap was picked by the Cincinnati Bengals

in Friday’s second round of the NFL Draft.

Damian Vaughn, Sean Brewer,

Matt Schobel, Matt Sherry

and Chase Coffman — before

deciding to make Gresham a

first-round investment.

Although Gresham hasn't followed

the Bengals closely, he

understands the significance.

He arrived on Friday with as

many expectations as any

tight end in team history.

"I'm OK with that," he said.

"I just have to be me."

The Bengals will give him

a chance to win the starting

job, although they caution

that Gresham could need

some time to get up to speed.

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