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COMPLIMENTARY COPY<br />

UTAH’S TRUSTED SOURCE FOR HEALTHY LIVING<br />

Women’s Health Risks p.10<br />

Prevention is<br />

<strong>the</strong> Best Medicine p.18<br />

InstaCare or<br />

Emergency Room p.21<br />

Brand Name or<br />

Generic Drugs? p.26


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2 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org 3


UTAH’S TRUSTED SOURCE FOR HEALTHY LIVING<br />

IN THIS EDITION<br />

Welcome to <strong>the</strong> premier edition of <strong>the</strong> Healing for Life magazine for<br />

<strong>the</strong> Cache Valley region!<br />

This magazine includes medically accurate and thought-provoking<br />

articles on a range of healthcare topics and will help us to inform<br />

you, our community, about important healthcare topics as well as<br />

introduce to you our outstanding physicians and exceptional services<br />

offered through <strong>the</strong> <strong>Intermountain</strong> Medical Group. This magazine<br />

highlights technologies, innovations, and medical insights that allow<br />

our doctors to care for <strong>the</strong>ir patients with exceptional care. I’m very<br />

proud to be part of this community of healthcare professionals and<br />

to participate in <strong>the</strong> commitment of <strong>Intermountain</strong> Medical Group,<br />

offering <strong>the</strong> highest quality healthcare by selecting <strong>the</strong> best healthcare<br />

providers possible and simultaneously assuring you of our commitment<br />

to “Healing for Life.”<br />

In Utah, <strong>the</strong> <strong>Intermountain</strong> Medical Group has more than 800 doctors<br />

and clinicians representing more than 35 medical specialties. In<br />

<strong>the</strong> Cache Valley region, we offer a wide range of services, including<br />

specialized care, family medicine (including children’s and women’s<br />

services), urgent care through InstaCare, and WorkMed occupational<br />

medicine. We have experts on staff handling <strong>the</strong> business side of<br />

our doctor’s practices, allowing our physicians <strong>the</strong> time to devote<br />

<strong>the</strong>mselves 100 percent to you, providing <strong>the</strong> most respectful and<br />

compassionate patient care possible.<br />

Please enjoy this complimentary copy of Healing for Life. Feel free to<br />

take a copy of <strong>the</strong> magazine home or to a friend.<br />

As always. Here’s to your health!<br />

Bartley<br />

Bartley M. Weiss, M.D. F.A.C.S.<br />

06 | Colds, Flu, and Antibiotics: Infections Come<br />

in Two Categories: Viruses and Bacteria<br />

08 | Safe Medications During Pregnancy<br />

10 | Women’s Health Risks by Age<br />

14 | Do You Have Cataracts?<br />

16 | Skin Cancer and Mohs Surgery<br />

18 | Prevention is <strong>the</strong> Best Medicine<br />

20 | Household Safety for Parents<br />

21 | InstaCare or Emergency Room<br />

24 | Low Back Pain: Common and Curable<br />

26 | Brand or Generic: Why your pharmacists<br />

should be your best friend?<br />

28 | Fevers: What Do I Really Need to Know?<br />

Vice President, <strong>Intermountain</strong> <strong>Healthcare</strong> and<br />

Chief Executive Officer, <strong>Intermountain</strong> Medical Group<br />

Linda Leckman, MD<br />

___________________________________________________<br />

Cache Valley Region Medical Director<br />

Bartley M. Weiss, M.D. F.A.C.S.<br />

___________________________________________________<br />

Cache Valley Region Operation Director<br />

Jana Huffman<br />

___________________________________________________<br />

Managing Editors<br />

Debbie Ostrander<br />

Sally Stocker<br />

___________________________________________________<br />

Publishing Company<br />

Adrenaline Graphics and Publishing, LLC.<br />

___________________________________________________<br />

Information and Advertising<br />

For information, please call 801.628.3160 or 801.544.9171.<br />

___________________________________________________<br />

Copyright and Disclaimer<br />

Copyright 2011 by Adrenaline Graphics and Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Printed in<br />

<strong>the</strong> USA. Reproduction of this magazine, in whole, or in part, is prohibited unless authorized<br />

by <strong>Intermountain</strong> Medical Group, <strong>the</strong> publisher, or its advertisers. The advertising space provided<br />

in Healing for Life® magazine is purchased and paid for by <strong>the</strong> advertiser. None of <strong>the</strong><br />

products or services is necessarily endorsed by <strong>Intermountain</strong> Medical Group or Adrenaline<br />

Graphics.<br />

The information contained in <strong>the</strong> magazine is intended to provide broad understanding and<br />

knowledge of healthcare topics. This information should not be considered complete and<br />

should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation, or advice from your physician or o<strong>the</strong>r<br />

healthcare provider. We recommend you consult your physician or healthcare professional<br />

before beginning or altering your personal exercise, diet, or supplementation program.<br />

Four Great Reasons...<br />

To Choose Budge Clinic Pediatrics<br />

1. Caring, experienced team of pediatricians covering all your children’s<br />

healthcare needs, from newborns to adolescents.<br />

2. Convenient appointment times, including evenings and weekends.<br />

3. No appointment needed for routine immunizations.<br />

4. Access to child psychologist Clint E. Field, PhD, with a referral from<br />

a Budge Clinic Pediatric physician.<br />

Nordell T. Brown, M.D. • Derrel W. Clarke, M.D. • Clint E. Field, PhD<br />

Sheryl Roper, P.N.P. • Tyson S. Horkley, M.D. • Prafulla D. Garg, M.D.<br />

J. Dennis Odell, M.D. • Stephen D. Schneider, M.D. • Michael K. Visick, M.D.<br />

435.792.1940 • 1350 North 500 East, Logan, Utah 84341<br />

budgeclinic.org<br />

4 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org 5


Most of <strong>the</strong> time <strong>the</strong> immune system will take<br />

care of what is ailing you with time, rest, and patience.<br />

Colds, Flu, and Antibiotics<br />

Infections come in two categories: viruses and bacteria.<br />

Getting sick is <strong>the</strong> worst; any busy<br />

person or parent wants nothing<br />

more than for those miserable<br />

symptoms to be gone and gone<br />

fast. Naturally, many people<br />

quickly start to wonder if an antibiotic would help.<br />

Infections come in two large categories: viruses and<br />

bacteria.<br />

Viruses. In general terms <strong>the</strong>re are no reliable<br />

medications available to treat viral infections, especially<br />

common viral upper respiratory infections,<br />

like colds, and flu or influenza. For <strong>the</strong>se illnesses<br />

it is best to provide supportive care and wait for<br />

<strong>the</strong> body to take care of <strong>the</strong> infection on its own.<br />

Fortunately, <strong>the</strong> immune system is well prepared<br />

By Nordell T. Brown, MD<br />

for <strong>the</strong>se illnesses and, given a little time, will take<br />

care of things quite nicely.<br />

Taking an antibiotic for viral infections is ineffective<br />

and can lead to more health care expenses<br />

and side effects. Some antiviral medications are<br />

available and can help treat influenza, but only if<br />

<strong>the</strong>y are started within <strong>the</strong> first 48 hours. The best<br />

treatment for flu is prevention; a yearly flu shot is<br />

<strong>the</strong> best defense against flu.<br />

Managing <strong>the</strong> symptoms. In most cases,<br />

viral illnesses last no more than seven to ten days<br />

and, listening to <strong>the</strong> advice of Mom and Grandma,<br />

most feel better with rest and fluids. Manage your<br />

fever with fever reducers when necessary.<br />

It is important to seek<br />

medical help if a fever lasts<br />

more than three to five days<br />

or if <strong>the</strong> symptoms<br />

continue to worsen.<br />

Bacterial Infections. Antibiotics can help one<br />

feel better faster and in some cases avoid potentially<br />

severe complications when <strong>the</strong> cause of <strong>the</strong> illness<br />

is a bacterial infection. Some of <strong>the</strong> more common<br />

bacterial infections are ear infections, strep throat,<br />

and sinus infections. These are illnesses that respond<br />

well to antibiotics.<br />

When to seek immediate medical<br />

attention. O<strong>the</strong>r bacterial infections can become<br />

quite severe if not attended to promptly and treated<br />

appropriately. Visit your doctor if you experience<br />

worsening or a rebound of symptoms that seemed<br />

to have been starting to resolve. For example, ear<br />

pain or trouble hearing that begins five to seven<br />

days after <strong>the</strong> onset of a cold, or a fever that just<br />

won’t go away after three to five days.<br />

Severe infections such as pneumonia can hit hard<br />

and fast and are characterized by high fever and<br />

more severe cough. Ano<strong>the</strong>r alarming symptom is<br />

fever, headache, and stiff neck. One should seek<br />

immediate attention for <strong>the</strong>se symptoms.<br />

Most of <strong>the</strong> time <strong>the</strong> immune system will take care<br />

of what is ailing you with time, rest, and patience.<br />

Stay alert to “alarm” symptoms and seek help when<br />

necessary.<br />

Nordell T. Brown, M.D.<br />

Pediatrics<br />

Budge Clinic<br />

435.792.1940<br />

Watch for <strong>the</strong> following<br />

ALARM<br />

Symptoms<br />

Persistent fever lasting more<br />

than three to five days<br />

Ear pain or trouble hearing<br />

that begins five to seven days<br />

after <strong>the</strong> onset of a cold<br />

Worsening or rebound of<br />

symptoms that seemed to<br />

have started to resolve<br />

6 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org<br />

<strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org 7


Safe Medications<br />

During Pregnancy<br />

While many of <strong>the</strong>se drugs have been shown by <strong>the</strong> FDA<br />

to be safe, you should always check with your doctor.<br />

Your situation and possible complications may be different.<br />

Safe<br />

Medications<br />

during pregnancy<br />

There is nothing more precious than bringing a new life into this<br />

world. At <strong>Intermountain</strong> we are dedicated to making sure that <strong>the</strong><br />

mo<strong>the</strong>r and child have <strong>the</strong> best, and most healthy, experience possible.<br />

One of <strong>the</strong> most often asked questions from mo<strong>the</strong>rs-to-be is<br />

what medications can be taken during pregnancy.<br />

With <strong>the</strong> mo<strong>the</strong>r and child in mind, <strong>Intermountain</strong> doctors have<br />

compiled a list of medications that are safe to take during pregnancy.<br />

It is our hope that this list will help to alleviate any anxiety a mo<strong>the</strong>r<br />

is having about taking medication to get her feeling better!<br />

Cold and Flu symptoms:<br />

Any Tylenol Products<br />

(acetaminophen)<br />

Sudafed (pseudoephedrine)<br />

Robitussin (guaifenesin)<br />

Cough Drops<br />

Mucinex (guaifenesin)<br />

Indigestion / Heartburn:<br />

Tums (Calcium Carbonate)<br />

Zantac (ranitidine)<br />

Pepcid (Famotidine)<br />

Prilosec (Omeprazole)<br />

Mylanta<br />

Gas X (Simethicone)<br />

Nasuea / Vomiting:<br />

Vitamin B6 50mg: three times a day<br />

Unisom: three times a day (whole<br />

tablet at night, ½ tablet during <strong>the</strong> day)<br />

Ginger 1 mg<br />

Ginger Ale<br />

Peppermint<br />

Dramamine (dimenhydrinate)<br />

Insomnia:<br />

Unisom (doxylamine succinate)<br />

Tylenol PM (Acetaminophen)<br />

Dramamine (dimenhydrinate)<br />

Benadryl (diphenhydramine)<br />

Constipation:<br />

Colace (docusate)<br />

Miralax (polyethylene glycol)<br />

Citrucel<br />

Fiber supplement of any kind<br />

Milk of Magnesia<br />

Seasonal Allergies:<br />

Benadryl (diphenhydramine)<br />

Claritin (loratadine)<br />

Zyrtec (cetirizine)<br />

Aches and Pains /<br />

Headaches:<br />

Tylenol (Acetaminophen)<br />

Excedrin tension headache<br />

(aspirin free)<br />

For medication questions please consult:<br />

www.sharecare.com<br />

www.health.utah.gov/prl (pregnancy risk line website)<br />

1-800-822-2229 (pregnancy medication hotline)<br />

<strong>Intermountain</strong> Budge Clinic<br />

Obstetrics and Gynecology<br />

Monday - Friday 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.<br />

435-716-1920<br />

8 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org<br />

<strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org 9


How can I decrease my risk of illness or death?<br />

This question is often <strong>the</strong> reason for preventive or wellness visits<br />

to <strong>the</strong> doctor. To answer this question, it helps to understand what<br />

<strong>the</strong> leading causes of death are for women of different age groups.<br />

Women’s Health<br />

RISKS<br />

by<br />

Age<br />

By Tandy G. Olsen, MD<br />

The teenage years<br />

The teenage years are characterized by experimentation<br />

and learning one’s limits. Girls and<br />

young women are testing boundaries and learning<br />

about relationships with o<strong>the</strong>r people. As<br />

such, it is not surprising that <strong>the</strong> leading causes<br />

of death in teenage girls are unintentional injuries<br />

and accidents. Two o<strong>the</strong>r leading causes of<br />

death are suicide and assault.<br />

20 - 39 Years<br />

As a woman matures, <strong>the</strong> risks of accidents or<br />

injuries begin to decrease and are replaced by<br />

<strong>the</strong> risk of cancer. Diabetes and cardiovascular<br />

diseases appear in <strong>the</strong> leading causes of death as<br />

well. Risks of death from HIV infection and<br />

liver diseases also appear in <strong>the</strong> top 10.<br />

40 - 64 years<br />

Surprisingly, <strong>the</strong> leading causes of death do not<br />

change much in this age group. Malignancy remains<br />

<strong>the</strong> number one cause of death. The risks<br />

of diabetes, stroke, and heart diseases increase<br />

and <strong>the</strong> risk of accidents decreases, but <strong>the</strong> leading<br />

categories are essentially <strong>the</strong> same.<br />

prevention<br />

While some of <strong>the</strong> diseases listed on <strong>the</strong> left are difficult or<br />

impossible to prevent, <strong>the</strong>re are things that can be done to<br />

decrease a person’s risk.<br />

Young women should know to act responsibly, to wear seat<br />

belts and drive carefully, and to be careful in <strong>the</strong>ir relationships<br />

with o<strong>the</strong>rs. Their families and friends need to watch<br />

for signs of depression or self-injury and to discuss concerns<br />

with <strong>the</strong>se girls.<br />

Diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and<br />

hypertension are often closely related to obesity and lifestyle.<br />

Proper diet and exercise can largely prevent <strong>the</strong>se diseases,<br />

particularly if <strong>the</strong>se habits are formed as children and practiced<br />

throughout life.<br />

Many cancers cannot be prevented, but one’s risk of death<br />

from cancer can be decreased. Sunscreen decreases <strong>the</strong> risk<br />

of skin cancer. Early detection of precancerous conditions<br />

or early cancers are possible through screening examinations<br />

done at wellness visits with your physician.<br />

If you have concerns about any of <strong>the</strong>se conditions, please<br />

address your concerns with your personal physician.<br />

65 years and older<br />

The leading causes of death in women in this<br />

age group are heart disease, cancer, and stroke.<br />

O<strong>the</strong>r causes, such as infections and Alzheimers<br />

disease, also appear on <strong>the</strong> list.<br />

Tandy G. Olsen, M.D.<br />

Obstetrics and Gynecology<br />

Budge Clinic OB-Gyn<br />

435.716.1920<br />

10 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org<br />

<strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org 11


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(Inside Debra Lynn’s Post<br />

Mastectomy Specialists)<br />

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Post Mastectomy Specialties<br />

ALIVE BECAUSE<br />

SOMEONE SAID YES!<br />

Please stop by to see our selection of mastectomy products.<br />

We have been fitting women for 15 years and will gladly make<br />

home appointments for your convenience.<br />

We bill most insurance companies.<br />

Open Monday thru Friday 10 am to 4 pm After hours by appointment<br />

1090 East 30th Street, Ogden | (801) 393-2885<br />

12 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org<br />

<strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org 13


A cataract is <strong>the</strong> clouding, or opacification,<br />

of <strong>the</strong> native lens inside <strong>the</strong> eye.<br />

Normal Healthy Eye<br />

BROWN CATARACT<br />

-OR-<br />

NUCLEAR SCLEROTIC CATARACT<br />

WHITE CATARACT<br />

Do You Have<br />

Normal<br />

vision<br />

<strong>the</strong> same<br />

picture as<br />

viewed by<br />

a person<br />

with<br />

cataracts<br />

cataracts?<br />

by Christian D. Nilson, M.D.<br />

A cataract is <strong>the</strong> clouding, or opacification, of <strong>the</strong> native lens inside<br />

<strong>the</strong> eye. When we are younger, <strong>the</strong> lens is virtually clear and flexible.<br />

The clearness allows light to pass into <strong>the</strong> eye and be focused into a<br />

sharp image on <strong>the</strong> retina. The flexibility of <strong>the</strong> lens allows <strong>the</strong> eye<br />

to see at distance and up close. As we age, <strong>the</strong> lens gets less flexible<br />

and gradually more and more cloudy. The decrease in flexibility of<br />

<strong>the</strong> lens causes an inability to see up close and brings on <strong>the</strong> need for<br />

reading glasses or bifocals. The clouding of <strong>the</strong> lens causes scattering<br />

of light and <strong>the</strong> inability of <strong>the</strong> eye to focus light correctly on <strong>the</strong><br />

retina which leads to blurry vision.<br />

There are many symptoms of cataracts. The most common is a gradual,<br />

painless blurring of <strong>the</strong> vision. Many people notice increased<br />

glare and halos with night driving. One can also get more glare from<br />

<strong>the</strong> sun especially at dawn or dusk. O<strong>the</strong>rs notice an increased need<br />

for lighting, especially when reading. Many don’t notice it until after<br />

<strong>the</strong> cataract has been removed, but <strong>the</strong> clouding of <strong>the</strong> lens can also<br />

cause colors to dim or fade.<br />

The most common cause of a cataract is age. Diabetes and certain<br />

medications can hasten cataract development. O<strong>the</strong>r potential<br />

causes include eye injuries, eye surgery, and exposure to sunlight.<br />

Genetics can play a role as well.<br />

Unfortunately, <strong>the</strong>re are no proven medications, supplements,<br />

dietary changes, and/or exercises that can prevent or treat<br />

cataracts. Good ultraviolet light blocking sunglasses may slow<br />

<strong>the</strong> progression of <strong>the</strong> disease. However, <strong>the</strong> only way to effectively<br />

treat a cataract is to remove it surgically.<br />

Cataract surgery is one of <strong>the</strong> most common procedures performed<br />

in <strong>the</strong> United States. The technology keeps advancing, and<br />

modern cataract surgery is safer and more effective than it has ever<br />

been. In surgery, we remove <strong>the</strong> native lens that has turned cloudy<br />

and replace it with an artificial intraocular lens (IOL). There<br />

are many lens options available. There are lenses that can correct<br />

your distance vision only; with <strong>the</strong>se lenses, after surgery you will<br />

still need to wear glasses for reading. If you need correction for<br />

astigmatism, <strong>the</strong>re are lens implants called Toric lenses that correct<br />

astigmatism as well. Nowadays, <strong>the</strong>re are Multifocal lenses that<br />

can correct distance vision and up close reading vision without <strong>the</strong><br />

need for glasses. Your eye surgeon can evaluate you and help you<br />

decide which lens is right for you.<br />

Your ophthalmologist can help you understand your eye care<br />

needs. You can <strong>the</strong>n choose <strong>the</strong> best option to help you rediscover<br />

your world with clearer vision.<br />

Christian D. Nilson, M.D.<br />

Ophthalmologist<br />

Nor<strong>the</strong>rn Utah Eye Center<br />

435.752.2020<br />

www.Nor<strong>the</strong>rnUtahEyeCenter.com<br />

Symptoms of<br />

Cataract<br />

• Cloudy or blurry vision.<br />

• Colors seem faded.<br />

• Increased glare or halos from <strong>the</strong><br />

sun, lamps, or headlights.<br />

• Poor night vision.<br />

• Double vision or multiple images<br />

in one eye.<br />

• Frequent prescription changes in<br />

your eyeglasses or contact lenses.<br />

These symptoms can also be a sign<br />

of o<strong>the</strong>r eye problems. Call your eye<br />

physician for a complete eye exam.<br />

14 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org 15


Skin Cancer and Mohs Surgery<br />

By Nathan W. Hanson, MD<br />

Skin cancer is more common than most think<br />

and it is increasing each year. More than 3.5<br />

million cases of skin cancer in 2 million individuals<br />

are diagnosed yearly. Over <strong>the</strong> past<br />

31 years, more cases of skin cancer have been diagnosed<br />

than all o<strong>the</strong>r types of cancer combined. In fact, one in<br />

five Americans will be diagnosed at some point in life with<br />

some form of skin cancer.<br />

Increased ultraviolet light exposure, from both natural<br />

and artificial sources (tanning beds), along with increased<br />

awareness and diagnosis, has contributed to <strong>the</strong> rising<br />

incidence of skin cancer. Here in <strong>the</strong> <strong>Intermountain</strong> West,<br />

we are particularly susceptible to skin cancer because of<br />

our love of <strong>the</strong> outdoors, <strong>the</strong> sunny environment, and our<br />

high altitude living.<br />

Skin cancer comes in multiple varieties and not all<br />

skin cancer is melanoma. Melanoma is <strong>the</strong> third most<br />

common form of skin cancer but accounts for nearly 75<br />

percent of all skin-cancer deaths. More common and rarely<br />

life threatening forms of skin cancer include basal cell<br />

carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Both basal cell<br />

and squamous cell carcinoma can be treated with Mohs<br />

micrographic surgery.<br />

Mohs micrographic surgery is a technique developed<br />

by Dr. Frederic Mohs in Wisconsin in <strong>the</strong> 1940s and has<br />

been continuously refined over <strong>the</strong> last 70 years. Mohs<br />

surgery allows nearly 100 percent microscopic visualization<br />

of <strong>the</strong> skin cancer margins, making possible very high cure<br />

rates (98-99 perecent) for new skin cancers while leaving<br />

smaller wound sizes when compared to standard excision<br />

techniques. In o<strong>the</strong>r words, this procedure allows your<br />

dermatologist to both analyze and efficiently remove skin<br />

cancers. The surgery is performed under local anes<strong>the</strong>sia<br />

and offers patients <strong>the</strong> confidence that <strong>the</strong>ir cancer has<br />

been effectively treated.<br />

Treatment of skin cancer is vitally important and<br />

<strong>the</strong> earlier that treatment takes place, <strong>the</strong> better.<br />

Skin cancer, when caught early and treated appropriately,<br />

is very often curable. While <strong>the</strong>re are alternatives to surgical<br />

procedures for some forms of skin cancer if caught early<br />

enough, most methods of treatment include some form of<br />

surgery.<br />

If Mohs surgery is deemed appropriate you should seek<br />

care from a Mohs surgeon who is a member of <strong>the</strong> American<br />

College of Mohs Surgery. A Mohs surgeon receives extensive<br />

training in a fellowship program that goes beyond<br />

normal dermatology residency.<br />

To make an appointment with a dermatologist near you<br />

visit intermountainmedicalgroup.org.<br />

Nathan W. Hanson, MD<br />

Mohs Surgeon<br />

Budge Clinic<br />

435.792.1770<br />

Factors that can contribute to your risk of skin cancer<br />

© 2011 American Cancer Society, Inc.<br />

• Previously treated for skin cancer<br />

• Family history of skin cancer, especially<br />

melanoma<br />

• Lots of moles, irregular moles, or large<br />

moles<br />

• Freckles that burn before tanning<br />

• Fair skin, blue or green eyes, or blond,<br />

red, or light brown hair<br />

• Spend a lot of time outdoors<br />

• Live or vacation at high altitudes<br />

(UV radiation increases as <strong>the</strong><br />

level goes up)<br />

• Live or vacation in tropical or subtropical<br />

climates<br />

• Work indoors all week and <strong>the</strong>n get<br />

intense sun exposure on weekends<br />

• Take medicines that lower your<br />

immunity<br />

• Have certain autoimmune diseases,<br />

such as systemic lupus ery<strong>the</strong>matosus<br />

(SLE, or “lupus”)<br />

• Have had an organ transplant<br />

• Take oral contraceptives (birth control<br />

pills)<br />

Ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist about <strong>the</strong><br />

risk of any medicines you may be taking that<br />

could increase your sensitivity to sunlight.<br />

16 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org 17


It’s time to start being proactive about your health<br />

and to get your and your family’s yearly check-ups.<br />

In recent decades <strong>the</strong> focus of medicine has<br />

shifted from acute care, or treatment of an<br />

illness, to prevention. Often, we take our health for<br />

granted and delay routine exams and screenings because<br />

we don’t feel sick. It is a well-known fact that early detection<br />

saves lives. If you don’t already have a primary care<br />

provider — consider establishing a relationship with a<br />

doctor you trust and are comfortable with.<br />

You are unique and your situation in life is personal and<br />

known best by you. You and your doctor can <strong>the</strong>n work<br />

toge<strong>the</strong>r to develop a personalized health care plan that fits<br />

your needs. It’s time to start being proactive about your<br />

health and to get your and your family’s yearly check-ups.<br />

Prevention<br />

is <strong>the</strong> best medicine<br />

By Brad M. Goates, MD<br />

In medicine, <strong>the</strong> saying “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”<br />

holds true and can save you money and your life. According to <strong>the</strong> World<br />

Health Organization, chronic illness is projected to be <strong>the</strong> leading cause of<br />

disability by 2020 and if not successfully prevented or managed <strong>the</strong>se illnesses<br />

will become <strong>the</strong> most expensive problems faced by our healthcare systems.<br />

As a family physician I feel it is my job to sift through<br />

<strong>the</strong> news and research and <strong>the</strong> ever-changing world of<br />

medicine to provide you with <strong>the</strong> latest and most up-todate<br />

recommendations. What I like to do during a yearly<br />

check-up is work with you to develop a personal preventative<br />

service plan that will incorporate your individual situation<br />

and preferences. This plan will include goals for diet,<br />

exercise, weight, cholesterol, and blood pressure.<br />

Besides working toge<strong>the</strong>r to make a plan, we will discuss<br />

cancer screening (if you are over 50, a colonoscopy is in<br />

order), vaccinations (whooping cough and shingles are<br />

becoming particularly important), and <strong>the</strong> appropriate age<br />

to begin a daily aspirin regimen (most over age 55).<br />

As a family physician, I am here to assist you with acute<br />

problems and provide preventative care to help you stay<br />

healthy. Let’s recommit ourselves to wellness and schedule<br />

our annual checkups.<br />

Brad M. Goates, M.D.<br />

Family Medicine<br />

Logan Clinic<br />

435.713.2800<br />

helpful tips for a<br />

successful check-up:<br />

• Make an annual appointment for yourself<br />

and your family members.<br />

• Ask a friend or family member to come<br />

with you to your appointment - this may<br />

help to alleviate any anxiety you may<br />

have.<br />

• Prior to your visit, write down questions<br />

you may have for your healthcare<br />

provider.<br />

• Bring a list of medications you are currently<br />

taking.<br />

• Schedule any preventative tests that your<br />

doctor recommends.<br />

• Remember to follow-up on your test<br />

results.<br />

18 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org<br />

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Household safety for parents<br />

Preventing accidents and injuries with kids around <strong>the</strong> home<br />

Your home should be a haven where your family can live, play, and explore safely.<br />

Here are some tips to help keep your children safe:<br />

• Don’t rely on window screens to keep kids from<br />

falling out of windows.<br />

• Move chairs, beds, and o<strong>the</strong>r furniture away from<br />

windows to prevent children from climbing onto sills.<br />

• Keep stairways clear of toys, shoes, loose carpeting,<br />

etc.<br />

• Don’t leave loose rugs on <strong>the</strong> floor. Put specially<br />

designed pads, available at most stores selling floor<br />

coverings, under rugs to hold <strong>the</strong>m securely to <strong>the</strong><br />

floor’s surface.<br />

• Attach protective padding or o<strong>the</strong>r specially designed<br />

covers to furniture and countertops with<br />

sharp edges.<br />

• Apply nonskid strips to <strong>the</strong> bottoms of bathtubs.<br />

• With young children in <strong>the</strong> home, never leave a<br />

bathtub, bucket, or o<strong>the</strong>r container filled with any<br />

amount of water or o<strong>the</strong>r liquid unattended, including<br />

<strong>the</strong> toilet. Keep bathroom doors closed at all<br />

times and consider using a doorknob cover.<br />

• Make sure all pieces of furniture a child might climb<br />

on are sturdy and won’t tip over.<br />

• Clean up any spills around <strong>the</strong> home immediately.<br />

• Remove tablecloths when not in use, and keep<br />

cords or o<strong>the</strong>r dangling objects out of reach.<br />

• Never leave a baby or toddler unattended in <strong>the</strong><br />

bath. Drowning can happen very quickly in less than<br />

one inch of water.<br />

• Keep <strong>the</strong> following numbers near <strong>the</strong> phone (for<br />

yourself and caregivers): toll-free poison-control<br />

number: 1-800-222-1222, doctor’s number,<br />

parents’ work and cell phone numbers, neighbor’s<br />

or nearby relative’s number (if you need someone<br />

to watch o<strong>the</strong>r children in an emergency).<br />

• Make a first-aid kit and keep emergency<br />

instructions inside.<br />

• Install smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.<br />

Source: Primary Children’s Medical Center and KidsHealth at<br />

primarychildrens.org.<br />

InstaCare<br />

When you need<br />

<strong>the</strong> best urgent or emergency care in <strong>the</strong> valley,<br />

<strong>Intermountain</strong> <strong>Healthcare</strong> has you covered with<br />

Logan InstaCare and Logan Regional Hospital Emergency Room<br />

Whe<strong>the</strong>r your child develops a fever on<br />

Sunday afternoon or your husband sprains<br />

his ankle Thursday evening, unplanned<br />

medical needs can arise anytime. Logan<br />

Instacare providers are ready when you or a<br />

loved one needs medical attention and your<br />

primary care provider is not available. Open<br />

8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week, including<br />

most holidays, InstaCare offers walk-in<br />

services for urgent injuries and illnesses, but<br />

not for life-threatening conditions.<br />

InstaCare physicians have access to state-of<strong>the</strong>-art<br />

digital X-ray equipment and lab services<br />

to diagnose medical conditions. We<br />

strive for short wait times, as well as rapid<br />

diagnosis and treatment, while providing<br />

quality care.<br />

In <strong>the</strong> case of a medical emergency, Logan<br />

Regional Hospital Emergency Room should<br />

be <strong>the</strong> facility of choice. When unsure if a<br />

condition is a life-threatening emergency, go<br />

to <strong>the</strong> ER as a matter of caution.<br />

or<br />

<strong>the</strong><br />

Emergency<br />

Room<br />

Logan Regional Hospital is <strong>the</strong> valley’s most advanced<br />

trauma center with <strong>the</strong> best emergency care capabilities<br />

and resources. Trauma centers vary in <strong>the</strong>ir certification<br />

levels and abilities as designated by <strong>the</strong> Utah Bureau of<br />

Emergency Medical Services. Logan Regional Hospital<br />

has <strong>the</strong> physician specialists, technology, diagnostic<br />

capabilities, and full-service hospital resources to provide<br />

complete care for most trauma patients. Trauma victims<br />

with exceptionally severe injuries are stabilized and<br />

transported to a major medical center such as McKay-<br />

Dee Hospital or <strong>Intermountain</strong> Medical Center.<br />

Logan Regional Hospital’s Emergency Room physicians<br />

are all board-certified, emergency-medicine specialists<br />

who live here in our community. The ER nurses and<br />

support staff are specially trained in trauma and critical<br />

care. They are exceptionally skilled in emergency care.<br />

As an emergency medicine physician, I appreciate <strong>the</strong><br />

fact that Logan Regional is a full-service hospital with<br />

<strong>the</strong> valley’s most advanced technology, resources, and<br />

services to care for our patients. I also appreciate <strong>the</strong><br />

commitment to keeping wait times as short as possible<br />

and to providing high quality, compassionate care to<br />

each patient.<br />

Douglas N. Esplin, M.D.<br />

Urgent Care<br />

Logan InstaCare<br />

435.713.2710<br />

Ryan J. Stolworthy, M.D.<br />

Emergency Medicine<br />

Logan Regional Hospital<br />

435.716.1000<br />

20 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org<br />

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22 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org 23<br />

<strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org 23<br />

22 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org


At age 20<br />

50 percent of <strong>the</strong><br />

population reports to<br />

have experienced<br />

low back pain<br />

At age 60<br />

80 percent of <strong>the</strong><br />

population reports to<br />

have experienced<br />

low back pain<br />

Non-Surgical Treatment Options<br />

Offered by Physicians Specializing in Physical Medicine<br />

Physicians specializing in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation are nerve, muscle, and bone<br />

experts. They treat a wide range of problems from sore shoulders to spinal cord injuries. Their<br />

goal is to decrease pain and enhance performance without surgery. <strong>Intermountain</strong> Medical<br />

Group of Cache Valley offers <strong>the</strong> services of two such specialists:<br />

By Jacob R. Egbert, DO<br />

Jacob R. Egbert, D.O.<br />

South Cache Valley Clinic<br />

Cameron G. Peterson, M.D.<br />

Canyon View Orthopedics<br />

Who gets low back pain?<br />

Nearly everyone will experience low back pain at some<br />

point in <strong>the</strong>ir life. In fact studies show that by <strong>the</strong> age<br />

of 20, 50 percent of <strong>the</strong> population has experienced<br />

low back pain. By <strong>the</strong> age of 60 that number rises to 80<br />

percent. Low back pain is second only to <strong>the</strong> common<br />

cold as <strong>the</strong> most common reason people visit <strong>the</strong>ir doctor.<br />

Because of <strong>the</strong>se visits, lost wages, and o<strong>the</strong>r associated<br />

costs, <strong>the</strong> economic impact of low back pain is immense.<br />

What causes low back pain?<br />

There are a number of causes of low back pain. The<br />

structures in <strong>the</strong> low back that have nerve supply can be<br />

irritated by inflamed or damaged tissues. Usually this<br />

happens after some activity where bending or twisting<br />

was involved. Commonly involved structures include<br />

<strong>the</strong> vertebrae (back bones), intervertebral discs (cushions<br />

between <strong>the</strong> vertebrae), spinal nerves, muscles, and joints<br />

of <strong>the</strong> spine.<br />

Will <strong>the</strong> pain ever go away?<br />

Low back pain is usually self limited. The majority of low<br />

back pain will resolve on its own without intervention.<br />

But <strong>the</strong>re are a number of cases where <strong>the</strong> pain persists.<br />

Among <strong>the</strong> cases where a doctor visit is warranted, most<br />

of those will resolve with time and specific <strong>the</strong>rapies.<br />

What can be done to help?<br />

Your doctor will be able to help you find an option that<br />

is right for you. You may simply need a core streng<strong>the</strong>ning<br />

program or anti-inflammatory medication.<br />

Depending on your medical history and physical exam<br />

findings your doctor may want to get an X-ray or MRI.<br />

Once a diagnosis is made, a treatment plan will be<br />

designed to best relieve your pain and help you regain<br />

your activity level. Conservative treatments are always<br />

preferred before more invasive procedures such as surgery.<br />

If you have persistent low back pain or progressing<br />

symptoms contact your doctor for an evaluation.<br />

Dr. Egbert earned his undergraduate degree from Idaho<br />

State University in Pocatello and attended medical<br />

school at Kansas City University of Medicine and<br />

Biosciences in Missouri. He completed an internship in<br />

Internal Medicine at <strong>the</strong> University of Missouri, Kansas<br />

City, and a residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation<br />

at <strong>the</strong> University of Missouri, Columbia.<br />

Dr. Egbert enjoys Olympic lifting, running, gymnastics,<br />

sports, mountain biking, rock climbing, whitewater<br />

kayaking, and teaching. He and his wife, Aimee, are <strong>the</strong><br />

parents of four children.<br />

Jacob R. Egbert, D.O.<br />

Physical Medicine<br />

South Cache Valley Clinic<br />

435.755.3355<br />

Dr. Peterson earned his bachelor’s degree in exercise and sport<br />

science from <strong>the</strong> University of Utah and attended <strong>the</strong> Ross<br />

University School of Medicine in Portsmouth, Dominica. He<br />

completed an internship in Internal medicine and a residency<br />

in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at <strong>the</strong> University of<br />

Utah. Dr. Peterson’s professional interests include musculoskeletal<br />

medicine, non-operative back pain management, as well as<br />

pediatric rehabilitation and spasticity management.<br />

Dr. Peterson enjoys back-country skiing, avalanche safety,<br />

wilderness medicine, mountaineering, adventure racing,<br />

mountain biking, trail running, and river rafting. He and his<br />

wife, Jackie, are <strong>the</strong> parents of four sons.<br />

Cameron G. Peterson, M.D.<br />

Physical Medicine<br />

Canyon View Orthopedics<br />

435.716.2800<br />

24 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org<br />

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According to <strong>the</strong> FDA, “a generic drug is identical, or bioequivalent,<br />

to a brand-name drug in dosage form, safety, strength, route of administration,<br />

quality, performance characteristics, and intended use.”<br />

Brand or Generic?<br />

Why your Pharmacist should be your best friend<br />

By Billie McCracken, PharmD<br />

When deciding between a brand-name and a generic<br />

alternative medication many people believe that <strong>the</strong><br />

brand-named drug is better quality and more efficacious.<br />

However, most will concede to purchasing a generic drug<br />

due to <strong>the</strong> high cost of brand-name medications.<br />

What is not always explained to <strong>the</strong> patient is<br />

that generic medications are almost always just<br />

as good as <strong>the</strong>ir brand name counterpart. In fact,<br />

it is estimated that 50 percent of<br />

generic medication production is<br />

produced by brand-name companies.<br />

Why are medication costs so high?<br />

The costs of brand name medications<br />

are high due to <strong>the</strong> expense of<br />

years of research and development and<br />

bringing a medication to market. All<br />

brand name medications are given a<br />

patent for a period of time which allows<br />

<strong>the</strong> drug manufacturers to recoup <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

costs and also be able to fund future<br />

research for o<strong>the</strong>r medications. Almost<br />

70 percent of all prescriptions dispensed<br />

are generic, yet <strong>the</strong>se account for only<br />

16 percent of <strong>the</strong> money spent on medications<br />

in <strong>the</strong> US. On average, a brand name<br />

drug costs $85 more than its generic equivalent.<br />

Almost70 percent<br />

of all prescriptions dispensed<br />

are generic, yet <strong>the</strong>se account for<br />

only<br />

16 percent<br />

Simple money-saving tips<br />

could save you hundreds of dollars every year.<br />

Ask if <strong>the</strong>re is a generic alternative available<br />

when your co-pay is higher than expected<br />

or higher than you can afford.<br />

If you pay cash or have insurance, have <strong>the</strong><br />

pharmacy bill you for a higher quantity of<br />

pills. The more you receive <strong>the</strong> cheaper it<br />

is (you need to have your doctor write <strong>the</strong><br />

prescription for <strong>the</strong> higher quantity to be<br />

able to have it dispensed at that amount).<br />

of <strong>the</strong> money spent<br />

on medications in <strong>the</strong> US.<br />

Get to know your pharmacist! Your pharmacist can help save<br />

you money when a generic version of your prescription is not available,<br />

a comparable generic alternative that works in a similar way<br />

may be on <strong>the</strong> market. Pharmacists have <strong>the</strong><br />

authority to switch a brand name medication<br />

to its generic equivalent when<br />

available but are not able to switch<br />

to a generic alternative without<br />

permission from your doctor.<br />

Always ask! Due to time constraints<br />

and workloads placed<br />

on pharmacy personnel, many<br />

pharmacists do not call <strong>the</strong> doctor<br />

to switch to ano<strong>the</strong>r agent<br />

unless asked. You can also ask if<br />

<strong>the</strong>re are more affordable generic<br />

versions of your prescription<br />

that will work just as well as<br />

what your doctor has prescribed.<br />

Billie McCracken, PharmD<br />

Pharmacist<br />

Logan Clinic Pharmacy<br />

Budge Clinic Pharmacy<br />

435.713.2770<br />

When a generic alternative is not available<br />

and you have to get a brand name medication,<br />

check <strong>the</strong> manufacturer’s website.<br />

They often offer savings cards that can give<br />

you a significant discount.<br />

Have your pharmacist check to see if <strong>the</strong><br />

cash price is cheaper than what your insurance<br />

wants you to pay. Surprising as it may<br />

seem, it happens.<br />

26 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org 27


Fevers<br />

Fever is <strong>the</strong> body’s natural way of fighting infection. Normal body<br />

temperature ranges from 97° to 100°F (36.1° to 37.5°C). A fever is a<br />

temperature of more than 100.4°F (38.0°C).<br />

The most common cause of fever in children is a minor infection<br />

like a cold. It could be, however, a more serious infection. How high<br />

<strong>the</strong> fever goes does not indicate how bad <strong>the</strong> infection is.<br />

Different types of <strong>the</strong>rmometers operate on different parts of <strong>the</strong><br />

body. If you suspect your child has a fever, take a temperature. This<br />

can be done by placing a <strong>the</strong>rmometer under your child’s tongue,<br />

under <strong>the</strong> arm in <strong>the</strong> armpit area, in your child’s ear, or in <strong>the</strong><br />

rectum.<br />

If you choose <strong>the</strong> rectal method, be sure to use a <strong>the</strong>rmometer designed<br />

for <strong>the</strong> rectum. When using a digital <strong>the</strong>rmometer, carefully<br />

read and follow <strong>the</strong> instructions found on <strong>the</strong> package insert before<br />

use. Never insert <strong>the</strong> <strong>the</strong>rmometer tip far<strong>the</strong>r than ½ inch, or as<br />

instructed. The tip of this <strong>the</strong>rmometer is more round than <strong>the</strong> oral<br />

or armpit <strong>the</strong>rmometers. Also, a rectal temperature is usually one<br />

degree higher than an oral or armpit temperature.<br />

Do not use fever strips because <strong>the</strong>y are not accurate.<br />

What do I really need to know?<br />

If your child’s temperature<br />

is higher than <strong>the</strong> normal<br />

range (97°–100°F), ask yourself<br />

<strong>the</strong> following questions:<br />

• How ill does my child seem?<br />

• Is my child fussy?<br />

• Is my child sleepy or does<br />

my child have no energy?<br />

If <strong>the</strong> answer is yes to any of <strong>the</strong>se, try to reduce <strong>the</strong> fever<br />

with <strong>the</strong> methods listed on <strong>the</strong> following page.<br />

Note: If your child is less than two-months-old, you should<br />

always call a doctor if you think your child has a fever.<br />

Bringing <strong>the</strong> fever down<br />

If <strong>the</strong> temperature is above 100.4°F, a variety of methods can be used to reduce<br />

<strong>the</strong> fever. The goal is to help heat leave <strong>the</strong> child’s body without causing <strong>the</strong><br />

child to shiver or have goose bumps. Shivering actually causes <strong>the</strong> temperature<br />

to go up. A fever can be brought down in <strong>the</strong> following ways:<br />

1. Dress your child in thin pajamas, shorts, underwear, or diapers.<br />

It is normal to want to bundle <strong>the</strong> child, but bundling will<br />

increase <strong>the</strong> temperature.<br />

2. Cover your child with only a sheet or leave him uncovered. Do<br />

not cover with blankets until <strong>the</strong> temperature returns to normal.<br />

3. Make sure <strong>the</strong> room gets lots of moving air. Small fans may be<br />

used to keep air moving.<br />

4. Give your child lots of fluids. Fluids are needed to help get rid of<br />

infection and replace <strong>the</strong> fluids that are lost through <strong>the</strong> skin<br />

during a fever.<br />

Medicines<br />

• Because fever helps <strong>the</strong> body fight infection, it is helpful to<br />

give medicine only after <strong>the</strong> fever is above 101°F (38.4°C).<br />

• Do not give your child aspirin. Studies have linked aspirin<br />

with brain, liver, kidney damage, and Reye’s syndrome.<br />

• The best way to bring down a fever is to give acetaminophen<br />

(a-seat-a-MEN-o-fen). Common brand names for acetaminophen<br />

are Tylenol®, Tempra®, Liquiprin®, and Panadol®. These<br />

drugs reduce fever and relieve pain. Antibiotics do not reduce<br />

fever or relieve pain.<br />

• Acetaminophen comes in drops, syrup, and chewable tablets.<br />

The dose (amount given) is based on your child’s weight.<br />

Most bottles will have a chart with <strong>the</strong> correct dose by weight<br />

on it. It is important to know that drops are usually stronger<br />

than syrup so you do not have to use as much.<br />

• Be sure to read <strong>the</strong> directions carefully. Acetaminophen may<br />

be given every four hours, but only give <strong>the</strong> amount that is<br />

recommended on <strong>the</strong> bottle.<br />

Mercury glass <strong>the</strong>rmometers<br />

Call your doctor if...<br />

• You have a newborn baby under 90 days old<br />

who develops a fever, call immediately!<br />

• Your child is having difficulty breathing.<br />

• Your child has a fever above 104°F (40°C) or fever<br />

that will not go down after you give acetaminophen.<br />

• Your child vomits (throws up) frequently<br />

or with unusual force.<br />

• Your child has a seizure (see complications below).<br />

• Your child has a stiff neck.<br />

• Your child looks ill, cries constantly, seems to be<br />

in pain, is unresponsive, or overly sleepy,<br />

whe<strong>the</strong>r <strong>the</strong>re is a temperature or not.<br />

• Your child has difficulty taking fluids<br />

or <strong>the</strong>re are fewer wet diapers.<br />

• A low fever (under 101°F) continuing<br />

more than 48 hours, even if<br />

your child seems well.<br />

Complications of Fevers<br />

Rapid temperature changes can cause seizures (convulsions). Your<br />

child may appear unconscious and his arms and legs may jerk. This<br />

may last from a few seconds to several minutes.<br />

Place <strong>the</strong> child on his side or on his stomach with his head turned<br />

to one side. Remove anything (such as a pacifier, or bottle) that<br />

may be in his mouth. Do not place your fingers or anything else in<br />

his mouth! Be sure to remove any objects that are around him so he<br />

does not hit <strong>the</strong>m during <strong>the</strong> seizure. Call your doctor immediately<br />

after <strong>the</strong> seizure. It is normal for your child to be sleepy after <strong>the</strong><br />

seizure. If <strong>the</strong> seizure has not stopped after 10 minutes, call <strong>the</strong><br />

paramedics.<br />

Primary Children’s Medical Center will not distribute nor provide information about using mercury glass <strong>the</strong>rmometers. Mercury<br />

(sometimes called quicksilver) is a dangerous material. Mercury-glass <strong>the</strong>rmometers are not available in stores; digital <strong>the</strong>rmometers have<br />

replaced <strong>the</strong>m. If a mercury-glass <strong>the</strong>rmometer ever breaks, do not touch <strong>the</strong> mercury— it is very poisonous. Use gloves and clean it up<br />

with something that can be thrown away.<br />

Do not simply throw mercury-containing or mercury-glass <strong>the</strong>rmometers away in <strong>the</strong> trash, because <strong>the</strong> mercury is considered “hazardous<br />

waste.” You can call your local Household Hazardous Waste hotline or Health Department for instructions on how to dispose of any<br />

mercury <strong>the</strong>rmometers you may have.<br />

Source: <strong>Intermountain</strong> <strong>Healthcare</strong> Primary Children’s Medical Center, 2007; https://intermountainhealthcare.org/ext/Dcmnt?ncid=520408205<br />

28 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org 29


Save LiveS!<br />

Spay and Neuter Your Pets<br />

Cost should never stand in <strong>the</strong> way,<br />

and No More Homeless Pets in Utah offers low-cost programs<br />

to help you help your pets and <strong>the</strong> community.<br />

Free Spay & Neuter for<br />

low income families<br />

Reduced cost Spay & Neuter<br />

Special pricing on Pitbulls and<br />

Community Cats<br />

Spaying and neutering your pets helps to reduce euthanasia statewide,<br />

and has many behavior and health benefits for your pets as well.<br />

Visit our website for details on our programs and let us help you.<br />

utahpets.org<br />

30 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org<br />

<strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org 31


32 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org<br />

<strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org 33


Finding quality<br />

home care doesn’t<br />

have to be diffi cult.<br />

<strong>Intermountain</strong> Medical<br />

Group of cache valley<br />

full service ad logan.indd 1<br />

HOSPICE<br />

HOME HEALTH<br />

INFUSION THERAPY &<br />

SPECIALTY PHARMACY<br />

HOME MEDICAL EQUIPMENT<br />

We make home care easy.<br />

CACHE VALLEY<br />

Home Health & Hospice<br />

(435) 716-5477<br />

Home Medical Equipment<br />

(435) 716-5396<br />

8/24/2011 4:15:45 PM<br />

understands healing<br />

isn’t always about giving you more time.<br />

Sometimes it’s about helping make <strong>the</strong><br />

most out of <strong>the</strong> time you have left.<br />

Hospice can help.<br />

• Pain & Symptom Management<br />

• End-of-life planning<br />

• Nursing & Aide Services<br />

• Social Work & Spiritual Support<br />

• Caregiver Respite<br />

• Bereavement Services<br />

<strong>Intermountain</strong> Homecare is a full service home care<br />

provider offering: Hospice, Home Health,<br />

Home Medical Equipment, and<br />

Home Infusion Therapy.<br />

For more information, call<br />

435-716-5477.<br />

Allergy<br />

1350 N. 500 E., Logan<br />

Keyser, Jeffrey S., M.D.<br />

435.792.1950<br />

Audiologist<br />

1350 N. 500 E., Logan<br />

Cobabe, Andrew, AuD<br />

435.792.1950<br />

Cardiology<br />

1300 N. 500 E., Suite 320, Logan<br />

Otrusinik, Rudolf, M.D.<br />

Saul, William L., M.D.<br />

435.755.8200<br />

Dermatology<br />

1350 N. 500 E., Logan<br />

Hanson, Nathan W., M.D.<br />

435.792.1770<br />

Dietitian<br />

1350 N. 500 E., Logan<br />

Shepherd, Patrick, R.D.<br />

435.792.1710<br />

EnT/Otolaryngology<br />

1350 N. 500 E., Logan<br />

Keyser, Jeffrey S., M.D.<br />

Stahl, Kathleen M., FNP<br />

435.792-1950<br />

Family Medicine<br />

*Includes Obstetrics<br />

502 S. Main, Smithfield<br />

Avery, D. Barton, M.D.*<br />

Harris, Gary L., M.D.*<br />

435.563.3222<br />

190 S. Hwy. 165, Providence<br />

Broadhurst, Jeremy W., D.O.*<br />

Call, Nathan H., M.D.<br />

Firth, R. Mark, M.D.*<br />

435.755.3300<br />

412 N. 200 E., Logan<br />

Carlson, Brian W., M.D.*<br />

Clark, Thomas H., M.D.*<br />

Goates, Brad M., M.D.<br />

Hyldahl, Douglas R., M.D.<br />

435.713.2800<br />

Gastroenterology<br />

1300 N. 500 E., Ste. 340, Logan<br />

Garg, Vikram, M.D.<br />

435.716.5900<br />

Internal Medicine<br />

1350 N. 500 E., Logan<br />

Faux, David S., M.D.<br />

435.792.1806<br />

Francis, Michael R., D.O.<br />

435.792.1780<br />

Internal Medicine (Cont.)<br />

Huffman, J. Mark, M.D.<br />

435.792.1810<br />

Nash, Robert M., M.D.<br />

435.792.1805<br />

Stones, Michael J., M.D.<br />

435.792.1807<br />

Strong, Jeffrey S., M.D.<br />

435.792.1808<br />

Szpunar, Agnes M., M.D.<br />

435.792.1804<br />

Neurology<br />

1350 N. 500 E., Logan<br />

Williams, Michael H., M.D.<br />

435.792.1809<br />

Obstetrics/Gynecology<br />

500 E. 1400 N., Logan<br />

Benedict, James P., M.D.<br />

Craig, Kristin F., M.D.<br />

Horsley, E. Brett, D.O.<br />

McCulloch, Kimberly D., M.D.<br />

Olsen, Tandy G., M.D.<br />

Anderson, Jennifer, N.P.<br />

Flansburg, Deborah, CNM<br />

Murillo, Ena, N.P.<br />

Thompson, Angie, N.P.<br />

435.716.1920<br />

Orthopedics<br />

1300 N. 500 E., Ste. 130, Logan<br />

Higginbotham, Thomas O., M.D.<br />

Hooley, Eric W., M.D. (neck & back)<br />

King, Bryan C., M.D.<br />

Murray, David P., M.D.<br />

Hunt, Scott, P.A.<br />

Patterson, Julie, P.A.<br />

Stowers, Benjamin, P.A.<br />

435.716.2800<br />

Pediatrics<br />

1350 N. 500 E., Logan<br />

Brown, Nordell T., M.D.<br />

Clarke, Derrel W., M.D.<br />

Garg, Prafulla D., M.D.<br />

Horkley, Tyson S., M.D.<br />

O’Dell, J. Dennis, M.D.<br />

Schneider, Stephen D., M.D.<br />

Visick, Michael K., M.D.<br />

Roper, Sheryl, PNP<br />

Field, Clint E., PhD<br />

435.792.1940<br />

pHARMACIES<br />

412 N. 200 E., Logan<br />

435.713.2770<br />

1350 N. 500 E., Logan<br />

435.792.1521<br />

Physical Medicine<br />

1300 N. 500 E., Ste. 130, Logan<br />

Peterson, Cameron G., M.D.<br />

435.716.2800<br />

190 S. Hwy. 165, Providence<br />

Egbert, Jacob R., D.O.<br />

435.755.3355<br />

Plastic Surgery<br />

1350 N. 500 E., Logan<br />

Isom, Casey N., M.D.<br />

435.792.1760<br />

Podiatry<br />

1300 N. 500 E., Ste. 130, Logan<br />

Pedersen, Curtis C., DPM<br />

435.716.2800<br />

Rheumatology<br />

1350 N. 500 E., Logan<br />

Walker, Corey W., M.D.<br />

435.792.1518<br />

sports medicine<br />

1300 N. 500 E., Ste. 130, Logan<br />

Lyons, Trek D., M.D.<br />

435.716.2800<br />

Surgery<br />

1350 N. 500 E., Logan<br />

Anderson, Allan D., M.D.<br />

Harker, David L., M.D.<br />

Weiss, Bartley M., M.D.<br />

435.792.1950<br />

Urology<br />

1350 N. 500 E., Logan<br />

Callister, Michael S., M.D.<br />

Hunsaker, Teryl, P.A.<br />

Pitcher, Brent P.A.<br />

435.792.1950<br />

WORKMED<br />

412 N. 200 E., Logan<br />

435.713.2850<br />

Wound Care<br />

1300 N. 500 E., Ste. 130, Logan<br />

Anderson, Allan D., M.D.<br />

Harker, David L., M.D.<br />

Pedersen, Curtis C., DPM<br />

Weiss, Bartley M., M.D.<br />

435.716.2850<br />

Urgent Care<br />

<strong>Intermountain</strong> InstaCare<br />

8 am-8 pm, seven days a week<br />

412 N. 200 E., Logan<br />

435.713.2710<br />

hospice ad logan.indd 1<br />

8/24/2011 4:17:50 PM<br />

34 INTERMOUNTAIN MEDICAL GROUP <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org <strong>Intermountain</strong>MedicalGroup.org 35


Fast, Convenient, Quality <strong>Healthcare</strong><br />

Open 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week<br />

Centrally located at 412 North 200 East, Logan<br />

X-ray • Lab • Pharmacy onsite<br />

No appointment necessary • Most insurance plans accepted<br />

Logan InstaCare can treat you or a loved one when you need to see a physician quickly.<br />

Our expanded hours and weekends give you more opportunities to receive convenient,<br />

quality medical care from highly skilled physicians and healthcare providers.<br />

435-713-2710 • instacareutah.org

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