St Mary's Messenger - Winter 2013

Stmarysb

St Mary's Messenger for Stoke Bishop - Winter 2013

WORKMAN

GUARANTEED

ROOFING AND BUILDING

MAINTENANCE

8 Glen Drive,

Stoke Bishop, BS9 1SB

COMPETITIVE RATES tel: 0117 904 2707

mobile: 07974 791 657

deneworkman@blueyonder.co.uk

Hughes Enterprise Law Practice is delighted to be able to

support St Mary’s Messenger and would be pleased to advise

you in any of the following areas:

Resolving Commercial Disputes

Claims against professional advisers

Shareholder and partner disputes

Drafting Commercial Agreements

Employment

Mediation

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED IN CONSUMER WHICH “LOCAL”

FOR BRISTOL PLUMBERS

We aim to provide a modern, practical way of tackling legal

issues with an eye to the commercial objectives required.

To discuss your business issues, please contact

Tony Hughes at:

Trym Lodge

1 Henbury Road

Westbury on Trym

Bristol BS9 3HQ

Tel: 0117 959 6424

Fax: 0117 959 6425

Email: info@enterpriselaw.co.uk

For further information, please visit our website:

www.enterpriselaw.co.uk

EXPERIENCED · ENLIGHTENED · EMPOWERED


Christmas Events and Servic

Something for everyone! You are most welcome to j

Sunday 1 st December– 6.30 p.m.

Advent Carol Service

This is a beautiful and dramatic traditional service of hymns, anthems and Advent

carols, led by our robed choir. It starts in darkness as a solitary flickering candle is

carried down the aisle to light a candle at the front. From there the light spreads out

as candles are lit on the window cills and low lighting is turned on. This illustrates the

coming of Jesus, the Light of the world, into a world of darkness. Refreshments are

served afterwards for those who would like to stay. Jennifer Hall will preach a short

sermon. Although children might appreciate the drama, this is essentially an adult

service.

Tuesday 10 th December - 6.30 – 8.30 p.m.

Stoke Bishop celebration of Christmas – do drop by!

Around a decorated Christmas tree, outside in the village at the bottom of Stoke Hill.

Mulled wine and mince pies will be on offer as carols are sung. Everyone please come to sing!

Sunday 15 th December– 4.00 p.m.

Christingle Service

This service is intended to appeal to children, accompanied by parents or

grandparents. It has become a very popular service with its visual aids –

an orange represents the world and the orange is decorated with a red

ribbon, sweets and finally a candle. It is in aid of the Children’s Society.

Again, a dramatic and attractive short service.

Tuesday 17 th December 2pm and 3.30pm

Carol-singing in Nursing Homes

Aabletone at 2.00 p.m, then Saville Manor at 3.30 p.m.

We shall also be visiting Stoke Leigh and Druid Stoke Homes,

dates and times tbc. Phone 968 7449

Please come to sing!

Tuesday 24 th

Christmas Eve 1

Midnight Comm

This is a service of Holy Communion, traditional car

short sermon, finishing just after mid-night, when we ca

another Happy Christmas before going home to put th

presents in the stockings. So, get organised and sneak aw

for this service, especially if you are cooking and entert

the morrow.


Sunday 22 nd December – 6.30 p.m.

Christmas Carol Service

This is intended to be a service for young people and adults to which

you might like to invite friends. Again, candlelight plays its part. There will be traditional well

-loved hymns familiar to all. The robed choir and Primary Voices will lead the singing and offer

some of their own anthems and songs. There will be short readings and the story of Christmas

will be told aided by readings and carols. One hour max! The service will be preceded by a

Christmas tea (congregational contributions welcome!) between 4.30 and 5.15. Afterwards

mulled wine and mince pies will be served.

Tuesday 24 th December - 4.00 p.m.

Crib Service

This is a very attractive 40 minute service for up to 7 year olds – younger ones might like to dress as a

nativity character. We need shepherds, wise men, angels and even a Mary and a Joseph – and if anyone

would like to loan a new born babe, I am sure it would be well received and cared for. There is sometimes

unpredicted audience participation! Our four television screens are well placed to enable everyone to read

the words of the songs.

Wednesday 25 th December

Christmas Day 9am and 10.30am

Holy Communion There will be the normal service at 9am, finishing by 10.

Christmas Praise 10.30 is our annual cheerful service for the young at

heart, especially frequented by families with excited children! This will be no longer

than 50 mins, to be followed at 11.45 by a short communion service for any who

feel that Christmas would be incomplete without it.


Illustration of a bombe


Stoke Bishop ‘Posada’

this Christmas

Hazel Trapnell

Time for a laugh!


Christmas Quiz

How much do you know

about Christmas?

1. Why is Christmas on the

25 th of December?

2. In 1843 John Calcott

Horsley designed the first

Christmas cards, acting on

the instructions of Sir

Henry Cole. What did the

cards depict?

3. What did St Francis of

Assisi contribute to

Christmas?

4. Who prohibited Christmas

parties in England?

5. Where does Father

Christmas come from?

6. Where do his costume and

sleigh originate?

7. What do crackers have to

do with a smith?

8. Why do we kiss under

mistletoe?

9. Why is the 26 th of

December known as Boxing

Day?

10. When should you say

‘Nadolig llawen’, and to

whom?

Answers overleaf


Answers to Christmas Quiz (see page 15)

1. The simple explanation of the date 25 th December is ‘tradition’. The date was fixed in the time

of the Roman Emperor Constantine, who converted to Christianity in 312. The underlying explanation

is debatable. The most favoured theory refers the date to pagan festivals connected with the

Winter solstice. It sees Christmas as a christianisation of these festivals.

2. The first Xmas cards depicted a family raising their glasses to the health of the card’s recipient.

Sir Henry was accused of encouraging excessive drinking.

3. St Francis of Assisi is traditionally regarded as the creator of the crib (1293). The setting was a

cave, and the figures were real people, so St Francis’s crib was a kind of living tableau. He may have

been inspired by religious painting and rudimentary religious plays.

4. Parties were prohibited by the Cromwellian/Puritan parliament in 1647. From then until the

restoration of the monarchy in 1660, all holy days were supposed to be reserved for religious

observance and prayer. No partying of any kind was officially allowed.

5. Father Christmas comes from the North Pole, of course!

6. It is sometimes said that Father Christmas as we know him today is the creation of a Coca-Cola

advertising campaign. In fact, the present-day figure has very ancient origins. His main ancestors

appear to be these: St Nicholas, the gift-bearing saint and bishop whose ecclesiastical robes were

red; the northern personification of winter (Old Man Winter) re-created in the flesh as a jovial

visitor to snow-bound homes; and the Norse god Thor – an aged, good, heavily bearded figure who

was associated with fire, hearths and flying; his aircraft was a chariot drawn by goats.

7. Tom Smith, a London confectioner, invented crackers around the year 1847. One of his sons

later put different kinds of present in them so that crackers could be personalised. The son had

impish tastes. Witness the sets of mock false teeth that are still to be found in some crackers.

8. We owe the custom of kissing under the mistletoe to ancient traditions that associate the plant

with love, beauty, fertility, sexual potency, and magic. Perhaps the most influential of these is a

mythic tale of motherly love protagonised by Frigg, the Norse goddess of love and the mother of

Baldr, the god of light (summer sun), who was murdered with a poisonous arrow made of mistletoe.

In one version of the tale of Baldr’s death, his mother’s tears are metamorphosed into the berries

of mistletoe, Baldr is then resurrected, and his mother turns mistletoe into a source of blessing: all

who walk beneath it receive her kiss.

9. There are two theories about Boxing Day. One of them connects the name with the ‘poor boxes’

that used to be kept in churches to receive alms for the poor and whose contents were traditionally

distributed on December 26 th . Another theory refers the name to the ‘Christmas boxes’ or boxed

gifts that the well-off traditionally gave to servants and tradesmen on December 26 th .

10. Say Nadolig llawen to speakers of Welsh at Christmas; .

Here are some starters for further reading or devising your own quiz:

http://www.thehistoryofchristmas.com; http://www.whychristmas.com;

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documents/cancelled-christmas-dec-2011.pdf;

http://www.pantheon.org/areas/mythology/europe/norse;

http://tlc.howstuffworks.com/family/christmas-trivia.htm.

Quiz and answers compiled by Paul Lewis-Smith


Hitting the Ground Running

Soul Survivor

Love...

Stoke Bishop!

Harvest Trail


University of Bristol

Sports Medicine Clinic at

Coombe Dingle Sports Complex

Open to the Public

Professional experts offering a high quality

Physiotherapy to people of all ages and activity

levels

All Physiotherapists hold post-graduate qualifications and provide care for

University Sports Teams (e.g. Rugby, Hockey, Football) and Coombe Dingle

Tennis Squads, beginner to elite. We treat all age groups.

Our clinic is the official Sports Medicine Partner of and Physiotherapy

provider for the RunBristol 10k and Half Marathon

Insurance Approved (e.g. BUPA, AXA PPP), Accepting GP referrals

To book, phone 0117 962 6718

Coombe Dingle Sports Complex, Coombe Lane, Stoke Bishop BS9 2BJ

http://www.bris.ac.uk/sport/sportsmedicine/smccd.html

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines