NEF 2005 Annual Report - Near East Foundation

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NEF 2005 Annual Report - Near East Foundation

EAR EAST FOUNDATION WINS 2004 AGFUND INTERNATIONAL PRIZE FOR

PIONEERING DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS among 83 competing projects, in 32

countries, on three continents. NEF won for its enhancement of nursing as a

career in Upper Egypt.

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Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott


EAR EAST FOUNDATION PRESENTED 2004 FREEDOM AWARD BY

ARMENIAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE OF AMERICA, WESTERN REGION, “…for

your organization’s longstanding history of aiding the Armenian people and others

in their darkest hours.”

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Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott


From thousands of miles away they came to Near East Foundation’s New York headquarters, little

burgundy velvet boxes that opened to reveal brass plaques:

ASIRA EL-SHAMALLIA WOMEN’S CLUB

Thanks gratefully

NEAR EAST FOUNDATION (NEF)

For their helpful efforts in establishing many projects

With all regards

2004

And from the Albadan Regional Council “For your support and efforts” and

the Bayte Imrin Village Council…all West Bank Palestinian towns.

Closer to home were recognitions from the State of California Senate and

the State Assembly “…for bridging national and cultural boundaries to help

people help themselves.” From the City and County of Los Angeles, “…your

commitment to helping people in the Middle East and Africa build better lives

for themselves and their communities by working with local institutions is of

great benefit to those you serve and to the global community,” signed Los

Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn.


Presented annually “for remarkable contributions toward the

Armenian people and the cause of peace in the world,” the Near

East Foundation was honored in October with the highest award

conferred by the Armenian National Committee of America,

Western Region, a dramatic, nearly foot high, bronze eagle with

outstretched wings. It was accepted by NEF Board Chairwoman

Linda K. Jacobs and NEF President Ryan A. LaHurd at a gala with

over 600 guests and a long list of dignitaries, who stood and

applauded the presentation.

“There is no more meaningful acknowledgement than that which

comes from those to whom we are most closely connected

historically,” Dr. LaHurd told them. Near East Foundation was created in 1915 to rescue desperate and

dying survivors of the Armenian Genocide and deportations, becoming the first nationwide, large scale,

international assistance organization in the United States. In February Dr. LaHurd returned to Los

Angeles to be featured speaker at the “International Relief, Refuge, and Recognition Tribute.” Near

East Foundation was recognized by the Armenian Assembly, Armenian General Benevolent Union, and

the Western Diocese of the Armenian Church, for its efforts on behalf of survivors of the Genocide.

In April Dr. LaHurd was guest speaker again, this time in Washington, D.C. for the Congressional

Armenian Genocide Observance held on Capitol Hill, joined by Members of Congress, civic, religious,

human rights leaders, and Armenian-Americans from across the country. “The work of the Near East

Foundation argues that humanity can respond to evil with good; to despair with hope; and to destruction

with rebuilding,” he told the assembly.

Near East Foundation received the very

prestigious 2004 International Prize for

Pioneering Development Projects by the

Arab Gulf Programme for United Nations

Development Organizations (AGFUND).

The announcement was made in Riyadh in

September on the recommendation of a

distinguished committee, and the award

was presented in Tunis in December by His

Royal Highness Prince Talal Bin Abdul

Aziz Al Saud. NEF won for its

enhancement of nursing as a career in Upper Egypt, in competition with 83 projects from 32 countries

and three continents. “Looking at the overwhelming need in our world,” the NEF President said upon

accepting the prize, “too many people regard as worthwhile only projects which affect millions…but

every human life is of great value. And every effort which enhances a human life is an important

success.”


Near East Foundation's efforts and successes in 2004-05 follow, in

keeping with our historic mission — To help the people of the Middle East and Africa build the

future they envision for themselves.

Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott

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This has been another momentous year for Near East Foundation. Not only did we mark the close of our

ninth decade, we also implemented important structural and organizational changes at NEF. The growth of

our field programs has been consistent and rewarded by new grants in places like Palestine, Egypt, and

Morocco. However, it has been a struggle for our fundraising, which mostly takes place here in the United

States, to keep pace with this expansion.

Consequently, NEF’s Board of Directors made a number of difficult decisions, including strict budget

controls, cuts in spending, and contracting our office here in New York to make the best use of our limited

resources. NEF President Ryan LaHurd and I went to Cairo in January to talk with our Egyptian staff about

implementing these cuts. Each manager understood the necessity and timeliness of the measures, and

worked wholeheartedly to implement them. Despite the challenges, NEF continues project exploration,

including in Armenia, Sudan and in Ethiopia, where we received government registration as an international

NGO this year.

Not just content with cuts, however, we have stepped up our fundraising efforts, both on the Web, through

personal contacts, and with our loyal donors. Your support has helped NEF reach this 90th year milestone.

Now we hope that you will help us, not just in monetary support, but in talking about NEF with your friends, in

your giving circle, at the gym, or at your place of worship. We would be happy to provide you with a speaker,

should you request one. Word of mouth is one of the most powerful ways that any organization becomes

known.

At this time, the American people are both curious about—and confused by—what is happening in the

Middle East. Having spent more than two decades in the region, working first as an archaeologist in Iran and

Jordan, and since 1986, with NEF, I have to say that never before have I seen the kind of mutual

misunderstanding which now exists. NEF is the only organization I know which can become a bridge of

understanding between our peoples.

Thank you for your continuing support, which has helped NEF reach this remarkable 90th anniversary year

in its service to the Middle East and Africa. Our partnership is more important than ever to the people we

serve during these difficult times in the Islamic world.

Sincerely,

Chair

Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott


Recently, The New York Times joined other periodicals in reflecting on the doomsday outlook of many

Americans. People anguish at the piling up of disasters and potential disasters from tsunami to earthquake to

avian flu. While their concern has motivated some philanthropic generosity, it seems to have also generated

feelings of despair: that improving the condition of people in developing countries is impossible.

The Near East Foundation shares a deep concern about the crises that affect people’s lives around the

globe. But far from despair, we have a sense of optimism. For we see first hand the genuine progress being

made by the people with whom we work in the Middle East and Africa.

In these countries one finds people suffering the devastation of famine, conflict, authoritarian government,

and economic deprivation. Yet we find them to be people of great resilience, hope, energy, and commitment

to the betterment of themselves and their communities.

They respond with gratitude and vigor to NEF’s participatory approach, which treats them as equal partners

with a great deal to offer, but in need of a helping hand. Palestinian villages are developing democratic

institutions and economic stability; displaced persons in Sudan are starting businesses and learning to

improve their health and nutrition; Malians are forging community structures to ensure their food security and

build the structures of civil society; women in Jordan and Morocco are gaining a place in the future of their

society through training and cooperative ventures.

These are examples of real people whose real lives are improving. Their stories unfortunately do not often

make it to the airwaves or the newsprint of American media. But they are no less a sign of hope for being

hidden from sight.

They are why we are optimistic about the state of the world and about the future--and why we think you

should be too. And, for those of you who support our work, these stories are why you should feel proud of

having made a difference. These people know they have enhanced their lives because of the generosity of

average Americans and of American foundations and corporations who care. I think there is no better “public

diplomacy.”


As we approach the end of our 90th anniversary year, we at NEF can proudly say that we are continuing to

bring hope, build friendships, and do good in the international arena as we enter our 10th decade. We are

hard at work shaping NEF to be even more effective in the future. We can do more with your help. Please be

generous enough to include NEF among those philanthropic efforts you support.

Sincerely,

NEF President

Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott


Remarks by Montasser Kamal, M.D., Ph.D.

Chief of the United Nations Health Institutions Unit

Director General of Multilateral Programs, Canadian International Development Agency (Quebec)

y relationship with the Near East Foundation began more than 20 years ago, starting from their work

in Egypt. During that time I was a medical student at Cairo University, and at a later date, I worked

directly with their Center for Development Services as a manager. NEF has without doubt come to

be one of the most influential institutions in my life and the lives of many other development practitioners in

Egypt and other countries of the Middle East.

“The influence of NEF cannot be attributed to the scale of its financial resources, which was always modest,

but is mainly due to the ability of its leadership to engage in key development issues, making timely

decisions and charting new strategic directions and alliances. These decisions have contributed

substantially to helping alleviate the suffering of poor women, men and children in the region….

“Perhaps one of the most extraordinary achievements of NEF has been to bring the voice of the poor to

policymakers. In the absence of democratic processes, people’s voices are often lost to the more powerful.

That is not the case where NEF works. Where NEF works, people now know that power is not a zero-sum

game and that they have an ally who can help them bridge this power gap in an effective and constructive

way.

“I remember the time I was working at NEF, when the concept of citizen participation in development was

paid lip-service at best. At that time, NEF had embarked on a change strategy by which all its projects and

programs had to demonstrate that they were participatory in nature. It was not easy. It is still not easy. But

progress has been made, and NEF has come to set the ground rules on how to encourage participation and

create the social sphere for it to take place.

NEF has also had a profound impact on my life. Work ethos, teamwork, mutual respect and having an

investigative mind—are all qualities which I gained while at NEF and which I carry with me to this day.”

hortly after the Camp David accords were signed in 1978, development resources began pouring into

Egypt, but something vital was in short supply—qualified local staff—to use these new funds effectively.

The Near East Foundation saw this need for a pool of skilled development professionals who could

provide necessary project management, development and capacity-building services. Given this important

recognition, NEF headed in a new direction in the Middle East with a vital and continuing infusion of financial


support and technical assistance.

While continuing its own grant-making and programs

throughout the 1980s, NEF began to emphasize the

professional development of individuals, including

forming strategic partnerships with other organizations in

order to provide Egyptian nationals with training and

education and a chance to apply what they had learned.

It was called “the network,” more formally known as the

Development Practice Support Network.

NEF provided sustained funding for needed publications,

local learning as well as scholarships to study abroad.

While the focus was on Egypt, the network soon expanded into Sudan and Jordan as well. It attracted young

professionals employed by local and international nongovernmental organizations; and also tried to lure

well-educated, young people into the development field, particularly encouraging them to work outside

capital cities and go into the countryside. An amazing 5,000-plus development practitioners joined this

network, and many went on to key posts, both locally and internationally.

By 1990 a new organization clearly was badly

needed to accommodate them. Heroically, 15

network veterans left secure jobs and an

uncertain future to establish the NEF Cairo

affiliate—Center for Development Services

(CDS).

At first CDS carried on the previous professional

development activities, but then realized yet

another need existed—capacity building for

institutions. For the next several years the NEF

affiliate focused on improving management,

finances, and service delivery by collaborating

organizations. A wide range of Arabiclanguage

courses and materials, training, and

technical assistance was developed by CDS

and provided to them.

Also, CDS approached leading lights in the field in order to provide Arab-language materials that made a

significant contribution, in particularly on participatory approaches; that in turn influenced development

education and practice throughout the region, raising standards to new heights. Thousands of

nongovernmental organizations were strengthened and became valued partners to their communities,

donors and governments. That CDS was based in Cairo was instrumental in its accomplishing so much in

such a short time, given many donors were attracted to undertake development in a country of 70 million

people, more than any other in the region.

CDS started offering project management

services by the mid-1990s, with its evaluations

particularly in demand. By 1998 this NEF Cairo

affiliate had 60 full-time employees and had

become the largest single provider of Arablanguage

development services for

nongovernmental organizations in the Middle

East. More recently CDS has again repositioned

itself, this time addressing the roles of government

and the private sector. For peak impact and continuing sustainability, CDS now is intensely involved in

participatory planning, coalition building, and the creation of structures and networks.

Here are some cases in community and sector development NEF-Egypt addressed in 2004-05.


At a meeting hosted by CDS, 40 lead researchers and experts from six countries came together in Cairo to

address the subject of philanthropy for social investment and development, with funding provided by the Ford

Foundation. CDS’s Egyptian philanthropy program is examining the patterns and size of local philanthropy

and very importantly, its potential to play a larger role in national development. This pragmatic, actionoriented

research is considered a leading effort to understand local assets of all kinds and mobilize them for

community betterment. In addition to Egypt, conference participants were from Indonesia, Turkey, Britain,

India and Tanzania.

In what could become the largest project every implemented by NEF in this field in Egypt, CDS began the first

phase of agricultural development of reclaimed desert land west of Lake Nasser, the largest fresh water

reservoir in the world and a fragile environment under increasing stress. Funding came from Canada’s

International Development Research Center, supplemented by a grant for training and market research from

the UN International Fund for Agricultural Development. The project also represents a landmark for NEF’s

growing expertise in innovative and sustainable strategies for communities with delicate ecosystems and

changing socio-ecological environments. The aim is to enhance the health, income, and welfare of the 2,500

small landholding families of the area. That includes an eco-health approach by CDS’s agro-ecology project

which designed a plan to overcome such difficulties as poisonous bites from snakes and scorpions, the

remoteness of the area, and lack of medical and emergency health facilities.

Ongoing since early 2003, CDS’s collaboration

with the Cairo-based Arab Council for Childhood

and Development aims to unify the efforts of five

countries in the Arab world and build their

institutional capacity to address the phenomenon

of street children and their lost human potential.

Participating in this significant joint initiative are

Egypt, Kuwait, Morocco, Syria, and Yemen. The

project has three main phases and CDS is

involved in all of them: first, development of a

general framework for action, including planning,

budgeting and reporting; second, training

workshops for the five countries using that

framework; and three, creation of operational

manuals and application of the information and

skills they contain. The Council and CDS

previously worked together on a training program

on project design and proposal writing for 24

participants from 13 Arab countries. This project builds upon Near East Foundation’s involvement with street

children in Egypt, Sudan, Jordan, and most-recently in Armenia.

But one example of the wide expertise CDS makes available to community-based organizations addressing

a range of needs and issues is a three-month project with the Association for Young Diabetics. The

organization was founded in Egypt in 2000 and since has served over one thousand cases, helping young

diabetics and their families better manage this disease. After conducting a comprehensive organizational

assessment of management, finances and programs, CDS worked with board and key staff to devise

expansion and implementation plans, then collaborated on securing needed funding to service the

increasing number of young diabetics across Egypt. NEF’s health and population staff began to take note of

diabetes as a rising health concern in the late 1990s, not only in Egypt, but throughout the region.


A first for Egypt, a fixed-price people’s market for

the Al Mounib District of Giza came about with

assistance from CDS and the United Nations

Development Program as well as cooperation

from the Giza Governorate, the Social Fund for

Development, and Sekem companies. Only

Venezuela has a similar enterprise, and it was to

the popular market there that the field team went

for a first hand look at a market that operates by

group collaboration, and directly connects

agricultural operators with the consumers of their

produce. Then CDS started training 30 local

volunteers and potential market operators,

designed the research and field work, and

supervised the team. NEF has a strong

background in establishing urban markets,

including the upgrading of the Tablita Market in

Old Cairo and the establishment of the El-

Harameen Market in East Alexandria.

A year-long, multi-faceted involvement in upgrading services to Egyptian children with disabilities and

special needs and at-risk youth in both urban and rural areas included a number of different assignments for

CDS. A main objective of the World Bank-funded project was to design a comprehensive training program

for staff of the Egyptian Ministry of Insurance and Social Affairs, who work with at-risk young people in

Greater Cairo. In addition, CDS monitored and evaluated 33 subprojects by service providers in 11

governorates throughout the country, leading to a complete and streamlined database. Based on this indepth

familiarity, CDS was asked to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the entire initiative preparatory

to World Bank review. Results indicated nearly 45,000 people benefited—children, trainees, participating

organizations. The increase in the number of service providers was perhaps the most important contribution

as well as the development and testing of new, integrated ways of providing services. CDS’s experience

with these issues goes back to 1995, including authoring a series of manuals on street children for the Arab

Council for Childhood and Development, and long-term assistance to organizations like the Hope Village

Association, which works with street children, and the Hospital Day Association, which serves the disabled.

In a public-private partnership affecting the delivery of

health care nationally, CDS is partnering with the Arab

African International Bank and Cairo University

Specialized Pediatrics Hospital, investing in the

hospital’s staff and expansion plans. The hospital

serves an average of 2,500 patients weekly and is one

of the largest health care providers for Egyptian

children. For its part, the bank is providing the majority

of financing for the project; while CDS is upgrading

nursing skills and simultaneously creating a core of

well-qualified professionals capable of transferring

their knowledge. The plan is for CDS to exit in a year

with a sustainable program in place. Further, CDS is

working at the operational level with the hospital’s

administration to improve management, technical

capacities and day-to-day efficiency. CDS was

selected to play this pivotal role because of its

involvement in the Egyptian health sector since 1991,

most particularly because of its truly remarkable

success at enhancing nursing as a career in Aswan. That project has since expanded to the Governorates of

Aswan and Qena.


Working with the Egyptian government’s Social Fund for Development, in turn using World Bank funding for

54 projects, CDS documented the implementation of four models being tried to increase awareness about

population and reproductive health issues. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, including

conducting 373 interviews, CDS clearly defined the characteristic strengths and weaknesses of each model,

determining exactly what created success and effectiveness. From these lessons learned, CDS then

extracted the basics for an efficient and sustainable model to address population growth and improve the

lives of rural women of reproductive age, reporting these complex findings to the government. CDS also

examined each model for the approach most helpful to effective cooperation among the Ministry of Health

and Population, nongovernmental organizations and local communities—the capacity-building part of the

project.

Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott


haled Bin Al-Waleid’s General Voluntary Society serves a community of 3,000 people who live in a

starkly dramatic setting in steep hills 40 kilometers south of Jordan’s capital city of Amman. There are

120 members in the society managed by a board of seven and assistance of four full-time women

volunteers. The community-based organization began in 1991 with the goals of increased education and

health awareness, vocational training, and support for school children. “We’ve reached almost all our goals,

including community-based credit,” reported Mamdouh Hawatmeh with evident satisfaction.

And their achievements are most impressive,

particularly given such evidently difficult

circumstances. The General Voluntary Society

conducts informal classes supplementing the

available school programming and in 2005 held

14 workshops on subjects such as women’s and

children’s rights, business awareness, care of the

elderly, as well as for kindergarten teachers in

conjunction with the kindergarten and nursery

school they maintain. Indeed, they made such a

good impression in 2001 when His Majesty King

Abdullah II visited their community, he donated a

bus to their kindergarten program. On the health

front, the society ran an eight-week training

program in family planning this year with 20

women participants; and also conducted a

workshop on the importance of a pre-marriage

health examination.

In addition, the society has a gallery space to

display and sell products created by village women and provides other income-generating activities. Two

dunums of land have been set aside for olive tree cultivation. They maintain the natural water springs in the

breathtakingly beautiful valley below benefiting 20 farmers, who grow wild mushrooms, tomatoes,

cucumbers, green peppers, olives, eggplant, figs, and guava. The catchment area for three farmers costs

$4,225; and their newly-constructed water tank and concrete canal collects precious rainwater for five farm

houses. “If we had more money, we could do more reservoirs,” Mr. Hawatmeh added. For his part, Falah

Khlaf needs water to irrigate his olive grove. A concrete wall and a cistern has the potential for 80 cubic


meters of water, helpful for three or four families.

The society also wants to establish a local bakery and use their bus to distribute baked goods throughout the

area. They figure the bakery would cost about $140,000 with their 30 percent share raised from cash and

building rent. They estimate profits of $4,225 annually, in turn used to expand their programs, even into

nearby villages. In addition to income generating activities, the society has donated $8,450 in direct cash

assistance to 300 poor families as well as to orphans and widows in their community.

But it sounds like Mr. Hawatmeh is most proud of

their NEF-funded credit program, which has

assisted 58 families so far, creating small

businesses like a grocery store, restaurant, and

making possible the additional income that

comes from raising rabbits, chickens, cows and

goats. A case in point, one village women, the

wife of a bus driver and mother of six children,

took out a loan of $700 two years ago and bought

six goats. Their milk, yogurt and butter products

were used by her family and sold. She repaid

the loan in full at $35 a month and now wants

another to raise turkeys.

Loans average about $700 with a maximum of

$1,400; run for two years; with the monthly

payment about $35. In three years they have

made $4,000 from fees and boast an impressive

96 percent repayment rate. About 75 percent of

the businesses they staked with $14,000 are still

going strong, and now have tripled in value to $42,300. The society has only $425 left to repay of the

$16,000 NEF provided to get them going, along with training and technical assistance, like designing the

application form, determining the selection criteria, and analyzing how much money is needed.

For all these reasons, Khaled Bin Al-Waleid’s General Voluntary Society met the Qudorat Project’s stringent

requirements and was selected to be one of 30 finalists from among 300-plus applicants. Society members

have participated in intensive NEF training sessions over the past months.

ear East Foundation opened its Jordan office in 1936 and since that time has been a prime mover in

training and capacity-building for Jordanians and Jordanian institutions, culminating most appropriately

in its leadership in 2005 of the Qudorat Project, Arabic for “capacities” and a most appropriate

translation. A televised ceremony in December and subsequent national media campaign officially launched

this ambitious, multi-year, multi-million program. It aims at nothing less than strengthening the country’s civil

society, boosting non-governmental, community-based organizations and their traditional services, while

enhancing their income generation potential.

In yet another major thrust, NEF has been very intensely

involved since last year in the creation of new fish farms in the

Jordan Valley, working with small farmers to raise fish in

existing irrigation ponds for both home consumption and sale.

Further, NEF has been busily planning with the Jordanian

government for a large aquaculture/fish farming program for

the Zarka Governorate. This grand-scale proposal, involving

the wider community—not just agricultural sector, uses NEF’s

20 years of solid expertise since its first introduction of fish

farming in rural areas in the 1980s.

It would create a major center for aquaculture promotion in the region; provide recreational facilities for the

people of Zarka and surrounding areas; increase water availability for bio-saline agriculture; and promote

environmental education and applications throughout Jordan. Such changes ultimately could impact up to

80 percent of Jordan Valley and Zarka Basin farmers.


These exciting latest developments really go back

much further, building upon NEF’s work in Jordan

since the 1930s with the founding of an institute

for teachers in Trans Jordan in conjunction with

the American University of Beirut, later attracting

many Jordanian students to a new College of

Agriculture, and by 1952 to an Institute of

Economic Research. Over the decades NEF

honed an approach based on agricultural

extension in combination with comprehensive

rural reconstruction—improvements in rural living,

increased farm production, and an emphasis on

the family. In every instance, programs were

requested, begun, and financed by the people

themselves.

From the beginning our kind of technical

assistance meant bringing scientifically skilled

people to live in Jordanian villages—where they

stayed in the background. Our funding focused

on providing education that stimulated Jordanian

villagers to freely undertake helpful change. By any standard, the Near East Foundation pioneered

international technical assistance in Jordan, reaching people of all economic and social levels. In

recognition of these contributions, His Majesty King Hussein awarded NEF the Jordan Star of the Second

Order in 1971, “for valuable work…in the domain of social service and economic development”— which

continued on a grander scale and with more sophisticated techniques in 2004-05.

Through the years NEF programs evolved, reflecting changing local conditions and new opportunities. In the

1980s NEF expanded into urban settings, promoting health and social services through local communitybased

organizations for the first time; and introduced fish farming in the rural areas. By the early 1990s this

now vast experience focused on local economic development, promoting small businesses and incomegenerating

activities in both cities and the countryside.

NEF was the first to introduce micro-credit to Jordan and

since the early 1990s has been a major player in assuring

equitable access to credit, promoting income-generating

activities, and supporting small and micro-enterprise

development. Today NEF-Jordan is a primary resource

for training, teaching materials, and technical assistance

for more than 200 community-based funds; and now

works with local banks and private sector companies to

increase capital flows to these funds.

literally entire communities.

In the Zarka Governorate, in cooperation with the

Jordanian Ministry of Social Development and local

community-based organizations, NEF more recently has

conducted housing assessments and established credit

funds for home improvement loans to poor urban

households. Over the years thousands of Jordanians

have received loans and enhanced their livelihoods and

living conditions as well as many organizations and

NEF’s innovative approaches to problem-solving and technological innovation continued in 2004-05,

particularly evident in its leadership of Qudorat,

our largest project ever in Jordan, consolidating 15 years of

capacity-building experience with community-based organizations there. With a $2.5 grant from Jordan’s

Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation’s Enhanced Productivity Program, NEF is the principal

agency in a consortium of Jordanian non-government and private sector institutions, including the Jordanian


Hashemite Fund for Human Development and Dajani Consulting, a private firm. Contracts were signed

October 19, 2004.

There are 5,000 community-based organizations across

Jordan offering a wide range of services and activities.

By

supporting them with a new and creative approach,

Qudorat aims at far more than training and technical

assistance, but fully integrated institutional change in

Jordanian civil society that will enhance and sustain

these institutions and the contributions they make to their

communities. Simultaneously Qudorat is encouraging

income-generation, job creation, local economic

development, and small and micro-enterprise throughout the country.

NEF’s long-time Jordan Program Manager Majdi Qorom is directing the Near East Foundation consortium,

which brings together a group of experienced and dedicated professionals, skilled in organizational needs

assessment, participatory strategic planning, custom-tailored training and technical assistance as well as

old-fashion hand-holding and cheerleading. They are working with management, board members, and

community representatives, equipping them with the tools and practical assistance--to take a new look at old

ways of doing business; redefine their relationships with existing and potential partners; and reform from

within and reach objectives.

Further, Qudorat intends to instill a better sense of direction, encourage commitment, and design

interventions, then measure results. Once assessed, the information, materials, systems and lessons

learned will be available for later expansion that should prove less costly and even more effective. At the

same time NEF is “linking” these institutions together for the first time, boosting Jordan’s role in Internet

applications and information technology. Every participating organization gets a computer with scanner and

Internet connection.

According to Manager Qorom, “ Qudorat aims to

encourage public involvement, expand private

financing as well as positive governmental

practices.... In short, this is an integrated, goaloriented

methodology and social change

strategy. It’s citizen-driven and asset-based.

The decentralized approach to implementation

will strengthen the sector and leave something

to build on for the future.”

By the end of this fiscal year, Qudorat had

received an overwhelming response to its

request for proposals—over 300 communitybased

organizations from six Jordanian

governorates applied by the January 6

deadline. NEF revolutionized the sorting

process by entering applications on a webbased

system for transparent tracking of

progress, and later, selection of the 30 finalists.

They were announced in Amman in April amidst

much fanfare, attendance by officials, and press

coverage. Finalists included 18 charitable organizations, eight cooperatives, two culture centers, and two

sport clubs. Interestingly, nine of the finalists provide services to women. Not incidentally, NEF spent a

month explaining to organizations that were not selected—why they did not win, considered a helpful

process for a future application.

Qudorat field trainer-motivators immediately began to compile basic information on the 30 communities

served by the finalists for baseline studies and later market research and business development activities.

Twenty of the finalists will receive financial assistance for income-generating activities. In conjunction with

the announcement of finalists, a day-long orientation immediately launched the training phase of Qudorat.


By March more than 7,800 visitors had checked

out the project website, about 18 percent from

outside Jordan, indicative of international

interest gradually growing each month. Also in

March the first youth volunteer group was

established to participate in Qudorat activities,

particularly research and marketing, with two

more planned. In April an intensive series of

workshops and training exercises began for

more than 200 trainees, carried out by 30

instructors at more than 40 locations in six

governorates.

Next came institutional needs assessments at

each community-based organization, prepared

and piloted by NEF’s Cairo-based Center for

Development Services, profiling each

organization and where reform was most needed. These findings then became the basis for further planning

at the three-day workshops on participatory strategic planning and visioning, to evaluate the general

environment in which these organizations operate. Parallel with this training, Qudorat staff met with

participating organizations to explore business concepts and ideas for income-generating activities.

Editor: Andrea M. Couture • Designer: Ellen Scott


ian Stanhouse, who worked after school as a bagger in a grocery store, donated 10 percent of his

paycheck, which he got his parents to match, plus involved his relatives in the cause. Some teachers,

like Carol Bertsch, challenged their classes by pledging to match their contributions, in her case

$1,700. A collection table manned during lunchtime in the school cafeteria began at about $20 the first day,

then exploded, reaching $2,400, even $4,000! Almost every club and organization on campus took on the

project—the orchestra raised $500 in a concert and the basketball team’s silent auction garnered $1,500.

Eventually checks sent to the Near East Foundation

in New York passed their $10,000 goal to support

NEF-Lesotho Country Director Ken Storen’s work

with orphaned and abandoned AIDS babies. That

was the spirit permeating Houston’s Kingwood High

School, introduced to the plight of Lesotho’s

orphans by teachers Courtney Wheeler and

Jennifer Orenic, ex-Peace Corps volunteers in

Lesotho and good friends of Ken. “I was thinking

maybe we’d make a thousand,” confessed Ms.

Wheeler, a special education teacher of students

with moderate to severe disabilities of all kinds. But

in just four weeks, “We were running through the

halls, yelling, ‘We got it!’ ‘We got it!’”

In total nearly $110,000 was contributed this year to

the Near East Foundation to support NEF-Country

Director Storen’s AIDS orphan project, an enormous outpouring of generosity.

Peace Corps volunteer in Lesotho before becoming the Near East Foundation’s Lesotho Country

Director, Ken Storen well knows the hugely tragic dimensions of the HIV-AIDS pandemic in Africa. The

number of children orphaned by HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa is expected to more than double by

2010, requiring one billion dollars annually to care for them, according to UNICEF, the United Nations

children’s agency. An unprecedented “drastic deterioration in children’s lives” will likely see more than 24

million children face AIDS-inflicted poverty, UNICEF says. Currently Africa is home to some 40 million

orphans and that number may shoot to 50 million in the next five years in sub-Saharan African where 60 to

80 percent of the cases are AIDS-related.


Tens of millions more will be made vulnerable as AIDS slowly

kills parents, stretches households which care for orphaned

relatives, and robs communities of teachers and health care

workers. Historically African communities have cared for

orphans and vulnerable children, but relatives and neighbors

have been overwhelmed by this disease, which kills not just

one parent—but usually both. Over time families find their

resources depleted. The lifelong impact on these children and

on the communities where they live will be profound and linger

for decades after the epidemic begins to wane, particularly

given the long incubation period of the disease—eight to 10 years.

Compelled to act in this southern African, land-locked country he

calls home, in May 2004 Storen founded a non-profit organization

registered with the Lesotho government to improve the quality of

life for infants and families affected and infected by HIV. Presented

in the United States as Six Degrees of Separation, it provides care

to orphaned infants through a place of safety based in

Mokhotlong, Lesotho, and an outreach program, training, and

supporting families so they can care for orphaned infants.

An elderly widow walked three hours to the district hospital, her

second such trip in three months. Mathato’s last visit ended when

her daughter, a single mother, succumbed to a variety of infections

acquired during her struggle with HIV. She died in her early

twenties.

When the old woman arrived at the hospital, she unwrapped her

blanket to expose the tiny body of nine-month-old Nthabiseng. The

baby was severely malnourished since the impoverished grandmother lacked the resources to provide more

than sugar water and an occasional bit of food over the past three months. She tearfully placed her

granddaughter in the hands of Nthabeleng, the project director, and said farewell, promising to visit when

she could.

Three weeks later, she returned to Mokhotlong town again on foot, and this time didn’t recognize her own

granddaughter! Through feeding, care and medical treatment, Nthabiseng had grown into a healthy baby, no

longer coughing weakly, but sitting up and smiling while playing with a small pile of toys. Mathato continued

her visits on a monthly basis, smiling and crying tears of joy every time she held her happy little

granddaughter in her lap.

After six months, baby Nthabiseng went home with the

program staff to be reunited with her grandmother in a

highly emotional celebration. Project people continued

to visit once a month, bringing food, training the family

in proper care, and monitoring Nthabiseng’s health.

Says her grandmother: “When I brought Nthabiseng

to the hospital that day, I thought I would never see

her again. I had lost my daughter and couldn’t bear the

thought of losing my granddaughter--she was all I had

left. Her life was saved and I am the happiest woman

alive, because I have my granddaughter. I cannot say

‘thank you’ enough.” On October 3 Nthabiseng

celebrated her second birthday, as smiley and happy

as ever.


Numerically there have been 93 home visits to provide nutritional support, monitoring, referrals and training;

42 trips to Leribe Hospital and Motebang Clinic for treatment, immunization, and consultation; 16 staff trained

in nutrition and medication administration; and 20 meetings with local government officials, hospital staff and

others to create a referral network, among other facts and figures.

Only three children sadly have died, while so many others are now living in safe, nurturing environments,

either with Ken or reintegrated into extended families or in foster care. Staff visited children reintegrated into

extended families at least two times per month, providing training for their care and monitoring weight,

general health, development, and attitude. They were reportedly adjusting well.

Although pressure exists to reintegrate all children into their families, it was discovered in many cases this

would not be in the best interests of the child’s welfare, indeed in some instances, extremely dangerous.

Despite training, many families have been found incapable of providing adequate care; and others,

apathetic to the children’s needs.

Virtually all children participating in the program

have been immunized, also are being properly fed

and receiving health care. Six children among

those tested have been confirmed to be HIV

positive; and four are taking anti-retroviral drugs.

It has not been easy. Although Mokhotlong Hospital

recently opened a clinic for people living with HIV,

there is no doctor available to provide treatment and

consultation, and the clinic is rarely staffed.

Consequently health care on occasion has required

a more-than-three-hour-drive from Mokhotlong to

Leribe Hospital--weather permitting. Further, the hospital in Mokhotlong does not provide comprehensive

pediatric care, so that can mean going even further afield to South Africa.

All staff are now trained in health monitoring, nutrition, and baby care skills. That covered common baby

infections, especially with infants who could be HIV positive; accurate measuring, preparation and storage of

food; and stimulating educational games for developmental growth.

In turn they trained caregivers about basics like hygiene, nutrition, and use of medications. Hygiene

concentrated on topics like the importance of washing hands before handling food, boiling drinking water,

and proper cleaning of baby feeding bottles and cups. Nutrition included formula preparation and

maintaining food diaries for better nutrition assessment. Medication training focused on the use of medical

equipment and observing child health progress, including reactions to anti-retroviral therapy. Importantly,

each household maintained a notebook to record daily accomplishments about the children’s general

health.

Creating a network for referrals for outreach and places of safety has been problematic. Despite repeated

attempts to create liaisons with the Lesotho Department of Social Welfare and the Child Gender Protection

Unit, neither has provided much support in referring children or attending cases relating to legal matters and

child welfare. To add to the frustrations, gender protection officers often have been placed on alternative

duties and the district social worker unavailable. In fact, most referrals have come from community members

and local chiefs; and consequently more meetings with local chiefs, clinics and communities are on the

agenda.

Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott


ountries that promote women’s rights and increase their access to resources and schooling have lower

poverty rates, faster economic growth and less corruption than countries that do not. Countries with

smaller gaps between women and men in areas like education, employment, and property rights, not

only have lower child malnutrition and mortality, they also have more transparent business and government

and faster economic growth--which in turn helps to further narrow the gender gap. In short, education,

health, productivity, credit, and governance all work better when women are involved. That’s what the World

Bank has written.

According to the United Nations, economies in the developing world grow by three percent for every 10

percent increase in the number of women who receive secondary schooling—since women are major

economic contributors. So empowering women and achieving gender equality and integrating equality into

development planning reduces poverty and hunger and improves poor people’s lives. In another promising

fact, over the last decade the number of women represented in government increased from 16 countries to

97.

For its part, the International Center for Research on Women has pioneered the recognition that the wellbeing

and survival of poor households depends disproportionately on women’s productive labor.

Regardless of whether the question is asked from an economic, health or human rights perspective,

according to the Center, investments in women’s lives yield high returns not only for women, but their families

and communities as well. Since women typically are responsible for collecting water and firewood for the

everyday needs of the household—they grow and process food to feed their families; they safeguard their

children’s health, and care for the sick and elderly. Evidence also demonstrates, they say, that income in the

hands of women results in better outcomes for children than income in the hands of men, because women

tend to invest more in their children’s education, health and well-being.

Despite all these facts and figures, gender inequality remains deeply rooted in entrenched attitudes, social

institutions, and market forces. However, with the right approach, these attitudes and institutions can

change—evidenced in Near East Foundation’s “remarkable breakthroughs” in Mali over the past year. NEF

well understands women’s critical role in building strong communities and strong nations, and consequently

reports with special satisfaction the progress made in Mali. Despite considerable obstacles, women gained

power and inequalities and discrimination diminished.

ver the past year, two very important facts about Mali generally, and the area of Near East Foundation

concentration in particular, hit hard at our multi-faceted rural development program. First, according to

NEF Country Director Yacouba Dème, the grain harvest was “calamitous” because of locust infestation--

the worst in 15 years (see photo above)--and drought conditions, creating a massive exodus from NEF

partner villages. Food prices soared, precious cattle died, and the government urgently called for food


aid. Second, municipal elections installed a new group of public officials in local and regional government of

the country. However, noteworthy too were remarkable breakthroughs in the enormous challenge of

involving Mali’s women in the development of their country.

It all goes back to 1964 when Near East Foundation

began working with the newly-independent African

countries on agricultural development, recruiting

hundreds of technicians trained in livestock

improvement, water management and scientific crop

improvement. As its program evolved, NEF established

a separate African Endowment Fund that by 1980

financed development of experimental projects in new

areas.

In the 1980s NEF responded to the threat of famine in

Mali with a program that embraced livestock rehabilitation, village seed and cereal banks, agricultural credit,

literacy, and soil and water conservation. Just one case in point, NEF designed an efficient, low-cost system

for better harvesting rainwater for agricultural and forestry purposes that reduced stress to crops and

improved food security. It represented in important ways an adoption and extension of traditional and locallyfamiliar

water conservation techniques, however, not limited to individual farms. To successfully extend the

design to a larger water catching area, NEF helped community members work through a number of complex

questions around land tenure, water rights, and labor management, yielding sustainable benefits that could

be managed by the local community permanently.

In the competition between population growth and food shortages in Africa and the Middle East throughout

the 1980s, NEF continued to work on agricultural improvement tailored to local conditions and the

strengthening of local institutions and communities. Increasingly, NEF cooperated with other donor

agencies to implement projects ranging from beekeeping in Sudan and Swaziland, to community

development in Egypt and Jordan, and seed and cereal banks in Mali.

Building upon work going back to 1984, NEF is intensely engaged in a band of 127 villages in Mali's

northern Sahel, an area plagued by poverty, degraded land, sparse rainfall and the encroaching desert.

NEF’s multifaceted, simultaneous strategy employs environmental and natural resource conservation and

management; micro-credit; community organization; information; food security; and decentralization in

consonance with government policy.

In keeping with a major objective of creating and

sustaining local community organizations and their

capacities, 18 new, viable, democratic

associations formed over the past year and

became engaged in the social and economic

development of their villages. Activities largely

centered on potable water with important

assistance provided by the Drilling Association of

Mali; natural resource management with the help of

the Regional Director of Nature Conservation, and

health issues. Significantly, all but one association

included women, in stark contrast to the cultural

tendency toward their systematic exclusion and

marginalization.

In the area of Bore, for example, women joined 11

committees concerned with woodland

preservation, six water committees as well as

multipurpose associations. Further, they were

appointed to important posts—treasurer, inspector,

secretary for information, for conflict resolution, for

development, even deputy secretary general in one case. Fifty women accepted these new responsibilities

from among a total of 387 new female members in the 1,467 combined membership of Bore’s various

groups.

This trend continued in NEF’s 45-day, capacity-building training in subjects such as literacy, leadership, plant

nurseries, gabion construction as well as management of sensitive areas like water power and agricultural


oundary projects. In particular, female participation pops off the charts reporting work in literacy: in the 41

sessions conducted, 15 were for women with participation a remarkable 89 percent, a significant increase

over last year’s 73 percent participation. Overall a total of 638 people attended training sessions with only

four drop-outs.

On the public education front, 140 radio programs out of the 550 broadcast—about 25 percent--concerned

the role of women in development. Next in order of frequency came education, health, environment,

democracy, animal breeding, and agriculture. Like the radio programs, booklets explaining the

government’s decentralization policy and the rights and duties of citizenship, rules about credit and collective

farming in democratic Mali, were translated into the languages of the people—Bambara, Dogon and

Peulh—and widely distributed throughout the area. Helen Keller International Foundation made possible not

only radio programming, but Internet connection for people living in the countryside. Countries in

Development-Canada and CTA (technical audio visual center) provided valuable radio programming

services.

Also, over 2,000 newspaper editions were published, reporting international stories like the situation in

neighboring Ivory Coast and in Iraq; more local concerns like locusts, microfinance and the actions of

community councils; and health issues including vaccination and fevers. All this kept information current,

raising the level of rural culture generally, and assisting information exchange between readers and the NEF

program.

Further helping that dialogue, NEF organized eight

inter-village gatherings with representatives from

59 villages—over 35 percent of them women,

coming together to discuss with NEF staff the

progress and problems of their village associations,

activities and plans, and provide increasingly

accurate statistics on births, marriages and

deaths—important information for civil society

building. A truly extraordinary phenomenon, the

number one concern expressed at these large

village meetings was the lack of women

participating in some of the villages. Here are their recommendations to correct the situation quickly:

NEF should make women’s participation in development the primary condition for assistance to

villages;

NEF should sensitize villagers, changing their attitudes toward women and promoting the importance of

community service at the same time;

village associations should appoint women to committees and responsible positions—and women

should accept those jobs when offered;

there should be more literacy training for women;

structures should be created and organized for men and women to work together as well as exclusively

women’s associations created or support renewed;

NEF should integrate women into program management and provide more information to women about

activities.

This past year’s NEF credit activities centered on assisting the financial needs of women in the areas of

Douentza and Mopti. For individual loans, amounts ranged from a low of nearly $10 to a high of $375; and

out of 60 applicants, 51 were favorably received. Also, three village groups were capitalized to make their

own commercial loans. NEF itself financed 19 women’s groups. In total there were 1,520 beneficiaries—11

per cent of the women in the area, receiving over $250,000. That was lower than in 2003 and even 2001

because of the locust infestation, which made the women even more hesitant than usual about taking on a

debt they might not be able to repay. Yet, of the nearly $525,000 loaned the previous year, about $440,000

has been reimbursed with another $73,000 late-but-expected. Only a single loan is considered a default—

an enviable record.

In addition, NEF credit activities generated an important operations manual that published in December,

outlining all procedures in proper credit processing; and created a fund of about $3,400, given interest

payments. The program’s 26 village credit agents added yet more experience to their growing competence

and careful risk assessment evident in this year’s reimbursement record. Agents also received language

lessons in Peuhl and Dogon in preparation for future expansion of the program in the country as well as

training from the Professional Association of Micro Finance Institutions of Mali and the Mali Finance Ministry.


And inspired by NEF’s credit activities, the women’s

group from Barmandougou visited the women’s

association in Boni to learn how it all works—conditions

for credit access, rules and regulations, their organization

and functions—with some plans clearly in mind.

Supporting Mali’s national policy and recognizing the

harmful impact of timber exploitation and

commercialization as an energy source, NEF continued

its efforts to train local people in the economic and

ecological wisdom of managing their natural resources

in 11 rural centers. Solid results were quantifiable: 4,667 cubic meters were authorized for cutting and sale

in the market and less were sold—3,904. Some 274 producers and 10 managers were involved. Further,

four among the 11 villages regulated their woodlands for the first time.

To restore and protect biodiversity and

prevent erosion, local associations put

nearly 4,500 new and varied plants into

the ground, adding to the nearly 4,000

successful plantings from the previous

year’s activities. Rice farming was

enhanced by NEF’s addition of a

permanent technician on-site and

provision of all necessary materials as

well as by 80 volunteers “seeding” this

experimental program in 12 villages.

However, nature was most uncooperative

and rice yields in some villages were

severely affected by the prevailing

drought. The year saw only 30 days of

rainfall with less than 13 inches of rain.

The village of Hombori was particularly

deprived, getting less than eight inches of

desperately needed water. In comparison,

New York City’s recreational-use Central Park received 47 inches of rainfall in the same period.

Despite such obstacles, NEF persisted on all fronts. Irrigation activity continued with new water pumps and

canal building. The previous year’s 10 participating villages were joined by six new ones and availability of

water increased as much as 153 percent. That meant a lot to the kitchen-gardeners of the villages of Mendie

and M’Bessena, just one case in point and a huge blessing for 156 women living there. Kitchen-garden

production in 12 villages—mostly onions with some tomatoes, apples, garlic, beets, peppers and tobacco—

brought in nearly $10,000, hardly small change in a country where nine out of 10 people live on less than $2

a day. And this clearly impressed women gardeners, attracting their increasingly active participation in

NEF’s program.

Also, a total of 86 hectares of denuded and degraded pastures were resurrected to the benefit of six villages.

Over 23,000 forest and fruit plants emerged from 33 nurseries equipped by NEF; and NEF agro-forestry

techniques helped farmers regenerate Baobab, Acacia and other valued trees. A total of 3,738 meters of

riverbanks were protected against erosion. While pond regulation was set back by financial constraints and

equipment problems, work on sand dunes continued. Twelve volunteers agreed to invest 18 months

protecting farm land against dunes and wind erosion by planting protective shields of trees, provided by NEF

along with all necessary equipment to accomplish the task; while six villages worked collectively on their

erosion problems. These are but a few highlights from the natural resource management section of a

detailed 51-page report on NEF-Mali 2004-05.

Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott


ear East Foundation Moroccan Country Director Abdelkhalk Aandam wants you to meet two women he

has come to know during this year’s continuing work in the education of women and girls in the remote

villages of the High Atlas Mountains. He writes:

"Her name is Aicha Youss, a woman nearing 60, more

marked by life than by her age. She has traveled a road of

suffering, humiliation, and sacrifice. Because of her unlucky

destiny, she was widowed and responsible for educating her

eight children. However, living in a heartless society for

widowed or divorced women only succeeded in making

Aicha stronger, more ambitious and thirsty to learn. She

succeeded is raising her children into the men and women

she always wished for, and even more important, in forging

her own iron personality and becoming a leader in the

development of her community. This year her village has

had the opportunity to make a leap and take the first step

toward a better life because of the NEF project in rural

primary education. It was also an opportunity to escape from

her life’s sad destiny and reach the peak of her powers.

Because of her unlimited ambition, her boundless

enthusiasm and her irreversible will, she was named the

leader of the local women. This new role opened up yet

further horizons, Aicha traveled here and there, encountering

many people and their differences, expanding her

sophistication and experiences, and making her

progressively deeper and more questioning.

"Then there is Fanna Aamamou, a 58-year-old woman taking

NEF literacy training. Her life has hardly been served on a

golden platter, so the powerful liberation of her personality

and charm of her conversation so full of wisdom comes as a

surprise. At the same time she is so different, yet also a consummate woman of Morocco and the Grand

Atlas. We have had the pleasure to recruit her as president of the women’s association in the Asseghmou

area of Ouarzazate Province. Fifty-five years old and the mother of seven children, Fanna never went to


school because at that time education of girls was given no importance. She excelled in meeting her

domestic responsibilities and with seven children to care for and without any resources, Fanne found refuge

in the warmth of the home she created and where her family never went lacking. But because of her

husband’s advancing age, he was no longer able to take care of the farming and the burden fell upon

Fanna, who typically rose to the occasion.

"The idea of creating a women’s association emerged from within the ranks of the village women and what

they saw happening around them. Motivated and convinced, their association first saw the light of day in

April 2001 and revived again in April 2005. After identifying the needs of the women, local projects were

launched, particularly literacy. Also, contacts were made with a number of organizations to obtain funding

and French Heifer agreed to provide the means for a goat raising project for the sale of milk and cheese.

Obstacles surely were not lacking, but they were managed, overcome by female initiative, and never

discouraging Fanna. It took a lot of time and there were occasions when the credibility of the association was

in question.

"This long process had its impact upon the personality and life of Fanna, allowing her to fulfill her innate

potential and to excel at advancing the best interests of her sisterhood. This journey and the solidarity of

others increased Fanna’s confidence in her abilities, and as a result, Fanna’s life as a village woman has

been transformed and she has become a militant for the rights of women and the well being of her

community."

he mountains of the High Atlas east of

Ouarzazate are breathtakingly beautiful--cool

and relaxing in summer, rugged and isolated

in winter. In the warm months, fruits and nuts are

plentiful; shepherds traverse the hills with sheep

and goats. These provide villagers with cash crops

for sale in distant urban markets. Where water is

available, villagers cultivate small plots of grain,

some few vegetables, and crops for animal fodder.

In a good year, there may be a surplus for sale in

local markets.

In winter, snow-covered mountains, narrow

unpaved roads, over-flowing rivers, and periodic

landslides block access for weeks at a time.

Small, isolated villages are cut off from one another

and from the surrounding area, relying on the

rewards of a summer harvest to survive the harsh

winter. Electricity, water, and sanitation facilities

are absent.

For the vast majority of people in the High Atlas, education is a luxury they can ill afford. In many villages

virtually all adults, both men and women, are illiterate; and there is a total absence of programs for adult

literacy. In one village the local school had to be constructed alongside the village cemetery, reflecting the

utter lack of social acceptance of education in or within proximity to the village. Further, teachers are

outsiders, speaking and teaching in Arabic rather than the local Berber dialect.

Where schools have been introduced, attendance is limited and largely restricted to boys. In some areas

women and girls are not even allowed to pass by the school, symptomatic of the longstanding culture and

traditions working against the education of girls and preventing the full integration of women in society.

There are an estimated 2.5 million girls of primary school age in Morocco; and more than half of them live in

the countryside, where again, less than half of girls attend school, and when they do, the drop-out rate

between grades one and six, is a shocking 80 percent.

Families feel little incentive to educate girls who are generally married by the age of 14 and are helpful with

household chores like gathering water and firewood as well as child-rearing. Consequently, there is strong

social pressure for girls not to attend school, and when they do, they often encounter a hostile environment

and leave in discouragement. When NEF first began the project, some communities even refused to

participate. They simply could not understand that education was important. Young men completing primary


school were unable to go on to the secondary level since it all too often meant a costly commitment to

boarding and education in a distant town.

Besides, local schools with their classes through

sixth grade were all too often simply uninviting bare

shells with little warmth and nothing to encourage a

child’s attendance. Many consisted of a single or

perhaps two classrooms. They lacked space, had

leaky roofs, broken windows, missing doors,

insufficient and often broken furniture, no heating

so were absolutely freezing in winter, and typically

had inadequate or often absent water and

sanitation facilities. School books and supplies

were extremely limited and beyond the means of

the majority of families.

Students, age six and up, had to walk many miles

through rugged country in the cold of winter to

attend class. Those beyond sixth grade have to

travel 50 miles or more across the mountains to

reach the nearest school at that level. Here they

had to board with relatives or in unfamiliar hostels,

and at a cost they could ill afford. Clearly such

conditions discouraged school enrollment and

encouraged frequent absenteeism.

According to Abdelkhalk Andam, NEF’s Moroccan

project director: “It’s hard for people to realize just

how much has to be done. For instance, it’s not

just about registering girls for school, but about

keeping them there. This means that we have to

deal not only with how these communities perceive

education, but also how they look at the role of

women at home and in the broader community,

and also the role of young girls in the household

economy. It’s about long-standing traditions and

cultural issues,” he continued, adding, “Many

people would prefer to see it more simplistically,

but that’s just not possible.”

Near East Foundation is working in the High Atlas Mountains in partnership with the US State Department’s

Middle East Partnership Initiative (MEPI) and the Moroccan Department of Education, to bring learning to the

High Atlas, promote the education of girls, provide continuing education, and encourage the involvement of

local parents and teachers in activities that promote education and further development in local communities.

The initiative was launched early in the year

with much fanfare at the area Chamber of

Commerce, including attendance by the

General Director of the Moroccan Ministry of

Education. Even the inauguration of the

program was a learning experience—a

workshop where all paricipants, including

village representatives, exchanged ideas and

NEF’s project manager outlined plans for the

year.

While initially difficult to gain community

acceptance, the project has in nine months of

intense activity produced a virtual revolution

in the perception of education among villagers


in the eight participating communities.

Villages that had refused to participate in the project are fast becoming models of educational reform.

Virtually empty classrooms are now full. Those who enroll tend to remain for the term. Over 300 adults, an

extraordinary more than 60 percent of them women, are enrolled in adult literacy classes--and their numbers

are increasing.

Newly-formed Parent Teacher Associations (PTAs),

joined by women leaders from the villages, are

collaborating with NEF to encourage education for

all and to mobilize the resources needed to

improve schools and allow local graduates to

continue their education in secondary schools

located in nearby towns and cities. Some PTAs are

nearly autonomous and have proven their ability to

organize and manage their affairs; some others will

need additional support before reaching that

plateau.

NEF’s Project Director Andam reported with evident

satisfaction: “A majority of both PTA members and

local teaching staff and administrators are now

much more aware of the role of the PTA in relation

to the school, as well as their role in relation to the

PTA. There is also much greater support and participation by local religious leaders, the Imams-fkihs.”

While PTAs had been tried in some communities, they had met with little success in isolated areas such as

the High Atlas. People simply did not understand what they were for, and if they did, they needed a great

deal of help to make them function. So this became NEF’s starting point to encourage education—make the

PTAs work for the community, and in turn, help the community understand how to work for the PTA. And to

do this, help the teachers and administrators assigned to the schools understand how they could help and

how the school would benefit from their greater involvement.

This often meant breaking down barriers between

insiders and outsiders since administrators and

teachers are assigned for short terms to the rural

areas, generally a few years at most. All the more

reason for parents to take more responsibility for

assuring that children attend school and that the

education they receive is what they need. That

challenge was further complicated by the gender

issue. When NEF began its work there were almost

no girls enrolled in village schools and the idea of

having women participate on the boards of local

PTAs absolutely unheard of, given that some

communities even prohibited women and girls from

venturing near schoolyards.

Confronting gender head on and as a condition for

participation, the project began by identifying and organizing women leaders from each village. Their role

was to support the PTA in its efforts to encourage education and discourage dropouts. These women

received training and were encouraged to participate in PTA activities and board meetings; and PTA boards

were prompted to seek their advice and assistance. The

strategy worked and gradually they became ad hoc members of the PTA boards.

In addition, adult literacy classes were established in most communities and the majority of attendees were

women. In class women were able to discuss their problems, needs, and aspirations. They were now

outside of their homes, in school, and involved in the larger community--participating in educational

awareness campaigns, making home visits to investigate school absences and dropouts, and encouraging

parents to send their children to school. Not only moving about more freely in their own communities, they

also traveled beyond and met with other women in other villages. For most, it was for the first time. For


some, it was their first time in an automobile.

For their part, school administrators and

teachers helped plan and participated in

project activities, assisting new PTA board

members in fulfilling their unfamiliar

responsibilities, and in organizing and

follow-up of project events. Many served

as instructors for adult literacy classes with

NEF providing vital training and support

for their new role. Clearly evident, the

educators came to better understand the

problems rural people face; the role they

can play in addressing these issues; and

the critical importance of the teacher in

encouraging and maintaining an interest

in education by children and adults alike.

To support all this, NEF encouraged the

emerging PTAs to take an interest in improving school facilities. Working together, NEF, local communities,

and local schools are transforming rundown facilities into adequate school rooms and providing pupils with

basic school supplies and teachers with teaching materials. Over the coming two years, NEF hopes to

continue to support the eight participating schools and to expand the project to include a total of 15 villages

in the surrounding area together with their satellite school.

This is only the beginning. Education is the core of development, but sustainable only through promotion and

support for local economies. People expect education to produce results, for both men and women,

improving their everyday quality of life. So NEF is working with government authorities and community

residents on the development of complimentary activities that help identify and benefit from previously

underutilized or neglected local resources.

These include expansion and diversification of

crops, introduction of quality seeds and plant

materials, rebuilding and improving herds

devastated by recent droughts, quality control

and marketing of rural crafts, improving

processing and packaging of goods, developing

local markets and transport facilities. Much of

this depends on putting in place simple, costefficient

forms of water harvesting, reforestation,

alternative sources of fuel, and greater fuel

efficiency. Required too is increasing community

participation and encouragement of individual

entrepreneurs of all ages, male and female.

Developing local economies provides incentives

for continuing education and feeds the process

of continuing and sustainable development for

all.

There is indeed a revolution brewing in the High

Atlas, one that is fueling development and making it possible for local people to build the future they envision

for themselves—the Near East Foundation mission. “I have to say that the work being done in the High Atlas

by the NEF team is some of the best that I have seen in my career. They really are promoting a revolution in

education and laying the base for economic recovery…I truly believe that,” emphatically commented NEF

Regional Director Roger Hardister.

Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott


AGFUND Prize Acceptance Remarks

Ryan LaHurd, President, Near East Foundation

Tunis, 15 December 2004

irst I offer thanks to the Arab Gulf Programme for United Nations Development Organizations

(AGFUND) and to its president HRH Prince Talal Bin Abdul Aziz Al Saud for honoring our project and

sponsoring a prize which recognizes that good work is being done in support of international

development objectives and that such work deserves to be held up and honored. The encouragement this

award gives to organizations like the Near East Foundation and those of my colleagues here is especially

important in an international environment which generally maintains that development efforts are

unsuccessful.

"I would like to thank our supportive partner and funder of the project, The Sawiris Foundation for Social

Development. The Sawiris Foundation and NEF's Cairo-based Center for Development Services worked

closely throughout in planning and development, showing how donor organizations can be intimately

involved throughout a project. I also pay tribute and offer appreciation to the staff of the Near East

Foundation who developed and carried out the project. They are committed to the philosophy which has

guided the Near East Foundation since its beginnings 90 years ago when it began as America's response to

the humanitarian crisis facing Armenian, Arab, Persian, Greek and Turkish refugees in the period of World

War I and its aftermath. At that time America's citizens, not its government, took responsibility for rescue and

relief efforts among these people they did not know and formed the organization that became the Near East

Foundation. NEF's founders understood that to create a lasting solution to human need, more than relief

efforts are required. The Near East Foundation pioneered an approach they called 'practical citizen

philanthropy.' By this they meant assisting people to gain the skills and resources they need to help build

their own better future, using an approach that seeks partnership and equality with no sense of domination

or superiority. It is this approach the Near East Foundation has continued to use throughout its history and

still employs, one which encourages participation of the people we seek to assist and listens to their needs

and plans, treating them with the dignity and respect they deserve.

"The reward of this approach is not only that the projects we work on together are more likely to be successful

but, in the process, we build friendships and we build human beings. Our staff has seen repeatedly over the

years that dealing with people as dignified and honorable equals builds their capacity more than any training

sessions or educational programs.

"The project for which the Near


East Foundation won the

AGFUND International Prize for

Pioneering Development

Projects for 2004, enhancing

nursing as a career in Upper

Egypt, offers a perfect example.

Three years ago when the Near

East Foundation started working

at nursing sector development

with the Swairis Foundation,

there were 170 applicants for

Aswan's six nursing schools

compared with this year's 535.

Immediate employment in

public health facilities has been found by 398 new nurses; and 443 new nursing jobs, including 74 for

nursing teachers and supervisors, have been created. While the project had many components, a key to its

success was our ability to enhance the sense of dignity and respect that accrued to the career of nursing and

therefore to the people who chose it as a career.

"Besides the most important aspect of this project—the enhancement of the lives of the women involved—I

ask all of you to consider another aspect: that a positive impact on the lives of even hundreds of people is a

worthy goal and should be encouraged. Looking at the overwhelming need in our world, too many people

regard as worthwhile only projects which affect millions. Hence they often conclude that the work of

organizations like the Near East Foundation is luxury. But every human life is of great value. And every

effort which enhances a human life is an important success. I ask your continuing support of work like ours,

and again I thank the AGFUND for recognizing its value and honoring the dedicated staff who commit their

lives to such work."

ear East Foundation moved from its mid-Manhattan offices the first of the year, taking advantage of the

end of its lease to benefit from financial incentives designed to attract occupancy downtown in the

aftermath of the World Trade Center tragedy. Rental costs were cut nearly in half while square footage

remains about the same at our newly renovated 90 Broad Street, 15th floor location in lower Manhattan’s

Financial District. It is convenient to public transportation for both staff and visitors; and a short walk from

historic Bowling Green park with its view of the Hudson River and Statue of Liberty.

Anwar Samad was named Chief Financial Officer. A native of

Bangladesh, he previously worked in finance for international

assistance organizations, including Counterpart International, involved

in social entrepreneurship, and InterAction, the alliance of US-based

international development and humanitarian nongovernmental

organizations, which includes NEF.

Anwar graduated with a bachelor’s degree in business administration

from Baruch College of the City University of New York, where he

majored in finance and computer information systems and minored in

accounting. He holds an M.B.A. in bank administration from St. John’s

University, and has completed most requirements for a second M.B.A.

with a major in accounting from Pace University. Both schools are in

New York City. He is also licensed in mutual funds, real estate, income tax preparation and has obtained

certificates in health care management, travel/tourism and other areas.

The NEF museum exhibition that debuted at the Museum of the City of New York in 2003, “Near East/New

York: The Near East Foundation and American Philanthropy,” toured to the West Coast, opening in October

at the Doheny Memorial Library of the University of Southern California. The NEF exhibition was on view

through January.

In October NEF partnered with ArteEast--


a nonprofit promoting the art and culture

of the Middle East and its diaspora--for

the premiere screenings of two

documentary films, one Palestinian, the

other Israeli. “Hopefully for the Best”

(2004) by Raed Helou portrays Ramallah

during the tense winter before the US-

Iraq war. “Mashallah” (2004) by Eytan

Harris was inspired by the brutal murders

of two cab drivers three days apart in

Jerusalem--the first an Israeli Jew, the

second a Palestinian and the absent subject of the film. The films provoked a lively, at times passionate,

post-screening discussion, which followed responses by NEF President Ryan LaHurd and Aissa Deebi,

ArteEast’s visual arts director.

The line went around the block for the February joint Near East

Foundation-New York University Middle East Studies Department

event. Participants filled all seats, and unfortunately the

Greenwich Village theatre could not accommodate all who

wanted to attend. The overflow audience came for a screening of

the documentary film, “Control Room,” about the Al Jazeera

television network, the Arab world’s most powerful broadcaster at

work during the Iraq war. It was followed by a roundtable

discussion including the film’s director, Jehane Noujaim, and

producers Rosadel Varela and Hani Salama. They were joined

by Jay Rosen of NYU’s journalism department and Khaled Fahmy

of Middle East/Islamic studies. “Why did you do it?” asked a

member of the audience. “Our hope is that this film will give

people a window into a different perspective”…”that people will

question the media”…”gain an independent way of thought,”

responded the three women filmmakers in turn.

In May NEF partnered with the Bard Program on Globalization

and International Affairs, to present noted authority and

commentator Fawaz A. Gerges, who spoke about the future of

Middle East security. He is professor of international affairs and Middle Eastern studies at Sarah Lawrence

College, and author of the new book, “The Jihadists.”

In the fall the NEF website www.neareast.org was

redesigned for a sharper look and easier maneuvering with

an ever increasing frequency of new postings—and steadily

gained more daily average visitors over the following

months. The NEF annual report became an entirely on-line

publication for the first time.

With generous funding by Antranig and Varsenne

Sarkissian, a portable NEF exhibition was created, featuring

seven panels about NEF’s history and one on present

projects. It was first used in October in South Pasadena, CA,

at the Armenian National Committee of American, Western

Region event, where NEF received the organization’s 2004

Freedom Award; again in February when NEF was among

honorees for the Armenian Genocide commemorative

“International Relief, Refuge and Recognition Tribute”

luncheon in Los Angeles; and in April for the Congressional

Armenian Genocide Observance held on Capitol Hill in

Washington, D.C.


In conjunction with NEF’s 90th anniversary year, a comprehensive three-part series of articles on our history,

evolution, past and current projects, and influence was widely featured in the Armenian American press and

excerpted in Arab American magazines such as “Islamic Horizons.” An NEF anniversary announcement ran

in “Washington Report on Middle Eastern Affairs,” a widely read magazine with an Arab American audience

of 100,000; also in a prominent Armenian weekly, “The Armenian Reporter,” in Armenian Genocide

commemorative issues in April.

In both an individual mailing and placement on the web, NEF promoted planned giving as a way for our

supporters to meet personal financial goals while simultaneously contributing to NEF. Planned giving to

NEF provides important benefits by allowing our donors to fulfill philanthropic interests today—making a gift

that will both have a long-term impact and provide opportunities to reduce personal taxes. Long-time

supporter William Z. Cline, who has NEF in his will, gave his strong, personal endorsement to NEF’s planned

giving program.

Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott


or a brief time, despair in the Abou Shouk–El Fashir refugee camp faded and life seemed almost normal

for people who feel preyed upon by all sides, caught up in a cruel conflict, with forced displacement of

civilians, mass killings, burned villages, abducted women, stolen cattle, rape, and other grave crimes

commonplace in this war-scarred region of Sudan. So far violence, hunger and disease have claimed up to

300,000 lives, according to United Nations sources, while a further two million people have been forced from

their homes.

Despite extreme risk for humanitarian

personnel, Near East Foundation's

Sudan administrator Mohamed Ali

successfully delivered 50 sheep,

purchased for the special occasion of

the Eid Al-Adha celebrations, the holiest

in the Islamic religious calendar. The

feast commemorates Abraham's near

sacrifice of his son and subsequent

slaughter of a sheep instead. The Near

East Foundation joined in the Eid Al-

Adha celebrations with camp residents,

most of whom had lost not only their

homes and livelihoods, but family and

friends as well.

Abou Fashir is comprised of 22 blocks

with about 500 people in each; and an average of three sheep were allocated to each block and the meat

shared, in keeping with the custom for this occasion. NEF was the only non-Islamic, Western agency

participating in the feast with local people in Darfur. Mohamed Ali reported back:

"It was very rewarding to see the impact of these gifts on the families and in particular on the children who

have suffered so much. We learned that this is the first time that such gifts have been distributed in the area,

with most agencies preferring distribution in the larger towns and villages rather than the camps, which are

more chaotic and less easy to deal with. Both local officials as well as camp residents welcomed the

initiative of Near East Foundation and extended a heart-felt welcome to continue to work with people in the

area."


Then he contributed this personal note: "I would like to say that although due to the travel I was not able to

be with my own family and children during the feast, I feel privileged and glad that I was able to contribute to

the happiness of so many others in this area, who have been so severely affected by recent conflicts and

tribal feuds. Rest assured that however small this effort may seem in comparison to the need, we did

something positive to help people and to let them know that someone cares about them and shares with

them during this important holiday season." He returned in early February and distributed thousands of

dollars of emergency medicines and blankets.

eople appreciate help on special occasions and emergencies—and we offer such help, but what they

really want and need most is the kind of long-term development assistance the Near East Foundation is

all about. For it is the underlying insecurity, poverty, disease, ignorance, environmental degradation,

and lack of economic opportunity, that create conditions hostile to peace and stability.

From the beginning, NEF’s work in Sudan has provided funds and training to increase the skills of Sudanese,

who often lack only the expertise or experience to implement the initiatives they have in mind. At the World

Bank's request, NEF helped launch and coordinate the first Ethiopia-Sudan Development Marketplace, a

competition showcasing innovative ideas for development and poverty reduction. NEF promoted and eased

Sudanese participation in the marketplace, where 20 Sudanese organizations secured funding. With

Sudan's land-based people, we have labored in fish farming, bee-keeping, rangeland rehabilitation and

much more.

But deserving of particular mention, one of NEF's

early publications in Arabic was an extensive case

study of micro-credit in Port Sudan back in the

1980s, and that long history of providing training

and capital for micro-credit continues. NEF set up

two programs in the Abou Hamid area, 350 km

north of the capital of Khartoum. Even for the

visually impaired, a very special challenge

requiring adaptation of all our materials and

techniques, for an association of more than 60

young adults and heads of households. The socalled

"popsicle lady" from Tyba Kababish in

northern Sudan, graphically demonstrates the

difference a $200 loan can make in a human

destiny.

Her house is mud brick, a couple of small, spare,

clean rooms with a bed of tree branches and

woven support for a thin mattress. Outside, the

garden space between the house and surrounding mud wall features a few flowers and some herbs and

peppers planted in dirt-filled, powdered-milk cans. This starkly simple home is also her business location

and makes possible the feeding, clothing, and education of the children of this widow and sole support of a

large family.

The enterprise was her idea. She borrowed the equivalent of $200 and bought a refrigerator with a freezer.

Every evening she fills small plastic bags with flavored juice, and freezes them overnight. In midmorning she

puts them in the orange insulated cooler atop the refrigerator, and heads off to the nearby elementary school

where the children buy them as recess-time treats. The pennies add up and she makes a living by dent of

her evident ingenuity, hard work, and the small loan—repaid in less than a year—and made possible

through NEF’s program.

NEF is now working with the International Fund for Agricultural Development to enhance Sudanese

resiliency to drought, food security, and income generation in two western Sudan states. Beneficiaries are

the small farmers, livestock keepers, workers and artisans, who comprise 90 percent of the rural population

with average annual incomes of only $100 to $150. Previously NEF partnered with the Global Environmental

Facility to support 20 community-based credit funds in the same area in 2001. With this new project, NEF is

connecting with local groups to help establish effective credit for small enterprises and income-generating

opportunities.


To make that possible, this spring NEF’s Jordan

staff organized a study tour for 16 Sudanese

officers of the traditional, informal, village saving

and credit sanduqs. The sanduqs offer the

advantages of use by illiterate villagers, low cost

servicing, and built in social pressure for

repayment. NEF is helping to develop these

sanduqs with organizational and management

support, loan policies and procedures, and grants

up to $20,000. A 15-day workshop was held in

Jordan, using participatory techniques, case

studies and other methods, including field visits to

two micro-financing companies and two

community-based credit programs established in

the south of Jordan with NEF support. Dr. Souliaman Ajeb, Director General of Sudan’s Ministry of

Agriculture/State of Kordofan North, accompanied the sanduq representatives on the study trip.

Also NEF introduced credit facilities in New Dar El-Salaam El-Rabwa to reinforce its reproductive health

program with income-generating activities that supplement family income, improve nutrition, and increase

access to health services. Again, to broaden the scope of training for the community-run, micro-credit fund,

NEF called upon its Jordan staff and technical specialists from NEF-Egypt.

After 30 months of very hard work to provide, affordable, quality reproductive health care to displaced

Sudanese living outside the capital city of Khartoum—there is a fully operational health clinic, made possible

by a grant from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and with NEF support. It is the only health center

available for the entire settlement of about 35-45,000 people fleeing Sudan's internal conflicts, drought and

other difficulties.

Their health is jeopardized by both poverty and the

environment in which they live. Malaria and endemic

diseases rank the main causes of illness and death

with high maternal and infant mortality and a fertility

rate of 5.4 children per women. National family

planning is estimated at only 9.9 percent because of

lack of information and misconceptions about risks; and

an estimated 82 percent of Sudanese women have

undergone female genital mutilation. Further,

reproductive health problems, sexually transmitted

disease and HIV/AIDS are growing at unprecedented

rates—and the Sudanese Ministry of Health has put

AIDS at the top of its agenda.

By the first of the year, the NEF clinic had treated over

33,000 patients since opening in September, and

nearly another 30,500 in the past six months. In

addition to general health services—diagnosis, primary

health care, laboratory tests and a pharmacy, the clinic

emphasizes reproductive health care, including family planning, prenatal and postnatal care, attracting more

than 800 patients for these new services in the past six months. In 2005 NEF was able to expand services to

include labor and delivery as well as advanced laboratory work, thanks to a grant from the Population

Council. This extension involves designing a health management information system and establishing a

sustainable pricing model for reproductive health care in low-income areas. All clinic services are offered at

nominal fees to enhance access.

Given the kinds of health problems encountered by clinic staff, there was a strong need for increased

community awareness, particularly about reproductive health and sexually transmitted diseases. So NEF

responded with an outreach program teaching both primary and reproductive health care. Women have

been trained in nutrition and hygiene, as midwives and home visitors, benefiting nearly 4,000 families.

There’s even the possibility of micro-health insurance. Also, the NEF project has helped local residents to

plan, manage and network within their own community, government and non-governmental organizations,


for the services they need, including a severe shortage of clean, potable water for the rapidly-growing

population of the settlement and roofing and equipping the local school.

And all that effort is very appreciated. “We used to travel a long distance to El-Hajj Youssef area just to get

even the most basic medications,” said one member of her new village health committee, “We can now get

them at cheaper prices at the NEF health center.” “This is my fourth pregnancy, but the first time I follow up

with a doctor,” said a visitor to the Center for Pregnancy. “I used to call the midwife only when the labor pains

came. Now I know how important it is to maintain a proper diet and healthy life-style during pregnancy. The

friendly staff at the health center have taught us many things about having and raising health children,” she

added.

On the official side, the Sudanese Ministry of

Health’s North Khartoum Health Team Director

summed up the prevailing opinion: “The NEF

center offers high-quality services at very low-cost

prices…services provided have contributed

considerably to improving the health situation. Our

entire team highly appreciates the valuable

services NEF is offering to the Dar El-Salaam

community.”

Clearly delivering sheep to Sudan to provide meat

for a religious feast is just one piece in the Near

East Foundation’s multi-faceted approach to

bolstering human dignity. Over this year NEF

continued to invest in the people of Sudan for their

long-term development and well being, building a people's sense of their possibilities and supporting their

priorities.

Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott


athy Gau, Near East Foundation Country Director for Swaziland, has lived there for over 20 years, in

fact has dual American and Swazi citizenship, which helps account for her commanding grasp of both

local issues and national character. Ms. Gau directs Vusumnotfo, a community organization begun by

NEF, which translates to “restarting the economy,” and employs a range of approaches from early childhood

education on through business development, to build individual and organizational capacity so Swazi

communities can responsibly and effectively pursue development. About 50,000 people in 18 chiefdoms

participate in Vusumnotfo. Ms. Gau made these observations during a home-for-the-holidays visit:

Business Development —“Swaziland doesn’t have to be poor,” she said of a country where the main

industries are sugar and forestry, the culture authoritarian, and life harder than in 1983 when AIDS struck.

Working with local associations to enhance business opportunities, “We look at the psychological issues

first. I tell them—‘We want you to make mistakes, business is about risks.’ Swazi culture wants to please, so

this is very radical.” Given a little start up money, eight weeks, and the challenge of making a profit, the

groups develop pilot projects and, “They get smart fast. I see slow, but steady progress.”

Early Childhood Education —“People are so hungry for it,” she said. Vusumnotfo started a model preschool,

provides in-service teacher training, and has been assigned a teacher by the government’s Ministry

of Education. “But with the kids playing games and having fun…parents don’t think we’re being serious,”

which led to a major undertaking, a manual on the physical, mental, and social development of children,

titled “Growing Children Straight and Strong.”

Social Development —Citing domestic water supply as but one example of Vusumnotfo’s contribution to

community well-being—given routine daily “fetching” requires nine-and-a-half hours per household in

addition to important implications for HIV, sanitation, convenience, the environment, and more—“But before

we do water, we have to do a lot of education.”

Status of Women —“The legal standing of a married woman is that she is a minor of her husband,” she said,

telling a lot in a single sentence, then adding, “Once a group of Swazi women get empowered, my advice is

to get out of their way.”

HIV/AIDS —“The most effective HIV education is in pre-puberty.” Vusumnotfo advocates HIV testing; current

US policy against providing condoms is “very detrimental," and orphanages are needed by only the 10

percent who have no alternative and cannot be accommodated by their community. “I am seeing slow

indications of behavioral change,” she gestured a tiny space between her thumb and forefinger, “but it won’t

show up in the statistics.” A shocking 39 percent of the country’s adults are infected with HIV—the highest


prevalence rate in the world.

he Near East Foundation was overseeing a beekeeping project under the Swaziland Ministry of

Agriculture and Cooperatives during the harsh 1991-92 drought, when the National Disaster Task

Force coordinated the distribution of food and water through various nongovernmental organizations,

including NEF. As a follow up to food distribution, homesteads were given the wherewithal to plant a half

hector of maize—with the provision they return a bag of maize at the end of the growing season.

In June 1993, 92 percent of the homesteads

overseen by NEF had returned their maize, which

was subsequently sold at a profit of about $11,300.

Rather than dividing these funds for projects within

each of their communities, the traditional leaders

decided to work together, and in December 1995,

agreed upon a constitution governing the funds.

Following a lengthy internal process—which

included substantial capacity building by NEF—a

redrafted constitution was authorized in September

1999. Vusumnotfo had been established and since

then has concentrated on three areas—business

development at the community level; civil society

and social development; and early childhood

development.

Very importantly, problems related to the country’s

HIV/AIDS situation are mainstreamed throughout these programs:

Business development activities increase income available to rural households, mitigating the impact of

HIV on families and communities.

Early childhood development activities help insure that children, particularly those orphaned and

vulnerable, meet age-appropriate milestones, making them more resilient to the impact of HIV/AIDS in

their families; less vulnerable to HIV/AIDS in later years; better functioning adults able to met

responsibilities.

Improved understanding from best practices in early childhood development provide a foundation for

community support for orphaned and vulnerable children.

Emergence of strengthened community-based organizations in turn empower entire communities to

organize and address their HIV/AIDS situation on multiple fronts. Similarly social committees are better

able to implement and sustain social services for their communities.

Also, Vusumnotfo conducted several surveys related to HIV and is well positioned for future social

research in communities served.

These points are vitally relevant in a region of the world where AIDS has caused average life expectancy to

drop to age 40 or less and population is declining. The economy and social fabric is deteriorating due to the

loss of women and men in their most productive years. There is a dramatic rise in the number of orphans.

And the proportion of people living in extreme poverty has continued to grow for 20 years.

In July the NEF project completed a monumental childhood education task underway for two years, the

publication of the community training manual, “Growing Children Straight and Strong.” A copy of the

parenting and early childhood development manual was distributed to all 14 partner organizations with

UNICEF, the funder, getting a CD Rom as well.

It was immediately put to productive use over the following months. Fifty-nine key people representing a

cross section of gender, age and area, as well as a number of partner organizations, both in and out of

government, were trained in the basic concepts of early childhood education; as were 37 other selected

caregivers. The manual also facilitated follow up HIV testing as requested.

Every opportunity was seized upon to train the


community at large in early childhood development—

National Women’s Day, the traditional July 7 reed dance,

on through the NEF project’s participation as facilitator

and secretariat in the development of a national

curriculum for psycho-social support in Swaziland.

Partners included the deputy prime minister’s office,

UNICEF, government ministries of public health, health

and social welfare, the regional education inspector for

preschools, and a number of nongovernmental

organizations, particularly those involved with HIV.

General in-service training for preschool

practitioners extended to 43 practitioners and 39

preschools, involving more than 1,250 children.

Training ranged from art making and volunteer

counseling and testing, on through when death

touches a child, kitchen gardens and speech and

hearing problems, and HIV-related topics like

supporting terminally ill people and mother-to-child

transmission and antiviral drugs. Also 194

monitoring days of applied knowledge at the

preschool level were held and 203 preschool visits

conducted. Twenty-one

teachers from 10 Vusumnotfo areas attended an

August workshop on early identification and

intervention of learning disabilities; and 45

preschool practitioners the two-session, September workshop on “understanding myself.”

Happily by year’s end the community of Lomshiyo was 75 percent along in obtaining matching funding to

construct a preschool, using the low cost $6,250 design prepared by the NEF project. Two other

communities were talking about it—the necessary first step. The structure includes two classrooms, storage,

teacher’s corner, common area, and with outside structures and play equipment added, can be built for about

$12,650.

Simultaneously Vusumnotfo’s business development program aimed to establish sustainable incomegenerating

initiatives at the community level through capacity training, resource allocation, and assessment

at each step of the way.

A total of 81 days of group formation training

within the community at large were held for

209 participants— 22 percent male and 78

percent female; seven existing associations

received training to strengthen their

organizations; and 10 meeting were held with

community trainers and three more with team

leaders. In-service training included provision

of supplies and funds to learn skills like hair

dressing, catering, driving, and computers.

Cutting through the numbers, here’s just one

example of an initial project development

workshop held in February that involved six

associations and in many ways summarizes

the issues facing grassroots Swaziland. There

were 61 members present—23 percent male and 77 percent female—with an average age of 49. Of their 88

total dependents, 35 were under the age of 20. Six members had immediate family who had died in the past

12 months; and 25 percent of members had taken in children, both family and non-family, during the past


three years. So it is in a country with the highest HIV infection rate in the world.

Technical support, working materials and tools were provided to five associations. That meant grants of

about $1,800 for the purchase of chickens after each member had built a shed from locally available

materials and for the stocking of an association’s new store; water feasibility studies for other associations

and capacity training for yet another needing help after getting financial support for a garden project…and on

the list goes.

Similarly social development at the

community level translated to the specifics

and diversity of rehabilitating a Lomshiyo

shed into a community hall for the

Lomshiyo Area Development Committee,

compiling a list of all local homesteads,

then linking and grouping them for a future

water system, and obtaining a grant from

the Finland Embassy for roofing of a

classroom block for their new school; on

through completing a domestic water

system for the Nkonjanani community of

982 people in 86 homesteads, with 95

kitchens, and 78 percent coverage of pit

latrines and 48 percent coverage of

rubbish pits.

It may not be glamorous but Vusumnotfo

is improving the daily lives of thousands

of Swazis. “What I love about NEF is that

you see human behavior for what it is—an untidy process that bumps along at an up-and-down rate,”

commented NEF’s well-experienced country director, adding, “The most you can hope for is that the overall

progression is angled upward…. Really, there is no ‘them and us’—it only looks like a cleaner process in the

United States because we are at a higher level than where Africa is at.”

Editor: Andrea M. Couture • Designer: Ellen Scott


he West Bank village Al-Bathan has big problems, according to Mayor Mohammed Salahat, who heads

the village council, only two years old and limited in resources. About 3,000 people live in Al-Bathan’s

scattering of houses and small landholdings, averaging two-to-three dunums. Unemployment is a

staggering 60 percent, since so many residents have lost jobs in Israel. But the youngish, serious-eyed

mayor peering through his glasses, has a vision for his community of something better.

On the up side, the large map in his office shows the locations of seven natural springs in the village,

producing 5.5 million cubic meters of water a year, and a system of canals—making the Al-Bathan area

green all year round and full of tourism potential. There are now seven small initiatives underway, he said,

including restaurant development, swimming pools, cafes and private water parks for this region abundant

with ancient history, vibrant culture, scenic landscapes and other attractions. A traditional Palestinian picnic

spot, 500,000 visitors came each year before the Intifada, but despite such success, tourism wasn’t well

planned, he added, and lacked appropriate infrastructure even before the economy suffered its current

drastic decline.

Now the mayor is lobbying the Palestinian National Authority and nongovernmental organizations for help

with proper planning. He attended a recent tourism forum held in Nablus on just where new facilities should

be located, and has established a good working relationship with Al Najah National University in Nablus and

its resources. The mayor is encouraged and now is looking beyond local tourism to Al-Bathan’s national

potential. Since Palestinians no longer have ready access to the Mediterranean, he says, Al-Bathan and its

beautiful natural environs become a major recreational resource ripe for development.

In 1998 a local pediatrician and a village mayor together

contacted the Near East Foundation office in the West Bank. Dr.

Hashem El Sholi and then-Mayor Assad Sawalmah from the

village of Asira Al-Shamaliya north of Nablus were concerned

about the increasing incidence of waterborne disease among

children in the area. To prevent further outbreaks, help was

needed. From these initial meetings began a long, productive

partnership between NEF and an ever growing number of

supporters--the Asira Municipality, local councils from 13 villages

in the surrounding area, and more than 30,000 area residents.

That relationship continues today and remains the strong core of

NEF’s 2004-05 programs in the West Bank serving a “cluster” of villages: Asira Al-Shamaliya, Sabastiya,

Bayt Imrin, Nisif Jubail, Burqa, Bazzariya, Al-Naqura, Dayr Sharaf, Yasid, Ajansiniya, Bathan, Taluzza, Bayt

Iba, and Zawata.


Initially, cooperation focused on the development of a common vision for the entire cluster area, addressing

basic needs while seeking longer-term solutions to endemic economic and social problems. Schools were

overcrowded and health services inadequate; water and sanitation in need of repair and expansion; garbage

collection sporadic with few available dumping sites. In particular, illegal roadside dumping and the burning

of toxic wastes were affecting health conditions throughout the area. Also, family incomes were low and

opportunities for jobs scarce in a society characterized by a young and growing population.

For NEF and its partners these were immediate priorities, yet to address them meant more long-term

approaches: human development, institutional capacity building, and more business-like planning and

service delivery. This in turn required effective leadership, good governorance, and informed citizen

participation. In short, to assure sustainability of any improvements made, there was a need for a delicate

balancing act between long-term development needs and short-term priorities.

As is often the case, reality overtook planning. Economic and social conditions quickly deteriorated given

mounting political pressures of the second Intifada, and NEF’s focus shifted from the long-term to simply

“what’s possible with what we’ve got.”

Local economies downslided. Laborers once accustomed to good salaries, no longer were allowed to cross

into Israel, and agriculture no longer an option for the majority of these young men. Education was

interrupted. Freedom of movement was restricted and often dangerous, affecting the ability of employees to

reach their work in the West Bank; also preventing producers from obtaining raw materials and from

transporting goods to local markets. Local councils, struggling to cope with declining economic conditions,

were strapped for cash, and despite often valiant efforts, generally unable to cope with emerging conditions.

International assistance downturned as the political situation deteriorated further, and donor assistance

increasingly focused on emergencies and relief operations.

Despite all, the Near East Foundation

continued to build its relationship with local

municipalities in the “cluster,” bringing relief

while establishing a base for future, long-term

projects. We did all we could—and frankly

accomplished a good deal. The Near East

Foundation Consortium of NEF and its

contributors, international partners and project

sponsors, provided assistance to families in

need, supported and encouraged school

attendance, sponsored summer camps, and

encouraged community participation in

environmental education and clean-up

campaigns. The consortium helped pay

mounting utility costs for local families and small

businesses; supported several self-help initiatives for women and youth; planned and raised funds for local

infrastructure and water projects; and shared in community celebration of special events. All this was done

in collaboration with local councils and civil society organizations, with many others throughout Palestine

joining the efforts.

As a result and even during the height of the Intifada, more than 1,000 children and their families were

involved in special programs for “Helping Kids Cope” under conditions of continuing stress and violence.

Over 2,500 children benefited from NEF provision of teaching materials and school supplies for children,

along with very important nutritional supplements through our “Cup of Milk” project. Building upon last year’s

success and responding to the requests of the six participating communities, this year packages of dairy

products went to the entire family, not just to kindergarten children—particularly helpful to the poorest. All 17

kindergartens received the milk, white and yellow cheese, and other local dairy products such as

pasteurized lebaneh.

Indicative of local enthusiasm for “Cup of Milk,” there was absolutely no absenteeism on distribution dates.

Family contributions to the program—about $9, 25 percent of total costs—were easily collected in their

entirety in the first month. Building upon evident parental support, this year NEF launched a health and

nutrition awareness program for the mothers of participating children, attracting 440 women to the

workshops. Also the local dairy industry benefited. The Al-Safa Dairy Plant in Nablus, for example, had an

important new outlet for its products during a difficult economic period of generally low sales, assuring


continued employment for its workers and the 250 small farmers in turn dependant upon the factory for their

livelihoods. Tetra Pac Inc. also is assisting the NEF program, funded by Human Concern International.

New classrooms were built onto existing schools

and in some villages, playgrounds and toilet

facilities added. In Asira Al-Shamaliya an

amphitheater was constructed with an added play

area and cafeteria, now venues for local

celebrations and community events. A new folkloric

troupe nurtured along by NEF, now performs in the

amphitheater and at weddings and other

celebrations, building up pride and identity.

“Emphasis on traditional culture, folklore, and

language is essential for holding societies together

in difficult times such as Palestinians now face,”

commented NEF Regional Director Roger

Hardister.

With NEF project development and proposal writing

assistance, the poorest of the poor in the village of

Yasid got clean, potable drinking water this year,

and workers in the area gainful employment while

making that possible. Funded by a grant from the

Welfare Association, the largest Palestinian nongovernmental

organization, 20 water cisterns were dug. NEF worked closely with the local village council to

develop transparent and accountable selection criteria. In addition, local workers benefited from the 900

working days needed to build the cisterns and an average income gain of $13,500.

Also, NEF partnered with the national Palestinian association working with youth, Taawon Cooperation for

Conflict Resolution, on boosting the infrastructure and programming of three youth organizations in Nablus,

hopefully the pilot for an even bigger youth program now in the planning stage, also financed by the Welfare

Association through World Bank Assistance.

The 10-month, nearly $100,000 project included the renovation of three youth centers, three sport halls, three

Internet cafes and libraries, and four management programs and workshops, benefiting around 600 young

people. “The emphasis is on financial sustainability over the long term,” said NEF-West Bank Country

Director Tarek Z. Abdel Ghany Kotob, “designing recreational and sports activities on a fee-for-service or cost

recovery system.”

With such assistance, large and small and throughout the “cluster,” NEF has been instrumental in creating

new institutions and strengthening others. These developments, while clearly positive in themselves, all

have a much bigger role to play as conditions in the area become more stable and long-term plans come on

line.

A case in point and in consonance with the larger vision

with which NEF and the residents of the cluster area began

their collaboration years ago--the preparation of a landfill

site is well underway, benefiting more than 3,500

households. The large, up-to-code site, complete with

electricity and water needed for cleaning and composing,

has been built by the municipality of Asira. Also, five village

councils have signed on, sharing costs and benefits, and

determining the fines to be paid for violations of their new

system. Roadside dumps are to be cleared in cooperation

with local councils and illegal dumping ordinances are now

being enforced.

Further, NEF’s Environmental Action Program (EAP) has

established a system of garbage collection and sorting at the household level; providing for timely transfer of

sorted garbage to the project dumpsite; identifying viable markets for recycled products; and separating and

sorting refuse to meet the demands of recycling. In summary and no small feat, NEF’s environmental

program is providing jobs, improving sanitation, increasing health, encouraging voluntarism, developing

local leadership, and instilling project management skills. Indeed, many consider it a model for future solid


waste disposal for the entire West Bank.

Some Environmental Action Program facts straight

from the grassroots include the following this year.

Comprehensive, 50-hour, training courses held for

80 male and female volunteers, focusing on solid

waste management, sorting, collecting and

composting, as well as community leadership and

collaboration, communications and reporting.

Equipped with this information, they became the

core of a much larger volunteer effort to build

community awareness, in all kinds of ways,

including house-to-house visits along the town’s

streets, advocating the sorting of organic and

inorganic waste, just one for-instance. NEF field

staff closely monitored the progress and

development of these volunteer groups to sustain

their environmental services and are at work

forming new youth groups. Targeting the sweepers

in particular, collection employees in the five villages were trained about solid waste’s deleterious impact on

the environment and in new sorting, collecting, and disposal techniques at three workshops and four

additional meetings.

Among many other events designed to focus attention on the environment, the Asira community planned,

launched, and directed clean-up campaigns, some attracting more than 240 participants—people of all

ages, involved and volunteering. They collected waste, cleaned streets and illegal dumping sites, painted,

distributed new waste bins, and generally worked together to make their environment a better place to live—

plus promoted their cause with the placement of 2,000 posters and 1,000 stickers.

Providing education without necessary resources only creates frustration. So NEF arranged for such

elementary equipment as brooms and shovels for street cleaning, on through arousing community pressure

that led to increased frequency of weekly waste collection, accomplished by new tractors and trolleys—

thanks to NEF. Also, there are now environmentally-friendly and educational play gardens for children, a

creative kids’ corners, mothers fitness center, among other small but helpful happenings.

Agriculture and animal husbandry are key for an economic revival in many parts of the “cluster” and NEF is

working with local authorities on plans to increase the number of livestock and boost dairy product

production. Already underway is NEF’s rehabilitation of the area’s olive industry and encouragement of a

wide variety of related income-generating activities.

To assure long-term sustainability,

however, there is a need for something

larger. NEF and its partners envision a

tourist route through the “cluster,”

beginning in neighboring Nablus, the

so-called “Gateway City,” known for its

historical core and traditional markets.

From there the route would wind its way

through one of the most beautiful

natural areas in the West Bank, with a

varied landscape of rolling hills, small

forests, orchards, and water parks,

amidst picturesque villages mixing traditional and modern buildings, open-air restaurants, and historic sites.

Such attractions already are a magnet for local tourists and the hope is for many regional and international

visitors in the future.

NEF’s involvement in the “cluster” has demonstrated without doubt the strong commitment of local leaders to

good governance; and these same local councils are now moving beyond their individual concerns to form a

Joint Services Council. This in turn will provide the legal status necessary to move forward with larger


cooperative efforts as well as the vehicle to attract international funding. To support this development, NEF is

planning a pilot project promoting good governance, encouraging greater transparency, and providing a

platform for broader participation by local residents and civil society institutions in their government.

In short, NEF’s involvement with these West Bank villages exemplifies common economic problems and

social concerns creating shared solutions. We think our “cluster” approach has clearly demonstrated more

options, increased cost effectiveness, and helped assure sustainability. For all that we thank our partners in

2004-05 for their support in making it all possible: United Nations Volunteers (UNV), Human Concern

International (HCI), Mercy International (MI), the World Assembly of Moslem Youth (WAMY), Flora Family

Foundation, and Mosaic Foundation.

While NEF is an international development

organization, we understand the importance of

traditional feast days—and their spirit of charity and

community. As the 2004 Ramadan began, 250

food packages containing 16 nutritious foods

cheered impoverished Palestinian families. Need

was determined by the numbers of children and

orphans, the sick and elderly, the unemployed and

those families unable to maintain a minimum

income level. The mid-October distributed was

initiated by NEF in cooperation with Mercy

International and Human Concern International,

and with the participation of local municipal

governments and Islamic charity committees in the

West Bank villages selected by the number of

inhabitants. In addition, the Ramadan food

packages inspired yet more generosity, for

example, the municipality of Asira and their village Islamic charity committee provided another 200 food

packages for the needy.

A few months later, again joined by its partners, NEF saw to it that nearly a thousand of the poorest “cluster”

families received the Eid Al-Adha feast day they deserved. Widows, orphans, unemployed, those with

special needs received meat packages along with a “Happy Eid” card and the good wishes of the NEF

consortium supporting integrated development in their villages. For Sa’ed Mashaki, a young boy from the

village of Yasid, whose unemployed father had not been able to buy meat for many feasts past--this was a

real family celebration.

Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott


(Gifts from July 1, 2004 - June 30, 2005)

DODGE CIRCLE

($10,000 and over)

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($2,500 - $4,999)

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SPONSORS

($1,000 - $2,499)

Anonymous

Anonymous

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Rutherford

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Development

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Mr. Paul Jorjorian

Mr. Sean F. Julian

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Kabrielian

Anahid and Vertanes Kalayjian

Mr. Elmer Kaprielian

Mr. Stefan Karadian

Mr. Haig Kartounian

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kasbarian

Josephine and Anthony Paragano

Michael and Mary Paul

Mrs. Ruth R. Pease

Mr. and Mrs. William W. Pease

Ms. Frances C. Perito

Lisa L. and Terry R. Perkins

Mr. Albert J. Perri

Mr. and Mrs. Victor E. Peters

( in memory of Dr. James C. Moomaw)

Mr. Carl H. Pforzheimer

Joanne Phelan

Ms. Anna Picone

Mr. and Mrs. Pouzant Piranian

Vincent P. and Carolyn D. Pisculli

Mr. Allan L. Pitcher

Bernice and Trampas Poldrack

Mr. James C. Poloshian

Ethel J. and Vito J. Porpora

Philip E. and Kandy M. Pouget ( for Sally

Martin’s birthday; in memory of Janice

McCarthy)

Dennis and Sandra C. Poulin

Mr. Hasmig Proudian ( in memory of

Aram T. and Rose Jenazian Proudian)

Ms. Ariane A.V. Putnam

Genevieve and Joseph Puzio

Ms. Jessica Quarles

Ms. Ingeborg Quesenberry

Ms. Helen R. Reed

Ms. Fran Renehan

Mr. and Mrs. William Renehan

Ms. Gerri Richardson

Ms. Heidi Riddlesperger

Mrs. Edgar C. Rines

Ms. Kay H. Roberts

Ms. Rona Roberts

Mr. Andrew A. Robinson

Mr. Horace C. Rodgers

Francis and Mary Ellen G. Ronnenberg

Mr. John B. Root

Ms. Emily Rosenberg

( in honor of Linda Jacobs)

Ms. Victoria A. Ross

Mr. and Mrs. Gregory J. Roth

Ms. Joan D. Rueckert

Dr. Herman Ruether

Patricia Waite Ruger and Jacqueline

Ruger Hutton

Ms. Phyllis Ruppert

Ms. Matilda Russo

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Ruth

Mr. and Mrs. Steve Sabella

Ms Sandra Sacks

Ralph and Francoise Santalis

Mr. and Mrs Cody Sargent

Mr. Khajag Sarkissian

Mr. Harold H. Saunders

Ms. Rachel Savane

Mrs. G. W. Scarborough

John and Margaret Scarfi

Ronald J. and Sherri M. Sceroler

Mr. James R. Schaefer

Mrs. Marion M. Schersten

Susan and Charles Schilling

Miss Helen R. Schlifke

William and Vivian Schmidt

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Schmitt

Dr. Walter R. Schur

Ms. Tina L. Schwab

Harsha A. Sen

Mr. and Mrs. Hasma Serverian


E. V. and Francine Cerutti

Ms. Nancy J. Chapman

Herbert and Marilyn L. Cheskis

Aroussiag and Tigran Chitjian

Newman B. and Carole J. Chittenden

Ms. Sharon B. Chrisman

Emily and E. Kathy Christensen

Ms. Barbara J. Christesen

Gary A. and Mary C. Ciasullo

Ms. Karen Cichocki-Vucci

Ms. Susan A. Clancy

Mrs. Sara F. Clark

Carol A. Clayton

Mr. and Mrs. James P. Clement

Miss Mary E. Clemesha

Denis and Kathleen J. Clifford

Mr. Marvin Coats

Ms. Hope Cobb

Mr. Dennis Cochran

John and Maria Coffin

Michael E. and Kerri Collins

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley C. Collyer

Frederick W. and Patricia M. Colman

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Copeland

Ms. Monika Cornelius

Mr. Joseph Costello

Thomas and Mary Agnes J. Cotter

Ms. Jeanette D. Coufal

Miss M. Celia Coulter

Mr. John R. Cox

Michael J. and Sandra J. Coyne

Mr. and Mrs. Miner D. Crary, Jr.

Mr. R. Stephen Craxton

Susan Cucinella and Holly C. Varriale

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Cullen

Philip and Terrie Curd

Ms. Margaret R. Curtin

Ms. Maria G. Cutrona

Ms. Donna D'Andraia

Charles and Loretta E. Dailey

Mr. Robert S. Damerjian

Mr. Ken Darian

Ms. Ida Darrah

Larry and Judy Darrah

Ms Sarah S. Davidson

Mr. George Davis

Dr. Susan S. Davis

Lucia M. and Artie De Feo

Ms. Theresa M. DeLucia

Mr. and Mrs. Boghos Der Ghazarian

Dr. and Mrs. George Dermksian

Ms. Nora M. Derwin

Mr. Thomas Desimone

Ms. Ethel M. Dewey

Mr. Armon W. Diedrich

Wesley W. and Cindy Diehl

Andrew and Diane Dinoia

Pauline Phuong Do

Mr. and Mrs. Cleveland E. Dodge

Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Doherty

Kerry P. and Dennis A. Dolan

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Donnelly

Ms. Nona M. Donoval

Samuel W. and Judith K. Doolittle

Mr. Alden C. Douglass

Dr. Heratch O. Doumanian

Ms. Amanda M. Dove

Mr. Anthony J. Draye

Mr. and Mrs. Mickey Dry

Rev. Robert J. Duane

Mrs. Suzanne F. Dunbar

Rev. and Yn. Karekin Kasparian

Dr. and Mrs. Paul Kechijian

The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. David R. Keck

Stacey W. and Brian W. Keltch

Miss Adele M. Kennedy

Mr. and Mrs. Mike Kerby

Dr. and Mrs. Michael Keshishian

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin M. Keusey

Mr. Aram T. Kevorkian

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Keyishian

Ms. Claudia J. Kilby

Erin K. Kilby

Grace V. and John P. Kincart

Ms. Belinda Zoet King

Miss Margaret Kinne

Ms. Sheila B. Kirkham

Alan and June Kluepfel

Mr. and Mrs. Gregory B. Knudson

Mr. and Mrs. Emil Koistinen

Mr. Oleh Kostiuk

Miss R. H. Lola Koundakjian

Erwin and Mildred A. Kraft

Mr. Haig Krekorian

Dr. and Mrs. John A. Lampe

Mr. George M. Landes

Ms. Marla Landis

Ms. Carol R. Lange

Alvin and Sharon Layton

Brian P. and Debbie W. Leech

Ms. Wanda LeGrand

Ms. Amy M. Lehane

Dr. and Mrs. William L. Lehmann

Ms. Jacqueline E. Lein

Anthony and Anne Lemma

Mr. Joseph Leporati

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander S. Lett

Stuart Levin and Chun Kim-Levin

Richard A. and Carolyn A. Lewis

Concetta and Heather Liberatore

Dr. Linda Lifur-Bennett

Mr. and Mrs. John Little

Mr. John J. Little

Mr. James Lombardo

Ms. Amanda Lowery

Mr. Charles M. Loyd

Ms. Donna Hutton Loyd

Mr. Oliver H. Loyd

Mr. Lawrence C. Lucas

Michael A. and Sigrid H. Luksza

William and Mary Luthin

Christopher and Eileen MacDonald

Miss Marcia MacDonald

Ms. Jane S. Mackay

Ms. Susan M. Mallonee

Mr. Robert S. Mallouk

Mrs. Harriette W. Mandeville

Robert J. and Margaret P. Manny

Mr. Hagop Manuelian

Edward and Columbia L. Marcantonio

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Mardian

Mr. Mark N. Markarian

Mr. and Mrs. David Marrash

Mr. James E. Martin

Ms. Patricia Martin

Mrs. Anita Masoian

Ms. Barbara Massey

Ms. Rosemary Matossian

Miss Merze Mazmanian

Ms. Lynda Mazzurco

John McAvoy and Kathleen Mcavoy

William and Diane McCabe

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew A. Shahinian

Keith and Joan M. Shepherd

Daniel and Patricia B. Sheppard

Ronald and Joan Sheppard

Thomas P. and Patricia Shiel

Ms. Betty Shumaker

James and Dorothy Sideris

Mr. Harold R. Sims

Mr. and Mrs. Leon Siroonian

Brian and Cynthia Skeels

Rev. and Mrs. Harold G. Skinner

Jeffrey J. and Ann Slader

Elizabeth A. and John A. Slosar

Mr. Alan Smith

Ms. Allison G. Smith

Mr. Eric P. Smith

Ms. Jacqueline A. Smith

Mr. James B. Smith

Joseph J. Smith

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Smyth

Joan and George Spano

Mrs. Doreen C. Spitzer

Cindy and Michael Stagner

Ms. Doris A. Stahl

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Staudenmayer

Ms. Katherine Steele

Mr. and Mrs. Curt Steger

Mr. Steven C. Steinberger

Mr. Eric P. Steinhoff

Mr. Lawrence Stelter

Paul and Anna Stenhouse

Mr. William A. Stoltzfus

Ms. Eileen A. Storen

Jeffrey and Janine Storen

Mr. Donald S. Stosberg

Ms. Elizabeth Stouffer

Ms. Pamela R. Stutzman

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Sundstrom

Joseph and Kathryn A. Sutka

Mrs. Joan S. Tait

Ms. Rose Tashjian

Haig and Sydnia Tcheurekdjian

Mr. Noubar Tcheurekdjian

Mr. Robert W. Thabit

Ms Rita Thomas

Miss Anahid Thomassian

Mrs. David B. Thurston

Ms. Arlene E. Tice

Ms. Laura Tivoli

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Tivoli

Mr. and Mrs. Kevork S. Toroyan

Ms. Helen Towsley

Dr. Bruce L. Trott

Mr. and Mrs. George E. Truppner

Cathleen C. and michael R. Truschelli

William and Jane Ann L. Tunnard

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Tusick

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Ufford

George A. and Lucille S. Uhlman

Pallas Lee Van Schaick

Mr. and Mrs. Harutun Vaporciyan

Reno and Inez Veschi

Mary Vicario and Nancy Lynne Gagne

Oba L. Vincent

Hercules and Barbara A. Volpe

Ms. Patricia von Ahnen

Ms. Beverly Paige Vyn

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Walkinshaw

Maryann and John Joseph Walpole

Stephen and Maura Walsh

Mr. and Mrs. Duane E. Ward


Mr. and Mrs. George S. Dunham

Ms. Kathleen Ebner

Richard A. and Anne Elizabeth Elbrecht

Ms. Mollie D. Elicker

Edward E. and Judy M. Elsner

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander T. Ercklentz

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Erickson

Ms. Marisa Ernst

Ms. Isabell C. Esposito

Ahmed and Eva Essa

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Essayan

Mrs. Elizabeth S. Ettinghausen

Mr. Jason W. Evans

Gerald F. and Rose Fahey

Dr. Amir Ali Farman-Farma

Jerilyn Fasold

Marcy E. Feller and Gabrielle A. Hanna

John and Mary Leigh A. Feloney

Rupert and Mary Fennelly

Mr. Keith M. Ferguson

Mr. Stephen Ferrari

Robert R. and Ann M. Fetzer

Ms. Heather L. Fisch

Ms. Heather L. Fisch

Mr. Edgar J. Fisher

Mr. Larry J. Flood

Duane H. and Verne F. Floyd

Ms. Lindsay Flury

James and Rosemary P. Flynn

Dr. Laurie Ann Forest

Mrs. William D. Foye

Edward A. and Patricia A. Frawley

Mrs. Donna A. Friedman

Ms. Karen L. Frye

Anne and David Gagliardi

Kevin McCarthy and Joyce Mccarthy

Ms. Carol McClellan

Ms. Lucinda McCloud

Mr. David McDonald

Mr. David T. McDonald

Ms. Molly McDowell

Carlene M. and Thomas J. McGill

Ms. Dana McKenna

Mr. and Mrs. Mark J. McManus

Ms. Laura S. McPherson

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Mekenian

Mr. Julio Melgar

Ms. Barbara Merguerian

Ms. Patricia E. Merrill

Mrs. Anne A. Meyer

Mr. James Micciulla

Cheryl A. Miller

Gerald and Claudia I. Miller

John M. and Marsha G. Miller

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Miller

Ms. Mary Ellen Miller

Mr. Ralph Minasian

Ms. Jeanmarie M. Mitchell

Mr. Andrew Moers

Walter H. and Anne F. Mongon

Mr. Andrew P. Monroe

Joyce C. and Michael Mooney

Marie A. and Stanley Morgievich

Ms. Regina C. Morini

Mr. William J. Mostler

Ms. Sara T. Munson

John W. and Catherine A. Murchison

Oliver and Ethel F. Murray

Robert and Margaret Murtagh

Ms. Patricia A. Ward

Mr. Brian B. Watkins

Ms. Teresa A. Wavra

Mr. Joseph M. Weaver

Gerald B. and Priscilla Weeden

Pauline and Roger Weger

Mr. and Mrs. Richard K. Wehter

Ms. Leslie Wenke

Debra R. and William G. Wenter

Lori J. and Edward L. Wheeler

Ms. Doris T. White

Ms. Jessica L. Whitney

Bryan and Kendra Williams

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel B. Williams

Miss Pauline E. Williman

Susan K. Willis and Leah D. Lucas

Ms. Gabriel C. Wilmoth

Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Wilson

Ms. Penelope P. Wilson

Bruce D. and Carolyn Wise

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic G. Withington

Mr. Virgil O. Wodicka

Betty M. and Craig W. Wolf

Ms. Murden Woods

Mr. Jan Wright

Ms. Julie Wyatt

Mrs. Hasmig Yankelovich

Ms. Denise L.C. Yap

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Ymbras

Dr. and Mrs. Malcolm B. Young

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Zenian

( in memory of Levon and Araxil

Zenian)

ARMENIAN FRIENDS OF NEF

90TH ANNIVERSARY DONORS

Mr. John Amboian

Ms. Eleonore Aslanian

Robert and Sophia Assadourian

Ms. Florence Avakian ( in memory of

Louise Dingilian, Ashan Avakian,

Phoebe Kapikian)

Laura and Stephen Avakian

S & K Baghdassarian

Ms. Karen Bedrosian-Richardson

Aram Berberian

Ms. Carmen Boghossian

Mr. Arman Boyajian

Ms. Lusi Caparyan

Aroussiag and Tigran Chitjian

Mr. Robert S. Damerjian

Mr. Ken Darian

Mr. Yervant Edward Demirjian

Mr. and Mrs. Boghos Der Ghazarian

Dr. and Mrs. George Dermksian

Dr. Heratch O. Doumanian

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Essayan

Mrs. Donna A. Friedman

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold H. Gazarian

Mr. and Mrs. William Goshgarian

Dr. Vartan Gregorian

Ms. Mary Hamparian

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Haratunian

DONORS TO SPECIAL APPEAL:

Six Degrees of Love, Lesotho

Anonymous

Mr. and Mrs James M. Alexander

( in honor of Jack)

Dr. and Mrs. Vahan Janjigian

Mr. and Mrs. Noubar Jessourian

Mr. and Mrs. John Jinishian

Mr. Paul Jorjorian

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Kabrielian

Anahid and Vertanes Kalayjian

Mr. Elmer Kaprielian

Mr. Stefan Karadian

Mr. Haig Kartounian

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kasbarian

Rev. and Yn. Karekin Kasparian

Dr. and Mrs. Paul Kechijian

Dr. and Mrs. Michael Keshishian

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin M. Keusey

Mr. Aram T. Kevorkian

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Keyishian

Mr. Haig Krekorian

Mr. and Mrs. Emil Koistinen

Miss R. H. Lola Koundakjian

Dr. and Mrs. Richard C. Boyajian Lacy

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Mardian

Haig G. Mardikian

Mr. and Mrs. Shant Mardirossian

Mr. Mark N. Markarian

Mr. Hagop Manuelian

Mrs. Anita Masoian

Ms. Rosemary Matossian

Miss Merze Mazmanian

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Mekenian

Ms. Lindsay Flury

James and Rosemary P. Flynn

Dr. Laurie Ann Forest

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce E. Fraser

Edward A. and Patricia A. Frawley

Ms. Barbara Merguerian

Mr. Ralph Minasian

Dr. and Mrs. Louis M. Najarian

Mr Nazar Nazarian

Ms. Alice Nigoghosian

Mr. and Mrs. Vahe Oshagan

Mr. and Mrs. Pouzant Piranian

Mr. James C. Poloshian

Mr. Hasmig Proudian ( in memory of

Aram T. and Rose Jenazian Proudian)

Mr. Khajag Sarkissian

Varsenne and Antranig Sarkissian

Mr. and Mrs. Alex Sarafian

Mr. and Mrs. Hasma Serverian

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Haig Setrakian

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew A. Shahinian

Mr. and Mrs. Leon Siroonian

The Tarvezian Group

Ms. Rose Tashjian

Haig and Sydnia Tcheurekdjian

Mr. Noubar Tcheurekdjian

Miss Anahid Thomassian

Mr. and Mrs. Kevork S. Toroyan

Mr. and Mrs. Harutun Vaporciyan

Mrs. Hasmig Yankelovich

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Zenian

( in memory Levon and Araxil Zenian)

Kenneth and Eileen R. O'Brien

Michael and Eileen J. O'Brien

Ms. Amy J. O'Connor

Ms. Mary O'Connor

Ms. Susan O'Connor


American Association of

Critical Care Nurses

American Eagle

Ms. Mary Elizabeth Anderson

Ms. Gabriela Andrade

Anonymus

Kathryn and Jon Appelbergh

Mr. James Archambeault

A.R.E. Inc.

Ms. Cheryl F. Aycock

Ms. Jennifer Bagrowski

Ms. Johanna Bairel-Wohlfart

P. R. Baker

Ms. Eleanore M. Baran

Mr. Andrew A. Barasda

Tracy and Danny Barron

Patricia M. and Robert L. Bartkus

Randy R. and Debra A. Bauler

Erich and Marianne Bayer

Dianne M. Bazell and Laurence H. Kant

Ms. Joyce M. Becker

Mr. Steven A. Becker

Mr. and Mrs. William T. Behrends

Donna L. Belger

Linda Jean Bell

Susan and Nicholas Berardi

Aram Berberian

Carol L. and John A. Bertsch

Mr. Gerard Bochicchio

P.J. Boone

Barbara A. and John J. Brady

Ms. Marie Brady

Matthew and Melissa Brady

Walter and Dorothy M. Brady

Ms. Nicole Breazeale and Rodolfo

Marcos Lloveras ( for Tara Loyd)

Kenneth J. and Shirley Breeman

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Brinkmann

Mr. and Mrs. Carl F. Brockenauer

Ms. Briana Brower

Michelle M. and J. Brad Browning

Craig E. and Kristi Bruner

William A. and Sandi Bruss

Jeffery H. Buck and David A. Gall

Russell and Barbara Bunyea

Walton and Mary E. Burdick

Ms. Patricia N. Burkitt

Ms. Patricia Burns

Robert and Louise W. Burton

Ms. Caroline Buscher

Craig S. Buscher

Ms. Maria E. Byrne

Ms. Linda Callanan

Ms. Elaine Carey

Nicholas and Rosemarie Carinci

Ms. Ann Marie Carlo

Kenneth and Barbara Carlson

Joseph S. and Therese M. Carr

Grover and Caroline A. Carrington

Ms. Roberta C. Cassetta

Central Ohio J.V.S.D.

E. V. and Francine Cerutti

Mr. John W. Chapman

Ms. Nancy J. Chapman

Herbert and Marilyn L. Cheskis

Newman B. and Carole J. Chittenden

Ms. Sharon B. Chrisman

Emily and E. Kathy Christensen

Ms. Barbara J. Christesen

Ms. Karen Cichocki-Vucci

Ms. Susan A. Clancy

Ms. Karen L. Frye

Anne and David Gagliardi

Mr. Louis Galeazzo

Mary Shiland Gallagher and Andrew

Shiland Poa

Mark Stephen and Laurie Galland

Thomas K. Garesche

Ms. Annette Gast

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Gennaro

Tommy George

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Gerrity

Ms. Dorothy Gill and Ms. Marcia Smith

Eileen Z. and Joseph A. Gillespie

James B. and Barbara J. Gilman

Gloria and Anthony Golia

Mr. John Graham

Ms. Theresa Graham

Charles A. and Mary Jane Green

Marie F. Greenhaw

Catherine and Joan Gronowski

Rick and Susan Groth

Larry and Joanne Grunwald

Jim E. Gummelt

Ms. Dena Hall

Roger W. and Gayle L. Ham

(in name of Judy Doolittle)

Barbara Hamilton

Carol Simon and Jack Harrigan

Harold and Claire Harrison

Ms. Carol Hartigan

Scott D. and Michelle J. Hartings

Ms. Karen L. Harvey and Marquis P.

Vawter ( in name of Pat Reilly, Teresa

Bell, Karen Harvey)

Mr. Daniel Fc Hayes

Edwin G. and Claire J. Hellgoth

Doug and Katherine Henry

Ms. Marilyn Herigstad

Paul and Kacy Hertz

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Hillery

Terry S. Hood and Julia Murray

Ms Virginia A. Humphreys

Mr. Robert M. Hutton

Francis and Nancy T. Ivanisko

Theodore and Annette Barbara Izzo

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald N. James

Wanda L. and Lawrence H. Johanson

Harry and Mary Ann Johnson

Mr. Sean F. Julian

Ms. Claudia J. Kilby

Erin K. Kilby

Ms. Belinda Zoet King

Kingwood High School

Alan and June Kluepfel

Knights of Columbus - Council 5743

Mr. and Mrs. Gregory B. Knudson

Erwin and Mildred A. Kraft

Ms. Marla Landis

Ms. Carol R. Lange

Alvin and Sharon Layton

Brian P. and Debbie W. Leech

Ms. Wanda LeGrand

Ms. Amy M. Lehane

Ms. Jacqueline E. Lein

Anthony and Anne Lemma

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander S. Lett

Stuart Levin and Chun Kim-Levin

Richard A. and Carolyn A. Lewis

Concetta and Heather Liberatore

Ms. Linda Lifur-Bennett

Mr. and Mrs. John Little

Dr. Omara and Dr. McGrath

Ms. Jennifer A. Orenic

Mr. Matthew S. Orosz

Josephine and Anthony Paragano

Aldo and Helene Parcesepe

Ms. Frances C. Perito

Lisa L. and Terry R. Perkins

Mr. Albert J. Perri

Joanne Phelan

Ms. Anna Picone

Michael T. and Pamela K. Piotrowicz

Vincent P. and Carolyn D. Pisculli

Bernice and Trampas Poldrack

Ms. Georgeen M. Polyak

Ethel J. and Vito J. Porpora

Philip E. and Kandy M. Pouget ( for Sally

Martin’s birthday; in memory of Janice

McCarthy)

Dennis and Sandra C. Poulin

Ms. Ariane A.V. Putnam

Genevieve and Joseph Puzio

Ms. Jessica Quarles

Ms. Ingeborg Quesenberry

Ms. Cecilia A. Quinn

Ms. Mary E. Ramser

Ms. Fran Renehan

Mr. and Mrs. William Renehan

Ms. Gerri Richardson

Ms. Heidi Riddlesperger

Ms. Kay H. Roberts

Ms. Rona Roberts

Mr. Andrew A. Robinson

Francis and Mary Ellen G. Ronnenberg

Ms. Victoria A. Ross

Patricia Waite Ruger and Jacqueline

Ruger Hutton

Ms. Phyllis Ruppert

Ms. Matilda Russo

St. John the Evangelist Church

St. John the Evangelist School

St. Johns Respect for Life Society

Ms Sandra Sacks

Ralph and Francoise Santalis

Mr. and Mrs Cody Sargent

Ms. Rachel Savane

John and Margaret Scarfi

Ronald J. and Sherri M. Sceroler

Walter J. and Maryjane M. Scherr

Susan and Charles Schilling

Ms. Tina L. Schwab

Harsha A. Sen

Keith and Joan M. Shepherd

Daniel and Patricia B. Sheppard

Ronald and Joan Sheppard

Thomas P. and Patricia Shiel

Ms. Betty Shumaker

James and Dorothy Sideris

Brian and Cynthia Skeels

Jeffrey J. and Ann Slader

Elizabeth A. and John A. Slosar

Mr. Alan Smith

Ms. Allison G. Smith

Ms. Jacqueline A. Smith

Joseph J. Smith

Joan and George Spano

Cindy and Michael Stagner

Walter A. and Dorothy W. Stanhouse

Ms. Katherine Steele

Mr. and Mrs. Curt Steger

Mr. Eric P. Steinhoff

Paul and Anna Stenhouse


Carol A. Clayton

Mr. and Mrs. James P. Clement

Denis and Kathleen J. Clifford

Mr. Marvin Coats

John and Maria Coffin

Michael E. and Kerri Collins

Frederick W. and Patricia M. Colman

Ms. Monika Cornelius

Mr. Joseph Costello

Thomas and Mary Agnes J. Cotter

Ms. Jeanette D. Coufal

Mr. John R. Cox

Michael J. and Sandra J. Coyne

Susan Cucinella and Holly C. Varriale

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Cullen

Philip and Terrie Curd

Ms. Maria G. Cutrona

Ms. Donna D'Andraia

Charles and Loretta E. Dailey

Ms. Ida Darrah

Larry and Judy Darrah

Ms Sarah S. Davidson

Lucia M. and Artie De Feo

Ms. Theresa M. DeLucia

Ms. Nora M. Derwin

Mr. Thomas Desimone

Wesley W. and Cindy Diehl

Andrew and Diane Dinoia

Pauline Phuong Do

Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Doherty

Kerry P. and Dennis A. Dolan

Ms. Nona M. Donoval

Ms. Jennifer Doolittle

Samuel W. and Judith K. Doolittle

Ms. Amanda M. Dove

Rev. Robert J. Duane

Mr. Christopher Ebert

Ms. Kathleen Ebner

Edward E. and Judy M. Elsner

Ms. Marisa Ernst

Ms. Isabell C. Esposito

Mr. Jason W. Evans

Gerald F. and Rose Fahey

Jerilyn Fasold

John and Mary Leigh A. Feloney

Rupert and Mary Fennelly

Robert R. and Ann M. Fetzer

First Presbyterian Church

Ms. Heather L. Fisch

Ms. Heather L. Fisch

Mr. Larry J. Flood

Duane H. and Verne F. Floyd

Mr. John J. Little

Mr. James Lombardo

Ms. Amanda Lowery

Mr. Charles M. Loyd

Ms. Donna Hutton Loyd

Mr. Lawrence C. Lucas

Joaquin C. and Marina M. Lugay

Michael A. and Sigrid H. Luksza

William and Mary Luthin

Christopher and Eileen MacDonald

Ms. Jane S. Mackay

Ms. Toni A. Magnotta

Ms. Susan M. Mallonee

Mrs. Harriette W. Mandeville

Mr. Robert E. Manning

Robert J. and Margaret P. Manny

Edward and Columbia L. Marcantonio

Ms. Patricia Martin

Sally Behn Martin and Mark Nelson

Lynas

Ms. Barbara Massey

Ms. Lynda Mazzurco

John McAvoy and Kathleen Mcavoy

William and Diane McCabe

Kevin McCarthy and Joyce Mccarthy

Ms. Carol McClellan

Ms. Lucinda McCloud

Ms. Molly McDowell

Carlene M. and Thomas J. McGill

Ms. Dana McKenna

Mr. and Mrs. Mark J. McManus

John F. McNamara and Maureen M.

McNamara

Ms. Laura S. McPherson

Ms. Patricia E. Merrill

Mr. James Micciulla

Cheryl A. Miller

Gerald and Claudia I. Miller

John M. and Marsha G. Miller

Ms. Mary Ellen Miller

Ms. Jeanmarie M. Mitchell

Walter H. and Anne F. Mongon

Joyce C. and Michael Mooney

Marie A. and Stanley Morgievich

Ms. Regina C. Morini

Ms. Sara T. Munson

John W. and Catherine A. Murchison

Oliver and Ethel F. Murray

Robert and Margaret Murtagh

Marlene and Joseph Natalie

J.M. O'Bar

Ms. Ann P. O'Brien

Ms. Eileen A. Storen

Jeffrey and Janine Storen

Mr. Donald S. Stosberg

Ms. Elizabeth Stouffer

Ms. Pamela R. Stutzman

Joseph and Kathryn A. Sutka

Ms Rita Thomas

Ms. Arlene E. Tice

Ms. Laura Tivoli

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Tivoli

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Towle

Ms. Helen Towsley

Ms. Helen Towsley

Dr. Bruce L. Trott

Cathleen C. and Michael R. Truschelli

William and Jane Ann L. Tunnard

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Tusick

George A. and Lucille S. Uhlman

Pallas Lee Van Schaick

Reno and Inez Veschi

Mary Vicario and Nancy Lynne Gagne

Oba L. Vincent

Hercules and Barbara A. Volpe

Ms. Beverly Paige Vyn

Brian and Rosemary J. Waldron

Maryann and John Joseph Walpole

Stephen and Maura Walsh

Stephen and Maura Walsh

Ms. Patricia A. Ward

Mr. John D. Waters

Arthur J. and Deborah F. Watson

Ms. Kami Sue Watson

Ms. Teresa A. Wavra

Gerald B. and Priscilla Weeden

Pauline and Roger Weger

Ms. Clare Wegescheide

Mr. and Mrs. Richard K. Wehter

Mr. Andrew Wenke

Ms. Leslie Wenke

Debra R. and William G. Wenter

Ms. Courtney Wheeler

Lori J. and Edward L. Wheeler

Ms. Jessica L. Whitney

Bryan and Kendra Williams

Sara C. and Gregory H. Williams

Susan K. Willis and Leah D. Lucas

Ms. Gabriel C. Wilmoth

Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Wilson

Bruce D. and Carolyn Wise

Betty M. and Craig W. Wolf

Mr. Jan Wright

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Ymbras

Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott


NEF BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Ms. Shahnaz Batmanghelidj

Mr. Charles E. Benjamin

Mrs. William L. Cary

Mr. David S. Dodge

Dr. Amir Ali Farman-Farma

Mr. John Goelet

Mr. John Grammer

Mr. Robert C. Helander

Dr. Jean Herskovits

Dr. Linda Jacobs

Dr. John M. Kerr

Dr. Ryan LaHurd

Mr. Haig Mardikian

Mr. Shant Mardirossian

Mr. Ronald E. Miller

Mr. David W. Mize

Mr. Abe J. Moses

Mr. Richard C. Robarts

Ms. Aida Shawwaf

Ms. Emma Torres

Mr. Anthony R. Williams

Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott


NEW YORK HEADQUARTERS

Ryan A. LaHurd

President

Andrea M. Couture

Development Officer

Anwar Samad

Chief Financial Officer

OVERSEAS NEF STAFF

Roger Hardister

Regional Director for Middle East, North Africa,

and Horn of Africa - Cairo

Alaa Saber

Country Director - Egypt

Hajem Halaseh

Country Director - Jordan

Kenneth Storen

Country Director - Lesotho

Yacouba Dème

Country Director - Mali

Abdelkhalk Aandam

MEPI Project Director - Morocco

Mohamed Ali

Administrator - Sudan

Kathy Gau

Country Director - Swaziland

Tarek Abdel-Ghany Kotob

Country Director - West Bank

Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott


BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU SEAL OF APPROVAL

Near East Foundation meets all Standards for Charity Accountability of the

Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. The alliance helps donors by

collecting and distributing information on hundreds of nonprofit organizations

that solicit nationally or have national or international program services.

Organizations are asked to provide information on programs, governance,

fundraising practices and finances.

NEF hopes the fact that it displays the Better Business Bureau’s National Charity Seal helps

reassure supporters, especially potential donors who do not already know our long history and

stellar reputation. Given the current environment of confusion and suspicion about organizations

working in the Middle East, the seal adds reassurance.

> IRS Form 990 Fiscal Year 2004 (available soon)

> Download IRS Form 990 Fiscal Year 2003

Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott


Near East Foundation - Headquarters

90 Broad Street, 15th Floor • New York, NY 10004, USA

Phone: +1 (212) 425-2205 • Fax: +1 (212) 425-2350

Editor: Andrea M. Couture

• Designer: Ellen Scott

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