SWIFT LOVING - Nanyang Technological University

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SWIFT LOVING - Nanyang Technological University

THE NANYANG

VOL.

17

CHRONICLE

NO.

08

07.03.11

ISSN NO. 0218-7310

PRICES MOVING UP

VENDORS MOVING ON

NEWS | 03

PRIVILEGED

ACCESS

SWIFT

LOVING

He gets paid to hang out

with luxury sports cars.

Find out what he does.

LIFESTYLE | 14

过 山 车

对 比

反 向

蹦 极

南 苑 | 31


02 NEWS

News Bites

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

VOL.

NO.

17

08

NTU

NBS don shARES ANCIENT nuggETS

of WISdom

PROF WEE Chow Hou, Head of

Marketing and International Business

and Chairman of Nanyang

Executive Programmes at the Nanyang

Business School spent an

hour revealing some nuggets of

Sun Zi’s wisdom to businesses at

BMW’s showroom on March 1st.

The talk was organised by The

Business Times and Performance

Motors.

v I R T u a l C A R E E R f A I R

LAunched to match emPLOy-

ERS to STudENTS

THIS YEAR, students from NTU

can hunt for a job and attend job

interviews, without leaving the

comfort of their home or hostel

room. The NTU Career Fair 2011

will go one step further this year

with the lauch of the first Virtual

Career Fair or the NTU iFair.

research agREEmENTS on energy

effICIENCy INKEd WITh

auSTRIANS

NTU signed two agreements on

February 22nd with Austrian researchers

to explore how the sun’s

energy can be tapped to improve

the energy efficiency of homes and

other buildings. A researcher said

these research projects will sow the

seeds of a sunrise industry—tapping

on the sun as a form of alternative

energy for Singapore.

HonduRAN PRESIdent Porfirio

LOBO Sosa vISITS CAmpus

PRESIDENT of Honduras, Porfirio

Lobo Sosa, visited the National

Institute of Education (NIE) on

February 24th as part of his threeday

working visit to Singapore.

The objective of the visit to NIE was

to learn more about Singapore’s

education system, with a focus on

higher education and NIE’s role in

teacher training.

studENTS LEARN how to live

“the good LIfe”

A SEMINAR organised by the

NTU Economics Society on March

3rd had speakers such as Minister

of State Mrs Yu-Foo Yee Shoon

and Chairman to the East Asian

Institute Professor Wang Gungwu

address students on how to live

well in the new economy.

SINGAPORE

SINGAPORE govERNmENT

CALLS FOR LESS RELIANCE ON

FOREIGN WORKERS

COMPANIES need to promote productivity

and reduce dependence

on foreign workers, said the finance

minister. Mr Tharman

Shanmugaratnam said on March

3rd that the increase in labour

supply is estimated to be slow, as

Singapore has almost reached full

employment. He suggested that

businesses reorganize their operation

so as to cope with increasing

labour costs.

EXCESSIVE WORK LEADS TO

LATE MARRIAGE

EXCESSIVE work is hindering

young people from entering into

marriage, said Straughan Paulin

Tay, Nominated Member of Parliament

and Associate Professor in the

Department of Sociology at the National

University of Singapore. Her

research shows that three reasons

contribute to young Singaporean

women’s late marriage: limited

social network, limited time, and

other life goals.

THE FIRST GERONTOLOGY

PROGRAMME LAUCHED IN

SINGAPORE

THE COUNTRY’S first postgraduate

Programme of Gerontology has

been launched. The programme,

promoted by SIM University and

supported by several organizations

such as the Ministry of Community

Development, Youth and Sports,

is expected to improve nursing

care for the ageing population of

Singapore.

‘MINOR’ LEAKS FOUND ON

SINGAPORE A380 ENGINES

SINGAPORE Airlines (SIA) said on

March 3rd that it had discovered

five cases of oil leaks on the Rolls-

Royce Trent 900 engines powering

its Airbus A380 planes. However,

a spokesman later assured that it

would not pose any safety issues

on flights.

mORE hdb fLATS avAILABLE

for LOWER INCOme buyERS

MEASURES announced on March

3rd include Special Housing Grant

of up to $20,000 to help lower income

households buy new flats.

The income ceiling for those buying

three-room standard flats has

been raised from $3000 to $5000.

WORLD

HUNDREDS DIED IN NZ QUAKE

THE OFFICIAL death toll climbs to

161, after a 6.3 magnitude earthquake

hit New Zealand’s second

biggest city Christchurch on February

22nd. More than 200 are

still missing. Relief officials said

on Wednesday that no more survivors

are likely to be found and

the dominant task now is recovery

instead of rescue.

CHINA OVERWHELMS JAPAN

AS THE SECOND-LARGEST

ECONOMY

CHINA has overtaken Japan as the

world’s second-biggest economy.

Japan earlier released its economic

figure showing that its economy

was worth US$5.474 trillion

(SGD$6.948 trillion) at the end

of 2010. China’s economy has hit

US$5.8 trillion (SGD$7.357 trillion)

for the same period, with a 10.3 per

cent growth compared to last year.

MORE THAN 1000 dead IN

LIBYA’S REVOLT

THOUSANDS of protestors rallied

in Libya’s second biggest city

Benghazi on the night of February

22nd, to demand the release of an

arrested human rights activist. It

has been estimated that more than

1,000 civilians have been killed in

clashes with security forces and

government supporters.

jOURNALIST DETAINED IN

BEIJING FOR “BREACHING

REPORTING RESTRICTION”

SEVERAL foreign journalists were

roughed up and detained in Beijing

after gathering at a busy shopping

district on February 28th to

cover anonymous online calls for

anti-government protests there.

The Chinese Government then

said journalists were detained for

breaching reporting restriction,

but refused to specify which procedure

had been broken.

APPLE LAUnCHEs IPAD2

STEVE Jobs unveiled the second

generation of its iPad tablet

computer in an event on March

2nd in San Francisco. He said the

major improvements for the new

version will be a faster processor,

improved graphics, and front and

rear cameras.

Upcoming Events

correction

9 to 11 March

ASTROWEEK 2011

The NTU Astronomical Society

will be holding an exhibition

and talks on astronomy.

Time: 9am to 5pm

Venue: Area in front of LT 1A

Find out what your DSLR camera

can do to capture the night

sky.

14 March 22 to 24 March

foxtrot fever!

NTU Dance Sport Academy

is organizing a one-day only

Recess Week Special ballroom

dance workshop—the Slow

Foxtrot. Prices are at $6 per

person and $10 per couple.

Email dsa@ntu.edu.sg to sign

up now.

Time: 2pm-4pm (Registration

begins at 1.30pm)

Venue: Hall 3 Function Hall

SOCIAL

AWARENESS WEEK

Uni-Y’s Social Enter prise

Club will be holding a Social

Awareness Week. Various

welfare organizations and

social enterprise companies

will be setting up booths in

NTU to promote their services

and to educate students. Profits

will be donated to targeted

beneficiaries.

If you have any

exciting events

to publicise,

please don’t

hesitate to

contact us at

chronicle@ntu.

edu.sg

“New yEAR Together”

(vOL. 17 No 5, Page 16-17)

In our photo essay,

two student groups were

incorrectly named.

We had named them: NTU

Chinese Dance Society and

PRC Student Union.

These two groups are

known officially as the

Chinese Dance Club under

NTU Cultural Activities Club,

and NTUSU International

Undergraduate Committee

PRC Group respectively.

We apologise for the

error.


News Balancing

act: the lives of graduate students – Page 8

Food price hike hurts

NTU canteen vendors

Despite the increase in

global food costs, NTU

is not letting its canteen

vendors raise their prices

Mark Tay

Food prices around Singapore

and the world have gone up, but it

is not the case for NTU’s canteens.

These vendors all face the same

problem: increasing raw food

prices eroding their profit margins.

Global food prices have been

rising for the past seven consecutive

months.

However, unlike other vendors,

those in NTU have found that they

cannot mark up prices to safeguard

their profits.

Standing in their way is the

Office of Facilities Planning and

Management (OFPM). The office

has rejected all applications for

fee hikes.

One of those rejected is Ng Poh

Gek, the owner of the Western

food stall located in Canteen 14.

She applied to increase her food

prices last December, but was rejected.

She then held on till March

1st, when she increased her prices

by 20 to 40 cents, because “food

prices have been continuously increasing.”

For example, prices of meat like

chicken rose from $3.70 in March

last year to $4.70 per kilogram

two months ago. Other ingredients

like cooking oil have also increased

from $16 per container in

2008 to $33 now, she said.

“I was left with no choice but to

go ahead with the price increase

(despite the rejection),” she said.

But she had to revert her prices

to “normal levels” after OFPM

subsequently found out.

Another vendor, the owner of

the barbeque stall in Canteen 2,

also had his application to raise

prices rejected.

Instead, Mr Tan Kay Hock cut

food portions, but this has not

gone unnoticed by the students.

"There used to be more fries,

and the piece of chicken has become

smaller. I would rather

that they increase the price and

keep the size of the portions unchanged,"

said Timothy Boey, 23,

a second-year student from the

School of Art, Design and Media.

It is exactly what Mdm Ng fears.

“If I were to give two pieces of

pork instead of three pieces, it will

not be enough for the students (to

eat),” she said, which was why she

preferred to raise the prices.

“Generally, prices

have started to

stabilise. We

should see a turnaround

after the

budget plans kick

in."

Derrick Ng

Manager

Office of Facilities Planning and

Management

ADDITIONAL COST: The price hike in raw ingredients reduces vendors' profit margin

PHOTO | WAN ZHONG HAO

UnCERTAINTY: Madam Ng Poh Gek is not sure she can continue operating her stall if the school does not let her charge more

PHOTO | WAN ZHONG HAO

First-year student at the Nanyang

Business School Jake Ng, 24,

offered a solution. “A school subsidy

by lowering (the stall owner’s)

rent to balance the increase

in food prices can help both stall

owners and students,” he said.

But OFPM’s manager Mr Derrick

Ng said that no such subsidies

will be dished out. NTU’s stall

rental rates are “already low”, although

he declined to reveal how

much they are.

Stall owners also cannot increase

food prices at their own

discretion. Attempts to do so will

be curbed, like in Mdm Ng’s case,

although errant vendors will not

be penalised as his office plans to

advise them instead.

He said he rejected the stalls’

applications to raise food prices

because the government already

announced measures to combat

rising food prices in its recent

budget, such as forming the Retail

Price Watch Group (see sidebar).

“Generally, prices have started

to stabilise. We should see a turnaround

after the budget plans kick

in. I believe help is on the way,”

he said.

He also believed if the canteen

vendors raised prices, they would

lose out to the school’s fast food

restaurants, which have not raised

prices.

“They risk losing their business

to the fast food outlets like Mc-

Donalds and Subway,” he said.

Meals offered at Canteen A’s fast

food outlets are at least 10 percent

cheaper than outlets around Singapore.

For instance, a McNuggets

meal in NTU costs $4.75 while the

same meal out of campus costs

$6.90.

However, vendors like Mdm Ng

find it difficult hold on to their current

food prices for long. “If food

prices continue to increase, and we

are not allowed to take measures,

my business is not going to be able

to sustain itself much longer,” she

said.

“If food prices

continue to

increase and we

are not allowed to

take measures,

my business is not

going to be able to

sustain itself much

longer."

Ng Poh Gek

Stall vendor

Canteen 14

Students interviewed felt that

to prevent the closure of stalls,

price hikes should be given the

green light.

In fact, about 1200 students,

mostly from NTU, have “liked”

a Facebook page petitioning for

Mdm Ng to be given permission

to increase her food prices.

Titled “Save the canteen 14

Western food stall”, the page was

created on March 2nd by Sarah

Tham, 23, a resident of Hall of

Residence 15 who frequents Canteen

14.

“The prices at her stall have

been stagnant for too long. It’s

been the same since I was in Year

One,” said the fourth-year student

from the School of Mechanical

and Aerospace Engineering.

“The portions (at the stall) are

really generous so the increase in

prices is really reasonable,” Tham

added.

Budget Information

The Retail Price Watch

Group (RPWG) was formed

under the Singapore Budget

2011 to keep immoderate

prices in check. Major

supermarket chains

like NTUC and Giant have

agreed to hold certain food

prices steady for the next

six months to help the average

Singaporean. While

no direct measures have

been announced to help

food hawkers, the government

has stated that it ‘will

stay alert to any attempts

by businesses to profiteer

or collude to raise prices

excessively’.


04 NEWS

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

VOL.

NO.

17

08

Students, professors

applaud budget goodies

Food wastage

continues in NTU

Assessable Income

Annual value of residence (as at December 2010)

for year of

assessment 2010 Up to $7,000 $7,000 to $13,000 More than $13,000

Up to $30,000

$30,000 to $100,000

Cash grants and tax

rebates will be put to good

use

Kenneth Foo

Students and professors are

generally delighted with the unexpected

windfall resulting from the

lavish payout from the latest government

budget, which they say

will be spent mainly on defraying

personal expenses, paying for

school fees and coping with rising

living costs.

Widely anticipated to be a

generous budget due to the upcoming

general elections, Budget

2011 lived up to expectations last

month when a wide array of benefits

for all Singaporeans was announced.

Budget incentives include cash

grants, tax rebates and enhanced

bursary awards for needy students.

But the handsomest of the

budget handouts has to be the

Growth Dividends, which will be

be awarded to every Singaporean

aged 21 and above this year.

Depending on one’s income

and the value of one’s home, Singaporean

adults can expect to get

between $100 to $800. Operationally-ready

national servicemen

(NSmen) and full-time national

servicemen (NSFs) will receive an

extra $100.

Many interviewed are pleased

with the payout and have already

made plans on how they will be

spending the bounty come May.

“I will use it to pay for my

school or hall accommodation

$700 $600

$300

More than $100,000 $100

NSFs/NS Men

+ $100

Source: Ministry of Finance

Up to $7000 = HDB flats with 3 rooms or fewer

$7001 to $13,000 = HDB flats more than 3 rooms/ lower value private homes

More than $13,000 = High-value private homes

fees. Then, maybe treat my friends

to a good meal,” said Ong Zhen

Iang, 23, a second-year student

from the School of Mechanical

and Aerospace Engineering.

He will collect $700 as he is an

NSman and lives in a 4-room HDB

flat which has an estimated annual

value of $8,000.

Second-year Nanyang Business

School undergraduate Jonathan

Tan, 22, plans to enroll for

career grooming courses that will

prepare him for his future career.

“It’s a great opportunity for

me to use the $700 to take courses

that provide training on interview

skills and personal branding that

will give me an edge over other

job-seekers,” said Tan, an NSman

who also lives in a 4-room HDB

flat.

“It’s a nice gesture

as I can now focus

more on my studies

instead of having

to put in so many

hours at my parttime

job."

Elena Quek

Undergraduate

School of Humanities and Social

Sciences

Some, like Assistant Professor

Shirley Ho from the Wee Kim Wee

School of Communication and Information,

will simply place the

money in the bank.

“I will save and use it to offset

the rising cost of living here that is

a result of GST hikes and increasing

inflation,” said Professor Ho

who will also be getting a 20 per

cent income tax rebate this year

thanks to the new Budget plan.

Besides the one-off cash grant,

undergraduates whose household

incomes are within the bottom

two-thirds of the country will also

benefit from an 80% increase in

bursary award amounts.

According to the Ministry of

Finance, this will be an increase

from the current $1,600 a year to

$2,900 a year, covering up to 40

per cent of school fees.

Elena Quek, 22, a third-year

undergraduate from the School of

Humanities and Social Sciences

cheers the move, as she will be receiving

a $1500 bursary grant.

“It’s a nice gesture as I can now

focus more on my studies instead

of having to put in so many hours

at my part-time job, ” said Quek,

who works three times a week as a

telephone surveyor earning $7 an

hour.

But not everyone is happy with

the way the budget goodies are allocated.

First-year Electrical and Electronic

Engineering student Cinny

Chin, 20, is disappointed that only

those aged 21 and above this year

will be eligible for the cash handouts.

She said: “I’m unhappy that

I won’t be getting it just because

I’m a year short of the age requirement.

I guess I will have to wait for

the next general elections for another

generous offering like this.”

WASTE NOT, Want NOT: Food leftover in Canteen B

Cheryl Chan

While food prices are rising,

food wastage is still commonly

observed in ntu.

Plates of unfinished food are

often left behind on tables or

at tray returning points in the

canteens, according to Ah Yu, a

cleaner who has worked for more

than a year at one of the tray

cleaning points at Canteen B.

“At my cleaning point, we

collect up to seven to eight of the

typical garbage bags full of food

wastages during lunch time alone

and around 10 bags in total every

day,” she said.

Colin Quek, 23, a second-year

student from the Nanyang Business

School, acknowledged that

he often has food left over.

“The food [on campus] isn’t

great, hence I always don’t [enjoy

it enough] to finish the whole

portion,” he said.

While students continue to

waste food, stall vendors, who

have felt the pinch of rising food

prices, are trying to minimise the

waste.

PHOTO | WAN ZHONG HAO

Leong Kok Wai, 30, a stall

assistant at the chicken rice stall

in Canteen 2, said he ensures

food is not wasted at the stall.

“Normally we have little leftover,

but if we do, we will deliver

them to other outlets to sell.

We usually estimate the amount

of rice to cook to prevent wastage,”

he said.

Similarly, Hartini, the owner

of the nasi padang stall at Canteen

B said: “If there are leftovers

at the end of the day, we either

bring them home for ourselves

or give them to our neighbours.”

“It’ll be good if the stalls

could charge slightly cheaper

for those who ask for smaller

portions,” said Joey Lee, 22, a

fourth-year student from the

School of Physical & Mathematical

Sciences, who usually has

food left over on her plate because

of the large portions.

“If they don’t lower prices,

people will simply take the usual

portions even if they don’t eat

that much as they’re not motivated

to get smaller portions, resulting

in a lot of wastage,” she

added.

Presidential smile: The Honduran president visits a Collaborative Classroom in

nie.

PHOTO | Goh Chay TEng

Two presidents in one week

Or in three days to be exact. ntu hosted the Federal President of

the Republic of Austria, Dr Heinz Fischer, on February 22nd and

the Honduran President Mr Porfirio Lobo Sosa on February 24th.

His Excellency Dr Heinz Fischer witnessed ntu signing two

agreements with Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH (AIT) and

SOLID ASIA to improve the efficiency of cooling systems such

as air-conditioning and to tap solar thermal energy in tropical

environments.

His Excellency Mr Porfirio Lobo Sosa visited the National Institute

of Education (NIE) to learn more about Singapore’s education

system, with a focus on higher education and NIE’s role in teacher

training.


VOL.

NO.

17

08

Judith Ho

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

SAC's first phase

now complete

Two brand new rooms are

ready for use

NTU clubs can book the two

meeting rooms at the new Student

Activities Centre (SAC) when they

open on March 7th.

The two rooms will be

equipped with tables and chairs

for meeting purposes and resemble

the meeting rooms in the

previous SAC, said Logistics Executive

for the Students’ Union

Kelvin Oscar Wangsa, 20.

The SAC, previously located at

the School of Biological Sciences,

is now at old Canteen A.

“The new SAC is part of a plan

to improve facilities and to build

a more fun and vibrant environment

for students,” said Wangsa.

It is scheduled to be fully operational

in June, when its students'

lounge, recreational U-ROC

area and study areas open. A third

meeting room which can be converted

into a dance studio will

also be ready then.

However, several clubs were

inconvenienced by the upgrading

process. Some meeting rooms

in the old SAC were closed three

weeks ago and there were restrictions

on booking the remaining

meeting rooms. Clubs that were

affected included the NTU Sports

Club, Fastforward, Christian Fellowship

and the NTU Rotaract

Club.

The SAC Meeting Rooms 1 and

2 were initially expected to open

on February 21st.

According to Wangsa, however,

importing of equipment from

overseas was delayed by the Chinese

New Year break, thus postponing

its opening.

Men AT WOrk: SAC meeeting rooms are opening after a slight delay.

PHOTO | WAN zHONG HAO

For the NTU Sports Club, it

was a particularly trying time as

they were in the midst of planning

three events—Sports Expose, Surf

N Sweat and Bike Rally 2011.

“It was difficult accessing

the meeting rooms due to the

construction at the old SAC and

meetings were hindered by the

noise from the construction,” said

Sports Club Logistics Officer Chen

Shao, 21.

NTU’s board game society,

Fastforward, moved their gaming

sessions to old Canteen A.

According to Fastforward’s

vice-president Tan Haiwang, 22,

the change in location resulted in

the society losing some students

who would usually join the gaming

sessions when dining at the

old SAC.

But for Christian Fellowship

and the NTU Rotaract Club, this

delay posed only a minor hassle,

said Honorary General Secretary

for the NTU Rotaract Club Ter Mei

Mei, 22.

The two clubs had booked

meeting rooms in the new SAC for

their joint event—Janitor’s High

Tea, on February 25th, but the

bookings were rejected due to the

delay.

“But we sort of expected this delay

and had other alternative venues

in mind, like the tutorial rooms in

the South Spine,” said Ter.

When the new SAC becomes

fully operational in June, students

can expect air-conditioned rooms,

game consoles and board games,

and an area for movie screenings,

said Wangsa.

NEWS 05

Hall toilets get a

makeover

Goh Ee Ling

Students of Halls of Residences 4,

5, 6 and 7 can expect fully upgraded

toilets come July 2013.

The new toilets will feature designs

similar to that of the ones in

the halls that were upgraded recently.

Students will be able to use them once

the renovations are completed.

Key changes include the use of

fluorescent lights, additional shower

and toilet cubicles and bidets. Users

will be greeted with a more spacious

interior, a full-length mirror, solidsurface

vanity tops and towel bar

hangers.

All renovation work for Halls 4-7

will be divided into four phases. Phase

1 of the upgrading works will commence

in December 2011 and take

place concurrently for the halls. The

work will be carried out on a blockby-block

basis.

Each is scheduled to be completed

within the semester vacation, but

may spill over to the first few weeks

of the following academic semester

However, students can expect minimal

disruption as these will be limited

to polishing and finishing works done

by contractors.

No noisy hacking or major disturbances

will take place once the academic

term begins, said Miss Angela

Shang, Deputy Director of Student

Accommodation from the Student

Affairs Office.

Wear and tear is the primary reason

for the overhaul of the washroom

units, said Miss Shang.

“Although localised repairs are

carried out routinely, we feel that now

would be a good time to start on the

renovation work,” she added.

Assistant Honourary General

Secretary of Hall of Residence 4’s

Junior Common Room Committee

Avalynn Chiang, 21, gave the new

design a thumbs-up.

She felt that the new design is a

tremendous improvement from the

current one where “toilet facilities are

rather old and dim-lit”.

“The brighter lighting and increased

showering space will make it

much easier for us to move around. It

seems safer too,” added Chiang.

According to Miss Shang, the

renovation costs for each hall are estimated

at $1 million, and up to $1.6

million for the halls with more washrooms.

KEEPING CLEAN: Hall residents can expect upgraded, brighter toilets.

PHOTO | WAN zHONG HAO

New modules reach for excellence

Aravinda Karunaratne

Students can look forward to a

slew of new modules released in

line with the NTU 2015 strategic

plan’s Five Peaks of Excellence—

Sustainable Earth, New Media,

Future Healthcare, New Silk Road

and Innovation Asia.

The plan aims to guide NTU’s

development based on the areas

represented by the peaks.

More courses with interdisciplinary

content are on their way,

said Senior Assistant Director of

the Office of Academic Services

Hariaty Mohamed Senin.

One new elective released this

semester is HU101: Introduction to

Environmental and Urban Studies.

It is part of a new minor in

Environmental and Urban Studies

offered under the School of Humanities

and Social Sciences.

The minor was inspired by the

peak of Sustainable Earth, and the

multidisciplinary emphasis of the

Five Peaks, said programme coordinator

Associate Professor Tan

Khye Chong.

He added that the minor will

take on an interdisciplinary approach,

enabling students to understand

threats and challenges

posed by increased urbanisation

of the environment. Some major

issues covered include energy,

pollution, social equity and economic

development.

After completing the prerequisite

HU101 for the minor, students

are required to take one module

each from the four different subject

groups of sociology, economics,

Chinese/English/Linguistics

and multilingual studies, and civil

and environmental engineering.

Third-year student from the

school of Materials Science and Engineering

Cai Li, 23, is currently taking

HU101 as he is passionate about

environmental sustainability.

Said Cai: “I like the fact

that this module looks at the

relationship between the environment

and the society with

a multi-faceted perspective. It

keeps in mind that many environmental

problems do not need

a technological solution, but a

shift in paradigms and mindsets.”

Cai added that more opportunities

should be made available to

students because enrollment for

the course is limited to 35 people.

“More line-ups such as competitions,

seminars, talks as well

as awareness campaigns can be

carried out to bring about a deeper

engagement of students,” he said.

Next semester, electives

CH0810: Biofuels and MS8205:

Materials for Energy Conversion

will debut for the minor programme

in Energy, which only

started last semester.

The minor in Energy from the

College of Engineering is also

driven by the peak of excellence

of Sustainable Earth, said Associate

Professor Gooi Hoay Beng,

from the School of Electrical and

Electronic Engineering, who is

teaching some modules for the

programme.

Said Dr Gooi: “Energy is

a deep concern of the modern

world. Even President Obama has

highlighted its importance. We

want to raise students’ awareness

on this timely issue.”


06 NEWS

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

VOL.

NO.

17

08

Janitors get

thanks

Winifred Seto

WHILE most students are still

asleep, cleaner Madam Suah is

reporting for work. As students

leave classes for homes or halls,

she departs campus too—for her

second job at Jurong Point.

Madam Suah, 66, works two

jobs despite her age. She, along

with 18 other janitors, two supervisors

and a manager, were

the attendees of NTU’s first Janitor’s

Appreciation High Tea held

on February 25th at a seminar

room in the South Spine.

“For one and a half years, I

work from 7am to 5pm in NTU

before going to work as a janitor

in Jurong Point from 6pm to

11pm. It is tiring but I need the

money,” she said. Most of the

janitors work solely in NTU.

The high tea consisted of

a welcome speech and a video

created by the committee, documenting

the tedious job of a janitor.

Students and janitors bonded

over a meal and the event ended

with a presentation of appreciation

notes written by students to

the janitors.

Jointly organised by NTU’s

Christian Fellowship and Rotaract

Club, the event seeks to urge

NTU students to take the initiative

to be more appreciative towards

janitors in the school, said

event chairperson Lydia Chan,

19, a first-year student from the

School of Humanities and Social

Sciences.

“Many people do not know

that the janitors have to wash

the toilets up to 13 times a day

and also expect them to clean

the litter left in seminar rooms

and lecture theatres,” she said.

Senior supervisor of facilities

maintenance in North Spine

Muhammed Idros works as a soccer

coach and volunteers at the

prison on his days off.

“It is tiring to work from 8am

to 5pm daily but I have no intention

to stop—especially when the

oldest cleaner here is 82 years

old,” said Mr Idros when asked

if he was retiring anytime soon.

Said See Jing Jing, 22, a

fourth-year chemistry student

who attended the event: “The

event was heartwarming because

it recognises ‘unsung heroes’ in

the school who are often overlooked

by many.”

Although not many students

have heard about the event,

event organiser Josephine Tan,

20, a second-year student from

the Nanyang Business School,

said she hopes to rope in more

student groups to share the budget

and manpower so the event

can be carried out on a larger

scale next year.

ADM works shine at Singapore

Short Film Awards

Films on rats and

isolation take

nominations by storm

Priscilla Kham

WHAT began as a fun holiday

project filming ‘Mickey’, a film

that juxtaposes scientific experiments

on lab rats with the mechanical

complexity of human relationships,

has earned 26-year-old

Wesley Aroozoo, a fourth-year Art,

Design and Media (ADM) student,

a nomination in the Best Experimental

category at the 2nd Singapore

Short Film Awards (SSFA).

For the first time, ADM students

are dominating the Best

Animation and Best Experimental

categories at the SSFA, the only

local platform which recognises

excellence in short films. Four

out of five nominees in the Best

Animation category, and all five

nominees in the Best Experimental

category are either current or past

students from ADM.

Organised by The Substation,

Singapore’s first independent

contemporary arts centre, and

Objectifs, a visual arts centre that

promotes filmmaking, the SSFA

kicked off with a run of public

screenings of all the SSFA nominees

on February 28th, and will

culminate in an awards ceremony

to be held on March 6th.

The process of producing the films

was not always smooth-sailing.

Aroozoo recalled some of the difficuties

faced while filming. “It was

basically a one-man show, I was producer,

scriptwriter, director, and had

to organise a whole team of about 20

people, including crew, actors, as well

as the props.”

Aside from technical burdens,

there was also emotional conflict involved.

“As my film is quite depressing

and anti-love, I had to stay in a sombre

mood during post-production in order

to effectively edit the film. However,

this was hard to do as I met someone

during that time and was actually really

happy,” he said.

Nominated in the Best Animation

category, twin brothers Henry and

Harry Zhuang, 26, both fourth year

students from ADM, faced a different

kind of difficulty while producing their

animation film.

Their film ‘Contained’ is about a

man on an isolated island with his beloved

flower.

“We found difficulty in trying to

convey the emotion of obsession. I

think with animation, it takes a lot of

time and courage to move the process

forward as you’re never sure if the outcome

is what you wanted to express.”

said Harry.

However, despite the difficulties

encountered, all remain optimistic

about the process of filmmaking.

“I think my best advice for budding

filmmakers would be to really

keep trying,” said Henry.

“Hard work pays off,” he added.

ANTI-LOVE: The short film Mickey examines romantic relationships.

PHOTO | CourTESY of WESLEY aroozoo

More alumni give back creatively

Stronger sense of

belonging is motivating

alumni to give back

Sharifah Fadhilah Alshahab

ONE gives all the money he

makes as a lecturer to an endowment

fund for needy students.

Another solemnises marriages

among graduates. Increasingly,

NTU alumni are finding creative

ways to give back to the university.

Sarjit Singh returns all the

money NTU pays for his work

teaching Risk Management,

Control and Ethics as an Adjunct

Professor at the Nanyang

Business School (NBS).

He recently used his salary

given by the university as well

as his own money to set up an

endowment fund of $50, 000 for

needy students and outstanding

final-year students.

As the President of the NBS

Alumni Association, he also

contributes his time to organise

events like their convocation

balls for the past five years.

Director of the Alumni Affairs

Office, Soon Min Yam attributes

the increase in alumni

involvement to his office’s

method of engaging them

through newsletters, e-mailers

and a quarterly magazine.

“The alumni receives information

about the university every

month and at least two activities

are held for them each

month,” he said.

Mr Soon—himself an alumnus

since 1975—is also giving

back to NTU creatively.

“I feel a strong

connection with

NTU and have

been following

the university’s

progression.”

Roderick Chia

Alumni

Class of 1998

He agreed to head the Alumni

Affairs Office about seven

years ago as he felt an obligation

towards his alma mater.

Since then, Mr Soon has

extended his job scope beyond

attracting alumni participation,

to include solemnising at the

weddings of alumni and their

spouses-to-be, whom they may

have met while studying at the

university.

The licensed minister sees

multiple benefits in volunteering

to do solemnisations.

Mr Soon explains that instead

of accepting tokens of

appreciation from the couple,

he offers the couple a donation

form from the NTU Development

Office to encourage them

to donate the money to needy

students.

These donations, combined

with the Government’s Dollarfor-Dollar

matching scheme,

ensure that more money is

available for needy students.

At the same time, he hope

alumni will feel closer to the

university through such solemnization

ceremonies, thus building

a close-knit community.

Some alumni regard themselves

as more than a part of

the NTU community. They see

themselves as stakeholders of

the university.

One of them is Roderick

I DO: Soon Min Yam feels that officiating at weddings of NTU alumni will deepen their bond to

the university.

PHOTO | WALLACE WOON

Chia, who volunteers as an

alumni representative on the

interview panel for the Discretionary

Admission of post-secondary

school students.

As a stakeholder, Mr Chia,

who graduated in 1998, finds

that it is important for alumni

to play an active role in guiding

NTU towards a global standing

its members can be proud of.

His involvement as a volunteer

has earned him the Nanyang

Alumni Service Award, an

award set up by NTU in 1996 to

recognise alumni who have rendered

outstanding service to the

University, in 2005.

“I feel a strong connection

with NTU and have been following

the university’s progression.

So far, it has been good so I am

more eager to get involved,” he

said.


VOL.

NO.

17

08

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

NEWS 07

Making parties their business

Entreprenurship students

see hot business

ventures in cool parties

Goh Ee Ling

THE booze was flowing, and

strobe lights flashing, as over 700

university students partied the

night away.

In the VIP lounge, lecturers

and students clinked their glasses

to the sweet sound of cash rolling

in.

House Party, held on February

19th in Mimolette, a colonial bungalow

converted into a restaurant

and bar just off Bukit Timah, was

no ordinary college party. It was

the culmination of a business idea

of six students minoring in entrepreneurship.

The team set up a company,

Singapore Uni, for EN105, which

has students launch a small business

project. Preparations for their

launch event, House Party, began

four months ago.

“We noticed that most tertiary

students don’t really mix around

with people from other universities,

and they usually participate

in events organised by their

respective schools,” said team

member Vinai Gopalakrishnan,

25, a third-year student from the

School of Electronic and Electrical

Engineering.

“As such, our idea was to allow

everyone, from NTU, NUS,

SMU, SIM and even other tertiary,

private school students to come

together and have fun,” he added.

A large portion of the profit

came from ticket sales, said team

member Desmond Choo, 26, a

third-year student at the School

of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.

The $18 ticket included one

complimentary drink.

Details of the party location

were deliberately unveiled only a

few days before, adding mystery

to the event, which fuelled publicity.

“For publicity, we also used

our personal networks to promote

Making MONEy: Sale of tickets to the party helped turn a profit.

the event by word-of-mouth.

Also, few third-party personnel

were employed to cut costs,” added

Choo.

Party-goers were generally

surprised by the party’s professionalism.

PHOTO | WAN ZHONG HAO

Said School of Humanities and

Social Science freshman, Grace

Ong, 19: “The atmosphere was

electrifying and the energy level

was just kept up throughout the

night.”

“It wasn’t like any other club,”

she added. A highlight was being

able to easily meet students from

other universities, rather than

sticking to her own friends.

When asked what plans lie

ahead for Singapore Uni, team

member Daniel Senjaya Wong,

23, a third-year student from the

School of Biological Sciences

said: “We will build on our current

networks to organise more

youth-related events. There’s definitely

more to come.”

out and about

Another group of students

from the EN105 module held a

pyjama party themed bash on

the same night at Blue Jazz.

Party-goers wore bathrobes

and nightgowns, and entertainment

included live bands

and pole-dancing. According

to team member Heather

Chin, 21, the project is meant

as a launching platform into

the organisation of theme

parties for corporations.

NTU journalism graduates

impress newspapers

Rebecca Lim

Not only is the winner of the Singapore

Press Holding (SPH) Young Journalist

of the Year Award 2010 from Wee Kim

Wee School of Communication and Information

(WKWSCI) , for the first time,

all three nominees are alumni of the

school.

The award was given to Jamie Lee,

25, who has worked as a journalist for

the Business Times for two and a half

years.

Given out during SPH’s annual

award ceremony, the award honours

the best of SPH’s English and Malay

Newspaper Divisions.

One of the three nominees, photojournalist

Neo Xiao Bin, 27, described

herself as a “late bloomer”.

Although Ms Neo worked for a total

of four years with MyPaper and the

Straits Times, she did not consider journalism

till her third year in WKWSCI.

She was taking courses mainly in

Public Relations but her trip in 2006

to Nepal under GO-FAR (Go Overseas

for Advanced Reporting) changed her

mind. The trip is an annual overseas

news reporting programme under WK-

WSCI.

“The first-hand experience of news

reporting really helped to broaden my

horizons,” she said. Ms Neo decided

that what she did on the trip was what

she wanted to do for her career.

Coincidentally, all three candidates

were alumni of the GO-FAR programme.

Nominee and eventual winner, Ms

Lee, sees herself as a finance reporter

living out her childhood ambition.

WKWSCI gave her the edge, she said,

preparing her for what reporting entails

through external internships and stints

with the Nanyang Chronicle.

In addition, Ms Lee bagged the Financial

Journalist of the Year 2010 in

October 2010.

The final nominee David Lee,

25, once aspired to be a professional

footballer but he abandoned the plan,

deeming it a child’s fantasy. He has

been a sports reporter for TNP for two

years now and described the job as “the

next best thing".

No CUB: (from left to right) Young Journalist nominees David Lee, Neo Xeo Bin and Jamie Lee.

PHOTO | WAN ZHONG HAO

Websites dish out advice

on campus life

Danson Cheong

NTU students looking for help on issues

ranging from module selection

to calculation of GPA can now look

no further than two new websites.

The first is HippoCampus.sg,

which connects undergraduates from

NTU, NUS and SMU. Registered users

contribute to the website with advice

on which modules to take, textbooks

to buy and professors to study under.

It was launched by NTU third-year

business and computing students

James Gwee and Benjamin Teo on

February 7th.

According to Gwee and Teo, HippoCampus

functions like an campus

version of Facebook, as they were inspired

by how undergraduates share

their personal experiences on the social

networking platform.

“Students will be able to contribute

ideas and comments much like

how Facebook functions,” said Gwee,

23.

A calculator at the website also

lets visitors calculate their GPA and

honours scores.

Medically, the term “hippocampus”

refers to the part of the brain responsible

for long-term memory. The

founders therefore hope that Hippo-

Campus will be a long-term solution

among students.

“We want HippoCampus to be

part of university life for the longhaul.

Social media has intruded into

our personal lives, but it’s not as pervasive

in education,” said Gwee.

“We can make use of it to enrich

our learning experience. An individual

can tap into the collective intellect

of the campus community,” he added.

First-year biological science student

Newman Loh, 20, is one of Hip-

TECH UPSTARTS: Hippocampus founders James Gwee (left) and Benjamin Teo in their

Innovation Centre office.

PHOTO | WAN ZHONG HAO

poCampus’ newest users.

He stumbled upon the website

after he saw a friend “like” it on Facebook.

Loh said: “I wanted to see what

other people thought about the modules

I chose, and also see if I could get

textbooks.”

“There are very few users at the

moment, but if more people started

using it, it could really take off,” he

added.

For information about courses,

students can also turn to another

website, NTUElectives.com. The website

went online on January 20th,

the night before the semester’s “Add/

Drop” period, during which NTU students

compete for limited places in

modules.

Reviews of NTU modules are

contributed by visitors to the website,

which is managed by a team of five

NTU undergraduates as a project for

their minor in entrepreneurship.

Said webmaster Sifat Rahman, a

second-year student at the School of

Electrical and Electronic Engineering:

“Our goal was to create a community

for NTU undergrads. We felt that many

of our peers always sought advice on

what modules to take—it'd be great if

they could hear from students throughout

the campus.”

“We want it to function like Wikipedia.

When people feel part of a community,

they will come forward to contribute,”

added the 20-year old.

Although new, the two websites

have seen a healthy amount of traffic

since their launches.

NTUElectives.com received over

51,000 page views and 6,000 unique

visitors over the course of the two-week

“Add/Drop” period, according to Rahman.

HippoCampus.sg has around 200

registered users to date.


08 NEWS

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

VOL.

NO.

17

07

Graduate studies not a bed of roses

Zackary Ong

They teach in the day, and are

taught at night. These graduate

students juggle between being

teaching assistants and pursuing

their Masters or doctoral degrees.

About 10,000 of them currently

populate NTU, doing either

coursework or research.

Zackary Ong talks to two

graduate students to find out

more about their lives.

The family guy

Nguyen Kien Truc Giang

came to Singapore from Vietnam

eight years ago to pursue an

undergraduate degree. Now into

his fourth year of doctoral studies

at the School of Biological

Sciences, he spends most of his

time working on his thesis and

guiding students as a teaching

assistant.

He also juggles his work with

maintaining a social life in Singapore

and keeping in touch

with his family.

“[Graduate studies] has affected

my social life a lot, with

a 12-hour working schedule per

day, you have to minimise your

time playing around and focus

on your project if you really

want to get something out of it,”

the 25-year-old Vietnamese PhD

student said.

He has four years to finish

his project and is working seven

days a week. He also spend

about 30 to 40 hours per semester

guiding students during their

Final Year Projects and URECA

(Undergraduate Research Experience

on Campus) projects.

With such a busy working

schedule, Nguyen has little time

to visit his family in Vietnam.

He has only 18 days of leave per

working lunch: Nguyen Kien Truc Giang takes in a home-cooked meal with fellow graduate students.

year, of which he takes seven to

14 days to visit his family.

“When I go home, I'll also

visit my friends in Vietnam.

Compared to them, I think I'm

the most successful!” Nguyen

said with a laugh.

Nguyen also supports his

family when he can. With his

$2500 monthly stipend and

about $1000 earned from teaching

per semester, Nguyen sends

money to his family when there

is a need.

Currently living with three

housemates in a two-bedroom

unit in a student hostel right

outside NTU, Nguyen’s social life

is limited to occasional movie or

food outings with his Vietnamese

friends.

“I do have local friends but

I’m still more comfortable with

my Vietnamese friends. I guess

it’s because we share the same

culture,” he said.

Approaching the end of his

Graduate programme, Nguyen

has recently submitted his thesis,

which involves the identification

of active compounds in hundreds

of plants that are anti-cancerous,

anti-inflammatory or anti-infection.

“Graduate life is fun when

you are discovering something

PHOTO | WAN zhong hAo

new,” Nguyen said. Despite his

busy schedule, he has enjoyed

his experience thoroughly.

But he has a word of advice

to those planning to embark on

this academic journey—“you

have to stay extremely focused

to succeed!”

The enthusiast

Tee Yock Sian, 26, loves

learning new things. That is the

reason she quit her job as a political

analyst at the Ministry of

Defence two years ago to become

a Masters student at the Wee Kim

Wee School of Communication

and Information.

“I’m not a nerd who only

knows how to study. I just simply

love learning. When the opportunity

arose and I could get funding,

I took the chance,” she said.

Tee is an avid fan of anime

and manga, and her thesis deals

with how the activity of cosplaying

affects relationships between

fans and media characters.

“This thesis marries both my

academic and personal interests!”

said Tee.

“I love cosplaying but never

had the courage to do it. Studying

all these people, I just admire

their courage to put on those outfits

and be out there,” she said.

To Tee, the life of a graduate

student is all about managing

time and money. With a $1500

monthly stipend, she feels “a lot

poorer” compared to when she

was working. However, she has

more free time now compared to

when she was working.

“There are good and bad

points. Now I have more freedom

in managing my time but I have

to be very self-motivated as there

is no fixed hours to force me to

work,” Tee said.

Like Nguyen, Tee also has to

work as a teaching assistant. She

takes tutorial classes for lower

level undergraduate modules in

WKWSCI.

“It’s very fun to interact with

students but the admin work is

tedious. I don’t like marking, collating

attendance and results at

all,” said Tee with a laugh.

However, in the end she said

she has no regret giving up her

job to pursue her Masters Degree.

“I’m enjoying myself here,”

Tee concluded.

Additional reporting by

Trinh Hoang Ly

Soaring to victory at unmanned aircraft contest

Kenneth Foo

Gadgets created by NTU undergraduates

are not too far off from

those created by Q for James Bond.

These won top spot in a recent international

unmanned aerial vehicle

(UAV) design contest in Taiwan.

An NTU contingent was in

Taiwan for the 2011 Annual Unmanned

Aircraft Competition, held

by National Cheng Kung University,

between February 26th to 28th.

Team X-5 trumped six other teams

to take first spot in the Navigation

Flight Design Level category.

Their winning prototype X-5, is

an automatic model capable of flying

over large distances without a

remote control and taking precise

aerial photographs of various targets.

There has been rising interest

in developing a new generation of

UAVs, due to their potential in military

and anti-terrorist operations,

said Assistant Professor Yongki Go

from the School of Mechanical and

Aerospace Engineering.

He, along with Assistant Professor

Son Hungsun, led the teams

under its Product Development

Challenge program.

According to Dr Son, 37, victory

was unexpected as the undergraduates

from NTU had to

compete against graduate students

who had taken part in past runs of

the competition.

To complete the mission, the

UAV had to fly and take photographs

of targets in the form of

rubber alphabets and letters, located

three to four kilometeres away.

All this had to be done without

the use of a remote control, so the

team had to pre-program its flight

path and use a Global Positioning

System to ensure that it took off

and returned to base safely.

What made their win even

more impressive was that the

teams could not even carry out

complete trial flight sequences for

their UAV due to space constraints

in Singapore.

Full flight tests need to be carried

out over a distance of several

kilometers but they could only initiate

short distance trials at a flying

field in Tuas.

Unforeseen weather conditions

in Taiwan forced Team X-5 to

make drastic changes to the UAV’s

onboard systems just hours before

the competition.

“We had to modify the camera

triggering mechanisms and flight

stabilising system due to the unexpectedly

strong winds in Taiwan.

It was very stressful,” said Joshua

Chao, 23, third-year aerospace

engineering student and leader of

Team X-5.

But they managed to recalibrate

their machine in time, with

much success. Their UAV X-5

emerged top for completing the

course in the least amount of time

and for taking the most accurate

photographs of the targets.

Another group of three NTU

students, Team Toruk-Makto, came

third in the Fundamental Design

level category.

PHOTO | COURTESY OF VALTS BLUKIS

"Ice-sledging" in NTU

Five NTU students sat on blocks of ice and “glided” down the

roof of the School of Art, Design and Media (ADM). The students

from ADM, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering and

the School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering were being

recorded for the My Epic School Story competition. These

students also danced a techno routine at two different locations

of ADM, and raced each other on chairs down a slope in ADM.


Lifestyle

Soak up Myanmar’s old world charm – Page 19

out of the box: extraordinary students

TIPS ON CAR PHOTOGRAPHY

NO SWEAT: Enduring the hot sun, Adrian works hard to get the best angles of a Ferrari 458 Italia.

You may have seen

Adrian Wong’s car

photographs in leading

car magazines

and websites such

as Ninetro, Torque, Top Gear and

sgCarMart.com. In fact, the firstyear

student from School Of Art

Design And Media even commanded

a four-figure sum on a

recent photography assignment.

But it was not always

smooth-sailing for the car aficionado.

When he decided to become

a car photographer upon graduating

from polytechnic, he had

nothing. No experience, name

for himself or sophisticated photography

equipment.

FREEZING

SPEED

At 23, Adrian Wong is one of Singapore’s most highly sought after

car photographer. Wang Wanxuan finds out more about his journey.

He did not even know if his

career path would work in Singapore,

because car photography

then was a relatively new field

with few players in it.

To gain experience and

carve out a name for himself, he

sought his friends’ permission to

photograph their cars, if it was a

Corolla or Suzuki.

“My friends were curious

but were willing and honoured

to lend their cars for my experimental

shots,” he said.

To buy his photography

equipment, he took up as many

photography gigs as he could.

“Whenever I saved enough

money, I would start to invest

in more expensive photography

DREAM BIG: Adrian feels a new thrill everytime he gets to shoot a Lamborghini

COURTESY OF ADRIAN WONG

equipment,” he said.

Fast forward three-and-ahalf

years later and things have

changed. The time he spent on

experimental photography, getting

to know customers through

referrals and participating actively

in car photography forums

has paid off.

He also gets to

drive his friends’

and clients’ exclusive

cars, earn a

three-figure sum per

job done and admire

pretty cars all day.

One of Wong’s proudest moments

was when his friend asked

him to take photographs of his

private collection last July. He

owned a Ferrari Enzo, a Ferrari

Daytona and a BMW Nazca

C2, just to name a few. Most of

the cars have never been on the

roads here as these left-handed

cars cannot be driven in Singapore.

He shot all 10 cars in a

day, earning a decent four figure

sum.

Today, he gets by with balancing

school and freelance

PHOTOS | GOH CHAY TENG

photography by applying his car

photography skills in some of his

modules like Photography and

Film, which he is currently taking.

“Studies are still my main

priority, and it helps that classes

don’t start early and examinable

modules are rare in my major. So

my schedule is more flexible. Because

overnight shoots are common,

it also fits right into my

nocturnal schedule,” Wong said.

He also gets to drive his

friends’ and clients’ exclusive

cars, earn a three-figure sum per

job done and be upclose with expensive

cars all day.

His clients now include high

income earners. “Just like wedding

shoots, where brides and

grooms want to capture their

best moments together, clients

also often wish to keep snapshot

memories of owning their ultimate

vehicle,” Adrian said.

“When I first started out, the

Singapore market was very small

and niche with very little players

to compete with. A unique eye

was what the market was scouting

for, and I guess that’s where I

fit the bill,” he said in retrospect.

But if one thing has not

changed, it is his dream car. “Aston

Martin Vanquish is and will

always be my first love.”

Wong stresses on the importance

of visualisation in taking lush,

audacious quality in his photos.

“I think it is incredibly useful to

play a ‘mind movie’ of how the

car will look like to get the best

results. And to quote Einstein’s

words, ‘Imagination is more important

than reality’. So I’m never

afraid to experiment.

It also pays to be adventurous.

At times, Wong has to conduct

overnight shoots to reduce

or eliminate reflective lighting

and surrounding distractions or

to skirt around Singapore’s strict

photography laws which prohibit

photography in many places

including some retail space.

“Sometimes, security guards

or the police may have an issue

with ‘wee hour photography’.

They often chase people away

with suspicions of illegal loitering.

It is also a pity that ideal

locations for shoots like expressways

and certain governmentowned

areas do not allow photography.”

Compared to wedding, fashion

and events photography,

photographing cars presents

unique challenges. “Cars are also

bulky massive objects. Shooting

locations have to be accessible

for such large objects that cannot

duck or cover.”

“We also need to constantly

think out of the box to shoot

cars in unconventional locations

such as underpass, dilapidated

areas, or even bus stop bays to

capture their beauty with fresh

angles,” Wong added.

Reading car magazines and

keeping abreast of latest developments

is a must for anyone

wanting to be a car photographer.

“For example, Ferraris and

Lamborghinis are long-lasting

arch rivals. So it’s a good idea to

contrast both together in a shoot

to pique readers’ interest. Also,

cars are static objects. So it can’t

possibly strike varying poses like

humans. You have to crack your

brains a little to illustrate contrast,

mood and dynamism,” he

said.

If you wish to see more of

Wong’s photography, go to

www.vanq.net


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The east cider trail

Well-known eateries and historical landmarks aside, Chen Shanghao hunts down the best places for cider in Joo Chiat.

THE National Heritage Board recently named Joo Chiat

Singapore’s first Heritage Town, you might think that its

Peranakan and Eurasian architecture and historical landmarks

are what it is famous for.

But all that culture and tradition was not what I was

looking for. I trawled the streets of Joo Chiat with something

else in mind – something that is not part of Joo Chiat’s rich

heritage – cider.

As cider is not as popular here as in the United Kingdom or

Australia, I used to think it was a type of beer. But while beer is

made with barley or wheat, ciders are the result of fermenting

apple or pear juice. Pear cider is also known as perry.

Generally, cider tastes like sparkling apple juice with a

kick of your typical Sauvignon Blanc. Lighter than beer and

without its bitterness, cider is wonderfully refreshing. It cuts

through the grime and fatigue of the day and instantly perks

you up. The fizz, too, will rejuvenate you on a humid afternoon.

With flavours ranging from strawberry to lime to toffee,

there is an infinite possibility of what you can pair cider

with. Cider, like wine and champagne, is a fruit based drink.

Therefore, if a dish goes well with Chardonnay, it will most

likely sit well with a fruity cider.

“I like it because it is more refreshing. I prefer the fruity

taste over beer,” said Edwin Cheng, a patron of Cider Pit in Joo

Chiat. “My favourite is Brothers Apple Toffee cider. The taste

of apple and toffee mashed together really makes you feel like

you’re drinking candy.”

However, do not let its sweet flavour fool you. Cider’s

alcohol content is higher than beer but lower than wine – about

6.5 to 8.5 per cent. After two pints, I could already feel the

alcohol kicking in.

Below are three places in the Joo Chiat area, all within

walking distance of each other, that are ideal for unwinding

with a pint of cider in hand.

The garden SLug

55 Lorong L Telok Kurau,

#01-59/61 Bright Centre

Tel: 6346 0504

The Garden Slug’s cider selection is rather limited – they

sell only Brothers’ Pear, Strawberry and Apple Toffee cider.

Those with a sweet tooth should opt for the Apple Toffee

Cider.

Brewed in England, Brothers cider is described as ‘palate

cleansing’. After just a couple of gulps, it cleared away the

taste of the salmon appetizer I had minutes before.

The creamy grilled dory fish and beef sandwich I had

went well with the bottle of cider. As the sandwich was

savoury, the sharp zesty flavour of my apple toffee cider

soothed out its saltiness.

What I loved most was their dessert menu, which

changes every weekend. I had stewed white pears sautéed

in white wine and cinnamon and topped with vanilla ice

cream, which was the ultimate companion to my apple

toffee cider. The flavour of apple and pear naturally blended

well, and the slight tartness of the drink sat well with the

sweet vanilla ice cream topping.

A pint of cider costs $12 here, and the price of a main

course ranges from $15 to $20.

The cider pit

382 Joo Chiat Road

Smokey's bbq and grILL

73 Joo Chiat Place

Tel: 6345 6914

Smokey’s is an open-air barbeque themed restaurant, and its

cider selection consists of Brothers, Bulmers and Hobgoblin

ciders, all brewed in England.

Cider goes well with barbequed food, as it cuts through the

oily aftertaste of grilled food. Besides quenching your thirst,

the Bulmers cider is a great antidote to the spiciness of the

chilli and replaces it with a pleasant, light aftertaste of apples.

Sitting in the midst of the smoke and grime, there is no

reason for you to put the cider on the back burner. It cools,

chills and dispels all that smoke, heat and humidity coming

from the grill.

The crowd mainly consists of expatriates, which could

explain the high price of the food. A plate of Buffalo wings

costs about $23, and a full rack of spare ribs sets you back $42.

However, their cider is fairly affordable at about $12 a pint.

The Cider Pit has an impressive selection of 15 ciders and

45 beers. Pipsqueak, Stowford Press and Westons cider are

just some of its better known brands.

Hidden away from the main road, Cider Pit might

be tricky to find. Look out for a signboard that reads

“Ocean Kingdom Live Seafood” – the Pit is right

beside it.

The al-fresco pub does not serve any food,

so it is best to fill your stomach before trying to

conquer their long list of ciders.

Their special brew is their draught cider –

Westons Vintage Organic, which has a dry,

yet strong fruity flavour. Canned cider like

Strongbow or Scrumpy Jack, usually tastes

rather plasticky and stale, but Cider Pit’s

draught cider is fresh and tasty. The

difference in taste is comparable to

freshly pressed apple juice at hawker

centres versus apple juice sold in

cartons at supermarkets.

The Cider Pit plays British indie

rock music. Fans of this genre will

find this a good alternative to The

Substation or Home Club.

It will certainly take some

time for one to conquer the many

ciders which this quiet, open-air

pub has to offer. The good thing

is that they’re all reasonably

priced at about $10 a pint so

you do not have to worry for

your pocket.

PHOTOS | Tan Wai Kiat & COURTESY OF CHEN SHANG HAO


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NEIGHBOURLY RETREATS

Tired and weary from the semester’s workload Three NTU students tell Vivienne Chang about

lesser-known places in Malaysia for short trips.

Destination #1:

Kuala Kubu Bharu

THIS is a hidden gem for the outdoorsy types. On a trip there last semester with NTU’s Outdoors

Activity Club (ODAC), Pang Jin Hao was swept away by its breathtaking scenery. The secondyear

Mechanical Engineering student explains why the ODAC’s Kuala Kubu Bharu trip, in its

second year running, is always snapped up.

(ABOVE) ALL ABOARD: Beginner rafters were thrilled by the river’s dips and sharp turns .

(BELOW) RIVER CROSSING: The cool waters were a perfect remedy for sore feet.

MUST-DO

Getting to Chilling Waterfalls, named after

its cool temperatures, requires hiking and river

crossing so you need to take a guide at all times.

But it’s worth it for a refreshing dip, especially after

a long hike in the tropics.

You can also go white water rafting at a nearby

river. On a scale of 1 (mild) to 5 (extreme), the

gushing waters here are a 3 – a thrilling experience

suitable for any novice.

WHERE TO STAY

Camping is the one thing you cannot miss.

Some might be uncomfortable with sleeping

outdoors, since there are monkeys that could steal

your food. However they are easily frightened off

PHOTO | COURTESY OF PANG JIN HAO by groups of people. If you book a tour with a local

agency, a ranger is also assigned to the enclosed campsite in case of an emergency.

There is only one campsite, and the cost is included in most packages that you book. For

those who prefer sleeping indoors, there is a clean, affordable hotel in the town itself, which

you will need to book in advance.

“A trip like this will really bonded people together. Simply cooking outdoors, eating and

chatting among friends, there is a lot of interaction. That was what I truly enjoy.” said the

Year 2 student.

WHAT TO EAT

A buffet place near the water rafting area serves richly flavoured nasi lemak and the local

guide recommended Chow Zhou Hawker, which cooks local specialities which may sound

familiar but have a slightly local twist.

HOW TO GET THERE

Take a bus from Singapore to Johor Bahru, followed by a train to Kuala Kubu Bharu Station

which costs RM20 ($8). The journey takes about half a day.

PREPARATION

Book a package tour with the local river raft vendor, which includes a trekking guide.

Apart from clothes and first-aid supplies, food and fuel is also necessary for outdoor cooking

and you need not limit yourselves to instant food.

RECOMMENDED FOR

The outdoor adventure junkie, and those travelling in big groups as it is perfect for camping

and other bonding activities.

Destination #2:

Desaru

FOR about the same price of booking a chalet in Singapore, Desaru offers more activities

and less crowded facilities. With wholesome places to explore and good food to indulge

in, Mavis Ang, a third-year student, reckons it is a great way to have fun with the family.

MUST-DO

The Teluk Ramunia Ostrich Farm houses more than a hundred of the world’s largest birds,

and a handful of them roam free, pecking at the hats and shirts of unsuspecting tourists.

Buy a bowl of dried corn and see if you’re game enough to feed them with your bare hands.

These comical birds are not aggressive, and are surprisingly photogenic.

Take an educational tour of the Desaru Fruit Farm and see how some tropical fruits are

grown and protected for harvesting. See the plants of fruits which are often already cut and

chilled, like passion fruit, jackfruit, dragon fruit and custard apple.

Another eye-opening activity would be the Fireflies cruise. In near total darkness, the

sight of many glowing dots on the trees and mangroves is pretty romantic.

WHERE TO STAY

Lotus Desaru Beach Resort occupies a huge area in front of the beach. It feels more like

a chalet though, with many families holding telematches by the restaurant and children

splashing about in the resort’s play pool, which doubles up as a mini water park for all ages.

WHAT TO EAT

The fresh ostrich egg omelette served at the ostrich farm is light and fluffy, and goes

very well with their home-made chilli. Ostrich satay is also served there. “After patting and

feeding those birds, I couldn’t bring myself to eat them. But my Dad said they were tasty,”

the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information student said.

Desaru Fruit Farm’s lunch and dinner buffets are both as satiating. Besides having 40

types of fruits, the meal also has staple

Chinese, Malay and Western dishes.

HOW TO GET THERE

Desaru is a 30-minute ferry from

Tanah Merah Ferry Terminal.

PREPARATION

Book a tour with Desaru Fruit

Farm Tour & Travel. A 2-day tour with

accommodation and many extravagant

meals provided costs around $200.

RECOMMENDED FOR

A weekend together with your

parents. Desaru is also a good place to

wind down with the extended family as

the tour caters to individuals of all ages.

POSE READY: It is easy to get a good shot of these comical birds.

TROPICAL FRUIT PARADISE: Desaru Fruit Farm offers a multitude of fruits for their lunch and dinner buffets.

PHOTOS | SUSAN CHOW

A SHEER RISE: The dramatic Stong Waterfall, which rises around 300 metres.

Destination #3:

Gunung Stong

PHOTOS | COURTESY OF TAN JUNJIE

SITUATED in north Malaysia, near the Thai border, Kunung Stong is a popular getaway

destination for tourists and locals. Its Thai-influenced food and outdoor activities have kept

Year 1 Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering student Tan Junjie going back regularly.

MUST-DO

The waterfall slide is the best feature of Gunung Stong. An hour’s trek from the main

campsite, the slide is two-storey high and ends in a waterfall pool.

The guides recommend beginners slide down in a sitting position to prevent abrasion.

But they will not hesitate to challenge the daring ones to slide down in a surfing position,

balancing on your feet.

There is also a cave complex nearby with majestic stalagmites and stalactites. It is a lot

cleaner than Kuala Lumpur’s Batu Caves, with their pungent smell of bat droppings, as the

caves here are water-based and house limestone structures rather than bats.

WHERE TO STAY

The campsite included in the package was a winner. “What I enjoyed most was the majestic

sunrise we can observe from our campsite, you can get nothing close to that in Singapore,”

Junjie said.

WHAT TO EAT

The local Kelantanese cuisine is an interesting fusion, which stems from influence by

Thai and Indian styles.

Tom yum soup is easily found all around the village of Stong. You can choose between

thick or clear broth. The brother carries a fiery aftertaste, due to the mixture of spices used

from the two cuisines and is a definite must-try.

There is also a collection of food stalls along Dabong train station, but it is the outdoor

cooking that one will really enjoy at Stong.

HOW TO GET THERE

Take the 12-hour train from Johor Bahru station to Dabong station. A night train is ideal as

you can sleep through the long journey on the train’s comfy beds, and arrive fresh in the morning.

PREPARATION

Do book a tour with local tour agency and ensure that the package includes access to the

camp site, a trekking guide, cave tours and guides for the waterfall slides.

For trekking on those slippery waterfall rocks, get a pair of “Kampong Adidas” from the

local stores. These rubber shoes are highly durable, dry fast, have a very good grip and cost

RM$6 (S$2.60) a pair. “My own pair saved my life when I nearly slipped on a rock while

trekking,” he said.

RECOMMENDED FOR

Beginners who want to experience basic trekking and camping. The terrain is relatively

manageable for first-timers, and is perfect for groups of five to 15.

Shoestring

Adventures

Having travelled to the furthest corners of the earth, NBS

lecturer Mr Tan Wee Cheng shares with Ong Yong Roy some

travel tips and tales.

A REMINDER OF HISTORY: Remnants of Somalia’s civil war are visible on the

former battlefield in Northern Somalia.

ACCUSED of being an illegal immigrant in Bulgaria, Nanyang Business

School lecturer Mr Tan Wee Cheng had the nerve to bargain with the

immigration officers on the bribe amount.

“It was my first solo trip. When I was crossing the Bulgarian border,

the immigration was corrupted and claimed that I faked the stamps of the

passport. I was very shaken then but I realised you can actually bargain

when someone is asking for bribes,” he said.

Having travelled to 196 countries and holding the record of “Most

Countries Travelled by a Single Person” by the Singapore Book of Records,

that encounter is just one of the many tales he has to share.

Mr Tan thrives on the thrill of unpredictable situations that travelling

offers. To date, he has scuffled with gangsters in Cyprus, been detained in

Russia and survived riots in Burkina Faso.

His traveling journey all began with a two-month graduation trip

to Europe with his NTU schoolmates. “I fell in love with travelling then.

Subsequently, all my annual leaves and academic breaks have been for used

up for travelling,” Mr Tan said.

He is always careful with his budget when travelling. “My cheapest hotel

in India was $4. Of course it was a terrible hotel. But if you are willing to

sacrifice on luxury, travelling can be cheap,” he said.

Mr Tan’s love of travelling and telling stories has

led him to immortalise his adventures in print. He

has written three travel novels titled “The

Greenland Seal Hunter”, “Hot Spots

and Dodgy Places” and “Exotic Places

and Dodgy Places”. The travel guru is

also a founder of www.sgtravelcafe.

com, a travel social networking site

that connects fellow travel enthusiasts

of all ages.

SAFETY FIRST: As it is common for civilians to

carry firarms in yemen, Mr. Tan got himself an AK

47 to blend in.

tips for bUDGET TravELLERS

1. Look out for budget airline promotions.

These promotions usually occur for

a limited time on Fridays and public

holidays.

2. South East Asia is good for budget trips.

While it might be perceived as a common

destination, there are hidden spots in the

Eastern part of Malaysia and unspoiled

tribes in Java.

3. Find out new areas of travel possibilities

by joining travel social networking sites

like www.sgtravelcafe.com, which holds

monthly gatherings where foreigners give

presentations on their country and fellow

travelers can share travel tips.

4. Planning is essential in budgeting. Read

up in advance on the places of interest,

and find out what the cheaper modes of

transport are. Emergencies should also be

addressed in budget-planning.

5. On budget trips to less developed

countries, it is sometimes uncertain the

problems you will meet due to corruption

and ambiguous immigration and travel

laws. It is important to have some cash

with you at all times for any potential

bribes.

6. A photocopy of your passport is another

item you should always have on hand.

7. Being “touristy” does not always mean

that the area is expensive. These places

often offer similar services in the same

area, like budget hostels and private villas.

Conversely, travelling is sometimes more

expensive in less developed countries

without a proper tourism infrastructure.

Additional customisation in terms of

transport and accommodation has to be

made, but it will cost you more.


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WALKS IN THE CITY

According to a report by CNN in 2007, Singapore has the world’s fastest walkers. Have we forgotten the pleasures of taking

a nice, leisurely stroll in this urban rush Malvin Chua visits three attractive walkways—Dhoby Ghaut Green, Marina Bay

Waterfront and the Sentosa Boardwalk—places of respite in the heart of the city to take a loved one for a chat or a drink.

RELAX: The timber boardwalk, with its lush palm trees and shrubs, gives the Sentosa Boardwalk a resort-like

atmosphere.

Sentosa Boardwalk

THE Sentosa Boardwalk opened in January

for visitors to get to Sentosa Island

from the VivoCity waterfront promenade

on foot.

Despite traffic on the vehicular bridge

running parallel to it, the walkway is tranquil.

Soft jazz playing in the background,

the many palm trees and shrubs, and the

timber boardwalk create a resort-like atmosphere.

If you are too lazy to walk, a series of

travelators will take you to the entrance of

Sentosa Island.

Marina Bay Waterfront

THE Marina Bay Waterfront has been

evolving with the development of the Marina

Bay Sands resort. Three iconic structures

have been added to the picture, namely the

Helix Bridge, the Marina Bay Sands Singapore,

and the newly-opened ArtScience

Museum.

Stepping into the Waterfront is like entering

a scene on a postcard—stand at the

Walking, however, offers a better view

and allows you to stop to admire the scenery.

Small boats occasionally pass by and

cable cars traverse the skyline. Up ahead,

the Merlion peeks out from behind the colourful

buildings on Sentosa Island.

Enjoy the sunset at The Wine Company

over a glass or two, or people-watch at

Ooh! Crepes, a small and quaint café on

the boardwalk, with crepes and coffee.

You can also indulge your sweet tooth

with Queens’ cakes and pastries or Italian

Gelato at Gelateria Venezia.

PICTURE-PERFECT: Stepping into the Marina Bay Waterfront is like entering the scene of a postcard—stand

at the Esplanade for a panoramic view of the cityscape.

PHOTOS | TERENCE LEE

Esplanade for a panoramic view of the cityscape

spanning from the Fullerton Hotel to

the Singapore Flyer.

Alternatively, stop at the “balconies”, or

viewing galleries jutting out along the Helix

Bridge, which links the Esplanade to the

Marina Bay Sands.

Seating is plentiful along the steps and

railings of the Waterfront.

JUXTAPOSITION: The landscape surrounding Dhoby Ghaut Green is an eclectic mix of old and new—with the

blue glass facade of the Atrium@Orchard contrasting with the faded red bricks of MacDonald House.

Dhoby Ghaut Green

DHOBY Ghaut Green was launched in October

last year as a place for arts events

and bazaars. It is the most accessible of the

three locations as three MRT lines converge

at Dhoby Ghaut.

Dhoby Ghaut Green is smack in the

middle of four stretches of roads. The surrounding

landscape, however, makes up for

all the noise with a picturesque view of the

eclectic mix of old and new architecture—

the blue glass façade of the Atrium@Orchard

contrasting with the faded red bricks

of MacDonald House, the beige exterior of

the MDIS building and the School of the

CENTRESTAGE: The outdoor amphitheatre outside the

Esplanade is a popular meeting place where friends

gather to chat and enjoy the scenery.

The place is generally quiet in the day,

but is filled with throngs of friends and lovers

come evening.

The outdoor amphitheatre outside the

Esplanade also transforms from a meeting

place to a live music venue at night.

Small shops along the walkway sell tidbits

and cold drinks you can take along on

your walk.

The Marina Bay Sands resort has many

expensive restaurants, but fret not, The

Shoppes also has a food court in the basement.

You can also have affordable hawker

fare at the Makansutra Glutton’s Bay which

is nearer to the Esplanade.

Arts, with lush greenery spilling down its

sides.

The landmark of Dhoby Ghaut Green is

the sculptural amphitheatre, which resembles

a rattan basket in shape and texture,

sitting in the centre of the space. In the

evening, it lights up like a glittering lantern

and is a great subject for photographs.

The park has an on-site restaurant,

Sakura International Buffet, for hungry

visitors.

You can also visit more restaurants

and shop at Plaza Singapura, The Cathay

Cineplex and Park Mall nearby.

“Must-dos” on your

walk about town

Free ConcertS

Catch free concerts at the Esplanade

Outdoor Theatre (at the Marina Bay

Waterfront), where local acts often

perform. See http://www.esplanade.

com/whats_on/index.jsp for the

year’s schedule of events.

Romantic Picnic

Pack a picnic before heading to Dhoby

Ghaut Green in the evening. The

lit-up façade of the outdoor amphitheatre

creates a glittering backdrop

for a romantic evening. You can lay

out a mat on the grass by the theatre

or in the theatre itself, or do away

with the picnic blanket and sit along

the theatre's steps.

Sight seeing

People-watch or enjoy the scenery

at the window seats at Ooh! Crepes

(at the Sentosa Boardwalk), which is

the only eatery along the stretch with

seats facing the waterfront. Its cosy

cafe atmosphere also makes it conducive

for conversation.


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LIFESTYLE 19

Sincerely,

Myanmar

It is isolated, undeveloped and poor, but that's exactly why you

should visit Myanmar, says Wallace Woon.

THE GOLDEN ROCK: The Kyaiktiyo Pagoda boulder sparkles in the sunlight as numerous Buddhist faithful apply layers of gold leaf.

PHOTOS | WALLACE WOON

Myanmar is one of the world’s

poorest nations, but the air

is full of gold. Flecks of gold

leaf floated on the breeze

around me and sparkled

in the sunlight at Kyaiktiyo Pagoda.

More commonly known as the Golden

Rock, this seven-metre high boulder

balances on the edge of a cliff, dramatic

against the backdrop of the Mon mountain

range, and the Buddhist faithful apply

layers of gold leaf until it glows in the sun.

Nothing is put on for the tourists; it

is the real thing, which is rare enough in

Asia and can set you wondering what is

the value of development and tourism

when much will be lost.

Travelling in Myanmar presents this

dilemma. Visiting the country means that

the locals are able to learn more about the

world, but it also means that a burgeoning

tourism industry will corrupt the purity that

makes Myanmar such a joy to visit.

This Catch-22 situation was fuel for

debate between other travellers and me

as we sat down after a day of touring.

The consensus was that, with responsible

and sustainable tourism practices, the

benefits of visiting Myanmar outweighed

the possible drawbacks.

That said, my tour of the country was

a valuable experience and I am grateful

for the chance to have visited it before the

influx of tourists changes it irreversibly.

As I walked its streets, I felt a real

sense of being transported back to a time

when Asian culture had not given way to

Western modernisation and people were not

preoccupied with achieving financial success.

In the former capital of Yangon the

buildings are reminders that the country

was colonised by the same nation that gave

the world afternoon tea and the Premier

League. Myanmar has more than its fair

share of British government buildings, like

Singapore. The stark difference is, unlike

City Hall and the Fullerton Hotel, these

buildings need a good scrub.

Myanmar bears some similarities to

Singapore. The population constitutes a

THE "LAND OF SMILES": Get ready to be greated by friendly faces.

multi-ethnic stew. Deep colonial influences,

both in habit and in policy, live on more than

half a century after the British pulled out.

But from this similar starting point,

the recent history of Myanmar has played

out almost in opposite of Singapore’s.

The country, at one time the ricebowl

of Asia, slid downwards to become

labelled Least Developed Country by the

United Nations.

Restricted areas and heavy media

censorship ensure that visitors and locals

alike remain ignorant about the government’s

ill doings as well as international affairs.

That was exactly why I chose to visit

the country.

With all of its mishaps in human rights

and economic development, Myanmar has

kept its local flavour very much unspoiled.

Claude Baronet, a French travel

photographer I met, proclaimed his idea

that the “Land of Smiles” title should

also be given to Myanmar. Because, smile

PHOTOS | WALLACE WOON

the people do. Everywhere I went I was

greeted with betel-stained teeth.

European hospitality is married with

Asian family values in Myanmar. It is all

too easy to be invited to someone’s home

for a meal after a short conversation.

Very often I would have a local snack

pushed towards me by a smiling stranger,

until I began to question if these generous

people were really as poor as we were told.

But appearances can be deceptive.

I marvelled at the Myanmese children,

who seemed to lead a carefree life.

Most are content to be running

around their neighbourhood with careless

abandon, with a posse of friends in tow.

More than once I came across kids playing

an impromptu game of football and joined

them for an afternoon kick-about session.

Idyllic as it may sound, being a kid

in Myanmar is not all fun and games.

Although the country boasts a relatively

high literacy rate at the primary level, it

plummets at the secondary and tertiary

due to the high cost of school fees.

Left to wander around home or in

town, many kids take up menial service

industry jobs to ease the burden on their

parents aging.

A highway stop near the capital Nay

Pyi Taw was staffed by kids looking as

young as seven or eight. The sight of the

eatery looking like a playground can be

disturbing, and a reminder that there are

deeply rooted problems in Myanmar still.

The country rides a rollercoaster in

and out of the spotlight. The world stops

and gasps, then quickly catches its breath

and continues on its way.

That gives us another reason to visit.

As residents of an advanced nation, who

are privileged to pursue a university

education and enjoy first-world comforts,

we are ambassadors in our own right.

Interaction with the locals is a two-way

exchange. Our knowledge of the world can

help reverse the effects that governmentimposed

isolation has on the people—as well

as giving a chance to see a beautiful country

before the progress that comes with tourism

changes it forever.


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SHOW 21

dapper: your essential style guide

Black Crop Jacket, $289, Shirt, $89.90, The Corner

Shop. Grey Pants, $115, Depression. Leather Shoes,

$159, J Shoes.

Satin Blouse, $59, Pants, $69, Alice’s. Stilettos, $99.90,

Charles & Keith. Sunglasses, $39.90, The Corner Shop.

Dress, $125, Depression. Boots, $75.90, Charles & Keith.

T H E M I N I M A L I S T.

Photographer - GLADYS NG / Stylists - HONG YU RAN - GLADYS NG / Assistant Stylist - FOONG WAI HARNG / Models - JONAS LINDBERG - LUIZA LINHARES / Make-up & Hair - KLEIN CHO

On Luiza: Black Dress, $125, Depression. Mesh Jumpsuit worn under, $69, Alice’s. Cut-out Boots, $75.90, Charles & Keith.

On Jonas: White Bow Shirt, $109, Black Crop Jacket, $289, Kilted Bermudas, $79.90, The Corner Shop. Patented Leather Shoes, $159, J Shoes.

STOCKISTS

Depression, Millenia Walk Parco, #P2-21,

Alice’s, Millenia Walk Parco, #P2- 22

Charles & Keith, 435 Orchard Rd #B1-18/19 Wisma Atria

The Corner Shop, 4 Scotts Road #03-16 Far East Plaza

J Shoes, #03-03 Cathay Cineleisure Orchard.

T-shirt, $35, Black Pants, $109, Vintage Hat, $49.90,

The Corner Shop. High-Cut Black Shoes, $189, J Shoes.

Black Dress, $95, Depression. Leather Booties, $69.90,

Charles & Keith.

Bow Shirt, $109, The Corner Shop. Shorts with Tights,

$110, Depression. Harness Vest, $49, Alice’s. High-Cut

Black Shoes, $189, J Shoes.


22 SHOW

photo: spotlight

THE NANYANG

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VOL.

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08

RIGHT: An

exchange

student

hangs from a

ceiling beam

above the VIP

dance floor.

He falls with

the beam but

walks away

unscathed.

BELOW: Merry-making is the order of the night. A local undergraduate grooves along

to the party beats.

In the darkness of the night,

the party animals come

a-prowling.

And they become wilder

the further they are away

from home.

And so we find,

at La Maison &

Blujaz Cafe,

exchange students party

harder while Singaporeans

play it safe.

WHAT HAPPENS

HERE

STAYS HEREand pianist

ABOVE: Hall of Residence 8’s Jam Band

plays to a quiet crowd at Blujaz Cafe.

“We’ll love it if you sing along,” says singer

Lyndsey Long.

LEFT: Two

friends looking

embarrassed

as their other

friends tease

them. “Kiss,

kiss, kiss,”

they chant in

Hokkien.

ABOVE: The bartender at La Maison

holds a $50 bill in his mouth as his

hands try to keep up with brisk business.

LEFT: A

party-goer

falls asleep in

a quiet corner

as the party

winds down at

the Ravehaus

presents Pyjama

Party.

RIGHT: As the

clock strikes

midnight, 50

couples are

invited to the

VIP dance

floor where

slower songs

are played.

This exchange

couple shares

an intimate

moment on the

crowded dance

floor.

ABOVE: Revelers dance to the tunes DJ JUICE spins. The Singapore Uni House Party saw more exchange students than locals among their guests.

PHOTOS AND WORDS | GOH CHAY TENG & WAN ZHONG HAO


24 LIFESTYLE

reviews

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Hey, Soul Sister

Jazz artist Esperanza Spalding shocked the world when she won the

Grammy for Best Newcomer.

Shahilia Bhagat sings her praises.

ESPERANZA Spalding, a little

known country jazz bassist

and singer, made waves

recently when she snatched

the Best New Artist Grammy

award from hot favourite

Justin Bieber.

At just 26, Spalding is

the first jazz singer to win

the award, beating Bieber,

English folk rock band

Mumford and Sons, hiphop

artist Drake and the

soul band Florence and the

Machine.

Spalding, whose first

name Esperanza means

‘hope’ in Spanish, was

brought up in what she

calls ‘the other side of the

tracks’, in a neighbourhood

in Portland, Oregon.

Growing up in a singleparent

home where money

was hard to come by, she

learnt the hard way that

nothing comes easy.

At the tender age of five,

Spalding taught herself to

play the violin well enough

to secure a place in The

Chamber Music Society of

Oregon. Her inspiration

Watching classical cellist Yo

Yo Ma perform on television.

She then stayed with the

orchestra for 10 years. At

just 15, Spalding was made

concertmaster (the leader of

the first violin section in the

orchestra).

Spa ld i ng, who wa s

home-schooled, later entered

Portland State University at

16 to pursue a Bachelor of

Music.

At 20, Spalding then

joined the faculty of Berklee

College of Music in Boston,

making her the youngest

faculty member in the

school’s 40 year history.

Despite her accolades,

Spalding remains grounded.

She attributes her success to

her mother who is also her

role model and biggest fan.

She does not consider herself

to be a musical prodigy and

regards her albums as collaborative

works rather than

solo efforts.

“I like

performing in

laid-back places

where people

get involved and

hoot and holler.”

Esperanza Spalding

Interview with Nu-Soul

Magazine

Spalding’s style of music,

recorded in English,

Portuguese and Spanish,

may not resemble the conventional

music played on

the airwaves.

But despite her supposed

lack of mainstream appeal,

the dark horse winner with

the distinctive afro possesses

astonishing musical talents.

She can play the violin,

bass guitar, piano, oboe and

clarinet—but picks the upright

bass as her instrument

of choice.

“From the time Esperanza

Spalding appeared in the

scene in 2005, the dynamic

singer, bassist, composer and

arranger has been heralded

as jazz’s next big thing,” the

Associate Press wrote in a

lead-up to the Grammys.

“Her impressive musicianship

has won her White

House recital dates, praise

from the likes of Stevie

Wonder and Herbie Hancock,

JUNJO (2006)

Though presented as a solo effort, “Junjo” meshes

the talents of Spalding with the artistry of Cuban musicians—pianist

Aruán Ortiz and drummer Francisco Mela—

to produce an album that ranges from modern American

jazz to contemporary Brazilian music and traditional

Argentine folk music.

Spalding uses a delicate, wordless pattern that is

cohesive enough to allow one vowel to flow into the next.

Her bass solo on “Mompouana” is brilliant and demonstrates

her great devotion to the instrument she loves.

and critical acclaim.”

Having been on tour

with the likes of singing ESPERANZA (2008)

legend Ella Fitzgerald and

The album mostly encompasses self-penned songs

saxaphonist Joe Lovano in that are simultaneously pleasant, compelling and powerful.

the past, Spalding is about

to embark on a solo tour

Standout tracks include the inspirational “Espera,”

across both North and South and her own interpretation of the classic “Cuerpo y Alma”.

America, Europe and Africa.

The brassy up-beat tune of “She Got to You” is a

Her next endeavour is definite crowdpleaser that even non-jazz lovers would love.

a record currently titled

The smooth jazz-samba hybrid creation, “I Adore You”

‘Radio Music Society’ set for is infectiously catchy with its deep, booming drumbeat at

release late this year.

the beginning of the song.

Spalding hopes that the

album will open listeners up

to jazz music by exhibiting

jazz musicians in a manner

appropriate for mainstream

radio. Despite her unexpected

Grammy win, the young

lass remains classy. When

asked about the backlash

from Justin Bieber’s fans, she

had a gem of a reply.

“You never know, some

of those Bieber fans might,

in a few years, discover they

like jazz, they like the bass,

and they like my singing,”

CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY (2010)

The record is Spalding’s biggest and most ambitious

effort yet. The album is filled with undulating vocals accompanied

by Spalding’s jazz trio (pianist Leo Genovese and

drummer Terri Lyne Carrington) and a string trio (violinist

Entcho Todorov, violist Lois Martin, cellist David Eggar)

that provides the backbone for every song.

The album encompasses Latin rhythms that shift

through blues, gospel, Brazilian, and Afro-Cuban and

does so always in good taste. A highlight of the album,

the upbeat “Winter Sun” allows Spalding to showcase her

impressive bass-playing skills as well as her robust voice

to produce a cheery song.

she told ABC News. “And if

they don’t, God bless them

and I’m going to keep doing

it anyway.” PHOTOS | INTERNET


VOL.

NO.

17

08

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

reviews

Music

AMANDA PALMER GOES DOWN UNDER

Amanda Palmer (Dark Cabaret)

, , , , ,

During her recent Australian tour to promote the album,

Amanda Palmer raised over A$3000 in a single show to

help the people of Christchurch.

REBELLIOUS, controversial,

and sinisterly humorous.

This mismatch of adjectives

describe Amanda Palmer and

her latest album, Amanda

Palmer Goes Down Under

perfectly.

While still relatively

unknown in the realm of

mainstream music, Palmer

(self-proclaimed and referred

to by her loyal fans as Amanda

F***ing Palmer for her devilmay-care

attitude) is wellknown

in the Australian and

New Zealand theatre circuits.

Goes Down Under is her

first recorded live album,

and plays like a comedy

musical to the ears of new

listeners. Hilarious lyrics

and catchy tunes make up

the essence of tracks such as

Vegemite, where she laments

the traditional Australian

spread, and Map of Tasmania,

a song with a funky, eclectic

Jamaican vibe.

In the latter song, Palmer

takes the unusual step of

comparing women’s pubic

hair to the little island south

of Australia. Let it fly in the

open wind/If it get too bushy

you can trim are some of the

track’s tamer lyrics.

Palmer does, however,

ta ke t h ings to a more

serious level with songs

such as Australia and On

An Unknown Beach, each

with her signature haunting

piano accompaniments. In

My Mind, a song reflecting

on her life and future, is

accompanied by the sounds

of a ukulele, her trademark

instrument.

Although Goes Down

Under is not your typical

easy-listening album, Palmer

never crosses the line into the

truly shocking.

You need an open mind

and a sense of humour to

enjoy her music, intentionally

recorded to entertain and

appeal to the quirky side in

all of us.

Nonetheless, her solid

vocals and witty songwriting

would serve her well if she

ever intends to break into

the mainstream market. For

now, take a walk on the wild

side with Amanda Palmer’s

unique effort.

-Priscilla Kham

"One of the reasons

why I love it here

so much is that

Australians aren’t

obsessed with

perfection.”

Amanda Palmer on her inspiration for

Amanda Palmer Goes Down Under

Interview with X-Press Magazine

LIFESTYLE 25

books

PREMIER LEECH

Neil Humphreys (Fiction)

$23.95 at Kinokuniya

Published by Marshall

Cavendish Editions

YOUNG men earn fortunes

for kicking a ball about while

the rest of the world struggles

through an economic downturn.

For fans of the English

Premier League who watch

their heroes on televised

matches every week, Premier

Leech gives them a shocking

look at the seedier side of the

global sport.

In the book, prominent

newspaper columnist and

writer Neil Humphreys returns

with a shocking exposé

about Scott (no last name

revealed), a football captain,

and his journey into the torrid

underbelly of the sporting

world.

Scott, a humble Essex

boy hailing from Dagenham,

East London, is riding high

as a top-tier league player.

But intoxicated by a deadly

concoction of fame, success,

and a lack of self-discipline,

he commits adultery with his

best friend’s wife.

As Scott attempts to suppress

the tabloid’s efforts to

uncover the affair, he is beset

by yet more troubles.

To compound matters, rumours

are gathering that his

club (which is never named

directly) may be subject to

a secret takeover bid by a

wealthy Saudi businessman.

Scott then worries that the

Saudi’s interest in his attractive

pop-singer wife may be

more than just coincidence.

We live in a definitive

new era of football where the

gap between the footballer

and his fans is increasingly

widened by fancy displays of

sports cars, celebrity wives

and sprawling mansions.

Humphreys questions if

the ‘Holy Trinity’ of the fans,

players and the manager all

being of equal importance, as

espoused by Liverpool legend

Bill Shankly, still holds true

today.

As you might expect, the

novel answers this with a

firm ‘no’.

Although the novel is told

from Scott’s point of view,

Humphreys echoes the disillusionment

of real fans by

emphasising the detachment

Scott has with the real world.

An early scene sets the

tone for the kind of cynical

humour that fills the pages.

Scott’s friend asks if the girl

he had sex with the night

before had taken a video of

their tryst.

Scott declares that unlike

Lampard, he’s sick of having

his face beamed around the

world every weekend.

He smugly adds that he

knows how to protect himself

from being filmed at any other

time, especially during sex.

EPL fans will no doubt

recall with some amusement

the sex scandal that implicated

Chelsea player Frank

Lampard some time ago.

With enough suspense

and drama to entertain even

non-football fans, Premier

Leech makes readers question

whether football really is still

the ‘Beautiful Game’.

-Goh Ee-Ling

100 MISTAKES THAT

CHANGED HISTORY

Bill Fawcett (Non-Fiction)

$23.95 at Kinokuniya

Published by Berkley Press

EVERYONE likes to hear stories

about others’ mistakes.

100 Mistakes That Changed

History provides you with just

that—a list of 100 mistakes

that changed the course of

human history.

While it is only human to

err, some mistakes come with

consequences too huge for

anyone to bear—even for some

of the world’s greatest leaders.

In his latest book, Bill

Fawcett takes readers through

a history of mistakes—from

the one that created the

Western Civilisation in 499

BCE to the one which led to

the collapse of the global

stock market in 2008.

Fawcett must have put in

tremendous effort presenting

the 100 monumental moments

as bite-sized stories,

and making them a joy to

read.

One story with an important

life lesson is how the

Americans took over Texas

from Mexico like guests that

had overstayed their welcome—since

1821 to be exact.

The stories may make

sense to those with a good

knowledge of historical

events, but confusing to those

without.

By cutting to the chase,

these stories leave out most of

the background information.

For example, Fawcett

mentions Richard Nixon’s

mistake of breaking into

the Democratic National

Committee headquarters at

the Watergate complex.

It cost him his 20-point

popularity lead in the polls,

along with the presidency.

However, Fawcett assumes

that readers are already

familiar with the context

of the 1972 American

Presidential election, and

does not delve into the de-

tails of Nixon’s obsessive

behaviour.

Probably the deadliest

mistake made in history was

the decision by European

peasants to kill off the cat

population during the ‘Black

Death’ period of the mid-

1300s.

The peasants eventually

caused the plague to spread

even further, as the population

of rats, the real carriers,

increased rapidly once their

natural predators were gone.

Their fatal error caused

100 million deaths, and the

social and political institutions

of Europe took a century

and a half to recover.

While Fawcett did a commendable

job in identifying

these defining moments, it

is a pity that he did not provide

additional insight or an

analysis of the events.

If his purpose for the

book is simply to provide an

overview of key mistakes

in history, the book serves

admirably.

Otherwise, it leaves you

searching for more background

information on the

mistakes you’ve just read

about.

-Cheryl Chan

BOOKS FROM KINOKUNIYA

PHOTOS | INTERNET


26

reviews

FILMS

TRUE GRIT

AMERICAN WESTERN

Jeff Bridges, Josh Brolin, Matt Damon,

Hailee Steinfield

110min

, , , , ,

A YOUNG girl’s quest for

justice and family honour begins

when 14-year-old Mattie

Ross’s (Hailee Steinfield) father

was wrongfully slain by

hitman Tom Chaney (Josh

Brolin). The young girl swears

vengeance, setting into motion

the events of True Grit.

True Grit is the modern

adaptation of a John Wayne

classic, and it is fascinating

to see how this legendary

Western tale still measures up

to today’s standards. The story

begins with Mattie’s narration

of her father’s murder.

With no other option,

Mattie hires the alcoholic,

merciless U.S. Marshal

named Rooster Cogburn (Jeff

Bridges) to capture her father’s

murderer. Reputed to

be the meanest and cruelest

Marshal around, Cogburn is

also known among his peers

as the “man with true grit”.

LIFESTYLE

However, he does show a

softer side when he rescues

Mattie from a snake bite,

and carries her on his back

for miles to seek medical aid.

As Mattie and Cogburn

trek across the great outdoors

on their horses in

true Western style, they are

accompanied by a Texas

Ranger named LaBoeuf (Matt

Damon). LaBouef is, coincidentally,

also in pursuit of

Chaney for the murder of a

Texas politician.

Mattie is reluctant to have

him along on their journey as

she refuses to have Chaney

trialed for any crime other

than her father’s murder.

The tension between the three

builds as they clash over how

best to deal with the man they

are hunting down.

Despite the slow pace of

the film, what is most impressive

is the development of

the characters. Like Cogburn,

Mattie too begins to show

flashes of “true grit” herself.

HARD JUSTICE: Hailee Steinfield, Jeff Bridges, Matt Damon and Josh Brolin all star in this classic Western tale of murder and vengeance.

Especially noteworthy is

her courage—she never allows

anyone or any circumstance

to stand in the way of capturing

her father’s murderer.

Despite going up against

two men much older and

far tougher than she is,

Mattie proves she is not so

easily dissuaded. “As I walk

through the valley of death,

I shall fear no evil,” Mattie

says repeatedly.

It is only through the occasional

flash of uncertainty

and tears in her eyes that the

audience is reminded that

Mattie, despite her cold and

hard exterior, is a teenage

girl.

The film fast forwards 25

years later, with Mattie looking

over Cogburn’s grave. She

remembers the old Marshal

and ponders how time catches

up with everyone.

Mattie is also shown to

have paid her price for the

revenge she sought. This

closely parallels her haunting,

powerful line at the start

of the film, “You must pay

for everything in this world

THE NANYANG

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one way or another. There is

nothing free, except the grace

of God”.

Directed by the Coen

brothers, True Grit is a worthy

adaptation of Charles Portis’

1968 novel. It definitely delivers

and is indeed deserving

of all its 10 Academy Award

nominations.

-Theodora Theresa D’cruz

NEVER LET ME GO

DYSTOPIAN DRAMA

CAREY MULLIGAN, KEIRA KNIGHTLEY,

ANDREW GARFIELD

103min

, , , , ,

IF The Island was an action-packed thriller

about clones being bred for organ donations,

Never Let Me Go is its quieter, more introspective

British cousin. This tale of attachment

and loss was adapted from a 2005 novel by

Japanese author Kazuo Ishiguro.

The movie depicts the lives of three

clones, born and raised specifically to ensure

an available source of human organs for the

people they were cloned from. The clones have

thoughts and feelings like any other human.

Three of them, Kathy (Carey Mulligan),

Ruth (Keira Knightley) and Tommy (Andrew

Garfield) are entangled in a love triangle that

begins in their childhood and lasts until they

are adults.

The movie begins in Hailsham, a special

boarding school where the clones live a life

of idyllic ease. Not everything is perfect,

however, as the clones discover that they are

destined to die when the originals require their

vital organs.

Tommy is distraught after learning this,

and becomes withdrawn and depressed. Kathy

grows fond of him, but Tommy eventually

enters into a relationship with Ruth instead.

Never Let Me Go does not concern itself

with the moral issues of cloning. It focuses on

the relationships between the main characters

and their emotional dilemmas. This is a good

decision as the film’s strength lies in the performance

of its three stars.

Although Tommy and Ruth’s relationship

takes up most of the movie, it is Carey

Mulligan’s portrayal of Kathy that stands out.

Her nuanced performance as a woman in

love with a man who only regards her as a

friend is remarkable in its subtlety.

The final third of the film includes a plot

twist that changes what the viewers would

DOPPELGANGER: Tommy (Andrew Garfield) has

a complicated relationship with Kathy (Carey

Mulligan).

have initially thought about the clones and

their place in the world. It is worked seamlessly

into the plot and as a result doesn’t

come off as trite or forced.

Despite the movie’s strengths, it is difficult

to determine exactly which genre this

film falls under. It has elements of a sci-fi,

romance or even a period piece. It feels as

though director Mark Romanek included

a little of everything to appeal to a wider

audience.

Nevertheless, Never Let Me Go is a work

of subtle beauty—a melancholic meditation

on the finality of life and the choices we

make as our time shortens.

-Marlene Tan

127 HOURS

ADVENTURE

James Franco

94min

, , , , ,

THE thought of watching a movie about a

man stuck in a narrow gorge for more than

a hundred hours hardly seems compelling.

But as Ryan Reynolds proved in Buried,

a movie which is about a man trying to

escape being buried alive, the desperation

of being caught in an impossible situation

can be fascinating.

James Franco (Spider-Man, Pineapple

Express) turns in a splendid performance

as mountain climber Aron Ralston facing a

similar in 127 Hours.

The movie distinguishes itself from the

rest by virtue of being based on a true story.

127 Hours depicts Ralston’s ordeal after a

boulder crashes onto his arm and traps him

in an isolated Utah canyon.

With limited resources and time running

out, Ralston must decide how far he is willing

to go to survive.

The success of a film that uses one actor

for almost its entire running time depends a

lot on him, and Franco delivers in spades.

He skillfully assumes both ends on the scale

of human emotion as he goes from comedy

to tragedy.

Director Danny Boyle, the man behind

Slumdog Millionaire, does not shy away

from shocking.

There are times when you feel Boyle is

tormenting the audience with several scenes

almost unbearable to watch.

For example, Ralston breaks his arm,

and desperately drinks from a water bag

filled with his own urine. But these moments

are what make the film intense and visceral.

In another graphic scene, Boyle cleverly

enhances its intensity by introducing a

deeply emotional sequence before it.

NO WAY OUT: Caught between a rock and a hard

place, how far will Aron Ralston (James Franco) go to

survive

Ralston begins to hallucinate and imagines

saying goodbye to his loved ones and an

imaginary future son.

Despite the gore and horror reminiscent

of a Saw movie, the best parts of the film are

those where Ralston sits and looks at the heavens

for hope. The stillness of the scene starkly

contrasts the despair of Ralston’s situation.

Unfortunately the film is not without problems.

Boyle indulges in too many flashback

scenes that are not developed fully, and lack

emotional depth.

Although disturbing at times, 127 Hours

is ultimately about an intense battle between

nature and Ralston’s will to live.

-Brenda Xie

PHOTOS | INTERNET


VOL.

NO.

17

08

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

reviews

Draw Me Closer

LIFESTYLE 27

FOUR strangers hailing from

wildly different backgrounds

discover they have something

in common—the search

for love and the pitfalls of

temptation.

C l o s e r i s t h e s e c -

ond stage production for

Singapore’s newest theatre

company Pangdemonium!

Productions, directed by

the husband-and-wife duo

of Adrian and Tracie Pang.

Originally written by

Patrick Marber in 1997 for

the West End in London,

it was later adapted to a

Hollywood film starring

Julia Roberts, Jude Law and

Natalie Portman.

Following the duo’s successful

inaugural production

The Full Monty, Closer

explores the line between

Pangdemonium! Productions wrapped up its final showing of Closer at the DBS Arts Centre yesterday.

Celine Chen shares her thoughts.

OH WHAT A

TANGLED WEB

WE WEAVE:

Larry (Adrian

Pang), Anna (Tan

Kheng Hua), Dan

(Keagan Kang)

and Alice (Cynthia

Lee-MacQuarrie)

discover that love

does not always

liberate—sometimes

it imprisons. Closer

is the second play

to be staged by

Pangdemonium!

Productions.

love and lust. The production

does away with slapstick

humour and presents instead

the morbid side of love and

personal relationships.

The story depicts the

lives of Alice (Cynthia Lee-

MacQuarrie), Dan (Keagan

Kang), Anna (Tan Kheng

Hua) and Larr y (Adrian

Pang) intertwined in a web

of emotions and deceit. The

script is explicit with a noholds

barred approach to

sex talk.

The tale of Closer begins

with the four characters

meeting one another through

a series of coincidences.

As the characters interact,

temptation eventually gets

the better of them.

T he production was

not all smooth sailing. Tan

Kheng Hua was forced to replace

Emma Yong a few days

before opening night due to

medical reasons. Fortunately

Tan, a stage veteran, was able

to perform the role of Anna

effortlessly.

Perhaps the small arts

scene in Singapore was helpful

in this instance, as most

of the actors already knew

each other.

The result was a good

portrayal of Anna, a professional

photographer who attempts

to control of her love

life, but to no avail.

“Opening

night was a bit

like falling in

love—thrilling,

terrifying and

unforgettably

romantic!.”

Adrian Pang, commenting on

the play’s opening night to

local blogger Red Dot Diva.

The role of Larry was

played by another veteran,

Adrian Pang. Larry is a

dermatologist grounded in

reality and a man assured of

his choices.

Pang’s portrayal of a

confident man who suffers a

shattering blow to his spirit

and pride was delivered convincingly

in the emotional

scenes that followed.

Alice, a free-spirited girl

who works part time as a

stripper, harbours secrets of

a disturbing past.

She was portrayed by

Cynthia Lee-MacQuarrie,

who delivered a believable

performance of a young

woman whose choices in love

and life eventually takes a

turn for the worse.

However as the play

was set in London, Lee-

MacQuarrie made the unfortunate

choice of affecting a

British accent that sometimes

came across as unnatural.

The Australian actor

Keagan Kang took on the role

of Dan, an aspiring writer

who is fickle-minded about

love. He is easily tempted

and immature in handling

serious relationships.

Kang, unfortunately, did

not seem to be in character at

some points although he got

better as the play progressed.

In essence, all four characters

are deeply flawed,

desiring to be redeemed.

Each of them encounters

certain moments which enables

them to appear more

vulnerable, allowing the audience

to relate to the drama

as it unfolds.

The stage was used in an

interesting manner. In one

instance, two scenes from

separate worlds were played

out side by side on stage. An

unconventional use of stage

space, but it fulfiled its aim

of showing the contrast between

the characters.

SULTRY SUB: Tan Kheng Hua replaces Emma Yong as Anna.

Closer serves as a mirror

for modern relationships. It

deals with mature themes

that would not be complete

without a lot of sex talk,

vulgarities and tension.

It illustrates how at times

lies can protect and truths

destroy, and how putting on

a mask to conceal our real

selves could instead lead to

a tragic end.

The script achieves a

good balance of delightfully

dark humour and genuine

moments of sadness.

Compared to its lighthear

ted debut The Full

Monty, Closer is a script that

proved more of a challenge.

It is harder to please the audience

this time around as the

production is a melodrama,

rather than a musical.

The cast of Closer pulled

it off well, largely due to the

good casting. Judging by

the quality of their sophomore

effort the future of

Pangdemonium! Productions

looks promising with Adrian

and Tracie Pang at the helm.

For a four person cast in

a play running for just 90

minutes, praise is in order for

this thoughtful production.

PHOTOS | INTERNET

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I AM WEARING...

New Era Cap from The Corner Shop. Supreme

tee from overseas, (I do not remember the

prices). Chino pants from Uniqlo at $49.90 and

Redwing yellow Mustang boots at $438. Fred

Perry bag at $119.90.

my pERSoNAL STYLE...

I am a sneakerhead! Other than that, I like the

old-school vintage look and I love to match it

with more modern pieces.

MY STYLE ICON IS...

Takuya Kimura, Hiroshi Fujiwara and Johnny

Depp.

NTU CAMPUS STYLE IS...

All about the berms-and-tee style!

I'D NOT BE CAUGHT DEAD WEARING...

Singlet and basketball shorts.

I AM WEARING...

Top from vintage store at Chatuchak, at $30.

Denim shorts from Cotton On, $30. Sandals

from Tang & Co at $80 and the bag is borrowed

from my sister.

my pERSoNAL STYLE...

I don’t really have a fixed style. I just wear

whatever I feel like when I want to express

myself, especially clothes that I am comfortable

in.

MY STYLE ICON IS...

Vanessa Hudgens and the Olsen twins.

NTU CAMPUS STYLE IS...

Comfort over style.

I'D NOT BE CAUGHT DEAD WEARING...

Tights as pants or FBTs to class, and clothes

with lace all over.


林 俊 杰 勤 练 六 块 肌 以 满 足 歌 迷

—— 刊 32 页

新 闻

为 了 筹 钱 学 生 组 织 忽 略 隐 私 问 题

许 多 学 生 填 完 问 卷 , 并 不 知 道 这 些 资 料 往 往 会 落 入 推 销 公 司 的 手 中 。

林 坪

● 报 道

辈 压 力 加 上 金 钱 的

同 诱 惑 , 使 许 多 学 生

不 知 不 觉 泄 漏 个 人 资 料 。

为 了 筹 钱 , 许 多 学 生

组 织 都 分 发 问 卷 给 身 边

的 朋 友 填 上 。 当 他 们 填

写 问 卷 后 , 并 对 这 些 资

料 的 处 理 一 无 所 知 。

用 歌 词 打 开 创 意 之 门

陈 婧 ● 报 道

熟 能 详 的 快 餐 店 和

耳 电 台 等 家 喻 户 晓 的

商 业 歌 曲 , 就 是 必 胜 的 广

告 旋 律 。

第 四 届 中 文 流 行 歌 词

与 创 作 课 程 结 业 礼 上 , 去

年 新 加 坡 文 化 奖 得 主 梁

文 福 商 业 歌 曲 为 例 , 说

明 :“ 有 创 意 的 歌 词 就 能

唤 起 人 们 的 记 忆 ”。

这 个 由 南 大 孔 子 学 院

与 新 加 坡 词 曲 版 权 协 会

(COMPASS) 合 办 的 座

谈 会 反 应 热 烈 , 吸 引 了 许

多 年 轻 人 出 席 。

梁 文 福 与 曾 为 周 华 健

和 阿 杜 等 知 名 歌 手 谱 写

就 读 于 商 学 院 的 一

年 级 生 黄 凯 琳 (19 岁 )

说 : “ 我 在 做 问 卷 的 时

候 , 并 没 有 想 那 么 多 ,

只 想 赶 快 完 成 。 问 卷 上

所 需 要 的 资 料 , 我 照 填

就 是 了 。”

海 峡 时 报 在 一 月 刊 登

的 报 道 中 指 出 , 有 许 多

毕 业 生 会 接 到 陌 生 的 电

话 , 向 他 们 推 销 产 品 或

歌 曲 的 创 作 人 李 志 清 以 讲

座 对 谈 的 方 式 , 让 公 众 了

解 歌 词 在 歌 曲 中 的 重 要 作

用 , 也 希 望 更 多 有 志 者 能

投 身 中 文 流 行 歌 词 创 作 。

嘈 杂 语 言 环 境 碍 于 创 作

对 于 新 马 中 文 作 词 人

呈 现 青 黄 不 接 的 现 象 ,

来 自 马 来 西 亚 的 李 志 清 指

出 , 新 马 两 地 的 嘈 杂 语 言

环 境 对 于 培 养 填 词 的 创 意

来 说 , 可 能 是 一 种 阻 碍 。

他 举 例 说 :“ 许 多 新

马 年 轻 人 会 用 ‘ 今 天 我

feel sad’ 中 英 混 杂 的 语 言

抒 发 感 情 , 使 他 们 很 难 使

用 纯 粹 的 中 文 来 表 达 自 己

摄 影 | 许 原 端

是 告 知 就 业 机 会 。

他 们 认 为 , 这 些 公 司

是 通 过 他 们 在 大 学 时 期

填 写 的 问 卷 获 得 他 们 的

资 料 。

学 生 们 为 了 学 校 或 宿

舍 的 活 动 发 问 卷 筹 钱 。

这 样 的 筹 款 活 动 在 本 地

大 学 都 极 为 普 遍 , 而 问

卷 上 的 问 题 甚 至 包 括 联

络 方 式 及 家 庭 收 入 。

的 原 意 。”

课 程 结 业 礼 当 天 , 就

有 三 名 优 秀 学 员 的 作 品 得

到 发 表 , 其 中 一 名 包 括 南

大 中 文 系 毕 业 生 刘 美 云

(24 岁 )。

现 任 中 学 华 文 教 师 的

刘 美 云 表 示 , 即 使 是 中 文

程 度 很 好 的 人 , 也 未 必 能

成 为 合 格 的 写 词 人 :“ 一

首 好 的 歌 词 不 光 要 语 句 优

美 , 还 要 注 重 押 韵 , 要 求

是 很 高 的 …… 因 此 , 我 还

会 在 这 条 道 路 上 继 续 探 索

和 学 习 。”

“ 词 源 ” 提 供 联 络 平 台

为 了 提 供 更 多 运 用 纯

在 阅 读 报 道 后 , 南

大 会 计 系 的 陈 嘉 卉 (19

岁 ) 说 : “ 哇 , 这 还 蛮

可 怕 的 。 其 实 不 是 我 们

不 知 道 参 与 问 卷 调 查 的

危 险 , 而 是 当 时 做 的 时

候 , 没 有 那 么 多 顾 虑 。”

“ 资 料 隐 私 ” 缺 乏 保 障

虽 然 这 种 行 为 不 违

法 , 但 更 多 人 开 始 关

注 “ 资 料 隐 私 ” 的 课

题 , 尤 其 是 这 些 公 司 如

何 获 取 并 售 出 这 些 个 人

资 料 。

有 读 者 收 到 一 则 兜

售 个 人 资 料 的 传 真 后 ,

便 在 报 章 上 的 言 论 版

说 : “ 我 最 近 收 到 一 则

传 真 , 上 面 有 至 少 一

百 万 个 电 话 号 码 , 并 附

上 这 些 号 码 的 主 人 的 资

料 , 如 性 别 、 年 龄 和 教

育 程 度 等 等 。”

学 生 事 务 处 的 发 言

人 在 受 访 时 说 : “ 校 方

非 常 注 重 学 生 的 个 人 隐

私 。 校 方 会 不 断 提 醒 学

生 组 织 的 会 员 们 小 心 处

理 个 人 的 资 料 , 同 时 也

得 征 取 他 们 的 同 意 后 ,

本 地 知 名 音 乐 人 梁 文 福 提 醒 年 轻 人 , 歌 词 创 作 是 一

门 极 具 商 业 价 值 的 创 意 产 业 。 摄 影 | 温 忠 浩

华 语 切 磋 的 机 会 ,16 名 歌

词 创 作 班 的 学 员 组 成 了 “

新 词 ” 部 落 格 创 作 小 组 ,

并 设 立 了 名 为 “ 词 源 ” 的

内 部 网 站 , 方 便 历 届 毕 业

学 员 保 持 联 系 。

为 了 不 让 本 地 写 词

的 创 意 失 传 , 词 源 ” 网

才 可 交 由 他 人 。 目 前 为

止 , 校 方 并 未 接 到 有 关

这 方 面 的 投 诉 。”

“ 哇 , 这 还 蛮

可 怕 的 。 其 实

不 是 我 们 不 知

道 参 与 问 卷 调

查 的 危 险 , 而

是 当 时 做 的 时

候 , 没 有 那 么

多 顾 虑 。”

陈 嘉 卉

会 计 系 一 年 级 生

就 读 黄 金 辉 传 播 与

信 息 学 院 的 郑 凯 盈 (19

岁 ) 说 : “ 这 样 的 筹 款

方 式 有 点 强 制 性 。 如 果

让 我 选 的 话 , 我 当 然 不

会 做 。 但 我 了 解 这 些 问

卷 可 能 是 最 快 速 也 最 容

易 筹 钱 的 方 法 。”

她 参 与 学 生 宿 舍 的 剧

团 组 织 , 每 个 星 期 都 得

分 发 10 张 问 卷 给 身 边 的

朋 友 。 她 无 奈 地 说 : “

长 久 下 来 , 大 家 也 都 做

站 命 名 的 梁 文 福 更 坦

言 :“ 新 加 坡 作 为 创

意 的 土 壤 还 不 够 肥

沃 , 所 以 我 们 还 在 不

断 施 肥 ; 除 了 现 有 的

课 程 , 也 要 为 新 人 们

提 供 更 多 发 表 作 品 的

环 境 和 管 道 。”

腻 了 , 其 实 自 己 也 过 意

不 去 。”

更 何 况 , 学 生 们 的 社

交 圈 子 也 有 限 , 所 以 做

问 卷 的 学 生 都 属 同 一 组

人 。 郑 凯 盈 说 : “ 大 多

数 的 人 就 算 再 不 愿 意 ,

也 会 在 同 辈 压 力 下 完 成

问 卷 。”

在 碰 到 朋 友 们 的 隐 忧

时 , 郑 凯 盈 在 答 复 时 常

说 : “ 我 不 会 向 他 们 作

出 任 何 承 诺 , 只 会 重 复

负 责 人 对 我 说 过 的 话 ,

再 让 我 的 朋 友 决 定 信 息

是 否 保 密 。”

隐 私 仍 是 敏 感 话 题

第 十 学 生 宿 舍 的 业 务

经 理 柯 毅 涵 (23 岁 ) 就

指 出 , 隐 私 问 题 永 远 是

宿 舍 活 动 的 敏 感 话 题 。

为 了 宿 舍 着 想 , 他 尽

量 选 择 不 会 透 露 太 多 个

人 资 料 的 筹 钱 机 会 。

他 说 :“ 如 果 学 生 们

的 个 人 资 料 被 揭 露 了 ,

对 问 卷 公 司 和 对 我 们 也

不 是 一 件 好 事 。”

身 为 业 务 经 理 , 柯 毅

涵 确 保 他 所 得 到 的 联 系

来 源 是 可 靠 的 , 也 希 望

能 够 过 滤 不 实 际 或 有 可

疑 的 筹 钱 机 会 。

为 了 争 取 参 与 者 , 问

卷 公 司 表 示 , 向 学 生 们

要 这 些 资 料 , 是 为 了 与

他 们 保 持 联 系 。

林 晓 恬 (22 岁 ) 就 为

了 宿 舍 的 筹 款 活 动 , 接

受 大 东 方 人 寿 保 险 公 司

的 邀 请 , 将 带 领 35 名 在

籍 学 生 参 加 公 司 的 就 业

讲 座 。 换 来 的 , 是 500 元

的 奖 励 金 。

这 名 第 五 学 生 宿 舍 组

织 的 业 务 经 理 说 : “ 我

对 这 样 的 筹 款 活 动 持 有

正 面 的 看 法 。 这 是 因 为

我 不 觉 得 问 卷 的 来 源 会

可 疑 。”

她 还 补 充 :“ 这 是 个

双 赢 的 局 面 , 我 们 其 实

从 中 获 得 更 多 的 好 处 。

这 种 筹 钱 的 方 式 , 也 可

以 介 绍 给 身 边 需 要 为 组

织 筹 钱 的 朋 友 。”


VOL.

NO.

17

08

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

29

Impresario 半 决 赛 2011

人 气 指 数 为 参 赛 者 晋 级 的 关 键

律 宾 的 她 拥 有 丰 富 的 参 赛 经 验 。 在 参 赛

者 中 , 评 判 认 为 她 是 夺 冠 热 门 , 但 她 觉

得 参 加 比 赛 只 是 为 了 兴 趣 。 爱 玲 最 终 的

理 想 , 是 要 站 上 百 老 汇 舞 台 。

另 外 ,“ 双 人 物 ” 的 两 名 团 员 朱 明

恺 和 陈 永 权 是 在 之 前 的 歌 唱 比 赛 中 结 识

的 。 两 名 型 男 在 半 决 赛 里 默 契 十 足 地 演

唱 了 陶 的 《 找 自 己 》。 团 员 陈 永 权 正

在 服 兵 役 , 朱 明 恺 则 忙 于 课 业 。 尽 管 两

人 一 起 排 练 的 时 间 有 限 , 他 们 仍 排 除 万

难 进 入 总 决 赛 。 两 人 表 示 会 多 加 练 习 ,

继 续 “ 挑 战 自 己 ”。

“ 我 们 只 是 在 做 自 己 爱 做

的 事 , 无 论 输 赢 , 只 要 自

己 满 意 就 行 了 。”

Frostyz

Impresario 半 决 赛 的 晋 级 团 体

Impresario 2011 总 决 赛

日 期 :2011 年 4 月 3 日 , 星 期 天

时 间 : 傍 晚 六 点 半 ( 六 点 开 始 入 场 )

地 点 : 南 大 大 礼 堂

票 价 :$12

Impresario 2011 总 决 赛 的 入 围 者

个 人 演 唱 :Mohammad Sufie B

Rashid、 李 佩 雯 、 Kevin Kristian,、Eirene

Enriquez、 王 悉 微

双 人 / 组 合 :Christy&Sheryl、

DZ、Cruyo、Ash & Su、 双 人 物

舞 蹈 :X-Tension, I.K.R, RRO,

Frostyz, NBM

原 创 歌 曲 : 陈 美 卿 和 蔡 吟 秋 ( 十 二

月 之 风 雪 )、 何 文 亮 ( 友 谊 )、 陈

永 权 ( 我 的 错 )、 庄 慧 艳 ( 慢 慢 走 )

、 陈 雪 莹 ( 未 了 结 )

总 决 赛 入 围 者 名 单 公 布 时 , 舞 蹈 团 体 X-Tension 成 功 晋 级 , 团 员 们 喜 极 而 泣 , 激 动

得 抱 在 一 起 。

摄 影 | 许 原 端

黄 雪 琪 ● 报 道

场 观 众 首 次 有 权 参 与 评 选 的 工

现 作 , 验 证 参 赛 者 高 涨 的 人 气 指 数

和 非 一 般 的 才 艺 。

在 Impresario 2011 半 决 赛 里 , 现 场

观 众 的 投 票 占 了 评 分 标 准 的 30%。 因

此 , 参 赛 者 不 只 要 获 得 评 审 们 的 青 睐 ,

也 必 须 要 有 人 气 才 能 晋 级 到 总 决 赛 。

由 南 洋 理 工 大 学 文 艺 活 动 学 会 举 办

的 全 国 才 艺 比 赛 今 年 已 迈 入 了 第 19 个 年

头 。 今 年 一 共 有 四 个 组 别 : 个 人 演 唱 、

双 人 或 组 合 演 唱 、 舞 蹈 和 原 创 歌 曲 。 每

个 组 别 分 别 只 有 五 名 参 赛 者 能 进 入 围 总

决 赛 。

其 中 被 评 判 韩 睿 君 冠 上 “ 动 力 火

车 ” 的 兄 弟 组 D Z 在 演 唱 《 无 情 的 情

书 》 时 , 却 出 了 点 小 状 况 —— 音 乐 停 止

两 秒 。 但 是 , 他 们 不 慌 不 忙 地 在 音 乐 恢

复 时 继 续 接 唱 , 获 得 了 评 审 们 的 赞 赏 。

个 人 演 唱 组 的 爱 玲 (Eirene Enriquez)

则 以 惊 人 的 歌 声 在 演 唱 珍 妮 佛

哈 德 森 (Jennifer Hudson) 的 “And

I am telling you I’m not going” 时 让

台 下 的 韩 睿 君 猛 拍 手 。 这 位 歌 唱 老 师

说 :“ 看 她 的 演 唱 就 像 看 表 演 一 样 。”

害 羞 的 爱 玲 年 仅 16 岁 , 可 是 来 自 菲

舞 蹈 组 热 力 四 射 , 炒 热 现 场 的 气

氛 。 穿 着 火 辣 的 X-Tension 虽 然 只 排 练

了 一 个 星 期 , 却 自 认 团 队 默 契 佳 而 晋 级

总 决 赛 。 问 到 她 们 对 夺 冠 的 信 心 指 数 ,

她 们 异 口 同 声 地 说 :“100% !”

来 自 国 大 的 Frostyz 则 觉 得 每 一 组 的

夺 冠 机 会 平 等 。 其 中 一 名 团 员 说 :“ 我

们 只 是 在 做 自 己 爱 做 的 事 , 无 论 输 赢 ,

只 要 自 己 满 意 就 行 了 。”

不 过 , 舞 蹈 组 的 评 审 Jootz 和 Rizal 很

开 心 今 年 的 水 准 比 往 年 好 很 多 。Jootz

觉 得 可 能 是 因 为 近 年 舞 蹈 在 新 加 坡 越 来

越 受 重 视 。

个 人 演 唱 和 组 合 演 唱 组 别 的 两 位 评

审 韩 睿 君 和 吴 仁 惠 一 致 认 为 今 年 参 赛 者

的 水 准 都 很 高 。 也 是 本 地 乐 团 黑 森 林 的

主 唱 吴 仁 惠 说 :“ 我 很 喜 欢 这 届 的 参 赛

者 , 因 为 他 们 多 数 都 有 融 入 自 己 的 想 法

在 表 演 中 。”

经 验 丰 富 的 爱 玲 年 仅 16 岁 , 歌 声 却 具 爆

发 力 , 获 得 评 审 的 一 致 好 评 。

财 政 预 算 案 论 坛 会 2011

周 博 士 :A- 的 预 算 案

张 健 俊 ● 报 道

中 文 编 辑

对 最 近 出 炉 的 财 政 预 算 案 2011,

针 参 与 论 谈 会 的 演 讲 嘉 宾 一 致 给 予

好 评 , 让 更 多 中 等 入 息 与 低 收 入 的 国 人

受 益 。

有 15 年 预 算 案 分 析 经 验 的 周 孙 铭 博

士 , 在 论 坛 上 说 :“ 我 给 这 次 的 预 算 案

A-, 可 是 如 果 能 够 更 好 的 照 顾 低 收 入

者 , 那 会 更 理 想 。”

这 位 南 大 经 济 学 教 授 的 周 博 士 在 针 对

预 算 案 的 措 施 时 , 谈 到 教 育 的 费 用 。 一

个 低 收 入 者 从 幼 儿 园 , 小 学 和 中 学 , 到

理 工 学 院 , 这 10 年 的 教 育 费 用 , 政 府 承

担 了 97%。 在 这 次 的 财 政 预 算 下 , 政 府

把 这 个 比 例 提 高 到 99%, 所 以 低 收 入 者

的 儿 女 可 以 通 过 教 育 来 提 高 收 入 , 改 善

生 活 。

周 博 士 认 为 , 这 次 预 算 案 的 主 题 是 通

过 改 善 收 入 平 等 来 使 全 体 新 加 坡 人 共 享

一 个 包 容 性 的 增 长 。

这 个 论 坛 会 是 南 大 校 友 事 务 处 第 六 次

主 办 , 主 讲 嘉 宾 包 括 人 文 与 社 会 科 学 学

院 代 院 长 柯 仲 佑 教 授 、 周 孙 铭 博 士 和 校

友 王 绥 钊 先 生 。

财 政 预 算 案 2011

关 键 数 字

● 15 亿 元 增 长 分 红 250 万 国 人 受 惠

● 5 月 前 分 发 每 人 100-900 元

● 从 托 儿 所 到 理 工 学 院 家 长 的 负 担

从 3% 降 至 1%

● 个 人 少 缴 税 所 得 税 回 扣 20% 顶

限 2000 元

综 合 预 算 案 的 措 施 , 王 先 生 说 :“ 措

施 主 要 目 的 在 于 提 高 生 产 力 。”

身 为 奕 丰 金 融 公 司 新 加 坡 办 事 处 的 总

经 理 , 他 向 现 场 观 众 勾 勒 出 未 来 的 经 济

由 校 友 事 务 处 主 办 的 论 谈 会 反 应 热 烈 , 出 席 人 数 约 250。 周 孙 铭 博 士 ( 左 起 )、 柯

仲 佑 教 授 和 校 友 王 绥 钊 先 生 对 出 席 者 的 问 题 一 一 解 答 。

摄 影 | 温 忠 浩

走 向 , 不 看 好 黄 金 在 未 来 的 价 值 。

出 席 论 坛 会 的 南 大 学 生 在 受 访 时 都 纷

纷 表 示 获 益 不 浅 。 其 中 , 经 济 学 一 年 级

生 连 慧 婷 (19 岁 ) 说 :“ 我 觉 得 这 个 论

坛 会 里 的 分 析 对 我 就 读 的 科 系 相 关 , 让

我 更 了 解 预 算 案 的 细 节 。”

在 论 坛 会 结 束 之 前 , 周 孙 铭 博 士 在

权 衡 预 算 案 的 措 施 时 , 风 趣 地 说 :“no

money, no honey, no energy, no babies.

( 没 有 金 钱 , 就 没 有 “ 蜜 糖 ”, 也 就 没

有 精 力 , 所 以 我 国 的 生 育 率 还 在 处 于 低

潮 期 。)”


VOL.

NO.

17

08

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

生 活

过 山 车 和 反 向 蹦 极 挑 战 自 我 极 限

31

三 月 的 假 期 即 将 来 临 , 岛 上 有

什 么 刺 激 好 玩 的 娱 乐 场 所 这

一 期 的 《 南 苑 》 生 活 , 就 从 记

者 卓 诗 婷 和 林 佳 颖 的 网 上 对

话 , 比 较 三 种 截 然 不 同 的 冒 险

经 验 !

喂 喂 喂 , 你 的 魂 回 来 了 没

还 没 , 还 在 九 霄 云 外 呢 。

不 会 吧 ! 不 就 只 是 反 向 蹦

极 和 过 山 车 罢 了 。

哇 , 这 两 天 可 是 我 生 平 最 惊 险 的 时 刻 ! 位 于 克 拉 码 头 的

Gmax、G5 Extreme Swing 和 新 加 坡 环 球 影 城 的 “ 太 空 堡 垒 ”

(Battlestar Galactica) 可 不 是 盖 的 好 不 好 !

我 还 想 回 去 再 多 玩 几 次 呢 ! 我 建 议 想 要 尝 试 极 限 新 事 物 的 朋 友 们

试 试 。 若 是 你 , 你 会 选 择 再 回 去 玩 哪 个

若 一 定 要 做 个 比 较 的 话 , 我 认 为 环 球 影 城 的 太 空 堡 垒 略 胜 一 筹

啦 。 太 空 堡 垒 能 期 待 接 下 来 的 航 程 , 但 反 向 蹦 极 却 无 法 预 料 。 初

级 者 的 我 还 是 比 较 适 合 过 山 车 吧 。

我 还 真 的 和 你 恰 恰 相 反 耶 ! 若 硬 要 我 选 一 个 再 乘 搭 , 我 一 定 选 Gmax

和 G5。 我 就 喜 欢 这 种 瞬 间 失 去 自 我 , 刺 激 万 分 的 舒 畅 感 !

坐 上 GSwing 即 有 赛 车 时 速 般 的 刺 激 ,

又 能 欣 赏 优 美 的 风 景 , 超 乎 票 价 所 值 。

看 来 我 们 的 志 趣 很 不 同 。 当 在 Gmax 和 Gswing 坐 着 等 待 工 作 人 员

倒 数 时 , 真 觉 得 时 间 过 得 特 别 慢 ! 脑 海 里 一 直 浮 现 各 种 忧 虑 。 工 作

人 员 在 我 们 毫 不 防 备 的 时 刻 把 我 们 抛 了 上 去 , 还 真 是 意 想 不 到 啊 !

这 就 叫 快 感 !Gmax 和 G5Extreme Swing, 给 我 的 是 那 种 一 瞬 间 的

刺 激 。 在 绳 索 弹 上 去 的 那 一 刻 , 我 简 直 是 感 受 到 无 与 伦 比 快 感 ,

仿 佛 整 个 人 飞 起 来 似 的 !

才 怪 ! 我 可 是 吓 得 半 条 命 。 其 中 一 段 航 程 中 还 出 现 了 人 工 雾 , 突

然 模 糊 了 我 的 视 线 . 我 还 以 为 自 己 快 撞 到 了 地 面 , 还 好 那 只 是 自 己

的 幻 觉 ! 好 险 啊 !

还 有 ,Human 的 极 速 前 进 和 Cylon 一 连 串 360 度 迅 速 的 转 弯 简 直

是 刺 激 无 比 。 在 短 短 90 秒 内 经 历 五 公 尺 深 处 急 速 往 下 冲 , 真 是

让 我 连 换 口 气 呼 吸 的 时 间 都 没 有 !

还 有 , 在 Gmax 和 Gswing 除 了 能 欣 赏 到 克 拉 码 头 的 美 景 , 也 能 让

我 看 到 新 加 坡 河 与 一 座 座 高 楼 大 厦 。

对 我 来 说 绝 对 值 ! 你 告 诉 我 , 在 哪 里 能 让 我 感 受 到 赛 车 时 速 般 的

刺 激 同 时 欣 赏 优 美 的 风 景 呢 这 真 不 能 用 金 钱 衡 量 的 。 不 过 不 知

是 谁 被 照 相 机 拍 到 整 脸 惊 慌 失 措 !

克 拉 码 头 Gmax+G5

ExtremeSwing

惊 险 刺 激 程 度 :

共 50 元 ; 各 45 元

环 球 影 城 :

太 空 堡 垒 (Battlestar

Galactica)

惊 险 刺 激 程 度 :

卓 诗 婷 ( 左 一 ) 和 林 佳 颖 率 先

尝 试 太 空 堡 垒 , 航 程 的 刺 激 指 数 破 表 。

摄 影 | 林 佐 伊

糟 了 , 如 果 上 载 到 注 册 Facebook, 我 的 形 象 不 是 完 全 没 了 !

你 几 时 有 形 象 啊 !

喂 !

72 元 ( 入 门 票 )


30

编 辑 室

张 健 俊

中 文 编 辑

言 论

区 划 分 报 告 出 炉

选 后 , 大 选 的 脚 步 逐

渐 逼 近 。 这 届 的 大 选 与 往

届 不 同 的 是 , 政 党 可 采 用

网 上 工 具 在 虚 拟 世 界 和 居

民 建 立 联 系 , 争 取 选 票 。

这 个 网 络 现 象 是 年 轻

一 代 的 共 同 经 历 , 因 此 必

定 会 对 我 国 政 治 发 展 产 生

影 响 。

对 此 , 李 显 龙 总 理 曾

说 过 :“ 政 府 将 在 来 届 大

选 , 积 极 使 用 新 媒 体 !”

根 据 最 新 的 选 民 人 数

资 料 , 每 三 个 选 民 中 ,

就 有 一 个 年 龄 介 于 20 至 39

岁 之 间 , 其 中 10 多 万 人 是

首 次 行 使 投 票 权 。

新 一 代 选 民 较 不 为 所 动

值 得 关 注 的 是 , 专 家

认 为 这 两 群 人 士 一 般 上 较

网 络 - 政 党 必 争 之 地

使 南 大 成 为 “ 绿 色 ” 城 市

梁 洁 欣

最 新 出 炉 的 “ 亚 洲 绿 色 城

在 市 指 数 ” 中 , 新 加 坡 是 22

个 亚 洲 城 市 当 中 最 “ 绿 ” 的 城

市 。 但 是 , 都 市 人 对 “ 绿 化 ” 环

境 的 意 识 却 有 待 加 深 。

据 报 道 , 新 加 坡 能 脱 颖 而 出

的 两 个 决 定 性 原 因 , 是 政 府 积 极

推 动 诸 多 相 关 政 策 , 以 及 提 出 关

于 水 资 源 、 垃 圾 与 能 源 效 率 等 方

面 的 管 理 方 案 。 不 过 , 人 们 是 否

懂 得 响 应 措 施 , 并 积 极 地 为 保 护

环 境 做 出 贡 献 , 也 是 关 键 问 题 。

迈 向 成 为 “ 环 保 战 士 ” 的 目 标

针 对 保 护 环 境 , 笔 者 认 为 多

数 都 是 被 动 的 参 与 者 。 但 是 , 若

有 措 施 和 足 够 的 适 应 时 间 , 人 们

也 能 主 动 地 为 “ 绿 化 ” 环 境 尽 一

份 力 。

例 如 , 南 大 在 设 置 分 类 垃 圾

桶 时 , 人 们 最 初 还 不 习 惯 , 常 误

把 垃 圾 或 可 循 环 物 丢 进 垃 圾 桶 。

现 今 , 人 们 已 能 正 确 使 用 分 类

插 图 | 吴 威 俊

感 情 用 事 。 新 加 坡 管 理 大

学 法 律 系 助 理 教 授 陈 庆 文

表 示 , 他 们 也 较 不 容 易 被

执 政 党 的 长 期 良 好 纪 录 所

打 动 。

“ 这 类 表 达 即 兴

的 社 交 媒 体 其 实

是 一 把 双 刃 剑 ,

使 用 不 当 就 会 自

食 其 果 。”

另 外 , 下 届 大 选 投 票

日 前 一 天 被 定 为 “ 冷 静

日 ”, 各 党 不 允 许 进 行 任

何 竞 选 工 作 。

陈 庆 文 也 指 出 现 在 网

络 发 达 , 即 使 政 党 不 能

在 “ 冷 静 日 ” 竞 选 或 在 各

别 网 站 发 布 消 息 , 其 他 网

站 对 选 举 的 讨 论 也 不 会 就

垃 圾 桶 。 另 外 , 校 内 的 许 多 食

堂 都 规 定 食 客 将 餐 具 拿 到 集 收

站 。 这 个 举 动 其 实 已 是 具 环 境

意 识 的 表 现 。

但 是 , 目 前 在 南 大 校 园 里 ,

关 于 保 护 环 境 的 措 施 还 不 够 。

如 在 打 包 食 物 时 , 只 有 少 数

的 人 会 自 带 可 循 环 的 容 器 。 在

人 人 都 求 方 便 的 情 况 下 , 多 数

的 摊 主 都 免 费 提 供 发 泡 塑 料 饭

盒 (styrofoam box), 间 接 助

养 恶 习 。

学 校 能 推 广 “ 自 带 可 循 环 容

器 ” 的 运 动 , 以 减 少 使 用 难 以

降 解 (non-biodegradable) 的

发 泡 塑 料 饭 盒 。

此 外 , 摊 主 应 改 用 较 环 保 的

饭 盒 。 如 在 国 大 校 园 内 , 已 有

宿 舍 的 食 堂 停 止 使 用 发 泡 塑 料

饭 盒 , 而 改 用 能 降 解 的 纸 盒 。

环 保 志 在 参 与 而 非 强 制

此 停 止 。

社 交 媒 体 是 把 双 刃 刀

若 要 使 人 们 成 为 积 极 的 参 与

者 , 就 必 须 加 强 他 们 对 环 境 的

意 识 。 这 或 许 仍 靠 官 方 强 制 的

措 施 , 使 人 们 改 变 目 前 不 环 保

的 坏 习 惯 。

同 时 , 人 们 也 应 被 灌 输 相 关

的 知 识 , 以 使 他 们 更 主 动 地 参

与 环 保 。

其 实 , 人 们 之 所 以 是 被 动 的

参 与 者 , 主 要 是 因 为 拯 救 地 球

的 个 人 使 命 不 够 强 烈 , 导 致 人

们 无 法 在 潜 意 识 中 产 生 保 护 环

境 的 意 愿 。

因 此 , 只 要 人 们 经 过 一 段 适

应 期 , 相 信 被 动 者 也 能 渐 渐 晋 升

至 积 极 的 参 与 者 。

可 是 , 这 类 表 达 即 兴

的 社 交 媒 体 其 实 是 一 把 双

刃 剑 , 使 用 不 当 就 会 自

食 其 果 。 上 个 月 , 大 约

400 人 收 到 由 保 健 促 进 局

所 发 出 的 ‘ 另 类 ’ 推 特

(Twitter) 讯 息 。 讯 息 里 显

示 :“F 你 啦 , 你 和 我 同

级 , 可 以 不 要 这 样 和 我 说

话 吗 ”

当 局 调 查 显 示 , 这 是

一 名 职 员 摆 乌 龙 , 在 没 有

退 出 保 健 促 进 局 的 账 户 ,

就 上 传 自 己 的 私 人 讯 息 。

这 相 信 是 第 一 起 在 政 府 部

门 网 上 出 现 的 粗 话 事 件 。

近 年 来 , 政 府 部 门 越

来 越 普 遍 使 用 网 上 工 具 。

在 去 年 九 月 的 调 查 显 示 ,

张 亦 弛

本 地 的 每 10 名 议 员 中 , 就

有 六 名 设 有 Facebook 社 交

网 站 。

另 一 方 面 , 八 大 反 对

党 也 不 甘 示 弱 , 积 极 利 用

社 交 网 站 , 提 供 政 党 走 访

选 区 的 消 息 , 发 表 言 论 以

及 提 高 其 知 名 度 。

截 稿 前 , 笔 者 浏 览 反

对 党 的 Facebook, 竟 然 发

现 由 秘 书 长 徐 顺 全 率 领 的

新 加 坡 民 主 党 已 经 有 超 过

3000 个 “ 赞 ”(likes)。

李 显 龙 总 理 也 曾 举 例

说 , 美 国 总 统 奥 巴 马 的 竞

选 团 队 透 过 互 联 网 拉 票 和

发 放 竞 选 信 息 , 几 乎 把 选

举 带 上 虚 拟 世 界 。

可 见 , 各 个 政 党 正 摩

拳 擦 掌 , 势 必 想 通 过 网 上

的 平 台 来 掳 获 人 心 , 而 成

败 的 关 键 可 能 就 取 决 于 各

自 的 政 纲 和 宣 传 手 法 。












THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

VOL.

NO.

17

08

酒 廊 和 戏 院 进 南

大 喜 忧 参 半

付 筱 淳

底 应 该 先 成 家 后 立 业 , 还 是 先 立 业 后 成

到 家 , 相 信 是 很 多 刚 刚 走 出 校 园 步 入 社 会 的

年 轻 人 心 中 的 疑 虑 。

去 年 的 新 加 坡 人 口 普 查 结 果 显 示 , 同 10 年 前

相 比 , 尽 管 处 于 35 至 44 岁 单 身 女 性 有 下 降 的 趋

势 , 但 是 介 于 25 至 29 岁 间 的 单 身 女 性 的 比 例 却 上

升 约 20%。

国 大 得 社 会 学 家 Paulin Straughan 指 出 :“ 这

些 女 性 其 实 并 不 是 抗 拒 婚 姻 , 只 是 单 纯 地 延 迟 了

这 一 计 划 , 这 一 现 象 在 受 过 高 等 教 育 的 女 性 中 更

为 普 遍 。”

笔 者 认 为 有 几 个 因 素 使 得 越 来 越 多 的 高 学 历

人 群 选 择 先 成 家 后 立 业 , 晚 婚 晚 育 。

许 多 年 轻 人 向 往 美 好 的 生 活 , 而 且 希 望 自 食

其 力 经 营 家 庭 。 在 物 价 上 涨 的 同 时 , 理 应 打 好 坚

定 的 经 济 基 础 , 所 以 都 没 有 时 间 和 精 力 把 结 婚 生

育 纳 入 计 划 中 。

然 而 , 先 成 家 后 立 业 也 存 在 好 处 。 首 先 , 受

传 统 观 念 影 响 , 早 些 成 家 , 不 让 父 母 为 自 己 操

心 , 也 是 一 种 孝 顺 的 表 现 。 另 外 , 迟 婚 和 人 口 老

龄 化 加 速 有 直 接 的 关 系 , 也 会 对 经 济 造 成 不 利 的

影 响 。

其 实 , 两 者 是 相 辅 相 成 的 。 一 方 面 , 有 了 家

人 的 支 持 , 可 以 更 安 心 地 投 入 工 作 ; 另 一 方 面 ,

靠 自 己 的 奋 斗 去 开 创 事 业 , 可 以 为 家 庭 创 造 美 好

的 将 来 。

大 在 上 个 月 公

南 布 了 最 新 的 校

园 发 展 蓝 图 , 致 力 打

造 校 园 中 的 小 城 市 。

发 展 计 划 的 第 一 阶

段 将 在 2018 年 竣 工 ,

到 时 酒 廊 和 戏 院 也 会

和 大 家 见 面 。

然 而 , 笔 者 认 为 ,

酒 廊 和 戏 院 虽 能 促 进

学 生 交 流 , 但 与 本 地

教 育 机 构 的 形 象 似 乎

有 些 不 搭 。

打 破 传 统 促 进 交 流

对 于 多 数 学 生 来

说 , 在 学 校 里 开 设 酒

廊 和 戏 院 算 是 个 很 酷

的 想 法 。 和 朋 友 在 课

余 时 间 去 酒 廊 轻 松 一

插 图 | 吴 威 俊

下 , 缓 解 各 方 面 的 压 力 ,

何 尝 不 是 一 种 享 受 。

南 大 也 处 于 离 市 中 心

相 对 偏 远 的 文 礼 , 若 在 校

内 有 了 酒 廊 和 戏 院 , 学 生

们 就 不 用 花 多 余 时 间 去 校

外 寻 找 娱 乐 节 目 。

在 学 校 修 建 娱 乐 设 施

不 仅 能 丰 富 本 校 学 生 的 业

余 生 活 , 促 进 学 生 之 间 的

交 流 , 而 且 能 吸 引 到 更 多

本 区 域 内 的 , 甚 至 欧 美 国

家 的 留 学 生 或 交 换 学 生 来

本 校 学 习 。

这 样 一 来 , 不 同 国 籍

的 学 生 会 对 彼 此 的 文 化 习

俗 有 更 深 一 层 的 了 解 。

设 施 管 理 还 有 待 商 讨

酒 廊 和 戏 院 为 学 生 业

余 生 活 带 来 许 多 自 由 和 方

便 , 与 此 同 时 , 它 们 也 为

校 方 的 管 理 方 案 带 来 很 大

的 考 验 。

很 多 安 全 隐 患 可 能 随

之 而 来 , 几 个 例 子 就 包 括

醉 酒 闹 事 , 打 架 斗 殴 等

等 。 校 方 必 须 要 采 取 一 定

的 预 防 的 措 施 , 避 免 此 类

乐 极 生 悲 的 事 件 在 校 园 里

发 生 。

适 当 的 管 理 娱 乐 设

施 , 才 不 会 影 响 到 学 生 的

正 常 生 活 和 学 习 。

首 先 , 对 学 生 的 教 育

是 必 不 可 缺 的 。 学 生 们 应

学 会 怎 样 合 理 分 配 自 己 的

时 间 , 有 松 有 弛 才 不 会 失

去 平 衡 。

其 次 , 对 于 经 营 业 者

的 管 制 也 是 至 关 重 要 的 。

比 如 , 业 者 卖 酒 精 的 条

规 , 和 学 生 们 购 买 酒 精 的

准 则 。

顶 尖 大 学 须 硬 体 与 人 才

笔 者 觉 得 , 校 园 内 有

娱 乐 设 施 固 然 不 错 , 但 并

没 必 要 。 如 果 学 校 的 目 的

是 为 了 吸 引 更 多 应 届 毕 业

生 , 那 么 还 需 考 虑 这 些 设

施 对 他 们 的 吸 引 力 。

安 博 迪 教 授 说 , 要 打

造 一 所 伟 大 的 大 学 , 就 是

通 过 它 的 硬 体 设 施 以 及 大

学 的 人 才 。

但 是 , 本 校 作 为 本 区

域 内 的 高 等 学 府 , 其 实 并

不 需 要 用 这 些 新 潮 的 设 施

来 吸 引 学 者 。

即 使 没 有 硬 体 设 施 ,

互 动 依 然 会 在 校 园 的 各 个

角 落 进 行 。 而 且 , 比 起 娱

乐 设 施 , 学 者 们 会 比 较 注

重 教 育 质 量 。


32

娱 乐

本 地 天 王 演 唱 会 宣 传 活 动

林 俊 杰 勇 敢 面 对 内 心 脆 弱

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

VOL.

NO.

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08

林 坪

● 报 道

经 历 歌 唱 生 涯 的 低 潮

曾 后 , 林 俊 杰 表 示 他 已 找

回 重 新 振 作 的 力 量 , 希 望 大 家

看 到 他 成 熟 的 蜕 变 。

在 2008 年 他 因 压 力 大 , 导 致

胃 食 道 逆 流 而 伤 到 喉 咙 , 影 响

北 京 演 唱 会 的 表 现 。

这 次 是 林 俊 杰 第 三 次 在 本 地

举 行 巡 回 演 唱 会 , 也 亲 自 参 与

了 制 作 过 程 , 想 表 达 自 己 的 内

心 和 音 乐 世 界 。

他 说 :“ 这 次 的 演 唱 会 将 让

新 加 坡 歌 迷 感 受 到 不 一 样 的 表

演 , 有 一 种 不 同 的 温 暖 。”

林 俊 杰 还 表 示 , 在 自 家 舞 台

表 演 的 自 在 感 , 是 其 他 地 方 所

没 有 的 。 在 新 加 坡 这 一 站 , 他

也 会 增 设 一 项 前 所 未 有 的 表 演

林 俊 杰 觉 得 , 每 一 种 台 上 和 台 下

的 合 作 要 靠 这 种 有 点 神 秘 、 又 有

点 小 小 距 离 的 空 间 , 才 能 够 碰 撞

出 新 的 火 花 。 摄 影 | 颜 家 骏

环 节 , 将 首 次 在 舞 台 上 半 空 吊

钢 丝 。

被 问 到 演 唱 会 的 造 型 是

否 会 与 海 报 一 样 时 , 他 逗 趣

地 说 : “ 那 已 是 去 年 的 事 情

了 。 ” 但 是 , 他 最 近 正 在 勤

练 , 相 信 会 让 歌 迷 看 到 海 报 上

的 六 块 肌 。

他 想 通 过 演 唱 会 主 题 曲 “I

Am” 让 大 家 体 悟 到 :“ 我 脆

弱 , 所 以 我 坚 强 。”

“ 一 个 人 脆 弱 时 ,

才 能 体 验 坚 强 的 差

别 ; 当 你 坚 强 地 回

来 了 , 你 要 怎 么 去

让 身 边 的 人 感 受 转

变 , 看 你 长 大 。”

林 俊 杰

本 地 歌 手

每 一 次 的 演 唱 会 , 林 俊 杰

总 会 想 起 从 刚 出 道 到 现 在 的 成

长 。 他 想 起 带 领 他 入 行 、 在 演

艺 道 路 上 不 断 鼓 励 他 和 看 着 他

成 长 的 恩 师 许 环 良 。

在 “JJ Party 5” 专 辑 庆 功 宴

上 , 没 有 前 四 届 的 绚 丽 表 演 ,

却 以 他 的 角 度 聊 音 乐 与 人 生 。

对 于 自 己 心 态 上 的 转 变 与 成

长 , 将 于 月 底 庆 祝 30 岁 生 日 的

林 俊 杰 有 感 而 发 地 说 :“ 一 个

人 脆 弱 时 , 才 能 体 验 坚 强 的 差

别 ; 当 你 坚 强 地 回 来 了 , 你 要

怎 么 去 让 身 边 的 人 感 受 转 变 ,

看 你 长 大 。”

谈 到 之 前 的 内 地 演 唱 会 时 ,

他 坦 言 , 一 开 始 其 实 会 担 心 体

力 会 负 荷 不 了 。 虽 然 这 是 他 第

以 前 的 林 俊 杰 在 台 上 总 是 蹦 蹦 跳 跳 , 现 在 他 已 能 更 诚 恳 面 对 自 己 ,

把 内 心 感 触 透 过 表 演 分 享 给 大 家 。 照 片 |Unusual Productions 提 供

一 次 尝 试 三 个 月 内 举 行 八 场 演

出 , 但 是 他 非 常 享 受 整 个 辛 苦

的 过 程 。

演 唱 会 的 幕 后 团 队 开 会 时 意

见 分 歧 , 但 林 俊 杰 认 为 这 是 好

事 , 因 为 大 家 有 自 己 的 想 法 ,

表 示 大 家 都 在 用 心 。

卖 力 于 慈 善 给 小 朋 友 希 望

除 了 忙 着 筹 备 演 唱 会 之 外 ,

林 俊 杰 在 这 几 年 也 不 遗 余 力 地

做 慈 善 。 他 相 信 , 艺 人 有 着 巨

大 的 影 响 力 , 能 呼 吁 大 家 一 起

帮 助 他 人 。

于 是 , 今 年 他 将 与 之 前

合 作 过 的 化 妆 护 肤 品 零 售 商

Kiehl’s, 在 下 个 月 再 度 合 作 , 把

筹 得 款 项 捐 给 新 加 坡 智 障 人 士

福 利 促 进 金 (MINDS)。 他

在 庆 功 宴 上 也 特 地 请 来 了 几 位

MINDS 的 朋 友 带 来 太 鼓 表 演 。

主 持 人 巫 许 玛 利 发 现 林 俊 杰

热 衷 于 帮 助 小 朋 友 , 他 解 释 ,

小 时 候 的 他 缺 乏 自 信 , 但 找 到

音 乐 和 梦 想 之 后 , 却 有 强 大 的

力 量 。

他 说 :“ 在 人 生 找 到 一 个 目

标 跟 一 个 重 心 是 一 件 太 重 要 的

事 情 。 今 天 能 够 有 梦 想 能 够 有

成 就 , 一 定 要 从 小 培 养 。” 所

以 , 他 想 帮 助 这 些 小 朋 友 , 给

他 们 一 些 希 望 , 让 他 们 找 到 人

生 中 的 重 心 。

2009 年 四 川 大 地 震 发 生 后 ,

他 探 望 了 患 有 下 半 身 粉 碎 性 骨

折 而 瘫 痪 的 女 生 , 王 敏 。 当 时

他 以 一 首 《 期 待 爱 》, 鼓 励 王

敏 勇 敢 地 面 对 生 命 。

当 林 俊 杰 在 宣 传 《100 天 》

专 辑 时 , 她 到 现 场 , 并 用 自 己

的 力 量 从 楼 梯 走 下 来 , 对 他

说 :“ 去 年 , 你 来 医 院 为 我 加

油 , 今 年 , 现 在 我 来 这 里 为 你

加 油 。”

对 林 俊 杰 而 言 , 看 到 不 幸 的

小 孩 脸 上 展 现 灿 烂 的 笑 容 , 会

让 他 更 想 要 伸 出 援 手 。

JJ 林 俊 杰 I AM 世 界

巡 回 演 唱 会

日 期 :3 月 5 日

地 点 : 新 加 坡 室 内

体 育 馆

票 价 :$78-128

新 剧 本 演 读 会 训 练 新 生 代 编 剧

雷 慧 媛 蔡 韵 ● 报 道

地 戏 剧 团 体 一 直 都

本 在 闹 剧 本 荒 , 为 培

养 华 语 剧 场 编 剧 人 才 , 戏

剧 盒 举 办 演 读 会 , 让 剧 场

爱 好 者 向 知 名 编 剧 学 习 。

演 员 以 演 读 的 方 式 ,

在 连 续 两 天 的 “ 新 剧 本 演

读 会 ” 呈 现 八 个 不 同 的 原

创 剧 本 。

编 剧 导 师 是 四 位 经 验

丰 富 的 本 地 编 剧 : 南 大 中

文 系 副 教 授 柯 思 仁 、 张 子

健 、 黄 浩 威 和 李 世 炬 。

柯 思 仁 说 :“ 在 指 导

时 , 我 都 会 把 作 者 比 较 特

第 一 天 演 读 会 的 导 演 杨 君

伟 想 让 观 众 看 到 剧 本 从 文

字 的 转 变 , 和 编 剧 的 意 图

和 技 巧 。 摄 影 | 温 忠 浩

殊 的 人 生 故 事 挖 出 来 , 并

为 剧 本 提 出 建 议 。”

然 而 本 地 著 名 戏 剧 人

张 子 健 则 对 编 剧 新 人 提 出

不 同 的 建 议 :“ 接 受 意 见

固 然 重 要 , 但 别 一 味 去 迎

合 观 众 口 味 。 懂 得 坚 持 内

心 想 法 , 才 能 创 作 出 别 具

魅 力 的 剧 目 。”

第 一 天 演 读 会 的 导

演 , 是 本 地 的 知 名 媒 体 人

杨 君 伟 。

这 名 义 安 理 工 学 院 中

文 系 讲 师 说 :“ 演 读 会 让

观 众 看 到 的 纯 粹 是 编 剧 想

要 传 达 的 意 图 及 技 巧 。”

他 当 天 导 了 四 部 剧

本 , 表 示 最 喜 欢 的 剧 本 是

《 玉 镯 》, 讲 述 一 家 三

代 因 祖 母 的 一 对 玉 镯 而

引 发 了 不 满 。

首 次 于 乌 敏 岛 举 办

六 天 的 全 封 闭 式 剧 本 催

生 营 , 更 请 来 台 湾 的 名

编 剧 纪 蔚 然 作 为 导 师 。

其 中 一 名 营 员 张 英

豪 就 把 处 于 人 生 分 岔 路

写 进 剧 本 , 演 绎 出 了 一

场 个 体 对 抗 体 制 的 精 彩

对 话 。

戏 剧 盒 将 会 听 从 观

众 的 意 见 , 并 选 出 二 到

三 部 剧 本 加 以 修 改 , 在

今 年 底 的 “ 新 剧 季 ” 中

把 剧 本 搬 上 舞 台 , 公 开

演 出 。

影 评 电 影 播 映 室

电 影 :“My Ex:

Haunted Lover”

导 演 :Piyapan Choopetch

主 要 演 员 :Ratchawin

Wongviriya,Marion

Affolter

照 片 | 邵 氏 机 构 提 供 , , , , ,

一 泰 国 经 典 恐 怖 片 ,“My Ex: Haunted

又 Lover” 继 上 一 部 “My Ex” 的 热 烈 反 应 推

出 , 导 演 依 旧 选 择 以 三 角 恋 爱 关 系 为 故 事 中 心 。

女 主 角 Cee 因 不 甘 被 另 一 女 主 角 Ying 横 刀 夺

爱 , 而 使 用 残 暴 手 段 处 理 感 情 , 导 致 Ying 堕 楼 身

亡 , 从 此 怪 事 连 接 发 生 。

电 影 赞 助 商 Karn、Cee 和 姐 姐 在 拍 戏 时 , 三 人

陷 入 三 角 恋 , 让 嫉 妒 心 强 的 Cee 重 蹈 覆 辙 。 其 中

最 可 怕 是 Ying 坠 楼 跌 入 泳 池 的 恐 怖 画 面 必 能 满 足

恐 怖 片 爱 好 者 的 欲 望 。 ( 文 / 卓 诗 婷 )


VOL.

NO.

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THE NANYANG

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蔡 健 雅 媒 体 见 面 会

创 作 才 女 将 在 家 乡 首 唱 大 展 舞 艺

张 扬 ● 报 道

城 创 作 才 女 蔡 健 雅 将 准 备 在 首 次

狮 于 家 乡 举 办 的 演 唱 会 突 破 尺 度 大

秀 舞 技 。

创 作 歌 手 的 包 袱 , 让 蔡 健 雅 甚 少 尝 试

舞 蹈 , 这 次 她 期 待 能 够 以 此 让 歌 迷 眼 前

一 亮 。

在 2005 年 人 生 的 低 谷 期 , 她 去 往 印 度

并 接 触 了 瑜 伽 。 旅 行 令 她 对 人 生 有 了 全

新 的 体 悟 。 这 也 是 她 把 自 己 的 演 唱 会 命

名 为 “Tanya and the Cities” 的 原 因 。

“ 不 同 的 城 市 给 了 我 不 同 的 灵 感 。 这

次 的 演 唱 会 就 是 以 城 市 划 分 章 节 , 搭 配

相 应 的 歌 曲 。” 而 其 中 的 一 个 章 节 就 以

家 乡 新 加 坡 命 名 。

出 道 14 年 , 两 度 问 鼎 台 湾 金 曲 奖 最 佳

女 演 唱 人 , 亮 眼 的 成 绩 单 下 , 蔡 健 雅 却

一 直 没 有 机 会 在 新 加 坡 开 个 人 演 唱 会 。

她 说 自 己 个 性 低 调 , 不 爱 绚 丽 的 舞 台 ,

更 愿 意 享 受 一 个 温 馨 的 小 角 落 。

今 年 她 却 觉 得 人 生 到 了 一 个 新 的 阶

段 , 于 是 决 定 以 演 唱 会 的 方 式 回 馈 本 地

歌 迷 。

至 于 她 演 唱 会 的 嘉 宾 和 服 装 , 她 表 示

保 密 , 并 希 望 歌 迷 能 够 亲 身 前 来 演 唱 会

揭 开 谜 底 。

恋 爱 对 象 要 能 够 “ 融 化 ” 自 己

在 问 到 她 挑 选 壮 男 舞 伴 时 , 她 害 羞 地

表 示 选 择 舞 伴 的 条 件 并 不 会 和 选 择 结 婚

对 象 相 同 。

在 台 湾 闯 荡 多 年 的 蔡 健 雅 原 本 担 心 本 地 观 众 会 对 她 有 些

陌 生 , 因 此 希 望 歌 迷 能 多 来 支 持 。 摄 影 | 王 辰 宇

过 年 的 时 候 被 妈 妈 “ 逼 婚 ”, 也 让 她 感 受 到 了 恋 爱

的 压 力 。 谈 到 择 偶 标 准 , 蔡 健 雅 说 :“ 哪 怕 自 己 列 出

了 无 数 的 条 件 , 默 契 和 感 觉 才 最 为 重 要 。”

她 说 自 己 还 未 遇 到 合 适 的 结 婚 对 象 , 并 把 这 归 咎 为

自 己 独 立 坚 强 的 性 格 。 她 解 释 :“ 灯 泡 坏 了 自 己 也 可

以 修 理 , 我 很 难 被 融 化 。”

蔡 健 雅 Tanya & Cities 新 加 坡 演 唱 会

日 期 :4 月 9 日

地 点 : 新 加 坡 室 内 体 育 馆

票 价 :$88 - 158





乐 评 音 乐 Jukebox

专 辑 : “Stranger under

my skin”

歌 手 : 陈 奕 迅

推 荐 歌 曲 :《 苦 瓜 》

《 关 于 爱 情 》


, , , , ,

年 在 狮 城 成 功 开 唱 的

陈 奕 迅 , 近 期 推 出 了

全 新 广 东 EP“Stranger under

my skin”。 作 为 上 张

EP“Taste the Atmosphere”

的 延 伸 , 这 张 EP 着 重 审 视 生

活 与 人 生 的 价 值 。

新 作 品 收 录 了 五 首 粤 语 歌

和 一 首 英 语 歌 , 以 及 Bonus CD 中 的 三 首 华 语 作 品 。 其 中 主 打 歌

《 苦 瓜 》 更 是 一 曲 道 出 了 他 成 长 背 后 的 心 灵 故 事 , 发 人 深 省 。

与 主 打 歌 一 样 , 整 张 专 辑 曲 风 偏 黑 暗 沉 重 。 第 一 首

歌 “Stranger Under My Skin” 中 古 典 与 流 行 的 交 织 荡 气 回 肠 。

而 “My Private Christmas Song”Eason 又 大 玩 爵 士 情 调 , 引 发

对 爱 情 况 味 的 百 感 交 集 。

作 为 亮 点 之 一 ,Bonus CD 中 收 录 了 Eason 与 天 后 王 菲 首 度 合

唱 的 歌 曲 《 关 于 爱 情 》。 王 与 后 的 对 歌 余 音 绕 梁 , 让 人 听 罢 直

呼 过 瘾 。 ( 文 / 张 扬 )

专 辑 : 《 孤 独 的 和 弦 》

歌 手 : 萧 煌 奇

推 荐 歌 曲 :《 末 班 车 》

《 旅 途 愉 快 》

, , , , ,

煌 奇 在 他 的 第 四 张 国

语 专 辑 中 以 敏 锐 的 心

思 诠 释 歌 曲 , 充 满 对 爱 情 的

真 挚 情 感 和 透 露 出 他 对 它 的

向 往 。

主 打 歌 《 末 班 车 》 描 述 一

段 恋 情 随 着 最 后 一 趟 的 末 班 车 走 到 尽 头 。 这 最 后 一 刻 的 离 别 显

得 更 悲 伤 。

其 他 歌 曲 也 表 现 了 他 对 爱 情 的 不 同 情 感 。 比 如 , 在 《 嗨 早

安 , 用 早 餐 》, 萧 煌 奇 以 轻 快 朗 诵 般 的 唱 法 , 唱 出 为 亲 爱 的 人

准 备 丰 盛 早 餐 的 幸 福 , 充 满 愉 悦 感 。 这 首 歌 也 营 造 了 一 幅 清 新

的 早 晨 图 景 。

《 旅 途 愉 快 》 却 表 达 对 无 法 成 眷 属 的 心 上 人 的 祝 福 。 这 首 歌

中 的 复 杂 感 情 , 以 淡 淡 伤 感 的 曲 调 呈 现 , 从 中 又 能 感 受 到 看 见

心 爱 的 人 愉 快 时 的 一 丝 丝 幸 福 。

唯 一 的 缺 憾 就 是 , 专 辑 中 没 有 高 技 巧 的 唱 腔 , 也 没 有 表 现 他

一 贯 的 嘶 吼 式 歌 声 。 ( 文 / 梁 洁 欣 )

轻 松 玩 乐 团 的 主 唱 Summer 坦 白 , 他 们 一 路 走 来 很 幸 运 , 轻 轻 松 松 的 , 但 坚 持 自 己

的 梦 想 。

照 片 | 滨 海 艺 术 中 心 提 供

卢 苏 沛 ● 报 道

北 独 立 音 乐 团 体 轻 松 玩 直 夸 本 地

台 歌 迷 对 他 们 的 歌 词 了 如 指 掌 。

他 们 在 华 艺 音 乐 节 的 压 轴 表 演 上

说 :“ 别 跟 台 湾 朋 友 讲 哦 , 你 们 真 的 很

会 唱 !”

成 立 至 今 已 有 12 年 的 轻 松 玩 当 初 纯 粹

是 一 群 喜 欢 音 乐 又 爱 玩 的 好 朋 友 。

其 中 好 玩 歌 曲 之 一 《 心 情 点 播 》 就 是

一 首 激 励 生 活 的 歌 曲 。 主 唱 Summer 鼓

励 观 众 :“ 如 果 有 梦 , 就 做 下 去 吧 !”

Summer 在 抒 情 歌 曲 《 亲 手 交 给 他 》

分 享 了 自 己 对 爱 情 的 看 法 。 她 说 :“ 只

要 能 爱 、 有 爱 的 能 力 就 够 了 。 这 样 , 社

会 才 会 有 多 一 点 点 真 正 的 爱 。”

演 唱 《 海 角 七 号 》 的 片 尾 曲 《 风 光 明

媚 》 时 。 尝 试 改 歌 词 , 唱 出 :“ 最 好 吃

的 海 南 鸡 饭 , 新 加 坡 风 光 明 媚 , 因 为 有

你 们 陪 。”

鼓 手 阿 昆 为 了 表 示 自 己 不 只 会 打 鼓 ,

吹 起 了 小 喇 叭 , 获 得 观 众 掌 声 连 连 。

分 享 了 他 们 12 年 傻 傻 追 梦 的 故 事 ,

轻 松 玩 对 音 乐 和 生 活 的 热 忱 非 常 让 人 感

动 , 也 给 观 众 留 下 了 深 刻 印 象 。







专 辑 : 《 独 一 无 二 》

歌 手 : 罗 志 祥

推 荐 歌 曲 :《 舞 所 遁 形 》

《 口 头 缠 》


, , , , ,

洲 舞 王 罗 志 祥 继 去 年

推 出 台 湾 销 售 冠 军 《

罗 生 门 》 后 , 今 年 再 接 再 厉

发 行 第 八 张 个 人 专 辑 《 独 一

无 二 》。

专 辑 破 天 荒 将 抒 情 慢 歌 《

拼 什 么 》 作 为 首 波 主 打 , 力

求 证 明 歌 唱 实 力 的 罗 志 祥 以

清 唱 开 场 。

不 过 , 在 抒 情 歌 曲 《 强 出

头 》 和 《 怕 安 静 》 诠 释 情 感

照 片 | 网 络 下 载

的 功 力 仍 有 待 加 强 。

在 擅 长 的 舞 曲 领 域 里 , 罗 志 祥 依 旧 表 现 杰 出 。《 舞 所 遁 形 》

的 画 龙 点 睛 之 处 是 他 一 贯 俏 皮 的 唱 腔 。

《 口 头 缠 》 十 分 阳 光 , 充 满 活 力 。 这 首 歌 的 旋 律 与 歌 词 都 琅

琅 上 口 , 势 必 成 为 新 一 波 的 必 点 K 歌 。

总 之 , 在 这 张 专 辑 里 能 听 到 罗 志 祥 在 唱 功 上 的 进 步 , 是 小 猪

努 力 后 的 不 错 成 果 。 ( 文 / 王 裕 权 )


Opinions

EDITORIAL

chief editor

Agung Santoso Ongko

MANAGING editor

Tan Ru Ping Celine

ART director

Vishaka Mantri

sub-editors

Audrey Lim En-Rui

Hong Yu Qing Amelia

Low Wei Xiang

Sia Ling Xin

Tricia Anna Lim Peiyu

News editors

Cassandra Yeap

Trinh Hoang Ly

Lifestyle editors

Mavis Ang I-Wen

Tan Su Yi Kay

Reviews editor

Sulaiman Daud

dapper editors

Hong Yu Ran

Gladys Ng

Chinese editors

Grace Chew Hui Min

Teo Jion Chun

Pork chop and

Facebook

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

opinionS editors

Ang Xue Ting Eunice

Jayashri d/o Lokarajan

sports editors

Annabelle Liang

Lai Junjie

layout editors

Nicholas Keith Tam

Vanessa Dora Godfrey

photo editors

Goh Chay Teng

Wan Zhong Hao

graphics editor

Goh Wei Choon

Online EditorS

Tran Anh Cuong

Pham Tuong Minh

business MANAGerS

Lim Pei Yi Vivian

Ng Wei Ying

production support

Ng Heng Ghee

Teacher advisors

Andrew Duffy

Debbie Goh

Xu Xiaoge

There are few things closer

to Singaporeans’ hearts

than food.

So naturally, when NTU

students are faced with the

prospect of losing one of

their favourite food stalls,

they turn to Facebook to

garner support and try

to ‘Save the Canteen 14

Western Stall’.

The campaign has been

gaining momentum steadily.

More than 1,000 people

have ‘liked’ the cause, and

a lot of them have shared

the message via social networking

platforms.

For many, the campaign

is simply about whether

they can still get that plate

of mixed grill tomorrow.

But the speed at which

the campaign gains support

and the passion with

which people speak for it

underline the special role of

food – and the people who

work to provide it – in our

community.

Food brings us together

because it is a shared necessity,

but also because it

moves our senses regardless

of our differences.

In fact, tasting the

food of other cultures

often serves as a way to

understand them better.

So as we build a more

interactive community at

NTU, let us see food not

just as physical nourishment.

Let us remember

the people who toil to

feed us not just as vendors.

Just as artists and

musicians over the generations

have enriched

our culture, so have the

aunties and uncles who

cook our char kway teow

and nasi briyani, albeit

in a much less glamorous

way.

And we will continue

to need their passion,

energy, and creativity to

liven up our community.

After all, Holland Village

would not have been the

hub of activities that it is

without food.

Now, why don’t you

share with us what you

would love to eat at NTU

E-mail us.

A students’ newspaper published by the

Wee Kim Wee School of Communication

and Information (WKWSCI)

Nanyang Technological University

31 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637718

Tel: 6790 6446

Unsigned editorials represent the majority

view of the editorial board of The Chronicle

and do not necessarily reflect the policies or

views of Nanyang Technological University,

its employees, the students or the Council of

the University.

Signed opinion columns, letters and editorial

cartoons represent the opinion of the writer

or artist and are not necessarily those of

The Chronicle.

Printed by KHL Printing Co. Pte Ltd,

57 Loyang Drive, Singapore 508968

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU

Facebook: The Nanyang

Chronicle

Website: www3.ntu.edu.

sg/chronicle

General Enquiries:

chronicle@ntu.edu.sg

frankly, my dear

A column by the Chronicle Editors on issues close to their heart

Cultivate interactivity now

Kay Tan

l i f e s t y l e edito r

Having read about NTU’s

new masterplan, I find

myse lf wonder i ng

how much the new

buildings and facilities

will foster “interaction between

brains” as mentioned by President

Designate Bertil Andersson.

In 15 years, we will have on

campus “meeting places where the

humanities girl can meet the engineering

boy, where the professor

can meet students”, said Professor

Andersson.

The masterplan will also allow

PhD students who take on interdisciplinary

research from this year

to “stay on the same floor… work

together and when the project

is over, go back to their school

again,” he said.

He hopes that these researchers

will be encouraged to interact

and launch research collaborations

across various disciplines.

But will they really interact

and collaborate

Given my experience, I feel

that mere proximity does not always

yield interactivity.

Having lived in a Housing

Development Board flat for most of

my life, I have noticed parallels between

NTU’s vision for the campus

with the HDB’s racial quota under

its Ethnic Integration Policy.

Under this policy, each of the

four main races has a quota of

homes allocated to them in a block.

This ensures a balanced ethnic

mix in public housing estates and

prevents the formation of racial

enclaves by promoting interracial

interaction.

Often, it is the residents belonging

to the older generation

who have lived in “kampongs”,

who will make the effort to interact

with fellow residents.

This is simply because they are

used to the “kampong spirit”—the

culture of neighbours being a community

of friends.

My grandparents, for example,

confidently claim that they know

every household in their block, and

many others in the neighbourhood.

However, the “kampong” culture

present amongst the residents

of the older generation is lost

among the younger generation.

Though my neighbours and

I live mere metres apart, only a

handful of us truly interact beyond

exchanging polite greetings.

With the EIP not being completely

successful in its aims,

housing the PhD researchers in

the same block might face similar

results.

This vision for the new campus

may not be enough to encourage

interaction, and subsequent collaborations.

The university’s collaborative

culture must be cultivated, not by

building physical structures, but

GRAPHIC | GOH WEI CHOON

by formally encouraging interdisciplinary

thinking.

This should start at the undergraduate

level and the school

could introduce incentives for

collaboration.

Awarding grants as well as

fast-tracking approval processes

for interdisciplinary projects could

encourage researchers to take

up ideas without hesitation, as

resources will be provided and

administrative hassles eliminated.

The remade campus will definitely

enhance the interactivity

with specially designed meeting

places and accommodation that

provide proximity.

Acting Chief Building &

Infrastructure Officer (Plans) for

NTU, Mr Chan Keng Luck, explained

in a Straits Times Forum

letter, that cross-campus dialogues

“can be facilitated through creating

a formal as well as social

environment that allows such

interactions to happen naturally”.

While the facilities do play a

part in fostering interaction between

students, it is imperative

that we cultivate a culture of interactivity

now, instead of waiting

until the campus is remade.

Aided by the catalytic environment,

interactivity and cooperation

will then happen naturally in

the future.

It is what we make of the

places, not what they are built for,

that can make a true difference.


VOL.

NO.

17

08

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

a matter of perspective

OPINIONS 35

Evolutionary e-relationships

Natasha Alvar

Email, Facebooking, IMing,

and tweeting.

These terms did not exist

in our parents’ vocabulary

in the past.

However, today, some parents

are able to bridge the gap in their

knowledge of technology and

keep up with the times.

But for others, their inability

to adapt to these forms of technology

increases the communication

gap between parent and child.

I, however, have a wholly different

story to tell.

Technology has helped improve

my relationship with my

dad.

From the moment I was born,

I was Daddy’s little girl. He would

bring me to the football pitch during

his soccer trainings and cheer

me on as I kicked the ball around.

He was convinced that I would

take after him and become a great

athlete. But I fell in love with

books instead.

A stern and gruff Navy man,

he found it hard to express his affection

to not just me, but my siblings

as well. It was easier for him

to bond with us when we were

GRAPHIC | GOH WEI CHOON

younger but became more difficult

as we grew older.

My dad did not know how to

respond to me or find the right

words to say. He also never understood

why I cried.

About a year ago, my dad got

a new phone, the HTC Touch. He

was immensely excited about it as

being in the Navy meant he was

required to have a phone without

a camera, and one that was cool

and savvy was hard to come by.

The QWERTY keypad on the

phone made it extremely userfriendly.

My dad was so excited

that he was finding reasons to

SMS. However, he never had

any reason to text me. That all

changed one day.

It was one of those sullen

days. I did not have a good day

at school and was feeling melancholic.

To add to my misery, my

mum insisted that I try on a frilly

floral dress that she had bought

when I got home.

One look at it and I knew it

would show too much as it was

way too big. But since my mom

had made the request, I decided to

humour her and try it on.

When my dad saw me in the

dress, he joked that I looked like a

‘man-whore’.

That remark struck a nerve,

and I lost control of the tears that

I had been holding back all day.

I yelled at him, calling him an

insensitive and horrible person

who only knew how to hurt my

self—esteem.

After my outburst, I refused

to talk to him for the rest of the

day, despite seeing him struggle to

conjure up the right words to say

to make the situation better.

But he did not know how to

say it.

So for the very first time, he

sent me an SMS.

“Hey Baby Girl, I’m sori for

what I said. I just meant that the

dress is not suitable for you. I’m

sori that I hurt you :( Love, Dads.”

He did care after all!

While I did not forgive him

straightaway, it did break the wall

of silence that I had built up between

us.

SMS-ing allowed him to convey

thoughts and feelings that he

was not able to vocalise due to the

gruff man persona he was used to

adopting.

He now SMSes me to ask how

my day went, to check if I “makan

already” and tell me “U r looking

tired. need to rest more okay”

He would also send me little

reminders like “Ok so pls tidy up

com table ya.”

And I would reply with, “I did!

Major room cleaning yesterday :)

Tml gonna tackle my cupboard :)”

Sometimes there were also

random messages like, “Are u

guys watching tv or sleeping”

My favourite part of all these

little back-and-forth messages

between us would be his usual

ending.“Awesome quack quack.

Love U.” (Quack Quack being

his nickname for me because he

claims I walk like a duck)

SMS-ing gave us a way of

showing affection and encouragement

to each other.

It also helped us communicate

and express what we might not

have been able to in a face-to-face

interaction.

Some might read this and

scoff, “It’s just SMS-ing.”

My response to this is a quotation

from The Jane Austen Book

Club by Karen Jay Fowler.

“Never underestimate the

power of a well-written letter,”

she wrote.

It is the same with an SMS. It

is a constant reminder of someone’s

wish to connect with you

and show how important you are

to them.

This is how SMSes helped me

and my dad. It showed me that I

would always be my Daddy’s little

girl.

Terence Lee

I

knew something was wrong

with my relationship when

my girlfriend preferred holding

her iPhone lovingly to

my stubbled chin.

When we first started going

out, we chatted for three hours

daily on MSN Messenger. We also

met almost everyday to study or

shop.

Nowadays, we’ve become too

lazy to even talk on a dedicated

chat software, preferring Gmail’s

chat function as I can type an

email to my lecturer and talk to

my girlfriend at the same time.

We used to give cute little

cards filled with cut-out hearts to

each other as an expression of our

love.

Now, we send animated e-

cards to one another because we’re

lazy.

We now share our Google

Calendars and sync them on our

smartphones to keep tabs on one

another.

Gone are the days of calling

my girlfriend to plan the time and

place for our next date.

Instead, we also share a Google

Doc where we have created a

list of places and restaurants we’d

like to visit.

Most of them are culled from

hungrygowhere.com—a site to

find out about the latest food

joints.

What happens when we want

to go somewhere but find ourselves

lost Google Maps takes

care of that.

We key in our destination and

it takes us there. No more approaching

strangers who might

point us in the wrong direction.

But spontaneity

was lost. We

became a twoperson

tour group

where every date

was a planned

programme.

Honestly, I was happy with

this state of affairs for a while because

maintaining a relationship

had become effortless.

But the spontaneity was lost.

We became a two-person tour

group where every date was a

planned programme.

We’d surrendered all elements

of surprise and given up on the

notion of exploring the urban

jungle like a modern Tarzan and

Jane.

I realised that I wasn’t able to

charm my girlfriend as everything

we did only required minimal effort.

Which was why I suggested

that we date on World of Warcraft.

However, that did not sit well with

her.

Faced with this crisis, I decided

on a plan to win her back—one

concocted in Germany by Klaus

Teuber.

Teuber is the inventor of Settlers

of Catan, a popular board

game that has sold 15 million

copies worldwide.

I recently bought the game for

my girlfriend. Yes, an actual board

game, and not a pixelated app.

Klaus mentioned that he created

Settlers of Catan to amuse his

wife.

Since I was becoming a boring

boyfriend, I thought this gimmick

would give me the boost I needed.

The plan worked like a charm.

We played Settlers with my family

when she came over to my place.

What would have been a

sleepy Sunday afternoon turned

GRAPHIC | VU VIET ANH

into a time of genuine bonding.

In fact, my plan has worked so

well that we’ve started to spend

more quality time together playing

all sorts of board games.

Lesson learnt One way to rejuvenate

a relationship automated

by technology is to step out of it

altogether.

Only then can we stop looking

at the screen and start looking at

one another.


36

OPINIONS

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

VOL.

NO.

17

07

Ethics in banking: an oxymoron

Ong Yong Roy

Shady banks are in the

news again. This time, it

is Goldman Sachs. This

is not the first time that

the investment bank’s

ethics is under question.

The Wall Street Journal reported

in late 2006 that traders in

Goldman Sachs convinced bank

executives that the subprime market

was heading for trouble.

The bank reacted by selling off

these investments and bet that the

financial markets would crash.

According to BBC News, exdirector

of Goldman Sachs was

charged with insider trading.

It was reported that he managed

to get more than US$18 million

for Galleon funds, a hedge

fund group.

Despite being fully aware that

these investments had a high

probability of losing money, Goldman

Sachs failed to advise clients

on the best course of action.

This was clearly unethical as

the bank made a profit of four billion

dollars from its clients’ monetary

losses.

Such unethical practices certainly

exist in Singapore as well.

Ethics is becoming a key theme

in the local financial industry.

The term “ethics” is derived

from the Greek word “ethos”

which refers to a system of ideal

moral character.

Applying this definition to the

banking sector, banks should have

a sustainable business model that

stresses on morality while simultaneously

pursuing profits.

The economy will benefit if

banks lend funds to quality corporations

instead of speculating

in high risk business transactions

(e.g. lending to a poor credit history

customer solely because of

higher profit margins).

This will result in positive externalities

like higher job growth.

Banks can play a crucial role

in safeguarding depositors’ money

through sound lending activities.

Current banking practices tend

to be very profit-oriented and

have a short-term outlook.

For instance, consumer bankers

push investment products to

consumers in order to meet sales

targets even though the products

may not be suitable for the clients.

Michael Beer, professor at

GRAPHIC | SWARNALI MITRA

Harvard Business School and author

of High Commitment, High

Performance, explains in his

book: “Banks handing out massive

bonuses based on short-term

performance can only be taken as

a sign that greed remains a driving

force.

“More bluntly, short-term

thinking doesn’t reconcile with

good ethics,” he added.

Dr Siriwan Chutikamoltham,

Senior Teaching Fellow at Nanyang

Business School said, “There

are so many financial temptations

and promises of getting rich.

“Sales performances are also

judged. This can result in unethical

behavior among bankers.

“That is why our business

“There are

many financial

temptations that

can result in

unethical behavior

among bankers.”

Dr Siriwan Chutikamoltham

Nanyang Business School

school absolutely emphasises on

ethics.”

Third-year banking and finance

student, Kent Choo, 24,

agrees.

“Looking at the regularity

which frauds and lawsuits involving

financial institutions occur, it

shows that there are no ethics in

this industry.”

Ethics is also rarely on the

minds of finance students entering

an industry that stresses on

profit, earnings and intellectual

capacity.

It is certainly the case that students

fear they will be unable to

join top banks upon graduation

and so, do not bother concerning

themselves with ethics.

For instance, the criteria for

being selected for an interview

at top banks such as JP Morgan,

UBS and Goldman Sachs include

both an excellent Grade Point

Average (GPA) in academics and

an outstanding Co-Curricular Involvement.

Such banks only select a

handful of students to join their

prestigious training programs,

which include overseas training

and mentorship by senior business

leaders.

Third-year banking and finance

student, Dale Lai, 24, said,

“Money is an important consideration.

“But another key attraction

is the prestige and ability of being

able to influence financial

markets even as a young professional.”

Lim Song Yee, 24, a third year

banking and finance student,

explained: “The pros of joining

banking includes the excellent career

prospects and exit options.”

Ethical practices are certainly

a key issue in this industry.

However, it does not mean

that only the bankers are at fault.

The society of today should

be held responsible as well for

today’s banking industry’s profitdriven

strategies.

Investors very often judge

firms based on short term performance

such as stock price and

profit margins.

Such short-term profit–seeking

attitudes from investors promote

the incentive for firms to be

unethical.

As Dr Siriwan explains, “Society

has to set the right tone, setting

forth the rewards for ethical

behavior and harsh punishments

for unethical firms.

“As consumers, we should buy

from firms that do business ethically.

“As investors, we should invest

in stocks of firms that do business

ethically, not only in stocks that

give the most gain in the short

term.”

louder than words

Goh Wei Choon

g r a p h i c s edito r


VOL.

NO.

17

08

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

In Unknown Territory

OPINIONS 37

canteen talk

The revamped edveNTUre boasts new functions

such as blogs, Wiki and connectivity to Facebook.

But is new necessarily better We ask students

their views on this.

I think the new

edveNTUre is

fine. I have not

experienced any

problems with it

like some of my

classmates have.

Jeff Lee, MAE, Yr 2, 20



I cannot access

the website using

Google Chrome. It

is very hard to get

to the home page of

my list of courses.

Rebecca Lim, WKWSCI, Yr 2, 21

GRAPHIC | GOH WEI CHOON

Xu Yuan Duan

The new edveNTUre seems

to be an exciting place

where students can learn

and invest time to acquire

and apply skills of

the 21st century.

But is this happening in reality

Five weeks into the new semester,

I have yet to see these features

being used in my courses.

They are instructor-initiated

and require approval before they

can be utilised.

Associate Professor Huang

Guangbin from the School of Electrical

and Electronic Engineering

said, “Re-learning how to perform

basic functions on the new layout

has to be done before learning new

features.”

“Other professors have even

approached me, asking for help in

performing basic functions with

the new edveNTUre. The new system

seems complicated,” he adds.

The chief complaint is the user

“un-friendliness” of the new system.

Functions that could be performed

easily in the past have to

be re-learned before the new functions

can be considered.

Associate Professor Stephen

Teo from the Wee Kim Wee School

of Communication and Information

agrees: “Who has the time

to watch these learning videos I

would rather be doing research or

writing with that time.”

Dr Ashley Tan, Head of the

NIE Centre for E-Learning offered

another explanation: “Humans

beings naturally fear change.

Resistance could stem from

the fear and uncertainty that one

feels when faced with something

new.”

Functions that

could be performed

easily in the past

have to be relearned

before the

new functions can

be considered.

Lecturers could simply be experiencing

problems of adapting

quickly to new systems.

Many of them are “digital

immigrants”—an individual who

was born before the existence of

digital technology and adopted it

later in life.

This results in one having to

face a steeper learning curve when

tasked with learning new technology.

The internet has truly become

part of our everyday lives.

Marc Prensky, acclaimed writer

and speaker in the areas of education

and learning, refers to the

younger generation as “digital natives”.

He defines them as a generation

born into a world where digital

technology is ubiquitous.

They thus have the advantage

of learning new digital skills

quickly.

EdveNTUre, which is a webbased

Learning Management

Systems (LMS), taps into this and

creates an opportunity for technologically

savvy users to learn

about the convenience the internet

provides.

Dr Tan Seng Chee, the Head of

the Learning Sciences and Technologies,

explains: “An LMS allows

one to engage in self-paced learning

or learning through social interactions

with others.”

The new features, such as the

Wiki tool, are convenient and add

a new dimension to learning for

students.

“By constraining a group of

learners to work on a wiki document,

it forces the learners to

reach a consensus on how their

ideas should be represented.

“This process creates opportunities

for the learners to discuss,

negotiate or debate about their

ideas,” Dr Tan added.

Mr Andrew Lim, an IT executive

with NTU’s IT Steering Executive

on Electronic Education said:

“A small number of the teaching

staff was taken aback when

the new edveNTUre update was

released.

“But these complaints were

from a small number of the teaching

staff who did not attend the

training courses for the new system,”

he said.

He added that provisions have

been made to facilitate a painless

migration.

“Video tutorials and a frequently

asked questions page have been

set up to make the transition easier

for teaching staff,” Mr Lim said.

But Associate Professor Huang

questioned the need for such

forms of learning.

He said: “If a site is truly intuitive,

re-training should not be

needed.”

However, I am hopeful it will

just be a matter of time before familiarisation

of the new system is

attained.

Only then, will the full potential

of the new edveNTUre and its

new e-learning features be unlocked.

I think the new

features are very

helpful. I often

use them to do my

research for my

subjects.

Ibrahim Aneel Ali, CEE, Yr 4, 23


There’s no difference

with the new

edveNTUre as my

professors have not

tried to use the new

functions in class.

Emil Fazira, SCBE, Yr 2, 20


It is more functional

now. Though the

graphics look nicer,

there isn’t any

difference between

the old and new.

Rebecca Lim, WKWSCI, Yr 2, 21


TEXT | JAYASHRI LOKARAJAN ; PHOTOS | WAN ZHONG HAO & GOH CHAY TENG


VOL.

17

NO.

bpl talk

Fallen giants feeling the blues

Tsang Wing Han

THE NANYANG

08 CHRONICLE

WITH two-thirds of the Premier

League matches over, Chelsea

are lagging in the chase for the

Barclays Premier League title.

The club is currently standing at

fifth place, 12 points behind league

leaders Manchester United. In fact,

for the first time in nine years,

they are in danger of missing the

Champions League.

Who would have seen it coming

In the early part of the season,

Chelsea were in unstoppable form,

if you include the six-goal hammering

against West Bromwich

Albion and Wigan Athletic.

So, you can imagine the bewilderment

of fans when the club

subsequently went through an arid

November and December period,

winning only once in eight matches.

The downfall was unexpected.

While Chelsea may be excused

for dropping points to Liverpool,

Arsenal and Tottenham Hotspur as

they were tough matches, losing to

Sunderland at home by a three-goal

margin was unthinkable and unacceptable

to any loyal Blues fan.

While the loss in form corresponded

with the injury of key midfielder

Frank Lampard, one would

expect a team like Chelsea to have

competent substitutes in their squad.

FORMER GLORY: The Blues are a shadow of their old selves.

But in truth, the squad did not

have strong substitutes and instead

relied on fringe players such as

Daniel Sturridge and Gael Kakuta,

both of whom have since been

shipped out of Chelsea on loan in

the winter transfer period.

The thin squad was terribly

exposed by their opponents.

Even Lampard’s return in early

December could not bring the Blues

out of their slump.

The team’s Russian billionaire

owner Roman Abramovich tried

PHOTO | INTERNET

to rectify things by pumping in

cash for coach Carlo Ancelotti in

January this year. The Italian head

coach promptly spent £75 million

to purchase Fernando Torres and

David Luiz.

It is too early to determine if the

two signings are worth the huge

amount of cash.

But by the looks of it, Coach

Ancelotti has to work harder to integrate

these players into the squad.

Judging by their recent loss

to Liverpool and draw against

Fulham, it is clear that Ancelotti

has yet to find the winning formula

for his two new strikers.

Ancelotti may need to revamp

the whole system to accommodate

the two star front men.

Having already been knocked

out in the two domestic cup competitions,

Chelsea’s title hopes are

left with the Premier League and

the European Champions League.

But all is not lost for them.

Although Chelsea are two

points away from the fourth spot

which guarantees Champions

League football, and four BPL

match wins away from league leaders

Manchester United, the unpredictability

of the season may soon

put the Blues back in the race again.

If the Blues, however, fail to

keep their confidence and expected

game-play, they may have to kiss the

Champions League trophy good bye.

After all, what chance will

Chelsea stand against Barcelona and

Real Madrid if they cannot secure a

full three points against the likes of

lower-ranked teams like Birmingham

and Wolverhampton Wanderers

Currently holding a 2-0 lead

against FC Copenhagen in the

Champions League, the return leg

on March 16 might just be the key

for Ancelotti and his Chelsea team

to get the act going and bring some

much needed motivation back.

SPORTS 39

they said

that

“Winning

is the best

deodorant.”

NBA player Jason Kidd

describing his passion to win.

“I’ve been called

‘The Maple Leaf

Missile’, and

‘Bombardier

Milos’.

Everything so

far has to do

with something

like war, like a

missile.”

Canadian tennis player Milos

Raonic, whose serve has hit

151 miles per hour, on the

nicknames that have been

used on him.

Weight loss: the ultimate seduction

Natasha Alvar

sports talk

THE recent death of a contestant

on Singapore weight-loss contest

Lose to Win struck a chord with the

dormant weight-loss junkie in me.

Mr Ong Joo Aun, 54, collapsed

on the Health Promotion Board’s

show, the Singaporean counterpart

to American reality show The

Biggest Loser.

Sent to the hospital immediately,

he was pronounced dead

soon after.

Looking at me now, you might

not know that I once tilted the

scales at a startling 60kg. The late

night binging sessions during my

junior college days made me well

overweight for someone my height.

When I found out that I could

not fit into my favourite pair of

jeans, I immediately embarked on

a stringent diet, shedding a dozen

kilograms in two months.

But I was still dissatisfied. I exercised

and watched my diet even

more religiously.

I started experiencing hair loss,

fatigue and my complexion took on

an unhealthy sheen.

What started out as a decision

to change my life became an obsession.

It was then that I recognised

the draw of commercialised weight

loss programmes.

Reality television shows, like

The Biggest Loser (both US and

Asia versions) have become increasingly

popular since their inception

in 2004. These shows offer

rewards in exchange for the extra

pounds shed by their contestants.

Despite safety reviews and assessments,

I believe all bets are off

when push comes to shove.

Competitors are likely to forget

the risks of rapid weight loss, such

as changes in blood pressure and

metabolic imbalances that can

affect vital organs like the heart.

Dr Sunil Kumar Joseph stressed

in an interview with TODAY newspaper

that “weight loss is not a

competition”.

He advised that one engage in

rapid weight loss programmes only

under proper medical supervision.

I understand how these programmes

provide the ultimate

seduction. We want to lose weight

as quickly as possible, so concerns

with health and wellness

get pushed aside when people get

caught up in playing the numbers

game.

Some contestants manipulate

the system by intentionally gaining

weight in the first week to achieve a

more significant amount of weight

loss in the next.

For example, the Biggest Loser

season 4 contestant Neil Tejwani

intentionally threw a weigh-in by

drinking two gallons of water for

a 6kg “weight gain”.

Weight loss programmes often

sully the cause they set out to

propagate.

When I set out to lose weight, I

wanted to lead a healthier life and

spend more time with my family

and people I care about. However,

the compulsion with numbers on

GRAPHIC | KANITHA ANGELA

the scale, brought on by popular

culture, made me lose sight of that.

I came dangerously close to ill

health before I remembered that

weight loss needed to be done in

moderation, on our own terms and

according to our individual needs.

One must remember that weight

loss should not be treated as a

quick fix as it is our health we are

tampering with. So take your time,

and don’t lose heart while trying to

lose weight.

GRAPHIC | GOH WEI CHOON

“Ferrari is like

Real Madrid,

buying the

most expensive

players in the

market.”

F1 driver Jaime Alguersuari

draws a comparision between

Ferrari and the Real Madrid

football team.

“Hockey is a

sport for white

men. Basketball

is a sport for

black men.

Golf is a sport

for white men

dressed like

black pimps.”

Professional golfer Tiger

Woods gives his two cents’

worth on the sport.


40

SPORTS

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

17

08

ONE FOR THE

TEAM: A tchoukball

player trying her

hand at the novel

sport.

DOUBLE

TROUBLE:

Couples in

the Lovers’

Challenge had

to paddle 350m

on surfboards.

SURF

SWEAT

The annual Surf N Sweat organised by the NTU Sports Club was

held on February 13th at Sentosa’s Siloso Beach.

BUNS OF STEEL: A participant of the muscleman competition tipping over a tyre.

AND

Photographer Wallace Woon brings you through a day of sumo

wrestling, gladiator fights, eating competitions and many other

exciting events.

KNOCK OUT: In the ‘Gladiator’ event, two players use pugil sticks to knock each

other off elevated platforms.

GREED IS GOOD: A contestant

ravages his way through a plate

of two bananas, a bunch of

grapes, an apple and a quarter

of a watermelon in the eating

competition.

FRIENDLY FIGHTING: Participants donning fat suits in the ‘Sumo Wrestling’ event.


VOL.

17

NO.

THE NANYANG

08 CHRONICLE

SPORTS 41

A running tribute to EW Barker

Shahilia Bhagat

FOR the first time, the Barker’s

Challenge Run was open to the

whole of NTU this year.

This is due to the new Open

(NTU) category for students from all

faculties in NTU.

Organised by the National Institute

of Education (NIE), the run

on February 18th attracted 128

participants.

The run is held annually in

memory of the late Edmund William

Barker, fondly known as “Mr

Singapore Sport”.

A sportsman, scholar and

statesman, Mr Barker became

president of the Singapore National

Olympic Council in 1970—a

position he held for 20 years. He

was also the first Singaporean to

receive the Olympic Order from

the International Olympic Committee

for his outstanding contribution

to the local sports field in

1986.

Runners in teams of four, at

least one of whom must be female,

each ran 630m relays around the

NIE triangle.

Other categories are the Physical

Education and Sports Science and

Sports and Science Management

(PESS-SSM) category and the NIE

Inter-Group Endeavours in Service

Learning (GESL) category.

Winning the NTU (Open) Category

was the team from the School

of Civil and Environmental Engi-

KICKING IT OFF: Runners starting the Barker’s Challenge Run around the NIE triangle.

neering (CEE). They clocked 7 minutes

and 31 seconds.

Team member Eve Chow, 19,

said: “It was a great race for all

of us. We are all from NTU Track

& Field, and trained three times a

week for about one to two hours

each time.”

She added: “We will definitely

join next year and hopefully get

a better timing.”

The runner-up in the same

category came from Hall 12. The

team missed out on the gold by 11

seconds.

Team leader and second-year

student from School of Mechanical

and Aerospace Engineering

PHOTO | WAN ZHONG HAO

Joshua Goh, 23, said: “My team

joined the race as a challenge to

see if we could finish the race with

a good timing and if we are prepared

for future competitions such

as the inter-hall race.”

NIE director Professor Lee Sing

Kong was delighted with the run.

He said: “The event is very

exciting as it reflects the stature

of the man we remember. In this

gathering of like-minded people in

sports, their enthusiasm and spirit

is present.”

Mrs Gloria Barker, wife of the

late Mr Edmund Barker agreed. She

said: “The atmosphere is very good,

he (Mr Baker) would have been very

proud of it.”

Professor Lee’s biggest hope for

next year is for participation to increase

further.

Second-year NIE student, Huang

Yuchi, 27, who is in charge of the

race, suggested: “There could be a

longer time for signing up to ensure

more participation.”

This year, the registration period

lasted for about two weeks across all

categories.

Before the run, the EW Barker

scholarships were given to outstanding

student-teachers from

SSM for their hard work and

achievement in academics and

sports.

Each one-off scholarship is

worth $8,000 with no bond.

Professor Lee felt that Mr Barker’s

legacy will be passed on through

the scholarship.

He said: “Mr Baker was a role

model and will continue to inspire

young athletes to pursue their

sporting interest with great enthusiasm,

perseverance and determination.

“The lives of good people serve as

a source of inspiration to the younger

generation.”

Tennis and romance a smash with couples

Andrew Koh

T EN N IS played cupid at the

Sports and Recreation Centre on

February 18th.

“Meet your Match on Court”

was the theme for the inaugural

‘Vday Tennis’ event organised by

the NTU Tennis Club.

Aimed at serving up romance on

the courts in line with Valentine’s

Day, the event saw mixed doubles

pairings play against each other.

“In keeping with the Valentine’s

Day atmosphere, we wanted to

bring couples together through

tennis. Playing doubles in tennis

requires a lot of chemistry

so we wanted to combine the

concepts of tennis and romance,”

said Andre Gunaharja Kusnadi,

22, vice-chairperson of the NTU

Tennis Club.

“For singles who turned up

alone, we matched them with other

singles who were alone too,” added

the third-year student from the

School of Chemical and Biomedical

Engineering.

Although rain initially threatened

to dampen spirits at the event,

everyone was unfazed.

Participants and organisers

chipped in to clear the puddles of

water that made matches unplayable.

“Even though we had a wet

start to the event, all the participants

were really positive about

it,” said Ethel Ngiam, 22, the

chairperson of the NTU Tennis

Club.

Registration costs $8 per couple

and half that price for members of

the club. Prizes for the event, such

as complimentary pairs of movie

tickets and books with dating

tips, were sponsored by the Social

Development Network.

On top of those prizes, the

tennis couples were also given

Polaroid pictures of themselves

as mementos.

“We chose prizes that would encourage

the winning pair to continue

to do things together hopefully

as a couple after the competition,”

said Ngiam, a third-year student

from the School of Mechanical and

Aerospace Engineering.

T he w inning duo, f ina l-

year students from the School

of Mechanical and Aerospace

Engineering Dennise Tanoko Ardi,

23, and Ang Li Ann, 22, plan

to watch the film ‘No Strings

Attached’ using their complimentary

movie tickets.

They met each other in the NTU

Tennis Club two years ago.

“Tennis is a good game for

strangers to play mixed doubles

because communication between

pairs improves the more you play

together,” said Ardi.

COURT CHEMISTRY: ‘Vday Tennis’ saw couples pit themselves against each other in mixed doubles.

Runners-up Goh Karwei and

Sharon Tan, who are close friends,

have known each other since their

junior college days.

Tan, 22, a first-year student

from the School of Materials

Science and Engineering said: “I’ve

known Karwei for so long and he’s

always such a joker on and off

court. He’s always been optimistic

and always encourages me.”

In response Goh, 23, a second-year

student from Nanyang

Business School said: “I can usually

PHOTO | SABRINA TIONG

tell when she (Sharon) is nervous

so I try to encourage her by giving

her high fives.”

“Even though we didn’t win, it

was a priceless memorable experience

for me. I guess chemistry can

be built on the tennis court.”


42

SPORTS

THE NANYANG

CHRONICLE

VOL.

NO.

17

08

VOL.

17

NO.

THE NANYANG

08 CHRONICLE

SPORTS 43

Danson Cheong &

Edward Teo

sports profile

Accelerating past limitations

PUSH-UP WITH TRUNK ROTATION

1

2

Lee follows a core

strengthening regimen

as part of his biathlon

training.

Here he outlines how

two different core

exercises should be

done.

HE IS Singapore’s second fastest

biathlete. But five years ago, Henry

Lee could hardly keep up with his

then girlfriend in the pool.

The 22-year-old said: “I would

lift my head to breathe and all I

would see were her legs splashing

away from me. She could lap me

five times during a 1,500m swim.”

Lee, a student at Ngee Ann

Polytechnic back then, was dating

a former national swimmer, and

had just picked up biathlon with

the Polytechnic’s biathlon team.

Lee has not swum against his

girlfriend since they broke up a

year ago, but the now second-year

student from the School of Physical

and Mathematical Sciences is confident

that he can now keep pace.

His confidence is more than

just hot air. Lee emerged out of the

water neck-to-neck with national

triathlete Mok Ying Ren at the

Singapore Biathlon last month.

He later finished 5th—behind

Mok, who came in 2nd—and was

the second fastest Singaporean on

the course.

Biathlon is an endurance sport

that consists of an open water swim

followed immediately by a run.

“I chose to pick up biathlon to

challenge myself and see if I could

transit from being in a uniformed

group to a competitive sport,” said

Lee, who used to be from the Boys

Brigade in secondary school.

Five years later, Lee has officially

made the jump from uniform

into the skin-tight lycra suits

biathletes use for competition.

Lee is the fastest biathlete

from NTU’s Biathlon Team and the

second fastest Singaporean in the

sport—according to results from

this year’s Singapore Biathlon.

Held on February 12th, Lee

came in fifth in the open category,

which consisted of a 1.5km seaswim

followed by a 10km run.

Compatriot Mok Ying Ren came

in second, with the first, third and

fourth podium spots going to New

Zealanders Dylan McNiece, Ben

Pulham and Australian Halligan

David Quinn respectively.

MAKING A SPLASH: Lee is a force to be reckoned with in the pool.

SWIFTLY DOES IT: Lee is the fastest biathlete in NTU and the second fastest Singaporean in the sport.

During the Singapore University

Games (SUniG) Aquathlon meet

last year, Lee came in third, just

a few minutes off Mok Ying Ren

from NUS, who broke the tape first.

It is hard to believe Lee’s dominance

in the sport was sparked

because he was frequently outclassed

by his ex-girlfriend.

He said: “Initially I just wanted

to swim faster than my girlfriend, so

I started putting in really long hours

in the pool. I guess you could say I

was motivated by a little bit of ego.”

These days, Lee—whose life

revolves around the sport and his

studies—often clocks up to 12 hours

a week training.

Indeed, when The Nanyang

Chronicle visited Lee in his hall

room, there was an entire wall

filled with his past race bibs.

“Each race bib has been with

me physically through a race.

Looking up at all of them on my

wall reminds me of all the great

experiences I had. This is my way

of keeping my love for the sport

strong,” said Henry.

He credits his teammates from

the NTU squad for his success.

“I am very fortunate to have

such great teammates who not only

give me emotional support, but professional

advice as well,” said Henry.

Unlike 23-year-old NUS medical

student Mok Ying Ren, who has

equipment sponsors and a personal

trainer, Lee relies on his teammates.

“I depend on what I call ‘peer

mentorship’. For what I lack in

professional advice, I make up for

it with the pool of collective knowledge

that is shared between every

NTU Biathlon

member of my team,” explained Lee.

So attached is Lee to his teammates

that he describes training

with them as his ‘social life’.

He said: “Many people tell me

that biathlon, by nature of being an

individual sport, is very selfish. But

I disagree. It’s really a team event.”

“Varsity races like the SUniG

Aquathlon and the NUS Biathlon

often take the cumulative time of a

team, so you are really only as fast

as your slowest athlete.”

According to Lee, the NTU

squad is gearing up for their final

race of the season, the NUS

Biathlon, where they will face off

with current champions, NUS.

PHOTOS | DANSON CHEONG

Team Manager: Mr Chia Chin Yeh

Contact Number: 67905166

E-mail: cychia@ntu.edu.sg

Training on Mondays and Wednesdays

Sports and Recreation Centre, Swimming Pool

Lee said: “This year the team

has really trained hard and improved

greatly. It’s going to be a

close race.”

Beyond biathlon, Lee hopes to

take his multi-sport ambitions one

step further.

Lee wants to complete a Half-

Ironman triathlon—which consists

of a 1.9km swim, a 90km bike

ride and a 21km run—before he

graduates.

“That’s been a longtime dream

of mine,” said Lee.

If his past successes are anything

to go by, Singaporean triathletes

might soon have another face

to look out for.

Assume push up position with arms slightly wider than shoulder

width.

THE PLANK

Lie face down on the floor resting on your forearms, with palms flat.

Push off the floor, raising up onto toes and resting on your elbows.

S&RC multi-purpose fields reopen for use

Brenda Xie

Keep your back flat, in a straight line from head to heels.

Hold for 20 to 60 seconds, lower and repeat for 3-5 reps.

NTU’s sportsmen and women no

longer have to resort to training

in car parks or within their own

hall compounds, after the Sports

and Recreation Centre (S&RC)

reopened the multi-purpose fields

on the 4th week of school.

Continual heavy rains in mid-

January disrupted many of the

Inter-Hall (IHG) and Inter-School

Games (ISG) as the fields beside

the basketball and tennis courts

were waterlogged and had to be

closed for almost a month.

O r ga n i s e r s of bot h I HG

Softball and Football had most

of their matches interrupted as a

result of the pitch closure.

Koo Jeng Shun, 23, organiser

of IHG softball (boys) event said:

“ IHG softball was quite badly affected.

It was supposed to be one

of the sports that ended the earliest

but it dragged on for 2 weeks.”

Due to the lack of a proper

training venue, some of the halls

resorted to having their sessions

at car parks or within their own

hall compounds.

This compromised on the

number and intensity of training

sessions that they could have.

“Trainings were cancelled

most of the time because of the

OPEN ONCE AGAIN: The multi-purpose fields could not be used for nearly a month.

Lower yourself until your chest is almost touching the floor.

3

Push off to starting position and rotate body 90 degrees to the left,

with your other arm pointing straight upwards.

Return to starting position and repeat on right side.

closure. Field trainings were

converted to physical trainings

to build up fitness and stamina,”

said Tan Kum Boon, 21, Hall of

Residence 12 Sports Secretary and

organiser of IHG football.

The S&RC came to an agreement

with the IHG committee to

minimize the use of the fields and

to find alternative venues for the

IHG events.

For instance the preliminary

rounds for Softball (girls and

boys) were held at the Anchorvale

This is one rep. Do 20 reps.

PHOTO | WAN ZHONG HAO

field in Sengkang West.

The S&RC has advised halls

to minimise the use of the fields,

especially after rainy days,”

said Hall of Residence 3 Sports

Secretary Winfred Oh, 23.

As the Coordinator for all 20

"Core

strength is

essential

to keeping

proper form

in both

swimming

and

running."

sports of the IHG, Oh understood

the problem: “Last year, IHG

soccer matches had to be held

at various secondar y schools

and softball matches were held

at the Japanese Association of

Singapore (JAS).”

In response to requests to

reopen the pitch, the S&RC said

that it was necessary to close the

fields, as constant usage of the

field when it is wet and muddy

will affect the growth of the

grass.

Using the field would not only

spoil its condition over time but

also affect future competition use

and other bookings of it.

Mr Darren Chua, Assistant

Manager (Sports) of the S&RC and

the team manager of the IVP football

team said: “Pitch closure during

inclement weather is required

for maintaining the quality of the

pitch in the long run.”

“Users have to understand

that at the particular point in

time when any decision is made,”

he added.

Mr. Chua added that there are

no hard and fast rules as to when

the field should be closed.

He revealed that duty officers

decide the closure of the football

pitch on the actual day, depending

on the weather and pitch

conditions.


Sports

Love

and tennis on the court – Page 41

New gym goes back to basics

Edward Teo

THERE are no treadmills, air

conditioning, or towels for hire.

At first glance, one may not know

what to make of this gym.

Called 'The Playground', it

boasts a wide range of free weights

such as truck tyres, sledge hammers,

gymnastic rings and kettlebells,

instead of the usual gym

equipment.

This gym is co-owned by

first-year Wee Kim Wee School of

Communication and Information

(WKWSCI) student Jeremy Ko.

The gym’s minimalist concept

is seen as an asset by its owners, as

it shows that the gym is for serious

workouts.

“It’s not clean, it’s not comfortable.

It’s a place where people get

results because of their efforts,” said

the 22-year-old.

Ko was roped in as web designer

in April last year for the then-upstart

company, after he met founder

David Devito, 46 at a rock climbing

session. He was then offered

co-ownership as they were able to

complement one another, said Ko.

Of particular novelty is the

kettlebell, a fitness equipment relatively

new in the local fitness scene.

Kettlebell H.I.T., a Singaporebased

fitness company that promotes

kettlebell lifting and highintensity

training workouts is the

parent company of The Playground.

It was established in 2007 and is the

brainchild of founder Devito.

“A regular dumbbell only trains

the isolated bicep muscle if you do

bicep curls, for example. However,

the kettlebell utilizes the whole

body while lifting it, working the

core and lower back muscles as

well,” Ko explained.

Devito added: “We have the

most diverse forms of kettlebells

in terms of weight and quantity in

Singapore at the moment.”

The transition from regular

dumbbells to kettlebells has been

picking up in Singapore recently.

“When I was exercising with

AN UNCONVENTIONAL WORKOUT: Co-owner of The Playground Jeremy Ko (right) guides reporter Edward Teo (left) on the proper use of a kettlebell.

just dumbbells, I could only do

10 chin ups at best. After starting

off with kettlebells six months

ago, I can hit a maximum of 20,”

said Nabil Ruysdi, 23, a student at

Singapore Institute of Management

and member of the SG Titans.

Groups of serious athletes who

engage in Kettlebell H.I.T.'s form of

training create the gym’s tough and

competitive atmosphere. These include

rock climbers and members of

the SG Titans, a local interest group

of strength training enthusiasts.

“The athletes create a strong

energy that motivates everyone to

push themselves beyond the limit,”

ROUGH AND TOUGH: There is nowhere to get comfortable and relax in this gym.

WHAT IS A KETTLEBELL

The kettlebell is a weight which looks like a

cannonball with a handle.

It has a centre of mass that

enables swing movements

not possible with traditional

dumbbells.

This makes training

with a kettlebell more

effective because more

muscle groups are utilised

in the swinging movement.

said The Playground’s founder

Devito, 46.

He added: “I believe that the local

fitness industry is moving towards

this trend of raw, full body workouts.

In fact, I predict that many gyms

may follow suit in the future.”

The Playground’s brand of

physical conditioning aims to promote

full body workouts, building

lean bodies that are functional

for overall physical movement in

everyday life.

Ko said: “Our training will help

athletes engage in possible day-today

activities like carrying heavy

loads with ease and increase overall

functional strength for contact

sports such as rugby and football.”

About 95 per cent of equipment

at The Playground are free weights

that train the body as a whole muscular

system.

Devito said that the gym owns

six power racks, as compared to a

maximum of two at a regular gym.

The power rack is a weighttraining

equipment for free weight

workouts, that consists of exercises

such as deadlifts (a weighttraining

exercise where one lifts a

loaded barbell off the ground from

a stabilized bent-over position) and

weighted squats.

The gym is located at Horsecity,

adjacent to shopping mall Turf City.

Activities that require more

space such as signature tyre flipping

and sledgehammer workouts

are conducted at the extended

road behind the gym.

In addition to its physically

challenging workouts, the gym also

offers milder workouts for middleaged

men and women who may not

be as physically active, and teenagers

who are amateurs in the area.

Devito added: “ I welcome any

NTU student for one free lesson

PHOTOS | GOH CHAY TENG

at my gym. Just be prepared both

mentally and physically to have an

exhausting workout.”

First-year WKWSCI student

Lam Zhao Yao, 22 was at the gym’s

soft opening on February 20th.

He said: “I would definitely visit

it again as the training methods are

interesting. Activities such as tyre

flipping add fun and realism into lifting

as compared to metal weights.”

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