eScoop - Issue 3 - Summer 2015

gnasralla

eScoop is OSBN's members magazine. A newsletter style bi-monthly magazine written by OSBN members to small business communities on the internet.

Issue 3 July 2015

eScoop

OSBN Members Magazine

Join OSBN small business community at www.osbn.ca

Sketch On Boards And

Make It Compelling

By Grace Nasralla, Operations Manager at e-presence Consultants Inc.

The same message can be relayed using different mediums to

result in a different effect with each medium used. This is the art of

effective communication!

e-mail marketing can be an effective marketing medium relaying not

only one message but few messages at a time and to a huge crowd

of people. Social Media is also an effective marketing medium used

for mass communication; however, its message outcome has a

totally different effect than e-mail marketing. Each communication

medium has its own purposes and can be used to achieve different

goals and objectives.

A fun and persuasive medium whose idea is obtained from using

the classroom or boardroom whiteboard is the whiteboard video

communication medium. Whiteboard videos have been a growing

trend in 2014 as it captivates the viewer and triggers engagement.

The benefits of using Whiteboard Videos as a marketing tool

definitely outweigh the cost. Visit e-presence Consultants Inc’s

youtube channel to view some of our Whiteboard videos.

https://www.youtube.com/user/epresenceConsultants

Article Contributors

Grace Nasralla

OSBN Founder

@gracenasralla

Claudia Adhair

Transform & Perform

@Claudia_Adair

William Ramdass

Sales Rep, Royal LePage

@WRamdass

Lisa Hess-Rodrigues

MAWAZO Marketing

@MawazoMarketing

Nigel Wrench

Printing Depot

@printingyourway

“Networking is marketing. Marketing yourself, marketing

your uniqueness, marketing what you stand for “

- Christine Comaford-Lynch


eScoopIssue 3 July 2015

The “Wind In Your Sales”

Creating Your “Signature Selling Style!”

By Claudia Adair, Founder of Transform & Perform Coaching/Consulting

After I graduated from university I landed a respectable job as a

trainer in the banking industry. As I settled into my first career I

noticed, that wherever I was, sales people stood out. They always

seemed to be having fun. They seemed so free – I wanted that too.

Eventually I traded in my bank suit for an outside sales job.

Everyone thought I’d lost my mind, giving up such a reliable job –

for this. In 3 years, I had worked for 8 companies. I’d been fired,

discouraged, depressed, underpaid and overworked. Reality was

sinking in. I was NOT a natural at sales.

Create A Selling Message

Something about sales just didn’t sit well with me. Still, I wasn’t

willing to give up that dream of freedom. So, how was I going to

make this work? Instinctively I aligned my values and strengths

with my selling approach.

Leveraging Personal Values:

I realized I didn’t just want to sell… I wanted to contribute. Eureka!

Sales in training and development! This was in alignment with my

values. Selling while empowering those I’m selling to – it’s so

Continued Page 3

Business Promotional

Whiteboard Videos

PROMOTE WITH STYLE!

For more information call

647.226.7313

OSBN SMALL BUSINESS

NETWORKING EVENT

April 29, 2015

Business Networking

A network of business

contacts that connect for

the purpose of acquiring

leads, exchanging

referrals and increasing

sales revenue

2


eScoopIssue 3 July 2015

Cont. The “Wind In Your Sales”

Cont. Page 2

obvious now. I chose to help under or unemployed

adults choose career training programs that would

support their life dreams and goals.

Leveraging Personal Strengths:

My prospects had no money and no future, had to

borrow thousands to go to school, then study for up

to a year before they could even apply for work!

Selling was, to say the least, complex. My strengths

served me and served my clients. Specifically:

• Honesty. When I enrolled a client I had to

“look them in the eye” in the hallway for up

to 12 months! If I wasn’t inclined to be

honest I wouldn’t have lasted long in this

environment. Honesty is impactful,

compelling AND rarely dismantles the sale.

• Authenticity. Scripts, rebuttals and “sales

lines” have never worked for me. Attempts

to “spin” the client into changing their mind

felt awkward and made my clients

uncomfortable. Instead, I became an expert

on the “decision making process” and was

deeply curious about what was on their

mind.

• Open-mindedness. My clients didn’t feel

judged. This made it easier for them to share

everything that was on their mind. When all

was revealed I was in a better position to preempt

objections and provide a solution that

resonated. Secondly, I could see the

unfulfilled potential of my clients and they

could feel this. This “infusion of confidence”

helped many people take courageous and lifechanging

steps.

• Critical Thinking. I could step into the

customer’s shoes and look at their situation

from all sides. I addressed all issues –

including poor fitting solutions – in real time.

A Good team and an

active network will

promote amazing

This type of transparency built trust and

supported confident decision making.

results

• Gratitude. In time I stopped freaking out

about the quality of the lead and learned how

to look for the “gift” in every conversation. I

discovered that it wasn’t necessary to close

the deal to get a referral.

I established a “signature selling style” that inspired

client’s to take action and that, frankly, made it easy

for me to jump out of bed in the morning to go to

work! My approach led to 20+ years of success in

sales and sales leadership.

You too can create your “signature selling style”

and it starts with being clear on what your personal

values and strengths are.

- www.transformandperform.ca

3


eScoopIssue 3 July 2015

Phantom Offers In Real Estate

By William Ramdass, Sales Representative at Royal LePage

A phantom is a ghost, something that does not exist. In real estate, in a

heated market, there have been phantom offers... Example: your home

is listed for sale and your realtor hints to a prospective buyer that offers

have been received or are imminent. In fact this is not so. Now the

unsuspecting realtor is led to believe they are in a competitive situation

and, upon briefing their client, they decide to increase their offer.

Is this practice ethical or unethical? In my opinion, it is unethical.

Any payment or value realized by false means is unethical, regardless

of the fact that a seller representative (the listing agent) has a general

obligation to advance his/her client’s best interests which I take to

mean negotiate the highest possible price (expectedly in the spirit of

integrity and honesty).

Thanks to Bill 55, Stronger Protection for Ontario Consumers Act,

2013 - Changes for handling of offers” these so-called phantom offers

are now a (provincial) violation in Ontario effective from July 1st,

2015.

The Bill directs that real estate sales representatives cannot represent an

unsigned offer, and obligates listing representatives to provide their

brokerages with either a copy of all offers received or a RECO

qualified offer summary form (OREA Form 801). My brokerage firm,

Royal LePage Real Estate Services Ltd., immediately distributed inhouse

a well-detailed policy and procedures manual covering every

aspect of compliance as it relates to reps. So, phantom offers are no

longer a worry for agents representing buyers.

Here is an outline of the changes taken from RECO website:

• Offers must be made in writing. Please keep in mind that a

written offer must be signed to be valid.

• A registrant cannot indicate that they have an offer, unless they

have a written offer.

• The seller’s brokerage must keep a record of all written offers

that it receives.

For more information on real estate issue visit my website at

www.williamramdass.ca

Bidding Wars is a continuation of this article written by William

Ramdass, Sales Representative at Royal LePage.

Bidding Wars

In the current Greater Toronto

Area market, bidding wars on

single family homes are

commonplace. A buyer caught up

in one of these wars is in a stressful

situation, dueling while

blindfolded. I saw a buyer who,

seeing several buyers’ reps in the

room, unnecessarily upped her bid

2 or 3 times in the space of about

30 minutes, ultimately paying

more than $120,000 over the listed

price of about $800,000. This was a

buyer who had recently lost at least

one other bidding war, probably

several more. By now she was so

angry that she made an emotional

decision rooted in frustration:

“Today I will show them. I

WANT that house” There is no

transparency as in an auction.

Everything is held close to the

chest.

One of my buyer clients, also

recently involved in several bidding

wars, complains about the lack of

transparency. Personally, I agree. I

would support legislation that

eliminates this lack. With

knowledge of the highest price

offered on a property on which

there are competing offers, an

interested buyer will rightly be in a

position to decide whether or not

to throw his hat in the ring.

4


eScoopIssue 3 July 2015

Don’t Be At Risk Of Not

Being Found Online!

By Liza Hess-Rodrigues, Co-Owner, MAWAZO Marketing

As of April 21st, Google started "punishing" websites

that are not mobile-friendly. This means that if your

website is not found to be usable on smart phones,

your website will fall dramatically lower on the

search results list.

Google uses various criteria to judge the mobilefriendliness

of your website, such as:

you. However, this does not appear to be a very high

priority offence, as we have come across many

websites with this issue but they are still found to be

mobile-friendly.

Setting of the viewport: In simplest terms,

a viewport controls how a webpage is displayed on a

mobile device. If the viewport is not set to adjust to

the width of the screen being used, then it will default

to the width of a desktop screen.

These are a few elements that are assessed by Google

when showing search results. They are not difficult

attributes to address when developing a website, and

in many cases existing websites can be easily

modified to ensure they become mobile-friendly. So,

don't wait and risk losing exposure and online sales!

For more from MAWAZO Marketing visit our

website at www.mawazo.ca

Tri-fold Brochure Layout

By Nigel Wrench, Owner at Printing Depot

1. Front Cover

Size of text: If your website simply scales to the size

of the mobile screen, then chances are the text

becomes much too small to read. Yes, it is possible to

zoom in, but this requires extra effort from your

website visitor. This is a punishable offence to

websites by Google.

Proximity of links: If the website's layout is lost

because of the screen size, often links appear too

close together, or content overlaps. Another

punishable offence.

Content width compared to screen: If the content

appears wider than the screen, Google will punish

The front cover should be visually appealing and

provide enough content to invite the reader to open

the piece and read more. Many companies simply

rely on the logo, company name, a great “tag line”

that sums up their products/services. This is the

approach we recommend. Some companies want to

bullet some items on the front, but remember that

space is limited. You can easily go overboard and

ruin the piece with too much clutter.

2. Back cover

Don’t put anything on the back cover other than

contact information. This is the panel that people are

least likely to read, so if you put an important

message there, it will be lost. If you own a small

company, you may want to consider just listing

phone/fax numbers, web site address, and email

contacts and leaving the physical address off. This

gives your brochure more shelf life if you move.

Continued Page 6

5


eScoopIssue 3 July 2015

General Brochure Guidelines

When preparing your text, keep it short and sweet. The

reader should be able to grasp the main points by simply

glancing through the piece. If you bury your messages in

dense text, the reader may simply decide that it will be

too much work to read your brochure and just throw it

away.

• Speak directly to the potential customer. “We

help you”

• Use headings and subheadings to group ideas and

help the reader focus on items that are of interest

to him or her.

Your brochure front cover should be

visually appealing with rich content

that invites the reader to open the

piece and read more

• Avoid industry jargon and acronyms, even if you

are sending to industry people. Use clear language

that everyone can understand.

Cont. Tri-fold Brochure Layout

Cont. Page 5

3. Inside front panel

This is the most important panel of the piece. We

recommend that you use it to summarize why the

customer should choose you. It is also a good

location for a glowing testimonial. While this is the

most important panel, we recommend that you

write it last. By writing the inside spread first, you

will have a better idea of what you want to

summarize on the inside front panel. The inside

front panel also is a great place for your phone

number and/or web site address.

4. Inside three-panel spread

When you open the piece fully, you have three

full panels to write a complete description of your

company and what it does. Here are some ideas to

get you going.

• Start with a one or two sentence description

of what your company does. Try to word it

in a way that makes the reader feel that he

or she would be “smart” for choosing you.

• Provide a list of your products and services.

Keep each item short and save the lengthy

descriptions for your web site or for sell

sheets.

• Write a paragraph or two for each of your

competitive advantages. This is more

important than providing long boring

descriptions of each of your products or

services. Customers want to know why they

should choose you over your competitors.

For example, you may sell the same kind of

widgets as your competitor, but your widgets

are of a higher quality or can be quickly

customized to the customer’s needs.

• Tell the reader how you typically work with

your clients. Customers like to know up front

what the process is that you will take.

• Refer the reader to your web site for detailed

information. If you do not have a web site,

invite the reader to call you directly to discuss

his or her needs or to request detailed “sell

sheets”

For more information about printing your business

material visit our website at www.printingdepot.ca

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines