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The Mokena Messenger 020917

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mokena’s Award-Winning Hometown Newspaper mokenamessenger.com • February 9, 2017 • Vol. 10 No. 26 • $1

A

®

Publication

,LLC

Safety

first

Visitor

management

systems track

the comings

and goings in

area schools,

Page 3

Six Lincoln-Way candidates make their case in first forum, Page 5

Spiking

cancer

Volley for a

Cure event

raises money

for the Cancer

Support Center

of Mokena,

Page 8

Packing

a punch

Local martial

arts class

teaches selfdefense

for all

ability levels,

Page 11

Six of the 13 candidates running for Lincoln-Way Community High School District 210 Board of Education — (left to right) Aaron Janik, Joe Kirkeeng, Joseph Kosteck,

Christopher Lucchetti, Dee Molinare and Robert Ripp — answer community members’ questions Thursday, Feb. 2 during a forum. Laurie Fanelli/22nd Century Media

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2 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger calendar

mokenamessenger.com

In this week’s

Messenger

Standout Student...........14

Police Reports................16

Editorial........................17

Faith Briefs....................20

Puzzles..........................28

Classifieds................ 32-41

Sports...................... 43-48

The Mokena

Messenger

ph: 708.326.9170 fx: 708.326.9179

Editor

Tim Carroll, x29

tim@mokenamessenger.com

assistant editor

Amanda Stoll, x34

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.com

Sales director

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real estate sales

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Legal Notices

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PUBLISHER

Joe Coughlin 847.272.4565, x16

j.coughlin@22ndcenturymedia.com

Managing Editor

Bill Jones, x20

bill@opprairie.com

president

Andrew Nicks

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EDITORIAL DESIGN DIRECTOR

Nancy Burgan, x30

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22 nd Century Media

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www.MokenaMessenger.com

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Published by

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Amanda Stoll

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.com

THURSDAY

Women’s Health Seminar

Thursday, February 9,

Women’s Healthcare of Illinois,

10260 West 191 Street,

Mokena. Dr. Finkelstein is

hosting a free educational

seminar on vaginal atrophy

and the MonaLisa Touch

treatment. Registration required.

Call (708) 572-4031

or email info@whcillinois.

com to register.

FRIDAY

Unclaimed Property

9 a.m.-2 p.m. Friday, Feb.

10, Mokena Village Hall,

11004 Carpenter St., Mokena.

The Illinois State Treasurer’s

office is currently

safeguarding more than $2

billion in unclaimed property

belonging to millions

of Illinois residents. One in

four Illinois adults discovers

property to claim, averaging

$1,000 per claim. Join a representative

from the Treasurer’s

office as they assist residents

in determining if they

have unclaimed property,

and if they do, how they may

obtain it. All are welcome.

For more information, visit

www.icash.illinoistreasurer.

gov.

SATURDAY

Coffee with the Candidates

8:30-10:30 a.m. Saturday,

Feb. 11, Frankfort Township

Administration Building,

11000 W. Lincoln Highway,

Frankfort. Candidates running

for the Lincoln-Way

District 210 School Board

on the Citizens for 210 slate

will discuss how their slate

is made up of individuals

with diverse skills and backgrounds,

who are all concerned

taxpayers intending to

work together with the community

to ensure student success

and fiscal responsibility.

Refreshments will be served.

Preschool Registration

9-10:30 a.m. Saturday,

Feb. 11, Program Center,

Registration will be accepted

in person for the Mokena

Park District’s Fall 2017

Early Childhood Education

Program. Fees, birth certificate

and proof of immunizations

will be required at

the time of registration. For

more information, call (708)

390-2401.

MONDAY

Cinderella Ball

Deadline to register is

Monday, Feb. 13. Event

will be held 3:30-5 p.m. and

6:30-8 p.m. Saturday, Feb.

25, Program Center, 10925

W. La Porte Road, Mokena.

Every little girl is a princess,

so don’t miss this special

daddy-daughter date night

opportunity. With dancing,

refreshments and music, this

event is sure to create lasting

memories. This event is

for children ages 5-10, and

dads. Cost is $29 per couple

and $12 for each additional

child.

Passport to Adventure

Deadline to register is

Monday, Feb. 13. Trip will

be Friday, Feb. 17. Enchanted

Castle, Lombard. School

is out but the fun is not. Join

in for Passport to Adventure

with the Mokena Community

Park District. This trip

will take participants to the

Enchanted Castle in Lombard.

There will be indoor

go karts, laser tag, bumper

cars, rides, mini-bowling,

inflatable’s, Karaoke, singing

dragons, a two-story

play land, games and prizes.

This program is for children

ages 5-11 years old. For

more information, call 708-

390-2416.

TUESDAY

100+ Women Who Care

5:30-6:30 p.m. Tuesday,

Feb. 14, Embers Tap House,

933 S. State Street, Lockport.

100+ Women Who Care of

Will County is a group of local

women who are interested

in supporting communities

by contributing to local charities

as a group. It’s a unique

way to multiply the impact of

big hearts. During quarterly

meetings, members nominate

charities, and after a

brief presentation, the members

vote on which charity to

support. Individuals or small

groups then write a $100

check to that charity. 100% of

the money goes to the charity.

For more information,

visit www.100wwc-will.org

or email maribeth@100wwcwill.org.

UPCOMING

Historical Society

8:30 a.m. Saturday, Feb.

18, Mokena Village Hall,

11004 Carpenter Street,

Mokena. NOTE: date of

the February Mokena Area

Historical Society meeting

has changed. The meeting is

normally held on the second

Saturday of each month.

Reading with Mandy

4-5 p.m., Tuesday Feb. 21,

Mokena Community Public

Library District, 11327

195th St, Mokena. Students

in grades 1-8 can sign up for

a time to read with Mandy,

a certified therapy dog. For

more information and registration,

call (708) 479-9663.

Group Exercise Open House

Friday, Feb. 23, The Oaks

Recreation and Fitness Center,

10847 W La Porte Rd,

Mokena. Try out free classes

that can add variety to your

workouts and a fun social atmosphere

and motivating instructors.

Non-members do

not need to be present with a

member to participate. Firsttime

guests only. Visit www.

mokenapark.com/oaks for a

schedule of classes.

Community Business

Expo & Health Fair

9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday,

Feb. 25, The Oaks Recreation

and Fitness Center, 10845

LaPorte Road, Mokena.

Event offers blood pressure

checks, diabetes screenings,

body fat ratio measurements

and more. Find a dentist,

plumber, sports team, dance

class, home repair service,

bank, restaurant, insurance

and more at the expo.

Showcase of Art

Feb. 25-25, The Oaks

Recreation and Fitness Center,

10847 W La Porte Rd,

Mokena. Join the Mokena

Park District for the Annual

Showcase of Art, displaying

the work of young artists

enrolled in park district art

programs. Enjoy this diverse

display of art from oils,

acrylics and watercolors to

sand castles and clay sculptures.

The exhibit will remain

open during the entire

weekend. For more information,

call (708) 390-2401.

Preschool Registration

8-11 a.m., Monday, Feb. 27,

Lincoln Way Central, 1801 E

Lincoln Hwy, New Lenox.

Registration for Lincoln-Way

High Schools 2017-2018 preschool

programs, sponsored

by the Family and Consumer

Sciences Early Childhood Education

classes, will be held

in room D119. 16 children

between the ages of three to

five will be selected to attend.

Children must be three years

old by Sep. 1, toilet trained,

and reside within the district.

Cost is $30 per month, or

$240 per year. A nonrefundable

$60 deposit will be required

of those selected, and

will be applied to the first two

months. For more information,

call (815) 462-2187.

Candidate Forum

7-9 p.m., March 8, Lincoln-

Way Central High School,

1801 E. Lincoln Highway,

New Lenox. The Lincoln-

Way Education Association

will host a District 210 School

Board Candidate Forum. invitations

to all thirteen candidates

have been mailed and

RSVPs are requested by Feb.

24. The forum will be open

to the public and audience

members will have the opportunity

to ask questions. Email

questions from the public can

be sent to lwea210@gmail.

com. For more information,

call (815) 545-9928 or email

lwea210@gmail.com.

Lincoln-Way Half Marathon

7 a.m. Saturday, April 29.

Breidert Green Park, corner

of Kansas Street and White

Street in Frankfort. The Lincoln-Way

Half Marathon,

formerly the Frankfort Half

Marathon will begin and end

at Breidert Green Park in

downtown Frankfort and participants

will run along Old

Plank Road Trail throughout

the race. Proceeds from the

race will go directly toward

enhancing educational experiences

of District 210 students.

For more information about

sponsorships, volunteering

and registration, visit www.

lincolnwayhalfmarathon.com.

ONGOING

Winter Reading Programs

Ongoing through Friday,

March 3, Mokena Community

Public Library District,

11327 195th St, Mokena.

Cozy up to a good book or

stop by the library to see what

the library has to offer this

winter. Reading programs are

geared towards both children

and adults. Earn prizes for

reading, attending programs

and trying out the new virtual

reality station. For more information,

stop by the library,

call (708) 479-9663, or visit

www.mokenalibrary.org.

To submit an item to the

printed calendar, contact

Amanda Stoll at (708)

326-9170 ext. 34, or email

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.

com. Deadline is noon

Thursdays one week prior to

publication.


mokenamessenger.com News

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 3

Visitor management system keeps students, teachers safe with ID checks

Amanda Stoll, Assistant Editor

Tracking visitors to a

school isn’t about just a pen

and paper sign-in system

anymore.

Whether it’s a more recent

addition to school security

procedures or something

that’s been used for almost a

decade, many area schools

use computerized visitor

management systems like

Hall Pass and Raptor that

check names and birth dates

against the national and state

sex-offender databases.

With a quick scan of a visitor’s

driver’s license or state

ID, front office receptionists

can check who should — or

shouldn’t — be allowed into

the school.

As long as the database

check comes back clear, the

scanner and printer combination

prints out a stick-on

visitor ID badge for the person

to wear during their stay

at the school.

The various systems,

which are by-and-large the

same, have other features that

schools can use to track things

like orders of protection.

At Mokena School District

161, that hasn’t been a feature

they’ve needed so far, and it’s

one that is rarely used in the

Lincoln-Way high schools.

Jake Smith, director of technology

for the Mokena school

district, said the district began

using the Hall Pass system at

the beginning 2016-17 school

year. Other districts, like the

Lincoln-Way Community

High School District 210,

have been using the Raptor

system for almost a decade.

At Mokena schools, visitors

are mostly parents who come

to volunteer or help out with

classroom events like holiday

parties. At the high schools,

however, members of the

A visitor ID sticker is printed out at Mokena Elementary

School. Amanda Stoll/22nd Century Media

community visit the schools

to use the athletic facilities.

“Anybody who comes

in that is going to possibly

pose a threat to the student

body needs to have their ID

scanned,” said Alex Petrakis,

Lincoln-Way Central associate

principal. “We don’t take

any chances with student

safety or staff safety, so it’s

the first line of defense.”

He said that goes for parents,

vendors who come to

the school for maintenance or

repairs, community members

and even former students

who come to the school to get

their transcripts.

Lincoln-Way has been using

the same Raptor Technologies

visitor management

system for quite a while, but

Taryn Atwell, Community

Relations Director for the

school district, said it continues

to be a valuable program

in combination with other security

measures at the schools.

“I think this in combination

though with our [school

resource officer] is a great

combination for school safety,”

said Atwell.

Parent and visitor responses

to the systems have been

overwhelmingly positive,

according to the receptionists

and administrators interviewed.

“Most people are saying to

us that we’d rather have you

check than not check,” said

Debbie Gallagher, Lincoln-

Way Central student servics

office secretary. “Most of

them are like ‘here’s my license,

not a problem.’”

At Mokena Elementary

School, receptionist Lisa Peters

said she’s gotten good

feedback from parents about

the Hall Pass system used

there.

“They feel good about the

children being safe,” said Peters,

who said she hasn’t had

a single person not want the

show their ID or have their

information scanned into the

system.

Curt Saindon, assistant

superintendent for finance

and operations at Frankfort

School District 157-C, said

Frankfort schools started

using the Raptor system in

the spring of 2013 after the

school shooting at Sandy

Hook Elementary School in

Newtown, Connecticut.

While the school was already

in the process of implementing

the visitor manage-

Please see Visitor, 8

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4 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger News

mokenamessenger.com

East grad offers pro bono

legal help to immigrants

Kirsten Onsgard

Contributing Editor

The fearful calls to attorney

Natalie Tepeli are more

frequent now.

The Frankfort native and

2008 Lincoln-Way East High

School graduate offers what

she knows to her clients, most

of whom are emigrating or

seeking asylum from Middle

Eastern countries. Cases are

delayed; background checks

have increased; everything is

more scrutinized.

After President Donald

Trump’s executive order on

immigration and refugees

was implemented, Tepeli was

among thousands of attorneys

who offered pro bono legal

work to incoming nationals

at airports across the country

through the International Refugee

Assistance Project. The

executive order bars residents

from seven Middle Eastern

countries from entering the

U.S. for 90 days and halts the

refugee program for 120 days.

It has since been challenged

and paused by a federal judge.

For Tepeli, who now lives

in Chicago, it is an issue that

hits home.

Her father is an Armenian

immigrant who came to the

United States from Turkey,

and her mother’s family is

from Ukraine.

While studying at Loyola

University, Tepeli volunteered

at immigration organizations,

later clerking at an

immigration firm during law

school.

Offering her expertise at

O’Hare International Airport

Jan. 28, the day after the ban

was enacted, was a matter of

duty.

“As an immigration attorney,

I have a responsibility to

help people, to serve justice,”

she said. “All of these people

are arriving and they’re afraid.

They didn’t know what was

going to happen to them.”

“I felt a responsibility to

go there, to help them.”

There, attorneys set up

a triage, she said, meeting

with people awaiting family

members who arrived from

one of the seven countries.

She watched as an Iranian

teenager broke down waiting

for his parents. A Syrian

woman was sent back. Later

that day, protests erupted

at O’Hare and elsewhere

across the county.

“You’re preventing reunification

of families,” she

said. “It’s heartbreaking.”

The order — aimed at protecting

the country “from terrorist

attacks by foreign nationals

admitted to the United

States,” according to the executive

order — sparked lawsuits

and condemnation from

Democratic and some Republican

lawmakers, including

Rep. Bobby Rush, who represents

the state’s 1st Congressional

district, who likened it

to the “infantile evil acts of a

street bully” in a statement.

The order also caused

confusion for foreigners and

green card holders. It would

Don’t just

list your

real estate

property...

later be deemed that as lawful

permanent residents,

green card holders would be

admitted on a case-by-case

basis following a secondary

inspection upon arrival.

At the airport, immigrants

do not have a right to counsel

by a lawyer but can speak

with family members over

the phone as they are detained

by Customs and Border

Patrol.

Tepeli’s job was to help

family members relay information

to their detained relative

behind closed doors.

She cautioned legal residents

about a form, known

as an I-407, which would

forfeit their green cards,

and urged them to request

a notice to appear before

an immigration judge. She

informed those without a

green card of their two options:

asking for a grant of

parole or seeking asylum.

“A lot of these people are

fleeing persecution in volatile

countries,” she said.

Though some attorneys

have returned to O’Hare

daily, her clients at the Law

Offices of Azita M. Mojarad,

P.C. in Chicago have similar

fears. And the calls keep

coming.

“I’m seeing every day,

people calling terrified about

their family members, about

what’s going to happen with

their case,” she said. “I do

think what’s going on is unjust.

It’s unconstitutional.

It’s horrific, really,”

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mokenamessenger.com News

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 5

Candidates envision path to district stability

Kirsten Onsgard

Contributing Editor

A half-dozen candidates

for Lincoln-Way Community

High School District 210

Board of Education urged

that the district uphold its

academic standards while

overhauling its finances at a

Feb. 2 forum.

More than 100 people attended

the event, hosted by

the community group Lincoln-Way

Area Taxpayers

Unite, but less than half of

the 13 candidates vying for

five school board spots open

during the April 4 election

attended: Aaron Janik, Joe

Kirkeeng, Joseph Kosteck,

Christopher Lucchetti, Dee

Molinare and Robert Ripp.

Kirkeeng, Kosteck and Lucchetti

currently serve on

the board, and Molinare is

board president.

Though candidates often

voiced agreement over a vision

for a stable future for

the district, they fought to

demonstrate how they could

best bring about that change

in answers to questions

about independence, the

role of the board and Lincoln-Way

North’s future.

The forum was moderated

by Kristen McQueary

— a member of the Chicago

Tribune editorial board,

which has offered several

scathing critiques of the district

— who asked questions

sourced from community

members.

“We must maintain that

academic excellence, and

preserve the overall educational

experience, but we

have to show unbelievable

perseverance, and strategic,

surgical precision to get

our house in order as we do

that,” said Kirkeeng, who is

running in a group known as

Candidates for Lincoln-Way

Excellence with Kosteck

and Janik, vice president of

Mokena School District 159

school board.

“The reputation of the

district has been tarnished,

and I believe that’s what we

have to protect as we go forward,”

Kirkeeng said.

Molinare, the only candidate

present who was on the

board when it voted to close

Lincoln-Way North High

School in 2015, blamed

the district’s deep debt and

shallow budget surplus on

the economic crash and

lack of state funding. At the

time, she urged the district

to close Lincoln-Way West,

instead.

Despite projections the

district would grow, enrollment

flatlined and has decreased

by about 200 students

since 2012, according

to the Illinois State Board of

Education. It currently faces

$307 million in principal

short- and long-term debt.

“As we look back, it’s

easy to say, we should have

probably only [built] one

school,” Molinare said.

“But we didn’t have that

crystal ball to look into to

build only one school. Voters

approved to build two

schools. And many of our

students had the educational

opportunities, the extracurricular

opportunities, that

the two schools — the fourschool

district — afforded.”

Though Lucchetti, who

was appointed to the board

last June, agreed the financial

crisis “compounded the

problem,” he blamed the

district’s debt on a lack of

oversight and poor reporting.

The district routinely

overspent its budget by millions

of dollars.

“How we got here was

poor financial management

and lack of internal controls,”

Lucchetti said.

“We’ve taken the steps

Candidates for Lincoln-Way Community High School District 210 Board of Education

Aaron Janik (left to right), Joe Kirkeeng, Joseph Kosteck, Christopher Lucchetti, Dee

Molinare and Robert Ripp answer questions Thursday, Feb. 2 during a forum at Lincoln-

Way Central High School. Photos by Laurie Fanelli/22nd Century Media

now, we basically tore down

the whole financial management

function and are in the

process of rebuilding it,” he

said.

Lucchetti found himself

in one of the few moments

of head-to-head opposition

when he emphasized that

he was the only dissenting

vote during the Board of

Education’s Dec. 20, 2016

meeting against continuing

an agreement with Aunt

Nancy’s Child Care. The

daycare, which previously

operated rent-free, will now

remit $60,000, as per the

new agreement. Lucchetti

argued the remittance was

not enough.

Kosteck, who voted to renew

the contract, said it was

a gain for the district.

At the December board

meeting, Superintendent R.

Scott Tingley said the district

received two bids from

daycare providers, and Aunt

Nancy’s was the only provider

that immediately offered

remittance.

“This was the only option

— this was the only one that

came to the table,” Kosteck

said.

When asked about the future

of Lincoln-Way North,

none of the candidates said

they would be in favor of

reopening the facility in the

near future.

“Short term, it would be

almost cruel and unusual to

ask the kids in the next few

years,” said Ripp, who was

previously LWATU’s vice

president when it sued the

district to keep Lincoln-Way

North open.

Lincoln-Way North cannot

be leased or rented to a

private entity due to its outstanding

bonds, and selling

to a company would be “a

very complicated process”

requiring “extensive research

from our bond attorneys,”

according to a district

spokeswoman. The school’s

facilities are currently being

used by the Frankfort Square

Park District.

“We are not a three-school

district — I think we’re

a four-school district that

has chosen to utilize three

of our schools,” Ripp said.

“We have four assets, two of

those assets are still heavily

mortgaged. I think the longterm

strategic plan for the

district has to include financial

projections that takes

into account all of our assets

to see how we can best use

those assets.”

Molinare said a new business

manager, which the

district is now hiring, could

help find better ways to utilize

those assets, trim the

budget and mend what she

said is currently “a fractured

team.”

For their part, Ripp said

the best path toward financial

stability would be to

improve the district’s junk

bond status to refinance its

bonds, and Kirkeeng pushed

for an ongoing conversation

about the budget.

Current Board President

Dee Molinare introduces

herself at the forum, hosted

by Lincoln-Way Area

Taxpayers Unite. Six of

the 13 candidates running

for Board of Education

attended.

Chicago Tribune Editorial

Board member Kristen

McQueary moderates the

forum.

None of the candidates

were in favor of cutting extracurriculars

to cut costs.

Questions, fielded from

12 community members,

ranged from transportation

cost cuts to term limits, a

move that all favored but

Molinare, who cited dedication

as paramount.LWATU

is expected to endorse candidates

within the next few

weeks, a move that factored

into a five-candidate slate’s

refusal to attend the Feb.

2 forum. Citizens for 210,

which has hosted its own

meet-and-greet events, said

that because Ripp is LWA-

TU’s former vice president,

the endorsement will be biased.

Citizens for 210 are expected

to attend a March 8

Please see FORUM, 6


6 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger News

mokenamessenger.com

They’re called heartfelt moments for a reason.

And it’s never too early to protect them.

MFPD, Mokena Lions Club to

celebrate 100th anniversaries

Submitted by the Mokena

Fire Protection District

As we all graciously welcome

the new year, 2017 is

a year for us all to be “Celebrating

Our Milestones,”

which is the theme for the

Fourth of July Mokena Parade

in 2017.

The Mokena Fire Protection

District and the Mokena

Lions Club are no different;

the Lions Club International

and the Mokena Fire Protection

District will both be

celebrating their 100th anniversaries

of serving the community

in 2017.

The Mokena Fire Protection

District and the Mokena

Lions Club will also be

joining forces to start a new

tradition this year. 2017 will

mark the first year of the Annual

Mokena Fire Protection

District Open House and

Mokena Lions Club Pancake

Breakfast.

For many years, the two

organizations have hosted

their separate annual pancake

breakfast events. We’re

proud to announce that on

Sunday, Oct. 1, the Mokena

Fire Protection District and

the Mokena Lions Club will

join forces and host their

Pancake Breakfast/Open

House. This event will be

hosted at Mokena Fire Station

#1, which is located at

19853 S. Wolf Road.

There will be live demonstrations,

free hearing tests

and retinal screening, door

prizes and much more fun.

Come bring your family

and join your neighbors and

friends in socializing and

enjoying this delicious traditional

pancakes and sausage

breakfast while visiting with

and learning more about

your Mokena Fire Protection

District.

100 percent of the proceeds

of this annual event

will allow the Mokena Lions

Club to continue to help the

sight and hearing impaired

and the less fortunate in our

community.

For additional information

about this exciting event

and/or either organization,

please contact Dennis Buxbaum,

president of the Mokena

Lions Club, by visiting

www.mokenalions.org, or

Howard Stephens, fire chief

of the Mokena Fire Protection

District, by visiting

www.mokenafire.org.

(MFPD) The Mokena Fire

Protection District’s antique

fire truck (left) stands in

stark contrast to the currently

used truck. The MFPD

will be celebrating its 100th

anniversary in 2017.

At Franciscan Health, we offer state-of-the-art heart and vascular screenings to identify potential

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FORUM

From Page 5

forum hosted by the Lincoln-

Way Education Association,

the district’s teachers union.

Educator Beth Janus-

Doyle said she did not attend

the forum because her

husband would be undergoing

surgery and Christopher

Kosel, the current board

secretary, said he had prior

commitments.

“Obviously we have more

citizen involvement now than

we’ve had for years,” Janik

said. “I’d be hard pressed

to think that, in the past 10

years, that we’d have 200

people on a Thursday night

coming out to hear about the

Lincoln-Way schools.”

“That’s what any elected

body need: they need that

public participation to keep

the screws to the board to

make sure they’re doing

their job,” Janik said. “ And

if they’re not, they’ll be voted

out and a new board will

be voted in to do the job.”


mokenamessenger.com MoKENA

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 7

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8 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger News

mokenamessenger.com

Volley for a Cure raises funds for those dealing with cancer

Ryan Esguerra

Freelance Reporter

“No one fights alone.”

That was the slogan printed

on the shirts of volunteers

and players in the Volley for

a Cure charity fundraiser

Thursday, Feb. 3, at Mokena

Elementary School.

In its fifth consecutive year,

the Volley for Cure charity

fundraiser brought together

local firefighters, police officers

and teachers in Mokena

for a night of friendly volleyball

in support of the Cancer

Support Center of Mokena.

Event organizer and kindergarten

teacher Debi Blank,

who has been organizing fundraisers

for cancer research

for nearly 20 years, said that

the idea for the fundraiser

came from her personal love

for volleyball and a need for

an event that would support

the members of the community

affected by cancer.

“I love volleyball, so this

is event is a result of a little

bias on my end, but everyone

seems to really enjoy

it,” Blank said. “I chose this

event, as well as this organization,

because I didn’t want to

send the money we were raising

out of Mokena anymore.

“We have plenty of people

in Mokena that this money

could have a direct impact

on, so we are happy to keep

it here.”

The three-game match between

a combination of the

firefighters and police officers

squared off against the

teachers while the crowd of

students and parents watched

on. Blank said that the point

of the match was not to have

a winner and a loser, but to

give the community something

to do that would bring

them together.

“The kids like seeing the

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firefighters and police officers

in their school with

them, as well as seeing their

teachers outside of school,”

Blank said. “So, it’s the perfect

chance for us to have a

friendly rivalry that will bring

the entire community in.”

In addition to the volleyball

festivities, attendees

were given the chance to

purchase raffle tickets to win

baskets donated from around

the community, as well as a

snack stand. All the proceeds

of the event went directly to

the Cancer Support Center.

“I never really have a goal

in mind for how much we

want to raise,” Blank said. “I

just want us to raise as much

as we can.”

The Cancer Support Center

of Mokena is a nonprofit

organization that originated

in Homewood. The mission

of the Cancer Support Center

is to provide support,

strength and guidance to

those diagnosed with cancer

and their families.

Cancer Support Center

Board Member Bob DeChene

said that last year’s Volley

for a Cure event raised

over $2,500. He said that he

Visitor

From Page 3

ment system, he said they

sped up the process in light

of what happened at Sandy

Hook.

“By and large, people are

very appreciative that we

are trying to keep the school

safe,” Saindon said.

In addition to the visitor

database checks, he said fulland

part-time employees and

regular volunteers are given

full background checks,

which is a much more indepth

process.

“You don’t ever want to be

lax in your preparation,” he

said. “I think it’s important

that the community has confidence

that we’re providing a

Students cheer during the Volley for a Cure fundraiser on Thursday, Feb. 3, at Mokena

Elementary School. Julie McMann/22nd Century Media

was surprised with the number

of people that he saw at

the event this year, and is very

grateful for the love and support

of the community.

“I look up into the stands

tonight and I see people who

have been to the support

center for one reason or another,”

DeChene said. “Cancer

is something that is so

close to home, it seems that

everyone is touched by it in

one way or another.

“It is amazing to see that so

many people truly care about

safe and secure and warm and

welcoming environment for

our students and our staff.”

While the systems aren’t

perfect, they do allow school

staff to view information and

make decisions based on what

the computer system finds.

In most cases, the ID scan

comes back without any

problems, but Peters said

sometimes she has to re-scan

cards that are dirty or beat up

to ensure the system gets all

the correct information.

Other times, Smith said the

system can come back with

a false positive. He said it

can happen with people who

have common names, like

himself, who may have the

same legal name and maybe

even birth date as someone

on the sex-offender registry.

In the case of a false positive,

Smith said school staff

can review the entry and

many times view the photo

of the flagged person to compare

with the visitor standing

in front of them.

With unisex names like Jordan,

Alex or Tyler the determination

can sometimes be as

simple as confirming that the

offender is of the opposite sex.

One of the challenges of

the system for elementary

schools is when large groups

of parents visit for classroom

parties.

At both the Frankfort and

Mokena school districts, staff

have organized a system to

check visitor’s information

before the event.

supporting those who are

dealing with this.”

Jim Andresen, president of

the Mokena School Board,

said that he loves the work

that is done by Blank and

other volunteers in putting the

event together.

“As the proud president of

the Mokena School Board, I

have no problem in saying

Debbie does a wonderful job

with this every year,” Andresen

said. “She does all of the

organizing of the baskets, as

well as gets all of the volunteers

for this. We are happy

to have her.”

Blank said that she is grateful

for all of the support that

the fundraiser has received

over the years, and credits

the Mokena community for

coming together in support of

such a worthy cause.

“Every year, you see more

and more people come, and

that is so nice to see,” Blank

said. “I think Mokena is a

caring community, and we

support each other in all that

we do.”

By inputting a person’s full

name and birth date, staff are

able to check the database

and print out a visitor sticker

before a large event. While

the sticker might not have

the visitor’s photo on it because

the visitor’s ID wasn’t

scanned, Smith said the most

important thing is that they’re

able to check the database.

At the Frankfort school

district, they have multiple

scanner and printer sets so

they can check multiple visitors

in at a time when there

is heavy traffic in the offices.

This year, the Mokena

school district plans to scan

all parents’ IDs at kindergarten

registration to ensure

they’re already in the system

for the coming school year.


mokenamessenger.com community

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 9

Announcements

It’s a boy!

Pamela Simon LaPorte

and Nicholas LaPorte, of

Mokena, announce the

birth of their son, Aiden

Patrick LaPorte, who was

born at 7:06 p.m. Nov. 2 at

Silver Cross Hospital.

He weighed 7 pounds, 6

ounces and measured

19 inches long. His older

sibling, Aubrie LaPorte,

age 3, is proud to be a big

sister.

His loving grandparents

are Jean and Howard

Simon, of Manhattan, and

Carl and Sara LaPorte, of

Tinley Park.

Aiden’s great-grandmother

is Helen LaPorte, of

Hometown.

Also pleased to welcome

Aiden into the family are

aunts, uncles, cousins and

his dog, Bella, who will

protect him.

Aiden was born during the

Cubs first home run during

Game 7 of the World

Series.

Make a FREE announcement

in The Mokena Messenger. We

will publish birth, birthday,

military, engagement, wedding

and anniversary announcements

free of charge.

Announcements are due the

Thursday before publication.

To make an announcement,

email tim@mokenamessenger.

com.

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birds. She would make a wonderful addition to any home. Contact Wendy at (708)

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Want to see your pet featured as The Mokena Messenger’s Pet of the Week? Send your pet’s

photo and a few sentences explaining why your pet is outstanding to Editor Tim Carroll at tim@

mokenamessenger.com or 11516 W. 183rd St., Office Condo 3, Suite SW, Orland Park, IL 60467.

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10 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger mokena

mokenamessenger.com

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mokenamessenger.com news

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 11

Family Martial Arts offers new defense, exercise hybrid

Ryan Esguerra

Freelance Reporter

At Family Martial Arts in

Mokena, the goal of their

new self-defense class was

to include anyone who was

willing to learn.

Whether you were a black

belt in the program or a person

walking in for the first

time, instructors at Family

Martial Arts wanted to share

their skills with the hope that

it will improve participants’

quality of life, both in and

out of the gym.

“For us, it is sharing,”

FMA Program Director

Krista Danielewicz said.

“Taekwondo is more than

just martial arts, and more

than just kicking and punching.

“We like to teach life

skills, or the tenets of taekwondo;

things like respect

and discipline. Which are

embodiments of martial arts,

but can also be applied to

your life.”

Adult women and men

gathered Jan. 22 for the second

class of Defensercise,

a hybrid class to maximize

exercise and teach self-defense.

Led by FMA instructor

Mike Cooke, students

started the class with a series

of exercises that aimed to

enhance their flexibility and

physical conditioning.

“I try to give everyone different

options based on their

age and activity level to keep

everyone involved” Cooke

said. “You don’t need to

know anything or have any

prior experience to come in

and learn.”

After initial warmups,

students gathered around as

Cooke showed them basic

moves to aid them if they

were to ever find themselves

in a dangerous situation.

Students learned basic defense

positions for perilous

situations, like if an assailant

came close came to attack

from behind.

Master Mike Cooke, who teaches Defensercise every other

Sunday at FMA, surveys his students as they limber up for

the class.

“You aren’t Jackie Chan,”

Cooke said to his class. “The

goal of these moves is to get

away and run.

“You can get really fancy,

but this isn’t what this class

is about. If someone tries to

attack you or tries to grab

you, we want you to have the

ability to get away safely.”

Anne Marie Manos, of

Mokena, is a first-degree

black belt that has been training

at FMA for four years.

Manos, who participated in

the self-defense class, said

that she never thought she

would be where she is today,

but she offered a vote of confidence

to anyone wanting to

give martial arts a try.

“After that first class, I

was so sore,” Manos said.

“But you just keep building

your stamina and endurance,

and you will absolutely be

blown away by the things

that you can do that you never

thought you could.

“Anyone can do it, you

just have to have the will and

desire to do it.”

Manos’ fellow classmate

and Frankfort resident Linda

Prainito has been attending

classes at FMA for five

years. Prainito said that she

is happy with the addition of

the new self-defense class

because of the knowledge it

provides her and her daughters

if a real-life situation

were to occur.

“When Master Mike told

me that they were going to

be offering this class, I was

so excited,” Prainito said. “I

have little girls, and I want

them to know how to defend

themselves, or be able

to defend them [myself], if

needed.

“As a woman, you really

need to know a lot more

about defending yourself.”

For Danielewicz, the new

self-defense class is about

much more than learning defensive

moves. She said that

a big part of the programs at

FMA deal with life outside

of the studio walls.

“Everything we do is to

try to boost people’s confidence,

respect and discipline

so that when they leave here,

it stays,” Danielewicz said.

“We want everything we

teach to go out in the world

with them.”

She added that while she

is proud of the number of

people currently attending

the class, she would love to

continue to see the programs

grow.

“At FMA, we are all about

helping out the community,”

Danielewicz said. “And anything

we can do to give back

to those who support us to

help them is great.

“We want to get out of our

little Family Martial Arts

family and expand, to share

with as many as we can.”

Krista Danielewicz (right), the program director at Family Martial Arts, shows Tanisha

Thompson (left) and Catherine O’Rourke proper technique during Defensercise, a self-defense

and exercise hybrid class, Jan. 22 in Mokena. Photos by Julie McMann/22nd Century Media

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12 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger mokena

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the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 13

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14 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger school

mokenamessenger.com

The mokena messenger’s

Standout Student

Sponsored by Marquette Bank

Maddie Slepski,

Mokena Junior High

School eighth-grader

Maddie Slepski was picked as

this week’s Standout Student

because of her academic performance.

What is one essential you

must have when studying?

One essential that I must

have for studying is silence.

I concentrate, and it becomes

difficult when things

come up. I clear my head,

and I just think about what

I’m studying.

What do you like to do when

not in school or studying?

When I am not studying

or in school, I like to shop,

hang with my friends and

most definitely spend time

with my family.

What is your dream job?

I’d like to be a sports journalist.

I like writing, whether

about sports or politics. I

don’t know which path I’m

going to follow yet.

Whom do you look up to and

why?

I look up to my Auntie

Natalie and cousin Amanda. I

am almost always with them,

and they are both successful,

independent women. I’ve

also notice from stories from

when they were young that

we are very similar. I know

I can always count on them.

Who is your favorite

teacher?

Mrs. Klappauf is my favorite

teacher. She is always in a

happy mood and can brighten

your day any day. She is very

Photo submitted

energetic while teaching and

makes learning history fun.

What’s your favorite class

and why?

My favorite class is Spanish

class. I think it’s so cool

when people can speak two

languages and can’t wait to

further extend my knowledge

with the Spanish language.

What’s one thing that stands

out about your school?

How close and kind all

us students are toward each

other. We never leave anyone

out and don’t accept bullies.

What extracurricular(s) do

you wish your school had?

I wish our school had a

cooking/baking class, because

I enjoy baking.

What’s your morning

routine?

I’m up by 6 a.m. every day.

I get ready until about 6:40

a.m. Then, I make my lunch,

and I’m on the bus by 6:52

a.m.

If you could change one thing

about school, what would

it be?

It would be how early the

bus comes and when we get

to school. I’m at school by

7:15 every day, and the first

bell doesn’t ring until 7:45.

Standout Student is a weekly

feature in The Mokena Messenger.

Nominations come from

Mokena area schools.

School News

Providence Catholic High

School

Providence names Mokena

residents to honor roll

John Harper, principal of

Providence Catholic High

School, recently announced

the school’s First Semester

Honor Roll. The honor

roll includes two categories;

first honors recipients

must obtain a 3.51 or higher

GPA, whereas second honors

students receive a 3.00-

3.50 GPA.

“We are very proud of

our students who work hard

in the classroom and strive

for academic excellence,”

Harper said.

The following students

were recognized with

first honors: Erik Anderson,

Ryan Anderson, Brad

Baldys, Jessica Baldys,

Magdalene Bandyk, McKenna

Bandyk, Ashley

Cairo, Nora Czupek, Cali

Dauparas, Thomas Davis,

Gabriela DelCotto, Stephanie

Duensing, Michelle

Eckel, Devin Evans, Liam

Flaherty, Owen Flaherty,

Graham Garrett, Brianna

Geary, Bridget Geary,

Elisebeth Gilles, William

Griffiths, Alyssa Gromala,

Jacob Hilty, Ryan Hilty,

Bridget Jeffries, Megan

Jeffries, Robert Jeffries,

Ethan Judge, Caden Kalinowski,

Kennedy Kalinowski,

Alyssa LaBine, Danielle

Lagone, Kyle Laird, Elizabeth

Marmo, Scott Marmo,

Joseph Marnell, Lindsey

Marnell, Karly Marth,

Samuel McCloughan, Liam

McGinnis, Meghan Mitoraj,

Faith Morrison, John

Morrison, Mary Murphy,

Bridgette Needham, Sarah

Noone, Joseph O’Connell,

Jack Patterson, Maximus

Pignotti, Anthony Prucha,

Gianna Prucha, Hannah

Regan, Carly Renfro, Jacob

Renfro, Maeve Richardson,

Dominic Russo, Abigail

Schaefer, Natalie Schaefer,

Benjamin Seeber, Brian

Seeber, Samantha Sharkey,

Emily Sicinski, Zachary

Sicinski, Victoria Sojka,

Mariano Sori-Marin, Julianna

Stukel, Aidan Trainor,

Kailey Voltz, Chelsea

Wells and Joshua Wilcox,

all of Mokena.

The Following students

were recognized with second

honors: Athanasios

Bastas, Patrick Cosgrove,

Hunter Dauparas, Thomas

Farley, Brennen Farrahi,

Jack Halper, Zachary Hitterman,

Andrew Holm,

Lauren Knight, Mikaela

Martin, Jack McConnell,

Jacob McKendry, Matthew

Noone, Madelyn Pascale,

Elizabeth Rohrer, Matthew

Russo, Taylor Schaefer,

Jake Schutter, Lilly Smith,

Trevor Sojka, Adam Taylor

and Chloe Tompkins, all of

Mokena.

Augastana College

Mokena students named to

Augustana’s dean’s list

Augustana College announced

986 students were

named to the dean’s list

for the 2016 fall term. Students

who have earned this

academic honor have maintained

a grade-point average

of 3.5 or higher on a

four-point scale for courses

taken during the term.

Among those named to

the dean’s list were Rafael

Rodriguez and Emilie Verran,

both of Mokena.

McKendree University

Mokena students earn

school honors

Maggie Ruane, a McKendree

University junior

speech communication

major from Mokena, was

named to the President’s

List for achieving a perfect

4.0 grade point average for

the fall 2016 semester.

Lucas Galifos, also of

Mokena, was named to the

dean’s list for earning a

grade point average of 3.60

or higher for the fall 2016

semester.

McKendree University

was founded in 1828 in

Lebanon, Illinois, 25 miles

from downtown St. Louis. It

has campuses in Kentucky

and programs at Scott Air

Force Base.

Miami University

Mokena student earns

dean’s list honors

Chase Fugett, of Mokena,

was recently named to the

dean’s list at Miami University.

Miami University students

who achieved a grade

point average of 3.5 or better

for the first semester of

the 2016-2017 school year

were named to the dean’s

list in recognition of their

academic performance.

Ridgewater College

Mokena native named to

Ridgewater’s dean’s list

Ridgewater College recently

announced that Rachel

Rauch, of Mokena, has

been named to the fall semester

2016 dean’s list.

To be named to the

Dean’s list, a student must

complete a minimum of 12

credits and earn a minimum

of 3.50 grade point average.

Ridgewater College is

a community and technical

college educating more

than 6,000 individuals each

year on its campuses in

Willmar and Hutchinson,

Minnesota.

Saint Xavier University

Mokena natives earn SXU’s

dean’s list honors

Andrew Cimonetti, who

majors in management;

Meghan Heenan, an English

major; Linnae Rodriguez,

who majors in hospitality/

human resource management/marketing;

Ramy Salameh,

a nursing major; and

Josephine Tadros, who majors

in education-middle

level math, all of Mokena,

were recently named to

Saint Xavier University’s

dean’s list.

The SXU dean’s list recognizes

full-time students

who have earned and maintained

a minimum cumulative

grade point average of

3.75 out of 4.0. Students

must have completed a

minimum of 15 total credit

hours at SXU and be enrolled

for a minimum of 12

credit hours during the given

semester.

Trine University

Mokena native earns dean’s

list honors at Trine

Amber Kazmer, of Mokena,

a sophomore studying

Informatics, was among the

students recently named to

Trine University’s dean’s

list.

To be named to the dean’s

list, a main campus student

must maintain at least 15

credit hours and have between

a 3.5 and 3.749 grade

point average.

University of Akron

Akron honors Mokena

native with dean’s list

recognition

Luke Schmitt, of Mokena,

was recently named to

the University of Akron’s

fall 2016 dean’s list.

To be eligible, Schmitt,

who is majoring in Mechanical

Engineering,

maintained a GPA between

3.500 and 3.999 and was

enrolled in 12 or more

credit hours.

University of Dayton

Mokena student earns

dean’s list recognition

Meghan Marth, Maximilian

Bonoma and James

Sharkey, all of Mokena,

were recently named to the

dean’s list at the University

of Dayton.

Dayton’s dean’s list honors

undergraduate students

achieving a minimum of a

3.5 grad point average for

the semester.

Compiled by Editor

Tim Carroll, tim@

mokenamessenger.com.


mokenamessenger.com Mokena

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16 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger news

mokenamessenger.com

FROM THE HOMER HORIZON

Local climber, adventurer

reminisces about ice climbing

A summit attempt on

Mount Shuksan in Washington

turned into a living

nightmare, complete with

avalanches; vertical walls

of slippery, loose rock; dangerously

exposed traverses:

slick ice; and a false peak

— something Dave Everson

calls a “climber’s mirage.”

Everson, a Homer Glen resident,

said sometimes the trips

that do not go quite as planned

are the most memorable.

With so many things that

could go wrong, it is hard for

some people to imagine why

someone would take those

risks, he said.

“You’ve got someone dealing

with altitude sickness;

you’re wondering in a whiteout

if you’re even in the right

part of the mountain,” Everson

said. “But [there is] the

joy of having that successful

summit and even more so just

getting back down safely.”

It is a sport that is both

physically and mentally challenging,

but that is what he

said makes it so rewarding.

While the conditions in

the southwest suburbs might

not always be ideal for ice

climbing, Everson said he

and friend Joel Taylor take

every opportunity they can

to get out and climb.

Everson said the fear of

heights is something with

which many people struggle,

himself included.

“That’s why I trust my

partner with my life and

learned every knot,” he said.

Reporting by Assistant Editor

Amanda Stoll. For more, visit

HomerHorizon.com.

FROM THE TINLEY JUNCTION

Couple opens new candy

venture in Frankfort

Five years ago, Maria

Zientara started making vintage

candy apples.

Then, Maria, along with the

help of her husband, Randy,

began to sell what became

their signature caramel-coated

treats at area farmers’ markets.

On Feb. 1, the two welcomed

familhy and friends

to their shop Short & Sweet

Tasty Treats, located at 9975

W. Lincoln Highway in

Frankfort.

Five days later, Maria and

Randy held a soft opening to

the public. Coffee and homemade

sweet treats — which

happen to the be Maria’s two

favorite things — are the

main items on the menu.

She also accepts suggestions,

which have turned into

creations like frozen bananas,

cheesecake on a stick and,

most recently, sponge candy.

“We have to make what the

customer wants,” Maria said.

“Who cares what we like?

We started to add [items].

People would make a suggestion,

and I would take that

suggestion, make something

and see how it would go.”

Although Maria is not a

formally trained pastry chef,

her love of learning has created

some tasty results.

“I’m pretty open to trying

new things,” Maria said. “I

think that is kind of exciting.

It drives me a little bit.”

Reporting by Brittany Kapa,

Editor. For more, visit TinleyJunction.com.

FROM THE NEW LENOX PATRIOT

Resident chronicles living

with, beating MS in book

Kellie Alderton knew

there was a problem, but she

thought it was with her eyes.

Alderton, now of New

Lenox, had played softball for

10 years at that point in her

life — 1988 — and she was

good. But during her high

school tryouts, things started

to go downhill, and fast.

“I went to go catch a ball

and got hit in the face,” she

remembered. “I went to catch

another, and it went way over

my head. I thought to myself,

‘What is going on?”

The tryout performance led

her to consult an optometrist,

because she also was having

trouble reading the chalkboard

and would get bouts of

dizziness in the hallways.

The doctor suggested she

see a pediatric neurologist.

Once there, Alderton was

given what she now knows as

a standard test for determining

multiple sclerosis. Then,

she was taken to get an MRI.

“We saw that I had 20 lesions

in my brain, and I had

optic neuritis, which was

the problem with my eyes,”

Alderton recalled. “They diagnosed

me with relapsing,

remitting MS.”

Now, nearly 30 years after

her diagnosis, Alderton has

written a book about her journey

toward “beating” MS.

“A lot of people who have

MS, when they first get the diagnosis,

they think it is a death

sentence,” Alderton said.

“Secondly, they trust their

doctors blindly. They will not

investigate alternatives. I want

them to just know that they

have options and choices.”

Reporting by Jon DePaolis,

Freelance Reporter. For more,

visit NewLenoxPatriot.com.

FROM THE ORLAND PARK PRAIRIE

Chicago man allegedly

carried out multiple home

burglaries, one in Orland

A Chicago man who carried

out and attempted multiple

residential burglaries in

at least four towns, including

Orland Park, was arrested

while burglarizing a home in

Please see NFYN, 17

Police Reports

Police: Monee man charged with DUI after allegedly hitting cars stopped at intersection

Ronald C. Stengel, 46, of

24932 S. Harlem Avenue in

Monee, was charged Jan. 25

with driving under the influence

of alcohol, operating an

uninsured motor vehicle and

failure to reduce speed to

avoid an accident which resulted

in property damage at

the intersection of W. 191st

Street and S. 88th Avenue in

Mokena.

Police reportedly responded

to an incident involving

three vehicles. Stengel allegedly

hit the rear end of a

vehicle stopped at the intersection,

causing it to then hit

the vehicle in front of it.

According to the report,

both victims stated that

Stengel attempted to leave

the scene, but the black 2008

Chevrolet Equinox he was

driving would not start.

According to the report,

Stengel failed roadside tests

and, after being transported

to the Mokena Police Department,

refused to give a

breath sample.

Jan. 21

• Jacob S. Strempel, 21, of

14322 Kildare Avenue in

Midlothian, was charged with

disobeying a traffic control

device after allegedly running

a red light at the intersection of

I-80 and S. La Grange Road in

Mokena while driving a white

2000 Chrysler Concorde. After

being stopped, the officer

was advised of a valid Will

County arrest warrant and

took Strempel into custody.

According to the report, he

was then transported to the

Will County Adult Detention

Facility.

Jan. 24

• Clementina Sullivan, 43, of

21934 Emily Lane in Frankfort,

was charged with driving

with a revoked driver’s license

and sign violation after

allegedly rolling a stop sign

at the intersection of Willow

Avenue and Scarth Lane in

Mokena while driving a black

2016 Ford Escape. According

to the report, Sullivan stated

that she thought she had taken

care of the legal issues that led

to her license being revoked.

Jan. 27

• Oscar E. Fajardo, 20, of 1322

Park Ave. in Chicago Heights,

was charged with operating

an uninsured motor vehicle

and driving without a valid

drivers license and cited for

other equipment violations after

police reportedly observed

him driving a black 2008 Ford

Focus with a nonworking rear

registration light near the intersection

of W. 191st Street

and S. La Grange Road in

Mokena. After police initiated

a traffic stop, they discovered

that he did not have a valid

drivers license.

Jan. 28

• John P. Baker, 39, of 48 Arrowhead

Drive in Thornton,

was charged with driving on

a suspended driver’s license

and disobeying a traffic

control device after allegedly

turning left despite a

no left turn sign at the 9600

block of 191st Street. After

police initiated a traffic stop

on the silver 2003 GMC Envoy,

Baker informed police

his license was suspended,

which, according to the report,

they found to be true.

Jan. 29

• Brian E. Webb, 45, of

10208 S. Torrence Avenue

in Chicago, was charged

with driving on a suspended

driver’s license and cited

for improper lighting, after

police reportedly observed

him driving a black 2002 Infinity

Q45 without the headlights

on at 2:23 a.m. at the

intersection of S. La Grange

Road and W. 191st Street in

Mokena. After police initiated

a traffic stop, they found

that his driver’s license had

been suspended, according

to the report.

Jan. 31

• Brandon T. Lemmons, 43,

of 10727 Mary Lane, Apartment

3B in Mokena, was

charged with driving on a

suspended driver’s license

and cited for speeding 52

mph in a posted 40 mph

zone. Police reportedly observed

him driving at a high

rate of speed in a blue 2006

Chrysler Town and Country

in the 10100 Block of W.

191st Street in Mokena, and

upon activating the dashmounted

radar, found him

to be speeding. After police

initiated a traffic stop, Lemmons

informed police that

his license was suspended,

which, according to the report,

they found to be true.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The Mokena

Messenger’s police reports

come from the Mokena Police

Department. Anyone listed in

these reports is considered to

be innocent of all charges until

proven guilty in a court of law.


mokenamessenger.com sound off

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 17

Social snapshot

Top Web Stories

From MokenaMessenger.com as of

Monday, Feb. 6

1. News from Your Neighbors: Lincoln-Way

West senior turns summer job into full

scholarship

2. Central mathletes hope for regional

comeback after disappointing conference

finish

3. Competitive cheerleading: East advances to

state with sectional victory

4. MFPD’s baby sitting class prepares future

entrepreneurs

5. Police reports: Woman trespassed at library,

obstructed officer’s attempt to get fingerprints

Become a member: mokenamessenger.com/plus

Lincoln-Way Community High School District

210 posted this Jan. 31:

“It’s safe to say we have some extreme

talent around here! Congratulations to our

Knight, Griffin, and Warrior award winners

of the 2017 Scholastic Art Competition!”

Like The Mokena Messenger: facebook.com/

mokenamessenger.com

“Congratulations to our JV Cheerleading

Team on placing 1st at the Bremen

Invitational today. The girls were named

Grand Champions!!!”

@LWCKnights, on Jan. 31

Follow The Mokena Messenger: @mokenamessenger

From The Assistant Editor

Flying solo this week in Mokena

Amanda Stoll

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.com

This week, Tim left on

vacation, so I’ve been

mostly on my own as

the stand-in editor for the

Messenger.

While I can’t say I was

completely on my own, as

Tim pretty well set me up

for success on Monday and

Tuesday before he left, I

feel accomplished having

(mostly) kept up with the

workload and not worked

too many extra hours.

There’s a lot of things the

editor does every week that

readers may not realize. Not

only are they responsible for

combing through every story

that goes into the paper for

grammar, spelling and accuracy,

they also write up many

of the paper’s extras — like

police reports, announcements

and school news, to

NFYN

From Page 16

Berwyn Jan. 31, according to

a Feb. 1 Orland Park Police

Department press release.

Cory Durr, 35, of 3125

S. Green St., reportedly was

charged by Orland Park police

with one count of residential

burglary, a Class 1 felony. He

also was charged similarly by

police in Berwyn, Wilmette

and Burbank, according to

Orland Park police.

At 12:13 p.m. Jan. 24, Orland

Park police reportedly

responded to a burglary in

progress in the 7800 block of

157th Street. The homeowner

heard the doorbell ringing and

a loud knocking at the door,

according to the press release.

When she went to answer the

door, she heard the front door

being pried open.

The homeowner reportedly

grabbed her phone and

fled through the garage. Durr

then fled in a white Nissan

Maxima, police said.

When Orland Park police

alerted other jurisdictions to

the burglary, they discovered

the vehicle was used in several

other recent burglaries in

name a few. They lay out

the paper and work with the

advertising department to

make sure everything will fit

with the space.

Although I’ve done less

writing this week than I generally

do as the assistant editor

for Mokena, New Lenox

and Frankfort, I feel like I’ve

had more on my plate than

any other week so far.

It’s not that there’s a lot

of big projects I’ve had to

tackle, it’s just an extensive

list of small details that make

up the paper each week.

One thing I didn’t expect

to take a long as it did was

recording and writing the

police reports.

I spent about two hours

sitting on the metal bench

in the lobby of the Mokena

Police Department, and then

another couple writing them

up. There were only seven.

While it’s not my favorite

thing this week, it is part of

our job as journalists, and,

therefore, it needs to be done.

I didn’t realize how difficult

it would be to shrink a

huge, sometimes six-page,

report down to a few paragraphs

and pack as much

information as possible into

them.

The staff in the front office

at the Mokena Police

Department were certainly

accommodating and helpful

during my lengthy visit to

the front lobby, but I can’t

say the cold aluminum

bench was kind to my back.

I’m sure no one else spends

as much time as I did sitting

there, as the officers seem

very quick to help people

who come in to see them, but

I may consider getting one

of those cushy seats people

have for the bleachers at high

school football games if I end

up doing more of the police

reports in the future.

The editor is also responsible

for contacting and

assigning freelance writers

and photographers while

staying within the budget

for each week.

I have to say, our freelance

writers and photographers

have been wonderful this

week, which has made my

temporary change in duties

much easier.

I’ve also had a lot of help

from the other editors in the

office: Kirsten Onsgard of

The Frankfort Station, James

Sanchez of The New Lenox

Patriot and Tom Czaja of The

Homer Horizon.

I think as a society many

people have become quick to

the Chicago area, police said.

Orland Park’s investigations

reportedly led to a vehicle

at Durr’s address. With

several other suburban police

departments, Orland Park police

identified the driver, and

then conducted surveillance,

leading to his arrest, according

to the press release.

The investigation continues

into Durr’s involvement in

other residential burglaries in

the Chicago area, according to

Orland Park police.

Reporting by Editor Bill Jones.

For more, visit OPPrairie.com.

criticize but slow to compliment.

It’s something I think

we can all work to improve

on every day.

We all know it feels

good to get a well-deserved

compliment. Not that we

don’t also need our fair share

of constructive criticism —

note the word “constructive”

— to keep us on the straight

and narrow, because that’s

important, too.

So, I want to thank everyone

in my office who’s

helped me out this week, and

give some kudos to Tim for

everything he does throughout

the week. He really

works hard and does a lot to

make the Messenger happen

each week.

Next time you see him, let

him know his work is appreciated.

Better yet, remember

to shoot him an email at

tim@mokenamessenger.com

if you’re happy with something

you read in the paper.

Sound Off Policy

Editorials and columns are the

opinions of the author. Pieces

from 22nd Century Media are

the thoughts of the company

as a whole. The Mokena Messenger

encourages readers to write

letters to Sound Off. All letters

must be signed, and names and

hometowns will be published.

We also ask that writers include

their address and phone number

for verification, not publication.

Letters should be limited to 400

words. The Mokena Messenger

reserves the right to edit letters.

Letters become property of The

Mokena Messenger. Letters that

are published do not reflect

the thoughts and views of The

Mokena Messenger. Letters can be

mailed to: The Mokena Messenger,

11516 West 183rd Street, Unit

SW Office Condo #3, Orland

Park, Illinois, 60467. Fax letters

to (708) 326-9179 or e-mail to

tim@mokenamessenger.com.

www.mokenamessenger.com.


18 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger mokena

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the mokena messenger | February 9, 2017 | mokenamessenger.com

Artistic

Awards

Lincoln-Way

students recognized

for painting, drawing

projects, Page 23

Getting

the scoop

Find out what sets El

Balcon apart in the

landscape of Mexican

cuisine, Page 27

Mokena Elementary students earn Mokemon cards

for being caught with good behavior, Page 21

First-graders Landen

Holba (left) and

Matthew Bullington

battle with their

Mokemon cards.

Photo submitted


20 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger faith

mokenamessenger.com

Robin’s Nest

A late night brush with humor

Robin Melvin

Contributing Columnist

I

tried not to laugh. I

really did was almost

midnight, and my

sleep-deprived husband was

snoozing five feet from the

bathroom door. It was Memorial

Day weekend, and he

was 31 hours into overtime

on the second day of storm

duty. He could be called

back at any moment, so I

didn’t want to wake him.

I was exhausted, too.

Physically, because it was

nearing midnight. Emotionally,

because we were

depressed after our recent

move from Texas. Humor

was in short supply. We’d

let too much seriousness

sneak into our days.

After tip-toeing past Jeff

and into the bathroom, I

squeezed paste onto my

toothbrush. About 5 seconds

in, something wasn’t right.

It didn’t smell right.

Tom’s of Maine Toothpaste

smells and tastes

weird, but this was different.

Kind of fishy. After sniffing

it, I shrugged and continued

scrubbing until I looked in

the mirror.

The white stuff was a

little too creamy and a tad

too white. A quick glance

into my toiletry basket revealed

a long-forgotten tube

of Preparation H sitting on

top of my Tom’s of Maine.

At first, I thought, “How

stupid is that?” Then, looking

back up at the ointment

oozing out between my

teeth, I wondered, “Will my

gums shrink and make my

teeth fall out?”

I tried to stifle my giggles

as I rinsed and re-brushed.

When I crawled into bed,

they still bubbled out. Trying

to hold it in only made

me snort, which woke Jeff.

“What’s so funny?”

I barely had breath to

explain. Soon he was laughing

too. A good, cleansing

laugh with the works. Snot

and tears and calming down

to try to sleep until one of us

giggled again.

When is the last time you

enjoyed a good belly laugh?

Are you so burdened, even

by everyday irritants, that

you miss the blessing of

humor? We don’t have to

look far to see we’re created

for it. It’s wired into us for

a reason.

Proverbs 17:22 tells us,

“A cheerful disposition is

good for your health; gloom

and doom leave you bonetired.”

When did we start taking

life so seriously? Perhaps

we need to look back and

seek healing. If we’re not

careful, a somber spirit

becomes natural to us. It’s

the way we roll. Too hard

on ourselves and others.

My friends, let’s not get

so bogged down in difficulties

and busyness that we

forget to see life’s funny

side. Even the most bizarre

and illogical can be downright

comical.

So, let’s lighten up. Life’s

too short to be stern and

humorless. Learn to play a

little and laugh a lot. And

don’t forget to laugh at

yourself. It’s good medicine

for the mind, body and

spirit. Our moods and our

relationships will benefit

from it.

I pray peace and laughter

for your journey, my

friends.

The thoughts and opinions

expressed in this column are

those of the author. They do

not necessarily represent the

thoughts of 22nd Century Media

or its staff.

Faith Briefs

St. Mary’s Catholic Church (19515 115th

Ave., Mokena)

Church Service

5 p.m. Saturdays; 8 a.m,

9:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6:

p.m. Sundays

Adoration

Wednesdays following

8:00 a.m. Mass in the Chapel

until 6:45 p.m.

Holy Rosary

7:30 a.m. daily; 7 p.m.

Tuesday evenings

Parker Road Bible Church (18512 Parker

Road, Mokena)

Worship Service

10:30 a.m. Sundays. Be

sure to arrive early for our

Sunday Worship Service to

enjoy a hot, complimentary

cup of coffee every week at

the church. Following the

Christian Education Hour

(9:15 - 10:15 a.m.), all beverages

can be found just outside

the sanctuary.

Grace Fellowship Church (11049 LaPorte

Road, Mokena)

Narcotics Anonymous

7-9 p.m. Mondays. All

those struggling or who have

struggled with a narcotics

addiction are welcome. All

meetings are confidential.

For more information, call

(708) 479-0300.

Spanish Church

12:30 p.m. every Sunday

Worship Service

10 a.m. every Sunday. All

are welcome.

Women’s Bible Study

8:45-9:45 a.m. every Sunday

and 2-3 p.m. every Tuesday

Marley Community Church (12625 W.

187th St., Mokena)

Church Service

10 a.m. Sundays. Childcare

is provided

Sunday School

9-10 a.m.

Men’s Group

6 p.m. Sunday nights in

the church basement. All

men are welcome.

Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church

(10731 W. La Porte Road, Mokena)

Friendship Weekend

5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 11

and 9 a.m. and 10:15 a.m.

Sunday, Feb. 12.

Contemporary Worship

5 p.m. Saturday

Worship

9 a.m. Sunday

Mokena Baptist Church (9960 W. 187th

St., Mokena)

Ladies Bible Study

7 p.m. every Thursday.

Meetings take place at The

Talking Shirt Boutique,

19805 S. LaGrange Road in

Mokena. For more information,

call (312) 350-2279.

Men’s Bible Study

The men’s bible study is

held quarterly at Cracker

Barrel, 18531 N. Creek

Drive in Tinley Park. The

meetings are held at 9 a.m.,

and men will enjoy studying

the Bible over breakfast.

Sunday Services

11 a.m. and 5 p.m. For

more information, call (312)

350-2279.

Sunday School

10:15 a.m. Sundays. Mokena

Baptist offers Sunday

School classes for all ages.

For more information, call

(312) 350-2279.

Mokena United Methodist Church (10901

LaPorte Road, Mokena)

Service and Sunday School

10:15 a.m. Sundays.

Church service and Sunday

school will be held. For

more information, call (708)

479-1110.

Bible Study

7 p.m. Tuesdays

Walking Club

7 p.m. Mondays

Weight Watchers

Wednesday

Weigh-ins take place at

6:30 p.m., while the meeting

is at 7 p.m.

Have something for Faith

Briefs? Contact Assistant

Editor Amanda Stoll at

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.com

or call (708) 326-9170 ext. 34.

Deadline is noon Thursday one

week prior to publication.

In Memorium

Frank Haddon

Frank Haddon,

68, of Mokena,

died Jan. 11. He attended

Thornton High School in

Harvey. He served in the U.S.

Air Force and was a Vietnam

veteran. Frank is survived by

his wife, Cindy (nee Rodenburg),

daughters, Joni (Brian)

Murphy and Molly (Scott)

Long, grandchildren, Carly,

Tegan, Olivia, Jack, Kyle,

and Georgia and sister Janice

(Vince) Rizzi. Interment at

Abraham Lincoln National

Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,

donations to the American

Cancer Society at www.cancer.org.

Lester Lingle

Lester B. Lingle,

88, formerly of Mokena, died

on Jan. 29. He was a United

States Army Veteran, retired

from Amtrak as a Material

Control Clerk and was formerly

a butcher for 27 years.

He is survived by his wife,

Sandra Faye (nee Bass),

children Timothy L. (Amy)

Lingle, Teddy W. (Kathy)

Lingle, and Tracey L. Lingle,

eight grandchildren, six

great-grandchildren, brother

Rev. Clifford (Lacene) Lingle

and son-in law, David Perry.

Visitation and funeral were

held at Kurtz Memorial Chapel

in New Lenox. Interment

Abraham Lincoln National

Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,

donations to Zion Hill Baptist

building fund, 2003 Zion

Hill Rd., Centralia, IL 62801

would be appreciated.

Luke Dominy

Luke Daniel Dominy, 32,

of Mokena and Homewood,

died Jan. 29. He was a graduate

of Lincoln-Way East and

Safety Director and Project

Manager for Meany Electric.

He is survived by his

mother, Jeanne M. Dominy

(nee Fares), father, Daniel R.

Dominy, and siblings Julie

(Alex) Zubak and Nick (Rebecca)

Dominy. Visitation

was held at Panozzo Bros.

Funeral Home in Chicago

Heights. Funeral service was

held at Olympia Fields Country

Club. Interment private.

In lieu of flowers, memorials

to New Star Services, 1624

East 154th Street, Dolton, IL

60419, would be appreciated.

Have someone’s life you’d

like to honor? Email Editor

Tim Carroll at tim@mokenames-

senger.com with information

about a loved one

who was a part of the Mokena

community.


mokenamessenger.com life & Arts

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 21

Mokemon revive MES incentive program

Amanda Stoll, Assistant Editor

Rewarding students for

meeting goals and practicing

good behavior is nothing

new at Mokena Elementary

School, but the design of the

reward tickets is new this

quarter.

Tickets are given to students

by teachers and staff

for exhibiting good behavior,

which is determined

by weekly goals such as

walking in the hallway.

Anna Kirchner, principal at

MES, said goals change every

week and are based on

the tenants of PBIS, which

stands for positive interventions

and supports.

She said goals revolve

around being respectful, responsible

and safe and are

worded positively for the

students.

The regular tickets are

worth one point each, while

the golden tickets are worth

15. At the end of each week,

students can cash in their

tickets for prizes during

Shine Time.

Art teach Steve Hippleheuser

and other tier 1

behavior team members

brainstormed ideas over the

summer to keep students

motivated year-long, eventually

coming up withe the

idea of Mokemon — a play

on the popular Pokémon

cards and characters.

With reward tickets given

out at the beginning of the

year in the first and second

quarter, Hippleheuser said

students generally remain

motivated, and then again

when the fourth quarter rolls

around and students can start

earning tickets toward the

end of the year carnival. But

he said the team noticed that

during the third quarter, after

winter break, the students’

enthusiasm waned.

To help encourage students

in the third quarter,

Hippleheuser designed the

tickets specially as Mokemon

cards.

New cards are “released”

each week, giving the students

something to continually

work toward.

“Outside of my room I

have a bulletin board and

I put them up every week

so they can see what the 8

new ones are,” said Hippleheuser.

“It keeps them from

week to week just motivated

and gives them something to

look forward to.”

Kirchner said many of the

students trade and play with

them like they would Pokémon

cards, and are even forgoing

prizes at the end of the

week so they can keep their

cards.

While the characters on

the cards are drawn by Hippleheuser,

name ideas for

each were submitted by the

students. The behavior team

chose from the entries and

the students whose name

ideas were selected are noted

on each card.

“[Hippleheuser] spent a

lot of time on it,” said Kirchner.

“He really should be

commended for it. It’s been

excellent.”

She said the cards have

been so popular they’ve had

a hard time keeping up with

the number being handed

out. It’s something she said

the parent volunteers at the

school have helped with tremendously.

All of the cards so far

feature drawings by Hippleheuser,

except one, which

features a picture of physical

Chop Chop, one of the characters featured on the

Mokemon cards at Mokena Elementary School, was named

by student Payton Didrickson. Photos by Amanda Stoll/22nd

century media

education teacher Kris Vandenberg

in a T-Rex costume

he wore for Halloween.

Not only do the cards have

an incentive for students

to practice good behavior,

Hippleheuser said they will

be used in the art curriculum

for second grade at the end

of the third quarter.

“In second grade I do a

unit on commercial artists

and illustrators, and I let

them choose from a variety

of projects,” he said. “One

of those projects will be to

make their own Mokemon

card.”

Students have been excited

about the cards, and Hippleheuser

said some of them

have even incorporated them

into their Pokémon decks

and play the Mokemon cards

Xenha, one of the characters drawn by art teacher Steve

Hippleheuser that is featured on the school’s Mokemon

cards, was named by student Jordan White.

alongside their other cards.

Hippleheuser said he reminds

students about the

cards regularly and what

they have to do to earn them.

“When teachers catch you

being good, you get to catch

a Mokemon.”

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22 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger mokena

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mokenamessenger.com life & Arts

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 23

Lincoln-Way students recognized

in Scholastic Art exhibition

Summit Hill pep band

plays at Wolves game

Submitted by Lincoln-Way Community

High School District 210

Lincoln-Way Central student Russell

Klopp received an honorable mention

in the 2017 Scholastic Art Awards for

his painting, pictured here.

Seven Lincoln-Way East High

School students were recognized by the

most prestigious high school art exhibition

in the country.

The 2017 Scholastic Art Awards

awarded 24 Lincoln-Way students in total,

including seven Gold Key Awards,

eight Silver Award and nine Honorable

Mention Awards. Gold Key award winners’

work will advance to New York to

compete at the national level.

In the Midwest region, area schools

submitted 2,619 works of art with only

838 pieces awarded and accepted into

the show.

Lincoln-Way Central students recognized

were Russell Klopp and Shannon

McGuire,

Lincoln-Way East students recognized

were Emily Alvarez, Sheila

Deacy, Emilee Grummel, Jordan Horneij,

Summer Lecas, Emily Oseman

and Kate Weithers.

All awarded works are on display at

the Regional Show, which takes place

at Downers Grove North High School,

4436 Main Street in Downers Grove.

An opening reception was held Feb. 5,

and the show runs through Feb. 10.

Lincoln-Way East student Kate

Weithers was awarded a Gold Key

Award in the 2017 Scholastic Art

Awards for her drawing, pictured here.

Photos submitted

Submitted by Summit Hill

School District 161

The Summit Hill Junior

High School Pep Band took

their show on the road last

month, performing at a semiprofessional

hockey game.

The band helped hype

up the crowd at a Chicago

Wolves game at Allstate

Arena on Jan. 22, with nearly

all of the band’s 47 members

attending.

The band performed songs

such as “Party Rock Anthem,”

“Eye of the Tiger”

and “Sweet Caroline” for

about 40 minutes straight inside

the south gate of the stadium,

playing for people as

they entered. A large crowd

of pep band fans watched

in the concourse, before

the band packed up their

equipment and watched the

Wolves win 6-1.

Chapter Chatter

Picoult’s ‘Small Great Things’ adeptly tackles racism

Barbara Knight

Mokena Resident

“Small Great Things” by

Jodi Picoult is a timely and,

I believe, important book

that offers keen insight into

the sometimes uncomfortable

issue of the state of race

relations in our culture.

The title is taken from a

famous speech by Martin

Luther King Jr.: “If I cannot

do great things, I can do

small things in a great way”.

She explains why she

chose to use a direct quote

for the title of this book. Particularly

for folks who live in

areas where diversity is not

as apparent as in others, there

is sometimes passive acceptance

of the unchallenged

“comfort zone” simply because

it isn’t part of how we

look at the wider world.

In “Acknowledgements,”

this writer talks about what

drew her to this subject and

how the urge to give voice to

the complex, many-layered

components of this issue

grew, resulting in this book.

I read a lot of books, but

am only moved to share my

opinion in a review when I

feel there is a social or cultural

lesson that might be instructive

or a message with

wide appeal to readers in

general and students of life.

I think this is such a book.

This is a thoughtful and important

look at how each of us

perceives racism in our world.

It forces the reader to take

an honest, introspective look

at whatever our notions of

racism after reading about the

experience of a black nurse

who experiences one of the

most glaring examples of racial

inequality imaginable.

The character of Ruth embodies

the ultimate triumph

of the human spirit; she is

shaken to the core but, in the

end, unbroken, which does

not in any way underestimate

the pain and difficulty

of her journey.

The story unfolds from

three perspectives: a black

nurse with an unblemished

20-year career in the same

hospital, a white supremacist

and a public defender.

It is riveting and intense

and portrays a deep struggle

that I think speaks eloquently

to the issues of our times.

This writer has tackled

social topics in the past. She

always does her research and

due diligence and speaks

from the heart in the acknowledgement

portion of

the book about what motivated

her to examine this timely

and current issue, which has,

I believe, resulted in a powerful

and educational look at

the issue of unconscious passive

racism in our culture.

If you are confident that

you have no bias about people

different from yourself,

reading this story may surprise

you, as well as present

an opportunity for growth.

It is at times disturbing,

authentic, unsettling, riveting,

powerful and, in the

end, hopeful.

Submit reviews (400 words

or less) to tim@mokenamessenger.com

and include your

name and phone number in

the email.

Forty-four of the Summit Hill School District 161 pep

band’s members perform at Allstate Arena Jan. 22 before a

Chicago Wolves game. Photos submitted

The band played favorites such as “Sweet Caroline.”


24 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger MOKENA

mokenamessenger.com mokenamessenger.com MOKENA

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 25

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26 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger Dining Out

mokenamessenger.com

Vegan Cafe owner overcomes illness to run restaurant

Erin Redmond, Assistant Editor

About 10 years ago, Marguerite

Baltages-Ruminski

was staring death in the

face.

Her corporate job, she

told her husband, was going

to kill her emotionally,

spiritually or physically.

She knew she had to get out.

So, she traded her cubicle

for kitchenware and started

her own catering business,

Healthy Sins.

Fast-forward five years to

the night the Homer Glen

resident and her husband

dropped into the Vegan

Cafe, 928 S. State St., Lockport,

for dinner. As she was

dining on the surprisingly

scrumptious cuisine, a light

bulb went off in Ruminski’s

head. She found out the cafe

offered classes and decided

to take a few as a way to expand

her catering business.

But when she found out the

cafe was volunteer-based, it

was game over.

“I love to volunteer. I

started volunteering so much

that [then owner] Laurie

Sloan approached me and

said ‘do you want to buy it?’

I looked at her and said ‘are

you nuts?’ ... Next thing I

knew, I was signing the [paperwork],”

Ruminski said.

Ruminski still had her

doubts, however. As she

waited for Sloan to arrive

the morning on Sept.

1, 2013, she asked her late

father, who also owned a

restaurant when she was

growing up, for a sign she

was doing the right thing.

And then she heard the train

whistle.

“It’s 9 o’clock in the

morning,” she said, looking

skyward and noting her

father’s old restaurant was

a half-block from the train

station. “The train never

goes by at 9 o’clock in the

morning. It blew its horn

and I went ‘OK, I got it. I

never looked back.”

Vegan Cafe

928 S. State Street in

Lockport

Hours

• 11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Monday-Thursday

• 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Friday-

Saturday

• Sunday: closed,

available for private

parties

For more information...

Web: www.rawvegancafe.

org

Phone: (815) 838-4626

A new era

Ruminski loved the cafe

so much when she bought

it that she didn’t want to

change much — but she had

to put her spin on it. The artwork

on the walls and some

of the traditional recipes remain

the same, but she has

introduced items like the

Salisbury “steak” ($17.95;

$13 lunch special), which

is made of walnuts, mushrooms,

pumpkin seeds and

onions and topped with a

creamy — yet cream-less —

mushroom gravy. The lunch

special is served between 11

a.m. and 2 p.m. Monday-

Friday, and includes a half

order of any entree, a garden

salad with choice of garlic

ginger or ranch dressing and

brownie bite ($10-$13).

The Creamy Alfredo pasta

dish ($14.95 for small,

$19,95 for large) is hands

down Ruminski’s favorite,

however. The pasta consists

of spiral cut zucchini noodles

and the sauce is simply

cashews, lemon juice, olive

oil, garlic, herbs and traditional

yeast, which gives

it the cheesy flavor. It’s

all topped with marinated

mushrooms.

“This is my absolute favorite,”

Ruminski said.

“When I tried this, I could

not believe it didn’t have

cream in it.”

As the owner of a vegan

cafe, Ruminski said she is

often faced with apprehension.

Because of that, she

tries to have something for

everyone. When carnivores

stroll through her door and

take a seat at the leaf-shaped

tables, she recommends the

nachos.

The taco “meat” is three

simple ingredients: almonds,

sun-dried tomatoes

and Mexican seasoning. It’s

piled high atop non-GMO,

organic, raw, vegan and gluten-free

corn chips, that are

made in house. Guacamole

from organic avocados, nacho

drizzle — made of sunflower

seeds and turmeric

give it a yellow hue — and a

cashew, lemon juice and olive

oil blended sour “cream”

sauce tie it all together.

“This is the healthiest you

will eat anywhere, any time,”

Ruminski said. “I tell people

to be open-minded and try

it. I’ve had people go ‘I’m

afraid’ and I go ‘it’s food;

there’s nothing to be afraid

of. It’s not for everybody and

I know that. That’s OK.”

And Ruminski won’t let

you leave with trying dessert.

Hearty but healthy, Ruminski

offers desserts such

as brownies, macaroons and

the cafe’s signature almond

butter pie ($8 per slice),

made from almond butter

that is ground on-site and

mixed with bananas and cinnamon,

stuffed into a date

and pecan crust and slathered

with chocolate ganache.

“I always say ‘you have to

try the desserts, that’s going

to put you over the edge,’”

she said.

On a mission

Ruminski’s interest in

healthy foods didn’t happen

by accident, and her mission

is two-fold — get healthier

and give back.

She was diagnosed with

multiple sclerosis nearly 20

years ago and when her doctor

told her that her numbers

The Salisbury “steak” ($17.95) is made of walnuts, mushrooms, pumpkin seeds and

onions with a cascading mushroom gravy on top. The lunch special ($13), seen here, also

comes with a garden salad and brownie bites. Photos by Erin Redmond/22nd Century Media

The Vegan Cafe also serves ravioli. The noodles are made from jimicca and topped with

marina sauce, made from re-hydrated sun-dried tomatoes. It is served on the lunch special

menu, which ranges from $10-$13 and runs 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through Friday.

were “off the charts”, she

knew it was time to make a

change.

She admits that she’s still

a “transitioning” vegan. She

also has a nut allergy, so

sticking to her new diet can

be tricky at times. Her restrictive

eating requirements

have inspired new dressings,

such as the Pumpkin Seed

Cheese, made of pumpkin

seeds, cilantro, garlic and

ginger, so that others like her

can enjoy what the cafe has

to offer.

“As soon as I decided to go

into this wholeheartedly, I feel

so much different and so much

better,” she said. “I don’t need

a nap after I eat now.”

The Vegan Cafe was a

non-profit when she bought

it and while she tried to uphold

its status, Ruminski

said she’s doing “the next

best thing.” All employees

went from volunteers to paid

employees, but she doesn’t

collect a salary. Instead, everything

goes back to charities

such as MorningStar

Mission to help the homeless

and animal rescues like TLC

Animal Shelter.

“Honestly, that’s why I do

it,” Ruminski said. “I got to

a point in my life where I’m

like ‘let’s have some fun’

— and it is. I love this ... I

wake up in the morning with

a purpose.”


mokenamessenger.com dining out

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 27

The Dish

El Balcon adopts rebellious Durango cuisine, attitude

Owners introduce

new dishes, put own

twists on classics

Erin Redmond, Assistant Editor

Rebellious spirits are born

and bred in Durango, Mexico.

From the very first Mexican

president, Guadalupe Victoria,

to revolutionary Francisco

“Pancho” Villa to restaurant

owners Claudia Morales and

her son Diego, they have

fought against social conformity

in their own ways.

The latter duo opened El

Balcon, 11247 W. 143rd St.

in Orland Park, this past November

with a plan to defy the

popular conception of Mexican

food. Their menu features

items that have left those most

fluent in Mexican cuisine

seeking a tasty translation.

The Morales family has

owned a restaurant by the

same name in Bolingbrook

for 13 years but decided

it was time to broaden the

reach of their culinary “revolución.”

“We include some not very

common or popular foods,”

Claudia said. “In Mexico,

they are popular, but not in

the area. So, a lot of people

ask us, ‘What is this?’”

Hard to say, easy to eat

One of the tongue-twisting

menu items featured at

El Balcon is the huarache

(Wah RAH chay). It is like

a Mexican version of a personal

pizza — but better.

The huaraches’ ($6.50)

elongated, open-faced tortilla

features a layer of beans upon

which your choice of meat

— steak, chicken, marinated

pork or Mexican sausage —

rests comfortably. Lettuce

and cheese are sprinkled over

the meat, and the whole thing

is topped with tomato slices.

“We do our own salsas, our

own chips, enchiladas — we

do everything. We don’t use

[anything] that comes from

outside. We do everything fresh

right here.”

Claudia Morales — owner of El Balcon in Orland

Park

Not a carnivore? The meat

can be swapped out for poblano

pepper strips with

cheese. It is also served sin

carne, or “plain.”

Anyone who has ever

stepped foot inside a Chipotle

restaurant has undoubtedly

heard of barbacoa, but

the fast food chain’s variety

is a far cry from how El

Balcon does it. While most

places use shredded beef for

this dish, at the Orland Park

spot it is made with steamed

lamb. The barbacoa can be

found nestled in the restaurant’s

hefty tacos ($2.59

each), wrapped in a corn tortilla

and paired with either

lettuce and tomato, or Mexican

style with onions and

cilantro. On the weekends,

El Balcon also sells its barbacoa

by the pound ($11.99)

or half-pound ($5.99).

“A customer told me the

other day that we were the

only ones in the area who

sold [lamb barbacoa],”

Claudia said. “I didn’t know

about that.”

And while they try to incorporate

foods from all

over Mexico, the Morales

family features some distinct

Durango-area dishes. Hailing

from an area known for

its peppers, the chiles rellenos

($9.99) — stuffed poblano

peppers — was a must for

El Balcon

11247 W. 143rd St. in

Orland Park

Hours

• 10 a.m.-9 p.m.

Monday-Saturday

• 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday

For more information ...

Phone: (708) 226-5666

Web: www.

elbalconorlandpark.com

their menu. The dinner plate

is served with rice, beans,

lettuce and tomato.

The enchiladas dinner

plate ($8.99) is another Durango

delight, especially

when served rojas-style,

which means it is smothered

in red sauce. It also is available

with a milder verdes

version, also known as green

sauce.

New twist on an old

favorite

Mexican food connoisseurs

know and love the

quesadilla, but Claudia will

bet pesos to pozole they

have not had it like this. El

Balcon features the classic

quesadilla fixins’ — steak,

chicken, pork and Mexican

sausage — as well as some

not as familiar to locals.

For diners feeling adventurous,

they offer ones with

The barbacoa taco ($2.59) at El Balcon is a popular favorite, especially given that it is made

from lamb, not beef. Photos by Erin Redmond/22nd Century Media

El Balcon offers quesadillas ($5.50) in a wide array of options, ranging from the classic

asada, or skirt steak, seen here to more adventurous options like the chicharrón, which is

fried pork skin.

Flor de Calabaza (pumpkin

flower), cuitlacoche (corn

mushrooms) and chicharrón,

which is fried pork skin. All

the quesadillas ($5.50) are

served with lettuce and sour

cream.

Every item on the menu

has been revolutionized by

the Morales family, right

down to the guacamole and

chips ($4.99). It is by far

one of the young restaurant’s

most popular dishes,

and Claudia said that is for

good reason.

“We have a home-style

in our food,” she said. “We

do our own salsas, our own

chips, enchiladas — we do

everything. We don’t use

[anything] that comes from

outside. We do everything

fresh right here, which

sometimes takes longer than

usual. I think [people can

taste] a difference.”


28 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger PUZZLES

mokenamessenger.com

crosstown CROSSWORD & Sudoku

The crosstowns: Frankfort, Homer Glen, Lockport, Mokena, New Lenox, Orland Park, Tinley Park

Crossword by Myles Mellor and Cindy LaFleur

Across

1. Catch

5. MIRV’s cousin

9. Dough

14. It may follow something

15. Drive off

16. Event presenter

17. Opposed to, in

dialect

18. Cut, as a log

19. Portly plus

20. Sandburg senior

drum major, Sydney

_____

22. All’s partner

23. “Yikes!”

24. Wriggler

25. He bugs you

29. Historic building

34. Gazed amorously

35. Gangster’s blade

36. Jeans brand

37. Defeat decisively

38. Exciting

39. Synthetic thread

40. Pitcher’s asset

41. Rest

42. Sudden attack

43. Famous aria from

‘Carmen’

46. She has a degree

47. Help

48. “Long, long time

___”

49. Supple

52. Sandburg school

sports performers

58. Work __

59. Agave plant

60. Exaggerated press

61. Picture

62. Housing payment

63. One of the Great

Lakes

64. Carpets

65. Simon who wrote

“The Death of Napoleon”

66. Make fun of

Down

1. Approximate

2. Pond scum organism

3. The upper Thames

River

4. Added something

5. Insurance underwriter

6. Blackboard need

7. New Year’s Day game

8. Like old recordings

9. Cried like a Siamese

10. Mummify

11. Super server

12. Branch headquarters?

13. Eyes

21. Rustic pipe

24. A deadly sin

25. Religious scroll

26. Ancient Greek marketplace

27. Vertical

28. Lassie, e.g.

29. ___ apso (dog)

30. Sidekick

31. Warning sound

32. Played again

33. Nairobi is its capital

35. Affix a brand to

38. Pay attention to

39. Pronoun

42. Sheet of ice

44. Expressing amazement

verbally

45. Reunion attendees

46. Shoelace tips

48. Intense suffering

49. Slightly lower

50. Longing

51. Former ABC sitcom

52. Lady’s man

53. On the safe side

54. The others

55. Newbie

56. Monumental

57. Request

HOMER GLEN

Mullets Sports Bar and

Restaurant

(14903 S. Bell Road,

Homer Glen; (708) 645-

7000)

■7 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Trivia

FRANKFORT

Pete Mitchell’s Bar & Grill

(21000 Frankfort Square

Road, Frankfort; (815)

464-8100)

■6-8 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Free N’ Fun Bar Game.

Free to play.

LOCKPORT

The Outpost Pub & Grill

(14929 Archer Ave., Lockport;

(815) 836-8893)

■8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays and

Thursdays: Live DJ and

Karaoke

Strike N Spare II

(811 Northern Drive, Lockport;

(708) 301-1477)

■9:30 ■ p.m.-12:30 a.m.

Mondays: Quartermania

■Fridays: ■ Live bands

MOKENA

The Alley Grill and Tap

House

(18700 S. Old LaGrange

Road, Mokena; (708) 478-

3610)

■9 ■ p.m. Tuesdays: Karaoke

Fox’s Restaurant and Pub

(11247 W. 187th St., Mokena;

(708) 478-8888)

■6 ■ p.m. Thursdays,

Fridays and Saturdays:

Performance by Jerry

Eadie

Jenny’s Southside Tap

(10160 191st St., Mokena;

(708) 479-6873)

■6 ■ p.m. Tuesdays: Acoustic

Avenue, Psychic

night - second Tuesday

every month.

■9 ■ p.m. Thursdays:

Karaoke

■Fridays ■ and Saturdays:

Live bands

NEW LENOX

Little Joe’s Restaurant

(1300 N. Cedar Road,

New Lenox; (815) 463-

1099)

■5-8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays:

Piano Styles by Joe

To place an event

in The Scene, email

b.kapa@22ndcenturymedia.

com.

answers

How to play Sudoku

Each sudoku puzzle consists of a 9x9 grid that

has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3x3

squares. To solve the puzzle, each row, column and

box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9.

LEVEL: Medium

Sudoku by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan


mokenamessenger.com mokena

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 29

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30 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger LOCAL LIVING

mokenamessenger.com

Outstanding new home values in Peotone can be yours At Westgate Manor

Distinctive Home Builders is building new homes from the low $200s

When it comes to a preferred location,

Peotone is a steadily growing

suburb with a strong infrastructure

and an irresistible small-town charm

with a bright future—which is why Distinctive

Home Builders chose the Will

County village for its newest community

of 38 single-family homes: Westgate

Manor.

“Peotone is a family-friendly village

just south of Chicago and is one

of the best kept secrets among new

home seekers,” said Bryan Nooner,

President of Distinctive Home Builders.

“We expect to attract home shoppers

from northwest Indiana and the

south suburban Chicago marketplace.

We will likely also see buyers from the

Kankakee area because the Peotone

school district is so desirable.”

Several factors attracted Distinctive

Home Builders to this hometown atmosphere

community, not the least of

which was its convenient location between

Interstate 57 and Illinois Route

50 and easy access to I-80. Commuters

will enjoy several nearby train stations

and a mere 35-minute drive to

Chicago.

“It’s a vibrant, growing community

that benefits from ease of access to job

centers in the west and southwest suburbs

with impressive commercial and

industrial growth that has followed the

residential boom here,” said Nooner.

“Affordable land prices in Peotone,

combined with lower construction

costs add up to savings when compared

to a similarly-equipped home in

the area,” added Nooner.

Westgate Manor brick and frame

homes offer (features vary per model)

The Fahan II, a split level 3-4BR luxury townhome at Brookside Meadows.

2-Story Great Room Prairie Model

three to four bedrooms, two to threeand-

a-half baths, full basement,

formal dining room, vaulted, tray or

nine-foot first-floor ceilings, a large

kitchen with custom maple cabinets,

family room or great room, and concrete

driveways. Depending on the

home selected, other standard amenities

can include a living room, den,

dinette, a tray or vaulted ceiling in

the master bedroom, and dual-zoned

heating and air conditioning.

Distinctive Home Builders offers a

wide variety of styles and selections—

buyers can choose among 12 different

designs—each available in three to

eight different elevations at Westgate

Manor, including two-story and ranch

homes. Square footages span 1,600 to

2,500 for ranches and 1,800 to 3,000

for two-story homes.

“Most home shoppers feel there

must be a trade off from getting what

you need and what you want in a new

home. With our new premium inclusions

we have closed that gap significantly

by including additional features

that our buyers told us were most important

to them,” said Nooner, who

added that “now is the best time to buy,

because you can still take advantage of

preconstruction prices that range from

the low $200s which makes this a terrific

New home value.”

Other premium standard features

included at Westgate Manor are brick

front exteriors on the first floor, free

basements in most models, ceramic

tile or hardwood floors in the kitchen,

baths and foyer; and custom maple

cabinets. Distinctive kitchen cabinets

feature solid wood construction (no

particle board), have solid wood drawers

with dove tail joints, which is very

rare in the marketplace.

“When you build a new home with

Distinctive, you truly are receiving a

hand crafted home with custom made

cabinets no matter what the price

range,” noted Nooner. This year, Distinctive

Home Builders is celebrating

30 years building thousands of homes

throughout the Will and south Cook

county areas.

Distinctive Home Builders, an industry

leading innovator, offers the

fastest build times (90 working days)

with a “Zero Punch list” closing policy.

Prior to closing, each home undergoes

an industry leading 100-point checklist

to insure the home measures up to

our high quality standards.

Single-family 2-3BR townhome - The Lennan II, at Brookside Meadows.

Exterior Prairie Model

Customers stay connected to the

progress of their home from start to

finish through Distinctive’s unique construction

portal. “Our customers simply

download our Distinctive HomeBuilders

app and they are in touch with their

new home 24/7 from anywhere in the

world. The app allows our customers

to see the progress of their home and

access their documents at any time,”

Nooner explained. “Our customers really

appreciate the integration of social

media sites directly in our app allowing

them to easily share photos and updates

of their new home with family and

friends,” he concluded.

As a semi-custom builder, Distinctive

Home Builders can modify any of

its standard designs to cater to a customer’s

tastes, which means that moving

walls, adding extra windows or even

extending the garage are all possible.

Nooner added that “All our homes

are highly energy efficient and will be

built to the new National Energy Code

guidelines. Every home we build has

upgraded wall and ceiling insulation

values with energy efficient windows

and high efficiency furnaces. Before our

customers take possession of their new

home, we perform a blower door test to

insure that each home passes a set of

very stringent guidelines which insures

that our homes are tight and energy efficient.

Owning a more energy efficient

means lower gas and electric bills for our

customers each month.”

Peotone was established in 1856 and

offers tree-lined streets and a charming

downtown area complete with diners,

pizza parlors, cafes and pubs. In season

there is a Farmer’s Market in front

of the American Legion. Also the community

has a popular Fall Fest in front

of the famous Peotone Windmill; once

a thriving flour mill that put Peotone on

the map in the late 1800s. A Christmas

in the Village Festival is another annual

community event that concludes with a

Lighted Parade at night. Peotone now

has an estimated population of just over

4,000. Metra rail service is nearby providing

commuters easy access to downtown

Chicago.

Westgate Manor is conveniently located

within walking distance of the

esteemed Peotone High School. The

Westgate Manor new home offsite Sales

and Information Center is located in

Manhattan three miles south of Laraway

Rd. on Rt. 52. at 16233 Pinto Lane,

Manhattan, IL, 60422. Hours are daily

from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., closed

Wednesday and Thursday and they are

always available by appointment.

Specials, prices, specifications, standard

features, model offerings, build

times and lot availability are subject to

change without notice. Please contact

a Distinctive representative for current

pricing and complete details. For more

information, call (708) 479-7700 or

(708) 737-9142 or visit www.distinctivehomebuilders.com.


mokenamessenger.com LOCAL LIVING

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 31

Build and Move into Your New Home from the low $200s

With Lincoln-Way Schools at Prairie Trails in Manhattan

Distinctive Home Builders provides homeowners the

highest quality home on the market

Distinctive Home Builders

continues to add high quality

homes to the Manhattan

landscape at Prairie Trails; its

latest new home community,

located within the highly-regarded

Lincoln-Way School

District. Many families are

happy to call Prairie Trails

home and are pleased that

Distinctive is able to deliver a

new home with zero punch list

items in 90 days. Before closing,

each home undergoes an

industry-leading checklist that

ensures each home measures

up to the firm’s high quality

standards.

“Actually our last average

was 81 working days from excavation

to receiving a home

occupancy permit - without

sacrificing quality,” said Bryan

Nooner, president of Distinctive

Home Builders. “Everyone

at the company works

extremely hard to continually

achieve this delivery goal for

our homeowners. Our three

decades building homes provides

this efficient construction

system. Many of our

skilled craftsmen have been

working with our company for

Recently closed Prairie Trails Arbor Model

over 20 years. We also take

pride on having excellent communicators

throughout our

organization. This translates

into a positive buying and

building experience for our

homeowners and one of the

highest referral rates in the industry

for Distinctive.”

In all, buyers can select

from 13 ranch, split-level and

six two-story single-family

home styles; each offering

three to eight different exterior

elevations. The three- to

four-bedroom homes feature

two to two-and-one-half

baths, two- to three-car garages

and a family room, all in

approximately 1,600 to over

3,000 square feet of living

space. Basements are included

in most models as well. Distinctive

also encourages customization

to make your new

home truly personalized to

suit your lifestyle.

Oversize home sites; brick

exteriors on all four sides of

the first floor; custom maple

cabinets; ceramic tile or hardwood

floors in the kitchen,

baths and foyer; genuine wood

trim and doors; granite countertops

and concrete driveways

can all be yours at Prairie

Trails. All home sites at Prairie

Trails can accommodate a

three-car garage; a very important

amenity to the Manhattan

homebuyer, according

to Nooner.

“When we opened Prairie

Trails we wanted to provide

the best new home value for

the dollar and we feel with

offering Premium Standard

Features that we do just that.

So why wait? This is truly the

best time to build your dream

home!”

Distinctive offers custom

maple kitchen cabinets featuring

solid wood construction

(no particle board), have solid

wood drawers with dove tail

joints, which is very rare in the

marketplace. “When you buy

a new home from Distinctive,

you truly are receiving custom

made cabinets in every home

we sell no matter what the

price range,” noted Nooner.

Nooner added that all

homes are highly energy efficient.

Every home built will

have upgraded wall and ceiling

insulation values with

Recently closed Prairie Trails Arbor Model

energy efficient windows and

high efficiency furnaces. Before

homeowners move into

their new home, Distinctive

Home Builders conducts a

blower door test that pressurizes

the home to ensure that

each home passes a set of very

stringent Energy Efficiency

guidelines.

Typically a wide variety of

homes are available to tour

that include ranch and twostory

homes.

Distinctive is also offering

a brand new home, the

Stonegrove, a 3,000 square

foot open concept home with a

split foyer entry, formal living

and dining rooms, a two-story

great room, four bedrooms

and an upstairs laundry room.

Distinctive also offers Appbased

technology allowing its

homeowners to be updated

on the progress of their new

home 24 hours a day, seven

days a week at the touch of a

button.

Prairie Trails is also a beautiful

place to live featuring a

20-acre lake on site, as well

as direct access to the 22-mile

Wauponsee Glacial Prairie

Path that borders the community

and meanders through

many neighboring communities

and links to many other

popular trails. The Manhattan

Metra station is also nearby.

Besides Prairie Trails, Distinctive

Home Builders has

built hundreds of homes

throughout Manhattan in the

Butternut Ridge and Leighlinbridge

developments, as well

as thousands in the Will and

south Cook county areas over

the past 30 years.

Visit the on-site sales information

center for unadvertised

specials and view the numerous

styles of homes being

offered and the available lots.

Call (708) 737-9142 for more

information or visit us online

at www.distinctivehomebuilders.com.

The Prairie Trails

new home information center

is located three miles south

of Laraway Rd. on Rt. 52. The

address is 16233 Pinto Lane,

Manhattan, IL, 60422. Open

Daily 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Closed Wednesday and Thursday

and always available by

appointment. Specials, prices,

specifications, standard features,

model offerings, build

times and lot availability are

subject to change without notice.

Please contact a Distinctive

representative for current

pricing and complete details.


32 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger Classifieds

mokenamessenger.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

CLASSIFIEDS SPOTLIGHT

Who We Are

Service 1 Plumbing, Heating & AC is an expert heating and cooling

company that serves the Southwest suburbs. We are proudly A+

rated with the Better Business Bureau, and all of our installers

and technicians are trained on a regular, on going basis.

What We Do

We are dedicated to providing the best possible solutions for

your home or business and can be counted on to do the job right

the first time.

What We Can Offer You

We treat every service call like it’s our own home - because we

know how much yours means to you. No matter what time of day,

you can count on Service 1 for a free estimate - just one of our

many other everyday promotions.

How to Reach Us


www.service1heating.com

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Find more great services like this by

turning to our Business and

Professional Directories

Seeking P/T Shop Worker

Tinley Park Manufacturing

Co. seeks responsible,

detail-oriented individual

to perform production and

shipping functions. Duties

incl. shipping, loading/

unloading trucks,

warehouse duties &

running production eqmt.

Forklift cert. & exp. with

UPS shipping software are

pluses. MUST be reliable,

self-starter, excellent

reading/writing/math.

Competitive wage. Email

resume and/or letter to:

cstratton@aerorubber.com

AERO Rubber Co., Inc.

8100 West 185th Street

Tinley Park, IL 60487

Part-time Telephone Work

calling from home for

AMVETS. Ideal for

homemakers and retirees.

Must be reliable and have

morning &evening hours

available for calling.

If interested,

Call 708 429 6477

M-F, 10am - 1pm Only!

P/T Positions Available.

Group Exercise Instructor,

Swim Instructor, Massage

Therapist. Please view our

employment section at

OPHFC.com to apply.

START A JOB THAT

YOU’LL LOVE!

BECOME A BUS DRIVER

WITH AMERICAN

SCHOOL BUS.

708.349.1866

St. Joseph Convent in

Lemont looking for P/T

CNA. Call Nurse Manager

Krestina 708.912.7510

CUSTOMER

APPRECIATION

Month

Help

Wanted

1003 Help Wanted

Outdoor work: F/T

year-round Employment

Potential for paid winters

off. Benefits incl. health,

dental, IRA. Clean driving

record a MUST.

Apply in-person 7320

Duvan Dr, Tinley Park

M-R 10a-1p or email

resume to

callus@lawntechltd.com

P/T Office Secretary

$13/hr flexible schedule.

No exp necessary.

Candidate must have

excellent customer service.

Email resume to

callus@lawntechltd.com

or walk-in M-R 10a-1p

7320 Duvan Dr.

Tinley Park, IL

Sox Outlet-P/T Days

Computer Register

Conducive to college student.

Employee receives 15%

discount. Never work past 9

pm. Closed Thanksgiving,

Christmas, Easter Sunday, 4th

of July. Apply within. No

phone calls please.

6220 W. 159th St, Oak Forest

LAWN TECHNICIAN

Professional company

located in Frankfort

looking for reliable

individual to apply dry

fertilizer. Experience a

plus, but not necessary.

For interview call:

(708)479-4600

Hiring Desk Clerk (2nd

& 3rd shift) &

Housekeeping (Morning)

Needed at Super 8 Motel

Apply within:

9485 W. 191st St, Mokena

No Phone Calls

1003 Help

Wanted

Pet Sitter/Dog Walker

needed at Tender Lovin’

Dog Walking in New

Lenox area. 10am-3pm,

Mon-Fri & weekends. Must

be 21 yrs. & love pets.

Excellent refs req’d, E-mail

tenderlovin@mail.com

Homer Glen, P/T Office

Help. Mon-Fri, 30 hrs/wk.

Skills required: accounting,

computer & strong customer

service. $12 an hour. Send

resume to:

apm-resume@comcast.net

Exp. Legal Assistant

FT/PT. Mokena criminal &

divorce firm. Send resume

& letter to:

jaytobrien@gmail.com

Looking for an

experienced insurance

phone solicitor. Please call

Cal. 708.460.9470

1022 Caregiver

Wanted

Caregiver needed for day

and a half per week in

Olympia Fields area. Light

cooking & housekeeping.

Please call: 630.400.1069

1023 Caregiver

Caregiver Services

Provided by

Margaret’s Agency Inc.

State Licensed & Bonded

since 1998. Providing

quality care for elderly.

Live-in/ Come & go.

708.403.8707

Heaven Sent Caregivers

Professional caregiving

service. 24 hr or hourly

services. Licensed &

bonded. Try the best!

708.638.0641

Caregiver available. 20 yrs

exp. Great references. Quality

caring. Excellent cook.

Driver’s license & own car.

Live-in or come & go. Call

Jose 773.559.4603


mokenamessenger.com Classifieds

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 33

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

1007 Education & Training

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

1061 Autos Wanted

CUSTOMER

APPRECIATION

Month

Real Estate

1090 House for Sale

1037 Prayer / Novena

Oh, Holy StJude, Apostle &

Martyr, great in virtue and rich

in miracle, near kinsman of Jesus

Christ, faithful intercessor

of all who invoke your special

patronage in time ofneed. To

you Ihave recourse from the

depth of my heart and humbly

beg to whom God has given

such great power to come to

my assistance. Help me in my

present and urgent petition, In

return, I promise tomake your

name known and cause you to

name known and cause you to

be invoked. Say three Our Fathers,

three Hail Marys and

glories for nine consecutive

days. Publications must be

promised. St. Jude pray for us

all who invoke your aid.

Amen. This Novena has never

been known tofail, Ihave had

requests granted. D.B.

Sacred Heart of Jesus Thank

You for Favors Granted. C.B.

Gracious Virgin Mary Thank

You for Favors Granted. C.B.

Tinley Park

2006 all brick custom

ranch, 3 huge BR’s, 2.5Ba,

high toilets & vanities,

beautiful kitchen 42 inch

cabinets with apantry, fully

finished sound proof basement,

huge storage areas,

super big 2.5 car garage, 80

x 235 picturesque lot, with

sprinkler system &swimming

pool. Reasonable

taxes. Don’t miss this one.

$355,000

708-466-2380

See the Classified

Section for more info,

or call 708.326.9170

22ndCenturyMedia.com

1094 Offices for Sale

Don’t just

list your

real estate

property...

Sell It!

With a Classified Ad

Automotive

1061 Autos Wanted

Office Condo for sale in

Tinley Park

Price reduced for a quick

sale! 1003 Sq. Ft. New

Roof and HVAC. Unit has

4sinks and akitchen area

lg. windows. $41,000.

Call Tom 708 280-8820

Attention Realtors

Looking to Advertise?

REACH MORE

THAN

96,000

HOMES &

BUSINESSES

EACH WEEK!

See the Classified

Section for

more info, or Call

708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

WANTED!

WE NEED

RUNNING

CARS, TRUCKS

& VANS

Running Or Not

Top Dollar Paid !!!

Free Pick-Up

Locally Located

708 205 8241

HIRE LOCALLY

Reach over 83% of prospective

employees in your area!

DRIVE CAR BUYERS

TO YOUR DOOR WITH

A CLASSIFIED AUTO AD

708.326.9170

CALL TODAY FOR

RATES & INFORMATION

708-326-9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

SUPPORT LOCAL

BUSINESSES

Turn to the classifieds section




The Frankfort Station


34 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger Classifieds

mokenamessenger.com

LOCAL

REALTOR

DIRECTORY

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

Rental

Automotive

$52 4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50 7 7 papers

lines/

Help Wanted

$13 4 lines/

per line 7 papers

Merchandise

$30 7 4 papers

lines/

1221 Houses for

Rent

1225 Apartments

for Rent

REAL ESTATE ATTORNEYS

CLOSINGS ANDALL REAL ESTATENEEDS

THOUSANDSOFTRANSACTIONSCLOSED

•RECOGNIZEDASAN

INDUSTRY LEADER FOR

OUREXPERIENCE AND

PROFESSIONALISM

•FEATURED INCHICAGO

REALTOR MAGAZINE

•SELECTED BYCHICAGO

AGENTMAGAZINE ASA

"WHO'S WHO" IN

CHICAGO REALESTATE

SELLING: $200 Flat Fee*

BUYING: $500 Flat Fee*

*Must mention Ad

OFFICESINORLANDPARK & CHICAGO

WWW.DUFFINDORELAW.COM• 312.566.0911

708.966.0692

Attorneys At Law

www.duffindorelaw.com

DUFFIN &DORE

Don’t just list your

real estate property...

Sell It!

With a Classified Ad

See the Classified Section for more info,

or call 22ndCenturyMedia.com

Contact Classified Department

to Advertise in this Directory

708.326.9170

Orland Park

House for Rent

Newly decorated, 4BR,

1.5Ba, walk in closets, no

pets. Tenant pays all utilities,

1year lease, $280.00 aweek

(6 week security deposit)

Avail. immediately

708-620-9703

1225 Apartments

for Rent

Oak Forest Terrace

15815 Terrace, Oak Forest

Spacious 1 & 2 Bdrms.

Serene setting & Beautiful

Grounds. Tennis, Pool,

Walking Trails. Near metra.

708-687-1818

oakterrapts@att.net

708-479-2448

Tinley Park

Clean, modern, 2BR,

$860/month plus security

& credit check. Heated,

laundry, A/C, no pets.

630-207-5994

New Lenox

2BR, 2nd floor, freshly

painted, new flooring, no pets,

one month security deposit.

Available now. Senior citizen

discount. Call 708-829-6294

1310 Offices for

Rent

Office Spaces For Rent

328 E. Lincoln Highway

3 Office Suites Available

Immediately!

500 Sq Ft -2nd Floor

$550/mo

900 Sq ft-Private entrance

& frplc. $825/mo

1000 Sq Ft -2nd Floor.

Private Entrance & frplc

$950/mo

All Utilities included.

Perfect for small business!!

National Advantage RE

815-485-0304

Advertise your

RENTAL PROPERTY

in the newspaper

people turn to first

CALL US TODAY: 708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com


mokenamessenger.com Classifieds

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 35


36 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger Classifieds

mokenamessenger.com

2075 Fencing

TR Fence & Deck

Licensed-Bonded-Insured

FREE ESTIMATES



20 Yrs experience

(708)243-0198(cell)

2080 Firewood

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

2090 Flooring

See the Classified

Section for more info,

or call 708.326.9170

22ndCenturyMedia.com

Don’t just

list your

real estate

property...

Sell It!

With a Classified Ad

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

CUSTOMER

APPRECIATION

Month

2120 Handyman

Ideal

Firewood

Seasoned Mixed

Hardwoods

$115.00 per FC

Free Stacking &

Delivery

708 235 8917

815 210 2882

2090 Flooring

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170

2096 Furniture Upholstering

SUPPORT LOCAL

BUSINESSES

Turn to the classifieds section

HANDYMAN SERVICE —WHATEVER YOU NEED

"OVER 30 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE"

Windows, Doors, Decks Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling, Plumbing Interior and

Exterior Painting Wall Paper Removal Professional Work At Competitive Prices

CALL MIKE AT 708-790-3416

CARRARAREPAIRSERVICE


mokenamessenger.com Classifieds

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 37

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

CUSTOMER

APPRECIATION

Month

2132 Home Improvement

2130 Heating/Cooling 2130 Heating/Cooling

Residential/Commercial

“Design/Build Professionals"

2132 Home Improvement

Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling · Room Additions · Finished Basements · Decks/Pergolas

· Screen Rooms/ 3 Season Rooms · Front Porches/Porticos · Commercial BuildOuts

- We provide Design, Product, and Installation -

Free Consultation:

Showroom:

Member

HomerChamber

of Commerce

Visit Our Showroom Location at 1223 N Convent St. Bourbonnais


38 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger Classifieds

mokenamessenger.com

2132 Home Improvement

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

CUSTOMER

APPRECIATION

Month

2150 Paint & Decorating

2150 Paint & Decorating

2135 Insulation

2170 Plumbing

2150 Paint & Decorating

Neat, Clean, Professional

Work At ACompetitive Price

MARTY’S

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mokenamessenger.com Classifieds

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 39

2170 Plumbing

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

CUSTOMER

APPRECIATION

Month

2200 Roofing 2200 Roofing

2200 Roofing

2220 Siding

TR SIDING

Licensed-Bonded-Insured

FREE ESTIMATES



20 Yrs experience

(708)243-0198(cell)

SUPPORT LOCAL BUSINESSES

Turn to the classifieds section


40 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger Classifieds

mokenamessenger.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

2255 Tree Service

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

CUSTOMER

APPRECIATION

Month

2294 Window Cleaning

Laura B. Voogt, CPA


708-668-4200

www.apex3cpa.com


TAX PREPARATION

Set up your

appointment

online or give

us a call.




P.K.WINDOW

CLEANING CO.

Window Cleaning

Gutter Cleaning

Power Washing

Office Cleaning

call and get $40.00 off

708 974-8044

www.pkwindowcleaning.com

2489

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Reach over 83% of prospective

employees in your area!

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& INFORMATION

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www.22ndcenturymedia.com

Merchandise

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2490 Misc.

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Call for an Appointment Today! Drop-Off Returns Welcome.

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Serving The Southwest Suburbs since 1947

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(Behind the Bonfire Restaurant)

Call (708)326-9170

to advertise

in the

Tax Services

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Scrap Metal, Garden

Tractors,

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Appliances, Etc.

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Free pickup!

Queen Size

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CONTACT THE CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT

708-326-9170 22ndcenturymedia.com


mokenamessenger.com Classifieds

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 41

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

2701 Property for

Sale

SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ES-

TATE of 11610 Abbey Road,

Mokena, IL 60448 (single family

home). On the 2nd day of March,

2017 to be held at 12:00 noon, at

the Will County Courthouse Annex,

57 N. Ottawa Street, Room

201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case

Title: The Bank ofNew York Mellon

fka The Bank ofNew York as

Trustee for the Certificateholders

of CWALT, Inc., Alternative Loan

Trust 2007-7T2, Mortgage

Pass-through Certificates, Series

2007-7T2 Plaintiff V. Chicago Title

Land Trust Company, as Successor

Trustee to New Lenox State

Bank, asTrustee under the provisions

of aTrust Agreement dated

August 26,1991 and known as

Trust No. 1517; Joseph S. Weber;

Penny A. Weber; Lincoln Way

Community Bank; Unknown Owners;

Non-Record Claimants; and

Unknown Tenants and Occupants

Defendant.

Case No. 14CH 1796 in the Circuit

Court of the Twelfth Judicial

Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%)

at the time of sale and the balance

within twenty-four (24) hours;

plus, for residential real estate, a

statutory judicial sale fee calculated

at the rate of $1 for each

$1,000 or fraction thereof of the

amount paid bythe purchaser to

the person conducting the sale, not

to exceed $300, for deposit into the

Abandoned Residential Property

Municipality Relief Fund. Nojudicial

sale fee shall be paid by the

mortgagee acquiring the residential

real estate pursuant to its credit bid

at the sale or by any mortgagee,

judgment creditor, or other lienor

acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights inand to the residential

real estate arose prior to the

sale. All payments shall be made in

cash or certified funds payable to

the Sheriff of Will County.

In the event the property is a condominium,

in accordance with 735

ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and

(H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and

765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are

hereby notified that the purchaser

of the unit, other than amortgagee,

shall pay the assessments and legal

fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and

the assessments required bysubsection

(g-1) of Section 18.5 of the

Illinois Condominium Property

Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03

(J) ifthere is asurplus following

application of the proceeds of sale,

then the plaintiff shall send written

notice pursuant to 735 ILCS

5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the

proceeding advising them of the

amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty

2701 Property for

Sale

obtains acourt order for its distribution

or, in the absence of an order,

until the surplus is forfeited to

the State.

For Information Please Contact:

J Peteman Legal Group Ltd.

165 Bishops Way Suite 100

Brookfield, WI 53005

P: 1-847-464-8089

F:

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR

DEBT COLLECTION PRAC-

TICES ACT YOU ARE AD-

VISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM

IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT

COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO

COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED

WILL BE USED FOR THAT

PURPOSE.

2703 Legal

Notices

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS )

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE

TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

The Bank of New York Mellon fka The

Bank of New York asTrustee for the

Certificateholders of CWALT, Inc., Alternative

Loan Trust 2007-7T2, Mortgage

Pass-through Certificates, Series

2007-7T2

Plaintiff,

vs.

Chicago Title Land Trust Company, as

Successor Trustee to New Lenox State

Bank, as Trustee under the provisions of

a Trust Agreement dated August

26,1991 and known asTrust No. 1517;

Joseph S. Weber; Penny A. Weber; Lincoln

Way Community Bank; Unknown

Owners; Non-Record Claimants; and

Unknown Tenants and Occupants

Defendant.

No. 14 CH 1796

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that pursuant

toajudgment entered in the above

cause on the 8th day of June, 2015,

MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will

County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the

2nd day ofMarch, 2017 ,commencing

at 12:00 o'clock noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa

Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432,

sell at public auction tothe highest and

best bidder orbidders the following-described

real estate:

PARCEL I: THAT PART OF THE

EAST HALF OFTHE NORTHWEST

QUARTER OFSECTION 19, TOWN-

SHIP 35 NORTH, RANGE 12 EAST

OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERID-

IAN, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

COMMENCING AT A POINT ON

THE WEST LINE OF THE EAST

HALF OFTHE WEST HALF OF SAID

SECTION 19, ADISTANCE OF 1345

2703 Legal

Notices

FEET NORTH OF THE NORTHERLY

RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S.

HIGHWAY ROUTE NO. 30. AS

MEASURED ALONG SAID LINE;

THENCE SOUTH 76 DEGREES 17`

44" EAST, 101.06 FEET PARALLEL

WITH THE NORTHERLY

RIGHT-OF-WAY OF U.S. ROUTE

NO. 30 TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-

NING; THENCE SOUTH 76 DE-

GREES 17` 44" EAST, 803.77 FEET,

PARALLEL WITH THE NORTH-

ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF U.S.

ROUTE NO. 30, THENCE NORTH 42

DEGREES 08` 08" WEST, 579.07

FEET; THENCE SOUTH 56 DE-

GREES 39` 21" WEST, 459.45 FEET

TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

PARCEL II: NON-EXCLUSIVE

EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND

EGRESS AND FOR UTILITY PUR-

POSES FOR THE BENEFIT OF PAR-

CEL I, IN, OVER, UNDER AND

ALONG THE WEST 33 FEET OF

THAT PORTION OF THE EAST 1/2

OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 35

NORTH, RANGE 12 EAST OF THE

THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN,

THAT LIES NORTH OF THE NORTH

RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF U.S.

HIGHWAY ROUTE 30 AND LYING

SOUTH OFALINE DESCRIBED AS

BEGINNING AT THE SOUTH WEST

CORNER OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF

THE NORTH EAST 1/4, THENCE

NORTHEASTERLY TO APOINT ON

THE WESTERLY RIGHT OFWAY

LINE OF WOLF ROAD THAT IS 1000

FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTH LINE

OF SAID NORTH 1/2 (AS MEAS-

URED ALONG SAID WESTERLY

RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF WOLF

ROAD) FOR ATERMINUS AS CRE-

ATED BY GRANT OF EASEMENT

FROM STANDARD BANK AND

TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE

UNDER TRUST AGREEMENT

DATED APRIL 1, 1988 KNOWN AS

TRUST NUMBER 11684 TO W.

CLINTON OWEN, HIS HEIRS, AS-

SIGNS AND AGENTS RECORDED

JUNE 4, 1990 AS DOCUMENT NO.

R90-298621; AND ALSO A NONEX-

CLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR IN-

GRESS AND EGRESS AND FOR

UTILITY PURPOSES IN, UNDER,

OVER AND ALONG THE NORTH 30

FEET OF THE SOUTH 60 FEET OF

THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED

LAND; THAT PART OF THE EAST

1/2 OFTHE NORTH WEST 1/4 OF

SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 35

NORTH, RANGE 12 EAST OF THE

THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, DE-

SCRIBED AS COMMENCING AT A

POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF THE

EAST 1/2 OF SAID SECTION 19, A

DISTANCE OF 1346 FEET NORTH

OF THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF

WAY LINE OFU.S. ROUTE 30, AS

MEASURED ALONG SAID LINE;

THENCE SOUTH 76 DEGREES 17

MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST,

904.83 FEET PARALLEL WITH THE

NORTHERLY RIGHT OFWAY OF

U.S. ROUTE NO. 30 TO THE POINT

OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH

76 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 44 SEC-

ONDS EAST, 427.87 FEET TO THE

EAST LINE OF THE WEST 1/2 OF

SAID SECTION 19; THENCE NORTH

00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 05 SEC-

ONDS EAST, 812.55 FEET, TO THE

SOUTH EAST CORNER OF THE

LAND CONVEYED BY DOCUMENT

NO. R79-43882; THENCE NORTH 89

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

2703 Legal

Notices

DEGREES 00 MINUTES 12 SEC-

ONDS WEST, 416.31 FEET ALONG

THE SOUTH LINE OFTHE LAND

CONVEYED BY DOCUMENT NO.

R79-43882; THENCE SOUTH 00 DE-

GREES 20MINUTES 05 SECONDS

WEST, 718.42 FEET TO THE POINT

OF BEGINNING, AS CREATED BY

DEED FROM W. CLINTON OWEN

TO STEPHEN P. WEBER AND JEN-

NIFER L KONING, RECORDED

JUNE 20, 1990 AS DOCUMENT NO.

R90-33546; PARCEL III: NON-EX-

CLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR IN-

GRESS AND EGRESS AND FOR

UTILITY PURPOSES FOR THE

BENEFIT OF PARCEL I,IN, OVER,

UNDER AND ALONG THE FOL-

LOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF

LAND: THE NORTH 30 FEET OF

THE SOUTH 60 FEET (AS MEAS-

URED ON THE EAST LINE) OF

THAT PART OFTHE EAST HALF

OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER

OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 35

NORTH, RANGE 12 EAST OF THE

THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, DE-

SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COM-

MENCING AT A POINT ON THE

WEST LINE OFTHE EAST HALF OF

THE WEST HALF OF SAID SEC-

TION 19, A DISTANCE OF 1346

FEET NORTH OF THE NORTHERLY

RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S.

HIGHWAY ROUTE NO. 30, AS

MEASURED ALONG SAID LINE;

THENCE SOUTH 75 DEGREES 17`

44" EAST, 904.83 FEET PARALLEL

WITH THE NORTHERLY

RIGHT-OF-WAY OF U.S. ROUTE

NO. 30 TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-

NING; THENCE NORTH 42 DE-

GREES 08` 08" WEST, 579.07 FEET;

THENCE NORTH 56 DEGREES 39`

21" EAST, 459.45 FEET; THENCE

SOUTH 0DEGREES 20` 05" WEST,

668.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-

GINNING.

Commonly known as:

11610 Abbey Road, Mokena, IL 60448

Description of Improvements:

single family home

P.I.N.:

19-09-19-100-024-0000

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential

real estate, astatutory judicial

sale fee calculated at the rate of$1for

each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the

amount paid bythe purchaser tothe person

conducting the sale, not to exceed

$300, for deposit into the Abandoned

Residential Property Municipality Relief

Fund. Nojudicial sale fee shall be

paid by the mortgagee acquiring the

residential real estate pursuant to its

credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee,

judgment creditor, or other lienor

acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights inand to the residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required bysubdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condo-

2703 Legal

Notices

minium Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is a surplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CON-

TACT:

J Peteman Legal Group Ltd.

165 Bishops Way Suite 100

Brookfield, WI 53005

P: 1-847-464-8089

F:

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

CUSTOMER

APPRECIATION

Month

2900

Merchandise

Under $100

2piece luggage onwheels, like

new $30 firm. 708.873.1245

20 ft extension ladder $80.

708.873.1245

Aldo nicoline black rhinestone

shoes, only worn once $30 sz 7

or 36B 708.873.1245

Body by Jake crunch machine

$25. Alpine flex-stepper $25.

Pro form teadmill $50. Call

Chris 815.791.7675

Brand new 15” donut tire & jax

assembly for Hyundai Elantra.

Car shole bolt pattern on rim.

Call 708.404.9722

Chilton’s Auto Repair manual

1993-1997 hardcover $15.

708.466.9907

Construction scaffolding 5x5

stored inside. Good condition

$25. 815.592.9474

Cuisinart grind & brew, never

used, new in box, 12 cup automatic

coffee maker $25.

708.349.1636

Dyson vaccum cleaner DC 40

$70. 312.560.8096

Frankfort area. Kenmore white,

electrical dryer. Works Fine

$50. 815.469.1638

FREE: Lowrey Theater organ,

double keyboard, full foot pedals.

Must remove by person.

708.301.0925

Green Bay down parka and

“throw back colors” jacket

$50. End table with 4pcglass

inserts on top $25. Hand knit

sweaters $25. 708.448.8920

2900

Merchandise

Under $100

HD USA snow shovel for car

$15, new USA bent handle 18”

snow shovel $20. Men’s rubber

totes sz 9, $9. 6pc wire brush

set $6. Dimmer switch for any

lamp $12. 708.460.8308

Homedics massage programmable

chair cushion $40.

708.466.9907

Long navy winter coat, 100%

wool size 14. Worn once. Excellent

condition $25.

708.444.8535

Makita Grinder $20. Skill jigsaw

$20. Ryobi buffer $20.

708.873.1245

Mrs. Santa Claus in rocking

chair, excellent condition $10.

708.873.1245

New deluxe 5piece barbecue

tool set, stainless steel, solid

oak wood handle $45.

708.466.9907

New Toshiba DVD recorder

with 1080 p upconversion,

model DR430 in box, $100

new, $50 cash. Lockport

815.588.1214

Queen comforter set, pastel

yellow $25. Call Geri

708.403.2473

Ryobi 6” buffer/polisher, random

orbit action, perfect for

buffing cars & motorcycles

$20. 708.873.1245

Sioux rare heavy duty

polisher/grinder #1200 5 AMP

115 volts electric polisher USA

Made $100. 708.466.9907

Snow White doll $10. Monster

High doll $5. Baby doll $5.

Walking doll $5. Four Barbies

$5 ea. All dolls brand new.

Text (708)218-6334 if interested.

Sofa and love seat (taupe) with

pillows. Like new condtion

$100 cash only. 708.645.4249

The Illustrated Home Library

Encyclopedia 1955, 22 volumes

$50. Rolodex with index

cards $10. 815.464.1133

Three Old Style Beer steins,

lids $25 ea. Boxed swing arm

lamp for bed, new $8. New

50th Ann. Nascar Barbie doll,

mint $25. New circa 1997 blue

dress barbie $18. 708.460.8308


42 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger real estate

mokenamessenger.com

The Mokena Messenger’s

of the

WEEK

need a Doctor? See a

DoCtor!

EVERYDAY • 7 AM – 11 PM

• Board-Certified Physicians

• Easy Access/Parking

• Prompt Attention

LA PORTE RD

TACO

BELL

45

N

ST. FRANCIS RD

Two-story townhouse

near La Grange and I-80,

Hickory Creek Forest

Preserve

What: End unit with three

bedrooms and a loft

Where: 10015 Cambridge

Court, Mokena

Amenities: Updated

eat-in kitchen has

maple cabinets, granite

countertops, all new

stainless steel appliances,

new tile floors and tile

backsplash. Main level

has two-story living room

with a gas fireplace and a

formal dining room. Master

bedroom has a large walkin

closet. Full bath has a

new double top vanity and

new tile floor. Second floor

laundry room includes a

utility sink and cabinets.

Main level powder room

has been updated with a

granite vanity top. Home

has a new water heater, a

private concrete patio and

a two-car garage as well.

Property is located across

the street from forest

preserve paved trail.

Asking Price: $199,808

Listing Agent: Bob &

Teresa Kroll of Century

21 Pride Realty. For

more information, call

815-735-0749 or email

bobandteresa@outlook.

com.

Want to know how to become

Home of the Week? Contact

Tricia at (708) 326-9170 ext.

47.

MOST INSURANCE PLANS ACCEPTED

COLORADO AVE

frankfort • 815-464-2010

LaGrange Road @ St. Francis Road

Dec. 20

•12259 W. Warren Drive, Mokena,

60448-9218 - Dennis K. Raatjes to

Kirsten Wilcox, $226,900

•18701 S. Mill Creek Drive, Mokena,

60448-8450 - Premier Builders Llc to

Manar Matariyeh, $295,000

•19328 Midland Ave., Mokena, 60448-

1147 - Rycon Cal Inc to Scott Priestman,

Julie Priestman $215,000

Dec. 21

•10935 Front St. 1a, Mokena, 60448-

1697 - Joseph A Collado to Robert A.

Kroll, Teresa K. Kroll $110,000

•9240 W Stanford Court, Mokena,

60448-8899 - Stephanie Galmines to

Joanna A. Wiatr, $190,000

The Going Rate is provided by Record Information

Services, Inc. For more information, visit

www.public-record.com or call (630) 557-1000.


mokenamessenger.com SPORTS

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 43

Athlete of the Week

10 Questions

with Dylan Sterling

Dylan Sterling is a swimmer

on Lincoln-Way Central’s boys

swimming team. He competes

in the 200-yard individual medley

and multiple relays.

How did you get into

swimming?

My older sister started

swimming and same with

my older brother. My dad

saw me swimming in the

pool and said I needed to

join to swim team.

You also play water polo.

Would you rather be a pro

swimmer or pro water polo

player?

A pro swimmer because

I’ve been swimming way

longer, and I’ve been only

playing polo for two years.

What are five things you

can’t live without?

My phone, sushi, coffee,

Taco Bell and hot tubs.

This Week In...

Knights Varsity

Athletics

Boys basketball

■Feb. ■ 10 - host Thornridge

Girls basketball

■Feb. ■ 9 - at Bradley-

Bourbonnais, 7 p.m.

■Feb. ■ 13 - host IHSA regional,

7 p.m.

■Feb. ■ 14 - host IHSA regional,

6 p.m.

■Feb. ■ 14 - host IHSA regional,

7:30 p.m.

What’s something most

people don’t know about

you?

When I was 10, I had appendicitis.

It almost ruptured,

but doctors were able

to take it out in time. It could

have been bad.

Who do you look up to?

Probably my dad the most

because no matter how much

we fight he’s always there

for me and cares for me. No

matter how rude and mean I

may be, he’s always looking

out for me.

Do you have any phobias?

I would say deep water

– whatever is in the deep

ocean, like sharks. You don’t

know what’s under you. I’m

always scared I’m going to

wake up and just be in the

ocean for some reason. I had

a dream when I was younger,

and it freaked me out.

What’s the most outrageous

thing you’ve ever done?

I was in Tennessee, and

we were hiking the mountains.

I kind of climbed this

rock wall to get to the top,

and then I carved my name

up there. I thought it was

pretty scary. My mom was

screaming at me to get back

down, but I want to go back

there one day and see my

Girls bowling

■Feb. ■ 11 - at IHSA sectional*

Boys track and field

■Feb. ■ 11 - at Lockport Quad

Wrestling

■Feb. ■ 10 - at IHSA sectional*

■Feb. ■ 11 - at IHSA sectional*

Griffins Varsity

Athletics

Boys basketball

■Feb. ■ 10 - at Stagg, 6:30

22nd Century media file photo

name carved into the rock.

What is your dream job?

I would like to have a

good job, but I’d rather just

have whoever I’m going to

marry just work and make

all the money, and I’d just

stay at home. I wanted to

be a marine biologist for the

longest time. I thought it was

pretty cool, but I’d be a stayat-home

dad.

If you won the lottery,

what’s the first thing you’d

buy?

I would probably buy a

mansion on some island,

probably in Fiji, St. Thomas,

Hawaii, one of those.

If you could be a fictional

character, what would you

be?

Probably a wizard, so I

could make myself into anyone.

I’d have a spell to make

myself something else if I

wanted to change it.

Interview by Contributing Editor

James Sanchez

p.m.

Girls basketball

■Feb. ■ 13 - at IHSA regional

Girls bowling

■Feb. ■ 11 - at IHSA sectional*

Girls gymnastics

■Feb. ■ 9 - at IHSA sectional,

6 p.m.*

Wrestling

■Feb. ■ 10 - at IHSA sectional*

■Feb. ■ 11 - at IHSA sectional*

Lincoln-Way Central student athletes

honored in Signing Day ceremony

Submitted by Lincoln-Way

Community High School

District 210

On Feb. 1 in the Lee

F. Rosenquist Theatre at

Lincoln-Way Central, parents,

coaches and teachers

gathered to recognize five

student athletes for their

commitment to compete in

athletics at the collegiate

level.

Athletic Director Matthew

Lyke welcomed those

in attendance at the National

Signing Day Ceremony.

Girls Basketball

Lincoln-Way Central 47,

Thornridge 23

The Knights put on another

dominant effort on the

defensive end. Sophomore

guard Grace Curran finished

with 12 points, and forward

Courteney Barnes had 11

“On behalf of the Athletic

Department, I want to thank

you for joining us in celebrating

the commitment of

these fine student athletes,”

he said. “The incredible people

before you are now part

of a very select group.”

Students recognized included

Colleen Barrett (St.

Ambrose University; softball),

Marina Esparza (Lindenwood

University; softball),

Hanah Mastandrea

(St. Francis University;

golf), Makayla Otto (Trinity

Christian College; softball)

points and three rebounds.

Lincoln-Way Central 49,

Thornton 45

The Knights take down

another SouthWest Suburban

Conference opponent.

Forward Abi Baumgartner

registered a double-double

and Cam Post (Oakland

University; baseball).

“Through hard work in

athletics and academics

you have been granted the

opportunity to pursue your

dreams,” Lyke said. “As we

are sad to see our seniors go,

we are excited about your

future in college athletics.

We know you will dedicate

yourselves as you prepare

for the next phase of your

life. You will carry your

Knight memories with you

forever. Congratulations,

you are truly deserving.”

Five Lincoln-Way Central student athletes were recognized Feb. 1 during winter signing

day. Each of the students has committed to plan athletics at the collegiate level. Photo

SUBMITTED

high school highlights

The rest of the week in high school sports

(11 points, 13 rebounds),

and Colleen Barrett and

Hayley Papoccia each

scored nine.

High School Highlights is compiled

by Editor Tim Carroll,

tim@mokenamessenger.com.


44 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger SPORTS

mokenamessenger.com

Wrestling

Knights send three individuals down to Bloomington sectional

Two Griffins win

regional titles, five

more advance

Jason Maholy

Freelance Reporter

Lincoln-Way high school

wrestlers put in a strong

showing in regional action

Saturday, Feb. 4 in Frankfort,

as grapplers from West,

East and Central represented

half of those who moved on

to sectional competition.

District 210 wrestlers

took 21 of the top 42 places

at the Lincoln-Way East

Class 3A Regional. The top

three wrestlers in each of 14

weight classes advanced to

the Normal Community High

School Sectional, to be held

Saturday, Feb. 11 in Bloomington,

and the winning team

advances to the team sectionals,

which the date and location

is yet to be determined.

West took the team title

with 232 points and led all

schools with 11 sectional

qualifiers, while East will

send seven and Central three

to Bloomington. East placed

third among 10 teams, with

168.5 points, and Central finished

fourth with 139 points.

Central seniors Liam Meagher

and Jason Stokes kept

their ambitions for a trip to

state alive by taking backto-back

championships at

126 and 132 pounds, respectively.

Meagher avenged a

defeat earlier in the season

by topping West’s Tommy

Buell, 6-4, in the championship

match; and he did it in

dramatic fashion, getting a

reversal and breaking a 4-all

tie with four seconds remaining

in the third period.

“The goal was just to work

hard the whole year and try

to [get to state], so I worked

my butt off the whole year,”

said Meagher.

He said it was “pretty

sweet” to beat Buell after

losing to him on the Knights’

Senior Night last month. He

had never before advanced

beyond regionals.

Stokes qualified for the

state tournament as a sophomore

two years ago and has

been on a season-long mission

to get back there after

falling short at last year’s

sectional competition. He

defeated Gehrig Simon of

West in the semifinals, then

upset Marian Catholic’s Carlos

Champagne, 6-3, in the

title match. Champagne entered

the match with a record

of 39-2.

Meagher and Stokes are

practice partners and have

been pushing each other every

day in the wrestling room.

“They both kind of have

that unique style, a little

funky at times, but they definitely

feed off each other,”

said Central coach Jason

DePolo. “I think Jason has

made Liam a better wrestler,

and I think Liam has made

Jason a better wrestler, as

well. They’re both a lot of

fun to watch.”

DePolo acknowledged

Stokes may have had the

hardest path to a championship

of any wrestler at the

regional.

“That was a big win in the

semis for him, Simon is the

real deal, he’s tough; and

beating a kid like Champaign

in the finals is a pretty tall

task,” DePolo said. “I don’t

think [Champaign] makes

many mistakes, but he made

one and Jason capitalized on

it, which was huge.”

Chris Wilder and Sammy

Diehl won titles for East at

195 pounds and 285 pounds,

respectively. Diehl, who was

battling a 102-degree temperature,

wrestled slightly more

than the equivalent of one period

while disposing of three

over-matched opponents in

Justin Brauer of Lincoln-Way Central works on David

Ackman of Lincoln-Way East Saturday, Feb. 4, during a

match the 120-pound weight class at the Lincoln-Way East

Class 3A Regional. Jason Maholy/22nd Century Media

a combined 2:14. The Griffin

senior pinned Bloom

Township’s Uland Siegers in

14 seconds, and in the title

match made short work of

Joliet West’s Robert Ford,

pinning him in 46 seconds.

Also advancing for the Griffins

are Dylan Conway, who

placed second at 170 pounds,

and third-place finishers Jacob

Abeja (113), Adam Aguirre

(152), Nick Mihajlovich

(182) and Jaden Hacha (220).

Wilder, a junior, earned his

first trip to sectionals via a

6-3 title match decision over

a familiar opponent, West’s

Robert Noga. The victory

was Wilder’s third consecutive

over Noga in four tries

this season. Wilder had a onepoint

lead over his district rival

before getting a takedown

with 30 seconds left in the

match, and providing himself

a three-point cushion he

wouldn’t relinquish.

East coach Tyrone Byrd

was pleased with the way

Wilder’s match played out,

and particularly that the junior

wrestled hard for the

entire six minutes.

“He’s got a couple tournament

wins this year, he’s a kid

you can always rely on his effort,”

Byrd said. “He makes

mistakes and get out of position,

but that’s wrestling, that

happens. He wrestled ‘til the

end and that’s important, and

that’s what we’re trying to

sell to all of our kids, and kids

like him are getting it.

Aguirre, a senior, and Mihajlovich,

a sophomore, will

be making their second consecutive

appearances at sectionals.

Both rebounded from

tough losses in the semifinals

to win their wrestleback

matches and take third in

their respective brackets.

Mihajlovich dropped a

2-1 overtime to decision to

West’s Trevor Schmidt in the

semis, and was not pleased

as he walked off the mat and

made a beeline for the locker

room. He won a hard-fought,

11-9 decision over Central’s

Noah Upchurch to earn a

spot in the third-place match,

then defeated QueJuan Sutton

of Bloom Township by

technical fall to punch his

ticket to sectionals.

He said his coaches were

key in helping him put the

loss to Schmidt behind him.

Aguirre pinned his final

two opponents after losing

by technical fall to eventual

152-pound champion Josh

Jones of Marian Catholic.

“I’m really excited to get

[to sectionals] again, it feels

great,” Aguirre said. “I used

what my coaches told me

throughout the year. I didn’t

give it up, just tried to attack

and I got a pin in the end.”

Gymnastics

From Page 47

higher on floor. They posted

five of the Top 6 scores in the

event. The team floor score

of 37.750 came directly after

a 35.500 on beam that

included three falls, which

cost Lincoln-Way at least 1.5

points and a shot at a 147 or

higher.

That rebound performance

was similar to Lincoln-

Way’s 37.175 on vault after

a slow start to the day on

bars (35.050), which included

landing troubles.

“[Lago] talked with us

after bars and said we need

to keep picking it up, hit

harder than we’ve hit before

and just nail our events like

we’ve been doing in practice,”

said sophomore Barb

Belka. “Today was a really

good confidence booster because

we just fell on beam

and knew we had to pick it

up on floor. If we’re able to

hit here and get a 145 with a

few falls, we could do even

better next week.”

Lincoln-Way’s score

of 145.475 was the highest

score of the four teams

advancing to the Oswego

sectional at 6 p.m. on Thursday,

Feb. 9. Downers Grove

South scored a 140.325,

Hinsdale Central posted a

140.175 and Downers Grove

North had a 139.05.

This will be Lincoln-

Way’s fourth consecutive

trip to a sectional under

fourth-year coach Lago. In

the first three, the team failed

to make it to state, finishing

second twice and sixth once.

“If we can go to sectionals

and not be nervous, just get

the nerves out of the way, be

confident and hit, we will be

at state,” Farrell said.

Farrell won the all-around

title with 36.875 points.

It was the same score that

earned her a third-place finish

at the SouthWest Suburban

Conference championship

on Jan. 26. Farrell won

beam (9.175), placed second

on vault (9.350) and bars

(8.875), and took third on

floor (9.475).

“She was on, on every

event,” Lago said. “She didn’t

stop fighting through the

whole meet. Her floor was so

powerful. It was dead on.”

Lincoln-Way freshman

Korina Jarosz was right behind

with 35.775 points to

place second in all-around.

It came one week after she

won the SWSC all-around

title with 37.000 points.

A first-place finish on

vault (9.475) highlighted her

day, and her 9.275 on floor

placed her fifth. She was

fourth on beam (8.55) after

falling off once and settled

for eighth on bars (8.475) after

landing on her knees.

“Not her usual night,”

Lago said. “She needed to

get it out. She’s hit every

meet. It’s crazy that it took

her this long to have a little

bump in the road. It’s going

to make her practice harder

and want it more.”

Junior Gabby DeVito won

on bars (8.900) and tied for

first place on floor with a

season-high 9.500. She finished

third on vault (9.200)

Belka also scored a 9.500

on floor to tie for first. She

was third on beam (8.75).

Senior Kara Auchstetter

finished second on beam

(9.025) and tied for third on

bars (8.800).

Junior Erica Dice placed

fourth on vault (9.15).


mokenamessenger.com SPORTS

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 45

Cheerleading

Griffins fly to state final victory

RANDY WHALEN, Freelance Reporter

When the husband and wife

team of Jayson and Julianne Polad

took over as cheerleading coaches

at Lincoln-Way East they wanted

to build a program based on love.

In the process, they built one that

wins state championships.

After not qualifying for state

last season, the Griffins made a

triumphant return to the Illinois

High School Association Competitive

Cheerleading State Finals last

weekend. There they captured first

place, for their third state title in

four years, in the large school division

by nearly two full points over

runner-up Joliet West, last year’s

state champion.

East scored a 94.46 on Saturday,

Feb. 4 which was the final day of

the state cheerleading competition

at U.S. Cellular Coliseum in

Bloomington. That’s the fifth highest

score ever on the final day of

competition in the 12-year history

of the event being an IHSA sport.

The Griffins hold the record for

best score with a 97.06 when they

won their first state title in 2014.

Joliet West (92.71) was second.

Sandburg (90.71) brought home its

sixth ever state trophy with a third

place finish. Providence (90.13)

was just behind in fourth, Neuqua

Valley (89.33) was fifth and Lockport

Township (87.00) was sixth as

the southland ruled with five teams

in the top six. Lake Zurich (85.91),

St. Charles East (82.63), Edwardsville

(81.91) and Prospect (79.56)

rounded out the top 10 in the large

school division.

“It’s an extremely special opportunity,”

Julianne Polad said.

“We work very hard to build a program

that facilitates success and

it feels great. We are all about the

kids, their academics and them.

We coach out of love, not fear, and

that’s what builds success for us.

“When you believe in something,

absolutely believe in it together,

magic can happen.”

The magic happened for the

Griffins at on the second day of

state. After winning the Andrew

Sectional on Jan. 28 with a score

of 92.09, they were third (89.49)

on Friday, Feb. 3 in the preliminary

round at state. But those scores

only matter for advancement as 25

teams qualify for state and the top

10 advance to the final day.

On the final day, East nailed it.

“It doesn’t feel real, it feels like

a dream,” East senior Lauren Williams

said. “But that’s a dream

we’ve been working for since the

first day of practice and it came true.

I think I knew when coach put five

fingers up because we did great on

all five stunts both times. I felt the

love then. It was really exciting.”

Williams was on the Lincoln-

Way North cheer team that placed

fifth in the state in the large school

division last year. But when the

school closed, she moved to East

this season. This team was about

50/50 on who attended East and

North last year, but this year, they

are all state champions.

“It’s awesome since I’ve accomplished

something that few in the

state ever get to feel,” said senior

Nicole Schipiour, who has been on

the varsity for three years at East

and won her second state title. “All

year long the coaches told us we

had a talented team and in the sectionals,

we felt it.”

There is a coed division in the state

series, but each small school, medium

school and large school cheer

team is allowed to have one male

performer with them. For the Griffins,

senior Kaleb Hong is that guy.

“We’re all here for the same goal

and it feels very special and good,”

Hong said of being on the team.

“When we were performing [on the

final day] that was the best we’ve

ever did. We left it all on the floor.”

Senior Sam Myers agreed.

“It feels amazing and I’ve been

working for this moment,” she

said. “I’ve never felt so much passion

in a routine and hitting it for

the last time as a team, I wouldn’t

have it any other way.”

Don’t expect an end to the Griffin

dynasty anytime soon. Their two

feeder schools - Hickory Creek and

Summit Hill - recently placed first

and second respectively at the elementary

school state championships.

“We strive to have the highest

level in the state,” Julianne Polad

said.

So does East in general, as this

was the 12th state championship in

the 16 years that it’s been a school.

The cheer team was honored with a

school assembly Saturday.

Another program that has won

a trio of state titles is Sandburg.

While this season didn’t result in

another championship for the Eagles,

it resulted in another trophy

- their third, third-place finish.

“There’s a lot of talent here and

I’m really proud of our team,”

Sandburg coach Mike Bruce said.

“It’s been awhile since we were on

the podium and we were thrilled to

get back.”

After winning three state titles

and two third-place finishes in the

first seven years of the state tournament

this is the first trophy for the

Eagles since they last won a title in

2012. They were in second place

(90.49) behind Joliet West (90.89)

after the preliminary round.

“This group came together over

the last month,” Bruce said. “We

had some obstacles to overcome

and we did.”

Maddy Cescato was beyond

thrilled to be part of a trophy-winning

team.

“I’ve been picturing this since I

was a freshman and to do it with a

team that’s overcome so much, I’m

just proud of my team,” she said.

“It’s a great way to end high school

and amazing. Our goal was to

make it to the second day at state,

so to make it to the podium was a

hundred times better.”

Fellow senior Emily Hayes

agreed. The Eagles finished fourth

last year and they wanted to be part

of the ending presentation.

“Ever since freshman year it’s

been a goal to make podium,” she

said. “With all the obstacles we

dodged it just felt great to get a top

three finish. It was one of our better

performances and we wanted

to leave it on the mat and have no

regrets.”

Although Providence, which was

second in the large school division

last season, just missed another trophy,

there were no regrets for the

Celtics either. Their top four finish

was their sixth in the past seven

seasons. They won the title in 2013

and were third in 2011 and 2014.

“The kids were very pleased

with their performance on both

days,” said Providence coach

Laura Duesing, who has been

head coach the past seven seasons.

“There were a lot of great memories

and they were thrilled to have

performed both days. This year we

have 11 seniors and last year it was

only five.

“It’s great that our surrounding

area is so strong. We are all there

to challenge each other and there’s

a good camaraderie between all the

[southland] teams and that’s nice.”

In the preliminary round, the

Celtics (87.16) were fifth, and then

moved up a spot and barely missed

out on third. But there were no regrets

in finishing fourth.

“Our goal was to get in the top

10 and on technique and grips,”

Duesing said. “On day two, we

didn’t feel any pressure out there.

We just had fun and performed.

The kids felt that they had their best

two performances of the season [at

state] weekend. It was a great way

to finish the season.”

Lockport, which has seven topthree

finishes - including two state

titles - entered hoping to bring

home another trophy. But a fall

didn’t help their score.

“Minus one stunt fall, everything

was better than [the preliminary]

day,” Lockport coach Jenny Krumlinde

said. “We only have three

minutes to go out and prove ourselves.

But I’m really proud of the

way we stayed with it and tried to

make up for it.”

Senior Izzy Piazza agreed.

We had one mistake, other than

that it was one of our best performances

of the season,” she said.

“We had a great season, we just

have a good area of high school

sports.”

Piazza was a four-year varsity

Members of the East cheerleading

team hoist the championship

trophy Feb. 4 after winning state.

clark brooks/pHOTONEWS MEDIA

performer. She and her teammates

made a lot of memories in that

time.

“I’ll remember being state runnerup

my sophomore year,” she said.

“This year we were [SouthWest

Suburban Blue, which includes East

and Sandburg] conference champions.

That’s the first time in over a

decade that we’ve won it.”

The Porters were fourth (88.67)

after the first day. Krumlinde, who

guided the team to a second-place

finish in her first season as head

coach in 2014-15, knows the area

and the state competition isn’t easy.

“It’s crazy how everyone in the

area is so good and we’re all competitive

with each other,” she said.

“I’m proud of the team and we’ll

be back.”

Tinley Park was once again back

at state for the 12th year in a row.

The Titans placed ninth (81.60) in

the medium school division. That

was their fourth straight season in

the top 10 after missing out on the

final day for five straight seasons

between 2009 and 2013. They won

the medium school state championship

in 2007 and 2008.

This year Tinley Park was seventh

(82.75) after the preliminary

round. The Titans also face topnotch

competition throughout the

season. Fellow South Suburban

Conference team Lemont (89.62)

won its fifth medium school division

state championship and 11th

trophy in the past 12 years and Oak

Forest (86.84) was third.


46 | February 9, 2017 | The Mokena Messenger sports

mokenamessenger.com

Knights hold off Warriors with clutch free throws

Frank Gogola

Freelance Reporter

It was starting to look like

their first meeting set to replay.

After dropping a December

game to district rival

Lincoln-Way West, Lincoln-

Way Central was in danger of

blowing another large fourthquarter

lead as its 10-point

lead was cut to one point in

less than a minute.

“We’ve blown a lot of

leads this year, so when they

cut it to 53-52, I called timeout

and was like, ‘alright,

let’s learn from what we did

in the beginning,’” Curran

said. “Even though they were

on a run, [the talk was] ‘let’s

just get back on track.’”

Central (6-14, 4-3) responded

by hitting its free

throws down the stretch

to survive a fourth-quarter

comeback attempt and beat

West, 63-56, in a SouthWest

Suburban Conference Red

road game on Jan. 31.

The Knights outscored the

Warriors 10-4 in the final

2:47 after the Warriors pulled

within 53-52. Central made

eight out of 10 free throws

during that stretch, and senior

Aaron Michalak added

a layup.

“We turned the basketball

over too much, and we

weren’t very confident handling

it,” said West coach

Brian Flaherty. “It ended up

[with] us not being able to

stay in offense the way we

wanted to [and] play our

usual long possessions. They

were very aggressive defensively.”

West (5-14, 3-4) senior

Marco Pettinato led all scorers

with 38 points and 12 rebounds.

The rest of the Warriors

combined for 18 points.

Michalak paced the

Knights with 17 points. Senior

Brian Ponton added 11

points off the bench. Junior

Chris Robinson chipped in

10 points. The Knights shot

17-of-22 at the free-throw

line.

“We executed the game

plan pretty good,” Michalak

said. “We knew Marco was

going to get his, and he had

a good game. It was probably

one of the best wins of

the year. We hit free throws,

which we struggled with.

Tonight they helped us out a

lot.”

When the teams met on

Dec. 6 at Central, the Knights

lost 68-66, despite leading

by seven points with 2:36 to

play. They led by two points

when Bryan Ross missed a

pair of free throws with 55

seconds left. On the following

possession, West’s Austin

King hit what proved to be

the game-winning 3-pointer.

“We felt like we had let it

slip away and that we should

have beat them,” Michalak

said. “We knew that if we

played well, played hard,

we’d get them this time

around.”

The high-scoring second

half was in stark contrast

to the first half. The teams

played to a 9-9 tie after one

quarter. Central led 16-14 at

the half.

The Knights built their

lead to 11 points, 31-20, with

a Ross 3-pointer midway

through the third quarter. In

the frame, Pettinato scored

13 of West’s 17 third-quarter

points to pull the Warriors

within 35-31 heading into the

fourth.

Central bench players Ponton,

Joe DiNaso and Matt

Pollack scored 14 of the

team’s first 18 fourth-quarter

points to build a 53-43 lead.

Ponton made two free throws

and two layups, DiNaso hit

3-pointers on back-to-back

possessions, and Pollack

added one basket.

West pulled within 53-52

with two free throws from

Pettinato, a 3-pointer by Nolan

Green, a layup by Austin

King, and a steal and layup

by Pettinato – all within 53

seconds. However, West shot

2-of-8 while being outscored

10-4 in the final 2:47.

“We moved the basketball

more off the turnovers because

they didn’t match up

quite as quickly,” Flaherty

said. “When they were back

Lincoln-Way Central’s Brian

Ponton goes for a layup

Jan. 31 during a crosstown

matchup against Lincoln-Way

West in New Lenox. Julie

McMann/22nd Century Media

and they were set, it seemed

like every pass was challenged

so much, and we were

so unconfident with the basketball

that it reminded me of

being at the dentist. Watching

every single pass on the floor

you’re cringing at every pass

on every play.”

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mokenamessenger.com SPORTS

the Mokena Messenger | February 9, 2017 | 47

fastbreak

James Sanchez/22nd Century

Media

1st-and-3

Oh, what a Knight

1. Aaron Michalak

(ABOVE)

In what may be the

senior’s last game

against rival Lincoln-

Way West, the

starting point guard

led Central with 17

points en route to a

victory to split the

season series at one

apiece.

2. Bench mob

Knights reserves

Brian Ponton, Joe

DiNaso and Matt

Pollack combined

for 14 of the team’s

18 fourth-quarter

points, leading to

a double-digit lead.

3. Learning from the

past

Last time, missed

free throws led West

to come back with

a game-winning

3-pointer. This time,

Central shot 17-of-

22 from the line.

Girls Bowling

Central sends three to sectional

Lincoln-Way East

advances as a team

Frank Gogola

Freelance Reporter

Andrew junior Amber

Furman was extra motivated

for regional play thanks

to a message from her dad.

“My dad didn’t come

today because he had to

work, but he left me a note

this morning on the counter

saying he knew I could

do it,” Furman recalled. “I

wanted to prove I could

be a huge bowler because

he’s my role model when it

comes to bowling.”

She captured the individual

title to help Andrew advance

to sectionals for the

fourth consecutive season

at the Minooka Regional on

Saturday, Feb. 4 at Town

and Country Lanes in Joliet.

Her performance highlighted

a day of big success

for area teams. Andrew

finished second, Lincoln-

Way West took third and

Lincoln-Way East placed

fourth to advance to sectionals.

Tinley Park and

Lincoln-Way Central

missed the team qualifying

cut, but they each will be

sending three individuals

to sectionals.

The Top 4 teams and 10

highest-scoring individuals

who didn’t qualify as a

team moved on to the Andrew

Sectional on Feb. 11

at Orland Bowl.

Lincoln-Way Central

Despite Central’s youth,

coach Steve Paulsen was

looking for his team to

qualify for sectionals.

Instead, the Knights had

to settle for three individual

qualifiers.

“It was a disappointment

for the team,” Paulsen said.

“We didn’t bowl well.”

The Knights finished in

sixth place with 4846 pins.

They were 324 pins behind

fourth-place Lincoln-Way

East.

Central surpassed its

goal of 850 pins in a game

in just two of the six games

at regionals. It averaged

807.7 pins per game. Its

lowest-scoring game was a

723 in Game 3.

“I knew things were getting

out of hand in the third

game,” Paulsen said. “In

that game we had more

open frames than in the first

two games combined. They

were losing it then and just

not scoring the ball well.”

Senior Maddy Willson

bowled a team-high 1095

to place 14thoverall and

second among individuals

without a qualifying team.

Willson, the only Central

bowler who had previous

regional experience, rolled

a high of 212 in Game 2.

Senior Maria Buck rolled

a 1044 to finished 18th

overall and fourth among

individuals advancing

without a team. Her best

finish was a 205, also in

Game 2.

Sophomore Kalei Bass

had a 987 to take 25th overall

and eighth among individuals

whose team didn’t

advance. She bowled a 188

in her first two games for

her highs of the day.

Other Central finishes included

sophomore Maddie

Conroy with an 895, and

freshman Marianna Hristakos

had an 825.

“For the season, I was

surprised myself,” Paulsen

said. “We didn’t let the

[players we lost] to West

get to us. I was also surprised

by how the younger

kids responded and stepped

up on the varsity level.”

Lincoln-Way East

East looked like a different

team at regionals than

it had two weeks earlier at

the SouthWest Suburban

Conference championship.

The Griffins, composed

largely of former Lincoln-

Way North bowlers, posted

a 5,170 at regionals to take

the fourth place for the final

sectional qualifying spot. It

was 378 pins better than its

sixth-place finish of 4,792

at conference.

“We knew after conference

that we had no choice

but to do good today,” East

senior Mary Toman said.

Toman led all East bowlers

with a ninth-place finish

and 1,148 pins. She

responded with a 200 and a

235, her two best games, after

rolling a 141, her worst

game, in Game 4. She averaged

191.3 pins per game.

“After the 141 in Game

4, I was super frustrated

and just need to calm myself

down,” Toman said.

“I was frustrated because I

wasn’t making good shots

and should have struck better.”

Girls Gymnastics

Regional win

gives LW fourth

straight sectional

appearance

Frank Gogola

Freelance Reporter

It was mostly all for show,

and what a show it was.

With all other teams finished

competing, Lincoln-

Way co-op gymnastics was

a mere 25.575 points behind

Waubonsie Valley heading

into floor exercise, its best

event. It would take a massive

meltdown across the

board for Lincoln-Way to

cough up the regional title.

Still, Lincoln-Way coach

Kim Lago challenged her

team after it struggled on

beam in the previous event.

“Today was a little rocky,”

Lago said. “We had a couple

falls that we normally don’t

have on bars and beam.

The team, I told them after

beam they needed to get it

together, they needed to pull

through, and they did. They

finished the events on floor

awesome.”

Lincoln-Way dominated

the event to run away with its

fourth consecutive regional

championship Thursday,

Feb. 2, at Lincoln-Way East.

Led by all-around champion

junior Una Farrell, Lincoln-

Way’s 145.475 was 12.175

points clear of second place.

All five Lincoln-Way

gymnasts scored 9.175 or

Sophomore Angela

Juskie placed 17th with a

total pin count of 1,052.

Her 215 in the first game

was her best score of the

day.

Sophomore Sydney Tyler,

who didn’t compete at

conference, and senior Olivia

Heppeler placed 21st

and 22nd, respectively.

Tyler bowled a 1,006, and

Heppeler had a 1,005.

Freshman Katelyn Adamitis

was 27th with a 959.

A 167 was her best score.

“The lanes were better,”

East coach Carlie Premo

said, referencing the oilheavy

lanes at the conference

championship. “I

think it was the competition

of regionals that drove

them today.

“Spares were good, but

we need more strikes so we

don’t have to worry about

picking up spares. Bowling

is all mental, so I think this

will give the team some

momentum heading into

sectionals.” Please see Gymnastics, 44

Listen Up

“We felt like we had let it slip away and that

we should have beat them. We knew that if we

played well, played hard, we’d get them this time

around.”

Aaron Michalak – Lincoln-Way Central point guard, on avenging

a loss to Lincoln-Way West in December

TUNE IN

Girls Basketball

7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9

• Lincoln-Way Central will get a stiff test

before heading into regionals the following

week with a matchup against SWSC

Red conference champions Bradley-

Bourbonnais.

Index

43 - High School Highlights

43 – This Week In

FASTBREAK is compiled by Editor Tim Carroll, tim@mokenamessenger.com


mokena’s Hometown Newspaper | www.mokenamessenger.com | February 9, 2017

Lincoln-Way Central avenges

buzzer-beating loss to crosstown rival

in December, Page 46

Lincoln-Way Central forward Luke Handley scores from a layup Jan. 31 during a

crosstown matchup against Lincoln-Way West in New Lenox.

Laurie Fanelli/22nd Century Media

Setting

the

bar

Lincoln-Way

gymnasts

follow up

conference

win with

regional

title,

Page 47

MatMen

Move

on

Central

sends three

wrestlers to

sectional in

Normal,

Page 44

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