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46TH ILOILO PARAW REGATTA<br />

<strong>2018</strong> PUNTA FUEGO REGATTA<br />

<strong>2018</strong> ZHIK HONG KONG<br />

29er WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP<br />

TIPS ON BUYING A BOAT<br />

LET’S TALK GIANT GROUPER<br />

PHUKET LIFE SAVING COMPETITION<br />

TAAL LAKE CHRISTMAS REGATTA<br />

SUBIC AROUND VERDE ISLAND RACE<br />

Destination<br />

ILOILO<br />

Anthea page 20<br />

MAR <strong>2018</strong> Vol. VII Issue 1<br />

ACTIVE BOATING & WATERSPORTS<br />

1<br />

PhP150


2


3


The 46th<br />

Paraw<br />

ILOILO<br />

Regatta<br />

4


One of the biggest sailing events<br />

packed with fun filled activities would,<br />

undoubtedly be the Iloilo City’s annual Paraw<br />

Regatta now in its 46th year.<br />

Organizers outdo themselves every year making<br />

each year bigger and better than the previous<br />

year, and the <strong>2018</strong> regatta was no exception.<br />

With Dr. Ronald Raymond L.<br />

Sebastian, President, of the<br />

Paraw Regatta Foundation<br />

at the helm, ably assisted by<br />

Paraw event organizer, Ms.<br />

Rachel Manero. Along with<br />

the full support of Hon..<br />

Samuel H. Gumarin, Governor<br />

of Guimaras, Hon.. Jose<br />

Espinosa III Mayor of Iloilo<br />

City, Department of Tourism<br />

and City Tourism Officer of<br />

the Iloilo City Tourism and<br />

Development Ms. Junel Ann<br />

Divinagracia, plus the entire<br />

population of Iloilo City, it<br />

was certainly a formula for<br />

success. And a success it was<br />

in spades, with nine days of<br />

fun filled activities. Beginning<br />

on February the 9th with the opening program on<br />

Guimaras Island, with the Sinamba Performance.<br />

The day’s activities also included plenty of eye<br />

candy on show as the 15 beautiful Miss Paraw<br />

candidates paraded in bikini swimwear, much to<br />

the delight of the crowd of onlookers.<br />

Organizers outdo<br />

themselves every year<br />

making each year<br />

bigger and better than<br />

the previous year, and<br />

the <strong>2018</strong> regatta was<br />

no exception.<br />

Day two still on Guimaras Island started off with<br />

the jet ski amazing race, followed by the miniature<br />

Paraw race. The Punta Baroto showcase, there was<br />

dancing and merriment with live bands, native<br />

costume dancing with Sinaba (mardi gras) Festival<br />

The launching of the Miss Paraw Regatta fashion<br />

show and colorfully lit paraws to finish of the day’s<br />

activities.<br />

The third day (Sunday) started<br />

with a traditional mass giving<br />

praise to god and thanks<br />

for another awesome Paraw<br />

Regatta. Mass was followed<br />

by a friendship breakfast held<br />

at Tatoy’s Manokan, after<br />

the breakfast it was excited<br />

preparation for the Official<br />

grand opening of the <strong>2018</strong><br />

Paraw Regatta held on the<br />

lawns at SM Iloilo, exciting<br />

the crowds with mesmerizing<br />

dances, colorful costumes and<br />

lots more eye candy as the 15<br />

Miss Paraw candidates were<br />

on show again in the dance<br />

routines, native costume<br />

parades and question time.<br />

Dr. Ronald Raymond L.Sebastian gave a welcoming<br />

speech to all before officially declaring the <strong>2018</strong><br />

Paraw Regatta open. With all the eye candy on<br />

show and spectacular dance routines a top day’s<br />

entertainment was had by all.<br />

Words by<br />

BARRY<br />

DAWSON<br />

Photographs<br />

as credited<br />

www.iloilo.net.ph<br />

5


Due to a threatening typhoon the following day was<br />

cancelled and the slalom race was postponed to the<br />

following day. The racing<br />

commenced just after<br />

8am on the Thursday with<br />

over 40 boats competing<br />

in the day’s events, giving<br />

the amassed crowds<br />

some exciting racing<br />

entertainment. The day’s<br />

events were culminated<br />

at 8pm that evening with<br />

the crowning of Miss<br />

Paraw Regatta <strong>2018</strong> before a massive crowd at<br />

the Diamond Jubilee Hall Iloilo City. The roars of<br />

The roars of the huge<br />

crowd along with<br />

the trumpeting and<br />

cheering were enough<br />

to just about bring the<br />

roof down.<br />

the huge crowd along with the trumpeting and<br />

cheering were enough to just about bring the<br />

roof down, when the 15 candidates paraded on<br />

stage. In order from 1 -15 the candidates for <strong>2018</strong><br />

were, Lorenz Jane Flores Amatorio, Saith Aides<br />

Alcontin Dela Cruz, Ma. Cristine Sabano, Janeen<br />

Dale Briones Gerosa, Kathrina Lpuise Subarba<br />

Varga, Christy Bengan Moneva, Irynne Jo Andrada<br />

Vilches, Kheshapornam Ramachandrran, Larice<br />

Serrano Matandac, Mary Elizabeth Parreno, REmia<br />

Analyn Aldasan Alvaren, Tsina jade Dumadiego Chu,<br />

Shannie Grace Provido Rio, Jascha Angela Arengo<br />

and Keziah Guanco Bartolome. After the crowds<br />

finally settled down, albeit temporarily, which<br />

increased four-fold as the final five finalists were<br />

announced. The final five were candidate number<br />

4, Janeen Dale Briones Geroso, candidate number<br />

6, Christy Bengan Moneva, candidate number<br />

7, Irynne Jo Andrada Vilches, candidate number<br />

12, Tsina Jade Dumadiego Chu and candidate<br />

number 15, Keziah Guanco Bartolome. After the<br />

final judging by six esteemed judges, where the<br />

candidates were put in a sound-proof room, then<br />

one by one they were all asked same question,<br />

after the judges deliberated, the final winners were<br />

announced, with 4th runner up being candidate<br />

number 6, 3rd runner up candidate number 12,<br />

2nd runner up candidate number 7 and 1st runner<br />

up candidate number 4 leaving a very emotional<br />

and excited Keziah Guanco Bartolome Candidate<br />

6


DEDICATED ENGINEERING SPECIALISTS<br />

7


WINNERS<br />

15 Keziah Guanco Bartolome -Ms. Paraw Regatta <strong>2018</strong><br />

4 Janeen Dale Briones Geroso -1st Runner Up<br />

7 Irynne Jo Andrada Vilches -2nd Runner Up<br />

12 Tsina Jade Dumadiego Chu -3rd Runner Up<br />

6 Christy Bengan Moneva -4th Runner Up<br />

<strong>2018</strong> Miss Paraw<br />

Regatta winner<br />

Keziah Guanco<br />

Bartolome with the<br />

Mayor of Iloilo City,<br />

Hon. Jose Espinosa<br />

III, PRF Pres. Ronald<br />

Raymond L. Sebastian<br />

and others<br />

The fifteen official<br />

candidates<br />

The day was blessed<br />

with good wind, bright<br />

sunshine, with plenty<br />

of color and excitement<br />

for the thousands of<br />

spectators.<br />

8<br />

Number 15 being crowned as Miss Paraw Regatta<br />

<strong>2018</strong> to the uproar of a very excited crowd of<br />

friends and family.<br />

Friday morning saw the<br />

skimboarding enthusiasts<br />

strut their stuff, while<br />

adjacent the beach volley<br />

ball was being played out.<br />

The day was completed<br />

with a street parade and<br />

Mardi Gras. With colorful<br />

costumes and wellchoreographed<br />

dancing.<br />

The final Day seen the main Race being held<br />

with over 40 paraws competing for the title. The<br />

beach was packed with thousands of spectators,<br />

all in attendance to cheer on their favorite sailor.<br />

For the final time Ronald Raymond L. Sebastian,<br />

President, gave the opening speech, with the<br />

Mayor The Honorable Jose Espinosa III officially<br />

starting the race. The day was blessed with good<br />

wind, bright sunshine, with plenty of color and<br />

excitement for the thousands of spectators.<br />

After a full day of great racing the moment that<br />

everybody anxiously awaited finally arrived with<br />

the awarding of the substantial prize money to<br />

the long list of very happy and excited winners.<br />

With Dr. Roberto R. Somosa, Tournament Director<br />

officiating, the winners were, In the Slalom, held<br />

earlier in the week, there were three categories.<br />

In Category A the winner was Orlando Demetilla<br />

on Arlyn who received a cash prize of P15,000 in<br />

second place was Cezar Demetillo on Jenjen with<br />

a prize of P10,000 and in third Rogelio Gareza<br />

taking home a P5,000 Prize. In Category B first was<br />

Cezar Espinosa on Apo Tat’s claiming the P20,000<br />

prize, second went to Nicanor Gad P15,000 and<br />

third Seriel Prado on Discovery 1 taking out the<br />

P10,000 in prize money. In category C the winner<br />

with a prize of P25,000 was Efren Aguirre on Kim<br />

Aron, second went to Chody Belejerdo on Ashley<br />

claiming the P20,000 Prize while Romel Cahilig on<br />

Happy Hour came third and received P15,000.<br />

The main event on the final day there was also<br />

three categories. In Catergory A there was ten


FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK<br />

Well we are into <strong>2018</strong> and proudly present our first edition for this year.<br />

Where we feature Iloilo, one of the most progressive and definitely one<br />

of the cleanest cities I personally have been to.<br />

While there with the feature was in time to enjoy the Iloilo 46th Paraw<br />

Regatta, it is so well organized and would be the biggest regatta in the<br />

Philippines with 9 days of fun and entertainment.<br />

Iloilo has so much to offer the tourist, you would have to put this<br />

destination on you priority to do list.<br />

We are pleased to inform our faithful readers that thanks to you, your<br />

favourite magazine continues to grow in popularity.<br />

Again we will be with the Hobie Challenge and look forward to<br />

an outstanding challenge that hopefully makes up for last years’<br />

mishap. Our next edition we will be revisiting Romblon. With so much<br />

happening there we could not resist a revisit to showcase all the<br />

improvements to this picturesque part of the Philippines.<br />

WHAT’S INSIDE?<br />

The 46th Iloilo Paraw Regatta 4<br />

Punta Fuego’s 12<br />

Double Weekend Regatta<br />

History of A Lady 20<br />

Lake Taal Hobie Hand Over and 22<br />

Christmas Regatta<br />

The Inaugural Subic 30<br />

Around Verde Island Race<br />

<strong>2018</strong> Zhik Hong Kong 29er 34<br />

World Championship<br />

Let’s Talk Grouper 40<br />

Phuket Surf Life Saving Competition 46<br />

Destination - ILOILO 50<br />

Choosing The Right One 74<br />

When Buying A Boat<br />

Sailing Tips - Downwind Sailing 78<br />

Barry Dawson Editor<br />

Turkish Airlines Around 80<br />

The Island Race<br />

<strong>2018</strong> Miss Paraw Regatta<br />

1st Runner Up<br />

2nd Runner Up<br />

3rd Runner Up<br />

4th Runner Up<br />

Anthea<br />

Cover photo by Barry Dawson<br />

Published quarterly by: <strong>ABW</strong> PUBLISHING<br />

House 16, Madrigal Compound, 2550 Roxas Blvd., Pasay City<br />

Editor & Production: BARRY DAWSON<br />

Contributing Writers: BRUCE CURRAN & JAMES WEBSTER<br />

Contributing Photographers: TERRY DUCKHAM & JOHNNY MARTINEZ<br />

Advertising: 551-4587/ 0928-714-4461<br />

Email: info@activeboatingwatersports.com<br />

Website: www.activeboatingwatersports.com<br />

Printed by: House Printers, Taytay, Rizal, Philippines<br />

Active Boating and Watersports is a copyright© production<br />

No part can be copied or reproduced without the express<br />

permission of the publishers.<br />

The views expressed and advertisements published in Active Boating & Watersports<br />

are those of the authors and advertisers, and not <strong>ABW</strong> Publishing.<br />

<strong>ABW</strong> Publishing does not accept any liability whatsoever for errors or omissions.<br />

9


entries, which seen Orlando Demetillo on Arlyn<br />

again claim first place receiving P50,000, Hector<br />

Espinoso received P30,000 for gaining second<br />

spot on Niniah & Issiah while the third place prize<br />

of P20,000 went to Ma. Theresa Aranda on KD,<br />

4th place with a prize of P14,000 went to Cezar<br />

Espinosa on Jen Jen while fifth place went to<br />

Rogelio Gareza giving a prize purse of P10,000.<br />

Paraws placed sixth to tenth each received and<br />

award of P5,000. In category B there was also ten<br />

entrants, Seriel Prado on Discovery 1 took line<br />

honors and received a prize of P75,000, Ricardo<br />

Gabales on Kiss claimed the second place purse<br />

of P50,000, while Jaydee Pauchano on 2 Angels<br />

received the third place prize of P20,000. Paraws<br />

finishing fourth to tenth received, 4th P15,000,<br />

5th P11,000, 6th P9,000, 7th P8,000, 8th<br />

P7,000, 9th P6,000 and 10th P5,000. There were<br />

ten entrants in category C and the winner with a<br />

handsome prize of<br />

P100,000 went to<br />

Chody Belejerdo on<br />

Ashlyn, Romel Cahilig<br />

on Happy Hour came<br />

in second receiving<br />

P75,000 and in third<br />

place was Ferderico<br />

Tantiado on Cheryl<br />

claiming the P45,000<br />

prize. Other places<br />

were awarded, 4th P15,000, 5th P11,000, 6th<br />

P9,000, 7th P8,000, 8th P7,000, 9th P6,000, 10th<br />

P5,000, there was also a builders prize of P5,000<br />

in each category.<br />

It is not surprising<br />

that it is ranked as<br />

one of the biggest<br />

events on the<br />

Philippine sailing<br />

calendar.<br />

Participants<br />

of the <strong>2018</strong> mardi<br />

gras parade<br />

With the organization and effort that goes into<br />

the Iloilo Paraw Regatta, it is not surprising that<br />

it is ranked as one of the biggest events on the<br />

Philippine sailing calendar, coupled with prize<br />

money totaling over P776,000, it can only get<br />

bigger and better, and we can all look forward<br />

to the 47th Iloilo Paraw Regatta with great<br />

expectations.<br />

10


L E O P A R D<br />

Welcome the newest addition to the<br />

award-winning fleet<br />

DEDICATED ENGINEERING SPECIALISTS<br />

11


Punta Fuego’s<br />

Double<br />

Weekend<br />

Regatta<br />

Anthea showing skill<br />

12


Punta Fuego Yacht Club, over the last few<br />

years has had some very innovative ideas<br />

concerning their annual regatta. The first was<br />

to move the regatta from October to January to<br />

avail better wind conditions as many times the<br />

lack of winds in October was detrimental to the<br />

success of the regatta, this innovation has proved<br />

a great success. The second innovation was to<br />

split the regatta into two weekends holding the<br />

regatta on the first weekend for sailing catamarans<br />

and dinghies, with the keel boats and multihulls<br />

contesting their sailing skills in avid competition on<br />

the second weekend, another innovation that has<br />

proven to be a complete success. Supported again<br />

by Broadwater Marine and<br />

had a display at the regatta<br />

for both weekends ensuring<br />

that support was there for<br />

all competitors needs in case<br />

replacement parts or rope was<br />

needed.<br />

Hobies and dinghies<br />

weekend 1 13th & 14th<br />

January <strong>2018</strong><br />

The weekend got off to a flying<br />

start with a good number of<br />

competitors consisting of 10<br />

Hobie 16’s Maria Vidoria Sail<br />

6, Michael Ngu sail 114773,<br />

Peter Capotosto sail 483,<br />

Dennis Cruz sail 10, Andy<br />

Aguilaasail 8, Monchu Garcia<br />

sail 4, Alex Chen Sail 15, Roman Azanzan sail 7,<br />

Albert Baltura sail 2 and Jose Sehwan with sail 9.<br />

This year also seen the presence of 7 Oz Goose<br />

from Lake Taal consisting of Job Ferranco sail 3,<br />

Roy Espiritu sail 2. Cherry Pinpin sail 10, Jioda<br />

Pablo sail 5. Ricardo Pellicer sail 14 Joaquin Casal<br />

sail 1 and Joy Calimin sail 6. The Oz Goose is an<br />

innovation of the Homebuilt of the Philippines<br />

and started to make a name for themselves in the<br />

first OZ Goose Nationals Held in Lake Taal last<br />

November.<br />

The seas were<br />

choppy and some<br />

suspected it may be<br />

too rough for the<br />

Oz Goose.<br />

With good winds prevailing the racing got off<br />

to a good start with plenty of action including a<br />

couple of capsizes in the Hobie fleet. The seas<br />

were choppy and some suspected it may be too<br />

rough for the Oz Goose, but they done themselves<br />

proud and handled the conditions extremely well,<br />

with only one mishap, a broken mast which made<br />

certain that particular boat did not compete on the<br />

second day.<br />

Jerry Rollin again was the racing officer and made<br />

sure that all went smoothly. Resulting in everyone<br />

enjoying a great day of racing. That evening<br />

competitors and officials celebrated at the Punta<br />

Fuego Club House, where<br />

a magnificent dinner was<br />

enjoyed by all.<br />

The second day of racing got<br />

off to a slower start with the<br />

absence of the wind, delaying<br />

the start, but they picked up<br />

after a short time giving a<br />

good start to the second day,<br />

some good competitive racing<br />

was seen again with Maria<br />

Vidoira showing the rest of<br />

the fleet a clean pair of heels<br />

in the first leg of the race.<br />

After the completion of the<br />

day’s racing a merienda was<br />

served at the Barracuda Bar<br />

with cold Heineken Beer served by one of the major<br />

sponsors of the event. After the refreshments were<br />

enjoyed by all the awarding took place with Jerry<br />

Rollin and the club’s General Manager Edgar Krohn<br />

officiating. In the very first Oz Goose series held in<br />

Punta Fuego, taking line honors was Joe Ferranco<br />

in first place overall, with Roy Espiritu in second<br />

place while never letting her handicap get in the<br />

way of good sailing Cherry Pinpin came third.<br />

Words by<br />

BARRY<br />

DAWSON<br />

Photographs<br />

as credited<br />

13


In the Hobie 16 class the overall winners were<br />

Maria Vidoira and crew member snagging first<br />

place, while the ever fierce competition Michael<br />

Ngu and Boyet Magsanay in second place, with<br />

Peter Capotosto and crew member Patrick taking<br />

third spot. After the awarding everyone prepared<br />

to return to their homes after what can only be<br />

described as a great weekend of sailing, while the<br />

club started to prepare for the following weekend<br />

with the keel boats and multihulls.<br />

Weekend 2 January 21st to 22nd<br />

The gathering of sailors from keel boats, multihulls<br />

and the newly introduced Far East 28R, a speedy<br />

28 footer, which were brought into the Philippines<br />

by the Philippine Sailing Association and racing<br />

for the first time in a Philippine regatta. The<br />

Far East 28R is a racing keelboat that combines<br />

the experiences and accumulated techniques of<br />

European design. Designed by Simonis Voogd,<br />

and Far East Boats, it is a well-designed, easy to<br />

handle and high performance uniform class racing<br />

sailboat. Even with a length of 28 feet, Far East<br />

28R can easily reach the maximum speed of 20<br />

knots. I am sure we will see a lot more of these in<br />

the near future as they race in the Boracay Cup in<br />

February and the Commodores Cup in April.<br />

The Far East 28R<br />

keelboat combines<br />

the experiences and<br />

accumulated techniques<br />

of European design.<br />

Also competing in this year’s regatta was Anthea,<br />

the Puerto Galera flagship, skippered by Russ<br />

Hughes and representing the Puerto Galera Yacht<br />

Club. Anthea was the only yacht racing for another<br />

Philippine Yacht Club. This was a very welcome<br />

entry and was good to see other Yacht Clubs<br />

get involved to further promote sailing in the<br />

Philippines.<br />

A good brisk wind ensured racing got off to a good<br />

start and two races were enjoyed that day, with<br />

Far East 28r tacking<br />

14


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15


Oz Goose<br />

ready to start<br />

Centennial II showing the way in both races. The<br />

Far East 28s also strutted the stuff out on the water<br />

in the 28s division. Kerida with Gary Kingshott was<br />

forced to retire with a damaged sail, and Gary had<br />

to have the spare sail sent down from Subic Bay so<br />

he could remain competitive on the second day.<br />

After the days racing it was back to the Barracuda<br />

bar to enjoy a few well-earned drinks, and in the<br />

evening a delicious dinner party was hosted at the<br />

San Diego Restaurant in the main clubhouse.<br />

After a sumptuous breakfast it was back into<br />

the fray with earnest with all boats vying for poll<br />

position at the start. Karakoa and Anthea were<br />

amongst the leaders over the line in the first race,<br />

with a good start to the race.<br />

Centennial II again showed its prowess by coming<br />

in first again in both races.<br />

Kerida with Gary<br />

Kingshott was forced<br />

to retire with a<br />

damaged sail.<br />

After the days racing it was back to the Barracuda<br />

Bar for a delicious merienda and more cold Heineken<br />

Beer supplied to the thirsty sailors. Heineken<br />

Beer was one of the major sponsors of the event<br />

16


Subic Bay<br />

Manila<br />

Cebu<br />

Boracay<br />

Davao<br />

Puerto Princesa<br />

17


Martin Tanco<br />

Receiving the<br />

Perpetual Trophy<br />

as skipper of the<br />

Overall winner<br />

and supplied free beer on both weekends. After<br />

enjoying this mouth-watering repast awarding got<br />

under way in earnest, again with the club’s General<br />

Manager Edgar Krohn and Jerry Rollin officiating<br />

the awards and congratulating the winners of the<br />

fabulous weekend of sailing. With the Far East 28s<br />

who went by hull number and not sail numbers.<br />

In first place was Alan Balladares and crew in<br />

hull number 1 who were sponsored by Standard<br />

Insurance. Second place went to in hull number 3<br />

was Emerson Villena and crew also sponsored by<br />

Standard Insurance, while third place went to hull<br />

number 2 with Sean Mitchell and crew sponsored<br />

by Subic Sailing.<br />

The Multihulls division seen Avitas with Roland<br />

Hermoso take out the top spot. Carino skippered<br />

by Monchu Garcia came in second place a mere<br />

ten seconds behind the winner, while Too Too<br />

Tango with Roman Azanza coming in third.<br />

With an impressive 4<br />

wins out of 4 races,<br />

Centennial II easily<br />

took first place in the<br />

cruiser division.<br />

With an impressive 4 wins out of 4 races, Martin<br />

Tanco and crew on Centennial II easily took out<br />

first place in the cruiser division, Karakoa with Ray<br />

Ordoveza and crew, with Maria Vidoira at the helm<br />

was placed second. While David Wheeler and crew<br />

in Freewheeler came third.<br />

18<br />

<strong>2018</strong> Punta Fuego regatta is one of the best<br />

regattas held at Punta Fuego that Active Boating<br />

and Watersports has attended, and we can only<br />

look forward with bated breath for a bigger and<br />

better regatta in 2019.


Early this year the Philippine Sailing<br />

Association took delivery of 6 Far East 28s<br />

and in order to promote keelboat sailing in the<br />

region have announced a 6 Regatta programme,<br />

where the boats will be available for charter and<br />

will sail as a one design fleet.<br />

Philippine •<br />

The 6 Regattas will be:<br />

• The Punta Fuego Yacht Club Regatta in 20/21<br />

January<br />

• The Standard Insurance Boracay Cup in 27<br />

February to 2 <strong>March</strong><br />

• The Subic Sailing Commodore’s Cup in 2 to 7 April<br />

Dates and locations to be confirmed:<br />

• Subic Bay<br />

• Manila Bay<br />

Puerto Galera<br />

Sailing Association<br />

Far East 28r<br />

Regatta Series<br />

Punta Fuego Regatta 20 – 21 January <strong>2018</strong><br />

Boats are available for Charter<br />

1. The boats will be available for practice on Friday<br />

19 January and an instructor will be on hand to<br />

brief anyone who has not sailed a FE 28 before.<br />

2. The boats are only available to teams that have<br />

a certificate of competence issued by their<br />

National Sailing Association or whose<br />

competence can be verified by the event<br />

Race Officer-Jerry Rollin–jerryrollin49@gmail.com<br />

3. Accommodation will be available at Club Punta<br />

Fuego<br />

4. Each crew will have to provide a returnable<br />

damage deposit.<br />

5. Transport can be arranged from Manila to<br />

Punta Fuego through the Philippine Sailing<br />

Association. Journey time 2 ½ to 3 hours.<br />

6. Racing will take place on Saturday and Sunday.<br />

Racing will be completed by 1500 on Sunday<br />

Costs Total Cost for entering a Team with 5 crew:<br />

PhP 70,000 (US$ 1,400)<br />

Plus a returnable damage deposit of<br />

PhP 50,000 (US$ 1,000)<br />

The Entry Fee covers:<br />

• Regatta Entry fee for boat, skipper and 4 crew<br />

• Charter of FE 28 for 3 days<br />

• Accommodation for Friday 19 and Saturday 20<br />

January - 2 rooms capable of sleeping 3 persons<br />

in each room, including breakfast<br />

• Lunch on Saturday and Sunday<br />

• Cocktails on Friday evening<br />

• Dinner on Saturday<br />

• Transport from Manila to Punta Fuego on Friday<br />

19 and return on Sunday 21 January<br />

Teams wishing to make additional or alternate<br />

arrangements should contact Chantal at<br />

membership@clubpuntafuego.com.ph.<br />

19


Words by<br />

BARRY<br />

DAWSON<br />

Photographs<br />

as credited<br />

H. G. Sicklemore,<br />

first owner<br />

HISTORY OF A<br />

Anthea is proudly the ‘flag yacht’ for the<br />

Puerto Galera Yacht Club (PGYC), and<br />

regularly races in PGYC regattas. She is also used<br />

for PGYC promotional work and is intended in<br />

the future for advanced sail training, as part of<br />

the PGCY Small Boat Program (a program that<br />

introduces local youth and students from schools<br />

in Manila and overseas to sailing and help them to<br />

develop their sailing skills).<br />

ANTHEA participates<br />

in Regattas around the<br />

Philippines, and in the future<br />

further afield in Asia.<br />

ANTHEA is an 8-Meter<br />

(‘8mR’), being the premier<br />

Olympic yacht class from 1908<br />

to 1936, and was built in 1929<br />

by Camper & Nicholson in<br />

the UK for H. G. Sicklemore,<br />

the then President, who later<br />

became Commodore of the<br />

Royal Cornwall Yacht Club<br />

from 1932 till his death in<br />

1954. It is worthy to note that<br />

in the same year that ANTHEA was built she won<br />

the RCYC Club Regatta, held on September 7,1929,<br />

in the 6-15 tons class.<br />

In the early 1950’s, ANTHEA was bought by an<br />

American, and was shipped to Long Beach where<br />

she underwent a refit and was used as a pleasure<br />

craft and raced in the local regattas. She the<br />

changed hands and was old to the Barker family<br />

in 167 and was used as the family yacht off the<br />

California coast.<br />

In the early 70s ANTHEA again changed hands and<br />

moved to Hawaii where she was later bought by<br />

ANTHEA is an<br />

8-Meter (‘8mR’) built<br />

in 1929 by Camper &<br />

Nicholson in the UK<br />

for H. G. Sicklemore.<br />

Gary Shipp and Kevin Hood in 1988 and underwent<br />

a major two–year refit.<br />

ANTHEA was then bought in 1998, by Gary Pione,<br />

a shipwright who had worked on the refit and<br />

renovation in 1988-89. Gary then sailed ANTHEA,<br />

mostly single-handed across the Pacific, and<br />

around for the next 15 years, cruising between<br />

the Philippines and Palau on<br />

a regular basis.<br />

L<br />

Notably, ANTHEA, with Gary<br />

at the helm, is credited with<br />

the world’s longest 8-Meter<br />

spinnaker run of 500 miles<br />

between Fiji and Tuvalu in 2002.<br />

Her current owner Mr. John<br />

Quirk, purchased Anthea<br />

in 2016, and she is now<br />

permanently moored in Puerto<br />

Galera Philippines, John has<br />

since embarked on a program<br />

to bring her back to full racing<br />

trim including a new full suite<br />

set of racing sails, modernized<br />

running rigging and a new engine.<br />

The upgrading and modernization of this grand<br />

old lady has been also sponsored by Puerto Galera<br />

Yacht Club, Broadwater Marine, Tricom Projects<br />

Inc. Ronstan, and Hyde Sails.<br />

Anthea competes regularly in Philippine sailing<br />

events her latest appearance, being the Punta<br />

Fuego Regatta in January <strong>2018</strong>.<br />

When attending these regattas watch out for this<br />

grand old lady who proudly continues to strut her<br />

stuff.<br />

20


Cornwall Yacht Club<br />

adyRoyal ANTHEA at the PGYC<br />

Xmas Regatta Day2<br />

30 Dec 2017<br />

Anthea New Covers 11 Mar 2016<br />

JQ ANTHEA 23 Dec 2017<br />

21


Lake Taal<br />

Hobie Hand<br />

Over &<br />

Christmas<br />

Regatta<br />

22


Although the hobie 16 fleet was almost<br />

demolished earlier this year with bad weather<br />

and other contingencies occurring it did not take away<br />

from the resolve of Monchu<br />

Garcia or Hobie Philippines, Taal<br />

lake Yacht Club and Phinsaf. It<br />

is off to a newer and brighter<br />

future when Monchu Garcia<br />

and all involved rebooted The<br />

Philippine Hobie 16 Fleet in<br />

a special Christmas regatta<br />

weekend at Lake Taal Yacht Club<br />

on December the 10th 2017.<br />

The behinds the scenes effort<br />

to bring this to fruition was<br />

nothing short of astounding<br />

from all concerned and before<br />

I continue I feel it is best said<br />

in the words of Roman Azanza<br />

the Phinsaf Director and Monchu<br />

Garcia of Hobie Philippines.<br />

Roman Azanza had this to say:<br />

“Taal Lake Yacht Club (TLYC), December 10, 2017 - The<br />

Philippine H16 fleet was rebooted in a major way during<br />

PHINSAF’s ceremonial hand-over of 15 new 2017<br />

designed boats to their new owners. “I recall the first few<br />

weeks after we lost the fleet, it was as if we were looking<br />

over a dark precipice with no way of ever rebuilding the<br />

local fleet,” recalled PHINSAF director Monchu Garcia<br />

while recounting the untimely events surrounding the<br />

loss of two thirds of the entire Philippine H16 fleet<br />

during last February’s 17th Hobie Challenge.<br />

To recall, after completing the first leg of the Challenge,<br />

the entire PHC17 fleet was pinned down by heavy<br />

weather after arriving in Lubang Island. With no let up<br />

in the heavy Amihan conditions in sight, the organizers<br />

decided to breakdown the fleet and transport sailors<br />

and gear to Busuanga via larger boats. However, while<br />

the entire entourage made it safely to the calm shores<br />

of Busuanga on February 15th, the main transport<br />

vessel carrying most of the dismantled boats and<br />

all the fleet’s spares, rudders and sails encountered<br />

mechanical difficulty and sustained structural damage<br />

an hour into the Calavite Strait. After an entire night in<br />

these conditions the crew eventually abandoned the<br />

vessel in heavy seas and boarded a passing freighter<br />

en route to Subic Bay. Despite mounting an epic three<br />

day search effort involving sea and airborne teams<br />

(composed of local and international hobie sailors)<br />

covering over 6,000 square miles, the vessel was not<br />

“For those of us who<br />

sail and been challenged<br />

by the majesty of the<br />

seas, life has a flavour<br />

the sheltered<br />

will never know.”<br />

found and was suspected to have drifted further out into<br />

the West Philippine Sea. Two weeks later, tipped off by<br />

an activated beacon, the organizers eventually contacted<br />

fishermen in General Santos City<br />

who had stumbled upon a halfsubmerged<br />

vessel many days later<br />

another 200nm out to sea —<br />

unfortunately nothing substantial<br />

was left of the cargo.”<br />

“Having lost the entire fleet<br />

of 21 boats, the Philippine<br />

H16 fleet faced an existential<br />

crisis — and all of us in the<br />

local and international Hobie<br />

community realized this harsh<br />

reality”, stressed Roman Azanza,<br />

PHINSAF director. At this point<br />

the PHINSAF board made the<br />

strategic decision to do whatever<br />

it could to help rebuild the fleet.<br />

Led by Monchu Garcia, several<br />

PHINSAF directors reached out to all possible sources<br />

from China and the US to Australia seeking alternatives.<br />

“To our surprise, we had all the heavy weights in the<br />

Austral-Asian Hobie scene batting for us — as regulars<br />

in the event they too realized that the fate of the<br />

Philippine H16 fleet hung in the balance.” Monchu<br />

Garcia commented. “Through the support of our long<br />

time international sailor friends and the commitment of<br />

the region’s Hobie dealer, we were able to work out a<br />

win-win opportunity with Hobie Australasia.”<br />

Just about nine months to the day the fleet disappeared,<br />

a simple hand-over ceremony prior to the inaugural<br />

Rayomarine Christmas regatta was held at TLYC to<br />

mark this momentous occasion. With TLYC commodore<br />

Peter Capotosto, various PHINSAF directors and a<br />

dozen excited new H16 owners in attendance, Monchu<br />

Garcia gave his heartfelt opening remarks — thanking<br />

all the affected sailors for their support, patience and<br />

confidence in PHINSAF. And with the backdrop of<br />

15 new H16s with their bright Cayman coloured sails<br />

luffing, Monchu concluded proudly “After peering off<br />

the precipice last February, we can now see the light at<br />

the end of the tunnel —and what a sight to behold it<br />

is: We now have the newest H16 fleet in Asia!”.<br />

This is the letter from Monchu Garcia after the tragic<br />

event that started the ball rolling.<br />

“For those of us who sail and been challenged by the majesty<br />

of the seas, life has a flavour the sheltered will never know.”<br />

Words by<br />

BARRY<br />

DAWSON<br />

Photographs<br />

as credited<br />

23


Dear Sailors,<br />

When I coined that quote in September of 2011<br />

during the awarding ceremony of the Hamilo Coast<br />

Regatta, little did I know that six years later it would be<br />

a prophetic caption to our PHC 17 experience which<br />

kicked-off on the very same shore earlier this year.<br />

After our support boat Poseidon1 was lost at sea on<br />

February carrying a dozen boats, all our sails, booms,<br />

rudders, and tramps, plus sailors’ personal bags and<br />

our provisions, I honestly couldn’t imagine how our<br />

fledgling sailing organization (PHINSAF) was going to<br />

recover from that crushing loss. It was by far the biggest<br />

challenge we had faced in 17 years of organizing<br />

sailing races<br />

around the<br />

country. But I<br />

underestimated<br />

the camaraderie<br />

a n d<br />

determination<br />

of our extended<br />

s a i l i n g<br />

community, and<br />

unbelievably here we are, just six short months later<br />

awaiting the arrival of 15 new Hobie 16s, plus parts to<br />

make our other boats whole.<br />

Pledges, donations and<br />

offers of support &<br />

assistance started pouring<br />

in “before” participants<br />

even left for home!<br />

24<br />

The support from our sailing friends around the globe<br />

has been incredible! Pledges, donations and offers<br />

of support & assistance started pouring in “before”<br />

participants even left for home! Which, by the way, was<br />

already a difficult ordeal for many friends who lost their<br />

travel documents and money. As word spread through<br />

the Hobie community we were bombarded with<br />

requests on how they could help - which admittedly<br />

we couldn’t adequately respond to as we were still shell<br />

shocked and had no idea how we would right our fleet<br />

again. But slowly, with the invaluable support of Steve<br />

Fields at Hobie Australasia, and many friends both here<br />

and abroad, a plan started to unfurl. We aren’t out of


25


With an abundance of<br />

excitement everyone<br />

gathered at Lake Taal<br />

to receive their brand<br />

new hobie.<br />

the storm yet and much still has to be done but...<br />

with a little luck and your prayers we are hopeful to<br />

have the fleet sailing again by the start of our annual<br />

Travellers Series this October; and (as promised by our<br />

Chairman Jerry Rollin) back in the beautiful Busuanga<br />

islands next <strong>March</strong> for the 18th running of the most<br />

flavourful regatta on the planet - The Philippine Hobie<br />

Challenge Life’s short, Sail Fast!<br />

Monchu Garcia,<br />

PHC 18 Co-Chairman.<br />

So with an abundance of excitement everyone<br />

gathered at Lake Taal to receive their brand new hobie<br />

and make into a fantastic day of fun and sailing for<br />

everyone present all chomping at the bit to test out<br />

their new cats in the inaugural<br />

Hobie Christmas Challenge. To<br />

start with the winds gods were<br />

dramatically unkind but that did<br />

not deter from the enthusiasm<br />

of all there. So like true to from<br />

sailors everyone was out there<br />

on the lake battling the odds.<br />

My partner in crime Richelle<br />

Galvan was out photographing<br />

the event while I was preparing the delicious Australian<br />

Sausage Sizzle Luncheon sponsored by Active Boating<br />

and Watersports Magazine, with genuine Australian<br />

Sausages supplied for the event by Scott Chambers the<br />

owner of Prime choice meats in Cavite, and anyone who<br />

wants to flavour true Aussie style sausages then get in<br />

touch with Scott you will be glad you did. Of course<br />

the proof of the pudding is in the eating, and not one<br />

single morsel was left as the hungry crews devoured all<br />

before them. After the lunch was over then it was onto<br />

the awards for the event hosted by Peter Capotosto the<br />

results were; For the 2017 club championships Boyet<br />

Mendoza and Japheth Pablo were 2017 champions<br />

while 1st runner up was Maria Vidoeira and Sean<br />

Mitchell and Peter Capotosto with crew member Mikee<br />

Vinzon coming in as 2nd runner up.<br />

In the Christmas Regatta, Norman Jaravata and<br />

Charlie Clement took line honours coming in 1st<br />

place while Maria Vidoeira and Sean Mitchell showed<br />

consistency by also coming in 2nd in this event while<br />

Peter Capotosto and Mikee Vinzon showed the same<br />

consistency by taking third place.<br />

26


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27


Northrop and Johnson Asia (N&J Asia)<br />

Joins Forces With Bali Catamarans<br />

Words &<br />

Photographs by<br />

NORTHROP<br />

& JOHNSON<br />

New<br />

Concept,<br />

Innovative<br />

BALI<br />

Catamarans<br />

Produced<br />

by worldrenowned<br />

French<br />

shipyard<br />

Catana,<br />

BALI<br />

Catamarans<br />

are perfect<br />

cruising<br />

yachts for<br />

Asia.<br />

There’s a brand new breed of sailing and motor<br />

multihulls on the market right now: BALI<br />

Catamarans. World-renowned French shipyard Catana<br />

has over 30 years of experience in designing and<br />

building top class racing catamarans already. Now they<br />

have branched out to create something innovative<br />

and contemporary for the next generation of cruising<br />

sailors – elegant and seaworthy yachts that incorporate<br />

the very latest in design and technology.<br />

BALI Catamarans are only three years old, but the<br />

yachts are already receiving awards and accolades from<br />

the boating community. Naval<br />

Architect Xavier Fay and designer<br />

Olivier Poncin have created a<br />

unique and stylish yacht. In<br />

conjunction with interiors from<br />

the Lasta Design Studio, they<br />

merged ergonomic fluid shapes<br />

with natural light to make for a<br />

more enjoyable and comfortable<br />

onboard sailing experience.<br />

Northrop and Johnson Asia<br />

have teamed up with BALI<br />

Catamarans. N&J Asia CEO<br />

Bart Kimman points out that<br />

“Asia has long led the way in<br />

retail multihull sales. Now the<br />

global charter companies are<br />

developing their catamaran<br />

charter fleets in the top<br />

destinations in Asia: multihulls<br />

are practical and desirable, and they are here to stay.<br />

BALI Catamarans are looking to significantly grow their<br />

market share; teaming up with the renowned Catana<br />

Group to launch the range in Asia, is a dream come<br />

true. Combining state of the art construction with the<br />

most innovative designs in the industry, I look forward<br />

Now the global charter<br />

companies are developing<br />

their catamaran charter fleets<br />

in the top destinations in<br />

Asia: multihulls are practical<br />

and desirable, and they are<br />

here to stay.<br />

to see the first boats arrive in the summer of <strong>2018</strong>. Our<br />

team will focus on a successful market introduction in<br />

the Philippines, Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand.”<br />

The sailing range starts with the BALI 4.0 (40ft) and<br />

currently goes up to the BALI 5.4 (55.2 ft). Even the<br />

baby of the fleet, the 4.0, shows off many of the features<br />

that make BALI Catamarans stand out from the pack.<br />

Gone is the trampoline ‘foredeck’, replaced by a large<br />

forward cockpit that constitutes another dining and<br />

sunbathing area with easy access to the galley.<br />

The L-shaped saloon provides<br />

an extremely large living space,<br />

entirely free of bulkheads, and<br />

accessed via an immense folding<br />

glazed door.<br />

There’s an integral aft platform<br />

that joins the two hulls, and a<br />

large relaxing area on the coach<br />

roof for taking in those breathtaking<br />

views.<br />

BALI Catamarans boast more<br />

entertainment space than boats<br />

of this size usually offer. Add in<br />

the reassuring high freeboards<br />

and high bridge deck clearance,<br />

and you have a yacht with<br />

optimal sea-keeping qualities<br />

wrapped around the very best of<br />

contemporary interior design.<br />

All the BALI Catana models offer an extraordinary<br />

‘inside meets outside’ experience, with natural light<br />

and ventilation enhanced by the wide folding and<br />

sliding windows. Privacy and intimacy are also ensured<br />

by clever design options that allow for shared or<br />

individual bathrooms for owners’ and guest cabins.<br />

There’s one power cat option on offer, the BALI 4.3<br />

m/y, and it offers the same innovations that make the<br />

BALI sailing versions so successful.<br />

28<br />

Greg Dagge, N&J Asia Brand Manager for BALI<br />

Catamarans in Asia, says, “We are very excited to be<br />

involved at this stage of BALI Catamarans’ evolution.<br />

Catana have created a compelling series of design<br />

breakthroughs (including the loft, or bow lounge). The<br />

hugely experienced N&J Asia team in our strategicallypositioned<br />

offices around the region, believe that this<br />

new range of catamarans is a game changer in all<br />

categories of ownership: Private, Shared or Charter.<br />

N&J Asia will be there to service all three”.


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29<br />

ANTIBES :: AUSTRALIA :: CHINA :: FORT LAUDERDALE :: HOLLAND :: HONG KONG :: LOS ANGELES :: MALAYSIA :: NEWPORT :: NEWPORT BEACH :: NEW YORK :: PALMA :: PHILIPPINES :: SAN DIEGO :: SINGAPORE :: THAILAND :: VIETNAM


Words by<br />

BARRY<br />

DAWSON<br />

Photographs<br />

as credited<br />

Antipodes 1st to finish<br />

The Inaugural Subic Bay Around Verde Island<br />

Race, which replaced the Subic to Boracay<br />

Race because of environmental issues in Boracay<br />

got under way with a strong North Easterly at 20 to<br />

25 knots, as the fleet steadily<br />

approached the downwind<br />

start line waiting for the<br />

horn sound and the race got<br />

underway in earnest. As the<br />

“Good Start” was announced,<br />

it looked as if it was a toss<br />

up between Antipodes and<br />

Standard Insurance Centennial<br />

III to be first across the line.<br />

Jun Avecilla’s Selma Star<br />

skippered by Sean Mitchell<br />

raised the spinnaker before the<br />

start and as they proceeded in<br />

close company with Mandrake<br />

III, they broached and laid<br />

the mast down on the water,<br />

with the white knuckled crew<br />

holding on tight.<br />

Taking advantage Standard Insurance Centennial III<br />

popped the asymmetric kite and flew down the bay<br />

to take a commanding lead by the time the exited<br />

the bay. Once Hill’s Antipodes broke away from the<br />

They broached and<br />

laid the mast down<br />

on the water, with<br />

the white knuckled<br />

crew holding on<br />

tight.<br />

pack, they managed to hit their straps and went<br />

charging down the bay in pursuit of Centennial III.<br />

A couple of quick gybes on the 6nm leg to the bay<br />

entrance Mandrake III were in<br />

hot pursuit and third to exit<br />

the bay. Karakoa and Sabad<br />

crossed gybed as they closed<br />

in on Grande Island at the<br />

entrance to Subic Bay and the<br />

battle was just beginning.<br />

Now having recovered from<br />

their earlier broach, the Subic<br />

Sailing team on Selma Star<br />

were unharmed and proceeded<br />

in a somewhat more orderly<br />

fashion, and keeping the<br />

spinnaker under control. With<br />

gusts in the 25 knot range,<br />

Emocean and the two Chinese<br />

entries Apsaras and Asia<br />

Pacific Sailing were taking it<br />

cautiously under head sails<br />

and were the last two yachts to exit the bay.<br />

One of the entrants, George Hackett’s Misty<br />

Mountain for some unknown reason did not start and<br />

Jun Villanueva’s failed to repair Bellatrix mast in time.<br />

30


The<br />

Inaugural<br />

Subic Bay<br />

Around Verde<br />

Island Race31


Peter Baird from Broadwater Marine supplied Lost<br />

In Asia as the support boat.<br />

As they are well on the way down the Luzon coast,<br />

the fleet expected a fast race but will still have to<br />

claw their way through the wind shadow of the<br />

Bataan and Batangas<br />

The fleet expected<br />

a fast race but will<br />

still have to claw<br />

their way through<br />

the wind shadow.<br />

Mountain Ranges plus<br />

strong tidal currents in<br />

the Verde Island Passage,<br />

on both the outward and<br />

return legs.<br />

The Regatta was organized<br />

by Subic Sailing, under the<br />

auspices of the Philippine<br />

Sailing Association and in conjunction with<br />

Watercraft Ventures, Inc., the Lighthouse Marina<br />

Resort, Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority (SBMA),<br />

Philippine Coast Guard and backed by Tanduay<br />

Rum, Pepsi-Cola, Broadwater Marine, NanoFixit<br />

and JellyChip.<br />

Selma Star broaching<br />

at the start<br />

Final results were:<br />

IRC 1<br />

Karakoa - Owner/Skipper -Ray Ordoveza - and<br />

Excel 53 - Philippines<br />

Antipodes - Geoff Hill - Smith 72 Custom - HK<br />

Standard Insurance - Ernesto Echauz - TP 52<br />

Davidson – Philippines<br />

IRC 2<br />

Mandrake 3 - Nick Burns/Fred Kinmouth - Sydney<br />

GS 43 - HK<br />

Sabad - Bobby Benares - First 44.7 - PHI<br />

Emocean - Michael Raueber - Oceanis 46 - Germany<br />

Selma Star - Jun Avecila - First 36.7 - PHI<br />

Cruising Class<br />

Asia Pacific - Liu Cheng Qi - Oceanis 45 - HK<br />

Apsaras - Li Jian - Advance 80 - HK<br />

Race Finishers on Sun 25th Feb.<br />

in Line Order:<br />

Antipodes - 10.54.09<br />

Centennial 3 - 10.56.09<br />

Mandrake - 13.43.27<br />

Karakoa - 16.27.04<br />

Sabad - 16.38.51<br />

Asia Pacific - night time finish<br />

Selma Star - night time finish<br />

Retired due to damages: Apsaras/<br />

Emocean<br />

32


THE<br />

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33


<strong>2018</strong> Zhik<br />

Hong Kong<br />

29er World<br />

Championship<br />

Words by<br />

RHKYC<br />

Photographs<br />

as credited<br />

T<br />

he Zhik Hong Kong 29er World Championship<br />

got underway on the 2nd of January <strong>2018</strong><br />

with the Opening Ceremony at the Royal Hong<br />

Kong Yacht Club’s main Clubhouse on Kellett Island.<br />

A traditional lion dance enthralled the 58 teams<br />

from 11 countries including<br />

Australia, Canada, France,<br />

Great Britain, US Virgin<br />

Islands, Japan, Netherlands,<br />

New Zealand, Russia,<br />

Slovenia, USA and Hong Kong.<br />

Out of the 58<br />

teams on the water<br />

there are five allfemale<br />

and eight<br />

mixed teams.<br />

Racing was cancelled on<br />

Day 1 due to the breeze<br />

that was consistently above<br />

the threshold of the 29er<br />

Class wind limit with gusts<br />

up to 41kts. The cliché of<br />

“It’s never like this” seemed<br />

to be the most common<br />

phrase heard among Hong<br />

Kong’s local sailors and<br />

with 30 to 40kts reported<br />

overnight at Waglan Island,<br />

there looked like there could<br />

be further postponements for today, Day 2.<br />

(with gusts close to the 25kt wind limit) at the start<br />

area located closer to the channel, resulting in some<br />

epic capsizes as the fleet rounded the gate marks.<br />

Four qualifying races were held today for both the<br />

Yellow and Green Flights, there<br />

was some very close racing<br />

among the top boats. Going into<br />

day 3 of the qualify series in first<br />

is FRA2 Benjamin JAFFREZIC<br />

and Leo CHAUVEL with 8 points<br />

followed AUS6 Lachie BREWER<br />

and Max PAUL on 10 points and<br />

NZL12 Francesco KAYROUZ<br />

and Jackson KEON on 11 points.<br />

The final day of the qualifying<br />

series will take place on the 4th<br />

January with each fleet sailing<br />

four races before they are split<br />

into Gold and Silver fleets.<br />

The final four races of the<br />

qualifying series for the <strong>2018</strong><br />

Zhik 29er World Championship<br />

were held today off the Po Toi Islands in Hong Kong.<br />

34<br />

Day 2 however, sailors were only held on shore for a<br />

short time whilst the breeze weakened slightly before<br />

making their way to the race course located off<br />

Stanley. The breeze across the race track varied from<br />

15kts at the sheltered top mark in Stanley Bay to 22kts<br />

With consistent top five finishes, Hong Kong’s<br />

Calum GREGOR and Jon CRAWFORD HKG 2532<br />

are headed to the Gold Fleet with 18 points. Hot<br />

on their heels and only three points behind are New<br />

Zealand’s Francesco KAYROUZ and Jackson KEON


NZL 12. France’s Theo REVIL and Gautier GUEVEL<br />

FRA 3 are on 23 point and the traditional rivalry<br />

between New Zealand and Australia is as present<br />

as ever with Aussie’s Lachie BREWER and Max<br />

PAUL AUS 6 not far behind the Kiwi’s on 25 points.<br />

To the relief of the sailors, the breeze dropped from<br />

the previous two days to a 10kt North Easterly.<br />

The breeze was fluky making a difficult race<br />

track that was heavily favoured toward the left.<br />

Out of the 58 teams on the water there are five<br />

all-female and eight mixed teams. Sailing is one of<br />

the few sports where females and males compete<br />

against each other on a level playing field. Gaining<br />

control in the first race and remaining comfortably<br />

ahead, extending on each leg to secure a much<br />

needed 1st place, was Australia’s Annabelle DAVIES<br />

and Madison WOODWARD AUS18. After a less<br />

than stellar first day on the water, they picked<br />

up today and scored top 5 placings in three out<br />

of four races. The girls have been a bit unlucky<br />

with two races yesterday not completed due to<br />

a broken trapeze wire and, with only one drop,<br />

they have to carry a result of full points on their<br />

scorecard. This meant that despite sailing brilliantly<br />

today in the challenging conditions, they just<br />

missed out on gold fleet by a mere three points.<br />

New Zealand’s Crystal SUN and Olivia HOBBS NZL<br />

2394 are headed to the gold fleet despite struggling<br />

in today’s conditions. With forecast predicting<br />

heavier breeze tomorrow though, they may be in<br />

contention to climb back up the fleet. They have<br />

consistently been in the top 10 against their male<br />

contenders in the monstrous breeze yesterday,<br />

earning respect from the whole fleet and showing<br />

that the girls have been training hard in the windy<br />

conditions that are renowned in New Zealand.<br />

The final series kicks off tomorrow with 10<br />

races being sailed over three days from which<br />

the <strong>2018</strong> World Champion will be crowned.<br />

After some very competitive racing on the final 3<br />

days today, New Zealand’s Francesco KAYROUZ and<br />

Jackson KEON (NZL12) took the title of the <strong>2018</strong><br />

Zhik 29er World Champions today with top 4 results<br />

in all races and a 9 point cushion separating them<br />

from their closest competition. New Zealand got the<br />

edge in the last two races today with an early gybe<br />

allowing them to take advantage of a big right-hand<br />

shift. KAYROUZ and KEON commented on their win<br />

on the race course “How did we do it? Consistency;<br />

making sure we sail to our best and to our full<br />

potential, sailing every leg like a new race and keeping<br />

your head out of the boat. Bow down and send it!<br />

On winning the title, Kayrouz said: “Well it sounds kind<br />

of cheesy but it hasn’t sunk in yet, but it feels good.<br />

The event’s been good; it’s been challenging and a<br />

bit nerve-racking at times, but it’s been a good send.”<br />

2nd Overall went to Australia’s Lachie BREWER and<br />

Max PAUL (AUS6) on 20 points. France’s Benjamin<br />

JAFFREZIC and Leo CHAUVEL (FRA2) followed in<br />

35


third on 25points with fellow countrymen Theo REVIL<br />

and Gautier GUEVEL also on 25 points in fourth.<br />

New Zealanders Crystal SUN and Olivia HOBBS<br />

(NZL2394) took the title as top female team in<br />

the Zhik 29er World Championship as well as 21st<br />

Overall. SUN and HOBBS were interviewed after<br />

their win “We feel pretty good, pretty excited,<br />

such a good feeling! We have been very excited<br />

the last few days to be the only girls to make the<br />

cut into the gold fleet. It feels good to know that<br />

all our training and hard work has paid off. The<br />

event was pretty tricky with the wind and all that,<br />

but it was really a great, fun event. The racing<br />

was pretty hectic, we had all sorts of competition<br />

but it was really fun and really enjoyable to race<br />

against other people in these tricky conditions.”<br />

Charlie Manzoni<br />

commented “We couldn’t<br />

launch you into nowhere<br />

with no wind and no<br />

visibility.”<br />

Today racers were met with no breeze and a heavy<br />

fog as they descended on the Royal Hong Kong<br />

Yacht Club Middle Island Clubhouse. Racers were<br />

initially held onshore with Race Officer Charlie<br />

Manzoni commented “We couldn’t launch you<br />

into nowhere with no wind and no visibility.”<br />

However, by around 1130hrs, a cold northerly had<br />

started to fill in and steadily built, compressing the<br />

fog into a more wet but transparent light drizzle. The<br />

gold fleet was sent to their race course in Stanley<br />

Bay where four races were sailed. The breeze for the<br />

36


37


eginning of the first two races race was at the top<br />

of the 29er wind limit however changing gears was<br />

critical as the breeze tapered off in the second lap<br />

of both the first two races. The breeze moderated<br />

for the remaining two races of the day and crossing<br />

the line first in the final race of the championship<br />

was the first Hong Kong team and winners of the<br />

2017 Hong Kong Open Calum GREGOR and Jon<br />

CRAWFORD (HKG2532)<br />

who took 6th overall with<br />

26 points. The results from<br />

the Silver fleet remain the<br />

same from yesterday as the<br />

race committee decided<br />

to hold them onshore<br />

due to the breeze being<br />

in the upper class limit.<br />

After racing competitors<br />

made a beeline back to<br />

shore to pack up their gear in time for the <strong>2018</strong><br />

Zhik 29er World Championship prize giving which<br />

will be held tonight at the Royal Hong Kong Yacht<br />

Club’s Kellett Island location in Causeway Bay.<br />

Changing gears was<br />

critical as the breeze<br />

tapered off in the<br />

second lap of both<br />

the first two races.<br />

1st Gold Fleet Flag<br />

Top Female Team Flag<br />

38


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LET’S TALK<br />

GIANT<br />

GROUPER<br />

Words by<br />

JAMES<br />

WEBSTER<br />

Photographs<br />

as credited<br />

40<br />

T<br />

he Giant Grouper or ”Lapu-Lapu” as it is<br />

known in the Philippines is the largest bony,<br />

reef fish on this planet. Growing to lengths of 2.7<br />

meters (8.9 feet) and attaining weights of 400<br />

Kilograms (800 pounds), although specimens have<br />

been recorded up to 14 feet<br />

and 1,318 pounds, they are<br />

found on reefs all over the<br />

Indo Pacific region, entering<br />

estuaries in many of those<br />

regions. There have been<br />

numerous catches of this<br />

culinary monster of the sea<br />

in the Philippines. Residents<br />

of Surigao City were amazed<br />

when local fisherman, Cesar<br />

Laon, arrived home after a<br />

day’s fishing in 2017 with a 130<br />

kilo “Lapu-Lapu” occupying<br />

almost all of his boat. Cesar<br />

claimed that it was the largest<br />

fish he had ever seen. Also in<br />

2017 the people of Manalo,<br />

Cesar Laon, arrived<br />

home after a day’s<br />

fishing in 2017 with a<br />

130 kilo “Lapu-Lapu”<br />

occupying almost all<br />

of his boat.


41


Yet another 7 foot, 176<br />

kilo giant was found<br />

trapped and floundering<br />

in shallow reef waters<br />

of Libertad, Antique.<br />

Puerto Princess were aghast when Nelbeth Valencia<br />

and her husband accidently caught a 130 pound<br />

Giant Grouper in their net while dragging for crabs.<br />

Yet another 7 foot, 176 kilo giant was found trapped<br />

and floundering in shallow reef waters of Libertad,<br />

Antique. Local fisherman, Jessie Cacam, had to<br />

petition seven other fishermen to assist in carrying<br />

the fish from Pandan Bay to shore. Given that the<br />

Giant Grouper is the size of a pig,<br />

a whole new approach is used for<br />

its consumption. Different cuts<br />

of flesh can be taken in much<br />

the same way as pig or lamb, all<br />

with different texture and flavor.<br />

When talking of sea food fare,<br />

species such as Mahi Mahi and<br />

Snapper hold center stage but,<br />

the mere fact that the cheapest<br />

cut of Giant Grouper, the white<br />

meat, fetches up to $60 a kilo in good restaurants<br />

throughout Asia, is testament to the fish’s culinary<br />

Giant-Grouper<br />

Antique Giant<br />

Grouper<br />

42


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Liver of a<br />

Giant Grouper<br />

Puerto Princesa<br />

Giant Grouper<br />

esteem. The red meat is considered a delicacy and<br />

more expensive. The red and white muscles in fish<br />

are the same as in a chicken in that they are designed<br />

for different uses. In smaller fish the amount of<br />

red muscle is so small you don’t bother to try and<br />

separate it, however, in the Giant Grouper it can be<br />

separated from the white meat to become slices of<br />

tasty steaks. The majority of fish we consume are<br />

too small to value the culinary benefits individually,<br />

however with a fish as large as a Giant Grouper,<br />

their testicles and liver become a specially prepared<br />

dish. There is very little waste on the Giant Grouper,<br />

even the head is recognized as a delicacy with the<br />

lower half a prized dish and bringing $120 a kilo.<br />

The throat, stomach and fins are not wasted either<br />

as they are also considered a delicacy in many Asian<br />

seafood restaurants, particularly in Singapore.<br />

With a fish as large<br />

as a Giant Grouper,<br />

their testicles and liver<br />

become a specially<br />

prepared dish.<br />

44


©alancegan.com<br />

45


Phuket Surf Life SaS<br />

Words by<br />

BARRY<br />

DAWSON<br />

Photographs<br />

as credited<br />

December 10, 2017. Zambales Lifesaving Inc.<br />

again competed in the Phuket Life Saving<br />

Competition for the second time, the Zambales<br />

team was represented by<br />

Isaac Emmanuel Daylo,<br />

Mark Anthony Jereza and<br />

Virgel Ramos, accompanied<br />

by Zambales Lifesaving Inc.<br />

president and team coach,<br />

Roger Bound, this year the<br />

Zambales team was the<br />

Philippines sole representative.<br />

In all 17 teams, representing<br />

a number of Asian countries<br />

attended this prestigious event,<br />

held by the Phuket Life Saving<br />

Club headed by Mr. Prathaiyut<br />

( Nat ) Chuayuan.<br />

Team and coach<br />

eventually arrived at<br />

the MY Hotel, with the<br />

competition only hours<br />

away, it was a case of<br />

try to get some sleep as<br />

quickly as possible.<br />

Things this year were made a little more difficult<br />

for the Zambales team, because there is no longer<br />

a direct flight from Manila to Phuket, creating<br />

logistical problems, both in<br />

time and in funding, as it was<br />

necessary to fly Via Singapore<br />

or Kuala Lumpur, which not<br />

only added travel time and<br />

distance but also costs, so<br />

much so that the proposed<br />

budget was nowhere near<br />

enough.<br />

Fortunately Zambales Governor,<br />

Atty. Amor Deloso came to<br />

the aid of the team with some<br />

additional funding, RP Energy<br />

offered to transport the team<br />

members to and from Manila<br />

46


aving Competition<br />

airport and the organizers offered to arrange free<br />

transportation in Thailand, something that was very<br />

much appreciated as without this additional assistance,<br />

it would have not been possible for Zambales to<br />

represent the Philippines and attend the event.<br />

The team arrived at Phuket somewhat delayed due<br />

to air traffic congestion at the airports, only to find<br />

themselves greeted by torrential rains, thankfully<br />

for the team transport had been arranged by<br />

Nat, President of Phuket Lifesaving Club, but the<br />

trip from the airport to the hotel was slow due to<br />

flooding along the way. It was nearly midnight when<br />

the team and coach eventually arrived at the MY<br />

Hotel, with the competition only hours away, it was<br />

a case of try to get some sleep as quickly as possible.<br />

The morning dawned bright and sunny and<br />

the team was pleasantly surprised to find more<br />

unexpected assistance from the MY Hotel by way<br />

of free breakfast for everyone. The team stayed<br />

there last year also and again this year as it is so<br />

well located and friendly, the team was very grateful<br />

for this, also the foods supplied by the organizers<br />

during and after the day’s events.<br />

Following breakfast the team took the short walk<br />

to the event venue, arriving at 8AM for registration,<br />

drawing the team 5 number, of the 17 men’s teams,<br />

this was complimented with a further 10 women’s<br />

teams and a number of juniors, so after briefing it<br />

was into a hard and long days competition.<br />

The event scoring unfortunately only saw the top<br />

5 teams in each event taking points, allocated on<br />

5 for first down to one for fifth; this sadly does not<br />

truly reflect the efforts of the lesser teams, with<br />

many showing a zero score, despite many of them<br />

47


having some good and consistent lower results in a<br />

number of events.<br />

The day started well for Zambales with a resounding<br />

win by Team Zambales competitor Isaac Daylo in<br />

the swim race, followed by Team 11, the Phuket<br />

Lifeguard Club, Nai Thorn, who would be by far the<br />

Zambales teams toughest competitors during all of<br />

the day’s events.<br />

The day turned into a wrestle for supremacy<br />

between Zambales and Phuket Lifeguard Club<br />

Nai Thorn (Team 11), with the two teams winning<br />

alternate events until event 3, the board race when<br />

the Zambales team scored only a third place, with<br />

some 17 boards on the course, it is very easy to get<br />

squeezed or blocked, also drawing a far outside<br />

start did not help, but Team 11 were clear masters of<br />

this event, event 4 saw it go back to a seesaw battle<br />

with Zambales team taking a resounding win in the<br />

Ironman finishing with a full 300 meters advantage<br />

against the opposition, this continued throughout<br />

the day, right down to the final event, the beach<br />

flags race, with Zambales taking the win and Team<br />

11 taking second, giving them the overall win, a<br />

single point ahead of Team Zambales Philippines.<br />

So after a great days competition which was really<br />

well run and organized, it was off to try to get in<br />

some shopping before another short nights sleep as<br />

we were scheduled to depart to the airport at 2AM.<br />

The flight back was tiring as it entailed an 11 hour<br />

stopover in Kuala Lumpur and eventually arriving<br />

back in Manila at 2:00AM, needless to say we were<br />

really happy to see the service from RP Energy there<br />

to pick us up and deliver us back to Zambales and<br />

also grateful for the stopover for free breakfast.<br />

48<br />

A very special thanks to all that made this happen,<br />

Hon. Gov. Atty. Amor Deloso and the Provincial<br />

Government of Zambales, Hon Mayor Rundy<br />

Ebdane, Municipality of Iba, Hon. Mayor Dr.<br />

La Rainne Abad Sarmiento. Municipality of San<br />

Narciso, all of whom continually support the


competitors and lifesaving in general, Crystal Beach<br />

Resort, San Narciso, RP Energy, Marilyns Garments,<br />

plus also Tees and Prints, who supplied the team<br />

uniforms, Phuket Lifeguard Club, MY Hotel and all<br />

of the competitors and officials of the event, who,<br />

as always, made us so welcome.<br />

RESULTS:<br />

The 1st.Phuket Lifeguard Nai Thorn Beach (36<br />

points) 2nd. Team Zambales Philippines(35 points)<br />

and 3rd is Phuket lifeguard Service Nai Harn Beach<br />

(16 Points).<br />

The day turned into a<br />

wrestle for supremacy<br />

between Zambales and<br />

Phuket Lifeguard Club<br />

Nai Thorn (Team 11).<br />

The woman 1st from Le meridian Beach 2nd Is<br />

from Tanyapura and 3rd from Institute of Physical<br />

Education.<br />

Zambales Lifesaving Inc. are again hoping to be able<br />

to attend the Phuket Lifesaving Sports Competition<br />

again in <strong>2018</strong> and to find additional sponsorship to<br />

also include ladies and junior teams, also from past<br />

experience it will be necessary to arrive at least a<br />

day before the event to overcome the fatigue of<br />

travel, especially with long stopovers.<br />

Should anyone be interested they can Email<br />

slszambales@gmail.com with their proposal or call<br />

Roger Bound on 0918 922 2863.<br />

49


Words by<br />

BARRY<br />

DAWSON<br />

Photographs<br />

as credited<br />

I<br />

loilo (Hiligaynon: Kapuoran sang Iloilo;<br />

Kinaray-a: Probinsiya kang Iloilo; Filipino:<br />

Lalawigan ng Iloilo) is a province located in the<br />

region of Western Visayas in the Philippines.<br />

Iloilo occupies a major southeast portion of the<br />

island of Panay and is bordered by the province<br />

of Antique to the west.<br />

The war heavily damaged<br />

the infrastructure in Iloilo.<br />

However, the continuing<br />

conflict between the labor<br />

unions in the port area,<br />

declining sugar economy,<br />

and the deteriorating peace<br />

and order situation in the<br />

countryside forced the<br />

exodus of Ilonggos to other<br />

cities, provinces/regions and<br />

islands that offered better<br />

opportunities and business.<br />

People were moving to<br />

other cities such as Bacolod,<br />

Cebu, and Manila that<br />

led to Iloilo’s decline in<br />

economic importance in<br />

central Philippines. Rural<br />

agricultural areas continued<br />

to help the local economy.<br />

For years, because of this<br />

exodus of investors, Iloilo’s<br />

economy progressed in a<br />

moderate pace.<br />

DESTINATION<br />

Change slowly came. First came the construction<br />

of the fishing port and international seaport.<br />

One by one commercial business firms invested<br />

in Iloilo, spurring on the city to its eventual<br />

recovery.<br />

People were moving<br />

to other cities such<br />

as Bacolod, Cebu,<br />

and Manila that led<br />

to Iloilo’s decline in<br />

economic importance in<br />

central Philippines.<br />

Iloilo became a highly urbanized city in 1979<br />

by the virtue of Batas Pambansa Blg. 51.<br />

Corollary to this new status,<br />

its residents effectively lost<br />

their eligibility to vote for<br />

provincial officials.<br />

After the opening of the new<br />

commercial and business<br />

center in Mandurriao<br />

district and with the<br />

construction of<br />

a national<br />

highway<br />

that<br />

50


ILOILO<br />

Cabugao-<br />

Gamay Island,<br />

Carles, Iloilo<br />

www.reddit.com<br />

51


ertlagawan.wordpress.com<br />

Iloilo Esplanade<br />

along the Iloilo river<br />

traverses this area, big business like the SM<br />

Supermalls, SM Prime Holdings, Megaworld<br />

Corporation, Gaisano Capital, and Ayala<br />

Corporation poured in huge investments in the<br />

City, giving impetus and catalyst toward future<br />

progress.<br />

Now Iloilo City is a tourist hub where the best<br />

restaurants, museums, hotels, shopping districts,<br />

and nightlife in the province await. It is most<br />

known for the annual<br />

Dinagyang Festival,<br />

exquisite heritage sites,<br />

deliciously fresh seafood,<br />

and signature Ilonggo<br />

dishes. The city is also<br />

home to many Spanishcolonial<br />

churches, grand<br />

vintage houses, and<br />

old commercial and<br />

institutional buildings dating back to its heyday<br />

as the “Queen City of the South.<br />

The city not only<br />

appears clean,<br />

but also smells<br />

fresh and clean<br />

all the time.<br />

city not only appears clean, but also smells fresh<br />

and clean all the time. The River also is dutifully<br />

maintained to ensure it is clean and rubbish free<br />

and I am sure you will agree there is nothing more<br />

pleasing than taking a stroll along the esplanade<br />

to a clean sparkling river and unpolluted fresh<br />

air. The Mayor, The Honourable Jose Espinosa<br />

III has left no stone unturned in making sure<br />

the city and the River are rubbish free. No dirty<br />

streets and pleasingly no plastic or rubbish<br />

polluting the waterways of this magnificent city.<br />

The clean Iloilo river<br />

52<br />

Iloilo city would have to be the cleanest city<br />

in the Philippines this editor has visited so far.<br />

The streets are always clean, with no waste from<br />

street vendors or anyone else to be seen, the<br />

Food is undoubtedly Iloilo’s biggest yearround<br />

attraction. Most true-blooded locals<br />

will, without fail, offer to take you to eat at<br />

local restaurants or prepare a home-cooked<br />

Ilonggo meal if they find out<br />

that you’re a first-time visitor.<br />

Don’t miss out on savoring<br />

fresh seafood and Iloilo’s native<br />

cuisine, especially its signature<br />

dishes like La Paz Batchoy and<br />

Pancit Molo. Rapid urbanization<br />

and higher living standards in<br />

Iloilo City has given birth to<br />

a growing number of lifestyle<br />

centers. Get your caffeine fix or<br />

have a spa day. Take your pick<br />

from restaurants serving a wide<br />

range of cuisines at Europeaninspired<br />

Plazuela de Iloilo, The


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53


ILOILO<br />

Heritage buildings<br />

preserved along<br />

city streets<br />

Shops in Ayala Atria Iloilo, Smallville Complex,<br />

SM City Iloilo, Robinsons Place Iloilo, or the up<br />

and coming Iloilo Business Park.<br />

Iloilo is home to some of the most beautiful<br />

beaches and churches in the Philippines. But<br />

the province’s beauty doesn’t end with these<br />

sites. There are so much more with places to visit<br />

and things to do in this culturally rich province.<br />

From natural saltwater lagoons to having its<br />

own Christmas village, there’s a diverse variety<br />

of Iloilo tourist spots to enjoy!<br />

When you first arrive in Iloilo, take a stroll along<br />

the streets of old Iloilo and appreciate the<br />

picturesque stretch of buildings — all displaying<br />

their nostalgic beauty. It’s like a walking through<br />

a museum. Iloilo city is rich in history and this is<br />

evident when you walk along JM Basa Street,<br />

aka Calle Real. The local government has<br />

preserved the old charm of the city by restoring<br />

the enfeebled buildings that line this historic<br />

street, reflecting the architecture during the<br />

Spanish and American era. In between food trips,<br />

visit treasured historical sights scattered over<br />

different districts in the city. Walk the streets<br />

of Iloilo City Proper to find recently restored<br />

heritage buildings along Calle Real, the city’s<br />

old central business district, and other corners<br />

of the downtown area like Plaza Libertad, and<br />

the Iloilo Provincial Capitol grounds. Head<br />

over to the districts of Jaro and Molo to visit<br />

centuries-old churches and the city’s grandest<br />

ancestral houses that have survived the test of<br />

time. To start, take a tour of the Jaro Cathedral,<br />

Lizares Mansion, Casa Mariquit, Molo Church,<br />

and Bahay Camiña nga Bato.<br />

Jaro Cathedral and Belfry<br />

The Jaro Cathedral (Church of St. Elizabeth<br />

of Hungary) was built in 1864, the year the<br />

district was named a diocese by Pope Pius the<br />

IX, by order of His Grace Mariano Cuartero,<br />

first bishop of Jaro. Destroyed in the quake<br />

of January 1948 and restored by order of His<br />

Excellency Jose Ma. Cuenco, first archbishop of<br />

Jaro in 1956. The cathedral’s style is basically<br />

Baroque, with the addition of Gothic elements<br />

over many renovations. The Nuestra Senora de la<br />

Candelaria (Lady of the Candles) is the only rose<br />

among the all-male collection of statues which<br />

line the walls of the cathedral’s interiors. The<br />

Lady of Candles is perched on a glass encased<br />

shrine carved out of the facade. The limestone is<br />

said to be continuously growing, and in fact had<br />

become too large to fit into its original niche just<br />

above the present one.<br />

Her shrine is visited often by many devotees<br />

who believe the statue to be miraculous. This<br />

400-year-old image is the focus of an annual<br />

Jaro Fiesta held every February 2.<br />

The Jaro Cathedral is the first and only cathedral<br />

in Panay built in 1864. Patriot and orator,<br />

Graciano Lopez Jaena was here in December 20,<br />

1856.<br />

A high point in the history of the cathedral<br />

was the visit of Blessed Pope John Paul II, who<br />

conducted a mass on February 21, 1981. He<br />

set a crown upon the Lady of the Candles, and<br />

declared it the Patroness of the Western Visayas.<br />

exploreiloilo.com<br />

54


zko.com.ph<br />

The Lizares Mansion<br />

Reflecting a mix of American and Spanish<br />

architectural styles, the Lizares Mansion is one<br />

of Iloilo City’s most beautiful heritage mansions.<br />

It was built in 1937 by Don Emiliano Lizares, a<br />

Jaro-born sugar baron, and stands in testimony<br />

of Iloilo’s booming sugar industry during its<br />

heyday. The Lizares compound along with the<br />

mansion was sold to the Dominicans in 1962<br />

and became home of Angelicum School Iloilo<br />

from 1978. The mansion<br />

now serves as the school’s<br />

chapel.<br />

Every December, the Lizares<br />

Mansion transforms into an<br />

even more awe-inspiring<br />

sight as thousands of<br />

Christmas lights adorn every<br />

inch of its facade. This is<br />

the best time to visit.<br />

Casa Mariquit<br />

It’s like a walking<br />

through a museum. Iloilo<br />

City is rich in history and<br />

this is evident when you<br />

walk along JM Basa Street.<br />

Lopez named it after his wife, Maria Javellana,<br />

whose nickname is “Mariquit” (probably from the<br />

Tagalog word marikit, which means beautiful).<br />

What made this Spanish-colonial ancestral home<br />

equally impressive, aside from being open to the<br />

public, is the fact that it has solar panels on the<br />

roof. There is also a huge banyan tree, which, is<br />

considered to be home of the spirits at the front<br />

of the house, which roots are creeping up the<br />

walls of the house.<br />

Camiña Balay nga<br />

Bato<br />

When in Iloilo city you<br />

don’t have to go far to<br />

find beauty combined with<br />

culture. Camiña Balay nga<br />

Bato is one of the ancestral<br />

houses and a compelling<br />

cultural attraction in Iloilo.<br />

Camiña Balay nga Bato<br />

means ‘house by the river’.<br />

Jaro Cathedral<br />

the Lizares Mansion<br />

Iloilo is associated with legacies of Spanish<br />

colonial era. Most noticeable lies in its<br />

architecture, where images of the city in the<br />

18th century show manorial old houses, in<br />

their ornate façades combined with classical<br />

western influences and folk-art motifs. Relics<br />

and mementos of the past abound. Mute, yet<br />

eloquent, reminding everyone of Iloilo’s colorful<br />

past bequeathed to the present.<br />

Casa Mariquit is considered one of the oldest<br />

buildings in Iloilo and was built some 200 years<br />

ago, by Fernando H. Lopez Sr., who served as<br />

vice president of the Philippines for three terms:<br />

55


ILOILO<br />

56<br />

And was built between 1860<br />

and 1865 in a style we call<br />

‘arquitectura mestiza’, the<br />

house is a beautiful example<br />

of indigenous Filipino building<br />

merged with colonial Spanish<br />

influences. Luth and Gerard<br />

Camiña, 4th generation owners,<br />

spent 10 years renovating<br />

Camiña Balay nga Bato into<br />

the treasure you see today.<br />

The Filipino bahay kubo, or<br />

cube house, dictates the shape<br />

of the structure. The shutters,<br />

or ‘ventanillas’, are made of<br />

mother of pearl, known locally<br />

as capiz. The walls are batten and board, the<br />

floors are narra and kamagong hardwood. The<br />

ceiling is made of nipa and bamboo, plaited in<br />

a sawali weave. Most of the pottery inside the<br />

house comes from Isla<br />

de Gigantes, a group<br />

According to Project<br />

Iloilo,“in the old days,<br />

the Lady had a habit of<br />

disappearing early in<br />

the mornings.<br />

of islands off Panay.<br />

Not only can you enjoy<br />

the wonders of this<br />

beautiful cultural home,<br />

but you can also enjoy<br />

some Filipino style<br />

refreshments at a very<br />

reasonable price. Camiña<br />

Balay nga Bato will serve<br />

you Iloilo’s best pancit molo and tsokolate in<br />

their sunny ‘balcon comedor’, or casual dining<br />

room. The molo soup comes from the kitchen<br />

of Kapitan Ising, a local legend. Each dumpling<br />

contains pork, chicken and shrimp, encased<br />

in a soft rice flour wrapper. The broth is full<br />

of flavour but lighter than you’d expect. It is<br />

something that you have to try it to understand.<br />

After trying the soup, it’s time for a cup of<br />

hot chocolate. Camiña Balay Nga Bato makes<br />

Camiña Balay Nga Bato<br />

Casa Mariquit<br />

tsokolate the traditional Filipino way. The cacao<br />

is grown on the owners’ family farm, made into<br />

tablea and heated in special cast iron jugs over a<br />

single flame. While boiling the mixture is beaten<br />

with a ‘batidor’, a whisk made from guava tree<br />

wood. The final cup is an incredibly rich and<br />

comforting drink. Camiña Balay nga Bato serves<br />

its tsokolate ‘espeso’: thick. Sip it straight or try it<br />

with local biscuits. There’s a lot to see at Camiña<br />

Balay nga Bato, from antique furniture, to old<br />

photographs, collections of pottery, religious<br />

altars, and relics recovered from other ancestral<br />

houses in Iloilo. But if you have a penchant for<br />

textiles, you’ll definitely enjoy checking out the<br />

weavers working the looms on the ground floor,<br />

and running your fingers over the lovely fabrics<br />

for sale. A visit to Camiña Balay Nga Bato is<br />

one of the best things to do in Iloilo. Make sure<br />

you set aside several hours to enjoy the whole<br />

building and the good eats. And take your time


in the curio shop looking for a few interesting<br />

mementos to take home as gifts for your loved<br />

ones.<br />

Try to make sure you are in Iloilo for one of<br />

its many festivals like the Iloilo Dinagyang<br />

Festival, which is one of the Philippines’ biggest<br />

religious and cultural festivals that transforms<br />

Iloilo City into one big venue for spectacle and<br />

merry making. Watch thousands of Dinagyang<br />

Ati performers fill the city streets as they dance<br />

in sync to fast-paced thundering drum beats. In<br />

addition to the Dinagyang Festival, the city is<br />

also host to many exciting events like the Paraw<br />

Regatta Festival, Jaro Fiesta, and Chinese New<br />

Year.<br />

Jaro Fiesta<br />

The annual fiesta of Jaro, is one of the biggest<br />

religious celebrations in the Philippines as<br />

it delivers solemnity, splendor, and mystery.<br />

Other than the traditional religious ceremonies<br />

being performed, agro-industrial fairs, beauty<br />

pageants, luncheons and dinners, none can<br />

ever be more immaculate than pondering about<br />

the famous icon of the Nuestra Señora de la<br />

Candelaria. Local legend says that the statue was<br />

discovered by a lone fisherman along the banks<br />

of the river when he was fishing. Other curious<br />

individuals peered at the icon and tried to lift it<br />

up, but to no avail. They said at least ten men<br />

attempted to remove the image altogether, but<br />

they failed. It was just the fishermen who could<br />

carry the statue as he gave it to the church.<br />

According to Project Iloilo, “in the old days, the<br />

Lady had a habit of disappearing early in the<br />

mornings. A thick mist would surround her niche<br />

at the pediment of the Cathedral, and around<br />

that time, a beautiful lady with long hair could<br />

be seen bathing her child at an artesian well<br />

in the plaza, facing the old Jaro Rural Health<br />

Building.”<br />

Participants to one<br />

of the city’s festive<br />

events<br />

57


Paraw regatta<br />

participants<br />

After going pitch black, the icon would grow<br />

much larger than it was. A healthy, thick vine<br />

was also recounted by parishioners to have<br />

grown within the abode.<br />

Words spread quickly<br />

The Paraw Regatta<br />

Festival is an event<br />

which may impress<br />

both professionals and<br />

beginners.<br />

that almost the whole<br />

nation focused itself on<br />

the miracle. February the<br />

2nd is her feast day, and<br />

it is the best time of the<br />

year where foreign and<br />

domestic tourists took a<br />

peek at the lady in her<br />

abode by the cathedral.<br />

They would find that the Lady has now grown<br />

and looked over the district of Jaro. Various<br />

streets are closed for vehicular traffic from 4pm<br />

to 7pm for the fiesta.<br />

The Paraw Regatta Festival<br />

The Paraw Regatta attracts boat-lovers who<br />

cannot imagine their life without sailing. The<br />

Paraw Regatta Festival is an event which may<br />

impress both professionals and beginners.<br />

Every February, hundreds of people take part in<br />

this sailboat race in the Iloilo Strait, mostly on<br />

paraws. A Paraw is a double outrigger sailboat<br />

that originated from the central part of the<br />

Philippines. The sail of a paraw is called layag—it<br />

can be made of cloth, woven mats, or canvas. As<br />

a result, each boat looks unique and colorful. In<br />

addition to the variety of sails, paraws may have<br />

different waterline lengths, and can be painted<br />

or unpainted. At first, the Iloilo Paraw Regatta<br />

was a half-day sailboat race but nowadays it is a<br />

ILOILO<br />

58


www.iloilo.net.ph<br />

www.iloilo.net.ph<br />

Samba de regatta<br />

Body painting contest at Paraw Festival<br />

Map of Iloilo<br />

59


Ms. Paraw Regatta<br />

beauty contest<br />

Surviving the<br />

centuries, the paraws<br />

have become a vital<br />

part of the Filipino<br />

seafaring life.<br />

60<br />

large-scale festival which has numerous events.<br />

The main events are naturally paraw races that<br />

take place between Iloilo City and the nearby<br />

Guimaras Island. 30 kilometers long race course<br />

starts from the coast of Panay, stretches down<br />

the coast of Guimaras, and finishes at Villa<br />

Beach. Along with the sailing competitions,<br />

Paraw Regatta Festival<br />

offers such events as<br />

paraw-inspired furniture<br />

making, miniature paraw<br />

making, paraw photo<br />

contests,<br />

and others.<br />

exhibitions,<br />

The regatta is a race<br />

among seafarers on<br />

colourful sailboats called<br />

Paraws in the straits between Guimaras Island<br />

and the city of Iloilo. The present-day paraw<br />

managed to maintain its original design from<br />

the sailboats of the first settlers from Borneo<br />

who were in search of a peaceful home in 1212<br />

A.D. Surviving the centuries, the paraws have<br />

become a vital part of the Filipino seafaring life.<br />

The first Paraw Race started in 1973 with the<br />

mission to preserve the historic value of the<br />

paraws. Today, in it’s 46th year, the event has<br />

grown from being a boat race to a festival with<br />

various interesting activities such as the making<br />

of miniature paraws, the Miss Paraw Regatta ,<br />

jet ski racing, miniature paraw racing, furniture<br />

making, the painting of the sails, photo exhibits,<br />

and many other activities culminating with<br />

the main race. Awards and the lighted paraw,<br />

a spectacular light show of the paraws. The<br />

grand opening ceremony for <strong>2018</strong> was held on<br />

the lawns of SM Iloilo. The opening speech was<br />

made by the Paraw Regatta President Mr. Ronald<br />

Raymond L. Sebastian, welcoming one and all,<br />

this was followed by a spectacular display of<br />

colour, native costumes and dance routines, with<br />

the 15 Miss Paraw Regatta Finalists showing<br />

colour and vibrance in the dance and native<br />

costume segments.<br />

And as Ilonggos take pride of their history and<br />

culture, so do the sailors and the boat makers<br />

who have inherited a legacy that became<br />

synonymous to the birth of a province and the


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The Marcelo Fernan<br />

bridge<br />

Guimaras Island-<br />

White Beach<br />

Hiligaynon-speaking region of the country. The<br />

sails on these colourful sailboats are all hand<br />

crafted and designed. The annual festival is held<br />

in February in the Villa de Arevalo district, Iloilo<br />

City, Philippines. Its main event is a sailboat race<br />

in Iloilo Strait that features the Paraw, a Visayan<br />

double outrigger sail boat. It is the oldest<br />

traditional craft event in Asia and the largest<br />

sailing event in the Philippines It is one of Iloilo<br />

City’s tourism events along with the Dinagyang<br />

Festival, Kasadyahan Festival, Chinese New<br />

Year festival and La Candelaria Fiesta. The Iloilo<br />

Paraw Regatta began as a half-day sailboat race<br />

but is now a multi-day, multi-event festival.<br />

ILOILO<br />

62


Kayak Racing in<br />

Palompon<br />

The Paraw race course is a 30 kilometers (19 mi)<br />

long, running up the coast of Panay and then<br />

down the coast of Guimaras, before returning<br />

to the finish at Villa Beach Participating paraws<br />

are categorized based on the waterline length<br />

of the boat and further classified according to<br />

their sails as “unpainted” or “painted” The sails<br />

are painted with colorful designs.<br />

The racing breaks down into two classes. Boats<br />

of length 16 ft and below of strictly traditional<br />

construction and those 16 ft 1 inch through to<br />

22 ft with a wider range of materials allowed.<br />

Planning your trip to Iloilo during the Paraw<br />

Regatta will ensure you a week of fun filled<br />

activities.<br />

Skimboarding<br />

There are many watersports activities you can<br />

indulge in when in Iloilo, and one of these is<br />

skimboarding. Some young entrepreneurs<br />

started Mad Skimboards,<br />

a project between friends<br />

some 8 years ago in a<br />

garage, to spread the<br />

love of the sport by<br />

bringing affordable quality<br />

skimboards to the<br />

Philippines. Each board is<br />

hand made in Iloilo, using<br />

a laminating technique,<br />

giving a solid board of matching imported<br />

quality at half the price. They are now the most<br />

popular board used in the Philippines.<br />

Each board is hand made<br />

in Iloilo, using a laminating<br />

technique, giving a solid<br />

board of matching imported<br />

quality at half the price.<br />

63


ILOILO<br />

Colorful island<br />

hopping<br />

Guimaras Island<br />

When in Iloilo a trip to Guimaras Island is a must.<br />

If you are not planning to stay there for a few<br />

days then you have to set aside a full day to<br />

enjoy as much as you can of what the island has<br />

to offer, but you will find<br />

one day is not enough<br />

to enjoy this island<br />

paradise. The island<br />

is located Southeast<br />

of Panay and just ten<br />

minutes by bunker from<br />

Iloilo City the fare to<br />

the island is a mere 14<br />

pesos, being blessed<br />

with an abundance of<br />

clean waters surrounded by white sand beaches,<br />

picturesque coves and offshore inlets, vast areas<br />

of agriculture and marked with a number of its<br />

famed mango trees, it is little wonder that it is<br />

Paradise awaits each<br />

and every visitor<br />

to this magical part<br />

of the Philippines.<br />

enticing visitors from right across the Philippine<br />

Archipelago and overseas, with its unspoiled<br />

rustic settings and unblemished simplicity of life<br />

and tranquillity. There are five municipalities<br />

in Guimaras, with each one offering something<br />

different to visitors and locals alike.<br />

Beaches and Islands of Iloilo<br />

Like most destinations in the Pacific, Iloilo’s<br />

coast is adorned with some of the most beautiful<br />

beaches and off-shore islands in the Philippine<br />

Archipelago abundant with scenic seascapes and<br />

a rich marine life. From Iloilo’s northern islands<br />

to the province’s southern beaches, paradise<br />

awaits each and every visitor to this magical<br />

part of the Philippines. Picturesque beaches<br />

are scattered across the seafood rich waters of<br />

Northern Iloilo. The coastal towns of Carles,<br />

Estancia, Concepcion, and Ajuy are home to the<br />

best islands including Islas de Gigantes , Sicogon,<br />

64


Mayor of Iloilo City,<br />

the Honourable<br />

Jose Espinosa III<br />

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*P750 PER YEAR<br />

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Bakwitan cave, Gigantes<br />

ILOILO<br />

66<br />

Bulubadiangan (Sandbar), Agho, and Marbuena.<br />

Grey sand and pebble beaches also abound in the<br />

mainland coast of Balasan, Batad, San Dionisio,<br />

Barotac Viejo, Banate, and Anilao. Head over to<br />

the southern coast of mainland Iloilo to find wellpreserved<br />

marine sanctuaries in San Joaquin and<br />

peaceful gray sand beaches in Miagao, Guimbal,<br />

Tigbauan, and Oton. They might not be as<br />

popular as Northern Iloilo’s, but they are great to<br />

visit if you’re looking for a peaceful beach setting<br />

that can be reached more easily from Iloilo City.<br />

Gigantes<br />

Approximately 5 hours from Iloilo city is<br />

Gigantes a remote group of islands that is part<br />

of Carles town in Northern Iloilo. Sought after<br />

for their pristine white sand beaches, mystical<br />

rock formations, and fresh seafood. They are<br />

currently the most popular island destination<br />

in the entire province of Iloilo. Tours normally<br />

include Cabugao Gamay Island, Antonia Beach,<br />

and Tangke, but there are a lot more islands and<br />

beaches to explore for more adventurous.<br />

Concepcion<br />

Before the popularity in the Gigantes increased,<br />

the islands of Concepcion were the better<br />

known islands to visit. There are 16 beautiful<br />

islands in Concepcion including Bulubadiangan<br />

(Sandbar), Pan de Azucar, Agho, Malangabang,<br />

and Baliguian. In addition to inviting white sands<br />

and pristine waters of the beaches, the area is<br />

quite special because of the scenic presence of<br />

majestic Mt. Manaphag in Pan de Azucar Island<br />

that towers over the landscape. Taking about 3<br />

hours including ferry ride the trip is well worth<br />

the time.<br />

Ajuy Islands<br />

Only an hour from Iloilo City makes the<br />

islands of Ajuy are the most easily reached in<br />

Northern Iloilo. The most famous in this cluster<br />

is Marbuena Island, which is home to a lovely<br />

island resort. Ajuy’s other islands include the<br />

fishing community of Nasidman, and Calabazas<br />

where visitors can find the ruins of a Spanish-era<br />

lighthouse ruins.<br />

South East Asian Fisheries<br />

Development<br />

Travelling south coastal from Iloilo City to the<br />

beaches and pristine waters of the southern part<br />

of Iloilo, a place well worth paying a visit to is<br />

the South East Asian Fisheries Development.


Situated in Tigbauan, about 30 minutes’ drive<br />

from the city centre was established for the<br />

protection and enhancement of marine life in<br />

the Philippines it showcases the types of marine<br />

life in the area. Another important aspect of the<br />

establishment is the hatcheries breeding milk<br />

fish and other varieties for human consumption.<br />

With breeders weighing up to 20 kilos each<br />

millions of eggs are hatched and shipped out to<br />

fish farmers. Each female breeder is capable of<br />

producing 1.3 million eggs per breeding season.<br />

With breeders weighing<br />

up to 20 kilos each<br />

millions of eggs are<br />

hatched and shipped<br />

out to fish farmers.<br />

Guimbal<br />

With a 9 kilometers of shoreline facing the<br />

pristine blue waters of the Panay Gulf, it has<br />

attracted tourists from different places because<br />

of its scenic beaches and inland resorts. Guimbal<br />

produces mango in Iloilo as well as other seasonal<br />

fruits. Farming and fishing are among the main<br />

sources of livelihood of its people. The Guimbal<br />

Church is one of the oldest churches in the<br />

country. Built in 1774 by Father Campos. This<br />

yellow sandstone church is made from adobe<br />

stones called “igang” and “coral stone” quarried<br />

from Guimaras.<br />

Miagao<br />

The Municipality of Miagao is a beautiful place<br />

you won’t want to miss to drop by when in the<br />

City and Province of Iloilo. Easily accessible<br />

through various modes of transportation due to<br />

its proximity to the City of Iloilo, Miagao can be<br />

reached via a 40-minutes bus, air-conditioned<br />

van or jeepney ride from the City of Iloilo. It is<br />

Marine museum<br />

Marine life at the South East Asian Fisheries Development<br />

67


also accessible via the Municipality of San Jose,<br />

capital town of the Province of Antique through<br />

a one-hour bus or van ride. Miagao is a mere<br />

three (3) hours away by land from Caticlan,<br />

jump off point to the Island Paradise of Boracay,<br />

passing through the scenic Province of Antique.<br />

The Miag-ao Church, or Church of Santo Tomas<br />

de Villanueva, was built in 1786 by Spanish<br />

Augustinian missionaries and was declared<br />

as part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site<br />

“Baroque Churches of<br />

The church and its<br />

watchtowers were also<br />

built to defend the town<br />

and its people against<br />

raids by the Moros.<br />

the Philippines” in 1993.<br />

On the front facade,<br />

which is flanked by two<br />

watchtower belfries,<br />

one can see the unique<br />

blending of Spanish and<br />

native influences.<br />

The central feature<br />

of the bas-relief facade is a large coconut<br />

tree which reaches almost to the apex. While<br />

an integral part of the Philippine landscape,<br />

the coconut tree is also the subject of lore.<br />

According to an old Philippine legend, the<br />

coconut tree was the only bequest from a<br />

loving mother to her two children, a tree which<br />

sustained them for life. On the church’s facade<br />

the coconut tree appears as the “tree of life” to<br />

which St. Christopher carrying the Child Jesus<br />

on his shoulder is clinging to. The lesser facades<br />

feature the daily life of Miagaowanons during<br />

the time. Also depicted are other native flora<br />

and fauna, as well as native dress.<br />

The church and its watchtowers were also built<br />

to defend the town and its people against raids<br />

by the Moros. It therefore has thick walls and,<br />

reportedly, secret passages. Indeed stretching<br />

along the Iloilo coast are defensive towers,<br />

but none that equal the size of the Miag-ao.<br />

It is because of this defensive purpose that it is<br />

sometimes referred to as the Miag-ao Fortress<br />

Church.<br />

San Joaquin<br />

San Joaquin is located in the southern tip of<br />

Iloilo Province and Panay Island. It is bordered<br />

by mountains in the north and Sibalom, Antique.<br />

West of it is the towns of Hamtic and Tobias<br />

Fornier in Antique and east of it the town of<br />

Miagao, Iloilo. The south of San Joaquin is a<br />

coastline facing the Panay Gulf where marine<br />

sanctuaries have been declared as Marine<br />

Protected Areas (MPAs). One of the rivers that<br />

traverse the town is the Siwaragan River with<br />

Barangay Siwaragan and Bucaya situated in<br />

its mouth. Another river in San Joaquin is the<br />

Surraga River.<br />

Cabugao Gamay<br />

A small island located two kilometers off the<br />

coast of Isla de Gigantes Sur in Carles. Seen<br />

from afar, its peculiar shape and inherent beauty<br />

is sure to attract the curiosity of most travelers.<br />

An easily conquered foot trail leads to the top<br />

of a hill that provides a gorgeous view of the<br />

island’s white sand beach and emerald green<br />

Miag-ao Church,<br />

or Church of Santo<br />

Tomas de Villanueva<br />

ILOILO<br />

68


SUBIC BAY CEBU<br />

DAVAO<br />

MANILA BORACAY PUERTO PRINCESA<br />

www.broadwatermarine.com<br />

69


ILOILO<br />

waters. Getting to Cabugao Island takes up to<br />

45 minutes by ferry from Gigantes Norte Island<br />

where most resorts in Gigantes are located<br />

Antonia Beach<br />

This beautiful white sand beach is to be found at<br />

a secluded corner of Gigantes Sur. The pristine<br />

waters that surround Antonia turns into a hypnotic<br />

turquoise color under the<br />

beautiful morning sunrise.<br />

The beach is an excellent<br />

place for swimming, picnics,<br />

and beach camping.<br />

Gigantes Sur<br />

Gigantes Sur along with<br />

Gigantes Norte, are the<br />

two biggest islands in the<br />

area. Most of Gigantes’ major tourist spots can<br />

be found on or off the shore of the southern<br />

coast of Gigantes Sur. These include the placid<br />

waters of Tangke Lagoon, enchanting caverns<br />

of Pawikan Cave, white sandy beach of Antonia<br />

Beach, the shifting sandbar of Bantigue, and the<br />

popular Cabugao Gamay Island.<br />

Gigantes Norte<br />

Tourists visit the<br />

island for its clear<br />

blue waters and a long<br />

white sandbar that<br />

shapeshifts.<br />

Gigantes Norte is home to the biggest cluster<br />

of resorts in the Gigantes group of islands. In<br />

addition to being a popular base for island<br />

hopping tours, a few interesting spots could<br />

also be found within the island like the Spanishera<br />

lighthouse ruins on its northern shores and<br />

Bakwitan Cave on the southern half.<br />

Agho Island<br />

Agho Island is a small<br />

island paradise found in<br />

Concepcion. It has an<br />

extensive white sand beach,<br />

crystal clear waters and<br />

a sprawling coral garden.<br />

The island also has a<br />

shifting sandbar similar<br />

to Bulubadiangan. The fine white sands of the<br />

beach, Agho is perhaps the best in Northern<br />

Iloilo. What makes it even more beautiful and<br />

majestic is the awesome view of Mt. Pan de<br />

Azucar and its surrounding islands.<br />

Cabugao Gamay Island<br />

70


The Shifting sandbar of<br />

Bulubadiangan Island<br />

Bulubadiangan or “sandbar” island is a popular<br />

island attraction in Concepcion. Many local and<br />

foreign tourists visit the island for its clear blue<br />

waters and a long white sandbar that shapeshifts<br />

depending on the direction of the wind. There<br />

is a resort in the island called Sandbar Island<br />

Beach Resort.<br />

Sicogon Island<br />

Sicogon Island in Carles is one of the numerous<br />

beautiful attractions in Northern Iloilo. It<br />

became a popular tourist destination during<br />

the 70s and 80s because of the high-end<br />

resort suitably named “Sicogon Island Resort”<br />

that operated in the island. Sicogon has many<br />

white sand and cream-colored beaches that<br />

had largely become clear of tourist crowds after<br />

the resort closed down. Currently, Ayala Land<br />

is developing Sicogon as a tourism estate with<br />

residential buildings, retail shops, forest trails,<br />

diving spots, an airport with a 1.2-kilometer<br />

runway and a jetty.<br />

Marbuena Island<br />

sandbar that stretches more than a hundred feet<br />

away from the shore during low tide. A nature<br />

trail encircles the island, offering a panoramic<br />

view of the sea and surrounding islands. The trail<br />

continues inland to an old-growth forest filled<br />

with large flocks of migratory birds and fruit<br />

bats.<br />

Iloilo Water World<br />

Waterworld Iloilo opened in 2016 and is the only<br />

solar powered watersports park in the Visayas.<br />

The Park offers extreme water rides, 17 slides<br />

for kids and kids at heart, a 222 meter long lazy<br />

river, water play area for toddlers, an open and<br />

a covered waterpark, all manned by 30 certified<br />

lifeguards. ‘Safety is our top priority’ Tiu adds.<br />

The said waterpark also offers automated<br />

lockers, air-conditioned suites, themed rooms,<br />

and lounge chairs. The aim of Waterworld is<br />

to improve branding and profile of Iloilo City<br />

as a tourist destination for both local and<br />

international visitors,<br />

How to get there<br />

Bulubadiangan Island, Concepcion<br />

Marbuena Island in Ajuy is home to Marbuena<br />

Island Resort. It also has a gleaming white<br />

From Manila there are numerous flights daily from<br />

Manila with all major airlines servicing the Island.<br />

71


ILOILO<br />

Waterworld Iloilo<br />

From Boracay, Ceres liner makes about 4 trips<br />

daily the trip takes about 5 hours.<br />

Places to Eat<br />

Because Iloilo is famous for its food and<br />

delicacies, there are numerous restaurants with<br />

varying cuisines that<br />

will satisfy even the<br />

There are also a<br />

number of places<br />

where you can enjoy<br />

Iloilo ‘s signature dish<br />

batchoy<br />

most discerning palate,<br />

places like Tatoy’s for<br />

the true to life Filipino<br />

fare. There are also a<br />

number of places where<br />

you can enjoy Iloilo‘s<br />

signature dish batchoy,<br />

and for a great meal of<br />

international cuisine at a<br />

price that will not break the bank there is the<br />

brewery, where you can enjoy an international or<br />

Filipino meal and wash it down with one of the<br />

many imported beers available both in bottles<br />

and draft.<br />

Places to Stay<br />

There are a number of hotels and resorts to<br />

choose from in Iloilo. Some of the upmarket<br />

places like The Mansion and host to Miss<br />

Paraw Regatta candidates is one of the better<br />

establishments, so is the Premier Hotel Des<br />

Rio. While the hotel where <strong>ABW</strong> stayed for the<br />

9 days we were here is the Iloilo Grand Hotel,<br />

who offer very clean and comfortable rooms at<br />

a very reasonable rate. The rooms have cable<br />

TV, free Wi-fi, hot water, friendly service and<br />

a great restaurant. No matter what you taste<br />

is Iloilo has accommodation that will suit you.<br />

All in all Iloilo city is one place that will<br />

having you wanting to return and return<br />

many times bringing your friends with you<br />

to enjoy what you have already sampled<br />

from this beautiful fresh clean friendly city<br />

of the Philippines.<br />

Active Boating and Watersports would like<br />

to express their gratitude for the on-going<br />

assistance of the Department of Tourism Region<br />

VI and tourism officers Ray Tabafunda, Jas<br />

Sedigo and driver Rey L. Losañes. Along with<br />

City Tourism Officer Junel Ann P. Divinagracia<br />

and Richard Paolo B. Porai for their dedication<br />

to their duty and the city of Iloilo in providing<br />

the guidance needed to gather the information<br />

contained in this feature.<br />

72


Sicogon Island<br />

newsinfo.inquirer.net<br />

Sandbar at Marbuena Island<br />

La Paz Batchoy<br />

Tangke Lagoon<br />

thebackpackcouple.com myiloilo.net<br />

Mt. Manaphag in Pan de<br />

Azucar Island<br />

73


Choosing The<br />

Right One<br />

When Buying<br />

A Boat<br />

74


Owning a boat is life-changing, that is why<br />

choosing the right one is the biggest<br />

decision to make. There is no secret formula when<br />

trying to select the right boat for you or your<br />

family but here is a guide on what to consider<br />

when buying a boat.<br />

number of reputable dealers in the Philippines like,<br />

Broadwater Marine who have 6 outlets in Luzon<br />

the Visayas and Mindanao, there is also RDH<br />

Marine, who deal exclusively in the secondhand<br />

market and the owner/manager has had over 30<br />

years’ experience in boating.<br />

Words by<br />

BARRY<br />

DAWSON<br />

Photographs<br />

as credited<br />

Choose The Right Boat<br />

Purchasing a boat is a lot like<br />

buying a car. You’re making an<br />

investment for you and your<br />

family; make sure that you are<br />

comfortable with all aspects of<br />

your new boat. As with a car,<br />

there are pros and cons to both<br />

new and pre-owned boats.<br />

When buying boats, if the<br />

budget allows, try looking<br />

at new first. The reasons are<br />

obvious: You know every piece<br />

of the history of your boat and<br />

its motor; if something goes<br />

wrong, you have a warranty to<br />

rely upon; you do not have to<br />

focus on all of the restoration<br />

or repair projects - allowing<br />

you to get out on the water right away; and finally,<br />

you often can order the boat custom to your needs<br />

and tastes.<br />

For first time buyers, sometimes the best option<br />

is to look at the secondhand market. Make sure<br />

you look to a reputable dealer who knows the<br />

industry, and stands by their product. There are a<br />

When buying<br />

boats, if the<br />

budget allows,<br />

try looking at<br />

new first.<br />

Here are the three main<br />

factors to consider when<br />

buying a boat:<br />

1. Activities – To narrow<br />

down your search, simply ask<br />

yourself how the boat will<br />

be used. One of the terrific<br />

things about boating is that<br />

there are boats designed<br />

for different activities, and<br />

there truly is something for<br />

everyone.<br />

2. Passengers – Considering<br />

the passenger capacity of the<br />

boat will give you an idea on<br />

the boat length that would be<br />

better for you. Boats usually<br />

range from 19 feet to 80 feet.<br />

3. Price Range – How much are you willing to<br />

spend? All new boats have options, knowing<br />

how much is within your price range will help you<br />

decide which ones are really needed.<br />

With so many choices, figuring out which boat is<br />

best for you is not an easy task. With every builder<br />

75


Benataue 1<br />

Chaparral<br />

saying that their boats are the highest quality, have<br />

the best features, and are the best value, what is a<br />

consumer to do?<br />

Choosing the right engine<br />

When choosing to buy the right boat, you’ve<br />

probably noticed three different types of engines:<br />

the outboard, inboard and<br />

inboard/outboard (I/O). You<br />

may already have set notions<br />

about one or the other, but<br />

the fact is that one is not really<br />

better than the other. It’s all a<br />

matter of preference and what<br />

you plan to do on and with<br />

your boat. Before you make<br />

a decision, you should really<br />

assess what your plans are<br />

for your boat and how much you know about either<br />

engine, and find out which engine is best suited for<br />

you and your needs.<br />

You’ve probably seen outboards on the boats of<br />

friends and family. They are the most popular amongst<br />

boat owners and are often the default choice for<br />

fishing, recreational and light inshore boats.<br />

For inboards diesel is<br />

by far the better choice,<br />

being far less expensive<br />

in both running costs and<br />

maintenance.<br />

Inboard motors require a large box in the middle<br />

of the boat, which will house the engine; they<br />

are much quieter than outboards, which is great<br />

for entertaining. They are more expensive than<br />

an outboard motor and harder to load onto a<br />

trailer, but because they were modeled after<br />

car engines, they are more fuel-efficient, have<br />

better horsepower and<br />

more torque. Because the<br />

transmissions are inside the<br />

vessel, more cabin space is<br />

allotted.<br />

Fuel Choices<br />

With outboards you have<br />

the choice of two stoke<br />

or 4 stroke? A two-stroke<br />

engine works by featuring<br />

a compression stroke followed by an explosion<br />

stroke, which uses the previously compressed<br />

fuel. Since two-stroke engines do not include<br />

valves, their construction is simpler and many<br />

mechanics argue that they are easier to work<br />

on. Additionally, two-stroke engines offer<br />

double the power for their size due to the fact<br />

that there are twice as many strokes for each<br />

revolution. Finally, two-stroke outboard motors<br />

are significantly lighter and cost far less to<br />

make. The main disadvantage of the two-stroke<br />

outboard motor is that it does not have the same<br />

longevity as a four-stroke. Two-stroke motors<br />

require a mixture of oil and gas to lubricate all<br />

of the moving parts, which can be expensive and<br />

somewhat difficult to formulate. Additionally,<br />

two-stroke engines are less fuel-efficient,<br />

get fewer miles per gallon and produce more<br />

emissions than four-stroke outboard motors.<br />

76<br />

Electric outboards once was a specialty amongst<br />

the select few, but with maturing technology this<br />

has changed dramatically with the introduction<br />

of mainstream models by manufacturers like<br />

Torqeedo, and by far is a smart choice in today’s<br />

technology.


For inboards diesel is by far the better choice,<br />

being far less expensive in both running costs and<br />

maintenance.<br />

Find Your Perfect Fit<br />

• Styling — Of course, the first thing many of us<br />

will be drawn to is the way a boat looks, whether<br />

that’s at a boat show, a dealer’s showroom, or<br />

out on the water. Look for styling that fits YOUR<br />

particular style, whether that’s flashy or slightly<br />

more conservative.<br />

• Seating — you might not think so, but there’s<br />

a pretty big difference in the way each one of the<br />

boat manufacturers configure their seating. The<br />

first hands-on test should be seeing if the boat has<br />

enough seating. If all goes as planned, you’ll be<br />

spending a lot of time in this spot, so if anything<br />

feels awkward to you now, that feeling will be<br />

magnified as time goes on.<br />

• Interior Ergonomics — most models today<br />

come with adjustable positions (for safety as well<br />

as comfort). Make sure you can easily see your<br />

gauges and switches. The boat should feel natural<br />

and comfortable on the inside.<br />

• Versatility — Depending on how you will<br />

primarily use your boat, there are some things to<br />

consider. For instance if you’ll be using the boat<br />

to tow water skiers, make sure you have plenty of<br />

horsepower, a good aft-facing spotter seat with<br />

grab handles, and an oversized mirror for the driver.<br />

If you’re looking for transportation out to your<br />

cottage or to get to your favorite camping island,<br />

your top selling points will be fuel capacity and<br />

storage. Typical boaters may swoon at convenient<br />

amenities like cup-holders, easy-to-climb boarding<br />

ladders, and swim platforms.<br />

• Berth or Trailer: You must also consider where<br />

your boat will be stored when not in use at a<br />

marina berth, private berth or removed from the<br />

My Dynamo<br />

water and put on a boat trailer. As long as the<br />

dimensions and more particularly the weight of<br />

you boat remain fairly low, these craft could<br />

indeed be taken to the sea or inland water areas<br />

using trailers fastened to the back of your car.<br />

The following facilities are only needed on the<br />

coast: land areas for parking the car and trailer;<br />

and a boat ramp to be able to launch your boat.<br />

• Innovations — More and more these days, some<br />

of the key differences among manufacturers are<br />

the innovative solutions they are coming up with<br />

to solve some of the issues common to all boats.<br />

The biggest one of course is braking. Various<br />

braking solutions are now available. Steering is<br />

another big feature that continues to be refined.<br />

Perhaps also consider a speed-limiting system<br />

that will keep inexperienced drivers from going<br />

too fast too soon. An easy-to-operate reverse<br />

control is also something you’ll find yourself<br />

using more than you think...especially when<br />

docking.<br />

Whether you opt for a day boat or a yacht, always<br />

remember that there should be no compromising<br />

when it comes to boating.<br />

Savanah<br />

77


Sailing Tips<br />

You’ve always been interested to sail, but you know little about boat parts, the confusing technobabble,<br />

and what little you know is making your head spin in four different directions! Worry no<br />

more. This continuing series of articles is for you: it covers tips regarding hardware present on most boats,<br />

as well as common sailing techniques, terms and definitions, the names of the different pieces of hardware,<br />

and much more. This will keep you informed about most things you will need before you begin your own<br />

sailing excursion. Be sure to consult with an experienced sailor and someone knowledgeable about boats.<br />

Steering on<br />

downwind courses<br />

is more difficult<br />

when there are larger<br />

waves.<br />

Article<br />

excerpts<br />

reprinted<br />

from<br />

the book<br />

CRUISER<br />

HANDLING<br />

by BOB BOND<br />

& STEVE<br />

SLEIGHT<br />

78<br />

Sailing goosewinged<br />

When sailing downwind in light airs, you may<br />

wish to consider ways of improving the boat’s<br />

performance, as most Bermudan-rigged sloops are<br />

underpowered on this point of sailing. If you are not<br />

sufficiently experienced to handle a spinnaker, or if<br />

you don’t have enough crew on board, then you<br />

must consider other options. These are: poling out a<br />

large headsail, flying a cruising chute, or using twin<br />

head sails. You will also need to get the mainsail to<br />

perform as efficiently as possible, and it should be<br />

eased out as much as possible, but not so far that<br />

the boom touches the shrouds. If you have a slack<br />

kicking strap, you will not get a good performance<br />

out of the mainsail, as the boom will rise and the<br />

mainsail will twist, resulting in a loss of power. It may<br />

also cause the boat to roll violently in strong winds<br />

and possibly to broach. To prevent an accidental<br />

gybe you can rig a boom preventer. Steering on<br />

downwind courses is more difficult when there are<br />

larger waves. If the boat is on a broad reach, the<br />

wave crests will pick up the quarter of the boat<br />

Boom preventer


Downwind Sailing<br />

Double head sail<br />

Downwind sailing<br />

with a cruising<br />

chute<br />

Broaching<br />

and attempt to turn the boat to windward, so the<br />

helmsman must steer to counteract this tendency.<br />

Poling out a Headsail<br />

A headsail can be poled out to give extra speed in<br />

light weather, or to balance the boat when running<br />

downwind in strong winds. A spinnaker pole is<br />

normally used to pole out the sail. Clip the inboard<br />

end of the pole to the mast and attach an uphaul/<br />

downhaul. Take a spinnaker guy or a spare long<br />

sheet through a fairlead, well aft, and outside all the<br />

rigging, before attaching it to the downhaul fitting<br />

on the end of the pole. With the headsail sheeted to<br />

leeward, clip the lazy windward headsail sheet into<br />

the pole end and raise the pole level with the height<br />

of the headsail clew. Position the pole, using the<br />

guy, about 50° back from the forestay. Goosewing<br />

the sail by putting in the lazy sheet.<br />

Cruising Chutes<br />

You can supplement your downwind sailing<br />

wardrobe with a cruising chute (a large boomless<br />

cruising sail). Unlike the conventional spinnaker, it is<br />

an asymmetrical, set from the spinnaker or headsail<br />

halyard and attached by the tack to the bow fitting.<br />

As it requires neither pole nor guy, nor sophisticated<br />

tackle, it is much simpler for the inexperienced sailor<br />

to control. Twin sheets are led back from the clew<br />

of the sail to the spinnaker winches, outside all the<br />

rigging. Set up in this way the cruising chute can be<br />

gybed like a headsail.<br />

Twin Headsails<br />

Extra drive can be achieved by hoisting two<br />

headsails, with one poled out to windward. The<br />

technique is also sometimes used offshore on a<br />

run, with the mainsail chafing on the shroud; it is<br />

best suited to boats with twin forestays, or a twingrooved<br />

headfoil. It can still be used with a single<br />

forestay by hoisting two headsails with the hanks of<br />

the two sails attached alternately on the forestay, or<br />

by setting one of the sails flying.<br />

Boom Preventer<br />

When sailing downwind there is always the danger<br />

of an accidental gybe. The best way to prevent this<br />

from occurring is to rig a boom on one side of the<br />

boat. Once you have rigged the line, ease out the<br />

mainsheet until the boom is out slightly too far and<br />

then pull in the boom preventer until it is taught<br />

before securing it. The mainsheet is then pulled in<br />

to fix the boom position. To gybe deliberately you<br />

must, of course, remove the boom preventer first,<br />

and then fix it in position on the new side after the<br />

gybe.<br />

Broaching<br />

Broaching is when the boat turns violently to<br />

windward, out of control. It is most common when<br />

broad reaching or running but can happen on any<br />

point of sailing. A common cause of broaching<br />

is rolling, which gives the hull an asymmetrical<br />

underwater shape causing the boat to move in the<br />

opposite direction to the way it is heeled. When this<br />

force is great enough to overcome the effect of the<br />

rudder, the boat will broach. If the mainsail is too<br />

large in proportion to the headsail or spinnaker, it<br />

will contribute to the tendency to broach, as once<br />

the broach occurs, the mainsail will assist the turn,<br />

if the broach occurs, the mainsheet should be eased<br />

out immediately and, once the boat is back under<br />

control the mainsail area should be reduced.<br />

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Turkish Airlines Arou<br />

It was a day of varied conditions for the 2017<br />

Turkish Airlines Around the Island Race with<br />

everything from 2 to 28kts of easterly breeze being<br />

reported across the race track. Approximately 1,400<br />

people on 230 boats and even two lifejacket-- clad<br />

dogs took part in this year’s 26nm circumnavigation.<br />

The big winners of the day<br />

were Jamie McWilliam with<br />

his crew Simon Macdonald<br />

and Peter Austin onboard<br />

the Etchells Shrub, they<br />

crossed finish line at 14h<br />

19m 07s this afternoon to<br />

take the overall win with a<br />

corrected time of 4h 59m<br />

02s.<br />

When Jamie<br />

was later called<br />

about his win he<br />

commented “That’s<br />

so exciting man!”<br />

Words by<br />

FOO YUEN-WAI<br />

Photographs by<br />

RHKYC/<br />

GUY NOWELL<br />

80<br />

Jamie commented on the racing, “Sailors talk about<br />

how the Around the Island Race is never the same<br />

but today was really not the same. I thought that<br />

Helmuth Hennig’s Marten 49 Vineta sailed the best<br />

from Green Island to the finish that I have ever<br />

seen, I don’t think they missed a single thing. There<br />

were more lead changes in the Etchells then I ever<br />

remember. Yah so there were lots of cool things<br />

about today’s race. I thought it was very punchy<br />

not to shorten the race at Green Island and would I<br />

imagine there will a lot of people moaning about it<br />

but there will be just as many people not moaning<br />

about it. The weather was wet but to be honest<br />

after the reach down past Shek O Rock we were<br />

soaked, so by the time it started raining it made no<br />

difference to us at all.” When Jamie was later called<br />

about his win he commented “That’s so exciting<br />

man!”


und the the Island Race<br />

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It took two start lines located off of Causeway Bay<br />

and Hung Hom and 22 consecutive starts to get the<br />

fleet away. There were boat breaking conditions<br />

right off of the start with the first casualty of the<br />

day headed back to the club by 0830hrs due to a<br />

broken mast and boom. The fleet tacked their way<br />

up the starboard side of the Hong Kong Harbour<br />

course, avoiding exclusion<br />

zones and Hong Kong’s<br />

Not only is Foo the<br />

first Para athlete to<br />

compete, he is also the<br />

first one to sail singlehanded.<br />

busy marine traffic and<br />

through Lei Yue Mun gap.<br />

Once the fleet reached<br />

Shek O rock they met<br />

with big swells of 2 to 3m,<br />

which proved difficult for<br />

some of the smaller fleets.<br />

Persevering on was the<br />

first Para athlete to compete in the Around the<br />

Island Race; Foo Yuen-Wai representing Sailability<br />

Hong Kong on board a 2.4mR, the smallest boat in<br />

the fleet The Kaplan, not only is Foo the first Para<br />

athlete to compete, he is also the first one to sail<br />

single- handed. Foo completed the race and sailed<br />

across the line at 16h 11m 24s.<br />

82


The 5th<br />

<strong>2018</strong><br />

OFFS<br />

S<br />

HIP build<br />

Philippines<strong>2018</strong><br />

H<br />

ORE<br />

P H I L I P P I N E S <strong>2018</strong><br />

83


HILIPPINE YACHT CLUB DIRECTORY<br />

84


85<br />

HILIPPINE YACHT CLUB DIRECTORY


Another first was Sean Law on board S M Kwan and<br />

Thomas Wong’s Sunfast 3600 Ding Dong Sean who<br />

is just 77 days old did his first Around the Island<br />

Race with mother and father Sally and Dominick.<br />

Kites were hoisted after the fleet rounded D’Aguilar<br />

point with gusts up to 28kts. There were a few<br />

exciting broaches and resulting in a few more<br />

retirements. However with the large swell running<br />

along the Sheung Sze Mun channel, some boats<br />

were fully launched and able to surf in on the run<br />

towards Stanley Gate.<br />

There were a few<br />

exciting broaches and<br />

resulting in a few<br />

more retirements.<br />

The swell tapered off as<br />

did the breeze, as the fleet<br />

approached Round Island.<br />

A park up ensued off the<br />

Cyberport Gate, where<br />

supporting sponsors<br />

St. James’s Place were<br />

waiting to greet the fleet<br />

on a spectator yacht. Once<br />

the fleet rounded Green Island the breeze increased<br />

a little but there were still a few holes along the<br />

harbour. First to make the circumnavigation was<br />

Bruce Anson and Wei Jie’s Discover Sail Asia an<br />

RC44 with an elapsed time of 4h 19m 21s.<br />

Simon Crockett on board Marcel Leidts Ker 46<br />

Zannekin remarked after racing, “Well organized,<br />

the safety boats were in abundance. We couldn’t do<br />

anything about the weather but the organization<br />

was excellent.”<br />

86<br />

Foo Yuen-Wai is the first the para athlete to compete in the<br />

event and completed the Turkish Airlines Around the Island Race<br />

in 7h 41m 24s.


87


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www.broadwatermarine.com<br />

SUBIC BAY<br />

MANILA<br />

CEBU<br />

BORACAY<br />

DAVAO<br />

PUERTO PRINCESA<br />

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