XTRI the Journey

xtriworldtour

FIRST EDITION

FIRST EDITION

Snapshot Canada

We take a dip into Lac-Mégantic

with Canadaman founder Jean-

Thomas Boily and feel the emotion

with 2019 winner Caroline Livesey.

10

the Stories

Read inspiring tales about the

people of Xtri: the Architect Hårek

Stranheim; the Artist Kai-Otto

Melau; the Celtman Chris Stirling.

6, 22, 44

Encyclopaedia Xtremica

Take an in-depth look at all our

races, their incredible locations and

statistical facts. All are unique and

every one special. You choose.

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Journey planner

Welcome to Xtri – Stuart McInnes..................................................... 5

the Architect – Hårek Stranheim....................................................... 6

Nouvelles frontières – Jean-Thomas Boily..................................... 10

Queen of Scots – Caroline Livesey................................................... 12

When is cold too cold? – Jorgen Melau........................................... 18

the Artist – Kai-Otto Melau.............................................................. 22

From one xtreme to the other – Siddhant Chauhan........................ 30

A life-altering trip to Morocco – Joan Pont Prats........................... 38

the Celtman – Chris Stirling tribute................................................ 44

Encyclopaedia Xtremica................................................................... 50

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the Journey is a magazine produced and distributed by Xtri World Tour AS Eidfjord, Norway

www.xtrithejourney.com | Xtri World Tour is supported by Innovation Norway.

Editor in Chief: Stuart McInnes

Design and Layout: Jannika Lantz

Cover: Kai-Otto Melau

Contributors: Hårek Stranheim, Steve Ashworth, Kai-Otto Melau, Siddhant Chauhan, Jean-

Thomas Boily, Caroline Livesey, Joan Pont Prats, Jorgen Melau

Photographers: Kai-Otto Melau, Lars-Erik Blenne Lien, Jannika Lantz, Stuart McInnes, Robby

MacBeath, José Louis Hourcade, Steve Ashworth, Alberto Palladino, Sampo Lenzi, Oriol

Martinéz Toro, Isidor Stankov Nupur Sing, Vikram Bhalla, Dido Fontana and Jorgen Melau.

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A life-altering trip to Morocco. My name is Joan

Pont Prats and with the rest of our team we are

working hard to make the upcoming Amazigh Xtri,

the first extreme triathlon in Morocco, a reality.

We are very excited about this project, as it is

an important addition to the story of my family’s

Moroccan adventure…

Photo: Stuart McInnes

Queen of Scots. The Canadian people’s reputation for

friendliness has been established for a reason. But they

also love a challenge. Descended from settlers who thrived

despite a fiercely harsh environment, tenacity is a natural

instinct. As a Scot, I was amazed to learn that the first real

settlers to race town Lac-Mégantic were Scottish islanders,

perhaps the most hardy of all.

Photo: Steve Ashworth

44

From one xtreme to the other. Generally everyone

marks festivals, birthdays and vacations on their

calendars, but there is a new ritual for me which has

found its way into my life over the last three years –

The Norseman Ballot.

Photo: Steve Ashworth

the Celtman. In April 2019 Xtri lost one of its most

devoted, talented and beloved family members

– Chris Stirling. Steve Ashworth, close personal

friend of Chris, pays tribute and tells us about their

joint first step into the world of Xtri.

Photo: Robby MacBeath

3


SOUND

DECISIONS

The Xtri World Tour Podcast is a perfect introduction to help you

make your choice of your next (or first) Xtri.

Join international sports anchor Tania Branzanic and quench

your thirst of all things Xtri.

Listen through Spotify, iTunes or visit xtri.podbean.com.

The Xtri World Tour Podcast – An essential part of your journey

Photo: Dido Fontana

TANIA BRANZANIC

AGE: 40 LOCATION: Malcesine, Italy

xtri.podbean.com

Photo: Kai-Otto Melau

4


Photo: Jannika Lantz

STUART MCINNES

AGE: 46 LOCATION: Jönköping, Sweden

Listen to

the athletes

Listen to the athletes: “I’m here because of the

community; we adore the landscape; the

course is tough and beautiful; it’s about the

experience, the feeling and the memories”.

Race times matter, but only to those who

can compete at an extreme level, and they are

few. For these superhumans we have the Xtri

World Championship, taking place within the

Norseman. For the rest, it’s about finishing, it’s

about the T-shirt, it’s about being part of the Xtri

family. Like dinner at an Italian’s house, there is

intense conversation, laughter, smiles and joy,

good vibes and the occasional divorce. And they

always want to come back for more. We have

seen friendships, relationships and lovers emerge

from our crazy little races.

For me Xtri is all about the feeling of

adventure, the excitement and the undiscovered

treasures. After an inspirational visit to the

Norseman in 2010 (as a filmmaker and not an

athlete I should add), we undertook the monumental

task of emulating this amazing concept

in Scotland. And the rest is history.

The future of the Xtri World Tour is bright

and expansive. We now have wonderful events

across the globe and many more are under development

in spectacular locations. We stipulate that

our new members have to follow the lead of the original

events and stick to our values. These values always

include using unique and wild locations, involving local

communities, using local resources and creating a

small, friendly event which will have a lasting impact

on the competitors and their support crews.

Our true and basic approach makes for an lifetime

experience which cannot be replicated by larger

events and thus, there will always be great stories

from your Xtri attendance. These stories became the

underlying idea for this magazine. When embarking

on our “let’s find a brand story” exercise, it became

obvious that we need no such thing, the story of

Xtri is already there. The Xtri World Tour is about

people and their differing cultures, it’s about adventure

travel, it’s about discovery and digging deep

and of course it’s about triathlon, but you can swim,

bike and run anywhere, we give you the opportunity

to do so in an unforgettable environment. Xtri is a

journey like no other.

Read on and be inspired.

Stuart McInnes

CEO Xtri World Tour

5


the Architect

Hårek Stranheim, 52 from near Oslo in Norway. Inventor of the

Norseman and the Xtreme Triathlon format. This article is extracted

from an interview with Hårek for the Norseman Radio Podcast.

I

live two hours south of Oslo and

I‘m a just a regular family guy who

has enjoyed long distance triathlon

as a lifestyle for some 20 years.

In the eighties and very early nineties

triathlon was fairly popular in Norway.

And then the sport completely died, so in

the year 2000 only nine people competed

in a long distance triathlon. I did my first

in Sweden in 1999 completely out of shape

and I enjoyed that experience so much

that I decided to bring a similar event to

Norway. So I started to look for a place that

could be as great as the one in Kalmar, now

the home of Ironman Sweden.

It‘s a beautiful little city, flat, has

warm water, it‘s always nice weather and

it has good people. I‘ve now done that

race four times, it‘s such a great place for

a triathlon.

Humble beginnings

I discovered that it is totally impossible

to find a comparable place in Norway

so it was quite easy to conclude that we

should do something completely the

opposite of the normal fast flat races.

I chose Hardangerfjord for the

swim as I thought going further north

the water would be too cold. And

since I live in Telemark county, I really

wanted the race to end at the top of our

mountain, arguably the most beautiful

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mountain in Norway – Gaustatoppen.

It didn‘t take much time playing around

on the map to realise where the obvious

route for Norseman would be. Starting in

the little spot called Eidfjord, travelling

across the Hardangervidda mountain

plateau and ending up on Gaustatoppen.

As this was long before Google

Maps, we were amazed to find that it was

absolutely perfect. 180 kilometres on

the bike and 42.2 kilometers of running.

It was like this event was given to us by

someone as a gift.

Social party of 21

There were 21 people on the start line the

first year. I had spent a lot of time in the

previous year trying to recruit people to

join me during the first race. But as there

were few triathletes around it was not

that easy to find them. But I managed to

persuade some to join. I told them that

this would be a very sociable event, not

a race as such. Just a swim and a bike

ride together, taking photos and being

sociable and so on. As friends do.

I did the race myself. It was a very

small organisation so when I arrived

at the finish line I sent the rest of the

organization away, took over as the

director and welcomed the rest of the

athletes. We were lucky enough to have

had the national broadcasters with us the

Photo: Kai-Otto Melau


7


Photo: José Louis Hourcade

Hårek seen here with compatriot Dag Oliver, General Manager of the

Norseman Xtreme Triathlon.

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whole day following me and one other guy

so it was actually quite exhausting, but it

was a good atmosphere the whole day.

I was convinced that this new race

would be a great success and so moved

forward with the preparations for the

second edition.

The next year we had 90 people

with international participation. We

had good photos from the first year

and I‘m going to say we were very good

at publishing these. We again had the

national broadcaster, and the editor of

a German travel magazine, Ian Stricter,

who came to cover the race. He gave

us some great help because he used a

little artisitc license which got us the

attention of the triathlon professionals

and some real international

recognition.

Norseman – a winning concept

17 years on and Norseman is very

much the same as it was the first year.

It has become professional but the

original feel of the race is the same.

The important parts of the race remain

unchanged and the good things have

been kept. It‘s why it‘s still so popular.

Having a slot for Norseman

should make the entire year great

for you. You should simply be happy

about it. Don‘t overtrain, don‘t be too

worried. It‘s a wonderful experience

and will be more successful if you

are not too focused or too stressed

about it. So just relax and enjoy it. The

experience of doing it together with

your support and the wonderful crew

is unique and memorable.

I should add that I‘m still

optimistic about this event. Even with

17 years gone it is still a very young

event. It‘s still in the early years. And

even if it has now become known

around the world, I think Norseman

is still a small event with a huge

potential. So I plan to stay around for

another 40 years enjoying watching

and following the race.

I also believe that Norseman

and the other Xtri events have a great

future and I look forward to the day

when the Xtri World Championship

has professionals fighting for the win

and we‘ll see helicopters in the air. That

is my dream, seeing the helicopters and

the crowd up on Zombie Hill. i

You can listen to the full interview with

Hårek on Norseman radio via

www.nxtri.com

Photo: Kai-Otto Melau

Slicing through Hardangerfjord.

Photo: José Luis Hourcade

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The finish line of Canadaman on Mont Mégantic.

Reach the stars before midnight.

Photo: Endurance Aventure

Mégantic region description:

The Mégantic region has wonderful scenery and captivating vistas no matter the season. Come and discover a wide

range of activities that can be enjoyed in a picture-perfect mountain and lake-filled setting.

The region is also known as the International Dark Sky Reserve. Canadaman participants will ride along the beautiful

Summit Drive marked with breath-taking panoramic views of the surrounding mountains and majestic lakes, where

the route reaches an altitude of approximately 1000 metres. Located in the heart of the first International Dark Sky

Reserve, the road also connects the highest mountain peaks of southern Quebec.

The race enters the national park and ascends Mont Mégantic, where athletes will discover the ASTROLab

observatories. These elements of mountain and sky make Mont-Mégantic National Park a place where activities

“from the Earth to the sky” come together in perfect harmony.

www.tourisme-megantic.com

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CANADA

Nouvelles frontières

Jean-Thomas Boily, JT to his friends, is a retired cross country skier

from the Canadian Paranordic Team. He started skiing at an early

age but in January 1988 had a severe fall while acrobatic skiing.

This fall resulted in paraplegia.

Jean-Thomas, not one for sitting

back, soon became involved with

para-sports in 1989, initially taking

up wheelchair racing until he

discovered para-cross country

skiing in 1996. His best season was in

2004 where he had 4 podiums on the

cross-country world cup series and

took the 5th place on the overall world

cup ranking. JT retired from skiing in

2006 after participating at the Torino

Paralympics.

He met his wife Melanie in 2007 and

they now have 2 daughters.

Beside his racing career, JT founded

Endurance Aventure, a sports event

company, with his best friend Daniel

Poirier in 1998. The company has grown

over 20 years to now be one of the major

Canadian event organisers.

The passion for the sport and for the

discovery of wild and beautiful places is the

core motivation for the enterprise. With

more than 10 000 km of race course marked

over the years and about 150 Canadian

and international associated specialists,

Endurance Aventure holds unique expertise

in sport and outdoors events management,

for summer and winter events.

The regional development and

international visibility associated with

Endurance Aventure is partly due to

the association with a professional

video production team working under

the banner of Productions Endurance

Aventure.

Endurance Aventure have events

presented in many Canadian regions as

well as internationally including China. i

Photo: S. Tourigny

JOHN-THOMAS BOILY

AGE: 47 LOCATION: Orford, Canada

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CANADA

Queen of Scots

The Canadian people’s reputation for friendliness has been

established for a reason. But they also love a challenge. Descended

from settlers who thrived despite a fiercely harsh environment,

tenacity is a natural instinct.

In the early days they relied heavily on each other for survival,

and had to give a warm welcome to every person who ventured to

settle with them. As a Scot, I was amazed to learn that the first real

settlers to race town Lac-Mégantic were Scottish islanders, perhaps

the most hardy of all.

Text: Caroline Livesey

So it is barely surprising that the

team from Canadaman have

coupled these two things to create

a race which is so tough it is

barely believable, but deliver it against a

backdrop of friendly encouragement and

a shared belief that everyone can finish.

They have taken the word “extreme” and

applied it to every detail of the course. It is

raw, beautiful, relentless and as physically

challenging as anything I have ever done.

Had I known exactly what I was getting into

I would have felt more trepidation on the

start line.

As it was I felt nothing but excitement.

As a professional long-distance triathlete, I

knew the day would be long and hard, but

I was there for that reason. My reason to

race, the “why” that kept me going through

the pain and fatigue, was to find new limits

on this testing course. To dig into my

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mental and physical reserves and find those

depths of endurance. Because experiences

like this are punctuation marks in our life.

They change a small part of us and etch

memories in our minds forever.

My excitement was also compounded

by the team around me. Xtri offers

an incredible opportunity that other

commercial long course racing does not,

the chance to race with a team. Triathlon

is such an individual sport that at times

it can feel selfish and lonely. But take an

epic challenge like Canadaman, and make

it impossible to complete without relying

wholly on your support crew, and you

create a shared experience that is rewarding

for everyone involved. I met my crew just

two days before the race, but we bonded

instantly. They oozed enthusiasm and

positivity, building my already sky-high

excitement to extreme levels.

Photo: Steve Ashworth


CAROLINE LIVESEY

AGE: 40 LOCATION: Felanitx, Mallorca

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Photo: Steve Ashworth

It is hard to describe the feelings and

emotions that I had during this incredible

race. It had all the elements of a truly

epic life experience. I was physically

fitter than I had been in years, mentally

prepared to push my limits to breaking

point, taking on a course that was

insanely tough with a crew who I knew

would motivate me and keep me positive.

Throughout the day I had moments of

clarity unlike anything I have experienced

before, this was truly living.

The race dynamic added another

key ingredient. Two time Canadaman

winner Lyne Bessette and I had met the

day before the race, and I knew that she

would be my main rival for the title. A

self-proclaimed poor swimmer, Lyne was

some 20 minutes behind me out of the

swim. But as a previous member of the

Canadian Olympic road cycling team and

expert trail runner, the race was certainly

not lost for her. I was being chased down

all day, and with no split information

available to me on course, I did not know

for a single moment all day how far

behind me she was. All day that is until

the final 300m.

Can you imagine a race so full of

mental and physical challenges it is like a

never-ending rollercoaster? A course so

stunning that it is breath-taking at all the

moments you need oxygen the most? So

majestic that it begs you to stop and take

it all in just as you remember you have to

keep moving?

All day I was hit by these powerful

moments, but nothing prepared me for

the final 2 hours of racing. Already 10

hours into the course, the final climb to

the summit of Mont Mégantic takes you

on a trail which offers no sympathy at all.

There are no easy sections, no kilometres

which pass quickly, no step you can take

without full concentration. The forest,

swamps and boulders line up to trip you

up and slow you down. It is a tussle with

nature, and one which would require

your every wit on a fresh day. But now,

having tested your endurance already,

this section challenges even the most

coordinated and strong athlete. Knee high

boulder after knee high boulder sap your

strength and rip your muscles apart.

As I was fighting for every inch,

Lyne was making time up on me with

every step. An experienced trail runner

who knows this course well, she had the

advantage of being given time splits as she

mounted the trail. Every mile she gained

time, and confidence that she could catch

me before the top. For me, as I neared the

summit my own confidence also built.

Maybe, just maybe, I would not be caught.

The drama all unfolded 300m from

the finish as I came out of the woods and

onto the road. The crowds were cheering,

and for the first time I started to believe

that I had won. At that moment I heard

shouting that Lyne was right behind me.

I glanced back and she was no more than

25m away, coming at me up the hill. In an

instant the tenacious Scot in me found the

reserve to run as hard as I could, crossing

the line just 10 seconds ahead of Lyne.

Victorious, my body heaved in disbelief

at what had just happened, and my legs

buckled. After 12 hours of racing, to be so

close, so insanely close, it was a shock for

both of us and everyone watching. I had

achieved my goal, I had found a new limit

of my endurance, and I had shared that

with my crew, creating a bond stronger

than Canadian winter ice.

The emotion of the day has not worn

off yet, and doubt that I will ever forget

the experience that Canadaman gave me.

As my first taste of Xtri, it truly lived up

to its strap line and reputation. It was my

first, but it certainly will not be the last. i

www.trainxhale.com

15


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Discover more at orca.com


MY

RACE

BEGINS

NOW

SEBASTIAN KIENLE

2014 IM KONA WORLD CHAMPION

IDEAL FOR

TOTAL SWIMMER

17


Jorgen Melau, Cold water scientist

Tell us about yourself and how

you became involved with cold water

swimming research.

I am a Norwegian PhD student, doing

research on how the body responds to extreme

endurance races. First and foremost, we have

focused on swimming in cold water. But we also

do a few other projects.

My background is as a rescue paramedic

in the air ambulance in Norway, I have also

been an officer in the armed forces, and as a

nurse anesthetist. I have done my fair share

of triathlons, including 6 Ironman races. I

have never done the Norseman though which

is a shame. I tell myself it is because I work at

Norseman, but the ugly truth is that I am out

of shape.

Doing a PhD on this particular subject was

a coincidence. I have been the safety director at

Norseman Xtreme Triathlon for 15 years now.

It is well known for the cold swim. In 2015, we

measured a water temperature of 10°C the day

before the race. I was there with my assistant

safety director, professor Jonny Hisdal, and we

really didn´t know if this would be safe for the

athletes. Jonny and I did a test swim the day

before, measuring our core temperature with

temperature pills. We then decided to shorten

the swim.

Jonny has been a scientist for several

years, and told me “Jørgen, you should do a

PhD and some solid research on this”. And so

it all started. I am now doing research at the

University of Oslo and Vestfold Hospital Trust.

What type of research have you done

and what results have you found about

swimming in cold water?

I am at the start of my research career,

so for now we have just a few results to

Jorgen in his role as an

emergency helicopter

paramedic.

Photo: Jorgen Melau

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When is cold

too cold?

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share. First and foremost, we have had 20

athletes swimming with a wetsuit in 10°C

water in a controlled environment to see

how the body reacts. We did all kind of

physiological measurements before, during

and after together with other scientists. We

looked at the effects on the heart and lungs,

temperature, effect of body fat and muscles on

core temperature and more. (the study can be

found at nxtri.com, “When is cold too cold“).

We also recently published a series of case

reports from Norseman, with athletes suffering

from Swimming Induced Pulmonary Edema

(SIPE) (nxtri.com “What is SIPE? – More

Norseman Research“).

In the last few years, we have created

a research group doing several studies at

Norseman.

We have drawn many blood samples

from athletes, before the race, at the finish

line and the day after the race. We wanted to

measure specific changes in biomarkers on

the heart, hormones, hydration and more. We

also did a lung function test. We will continue

these studies every year. This year, we will

include cardiac examination using standard

ultrasound assessment of the athlete’s heart.

The ultrasound recordings can be used to

investigate how big the heart is and how

your heart muscles contracts. The athletes

blood vessels will also be examined with

standardized methods to investigate how the

blood vessels work.

We have been testing Olympic athletes

who are qualified to Tokyo Olympics in

2020. There is a huge challenge with heat and

humidity in Tokyo so the Norwegian Olympic

Training Centre held a training camp for

the athletes with testing. The first day was in

normal conditions and the second day was

in “Tokyo” conditions. We let the athletes do

standardised tests in a room heated to 35°C

and high humidity. And then we did a series of

physiological tests to see if there were

any differences.

At what point is cold water

swimming dangerous?

Our objective is not to show that

swimming in cold water is dangerous! We

do not believe it is. We think that sports like

triathlon are vital parts of the public health

and we very much urge people to participate

in endurance races and recreational activities.

That being said, there is a lower limit on

water temperature safety but we don´t know

the exact limit. There are many factors that

play a role in this, such as how long you are

exposed to the cold water, how your wetsuit

fits, your levels of body fat and muscles,

air temperature and more. We will work

on this for the next few years to gain more

knowledge.

For a very few exposure to cold water

can be a risk factor. Several scientists have

tried to identify what characterises these

few people. We know that sudden exposure

to cold water could put a heavy strain on

the heart.There is much more to learn on

this topic.

Our objective is first and foremost to see

how the body responds to cold water. Then we

hope to be able to give advice and guidelines

to athletes and race directors about how to do

training and races in the safest possible way.

We know that a lot of the XTRI races have

cold waters and low air temperatures. We will

do our best to give good advice on how to do

this in the safest possible way.

And finally, the most important

question of them all – will you ever

race an XTRI race?

My supervisor and buddy (not sure

about the “buddy” thing though...) told me

that I will not pass my PhD dissertation if I

haven’t done an XTRI race. It is easy for him

to say as he has done more than 15 XTRIs

himself. So, I probably have to do it in a few

years. It will be ugly to watch; I can tell you

that. Probably not Norseman.

Is there such thing as an easy XTRI? i

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JORGEN MELAU

AGE: 48 LOCATION: Stavern, Norway

Photo: Steve Ashworth

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„ If you come back from Xtri without

awesome pictures – it‘s time to sell your gear“

– Kai-Otto Melau

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Hardangerfjord, Norway.

Photo: Kai-Otto Melau

23


the Artist

Kai-Otto Melau has become a staple at Xtri races, passionate and active in

the field for over ten years. However, the norwegian photographer was not

particularly convinced when he arrived at his first Xtri job in 2008, wearing a

leather jacket and Converse, feeling completely out of his comfort zone.

„ I was smiling to myself at all the silly people wearing sneakers, compression

socks, t-shirts with goofy quotes and ‚ fast‘ sunglasses“, the photographer

recalls. „ I couldn‘t imagine how they where able to gather so many people with

bad fashion sense in one place“.

Text: Kai-Otto Melau.

KAI-OTTO MELAU

AGE: 40 LOCATION: Stavern, Norway

Photo: Kai-Otto Melau

Photo: Alberto Palladino

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Back in 2008 I worked as a

photographer at a Norwegian

newspaper. I had never shot

sports in my life and not

really into it. My brother had been

involved in Norseman more or less

since the beginning, and I briefly

knew Hårek, the founder of the

Norseman. They both asked me a few

times to come shoot the race. I wasn’t

really interested at first, but in the

end I ended up losing my job at the

newspaper, and in an effort to make

ends meet I finally agreed.

Gaustatoppen – a turning point

I remember arriving in Eidfjord for

the Norseman race. It was just before

the race briefing, and I was walking

around smiling to myself at all the silly

people wearing sneakers, compression

socks and ‘fast’ sunglasses. Their goofy

T-shirts had slogans like „ I love the

smell of neoprene in the morning“

and „ If you see me collapse, pause

my Garmin“. Besides me there was no

one around with black leather jackets,

skinny jeans or Converse shoes. I

couldn‘t imagine how they where able

to gather so many people with a bad

sense of fashion in one place. I felt

totally out of my comfort zone.

The next morning I was woken up

at 3 am and told to get to work. I got

up, walked outside and was met by a

horde of people in neoprene, checking

their Garmins as they slowly walked

towards the ferry. All I really wanted to

do was go back to sleep.

Fifteen hours later I wasn’t smiling

anymore. I was standing on top of

Gaustatoppen, according to some the

most beautiful mountain in Norway,

overlooking the town of Rjukan at

nearly 1 883 meters above sea level. I

had followed the athletes jumping out of

the ferry into the cold, dark fjord, biking

up steep hills that I couldn’t even imagine

myself walking up, and jogging up a huge

pile of rocks – and for what? A black

T-shirt! I was in complete awe, but they

were all beyond crazy!

As I walked back down the

mountain my respect for the athletes was

overwhelming. I ended up making myself

two promises – I will never make fun of

their stupid T-shirts, compression socks or

sunglasses again, and secondly I will never

walk Gaustatoppen in a black leather

jacket, skinny jeans and Converse shoes

ever again.

Raised by Xtri

I never really wanted to become a sports

photographer. In fact it took me a lot

of years to realize that this is what I’ve

actually become. I am really thankful to

Norseman and the other races in the Xtri

World Tour who gave me the chance to

shoot their races. Ten years ago I couldn`t

even imagine I would be where I am

today. Xtri made my career and I am

forever grateful, it‘s where it all started

for me.

There are a lot of similar races

out there, but nothing compares to an

authentic Xtri. I guess it’s the combination

of unique and spectacular locations,

awesome athletes and great organisation

that makes Xtri stand out.

It‘s a photographer‘s dream come true.

You have athletes doing hardcore stuff

with a spectacular backdrop. It’s pretty

much just to push that button on your

camera and voilà!

I always said that if you come back

from an Xtri and you don`t have awesome

pictures it`s time to sell your gear. i

komelau

25


Photo: Kai-Otto Melau

26


27


NO, WE’RE NOT AN

OFFICIAL SPONSOR

OF TRIATHLONS.

WE’RE JUST

OFFICIALLY USED

BY THE ONES

WINNING THEM.

28


FUELING THE BEST.

OFFICIALLY AND UNOFFICIALLY.

29


From one xtreme

to the other

Generally everyone marks festivals, birthdays and vacations on

their calendars, but there is a new ritual for me which has found its

way into my life over the last three years – The Norseman Ballot.

Text: Siddhant Chauhan.

The first year when I applied

there were just three races in

the Xtri family – Norseman,

Celtman and Swissman.

Unfortunately I was unlucky in the draw

and settled for an Ironman race in France.

Second year, same story. But this time I

had also decided to apply for Celtman.

Scotland has been on my bucket list since

the day I saw Mel Gibson play the part of

legend William Wallace in the Hollywood

hit – Braveheart.

I marked the date in my calendar for

the ballot results and completely forgot

about it. When folks in the Celtman group

started posting about their acceptance

for the race I went straight to my inbox,

without much hope, to see if I had received

the email. What followed was excitement,

some woohoos and a raw version of the

moonwalk across my hallway.

The journey begins

Once the excitement had settled, came

the big question: How do I train for this

complex terrain and crazy weather?

And don’t even mention the jellyfish. I

wanted to check if there was anyone else

who had done this race from India and

30

could advise me so I wrote to the team at

Celtman, but was informed that I was the

first one to do so. Challenge Guinea Pig:

ACCEPTED. But the jellyfish! Ok, lets not

discuss them for now.

I live in Gurgaon, a suburb of the

capital, Delhi. During the winter season

which stretches from November to

February, the handful of triathletes in

the city become nothing less than secret

service agents trying to hunt for a pool

which is functional. There are hardly

any available.

For those who are not aware, India is

considered the road accident capital of the

world clocking 17 deaths and 53 crashes

every hour. Now you can imagine that this

doesn’t make for a pleasant situation when

doing long bike rides.

Nevertheless, here we are aware of

the risks and try to work around them.

You can train as much as you want on

an indoor trainer, but the true joy of

cycling is riding outside and exploring the

terrain. So with the pool access limited, I

continued to focus on cycling and running.

Just when the base phase was coming to an

end, I received a warm welcome from the

scorching heat of our famous summers.

Photo: Nupur Singlon


SIDDHANT CHAUHAN

AGE: 36 LOCATION: Gurgaon, India

31


„ There was no way to carry out a simulation

of the race conditions.

Swim in 11 degrees – impossible.“

32


The peak months ahead of the

event were insane. The temperature

through the month of March to June

reached almost 42 degrees. There was

no way to carry out a simulation of the

race conditions. Swim in 11 degrees –

impossible. Oh and the jellyfish will have

to wait a little longer...

Riding on a course with cold

winds or rain – of course, 42 degree gets

nowhere close to that. Running across

munros – absolutely. Wait, what? Hills in

this city? Never heard of them!

The training was mentally

exhausting and my professional work

could never take a back seat, making it

even more challenging. There was also

no one to give me company for long

workouts in this kind of weather.

I clearly remember one instance

where after a 160 km bike ride, it was just

past noon and the heat was unbearable.

The highway was like a barren land and

I had to crawl to a shanty and lie there

waiting for some kind of assistance.

No taxis to hail or immediate help was

accessible on this stretch. I eventually

managed to convince a truck driver to

take me back to the starting point of the

highway where I had parked my car.

Photo: Sampo Lenzi

Support

I will take a slight detour here – no, not

for the jellyfish. I was on the look out

for a support runner and didn’t really

know anyone in that part of the world

who would be willing to take up this

challenge. I managed to connect with

a young chap called Robin Downie

thanks to the world of Instagram. I had

posted a picture from the last edition of

Celtman and he pinged me saying “hey,

that’s me in that pic”.

Robin helped me connect with

Kenny from Loch Carron. I was in

33


34

innofield.com


„ The jellyfish were

big enough to be punched

in the face“

touch with him via email and he was extremely

helpful and also did a course route recce a

couple of weeks ahead of the race. When he

posted the spoils of his adventure on his social

channel, someone in his circle asked him if he

was participating in the Celtman. He said he

was the support crew for this crazy guy from

India who is up for a big shock or surprise.

I never told him that I chanced upon that

comment but I couldn’t agree more with him.

He also became the key element in helping me

complete the race.

Scotland

Cut to the day when I drove down with my wife

from Oban to our cottage in Kinlochewe. While

I was in awe of the natural beauty around, in

my head I kept scanning the sections of the

route which were a part of the race course. The

weather was crazy – cold, heavy rainfall and

windy. No problem, I had trained for this (in 40

degrees, with no hills…).

It is hard to explain the feeling when you have

watched something on your TV screen for months

and then when you are in that frame for real.

Right after that, I decided to go for a short

swim – well yes, to say hello to jellyfish and

of course to experience what 11 degree water

actually feels like. It took me some courage to get

into that choppy water and I didn’t survive for

more than 2 minutes. I came out, all shaken up

and took a few moments to absorb what had hit

me. My wife was confused by the blank look on

my face and then she couldn’t find the unmute

button on me for the next 15-20 mins. What the

hell! How will I swim through this on the race

day? Oh and I dint see any jellyfish.

The next 48 hours required a lot of mental

preparation to bite this bullet but not to quit

under any circumstances.

Jellyfish

Race day was one challenge after the other.

My swim goggles got blotched by a chunk of

Vaseline I had applied on my face which killed

the visibility just seconds before the swim start.

35


After a while, I just couldn’t sight and

had to rely on where the swimmer next

to me was heading. And yes, this is the

part where the field of jellyfish comes

in. For the first time in my life I met

those critters – they were big enough

to be punched in their face, which I

often did, but they got their revenge

like a naked electricity wire running

past my cheeks and nose.

I lost track of where I was on the

course, but from the corner of my eye,

I kept hanging on to the neon green

striped wetsuit I could see at

a distance.

Making it to T1 was half the

battle for me. But in reality, it wasn’t.

The first 80 km bike ride was fantastic

– beautiful course, rain, wind and

for some part, missing support crew.

Despite gaining position during this

leg, I got severely cold and my body

was involuntarily shivering. My

support crew was worried and asked

if I wanted to call it a day. But I hadn’t

come this far to quit – I was clear in

my head.

Some extra layers and hot coffee

later, I was back on the saddle having

lost a considerable number of positions

and likely said bye-bye to the blue

T-shirt. I knew running wasn’t my

strength and I could have gained the

buffer I needed during my bike course.

At T2, I knew I was cutting it

close to the cut off but didn’t anticipate

what would hit me a few kms down

the road. It was a trail, but not the

kind I had ever seen. In my dictionary

or reference point, that was a hiking

track! I had to walk, scrape through

and constantly keep an eye on the

watch. Just ahead of T2A, I could see

Kenny run towards me frantically

waiving his arms. I wanted to tell him

that I knew I was a few minutes from

the cut off and I will make it. I was

wrong, he came by and pushed me to

run harder “you got 90 seconds Sid!”.

Good lord, that was close, I dashed

with whatever little glycogen was

hidden in my body somewhere and

crashed at T2A.

Low course

The low route in Celtman is by no

means easy. It was extremely foggy and

cold up in the mountains. I walked

through the remaining part of the

course with no motivation left for any

kind of race position. So I decided to

enjoy the beauty of the country, chit

chat and move steadily towards the

finish line.

It was dark by the time I crossed

that line and most of the participants

had finished, celebrated and were

settled back in their cottages and

caravans. But the organisers were all

there to cheer me on, which is a rare

sight for the last guys in the local races

I have been a part of.

To date, I don’t enjoy the thought

of being the last one to cross the line,

but I console myself by stepping back

and acknowledging that I didn’t quit

despite training in one extreme and

racing in another.

This is a beautiful race and a

tough one, once you have done it, you

become a part of this close-knit family.

I cant thank the Celtman team enough

for putting together this fantastic event

– which is something more than just a

race or triathlon – it is an experience

of a lifetime.

For me there is unfinished

business and I will be back for it, better

prepared for the terrain, the conditions

and the jellyfish. i

36


Siddhant with his wife Karuna

and dogs Moose and Cherry.

Photo: Vikram Bhalla

37


A life-altering trip

to Morocco

My name is Joan Pont Prats and with the rest of our team we are

working hard to make the upcoming Amazigh Xtri, the first extreme

triathlon in Morocco, a reality.

We are very excited about this project, as it is an important addition to

the story of my family’s Moroccan adventure…

Text: Joan Pont Prats

38


JOAN PONT PRATS

AGE: 32 LOCATION: Barcelona, Spain

Photo: Stuart McInnes

When I was a kid, my

parents decided to take

my sister and I on a

family trip to Morocco

to understand the value of non-essential

things. My father had a history of riding

mopeds through North Africa and was

one of the first pioneers to go from Spain

to Algeria on a Vespa.

We learned so much on that trip,

and our lives changed forever.

One afternoon we were in Arfoud,

the city also known as the gateway to the

desert. A cheerful young man put fuel

in my parents’ vehicle at the gas station.

In a clumsy, yet humorous attempt to

speak Spanish he asked us where we

were going. We told him we were going

towards Merzouga to see the Erg Chebbi,

the most significant accumulation of

dunes in the region, and he immediately

offered to accompany us. He told us he

knew the area very well because he and

his family had a café – the restaurant Des

Dunes in Arfoud and a small hostel in

the city of Merzouga.

But we weren’t interested in being

guided. First of all, because my father

had already driven the route, and

secondly because the boy was young and

we did not know him at all.

He insisted and eventually

convinced us with his huge smile to

allow him to join us. He jumped into the

car without telling any of his family that

he was going to be away for the night.

During the trip he offered to

organize a walk with dromedaries

around the dunes for us, and we

accepted. Once we were on the

dromedaries and about to head out with

a nomad guide, the young man asked my

father for the keys to his car. We thought

he might have forgotten something and

threw the keys to him. We were stunned

when we saw him jump to the car and

39


drive off, disappearing with all of our

belongings. My mother almost had a

nervous breakdown because she thought

the car had been stolen from right under

our noses.

We tried to communicate with the

nomad owner of the dromedaries, but he

didn’t understand anything we were saying.

His reply to us was simply a big smile.

We spent three anxious hours riding

the dromedaries through the dunes

until we reached a settlement of the

Hamelia people. The first thing we saw

was our family car, washed and in perfect

condition. What the young man had done

was to take the car to the end of the route

and clean it to get a tip. The problem

was that he didn’t tell us. Sometimes

communication can be a burden.

The people from Hamelia treated us

exceptionally - they made us feel unique

and gave us unexplained sensations.

To show them gratitude for

everything they did for us we came

back the following year with friends and

brought school materials, clothes, and

other things to give to the families, and

we contacted the young guy from the gas

station again, his name is Tayeb.

Every Easter we would go to this

part of the country, every time with

more people to share the experience

with friends and families. The

relationship between my father and

Tayeb was, and still is, very strong, and

one day he proposed to my father to

collaborate and build a small hotel with

some rooms on the outskirts of Arfoud.

It was a kind of symbolic contribution

to the progress of the area that had

given so much hospitality to our family

and where Tayeb had lived all of his life.

Today we are able to let tourists

also savour the “magic” of the country

and the affection of its people. Our

family business has a large group of

companies and hotels that are an excellent

resource for more than 300 local families.

None of this would have been possible

if Tayeb and his entire family weren’t

extraordinary people with huge hearts

and a wonderful sense of hospitality that

infected us. It gave us the desire to show

Morocco to others.

„ Sometimes things that you weren‘t

looking for find you, and if you allow

yourself to follow your heart, they

will rarely end badly“

Photo: Oriol Martinéz Toro

Joan‘s team with Xtri CEO Stuart McInnes

checking out the Amazigh race course.

Sometimes things that you weren’t

looking for, find you, and if you allow

yourself to follow your heart, they will

rarely end badly.

After more than 20 years in the

country and with the same exact attitude of

humbleness and effort that brought us here,

we’re very excited to have the opportunity

and responsibility to organize the first

extreme triathlon in Africa and become

part of the Xtri Family. i

The Amazigh Xtri will take place as an

Xtri world Tour Prospect Race on October

31st 2020. Visit www.amazighxtri.com for

more information.

40


„ We were stunned

when he went to the

car and drove off,

disappearing

with all of our

belongings“

The construction stage

of one of the Pont Prats‘

hotels in Southern Morocco,

the early building blocks for

this amazing journey.

41


42


43


Photo: Robby MacBeath

CHRIS STIRLING

7th January 1982 – 29th April 2019

the Celtman

In April 2019 Xtri lost one of its most devoted, talented and beloved family

members – Chris Stirling. Steve Ashworth, close personal friend of Chris,

pays tribute and tells us about their joint first step into the world of Xtri.

Text: Steve Ashworth.

Torridon and Triathlon was the only

information we had held on to, what

else would we need to know? The

story of our arrival and subsequent

first contact with the Xtri world now leads to

considerable amusement whenever it’s retold.

Needing no excuses to visit Torridon and having

previously once done a triathlon, I was obviously

Chris’ first choice when looking for support

crew. I also happened to have a campervan

which would make a nice home from home

when parked awkwardly in what would become

Celtman’s T1.

Yorkshireman

It would be fair to say we hadn’t read the manual

and had our own ideas as to how things would

be going to pan out… If you get a chance at one

44


Photo: Steve Ashworth.

of the Xtri races around the world, ask Stuart

McInnes (Xtri chief) to do his impression of

Chris and I at race registration, it’s a good way of

passing a few minutes and at the very least you’ll

have to laugh at his very convincing attempt at

a grumpy Yorkshire fell runner accent. It is a

testament to the friendly and welcoming nature

of the Xtri community that a couple of renegades

like us were not only accepted by the “family” but

that in a short period of time we would come to

look on Shieldaig, Torridon and the Celtman as a

home from home.

As his first triathlon, Chris aimed big

with the Celtman, but the draw of being in the

mountains alongside trying something new was

an adventure not to be missed. As a climber,

mountaineer and fell runner, the Celtman offered

him a new challenge. But when a shivering

45


Chris left T1 on his antique TT bike

(we thought it was good but apparently

it wasn’t) and headed off on to the bike

course in 2012, I don’t think he had any

concept of the journey he was about to

embark on.

Fast forward seven years and we

together walk out on to a Patagonian

beach surrounded by snow-capped

mountains while a condor circles one

of the higher peaks. 10 km down a dirt

road and we’ve arrived at a swim spot

recommended by the locals and the

Patagonman organisers. As was now the

norm in Xtri circles around the world a

voice cried out “Hi Chris, how you doing.”.

Chris soon had a small Chilean

fan club having made great friends with

Martina, our local host John’s 11 year old

daughter, she subsequently bunked off

school for a week to hang out with us.

Chris was great with kids always having

time for them and keen to inspire. In a

triathlon I organised on for my son’s 7th

birthday, Chris not only turned up to race

but also allowed all the kids to beat him

(he was a true sportsman).

Chris with John Medina and

John‘s daughter Martina in

Puerto Chacabuco.

Photo: Stuart McInnes

Victorious

There were many trials along the Xtri

journey, broken bikes, poor results,

more shivering, big sacrifices, dark

mornings, hours and hours on the

turbo, various different approaches to

training/nutrition/recovery and some

tough days for support crews. But after

two second place finishes, Chris finally

won the Celtman in 2017. He was now

very definitely a triathlete, backing

this up a few weeks later with a win at

the inaugural Canadaman. Chris had

showed that he wasn’t just a force to be

reckoned with in the rough mountains

of Torridon, he could adapt and excel

in many environments. Chris lived and

breathed Xtri.

46


Working in his local bike shop was

an attempt to turn the mountain runner

in to a cyclist, not just because of the 15

mile ride each way but because he was

absorbed in a cycling world. The lure

of performing well at Norseman drove

a need for speed. The speed came and

was on full display when Chris won and

broke the record for the challenging

Brutal triathlon in Wales.

Family

It was the feeling of being a part of a

community that Chris valued more than

having a bunch of races in beautiful

places to go and do. Chris had time

for anyone when it came to all matters

Xtri and he was always happy to answer

emails, chat to folks at races, and if you

were lucky he would even take time

out to fit you up for one of the famous

Celtman Kilts.

Chris Stirling was most happy

out in the mountains and it was those

mountains that brought him to Xtri. He

also seemed most relaxed when training

in the munros of Torridon.

Photo: Steve Ashworth

Chris comes home to a victorious win at the

Celtman 2017, in Torridon, Scotland.

47


Legacy

Running in the sunshine cruising over

a carpet of perfect spring snow on

Beinn Eighe after a morning of cycling

around the West Coast of Scotland

will be a lasting memory of an athlete,

friend, mentor to my kids and all

round inspiration. Chris you were

a Celtman. i

Photo: Steve Ashworth

Editors note: Chris was a huge

part of the Xtri community. We

have chosen to include a number

of images of him throughout the

magazine as a tribute to a great

friend and fabulous athlete.

Chris climbing Gaustatoppen during the final stages of Norseman.

Photo: Steve Ashworth

48


49


Norseman,

the original Xtri

Isklar Norseman Xtreme Triathlon is considered the ultimate

triathlon on the planet. It’s the race that any hard core triathlete

should do at least once.

It was at the turn of the millennium,

Hårek Stranheim wanted to

organize a unique competition.

This was his vision:

“I want to create a completely

different race, make it a journey through

the most beautiful nature of Norway, let

the experience be more important than

the finish time, and let the participants

share their experience with family and

friends, who will form their support.

Let the race end on top of a mountain,

to make it the toughest full distance

triathlon on planet Earth”.

The course runs point-point or

fjord to peak: starting at sea level, with

a 4 meter drop off a ferry into the

Hardangerfjord, then crossing the starkly

haunting Hardangervidda mountain

plateau and finishing at the rocky peak of

Gaustatoppen, 220 km away at 1,850 m

above sea level. Norseman is a long day’s

journey through some of Norway’s most

spectacular scenery. The total ascent is

5,000 meters. The water is cold, clean,

and comes lightly salted. The weather

can be anything from brilliantly beautiful

50

to blasting blizzard, sometimes all in one

day. If you’re really lucky, you may see

porpoises, orcas or reindeer.

This is the triathlon were you may find

yourself all alone on a small bike on top of

a big mountain plateau. Getting the sense

of being maroond in a wast landscape only

suited for reindeer and hard rocks. Where

no one sees you, hears you or cheers you on.

It’s just you, your bike and the will to make it

to the finish line.

Norseman is a tribute to triathlon,

where you bring your best friends and

family to join the party. You bring them as

your support. As your safe haven. You join

together as a team, where your best friend

is the one handing you the bottle that helps

you up that next ascent.

And when you get to the finish line,

whether on Gaustatoppen or Gaustablikk,

your hard work and effort will get rewarded

– Our approval of your success; a t-shirt.

But most important off all, you can

claim the title of a true triathlete: You are

a Norseman. i

www.nxtri.com

Photo: Lars-Erik Blenne Lien


Norseman

Xtreme Triathlon

Time of year: ....................................................................... August

Hours of daylight on race day: ........................................... 16.4

Year established: ................................................................ 2003

Distances: ........................................................................... Swim 3.8 km

Bike 180 km

Run 42.2 km

Total elevation: ................................................................... 5235 m

Average water temperature: ............................................. 13 degrees C

Finisher shirt colour: ......................................................... Black or white

Maximum number of competitors: .................................... 250

Number of World Championship qualifying slots: ........... 10

Location: Eidfjord to

Rjukan, Norway

60 ° North, 7 ° East

51


Celtman Extreme

Scottish Triathlon

Time of year: ....................................................................... June

Hours of daylight on race day: ........................................... 19

Year established: ................................................................ 2012

Distances: ........................................................................... Swim 3.4 km

Bike 202 km

Run 41.5 km

Total elevation: ................................................................... 3769 m

Average water temperature: ............................................. 11 degrees C

Finisher shirt colour: ......................................................... Blue

Maximum number of competitors: .................................... 200

Number of World Championship qualifying slots: ........... 4

Number of Norseman slots available: .............................. 8

Location: Torridon and

Shieldaig, Scotland

57 ° North, 5 ° West

52


From Norsemen

came the Celts

The CELTMAN! Extreme Scottish Triathlon was established in 2012

in homage to the Norseman in Norway.

Photo: Kai-Otto Melau

Now an internationally

famous race, it is set in a

wild and remote part of

Scotland, home to some

of the oldest rocks on Earth. The race

conquers magical landscapes of exposed

peaks, open coasts and ancient forests.

Travelling to the race athletes and

support crews must leave the central

belt of Scotland, the most populated

area, and head north through some of

Scotland’s most spectacular scenery for

at least 5 hours, to arrive in Torridon,

Wester Ross.

Small community

Torridon is a town of less than 100 souls

and sits at the base of the magnificent

Liathach, on the shores of Loch

Torridon, sandwiched by mountains and

sea. It’s a magical place, a place known

for Celtic history and myths and an ideal

location to base the Celtman.

The race

After starting the race on a small beach

near Shieldaig (herring bay) competitors

must endure long and tough distances -

3.4 km swim in cold Atlantic waters, 202

km of cycling along exposed coastal roads

gaining 2000m and a 42 km run over

two mountains. They must also deal with

unpredictable temperatures, rain, wind,

storms and the local wildlife. The latter can

include swarms of midges and jellyfish and

the constant threat of wild deer and sheep

on the roads.

Reaching the finish line after upwards

of 12 hours, they are greeted by friendly

faces and wonderful sustenance provided by

the ever-welcoming local community.

Memories

Celtman! is a life changing adventure in a

country of legends. i

www.cxtri.com

53


From the palm trees

to the eternal ice

The SWISSMAN Xtreme Triathlon is a beautiful journey from the palm

trees of Ascona via 3 mountain passes to the eternal ice of Kleine

Scheidegg at 2000m. This quest is fuelled from the hearts of the athletes,

not simply from their physical endurance. Each year 250 international

athletes travel this epic route route with 5700 meters of climbing.

At 05:00 the cow bells signal the

start of the SWISSMAN Xtreme

Triathlon from Brissago Island,

Lake Maggiore. After a hypnotic

3.8km swim during sunrise, the athletes take

their bikes to tackle one of the most extreme

and challenging bike courses of the entire

Xtri world tour. The elevation of 3800 m and

the fast changing weather is a huge challenge.

It can be a sunny 25°C in the valley of Ticino

but snowing in the mountains. It is possible

the athletes will face four seasons in one day

of SWISSMAN.

The old cobblestone road up to

Gotthardpass is one of the highlights of

the SWISSMAN. It is the longest road

monument in Switzerland at 4 km with 24

hairpin bends. The other 2 climbs Furka

and Grimsel, with 2429 m and 2164 m

respectively, are both as iconic. The Furka

Pass was used as a location in the James

Bond film Goldfinger. On their way down,

athletes will pass the Rhone glacier, which

moves 30-40 metres annually. The descent

from Grimsel is challenging yet beautiful as

athletes pass impressive dams and waterfalls.

A highlight of the entire course is a pass

under one of these huge waterfalls on the run.

54

34km into the running course, athletes arrive at

the check-point in Grindelwald Grund where

their backpacks are checked and they collect their

supporter for the last, very steep, climb to the

finish at Kleine Scheidegg. There, at more than

2000 m, and after an incredible journey through

the most spectacular parts of Switzerland, the

athletes arrive at the SWISSMAN finish line in

front of the breath-taking mountain faces of Eiger,

Mönch and Jungfrau.

The SWISSMAN represents Switzerland

not only with stunning landscapes but also with

Swiss values of quality, precision and authenticity,

cow bells and alphorn blowers!. SWISSMAN also

has a sophisticated emergency concept, which

has been developed in close collaboration with

Rega, the Swiss air rescue service. Furthermore,

the organisation is very swiss as the entire event is

organized on a voluntary basis. The dedicated and

friendly Swissman crew, many who are passionate

sports people themselves, sends off each athlete

with a hand-shake and welcomes them warmly

when they arrive at the Kleine Scheidegg.

Marcus Raatz, one of the first SWISSMAN

finishers concludes: “A marathon you do with

your muscles. An Ironman you do with your

head. The SWISSMAN you can only achieve

with your heart.” i www.suixtri.com

Photo: Kai-Otto Melau


There‘s no official timekeeping

at SWISSMAN

as it’s not about how

fast the athletes are.

It’s about finishing an

original xtreme triathlon.

It’s about enjoying the

stunning landscape

together and not against

each other. That’s the

spirit of SWISSMAN.

Swissman

Xtreme Triathlon

Time of year: ....................................................................... June

Hours of daylight on race day: ........................................... 15.5

Year established: ................................................................ 2013

Distances: ........................................................................... Swim 3.8 km

Bike 180 km

Run 42 km

Total elevation: ................................................................... 5500 m

Average water temperature: ............................................. 19 degrees C

Finisher shirt colour: ......................................................... Red

Maximum number of competitors: .................................... 250

Number of World Championship qualifying slots: ........... 4

Number of Norseman slots available: .............................. 8

Location: Ascona,

Grindelwald, Kleine

Scheidegg

46 ° North, 8 ° West

55


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EXPERIENCE

Race is the new offical digital entry platform for Xtri World Tour.

Register directly for your next Xtri challenge, gather your races and

results in your profile and get the latest Xtri World Tour news.

Read more at xtriworldtour.com/race

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Photo: Kai-Otto Melau


Canadaman

Xtreme Triathlon

Photo: Steve Ashworth

Time of year: ....................................................................... July

Hours of daylight on race day: ........................................... 15.5

Year established: ................................................................ 2017

Distances: ........................................................................... Swim 3.8 km

Bike 180 km

Run 42 km

Total elevation: ................................................................... 4000 m

Average water temperature: ............................................. 18 degrees C

Finisher shirt colour: ......................................................... Black

Maximum number of competitors: .................................... 250

Number of World Championship qualifying slots: ........... 4

Number of Norseman slots available: .............................. 4

www.caxtri.com

Location: Lac-Mégantic,

Canada

45 ° North, 70 ° West

57


Swedeman

Xtreme Triathlon

Photo: Kai-Otto Melau

Time of year: ....................................................................... July

Hours of daylight on race day: ........................................... 19

Year established: ................................................................ 2018

Distances: ........................................................................... Swim 3.8 km

Bike 205 km

Run 41 km

Total elevation: ................................................................... 4700 m

Average water temperature: ............................................. 13 degrees C

Finisher shirt colour: ......................................................... Yellow

Maximum number of competitors: .................................... 250

Number of World Championship qualifying slots: ........... 4

Number of Norseman slots available: .............................. 4

www.swextri.com

Location: Åre, Sweden

63 ° North, 13 ° East

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ICON Livigno

Xtreme Triathlon

Time of year: ....................................................................... August

Hours of daylight on race day: ........................................... 13

Year established: ................................................................ 2016

Distances: ........................................................................... Swim 3.8 km

Bike 195 km

Run 42 km

Total elevation: ................................................................... 6500 m

Average water temperature: ............................................. 15,5 degrees C

Finisher shirt colour: ......................................................... White

Maximum number of competitors: .................................... 250

Number of World Championship qualifying slots: ........... 4

Number of Norseman slots available: .............................. 4

www.iconxtri.com

Location: Livigno, Italy

46 ° North, 10 ° West

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Jánošík Slovak

Xtreme Triathlon

Time of year: ....................................................................... September

Hours of daylight on race day: ........................................... 13

Year established: ................................................................ 2016

Distances: ........................................................................... Swim 3.8 km

Bike 185 km

Run 41.5 km

Total elevation: ................................................................... 5675 m

Average water temperature: ............................................. 18 degrees C

Finisher shirt colour: ......................................................... Blue

Maximum number of competitors: .................................... 100

Number of World Championship qualifying slots: ........... 4

Number of Norseman slots available: .............................. 4

www.svkxtri.com

Location: Terchová,

Malá Fatra, Slovakia

49 ° South, 19 ° West

62


Hispaman

Xtreme Triathlon

Photo: Steve Ashworth

Time of year: ....................................................................... September

Hours of daylight on race day: ........................................... 13

Year established: ................................................................ 2018

Distances: ........................................................................... Swim 3.8 km

Bike 181 km

Run 42.2 km

Total elevation: ................................................................... 5350 m

Average water temperature: ............................................. 21 degrees C

Finisher shirt colour: ......................................................... Red

Maximum number of competitors: .................................... 250

Number of World Championship qualifying slots: ........... 4

Number of Norseman slots available: .............................. 4

www.hxtri.com

Location: Peñiscola,

Castellón

40 ° North, 0 ° East

63


64


Patagonman

Xtreme Triathlon

Photo: Steve Ashworth

Time of year: ....................................................................... December

Hours of daylight on race day: ........................................... 16

Year established: ................................................................ 2018

Distances: ........................................................................... Swim 3.8 km

Bike 180 km

Run 42.2 km

Total elevation: ................................................................... 3500 m

Average water temperature: ............................................. 11 degrees C

Finisher shirt colour: ......................................................... Varies

Maximum number of competitors: .................................... 250

Number of World Championship qualifying slots: ........... 4

Number of Norseman slots available: .............................. 4

www.patagonman.com

Location: Coyhaique,

Aysén, Chile

46 ° South, 72 ° West

65


Blacklake

Xtreme Triathlon

Photo: Isidor Stankov

Time of year: ....................................................................... October

Hours of daylight on race day: ........................................... 11.5

Year established: ................................................................ 2019

Distances: ........................................................................... Swim 3.8 km

Bike 187 km

Run 42 km

Total elevation: ................................................................... 6000 m

Average water temperature: ............................................. 13 degrees C

Finisher shirt colour: ......................................................... Black

Maximum number of competitors: .................................... 250

Xtri Prospect Race in 2019.

www.blackxtri.com

Location: Zabljack,

Montenegro

43 ° North, 19 ° East

66


67


Manx

Xtreme Triathlon

Photo: Steve Ashworth

Time of year: ....................................................................... September

Hours of daylight on race day: ........................................... 12

Year established: ................................................................ 2019

Distances: ........................................................................... Swim 3.8 km

Bike 185 km

Run 40 km

Total elevation: ................................................................... 4172 m

Average water temperature: ............................................. 14 degrees C

Finisher shirt colour: ......................................................... Green

Maximum number of competitors: .................................... 250

Xtri Prospect Race in 2019.

www.manxtri.com

Location: Laxey,

Isle of Man

54 ° North, 4 ° West

68


Fodaxman

Xtreme Triathlon

Time of year: ....................................................................... December

Hours of daylight on race day: ........................................... 14

Year established: ................................................................ 2017

Distances: ........................................................................... Swim 4 km

Bike 173 km

Run 42 km

Total elevation: ................................................................... 4900 m

Average water temperature: ............................................. 24 degrees C

Finisher shirt colour: ......................................................... Black

Maximum number of competitors: .................................... 100

Xtri Prospect Race in 2019.

www.fodaxman.com.br

Location: Nova Veneza

and Urubici, Brazil

28 ° South, 49 ° West

69


CANADA

Photo: Steve Ashworth

Athlete: Caroline Livesey

Race: Canadaman

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The Xtri World Tour is a journey of amazing extreme triathlons in unique and spectacular places, where the richness of culture

is tangible. It's a journey of exceptional people and their exclusive, diverse stories. It's a journey that will be different for every

traveller, a journey of cold water swims, high mountain passes and beautiful wilderness trails. A journey where all athletes,

supporters and crew will leave with new friends and lasting memories.

Quite simply, it‘s a Journey like no other.

www.xtriworldtour.com

xtriworldtour

xtriworld

Xtri World Tour is supported by Innovation Norway.

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