The Pioneer, Vol. 53 Issue 2

thepioneer

Pierce College's student magazine.

Nov. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2

Pierce College Fort Steilacoom’s student news publication, Est. 1974

The potential

of VR headsets

on campus

Pages 12-13

Lakewood turning

the other cheek

on rent control

pages 14-15

Student body

president envisions

big changes

for Pierce

pages 10-11


THE

Web: piercepioneernews.com

Email: pioneer@pierce.ctc.edu

Facebook: piercepioneernews

Twitter: @piercepioneer

Phone:253-964-6604

Room: CAS 323

Writers

James Sarabia Zaldivar

Anne Paxton Hammond

Lizzy Rowe

Katie Kittlitz

Matthew Slater

Eben Johnson

Avathni Pathammavong

* Your name here

Interested in writing?

Stop by our office

CAS 323

Podcaster

Tyler Grover

Staff

Editorial Manager

Taylor Riley

triley@pierce.ctc.edu

Production Manager

Ciara Williams

cwilliams@pierce.ctc.edu

Web Manager

Myra Fehling

mfehling@pierce.ctc.edu

Social Media Manager

Kotone Ochiai

kochiai@pierce.ctc.edu

Office Manager

Manuela Schneider

mschneider@pierce.ctc.edu

Designers

Abri Wilson

Darrell Kuntz

Jezreel Proo

* Your name here

Interested in design

or illustraation

Stop by our office

CAS 323

Photographers

Veronica Lu

Lily Binderiya

Ty Phay

Kevin Collins

Jesus Contreras

ABOUT THE COVER:

VR headsets, a once untapped source for potential are now

being seen as a possible tool for learning. As the opportunity

arises, students are left with an important question - What

could this entail for the future of classrooms on Pierce?

Letters to The Editor

Have an opinion on our articles or about campus events, policy?

Write a letter to the editor and send to: pioneer@pierce.ctc.edu.

We cannot publish letters that are anonymous.

THE PIONEER MISSION STATEMENT

The Pioneer is an official publication of the Associated Students of Pierce College and is sanctioned as such by the college’s Board of Trustees and funded primarily

by student fees. It is a public forum for student expression since 1974.

The Pioneer’s mission is:

(1) to inform the student body of issues and events of interest, relevance and importance;

(2) to provide students with a forum for discussion, opinion and expression; and

(3) to provide the student body with editorial leadership.

In carrying out this mission, The Pioneer will use as its ethical guide the Statement of Principles adopted by the American Society of Newspaper Editors. Although

it will strive to represent the diverse views and interests of the student body, The Pioneer is not responsible for representing, endorsing or promoting any

person, group, organization or activity.

02 / piercepioneernews.com

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2


PIONEER PAST ISSUE

Miss a past issue? Come into

our office and get a copy. It’s not

too late! Room: CAS 323

TABLE OF

CONTENTS

Campus

Feature

Feature

6-7/ CLASS IS

CANCELED

Are online classes taking

over?

8/ ECO-FRIENDLY

ON A BUGET

how to make a diffrence

without breaking the bank

18-19/ MEET

STUDENT LIFE

Welcome the new Activity

Board

Anne Paxton Hammond/Staff Photo

Feature

Feature

Sports

10-11/MEET CHAZ

The friendly face of the

Student Government Board

12-13/LEARN IN VR

Could Pierce be getting VR

headsets in the near future?

20-21/NEW CROSS

COUNTRY TEAM

Pierce College first Woman’s

Cross Country team

courtesy photo/ pierceraiders.com

Feature Feature Feature

14-15/RENT IN

LAKEWOOD

16/HALLWAY HASSLE

23/HOUSING

RESOURCES

Rising rent makes it hard

to find an affordable place

to live

What do students have to

say about the rise in rent

prices?

All the info you need

if you’re a student with

housing problems.

pixabay.com/Courtesy photo

15

Sports

24-25/PAYING

STUDENT ATHLETES

Should student athletes

earn money if their image

is used?

Kevin Collins/Staff Photo

Coffee Break

27/ CARTOON CORNER

Drop by the Cartoon Corner

for this issues new comics

pixabay.com/Courtesy photo

November .2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2 piercepioneernews.com / 03


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER

Nov 18,

Monday

Clubs Council

Meeting

1-2pm

OLY 205

Nov 21,

Thursday

Game-Con

11am-2pm

Preformance

and Fireside

Lounge

Nov 22,

Friday

MLI Workshop

12-1pm

Nov 26,

Tuesday

Student

Government

Meeting

1-2pm

Student Life

Lobby

Nov 27-29,

Wed-Fri

Thanksgiving

Break

no school

Dec 2,

Monday

Clubs Council

Meeting

1-2pm

OLY 205

Dec 2,

Monday

Raider Review

4-10pm

Preformance

and Fireside

Lounge

Dec 3,

Tuesday

Student

Government

Meeting

1-2pm

Student Life

Lobby

Dec 5,

Thursday

Frosty Fest

9:30am-Noon

Student Life

Lobby

Dec 6,

Friday

ELA Workshop

12-1pm

Dec 6,

Friday

Dec 9-13,

Mon-Fri

Last day of

Instruction

Finals Week

Abri Wilson/ Staff Illustrator

04 / piercepioneernews.com

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2


PIERCEPIONEERNEWS.COM

check out more content beyond the magazine

Promoting Peace in Times of Trouble

Peace activist attends local elementary school in hopes of

educating children about peace, empathy, love and how they

can implement it in their communities.

By: LIZZY ROWE PHOTOS By: VERONICA LU

Homestay Barbeque

Staff Photographer

Photo gallery

By: LILY BINDERIYA

Halloween at Pierce College

The Pioneer decided to explore and share the Halloween culture of the

Pierce community. From the sports team to the international office, everyone

was making plans and celebrating the spooky day.

By: PIONEER STAFF PHOTO By: TY PHAY

Professor Alan Kemp Retiring in 2020

The sociology professor reflects back on his three

decades at pierce.

By: MATT SLATER

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2 piercepioneernews.com / 05


Campus

ONLINE COURSES

SWEEPING AWAY CAMPUS CLASSES

A surge in online enrollment is leading to colleges having to find a

way to balance two different learning styles

BY KATIE KITTLITZ

Staff writer

It’s the middle of the quarter, and

already time to start thinking about

what classes to take next. With so many

options available between going on

campus, taking hybrid courses, or a class

completely online, this is a situation all

students have faced at some point. However,

weighing the different pros and cons

can help students find the perfect class to

succeed in.

With the world moving more towards

technology, education has to move along

with it. This provides a new challenge

with finding a balance between faceto-face

and the online world within the

school system.

At Pierce College Fort Steilacoom’s

campus, the number of students taking

online classes has been growing each

year. According to Pierce’s Tableau dashboard,

the number of students enrolled

in online courses has increased by 20

percent over a 10 year period.

As the popularity of online classes

increases, on-campus course enrollment

is slowly decreasing. In the past 10 years,

the number of students enrolled in faceto-face

classes has gone down 10 percent.

This fluctuation has caught the attention

of some staff members at Pierce.

Fred Metzger, a communications and

film professor at Pierce College, notices

that whenever an online class is offered, it

fills up quickly. “It becomes a safe move,

and strong evidence that this is where

the need is,” he said. “People that are in

charge of those decisions can easily think

we need more online classes.”

Each quarter, choosing between online

and in-class courses are a choice that

faculty have to make as well. Joyce Pace, a

history professor at Pierce College said

BY KOTONE OCHIAI

Staff photos

06 / piercepioneernews.com

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2


Campus

“WE DON’T LEAVE

PEOPLE LEFT BEHIND,

WE BRING THEM ON

BOARD AND MAYBE

HAVE TRANSITIONAL

CLASSES, OR

UNDERSTAND SOME

THINGS YOU JUST

DON’T WANT TO

TEACH ONLINE,”

SAID FRED METZGER,

COMMUNICATIONS

AND FILM INSTRUCTOR.

that teaching an online class can be

more of a workload on staff members.

This is a result of trying to recreate classroom

experiences in an online environment,

which can be hard to keep up with,

she added.

Selecting the right class has much to

do with the individual’s learning style,

however. Marilyn Gay, a Pierce College

student, mentioned how on-campus

classes are important to her because of

the teacher and peer interactions. “I like

the interaction with the instructor and

the other peers, and you don’t get that

with online classes.”

E-learning can provide an exceptional

opportunity for many people. As Pace,

said, “I knew a military student who ended

up finishing some online course work

while he was deployed in the middle east,

and another who was going to school online

while on a ship in the Persian Gulf.”

Cases like these show the benefit of

online courses. However, could there be

too much of a push toward online in this

day and age? Metzger says that his public

speaking class almost didn’t happen this

quarter.

Metzger mentioned how there is no

substitute for the energy, nerves, and

emotion that are in the room during a

public speaking course. “We don’t leave

people left behind, we bring them on

board and maybe have transitional classes,

or understand some things you just

don’t want to teach online.”

Although there are many positives of

online classes’ availability in this digital

age, it’s also important to keep enough

campus classes available to students.

Naudyia Pichette, a student in her fifth

quarter at Pierce College mentioned,

“Not everybody has access to a computer

and that’s basically your lifeline with an

online class. Also, the books tend to be

pretty expensive.”

Pichette said she likes to take electives

online, instead of core classes, such as

accounting. She adds that usually more

help is available from a teacher and

fellow students in an on-campus math or

science course, that isn’t as needed in an

online class such as art appreciation.

Upon entering college, it can seem

overwhelming with all of the different

options of what classes to take, but once

everybody finds the type of class that

works best for them, it can be a rewarding

and enjoyable experience.

Metzger had a valuable statement that

those on campus should keep in mind

when discussing the removal or addition

of both forms of courses, “It’s not which

is better? It’s why can’t we have both?

Why can’t we nurture both? Why can’t

we be diverse and be open to all with the

diverse community?”

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2 piercepioneernews.com / 07


Features

4 WAYS TO REDUCE YOUR CARBON

FOOTPRINT ON A BUDGET

Being environmentally cautious can be pricey, but fortunately

there are a few ways that you can help

By Abri Wilson

Staff Writer

The health and wellbeing of the planet is a current hot topic that has people asking what they can do to make a difference. But if

you’re on a budget, doing this can be difficult. Below is a list of four things you can do to reduce your carbon footprint. Just doing

one of these can make an environmental difference.

RECYCLING AND REUSING

Recycling doesn’t make as big of a difference as people think,

as it doesn’t do much for reducing waste. However, when you

save and reuse objects, as well as give unwanted items a new

life, then it makes a bigger difference than recycling does by itself.

For example, objects such as jars and old shirts can be used

for things like storing food or making shirts into a shopping bag

and reusable makeup wipes.

SHARING / RENTING

Share clothes, movies, games and other things with your

friends and family, or even rent them. This way you can save

money while also reducing the amount of plastic products you

buy. You have a pair of shoes that just sit in your closet, let your

friend that has a party to go to borrow them, now they are getting

some use out for them and saving your friend from buying

a new pair.

THRIFTING

Buy things used, doing this can save you money and save

plastic products from making its way into landfills earlier than

needed. Join groups like BuyNothing on Facebook and post

your unneeded things for others to have and ask for thing you

need. People tend to have things laying around that they don’t

need and giving them to others save it from being thrown out.

BUY REUSABLE REPLACEMENTS

Save up to replace your one use plastic products, replace your

razor with a safety razor and replace Saran Wrap with bees wax

cloth and use solid soaps in place of bottled soap. Find ways to

reduce your everyday plastic waste and after paying for a reusable

produce you’ll eventually save money by not having to buy

one use plastic products.

If you can not do some of these things do not beat yourself up for it, everyone has different circumstances that may contribute to

not being able to meet their minimal waste goals. Even just supporting companies and elected officials that want to make a difference

helps. Do what you can with what you have, future generations will thank you for it.

Abri Wilson/ Staff Illustrator

08 / piercepioneernews.com

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2


ENROLL NOW!

Winter

Registration

Begins

NOV.

4

Make an appointment with your advisor today!

Pierce College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, perceived or actual physical or mental disability, pregnancy, genetic

information, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status, creed, religion, honorably discharged veteran or military status, or use of a trained

guide dog or service animal in its programs and activities. For inquiries regarding compliance contact the Pierce College District Title IX Coordinator,

253-964-6519 | 9401 Farwest Drive SW, Lakewood WA 98498.


Campus

CHAZ SERNA: PASSIONATE ABOUT REFORM

Meet your new Fort Steilacoom Student Government President

Anne Hammond/ Staff Photos

BY ANNE HAMMOND

Staff Writer

BIGGER THAN LIFE WITH A

RADIO VOICE, a gentle smile and a

hearty, kind laugh – that’s what students

experience when they meet new Student

Body president Chaz Serna.

“This door opened up and I took it,”

said Serna. “It’s very exciting.”

Serna views himself as a mediator

between the activities board, the student

government, and what they collectively

do together.

“I see my world as finding ways to

reach out to and connect with the student

body and to interest them in building

a community here at Pierce College,”

said Serna. “My role is to facilitate those

10 / piercepioneernews.com

things and bring them about; to be the

voice in the presence of the legislators

and the Board of Trustees and to oversee

the respective projects the senators have

going on.”

His vision for Pierce College Fort

Steilacoom starts with easing stress and

beating down barriers to education.

“We’re trying to enhance the educational

and health experience that people

can have here because health starts in

your mind,” said Serna. “Your body can

really react to the things that are going on

in your mind -- stressors and stress levels

– so we’re trying to ease that. We’re trying

to reach out to our more at-risk population,

people who are on the cusp of

having issues of not being able to pursue

their education. We’re all about trying

to beat those barriers down and build

bridges, build pathways, build roads, if

need be, out of one place to another for

an individual.”

His term for 2019-2020 started this

summer with workshops, conferences,

and joining Director of Student Life,

Cameron Cox, and Student Life Program

Coordinator, Allie Morrow, for training.

“Chaz ran his own nonprofit and has

experience working with people, teams,

and communities,” said Cox. “Those are

unique skill sets that he’s bringing. Not

every student body president in the past

has had those specific life experiences.”

Cox went on to say how he believes

Serna to be a very goal oriented man;

passionate about his values and genuinely

caring about making a difference.

November. 2019/ Vol. 53, Issue 2


Campus

Cameron Cox (left) and Chaz Serna (right) had fun discussing student plans.

He cares about Pierce College and his

fellow students.

“I WILL CONTINUE TO

LISTEN, TO SEE, TO

IMPLORE, TO ASK, TO

TRY TO GET STUDENTS

TO ENGAGE, AND TO

TEACH THEM THAT

THEY CAN COME TO

US WITH ISSUES,”

—STUDENTBODY

PRESIDENT, CHAZ

SERNA

Serna immediately went to work

tackling three issues before fall quarter

even began. One of the main issues is the

Health Administration Center (HEC) fee

which he hopes to eliminate.

“Another one of my larger issues is

financial aid – the way it happens, the

way it doesn’t happen, the loopholes,”

said Serna.

“Other colleges have up-to-date ways

of dealing with and distributing funds.”

Serna is also trying to bring self-compacting,

solar powered recycling trash

cans to the campus, as a way to

encourage recycling.

“The ones we have now, the birds get

into them and spread trash everywhere,

and nobody wants to clean it up,” said

Serna. “These trash cans, they cannot get

into. They hold five times the capacity of

a normal trash can.”

Serna hopes to knock off these challenges

left and right. “If they give me

authority to do things, I’m going to use

it,” he said. “It’s not about trying to leave

my print or name on anything, I’m just

trying to leave something that future

student body generations are going to

be able to appreciate and enjoy. What

matters is the lasting legacy.”

Serna enjoys supporting each student

government senator and their programs,

and leading by servitude.

“I will continue to listen, to see, to

implore, to ask, to try to get students

to engage, and to teach them that they

can come to us with issues,” said Serna.

“Whatever it may be, if we ourselves

can’t help you we’re going to direct you

in some path where you can get help. We

want to do as much as we can, to be the

servants we were hired to be.”

His humble heart has roots in a very

tough childhood and upbringing, during

which he learned powerful lessons about

people and life that he plans to use while

at Pierce.

Serna did prison ministry and taught

Sunday School for six years. He also

started his own nonprofit organization,

called CJS Urban Outreach Ministries

that reached out to homeless children,

to give back to the things he didn’t have

when he was a kid.

“That’s what I sought to do, hence my

major of clinical psychology,” said Serna.

“I want to work in abnormal psychology

with kids.”

In the meantime Serna has big plans

for students at Pierce College this year,

specifically to create a community.

“We don’t want sects of individuals

here, and cliques of individuals here and

there,” said Serna. “We want to show

people: Have pride in where you go to

school. Don’t just come, go to school, and

then go about your business. Be part of

this community. Serve in ways that you

can. Give back.

“We want the student body to know

they have a real voice. Student input

won’t fall on deaf ears, fall through the

cracks, or get caught in bureaucratic red

tape. We want to create a vibrant, viable,

healthy community that’s inclusive to all.”

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2 piercepioneernews.com / 11


Features

VR HEADSETS TO POTENTIALLY

BE USED IN CLASSROOMS

Pierce College Fort Steilacoom has purchased a small set

of VR headsets and is looking for student participants.

By TAYLOR RILEY

Staff writer

ILLUSTRATION By

Abri Wilson

THE WAY CLASSROOMS INCOR-

PORATE GAMING into their courses

has been subtle yet effective, so far.

Games like Kahoot, an online trivia

game, have students scrambling

to play during class. Even simple

games, such as an educational

styled jeopardy on the whiteboard,

manage to entice students to engage,

both with technology and their

classmates.

Video games have influenced

the way classrooms are conducted

since their creation. New devices are

announced annually at conventions

such as E3, and this rapidly growing

market is beginning to push schools

into improving their own technology.

Schools are now finding ways to

adapt to this ever growing climate.

Pierce College Fort Steilacoom is

currently looking to test out virtual reality

headsets that have the potential

of being incorporated in classrooms

such as for STEM and the design

programs. Kyle Pierson, an educational

technology specialist for the

Center for Engagement and Learning,

says that Pierce is still trying to

formulate plans on how they can be

incorporated into classrooms.

“We wanted to introduce new tools

to be used in the classroom,” said

Pierson. “VRs are an ever expanding

and growing field that’s used in K-12,

and it’s getting into higher education

more frequently - more in the last

couple years.”

The Employee Learning and

Engagement department has purchased

four headsets for the campus

and are looking for students willing to

test them. With vested interest and

time for a trial run, this could bring a

whole batch of headsets to certain

classrooms in the future. This will

be an ongoing experiment at Pierce,

as ELAD continues to organize the

logistics of it.

VR headsets used for learning is

not an unfamiliar concept, but this

idea is a fairly recent one for Pierce.

While specific classes have not been

chosen to use VR headsets, STEM

and design programs seem to be

the main target audience. Pierson

explains how he believes VR can be

applied to STEM courses in particular.

“There’s a lot of stuff about human

anatomy, chemistry, space, exploring

the ocean, geology - The sciences

are pretty easy to apply the headsets

to because of all the apps that are

already out there, which dive into

all these different things that can be

used in a classroom.”

STEM program students could

see a benefit in learning with such

technology. Justin Hawes, a student

at Pierce who’s currently pursuing

psychiatry, shared his thoughts on

the usage of VR headsets for the

program. “I think that it would be

valuable to use VR with things that

can be potentially dangerous,” he

said.

12 / piercepioneernews.com

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2


Hawes explained how VR headsets

could reduce in-class risk of injury or

harm in places such as science labs,

which typically require hands-on

approaches. Rather than dealing with

dangerous materials physically, it’s

possible the risk can be removed by

doing so digitally.

While STEM would be using the

headsets in ways that allow them to

simulate learning scenarios, classes

such as design could use them for

creating. Instructors such as Leigh

Rooney, assistant professor for digital

design, have been attempting to

garner interest from students.

“I’m thinking of how you can create

virtual reality environments,” said

Rooney. “There’s also some virtual

reality applications or software that

you can paint in 3D in VR, which

I think is a really cool way to think

about design.”

Earlier in October, Rooney sent

emails to her students, creating a

virtual sign up sheet for the trial run.

Rooney believes that the usage of

VR headsets can be an exciting and

brand new learning tool that Pierce

does for future classrooms.

Instructors on campus are seeing

the benefit of using headsets for in

class learning. But as ELAD continues

to work out more of the details

on the matter, certain concerns have

been mentioned by students, one of

them being the cost.

VR headsets within the gaming

community may be seen as a gimmick;

a fad that has slowly begun

losing its steam over the years. And

with the cost of headsets ranging

between $100 - $400 on average,

Pierce could be spending thousands

to supply a single classroom of 30 at

the risk of it being wasted.

Once a class is supplied, maintaining

student’s interest in using the

headsets would be the biggest challenge.

VR has been around for years

and arguably peaked between the

years of 2012 to 2016. Nathan Jefferey,

a business student at Pierce,

wonders himself how exactly Pierce

plans to get students to engage with

such devices.

“I don’t think it’ll be like a necessity,”

he said. “A lot of students, especially

older ones, I don’t think are

really going to care for VR headsets.

“Some people already feel like

they’re kind of goofy to wear. Even

gamers are kind of like, ‘I don’t want

to put that thing on’, so I can only

imagine someone who’s 30, 40, or 50

years old being asked to wear a VR

set.”

“PEOPLE WOULD

PROBABLY

INITIALLY NOT BE

AS COMFORTABLE

BECAUSE PEOPLE HAVE

THIS STIGMA THAT

THAT’S NOT HANDS ON

EXPERIENCE. YOU’RE

NOT USING THINGS

IN THE MATERIAL

WORLD, YOU’RE NOT

PLAYING WITH A

MODEL. INSTEAD

YOU’RE PLAYING WITH

A DIGITAL MODEL.

SO PEOPLE MIGHT

FEEL THAT YOU HAVE

THE SKILLS TO IT

THEORETICALLY, BUT

NOT PRACTICALLY,”

— JUSTIN HAWES, A

STUDENT AT PIERCE WHO’S

CURRENTLY PURSUING

PSYCHIATRY.

Cost and interest aside, other

concerns such as hygiene have also

been mentioned. “I’m worried about

hygienics in general,” said Hawes.

“I think that if people are constantly

swapping them, how are they going

to be handled in that regard?”

Hawes also mentions that others

on campus might also be skeptical

of the changes that could come from

switching to VR. “People are very

apprehensive to change,” he said. “I

think that because it’s a little different

I might be a little wary of getting

into it.

“People would probably initially

not be as comfortable because people

have this stigma that that’s not

hands on experience. You’re not

using things in the material world,

you’re not playing with a model.

Instead you’re playing with a digital

model. So people might feel that

you have the skills to it theoretically,

but not practically.”

Despite his fears however,

Hawes feels that a problem such

as student’s adjustment could

easily be mended with the right

methods. If ELAD could find a way

to have both digital and physical

teaching methods conjoin and

compliment one another, the

usage of VR headsets could be

invaluable.

Other concerns such as hygiene,

also prove to be less of an issue

than feared if handled properly.

Most classes at Pierce range

around 50 minutes, with many

STEM and Design coming close to

two hours. On average, students

might spend half an hour using the

headsets, allowing time for them to

be cleaned and properly handled

like any other lab equipment.

While these concerns exist,

the interest it creates is the main

reason that the headsets are going

through a trial run on campus. The

idea is still young, but discussing

both the potential costs and benefits

is exactly what ELAD wants.

Pierson spoke on the importance

of gathering awareness for the

project, as more students interested

means for better testing results.

Students interested in signing up

or learning more about it can do so

with eLearning located in CAS 322,

as they're still accepting

participants.

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2 piercepioneernews.com / 13

Features


Features

HEY MTV, HELP ME FIND

AN AFFORDABLE CRIB

Lakewood has no limit on how much monthly rent can be increased,

giving students the difficult task of finding an affordable home.

BY ABRI WILSON

Staff Illustration

BY LIZZY ROWE

Staff Writer

Everyone deserves access to clothing,

food and shelter. They are essentials to

living and surviving. But can you imagine

not having access to these essentials? For

many college students, there is uncertainty

with securing a warm place to come

home to.

Pacific Lutheran University held the

Ruth Anderson Public Debate on Oct. 1,

debating rent control in Tacoma and surrounding

areas. Rent control is the limit

the amount a property owner can charge

for leasing and lease renewal for a home

or apartment.

There were two opponents on each

side for and against rent control. Summer

Ash, a senior at PLU, argued that the

increase in rent costs forces people to

move out of the city they grew up in. “We

aren’t afraid of growth and development,”

said Ash. “But we have to recognize that

new development is not being conducted

in a way that is uplifting to all Tacoma’s

residents.”

Hannah Backus, also a senior at PLU,

was against putting a cap on rent. Backus

emphasized the rights to own property

and do with it what you please. “This is

where rent control unknowingly seeks to

undermine the principle of the American

Dream, by trivializing the ownership of

property,” said Backus.

Pierce College students have a variety

of living circumstances. Some live alone,

with their families or with roommates,

and each present challenges when working

a part-time job and furthering their

education.

Keara Tiedeman, a student at Pierce, is

working part-time as a nanny and attending

school full-time to make ends meet.

Tiedeman lives in an apartment with her

girlfriend and her roommate, both being

military veterans, and says the housing

allowance they receive every month helps

them afford their apartment. “If we didn’t

get that housing allowance,” she said. “I

don’t think we would be able to go to

school because it pays all of our rent.”

Tiedeman hasn’t had the most pleasant

experience at her current living space -

It’s impossible to find parking, there are

loud neighbors and every time a new

lease is signed, the rent increases. She

says if she was a landlord and raised prices,

she would need to be reassured that

tenants are responsible and have stable

jobs. “Society puts a label on people who

only work minimum wage jobs, that they

are younger and less reliable, so I can see

both sides.”

Erin Teston, a criminal justice major

at Pierce, has lived independently for

27 years and has had experience with

apartment living. “I don’t agree with rent

control,” he said. “But I do agree with a

14 / piercepioneernews.com

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2


level of which the rent can be increased.”

He described a time when he was 22

years old, was divorced and moved into

an apartment as a single dad on a tight

budget. He was alarmed when his landlord

gave him an increase of $50 on rent,

with one month’s notice.

Living on your own without any help

from family or friends can be difficult in

any situation. Teston said requirements

to get an apartment didn’t align with the

cost of the apartment because residents

must make three times more than the

monthly rent. “It is attempting to survive,

that’s the best way to describe it,” he said.

“It puts shackles on people that want to

go to school with those requirements.”

As a communication manager in

Lakewood, Trini Balles said she must

abide by specific codes that take a lot to

maintain the property, which includes

522 units. “Residents don’t anticipate an

increase in rent and the increase is based

on the market and what everyone else is

charging,” said Balles. “Landlords have

to keep some sort of renewal process to

sustain the property and market control.”

Balles has been in the housing industry

since 2002 and managing apartments

across Pierce and King county. She makes

herself accessible to residents either in

“IT IS ATTEMPTING

TO SURVIVE, THAT’S

THE BEST WAY TO

DESCRIBE IT. IT PUTS

SHACKLES ON PEOPLE

THAT WANT TO GO TO

SCHOOL WITH THOSE

REQUIREMENTS,” -

SAID ERIN TETSON,

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

MAJOR.

person or via email based on

her past experiences with apartment

living; but she expects her

residents to be consistent with

the lease. “Having the same

communication is huge to having

a good relationship with the

landlord or property manager,”

she said.

With the population in Washington

State nearing eight million people, the

demand for affordable housing increases.

The average monthly apartment cost in

Lakewood is $926. For many full-time

students working part-time, this cost

causes an unbearable burden and limits

their access to housing. How can apartment

managers and leasing companies

ensure they are able to make a profit

while meeting the needs of a financially

diverse population?

Features

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2 piercepioneernews.com / 15


Features

HALLWAY HASSLE

Q&A

LYDIA FITZSIMMONS

“I think there should be some kind of regulation put on rent.”

WILLIAM WASSON

“Every human being deserves housing. Landlords don’t deserve

the right to just make endless money. There is a very easy

way to change that.”

CHRIS HETTER

“Right now is tricky. Many people are unable to afford both

[school and rent] when you’re not being supported. I’m working

two jobs right now.”

KRYSTAL ROBLES

“Sometimes landlords do overcharge. They just want to make a

lot more money than they are already making. the prices definitely

going up right now I’m renting so I know.”

MELONIE WASHINGTON

“I think that rent control in Tacoma is pretty high. It’s also hard to

get into a lot of communities depending on your background and

how much you make. Even when me and my wife were qualified

we were still denied, and we fixed what they told us to fix and tried

to come back and we still got denied. They wanted their own type

of people in that area. I was making way more than what they were

asking for. They are really picky in who they let live in certain places,

and they’re background.”

VERONICA LU/

Staff Illustrator

ABRI WILSON/

Staff Illustrator

16 / piercepioneernews.com

November. 2019/ Vol. 53, Issue 2


Business Classes at Pierce

Earn your business certificate and degree

both online and in class

Classes offered in winter 2020

Classes on campus

MNGT 182: Creative Sales and Customer

Relationship Management

MNGT 186: Professional Development

MNGT 295: Human Resource Management

Classes online

MNGT 136: Online Selling

MNGT 137: Independent Contracting

MNGT 138: Information Design

MNGT 276: Employment Law

BUS 240: Human Relations

Certificates include

Social Media Marketing

Human Resource Management

Entrepreneurship

Business

Project Management

Supervision and Management

Degrees

Associate of Science in

Applied Business

Bachelor of Science in

Applied Business Management

For more information, contact

Dr. Paul L. Gerhardt, PhD

Phone: 253-964-6429

Email: pgerhardt@pierce.ctc.edu

Web: www.pierce.ctc.edu/business


Campus

THESE ARE THE FACES

They spend their time dreaming up ways to make

O

e

BY ANNE HAMMOND

Staff Writer

Anne Hammond/ Staff Photos

Yajahira Parham

Special Events Coordinator

YDominguez@pierce.ctc.edu

Parham hopes to surpass event attendance

goals, attract students who don’t

normally attend events and create new

events.

Last year she worked as an Entertainment

and Recreation coordinator for

Student Life.

“Planning events is like a piece of pie

for me now,” says Parham. “I definitely

like going all out.”

As an organizer and planner at heart,

she is also focused on her board goal of

increasing attendance at all board events

and activities.

She plans to earn an AA in dental

hygiene and then continue at Pierce in a

special program.

Kaela Belen

Issues and Awareness

Coordinator

KBelen@pierce.ctc.edu

Belen organizes events that raise

awareness for certain causes such as

mental health, Breast Cancer Awareness

and Hispanic heritage. Mental health is a

priority for Belen.

“I want students to know where they

can get help and know the resources

and hopefully help people feel like they

belong,” said Belen.

She hopes students feel like Pierce College

is a community and a family where

they can get to know each other, not just

a school. She wants to help students build

connections and feel happier as a result.

“I like to think big,” she said.

Belen wants students to remember an

event. That it made an impact on them,

they got something out of it and it helped

them or a friend.

Belen is an education major who came

from a large family and loves to cook.

Tracy Vo

Outreach Coordinator

Lvo@pierce.ctc.edu

Vo wants to create memories, opportunities

for creativity, and attract new

students to engage more in college so

they learn how much Pierce College cares

for them.

When students complete their college

education, she wants them to leave with

lots of good memories, in addition to

knowledge. She feels that Student Life

events can affect students in positive

ways and increase their happiness.

“We can find more services for the students,

such as the free bus pass,” says Vo.

Vo says she is passionate about what

she is doing; she’s creative, very organized,

a good learner and loves working

with people.

“My strong point is that I’m an international

student and I want to create new

things that all students can enjoy,” says

Vo.

“People are curious about differences.”

Vo is studying business at Pierce

College and ultimately will specialize in

marketing elsewhere.

18 / piercepioneernews.com

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2


e

OF FUN AT PIERCE

each week something special for their peers

Campus

Dennis Johnson

Communications Coordinator

DJohnson@pierce.ctc.edu

Johnson is in the digital design program,

and is passionate about helping

students with mental health by providing

speakers, resources, and by increasing

awareness of what exists.

“I just want to sit down and talk to

people,” said Johnson. “Because a lot of

people who suffer from depression don’t

want to talk. They just keep to themselves

and will be the ones hiding in the back of

the room.”

During the first two days of classes he

was personally walking lost students to

their classes as part of the board’s ‘Welcome

Days.’

Johnson’s also focused on improving

the social media presence on Instagram,

Facebook and possibly Twitter by

updating it regularly and providing a lot

of relevant content that’ll keep students

up-to-date regarding events.

Johnson is enthusiastic about a campus

cleanup effort, including a focus on trash,

recycling, and landscaping.

“We are committed to the students,”

says Johnson.

Taimane Rice

Entertainment and

Recreation Coordinator

Trice@pierce.ctc.edu

Rice is studying digital design, and

has creative ideas on how to broaden the

variety of students at events.

“I want to ensure that we create a platform

that accommodates both Running

Start students but also students who may

just want to come by on the way to class,

who probably have to go pick up their

kids later and maybe have a job as well,”

says Rice.

She wants to entice more people to

sporting events, including those held off

campus.

Rice has exciting plans for an international

Passport Café with free drinks and

tables with treats.

She grew up in a big family where her

mom entertained, then she became a

wedding planning assistant for her aunt.

“After a while I ended up becoming

her right hand,” says Rice. “She put that

little bug in me to want to be able to plan

things.

“I like that ability to be able to affect

somebody so much that even years later

they’ll remember it,” says Rice.

Kaitie Ferencik

Promotions Coordinator

KFerencik@pierce.ctc.edu

As a digital design student, Ferencik

creates constantly -- all the posters,

flyers, handbills, and the quarterly event

calendar.

“The calendar has a list of all the events

that Student Life holds which is really

cool because almost every single one of

them has free food, free resources, giveaways,

games, things that they can do,”

says Ferencik.

She’s looking forward to creating three

very different calendars – fall, winter, and

spring – that are gender-neutral, and easy

to read and navigate.

Ferencik is also making sure that all

promotional material is posted in ways

that students can access it.

“Our biggest issue is reaching certain

demographics of students, like students

that take online classes or nighttime

classes,” says Ferencik. “I’d really like to

create promotional banners for Canvas.

We have a very large demographic of

people that are not right-out-of-highschool

college students, so our goal is

finding events that they would like to go

to as well as students that are just out of

high school.”

piercepioneernews.com / 19


Sports Commentary

20 YEARS IN THE MAKING

This year marks the beginning of an era as Pierce College

introduces its first ever Women’s Cross Country Team

courtesy photo

/ pierceraiders.com

JAMES SARABIA ZALDIVAR

staff writer

Ready, set, go! #132 Serin Caldwell (left) and #133 Tiffany Compton(right) Line

up at the satring line moments before the first race in the Pierce College’s

Womens Cross Country history.

FOR THE FIRST TIME IN PIERCE

COLLEGE’S HISTORY, the women’s

cross country team debuted on Aug. 31

after twenty years in the making. Daniel

Richards, head coach of the team, helped

orchestrate the meets and practices,

playing a key role in getting this team off

the ground.

Richards had conversations with

Duncan Stevenson, director of District

Athletics, which focused on strengthening

the college’s athletic program. This

is what led to Pierce adding women’s

cross country to the program, which has

been a goal of Stevenson for the past two

decades.

“Year one we just wanted to form a

team,” said Richards. “Next year, I want

to be able to compete in the NY conference;

it's a prestigious conference when

it comes to distance running and cross

country and I want Pierce to be in the

conversation as early as next year.”

As far as how Pierce should be seen

in the realm of cross country, Richards

20 / piercepioneernews.com

mentions that he hopes to make this a

place to go and run for. “That’s my goal

- competing for and winning conference

championships in the next few years,” he

said.

Currently the team is excelling as

the season progresses, and students are

excited that they have this new opportunity

available to them. Serin Caldwell, a

student on the team, expressed her thrill

for being able to be a part of this. “I’ve

always loved to run and now that Pierce

College has a cross country team I think

it’s a great opportunity for lots of girls to

go in and do their passion.”

Other athletes on the team, such as Tiffany

Compton, have also expressed their

excitement about their experience. “I

enjoy my time very well,” said Compton.

“I’ve done this since high school and took

a two-year break, so it’s really nice getting

back into the individual school schedule.”

When it comes to Richards experience

coaching he says his favorite part is the

comradery. “Meeting these girls with a

passion for running, it’s a diverse group

of girls and it's cool seeing how running

can bring them together. Sometimes you

have a handful of people and you’re like

‘how is this going to form a team?’. It's

cool to see them bond over hard work

and practices day in to day out, that's the

biggest reward.”

Over the season, the team has done a

total of six games, including their most

recent one on Nov. 18 at Saint Martin’s

University. Each member has been

improving and enjoying their time since

the creation of this team, and are looking

forward to continuing to do so.

For those that have an interest in

learning more about the women’s cross

country team, students can check out the

sports athletic page on the Pierce College

website. Students can look forward to the

future of this new team as it becomes a

competitive and sought out school to run

for. It is here to stay.

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2


ine



HOUSING RESOURCES

THROUGH PIERCE COLLEGE

Features

Pierce College has an abundance of resources that includes housing

on this page are some of the resources they offer. And Pierce College

is going to implement more in the future.

FIND OUT MORE AT:

HTTPS://WWW.PIERCE.CTC.EDU/HELP-HOUSING

ARE YOU A SINGLE PARENT FLEEING DOMESTIC VIOLENCE?

EXODUS HOUSING: : Must be a single parent 18 or older with a minor child in their custody, must be fleeing

or attempting to flee domestic violence and lack resources to obtainstable housing. Employed or able to obtain

employment for a hsort period of time. Applications are active fo 60 days and then deleted. Applicants are welcome

to reapply as necessary

Website: https://exodushousing.org/

Call 253-862-6808

Are you a minor who lives in Eastern Pierce County?

Open Hearth Ministries — Provides short term motel assistance to those with children up to 18 years old in

Puyallup and Eastern Pierce County.

https://www.gtcf.org/community/directory/open-hearth-ministries-organization-helping-hand-house/

Call 253-307-2274

Are you a pregnant woman or a new mother and looking for a place to live right now?

New Beginnings — Provides housing support services for young women who are pregnant as well as new

mothers who are in crisis and need assistance with temporary housing.

Website: https://newbeginningshome.org/our-programs

Call 253-353-2229

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2 piercepioneernews.com / 23


Commentary

SHOULD

COLLEGE

ATHLETES

BE PAID?

24 / piercepioneernews.com

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2


Commentary

Kevin Collins / Staff photos

By MATT SLATER

Staff Writer

The debate of whether or not we

should be paying college athletes has

come to prominence with the introduction

of a new California law regarding

the subject. Recently, California governor

Gavin Newsom signed the Fair Pay to

Play Act, which would allow college athletes

to make money from sponsorships

and product endorsements.

The National Collegiate Athletic

Association objects to this law. According

to NPR, they see it as a threat to the

traditional model amateurism in college

athletics. However, considering that

colleges make money off of the athletic

games, it doesn’t seem so fair that the students

aren’t being compensated, but their

professional counterparts are compensated

with significant payment.

Take Zion Williamson, a basketball

player from Duke University, for an

example. According to The New York

Times, Williamson is college basketball’s

best and most prominent player.

However, back in February, he

suffered an injury to his right knee after

his sneaker split open during a game.

This unfortunate event led to calls for

him to stop playing college basketball,

seeing as he was already an NBA

draft prospect.

This drew criticism towards the NCAA

for not paying student athletes. In another

case years earlier, a college football

player chose to end his college career prematurely

after receiving an injury more

serious than Williamson’s. This was due

to the fact that he wouldn’t be compensated,

along with the athlete wanting to

limit the risk to his professional payday,

according to the NYT.

Of course, there are arguments against

paying college athletes. Some college

athletes get numerous privileges from the

schools they’re at - scholarships, reduced

fees, and getting priority when picking

classes for each term. However, the law

does not say that the students would

get paid by the college itself, or by the

NCAA.

The money would come from sponsorships

by outside companies to use their

name, image, and likeness for product

endorsements and advertisements.

If the money paid to athletes came

from the university, the student athletes

would become student employees, presenting

Title IX challenges.

There are cases of athletes being

drafted into the professional leagues right

out of high school, meaning they might

not have to play in college in order to

get a position in a major sports league

like the NBA or NFL. This may distract

them, and prevent them from pursuing

an education, which is a risky way to go.

Besides, the odds of getting drafted right

out of high school is small, and having a

good education is the safer route.

So, while I still support college athletes

being paid, I can see reasons why others

would go against this.

As we were making this commentary the NCAA is now in development to allow

athletes to earn compensation for use of their name, likeness and image

after a unanimous vote (NPR)

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2 piercepioneernews.com /

25


Science

Dome

South Sound’s only planetarium!

1910 TM

ALL AGES SHOWS

$6 for ages 3 and up | FREE for Pierce College students with I.D.

Includes a half hour live astronomy presentation and half hour fulldome video

Fridays at 7:15 p.m.

Saturdays at 3:15 p.m.

CHILDREN’S SHOWS

$6 for children | Adults FREE

Interactive live presentations

Saturdays at 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m.

Pierce College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, perceived or actual physical or mental disability, pregnancy, genetic information, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity,

marital status, creed, religion, honorably discharged veteran or military status, or use of a trained guide dog or service animal in its programs and activities. For inquiries regarding compliance contact the

Pierce College District Title IX Coordinator, 253-964-6519 | 9401 Farwest Drive SW, Lakewood WA 98498.

Pierce College is committed to equal access to all college sponsored events. Persons with disabilities who anticipate needing accommodations or who have questions about physical access provided should

contact Access & Disability Services, 253-964-6468 or ADS@pierce.ctc.edu. Requests can be served most effectively if notice is provided at least 2 weeks before the event.

piercecollegedome.com | 253-964-6440

Pierce College Fort Steilacoom

Rainier Building, 263

9401 Farwest Dr SW

Lakewood, WA 98498


1910 TM

TAKE A BREAK

You deserve it

Coffee Break

Written by

ABRI WILSON

Written by

MATT SLATER

November. 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 2 piercepioneernews.com / 27


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