POWERGROUP

munich.members

POWERGROUP


2014

004

2


2014

2004

2014

10 YEARS

2014

3



WELCOME

Imagine that you’re at a

COCKTAIL PARTY

And someone asks: Where do you work?

And you say: With POWERGROUP.

And your counterpart asks: What’s that?

And you say: A global creative community.

And your counterpart asks: What do they do?

And you say: I need a drink.

That’s just one of the reasons for this book

It was created by a team of highly talented people from all

over the world, for the purpose of defining – perhaps for the

first time since the founding of our company – who we are

and what we want to be.

For many of you, this book is probably the first opportunity

to experience our company in all its diversity and to get to

know the success stories – and faces – of POWERGROUP

around the world.

To see, in this new articulation of POWERGROUP, what it is

that both unites us and at the same time provides us with the

individuality that sets us apart from others.

And this book is just the beginning of our journey.

But right now we’d just like you to sit back, relax – pour

yourself a drink – and enjoy reading about POWERGROUP.

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WELCOME 3

POWERGROUP 6

THE COURSE OF TIME 9

POSITIONING 11

WHERE DESIGN MEETS STRATEGY 12

THE POWER STRATEGY 14

CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION 16

GROWTH 19

INSPIRATION 20

PEOPLE AND MOMENTS 24

OPEN HORIZONS 26

A FEW WORDS ABOUT WORDS 35

THE RED DOOR 43

WITH OPEN EYES 46

KEEP RUNNING 50

IM.PULSE 53

IMPRINT 60

INNOVATION MANAGEMENT & KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER 62

TRENDS ANALYSIS 67

FEASIBILITY STUDY 71

GROWTH POTENTIAL 72

GEOSTRATEGY 75

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT 78

INTERDISCIPLINARITY 83

BRAND POSITIONING 86

PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT 89

CAMPAIGN 94

STRATEGIC BRAND MANAGEMENT 96

BUSINESS LOCATION DEVELOPMENT & MARKETING 100

BERLIN SCIENCES 2015 104

IN-DEPTH INTERVIEWS 107

BRAND MAP © 110

SCIENCE MARKETING 114

BRAND SYMPOSIUM 117

CREATIVE COMPETITION 119

MIMETIC MODULATION © 120

SCIENCE PORTAL 121

MEDICINE & HEALTH 122

LOGISTIC OF KNOWLEDGE © 127

KNOWLEDGE COMMUNICATION 128

BUSINESS STRATEGY 133

FAST MOVING CONSUMER GOODS 136

RACING SHOE 141

SUSTAINABILITY & SOCIAL WELFARE 150

THE MUSIC EDUCATION PROJECT „OPER ÜBER LEBEN © “ 155

THE 100 POOREST GERMANS 157

WORLDWIDE RESPONSIBILITY 159

PATTY´S CHILD CLINICS 163

THE RACE GOES ON 166


CONTENT

WELCOME &

POWERGROUP

PAGE 3

WHERE DESIGN

MEETS STRATEGY

PAGE 12

PEOPLE &

MOMENTS

PAGE 24

INNOVATION MANAGEMENT &

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

PAGE 62

ENERGY &

ENVIRONMENT

PAGE 78

BUSINESS LOCATION

DEVELOPMENT & MARKETING

PAGE 100

MEDICINE &

HEALTH

PAGE 122

FAST MOVING

CONSUMER GOODS

PAGE 136

SUSTAINABILITY &

SOCIAL WELFARE

PAGE 150

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THE POWERGROUP

The POWERGROUP was founded in 2001 as a strategy

and planning company within the international agency

network TBWA. The name TBWA is derived from its

four founders William G. Tragos, Claude Bonnange, Uli

Wiesendanger and Paolo Ajroldi. During the selection of

the name for the new business consulting company, the

partners (Dr. Pantelis Christian Poetis and Volkmar Wermter)

used the same idea and formed TBWA\POWER from the

acronym of their surnames.

After the management buyout in 2004, Dr. Poetis, a lawyer

and former Quandt Group manager, developed the resultant

POWERGROUP network into an internationally recognised

strategy consulting agency. POWERGROUP’s most

important conceptual instrument is Business Design Thinking

– knowledge-based, strategic planning and development of

products, brands and companies.

As a strategic consultation and implementation agency,

POWERGROUP today works for clients in more than 50

countries. With the founding of POWERASIA in 2013,

POWERGROUP further intensified its focus in Pakistan,

Afghanistan, India, China, Indonesia, Bangladesh and

Turkey. We use a comprehensive network to identify business

opportunities in these fast-growing markets, and support the

development of multilateral collaboration. The expertise of

our international teams in cross-cultural communication has

proven to be extremely valuable for the implementation

process.

With POWERMADRID, POWERGROUP has been present

on the Iberian Peninsula since March 2014 for the purpose

of supporting our international clients in their local challenges

directly in situ as well as identifying developments and

opportunities in Spain as a gateway to South America.

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9



THE COURSE OF TIME

The picture shows Jesse Owens at the finish-line during

the 1936 Olympics and characterises the spirit of the

POWERGROUP in an idealised manner. The Afro-American

wrote sports history at the Olympiad in Berlin, as he won

gold in four disciplines: 100 metres, 200 metres, long jump

and the 4x100 metre relay. Despite the fact that the Games

were clearly dominated by Nazi propaganda, the German

public rapturously applauded Owens.

We view the picture, in which the artist Stefan Heide clad

Jesse Owens in a POWERGROUP jersey, as symbolic for

the POWERGROUP. An alleged outsider, considered so for

whatever reasons, wins respect mainly through achievement.

But, when someone or a group achieves victory, the victor

soon becomes the hunted. Staying at the top of the list in the

long term requires the ability to constantly renew one’s focus,

as well as the occasional bit of luck.

We reflect on ten very successful yet sometimes difficult

years. It is a particular pleasure that we’ve been able to

build a business which is driven by its team spirit to achieve

the best – for our clients, our employees and our company.

The race goes on!

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Analysis

Market Researchers

rational

scientific

M&A

Consultants

aggressive

rich

Business Designers

POWERGROUP

interrogative

analytical

inventive

creative

Advertising

Executives

artistic

intense

Creation

Business Consultants

traditional

serious


POSITIONING

As business designers, POWERGROUP’s experts fill the gaps

between market researchers, business consultants, advertising

executives and M&A consultants and combine the knowledge

gained in these fields to develop new solutions.

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WHERE DESIGN

MEETS STRATEGY

When design and strategy meet, two schools of thought

face each other.

Management consultants, being trained in business

management, use a linear approach to decision-making and

usually start with an intensive solution analysis. Designers start

with a holistic solution which they then modify to conform

with circumstances and requirements.

This conceptual design process requires a great level

of sensitivity on the part of the designer who must learn

to understand the customer to be able to develop the

right business strategy, branding concept or product.

Designers challenge assignments – a characteristic which

is in turn grounded in their empathy: it’s about wanting to

truly understand the customers and consumers; they’re

accustomed to questioning apparently fixed thinking models

and specifications. Designers often put a problem in a

completely new light for the purpose of considering it in a

broader context.

This solution-oriented approach of Design Thinking is

adopted for POWERGROUP‘s Business Design Thinking: the

knowledge-based planning and development of strategies

for products, brands and companies. Depending on the

focus of the project, our multi-functional team’s experts from

the areas of business, design, IT, finance, marketing, sales

and research will be involved in the development process

from the outset for the purpose of achieving optimal results

through comprehensive collaboration.

As Business Design Thinking is inherently rooted in the real

world and marketplace, it is an ideal conceptual design tool

for strategic development in an ever-changing market and

competitive environment.

Companies must respond to the challenges associated with

the globalisation of markets and competition, the triumph of

the service industry, the effects of deregulation, privatisation

and the knowledge revolution.

POWERGROUP offers solutions in the following three

sectors in particular: strategy, marketing / sales, and M&A

transactions.

Our expertise includes projects in the following areas:

energy and the environment, innovation management and

technology transfer, health and medicine, Fast Moving

Consumer Goods, sustainability and social issues, and

communal marketing.

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15


THE POWER STRATEGY

BUSINESS DESIGN – GROWTH MARKETS – BUSINESS STRATEGY –

BUSINESS UNIT STRATEGY – SUSTAINABILITY

The development of innovative marketing strategies which

help accelerate the achievement of corporate objectives

is the raison d’être of POWERGROUP. We use Business

Design Thinking to create distinctive strategies for businesses

and brands as well as to introduce new products or services.

Business Design Thinking – knowledge-based, strategic

planning and development – can be applied to a wide

variety of companies. Having successfully implemented

this conceptual approach in the development of innovative

projects for the FMCG industry, POWERGROUP is now

using it mostly for B2B projects. Business Design Thinking

is particularly suited for non-tangible brands from branches

such as logistics, health, insurance, banking, energy, science

and culture.

For us, creativity means solving tasks through unconventional

and innovative means. We expect these solutions not only to

be new and unique, but also to show considerable growth

potential. Creativity is the source of the thought process

which ultimately leads to creative ideas. This “Eureka”

moment brings information, knowledge and experience

into the creative process and can thus help to achieve

strategic business goals. Our design team generates and

provides highly innovative trend analyses which are used as

a basis for the development of inspiring creative concepts

for accelerating the implementation of business, brand and

product strategies.

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CREATIVITY AND

INNOVATION

BRAND MANAGEMENT – STRATEGIC MARKETING – OPERATIVE MARKETING – CUSTOMER

EXPERIENCES AND SEGMENTATION – CUSTOMER LOYALTY – CUSTOMER SATISFACTION

The development of innovative products and concepts is

the primary focus of our work. In order to identify strategic

opportunities for innovation, we compile qualitative and

quantitative data models to analyse the company and market

potential and evaluate the competition, taking into account

social developments and trends in fashion, art and media

usage to provide the framework for our creative process.

A coherent, clearly defined brand definition and careful

brand management are pre-requisites for a company’s

successful interaction with its market environment. Brands

are a highly concentrated form of communication. We

develop brand communication concepts that provide an

emotional experience, which in turn generates brand loyalty

and satisfies the need to belong. Our agency implements

these communication concepts over the entire range of

communication channels: from print to radio and TV up to

interactive, digital media. The agency can offer the entire

service spectrum, including the design and implementation

of internal communication measures, PR and corporate

representation at trade fairs and congresses. Our aim is to

satisfy all the creative needs of our clients, small or big.

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19



GROWTH

ACQUISITION SCREENING – ACQUISITION STRATEGY – DIVESTITURES – MERGER INTEGRATION –

JOINT VENTURES – STRATEGIC DUE DILIGENCE

Growth strategies often include mergers, acquisitions and

joint ventures in order to complement product or enterprise

development. Our experts from the financial sector, business

operations and strategy development work in close

collaboration with management to define and implement

plans for helping companies to grow and reach their full

potential. POWERINVEST, the transaction and portfolio

team integrated in POWERGROUP, places a special focus

on strategy conception and implementation to ensure a

consistent and pro-active management approach. Close

collaboration with our experts for ‘new markets’ allows for

cross-border growth.

POWERINVEST consults German and international corporations,

owner-managed medium-sized companies and

financial investors in the domain of corporate finance.

Our success lies in the establishment of long-term strategic

partnerships. Implementation processes are continuously

monitored by our experienced experts and guarantee the

realisation of jointly agreed collaboration objectives. We

provide professional support in purchasing and selling

businesses and shareholdings, structuring and implementing

financing activities, and winning investors and collaboration

partners via the international POWERGROUP network.

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INSPIRATION

A problem always looks easy after it’s been solved. The great

victory which today appears easily won, is the result of a series of

small, unnoticed victories.

Paulo Coelho, Manual of the Warrior of Light

The “Warrior of Light” (as dubbed by Patricia Poetis,

POWERGROUP’s creative director) – a copy of a clay figure from

221 B.C. of the terracotta army of Emperor Quin Shi Huangadi –

guards the door of POWERGROUP and is representative of

many inspiring symbols which can be found in the works of art,

artefacts and objets d’art from around the world located on the

POWERGROUP premises.

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25


PEOPLE

AND

MOMENTS

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27


OPEN HORIZONS

Tête-à-Tête with Pantelis Christian Poetis and Patricia Poetis

Interview: Ines Rößler

Pullach on an early summer day. The eye sweeps over the

Isar valley up to the peaks of the Alps that are visible in the

distance. POWERGROUP’s Managing Director, Honorary

Consul Dr. Pantelis Christian Poetis and Creative Director

Patricia Poetis, whose offices are connected by an internal

door, finish a last email before the interview can begin.

POWERGROUP celebrates its ten-year anniversary this

summer. In your view, what has been the most significant

change between then and today?

Patricia Poetis looks at her husband.

Pantelis Christian Poetis (PCP): I’m not saying anything.

Patricia Poetis (PP): Why not?

PCP: You have to answer that.

PP: But you were one of the founding members of

POWERGROUP.

PCP: The most important change is that we inserted the

connecting door between our offices.

PP: I think that the most important and correct step for

POWERGROUP was to move here to the Riverside Offices.

PCP: I was a little hesitant at first. But ultimately it was the

right decision.

In doing this, you virtually brought the company to your

home.

PP: Our projects cannot really be separated from what

is considered a career. We see them as a vocation. The

problem with a vocation is that you can no longer distinguish

between private and professional life – after all, you’re

involved around the clock. However, I see this as a very

positive thing – in combining professional and private

spheres, it is possible for both of us to work together day

and night, in the truest sense of the word.

PCP: I think that’s a great luxury.

Do you still remember the very first project which you

supervised with POWERGROUP?

PCP: That was a very strategic mission in which an Internet

start-up company was acquired by a large corporation from

Gütersloh – two cultures clashed. It took us quite a while to

find the right way. With this project we learned that it’s not

just the theoretical conceptual design that is important for a

project; rather it is the practical application.

PP: At the time, we had not yet worked together, and you

couldn’t explain to me what you were actually doing.

PCP: We had to define that for ourselves in clear terms, and

proceed task by task, step by step. In the end, we found a

successful concept.

Ms. Poetis, you have only just mentioned that you were

originally not involved in POWERGROUP. What led to the

decision to turn away from the fashion industry and join a

consulting company?

PP: This was a gradual process. In fact, I originally consulted

fashion companies in regard to how their design teams were

co-ordinated and controlled. It was about huge collections

and the designers had to brought into line, or else everyone

would have designed something different. Parallel to this,

we had many discussions at home about POWERGROUP

projects, including ideas and strategies. In many cases,

we debated how concepts and their message could be

conveyed well and clearly. Back then we found out that the

easiest way to communicate something is with graphical

visualisation. Through these discussions, I became more

and more involved and ultimately became a member of

POWERGROUP.

PCP: Even when we found the right words to outline a

strategy, this did not mean that it would also be properly

understood on an international level. The Spanish, Greeks,

Portuguese and Brazilians may interpret it quite differently. A

picture is the same for everyone.

PP: That‘s why I always say, “a house is a house”. Words are

understood quite differently from images. Get ten people to

draw a house and you will get ten different houses. A picture,

on the other hand, provides everyone with the same idea.

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Are there any approaches from the fashion industry which

are also reflected in your present job?

PP: The fashion world is very fast-paced and extremely shortlived.

In addition to creativity , I bring along the fast pace.

PCP: There simply is no faster or more direct communication

than in the fashion industry. Patty always knows from

experience what works quickly, and how colours, shapes

and words function and are perceived. This quick pace can

be applied to everything.

”DIFFERENT FROM TRADITIONAL

MANAGEMENT CONSULTING

COMPANIES, WE DON’T THINK

BACKWARDS, BUT FORWARDS.“

Pantelis Christian Poetis

Has POWERGROUP‘s operation method been changed

with the inclusion of your wife?

PCP: It has always been very important for us at

POWERGROUP to distinguish ourselves from the competition.

The big consulting firms are strong in theoretical development.

In my opinion, their weakness lies in lack of creativity – the

development of the actual vision and with it the associated

realignment of the company; and then the corresponding

visualisation and implementation. I often receive calls such

as this from my customers: “Christian, come quickly, we have

just received eight folders from a consulting firm and don‘t

know what to do with them.” On an intellectual level, the

content can indeed be understood, but the mental leap to

building a vision or to developing a new product cannot be

completed.

PP: Through joint discussion, we have developed our

“Eureka effect”. The different approach from the strategic

and the creative sector, which is completely detached from

any constraints, leads to the convergence of these two points

and thus serves the development of concepts and their

visualisation.

PCP: And at the end of the day, the customer does not have

a developed project or task, but an implemented result. And

that is a substantial difference.

How else does POWERGROUP distinguish itself from the

competition?

PCP: There are a few fundamental differences between

a traditional management consulting company and

POWERGROUP. One of the most important differences is

that we do not deal with internal functions. We do not do

restructuring or cost cutting, we don’t do any production

relocations or plant closures. Design Thinking is exclusively

focussed on external things: What is the market like, how

can I better represent myself in the market, how can I win

additional market potential? This can be accomplished via

diverse processes. It can be a product, but it doesn’t have to

be. Even extended product offers or market entries represent

opportunities. The second difference is that we don’t think

backwards, but forwards. For example, is there is a vision for

a company which can be translated into a strategy, and with

such a strategy, is it possible to position the company better

than how it is currently positioned? Which reminds me of

how, right at the start of POWERGROUP, we were invited to

a BMW seminar with maybe 35 other consulting firms. They

said that they were doing so well that they were afraid of the

future. This was an intriguing introductory question: We are

doing fantastically well, but how could we do even better, or

how can we stay that way and even top it? This is Business

Design Thinking at its best. This is primarily not about crises;

rather, it is about the future and using appropriate means to

secure this future.

PP: In fairness, it must be said that we never actually work for

companies which are in a crisis, but we almost always work

for companies that want to increase their market power and

their influence. This also implies that we operate in a very

positive, upward-moving field. We can start thinking without

cost being an issue at all. Only once we have developed

the strategies and new ideas do we enter into the discussion

of what it may cost and how much money is available. This is

a very different approach from going into an ailing company

and looking to save money everywhere – ultimately realising

reductions. We externalise, we open the company to new

possibilities– for new sales and new success.

PCP: Costs are also relative. When I have a company which

is on the verge of bankruptcy and I cause additional costs

of one million, then that is one million too much. If we have

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opportunities for advancing a company that is worth billions

and securing markets with a turnover in the millions, then

costs of a million are very low. Of course, at the same time,

it is more fun for us to think positively. Right at the start of

my career I got ailing companies back on their feet, but, to

be honest, it was terrible. This cost cutting, closing factories,

looking people in the eyes and telling them that their jobs

have been outsourced – it didn’t give me any pleasure.

PP: This was actually the beginning of our strategic thinking.

Because we wanted to avoid having to lay off people, we

came up with new concepts for fashion collections, and in

this way we were able to either prevent layoffs or significantly

delay them.

PCP: Cost cutting basically doesn‘t get you anywhere if

you don‘t have a vision for the future. Otherwise, after two

years, the costs are too high again and you have to make

reductions again. And cost cutting does absolutely nothing

for a company which has no future.

PP: This positive, long-term work also means that we

nurture very personal, often even private, relationships with

our clients, almost on a friendship level. These are mostly

senior corporate executives and CEOs, and that leads to

short decision paths. This kind of relationship can almost be

compared with that one has with one‘s GP, that‘s how large

the mutual trust is.

PCP: This is perhaps also reflected in how we don’t consider

ourselves service providers. We act as business partners

who anticipate our clients‘ every wish.

PP: Make it happen whatever it takes.

Over a period of ten years, surely some strategy also must

have failed?

PCP: We can look back on some 80-90 large projects

over this 10-year period, and only a few of them were not

successfully implemented. We keep an eye on these projects

for years and take note, with satisfaction, that it wasn‘t our

fault if something could not be implemented.

PP: Satisfaction is not the right word. Of course we are proud

when we receive feedback, such as happened recently

regarding the black-and-white hands campaign. I had almost

forgotten it, and then there is such positive feedback years

later. The campaign was really able to convey a unique

selling proposition. But some projects just fail, and I find that

really frustrating. We spend many hours contemplating the

project and then something simply cannot be realised. A

good example of this is Berlin Tempelhof.

PCP: After all, projects and the implementation of the projects

do not fail on a large scale. It is very rare that you have an

idea and then it flops because it was simply bad or missed

the point. Actual failure happens mostly when somewhere

the fine-tuning doesn‘t work out during implementation. It’s

only a small parameter and the whole project topples.

Sometimes there is also resistance which was not anticipated

or was misjudged, and the whole thing stumbles. The

Tempelhof project for further usage failed due to lack of

political will. Following this year‘s referendum in Berlin,

the Tempelhof site will probably lie fallow for a long time.

”WE OPEN COMPANIES TO NEW

POSSIBILITIES– FOR NEW SALES AND

NEW SUCCESS.“

Patricia Poetis

One important subject in your daily work is inspiration.

Where do you get it from?

PP: Inspiration is varied: anything you come across in the

course of the day can inspire. From family to nature, or a

normal trip to the supermarket, plus specialist magazines

dedicated to trends and future research. Naturally, politics

of the day and the news also play a role – just like the unrest

in various countries, or ‘liquid democracy’. It all influences

creativity and allows one to think about it and to transform

learnings into input for projects.

PCP: Reflection is decisive for me. We discuss things

discursively, not only at home but also in the company. Every

employee knows that he or she can contribute something

constructive to a project at any time, regardless of their

position or specialisation. This inter-disciplinarity is a very

important aspect for generating the right impulses or ideas.

We highly appreciate the personal exchange with our staff -

it is in this way that we learn about trends. For example, what

does a techie or a graphic artist do when they have a long

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weekend; where do they go, what is their objective, what

do they do there, and with what experiences do they come

back? Similarly, we also get important input from our children,

who are quite a bit younger than our employees. What

happens in this new young world, naturally has implications

on the “grown-up” world, we don’t live in a vacuum. The real

intuitive approach is to use this discourse, the back-and-forth,

to develop what starts as a holistic approach into a widelyapplicable

strategy.

Are you clear from the outset on how you will apply a

certain trend or graphical stimulus for a project, or does

that crystallise only over time?

PP: Once you‘ve read up on a project, then some flash

of inspiration comes relatively quickly. Then it’s all about

determining whether it can be implemented as intended.

PCP: If, based on my wife’s description, I’ve fully understood

what’s possible and how to implement it, that’s when I say

“Sold!”. If I as a non-creative person understand it, then

everyone else will also understand it. I learned this from

Patty; if she says “Look, this might be like so and so”, I know

immediately whether it appeals to me and whether it could

work or not. Indeed, in nine out of ten cases, it passes

thorough examination both internally and – after we have

elaborated the concept – it also passes upon review by the

customer. I don’t know what that is – intuition or experience.

PP: It‘s a combination of many factors.

Some of your children contribute on a regular basis,

some on short notice as needed, to various projects

of POWERGROUP or the Honorary Consulate. How

important is it to you that your children get an insight into

the operation?

PP: It is very important. For us it was a pre-requisite that our

children should be able to be involved in the communication

between us. We have always spoken to everyone about

everything. We have often received significant input for

decisions in this way. Ever since our children were old

enough to understand what we’re talking about, we have

wanted them to also understand the basics of our work;

how strategies are developed and how they are ultimately

implemented. In this way, I believe that we can provide them

with what they need to have a solid basis for any career that

they might choose later in life. We don’t want to nail them

down in POWERGROUP, and also do not want to force

them to work here. Currently, of course their studies are the

focus of their lives. But if they take on a job in the company,

then they must also perform it responsibly, from the beginning

to the end.

”INTER-DISCIPLINARITY IS A VERY

IMPORTANT ASPECT FOR GENERATING

THE RIGHT IMPULSES OR IDEAS.“

Pantelis Christian Poetis

PCP: Patty has once again forgotten the most important

point. We have always told our children when they asked

for pocket money that they could naturally work for it, that’s

not a problem. The educational intention behind this goes

along with the old adage “from nothing comes nothing”.

They should understand that, if they work, they can also get

money for it.

PP: When it comes to money – let me add something here.

For me, money is not a decision criterion, and it should not

be one for our children either. I have never made money the

focus of my life. As Erich Sixt recently said in his acceptance

speech at the Scopus Awards in Berlin: “Those who earn

money just to earn money deserve only to earn money”. Of

course you‘ll need some yield at the end, but primarily it’s

the cause that counts. That‘s what our children are learning.

They have also learned that performance and reward are

closely related, for they have never received pocket money;

rather, they have always had to work for it. However, it was

not primarily about money, but about the idea. It‘s just the

opposite of what you just said.

PCP: It would really have surprised me if we were of one

mind. In this context I‘d like to stress that we are fully open

not only to our children but also to our employees. The

Design Thinking that is at the core of POWERGROUP can

be practiced only if you are ready and willing to learn it, and

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have had experience in going beyond borders, crossing

them and thinking big. I understood my wife immediately

when she said: ”Move the company to here in Pullach,

the horizon here is endless; you have no mental barriers

or content limitations.“ This is what we want to convey to

both our children and our staff. If now one of them has the

idea - which is what just happened – that she would like

to found and run POWERMADRID, and we believe that

makes sense, we will do it. And if the next employee comes

along and says that he or she is now opening an office in

Shanghai, then Shanghai it is. I believe that, if the basics and

the chemistry are right, and the external parameters as well,

then anything is possible.

PP: True to Walt Disney: “If you can dream it, you can do it”..

PCP: Exactly.

PP: And that means that your horizon is open – there are

no barriers, there is no No. A no is just a short-term result

prevention, as my husband always puts it so nicely. That‘s

when one has to keep looking for a way as long as necessary

until it is found. That is a major aspect with POWERGROUP:

There are no limits.

”A MAJOR ASPECT WITH POWERGROUP:

THERE ARE NO LIMITS.“

Patricia Poetis

POWERGROUP often uses social topics to support brand

building. Aren’t you worried that that might be understood

purely as a marketing gimmick?

PP: I don’t believe that, because that is simply not the case.

We have always believed that if we’re doing well, then we

must share some of it. We have understood that our strategies

can also be used successfully for social topics. This is dear

to our hearts; it’s really important for us. In this globalised

world in which we move and work, we must also consider

such projects. They’re not just a part of our everyday work;

ultimately, they also contribute to the success itself – for it’s

only if we are able to defuse social hot spots that we are

able to establish new markets there. For me personally, it’s

the humanitarian, not the economic, aspect that comes to

the fore.

PCP: And it’s fun. Neither of us play golf, so I always say:

I don’t play golf, I have Pakistan. This commitment with the

Consulate gives me a satisfaction completely different from

playing golf. Besides the fact that I am a terrible golfer.

Recently, you have been able to recruit several Asian,

South European and South American employees for

POWERGROUP. Is this a mere coincidence or a part of

your business strategy?

PP: This has become a part of the business strategy. It was

thanks to a first coincidence that we learned how much

potential and new knowledge we can gain from such

employees, and therefore this approach appealed to us.

This once again expands the horizons immensely, and its

simply fun. We are proud that we can offer these employees

a platform, and we are learning a lot from them.

PCP: As my wife always puts it so nicely, “Life is lived

forwards and understood backwards”. I don’t know where

she got that from.

PP: I think we use a bunch of such sayings.

PCP: Anyway, we really decided on that intuitively and by

chance, and now we understand it as a part of our strategy,

because you can just get an awful lot of learning from it.

We also note differences in mentality, just like one approach

or another which is simply not up for discussion. Some

things just cannot be realised in the way we in Germany

think will work. Sometimes, insurmountable barriers present

themselves. I find that absolutely exciting.

You have already had some - one might even say: radical -

experiences in your life; not just geographically but also

professionally. Hasn’t it become boring, always in Pullach,

always with the same company? What are your future

plans like?

PP: Amazingly, Pullach has become our haven to which we

always like returning. As we work internationally – in more

than 50 countries – the world comes to us at home, and

at the same time we go out into the world. We notice no

limits here. Nevertheless, we are still open for everything. I

could well imagine going somewhere else again. Maybe

33


to Washington or London in ten years. Nothing needs to

remain the way it is. On the other hand, we feel very much at

home here, in this house, in this company, in this location. For

my part, I would never give it up. That is not to say that that

would keep me from something else. What do you think?

PCP: I think you said all there is to it. I agree with you

completely and have nothing to add. I believe just as much

as you do that every person seeks a place of tranquillity

somewhere. We have often discussed this. With our

international projects and trips, we have been able to

develop many thoughts about it. Time and time again, we

have come to the conclusion that Pullach offers so many

advantages that there is no alternative for us. This does not

mean that we are tied one place – quite the opposite. The

only thing that is really immutable for me is Business Design

Thinking – which in turn is the most agile and creative thinking

model there is.

PP: That virus really settled with us. We really can’t do

anything in our lives without...

PCP: We can’t travel to any town, go in any restaurant, enter

any hotel or company, watch any Maypole celebrations...

PP: ...without applying Business Design Thinking. It is indeed

extreme. Extremely beautiful!

Dr. Pantelis Christian Poetis, Pullach

Dr. Poetis had just enough time to approve the content of the 10-year

compendium before he departed for Pakistan. The POWERGROUP

chief executive and Honorary Consul for Pakistan is currently negotiating

with the Ministry of Health and hospital managers in order to establish

parameters for better hygienic conditions.

Patricia Poetis, Pullach

The POWERGROUP’s creative chief is particularly pleased that the Team,

after 10 years, has finally found the time to present selected projects in a

compact book. Normally, looking after corporate communications is put

to one side in favour of work on client projects.

34


35


A FEW WORDS

ABOUT WORDS

Tony Morollo, South Carolina

There’s not much Tony Morollo hasn’t done in his long career. The

linguist, physicist and long-term agency boss didn’t flee into his

well-earned retirement. His perceptive appraisements often help

put the finishing touches on projects and have earned him the role

of the POWERGROUP’s devil’s advocate.


The winters of the late forties and early fifties were the coldest

for decades. Germans who are old enough to remember

the Berlin blockade and the Rosinen bombers still shiver at

the thought of that mini ice-age. As fate would have it, the

blockade ended on my birthday, the day my Mother gave

me used copies of Webster’s Popular Illustrated Dictionary

and Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations. Both were 1938 editions,

as am I. Both of those books, in a certain sense, sealed my

fate. I formed the habit of making sure I knew the force of the

words I used by looking them up in a dictionary. Knowing

who used those words in an admirable form made my habit

all that more enjoyable.

Having nothing better to do during those long cold winter

evenings in the pre-television age, I read books and gave

perhaps overly frequent attention to my friends Webster and

Bartlett. Goethe said that ‘habits are man’s only pleasures’

(according to my friend Bartlett). He, dear Bartlett, also told

me that Confucius said “Without knowing the force of words,

it is impossible to know more.” I thus formed the pleasurable

habit of making sure I knew the force of the words I used

by making reference to friend Webster and the like. And

to Bartlett as well, who showed me how men much wiser

than I had used those words. “The chains of habit are too

weak to be felt until they are too strong to be broken” said

Samuel Johnson, a wordsmith after my own heart. Bosworth

told the anecdote about Johnson’s rebuttal to a woman who

criticised his poor personal hygiene. She said “Mr. Johnson,

you smell”. Johnson replied; “No Madam, I stink and you

smell of cheap perfume”.

My habit of talking about words and well-known usage

thereof, quotations, has often driven my family, friends and

business associates to distraction. I deeply apologise and

‘blame’ my Mother who told me that “the beginning of

wisdom is the definition of terms.” Later in life I discovered that

she found those words of wisdom, which are from Socrates,

in my copy of Bartlett. I had over-looked them. My Mother

is smarter than I.

I took my book-friends’ words to heart and set off on a

life-long journey during which my habit, determining the

importance and meanings of words, influenced my choice

of education; I studied philology; and my career path, which

always had to do with fine tuning of words.

We at the POWERGROUP do our utmost to ensure that

the words we choose for our clients' communications are

unmistakably clear and concise. We know that ‘words are

not simply made up of symbols, but are the shells which

enclose our thoughts’. (I think I ‘borrowed’ that from Herder;

I must look it up to be sure.) As the communications we

develop are often used in other languages, we take great

pains to assure that the words we use are translatable.

Knowing that the English word translate and the German

word übersetzen both mean ‘to bear across’ helps me, the

team’s only native-speaker of English, choose English words

which can be carried over into any other language. Our

clients pay for the words we choose. Knowing that the

condensed power of the words in a headline is worth 80%

of every advertising dollar/Euro spent, drives us to ensure

that those words are right in any language they may appear.

(I know that I borrowed that thought from David Ogilvy; I

don’t have to look it up.)

Let us not forget that the world’s three monotheistic religions

are based on words. The word Torah means ‘teaching words’.

According to the Koran, the first words Prophet Mohammed

received were “read the words”. The New Testament tells

us that “in the beginning was the word”. What’s in a word?

More than at what first meets the eye!

37



CREATIVITY

Panoria Poetis, Pullach

Panoria Poetis, creative artist and currently a pupil at the Günter-

Stöhr-Gymnasium, helps in the last-minute preparation of promotional

materials; such as when logos have to be pasted on 200 model cars

during a single weekend.

39


cami

Wanderer, there is no path.

A path is made by walking.

Antonio Machado

Enrique Schumann, Caracas

The Venezuelan graphic-designer Enrique Schumann has been a

passionate cartoonist since childhood. After the demonstration of

his talents in making an animated film for the POWERGROUP’s

Christmas party, the Team promptly developed a new mission

for him: making cartoons for products and services which need

detailed explanation.

Camina

no hay c

se hace camin


nte

no

amino,

o al andar...

41


Pericles Poetis, Munich

After having completed his Abitur and his first work experience in

Italy, Pericles Poetis has returned to the arms of his Alma Mater in

Munich. He’s striving toward a long stay abroad, preferably in

London. Pericles Poetis, an ambitious photographer, contributed a

large part of the pictures used in this book.


THE TARGET

IN SIGHT

43


Laura Montero, Madrid

Laura Montero came to Munich from Madrid in 2013 in order to

broaden her perspective outside her tenure as an architect. The

ensuing period turned out to be the most diversified stage of her

career. Since early this year, Laura Montero has been in charge of

the POWERGROUP affiliate in Spain; POWERMADRID.


THE RED DOOR

And then I was there, finally, at the entrance of something

completely new for me.

Excited and nervous about what I would find after going

through that red door. It caught the eye when I got closer,

and as I decided to go by foot that day, so did the glances

from the people strolling by. Something behind that door

awoke my curiosity.

I thought the red colour of the door would symbolise a team

without fear: optimistic, ambitious, self-confident and even

powerful. When entering the door that had opened for me

in Spain a few months before, I found not only a team; I

found a family and good friends as well.

I was right: the red colour reflected what I thought I’d find

behind the door. And there I was, ready to start a professional

challenge completely new to me. I soon identified myself

with the colour red. Although it was hard at first, something

propelled me through that door every morning of the 180

days that I would be there.

New challenges, a new language, new customs and even

laughter (sometimes tears as well) accompanied me from

morning to night in those days between October and March.

But at the end, it was something Red like the door, something

that has made me strong, ambitious and confident in myself.

Thanks colour red. Thanks for that open door and for finding

you. I will always have you in my heart.

45


Murad Mehmood, Chillianwala

The adage which says no two people are more than six degrees

apart certainly applies to the lawyer Murad Mehmood. His multibranch

Pakistani family can provide, if needed, contact with the

country’s richest person or the best source of mangos.


”He has created an earth of varied hues, most

surely there is a sign in this for a people who

are mindful.”

Quran, The Bee 16:13

47


WITH OPEN EYES

How could the ideologies of National Socialism cloud the

minds of most Germans so successfully? And how did the

many others who despised the Nazi regime but who did

not dare to show any open resistance cope with the new

reality?

While I was cleaning up the archives in my Munich school,

the Max-Josef-Stift Gymnasium, I found answers to these

questions, which in turn raised new questions. From historical

documents, interviews with witnesses of the time and a

volume of Third Reich laws, I gained insights which made

much clear to me. And the book was born.

The role of women in National Socialism in particular was

discussed. It led up to a fictional story which was designed

to usher readers deeper into the subject.

When the Nazis came to power, this changed the life of

the pupils in the Max-Josef-Stift Gymnasium. Aurora and

Erika experienced some restructuring of the school before

being released into the changing adult world. Marita,

Linda, Anneliese and Theresa experienced how the school

adapted, how teachers were dismissed for ideological

reasons and how Jewish students were bullied out of the

school. When the war began, the girls, through their

environment, see the soldiers‘ daily life, but also that of the

persecuted. How should they behave? Should they submit

to the ideology of National Socialism, become tools of it, or

call for resistance to it?

Based on real events, the girls‘ stories are experienced in the

here and now. Each girl has a different starting point, and

each girl must select the right way for herself.

It is always around us, and continues to shape our ideas of

morality and ethics. We cannot forget it, if only because it

is reflected in our language. However, while working on the

book, I noticed that we are masters in overlooking it.

What can on no account make history boring is the people

behind it. Behind every fact, behind the tiniest process,

ultimately there is a human being with feelings, a perception,

a belief. And this is what continues to affect the people of

today most strongly. The book “Offenen Auges (With Open

Eyes)” should show the stories behind history – the emotions,

the perception, the life.

Since its release in December 2013, the book indeed

opened my eyes in a whole new way. Thanks to readings

and book presentations, I have been able to meet a large

number of interested readers, curious students and inspiring

people just within the last six months. And that’s why I’m pretty

sure that I want to continue working in this direction. I am

very interested in other cultures and politics; I study history

and archaeology, and at the moment I already have ideas

for a new book. The field of journalism also appeals to me

immensely, and I think it would suit me well. One cannot say

exactly what the future will bring – maybe I will orient myself

quite differently. But my love for language, communication

and interaction with other people will hardly dissolve into

thin air.

Also, there are so many stories in the world – and I believe

that most of them are just waiting to be told.

The book is intended to stimulate the reader to look at his

environment more closely. Where do I really live? What

was the past like in this location? For me, the main question

became: can history be boring? Especially when it comes to

a subject like the 1933-1945 period, which is really covered

in detail at the school. The answer is clear: It can’t be boring.

48


Penelope Poetis, Milan

Penelope Poetis happily plunges into doing research for the

POWERGROUP. This has little to do with her collegiate historical

studies or her budding career as a writer but rather with sound

market and competitor observation.

49


A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.


Tianxiang Lu, Beijing

The information scientist Tianxiang Lu didn’t expect that knowledge

gained as a book-keeper early in his career would find a use at the

POWERGROUP. A specialist for market and potential analyses, he

also widens his colleagues horizons with anecdotes and wisdom

from China.

51


KEEP RUNNING

I packed my bags – with dreams and hope

Step by step – I’m leaving home

I’m headed West – where the ocean’s blue

Searching myself, I got an open view

The road I took is paved with trust

Even if I fall I’ll be brave enough

The sun is shining and melting my doubts

Amazing friends they’re helping me out

Whatever you can dream, you can do

Big City, Bright Lights; this freedom is new

Destiny is destination

Every step means elevation

Keep running fast

No time for gasp

Your vision’s clear

You’ll find your path

I found things I wasn’t looking for

Bitter crumbs in every cookie jar

I’m testing my limits living in here

I won’t change for an image, my vision is clear

Heaven and Hell – are pretty close

City of Angels and City of Ghosts

Singing for you, is the greatest choice

If they say I won’t make it, I will raise my voice

Whatever you can dream, you can do

Big City, Bright Lights; this freedom is new

Destiny is destination

Every step means elevation

Music and singing are important factors in my life. I have

been performing on stage since a very young age, and

no locations have been too weird for me to sing at.

After my Master’s degree in March 2014, I planned to

work on my singing career, but learned very quickly that

I wanted to write my own songs to express my ideas.

Earlier in my university studies, I started to find and understand

the correlations between music, the society

and politics during all the different years and centuries.

From the musical side, I want to pursue this trend of mirroring

the time I live in without losing the roots and ideas

I learned from the master craftsman in the past. Therefore,

I combine classical music techniques and styles

with modern musical approach and beats of today’s

popular music.

But what content did I want to issue in my songs? My

very first song “Keep running” shows this development

of my thoughts. Firstly, I was rather driven by an egoistic

approach looking for success and acknowledgment in

my singing in another country. But during my time on

the West Coast I found the vision, that my music should

have a purpose and cause. I want my music to be socially

beneficial. I am showing what music makes me

think, how it makes me see the world and how it gives

me the strength to follow ideas. I plan to positively point

out events and happenings of our society and politics

and discuss the prosperous projects of today’s people,

who work and care for other people and a better

place. I want to use my medium and my voice to tell

their stories and support their cause, first of all by making

their stories heard and second of all by including

them in future success. My major goal is that my music

is not only nice to listen to but actually benefits other

people. I will “keep running”.

Keep running fast

No time for gasp

Your vision’s clear

You’ll find your path

I’m on my own – I left my comfort zone

There’s no feeling such as coming home

Time for decisions – Keep going! Keep going!


Philomena Poetis, Los Angeles

Philomena Poetis, who completed her music and American studies

degree in 2014, learned the vagaries of the American copyright

laws during music composition in Los Angeles. Her research into

such matters helps in developing concepts for POWERMEDIA.

53


Ines Rößler, on the road

During her trip to Japan in the spring of 2014, the country and its

energy sector were still to a large measure deeply marked by the

Fukushima nuclear catastrophe. As an economist, Ines Rößler has

since then been engaged in evaluating the investment potential in

renewable energy and strategic concepts for the realisation of its

market-potential.

54


IM . PULSE

And when the storm roars screeching through the forest, When giant fir tree plunges, sweeping down And crushing neighbouring branches, neighbouring trunks, And

at its fall the hills, dull, hollow, thunder: Then leadest thou me to the cavern safe, Show‘st me myself, and my own heart becomes Aware of deep mysterious miracles. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust I, Forest and Cavern

I foresaw a quotation for this space. However,

based on the highly subjective grounds that I

write well, I was asked to compose my own

contribution.

Why do we use quotes instead of finding our

own words?

Very often we find that our own thoughts were

aptly formulated by someone else, perhaps

more appropriately than we ourselves can do.

I was never asked to sketch something when I

already had a picture which best illustrated my

imagination.

Perhaps we attempt to hide behind the words

of others the imprecision of how our inner voice

reflects the way we perceive the world. Perhaps

we’re poor observers and don’t want to be

exposed as such by our own words.

The book which you hold in your

hands contains an unusually large

amount of quotations and folk wisdom.

These entries convey experiences,

feelings and perceptions

from time past, from other countries

and unfamiliar ideologies.

One of the two quotes I had originally

planned to use would fit

the bill for this page. It comes from

a particularly moving passage in

Goethe’s Faust; the forest and cavern

scene. The setting offers Faust

a short-term safe haven, and via

an ingenious change of perspective,

the reader or audience member

a look at what’s imminent.

55

Many of us find that the experience of vastness,

be it the view of the seemingly endless ocean,

the view of an endless horizon from a mountainpeak

or the freedom to travel, is the basic prerequisite

of being able to set loose our creative

impulses. When external circumstances pose

barriers, we nevertheless find freedom in our

own thoughts and memories, or perhaps in art,

literature or music.

And in the sanctuary of our thoughts, we find a

source of inspiration that gives us the strength to

rise to new beginnings.

The quote from Henry Miller that I’d thought of

using instead of this contribution closes with these

words: “Every moment is a golden one for

him who has the vision to recognize it as such”.


Magdalena Avril, Munich

Magdalena Avril, who studied design, is a long-standing

POWERGROUP Team member and over time has become the

right hand of creative chief Patricia Poetis. When words no longer

help, Magdalena transforms concepts into images and in doing so

often eliminates difficulties in understanding things.


A JOURNEY

OF THOUGHTS

57


NO

WORRIES


Ferdinand Storek, Munich

‘No worries’, perhaps the most commonly used Australian idiom,

has an effect on anyone who’s lived in Australia for a long time.

Such is the case with Ferdinand Storek, MA in International Business

from Griffith University in Brisbane. In the POWERGROUP, his levelheaded

manner in masterly carrying out complex tasks and his

regular “no worries” helps in creating a good mood amongst the

Team.

59


Britta Leibeling, Munich

What would a 21st century company be without an employee

who’s mastered Excel? Britta Leibeling is the POWERGROUP’s uncrowned

queen of Excel. As assistant to our senior executives, she

brings the imponderables of a creative team in harmony with the

demands of book-keeping.


PICTURES

Pictures hung in upside-down position,

upper hand reversed with lower hand,

may find unexpected recognition,

for they are transposed to fairyland.

Christian Morgenstern

61


IMPRINT

Publisher: POWERGROUP GmbH

Copyright: Dr. Pantelis Christian Poetis, CEO of POWERGROUP GmbH, is the originator of all works of applied art

(graphical elements/layout) and written composition (text) used in conjunction with all projects outlined in this publication.

Design Concept: Patricia Poetis

Editor-in-Chief: Ines Rößler

Art Director: Magdalena Avril

Columnists: Tony Morollo, Laura Montero, Philomena Poetis, Penelope Poetis

Contributors: Tianxiang Lu, Ferdinand Storek, Murad Mehmood, Britta Leibeling, Panoria Poetis

Copy Editor: Tony Morollo

Illustrator: Enrique Schumann

Photography Editor: Pericles Poetis

Picture credits:

Prof. Bernd Albers (pp. 84-85), Beiersdorf AG (p. 133), Berliner Tafel e.V. (pp. 160-161), Hans Buttermilch (pp. 130-131

(photography)), Daimler AG (pp. 68-69), Michael Danner (p. 115), Fotosearch (p. 102), Stephanie Girard (pp. 50-51),

Gerrit Hahn (p. 106), Hartmann AG (pp. 125, 133), Stefan Heide (pp. 24-25, 166-167), IFCO (pp. 160-161), iStockphoto

(p. 126), Egbert Krupp (p. 47), Daniel Leal-Olivas (pp. 160-161), Harry Mentzel (pp. 5, 64-67), Motorsport XL (pp. 140-

141), Laura Oldfield Ford (p. 156), Panoria Poetis (pp. 36-37), Pericles Poetis (pp. 5, 17, 40-41, 73, 138), POWERGROUP

(pp. 2, 5, 6-15, 17-23, 26-27, 33-34, 38-39, 42, 48-49, 52, 60-61, 70, 80, 82, 88, 90-91, 103, 105 (collage), 108-109,

116, 129, 160-161), Ghulam Rasul (pp. 44, 74), Rabia Rasul (p. 45), Claus Schunk (pp. 98-99, 160-161), Spearhead

Research (pp. 76-77), Ferdinand Storek (pp. 56-57), Rai Sumendra (pp. 54-55), Antje Tesche-Mentzen (pp. 28-31), The

DAN Blog (pp. 164-165), Hannes Tscharner (pp. 58-59), VectorStock (pp. 5, 153)

Translation: IF-Localization GmbH, Leipziger Straße 16, 82008 Unterhaching

Print: Weber Offset GmbH, Ehrenbreitsteiner Straße 42, 80993 München

Despite thorough research and the use of reliable sources, we cannot accept responsibility or liability for the completeness

or accuracy of this publication‘s contents.

All rights reserved.

Use of the copyrighted publication or of any of the contributions and illustrations it contains, in particular through duplication

or dissemination, is not permitted without prior consent in writing from the publisher and shall lead to prosecution unless such

is excluded by copyright laws.

In particular, storage or processing in data systems is not permitted without prior consent.

Letters to the Editor: info@power-group.net

POWERGROUP GmbH . Habenschadenstraße 13 . 82049 Pullach . www.power-group.net . Tel +49 89 759 00 50


63



INNOVATION MANAGEMENT &

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

65



INNOVATION MANAGEMENT &

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

How can interfaces between different circles of an economic

system be bridged without incurring information losses, and

how can an economic system use its own innovation potential

more effectively through structuring of the communication

processes?

These are questions which we answer for each of our clients

specifically. To this end, we develop solutions in strategic,

organisational, but also technical domains, in order to optimise

the information flow processes of an economic system.

67



TRENDS ANALYSIS

A trend is nothing more than a movement for change or a

transformation process. Trends can be found in all areas of

life – from economy to politics up to the consumer world – at

all levels: They may be mere surface phenomena or deep,

lasting currents.

The term “trend” in business, brand or topic positioning does

not (just) describe a short-term hype as in seasonal fashion

trends, but long-term profound changes and transformations in

society which affect people‘s needs and expectations.

We distinguish between long-wave megatrends whose

development progresses over decades, and short-wave

movements which fade away after weeks, months or a few

years.

Megatrends are long-term developments which affect all

domains of society and economy. For this reason, they also form

one of the foundations for the analysis by POWERGROUP.

The term “megatrends“ can be traced back to the founder of

modern future research, John Naisbitt, who wrote the world

bestseller with the same title in the year 1980.

Three conditions must be met before a megatrend is

identified:

Megatrends have a half-life of at least 25-30 years.

They must extend into all possible aspects of life

and effect changes therein (not just with regard to

consumption, but also politics, economy, and so on).

In principal, megatrends have a global character, even

if they are not equally strong everywhere at once.

From megatrends we can deduct subordinate and

tangible key themes. It is these that provide central focus

points for public debate and that move people.

The following five main themes are the most important

reference points for the presentation and discussion of

individual events, contexts and issues, and characterise

the next decade:

• Community & Lifestyle

• Environment & Energy

• Health & Well-Being

• Mobility & Infrastructure

• Education & Knowledge

69



71



FEASIBILITY STUDY

After a thorough analysis of the determining factors

for brand and marketing, POWERGROUP, in close

collaboration with architects in Berlin, developed a

comprehensive basic idea for the Tempelhof site, giving

consideration to the future trends and urban context for

both the overall concept and an integrated science park

as an interface between science and business.

At the beginning of the conceptual design, the social

basic trends and developments that were significant for

the further usage of Tempelhof were evaluated using

trend screening. A second analysis structured the existing

expectations. Together with the key themes and the

existing science parks in the Greater Berlin area, these

formed the framework conditions for finding a solution.

In experts panels, the Tempelhof brand, its roots and

competencies were investigated and then this description

of the actual state was used, under consideration of the

framework conditions, to define the brand to be. Existing

concepts and sub-concepts were compared with this

brand. The final overall concept combines the underlying

conditions, basic concepts and brand attributes in a

holistic principle.

MAN AT THE CENTRE OF THE FUTURE.

Just like a magnifying glass, man as the common

denominator bundles together all the topics treated in

the science park at the focal point. The magnifying glass

makes clearer the development of domains and topics

treated in the science park (building) on the open grounds.

Vice versa, the challenges of urban life of the open

grounds are reflected in the range of science topics. The

grounds and buildings serve as the showcase for science

in Berlin and thus as a magnifying glass for tomorrow‘s

challenges.

In 2008, the Berlin Senate Department for Urban

Development presented the urban development project

Tempelhofer Freiheit as a concept for further usage of the

airport area after the Tempelhof referendum confirmed

the end of flight operations. Since the central terminal

building was temporarily assigned to the bi-annual Bread

& Butter Fashion Fair, however, the object was blocked

for other activities or even long-term events. In May

2014, the Berlin citizens voted by referendum for the

preservation of the almost 355 hectares of open space

of the former airport.

73


GROWTH POTENTIAL

For POWERGROUP, the identification of opportunities

is possible not only through a general market and

trend analysis, e.g. with trend screening and POWER

seismograph, but also in particular through the detailed

insights obtained from the (industry) projects of

POWERGROUP customers as well as partners affiliated

with POWERGROUP in the domains of politics, economy

and science.

To determine growth potential, the POWERGROUP

strategy team first performs an evaluation of the company‘s

actual situation, taking into close consideration the

findings gained from opportunities identified in the market

analysis. The megatrends of this world – long-term and

comprehensive transformational processes – are included

in this analysis as effective powerful influences which

characterise the markets of the future.

Deducting from the megatrends of globalisation and

urbanisation, the development of metropolises and its

consequences were considered in this context. In 1950,

the world‘s only megalopolises – urban agglomerations

with over 10 million residents - were New York and Tokyo.

Today there are 23 megalopolises. The United Nations

estimates that there will be nine new mega-cities in Asia

by 2025. Except for eight of the 32 megalopolises,

all of these cities will be located in emerging markets.

The quality of life for millions will be determined by the

quality of their cities. The fact that as a consequence,

the energy demand in urban areas will rise exponentially

could be quantitatively proven with a growing need for

large-scale energy plants; and with it, among other things,

appropriate recommendations for the logistics sector

could be deduced.

74


75



GEOSTRATEGY

With the planning of the NATO withdrawal from Afghanistan,

the POWERGROUP strategy team performed a geostrategic

evaluation of the potential transport routes. The analysis was

to aid the decision-makers with NATO and its partners and

to provide contracts to logistics companies.

A large number of different routes is possible in principle,

but various restrictions reduce these routes to a smaller and

manageable number. As an example, transportation through

or via Iran or China is no option for NATO/ISAF.

NATO distinguishes three main routes: Northern (Northern

Line of Communication, NLOC), Central (Central Line of

Communication, CLOC) and Southern (Southern Line of

Communication, SLOC).

During the analysis, the Southern route was found to be the

most cost-effective option. The harbours of Port of Karachi

and Port Qasim (both located in Karachi, Pakistan) have

been defined as NATO destinations for transportation along

the Southern route and for further transport by sea. The

harbour of Gwadar Port in South-West Pakistan has been

defined as a third option.

When the Southern route is selected, the only transit country

is Pakistan. To carry out the redeployments, POWERGROUP

identified local partners who could ensure a safe

implementation of the container logistics.

77


TROOPS AT THE AFGHAN-PAKISTAN BORDER


AFGHANISTAN

ISAF COALITION + ANA

FORCE LEVEL: ca. 230,000

PAKISTAN

FORCE LEVEL: ca. 150,000

79



81



ENERGY &

ENVIRONMENT

Since early 2007 at least, there has been much talk about the

environment, climate change, energy and its efficient, responsible use.

It’s a range of topics which many business companies have adopted

as a pure trend topic. We analyse these topics for our customers from

an industry or company-specific viewpoint, find new ways for them

to handle these issues and develop concepts for a serious discussion

of these challenges. The objective is the development of a unique

and sustainable plan for the companies and locations that we serve.

83



INTERDISCIPLINARITY

The main actors in the context of the global energy challenge

are science, business and politics: Only with a concrete,

knowledge-based and future-oriented collaboration of

science, business and politics is it possible to find holistic,

innovative solutions to meet the current challenges in

the energy sector. Collaborative, interdisciplinary and

international interaction will be bundled into successful

strategies by these three actors.

ENERGY IS AN INTERDISCIPLINARY TASK

The 600 Million Euro project European Energy Forum –

EUREF – is the forum which, for the first time, unites science,

business and politics in terms of space, but especially in

terms of content.

In August 2009, the topping-out ceremony for the

modification of the 78-metre high gasometer, completed in

1910, was celebrated. It is expected to be the symbol of the

first zero-emission office district in Europe – with the EUREF

institute as the first private energy college in the world. The

European Institute for Energy Studies as a scientific basis

offers the three core stakeholders – science, business and

politics - the opportunity of a pioneering role in one of the

most important main themes of the present and the future.

Since the 2012/13 winter semester, TU Berlin has

been offering the following four interdisciplinary master‘s

programmes around the theme “City and Energy” on the

new TU campus EUREF at the Berlin-Schöneberg gasometer:

• Energy-efficient construction and operation of buildings

• Energy-efficient urban traffic systems

• Communal infrastructure management

• Energy management

The master programme is focussed on the challenges which

emerge during the modification of our energy system and

encompasses the ecological and economical dimension

as well as the technical one. Sustainability issues should

be treated on a cross-faculty level, just like innovation and

project management.

Another feature of the “City and Energy” master‘s programme

is the practical relevance of the training, for the whole EUREF

campus is a unique testing platform for the development of

the energy-efficient model city of tomorrow. Master’s degree

students are directly involved in the development, testing and

implementation of innovative concepts and ideas in this reallife

laboratory.

85


.

Model of the European Energy Forum EUREF, Berlin


87


BRAND POSITIONING

E.ON set itself the goal to become the top brand among

international energy providers.

Only a short time after the launch of the brand, E.ON

achieved excellent recognition values. However, the

successful brand launch resulted in an atypical brand

situation: The brand did not arise from the market success

of its products. The E.ON brand was originally a brand

without promise, lacking as it did, an emotionally charged

product range.

The POWERGROUP business designers started by

conducting extensive brand and consumer studies to

determine its position in the market. They positioned

the E.ON brand as an umbrella brand and determined

the brand communication strategy of the company and

product brands within the brand conglomerate. The next

step was a counselling session with regard to the target

group and price range, as well as an evaluation of the

communication strategy, for the purpose of supporting the

brand introduction of the new product E wie einfach (E as

in easy).


89



PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

When faced with the task of developing a new B2C product

portfolio strategy and a marketing strategy for promoting

the growth of electrical power products with a high profit

margin, the POWERGROUP strategy group designed new

strategies for existing electrical power products and new

products with additional benefits for customers.

The three resulting product positioning features – “E.ON

BASIC, PURE and SURE” served as balancing arguments

and strategic guides in product developments and the

repositioning of existing E.ON products in the energy

companies category. All products were combined with

various incentives such as loyalty programmes or special

prices.

Following the results of the designed product matrix, E.ON

reduced the number of its electricity products for end

consumers and introduced the products E.ON Basis Power

and E.ON Aqua Power, developed by POWERGROUP,

into the market.

91



93


E.ON

Aqua

Power


95


CAMPAIGN

CHANGE NEEDS ENERGY

The E.ON business strategy anticipates dynamic global

growth.

Large does not necessarily have to be accompanied with a

negative assessment; rather, it serves as a starting point for a

positive reinterpretation:

It is only thanks to the size of the business that E.ON has

the power, energy and endurance to make world-shaking

changes.

If power and energy are used purposefully, they can cause

movement and change. An ethical and moral commitment

is the emotional added-value of the brand. With an eye on

existing social core beliefs, E.ON uses power and energy to

take responsibility for the future by virtue of its significance.

E.ON moves towards people to actively shape the future

with them together.

The key theme “change needs energy” is active, dynamic,

encouraging, changing and aimed at improvement. The

deliberate association with ideological, political and

religious movements suggests a positive direction of change:

all for one purpose. E.ON has formed a coalition with

society for a good cause.

The key theme is an encouragement and plea at the same

time: the chance to shape the future together and the ethical

obligation to participate and to act.

ALWAYS A WARM WELCOME

E.ON is energy. And energy is heat.

On a visual level, this relationship manifests itself in the warm

colour red.

In terms of colour psychology, red is connected with warmth

and security, among other things.

E.ON ensures the basic needs of people:

Light and heat in the most trusty environment – at one’s place

of work, with friends and especially at home. “Welcome” as

an expression of hospitality represents a deeply humanistic

mind-set and implies a promise of security, relaxation and

human warmth.

A consumer and customer-friendly self-understanding as a

central model harmonises with the inner values and the tasks

of E.ON.

Welcome to the world of E.ON!

The key theme “always a warm welcome” expresses longterm

safety and support by a strong and responsible partner.

It conveys security, esteem and the feeling that one is not

alone.

The theme represents an active focus on consumer

convenience and service by the company.

96


change needs energy

97


STRATEGIC BRAND

MANAGEMENT

In times of crisis, the stronger win. Along with the corporate

size, territory, sales efforts and product portfolio, the brand

itself takes on an even more important role: a strong brand

strengthens customer loyalty and provides an advantage

in terms of credibility, which in turn helps in winning new

customers. Times of crisis are the times of brands, as

strong brands enjoy customer loyalty. A clear and unique

positioning differentiates the brand from its competitors and

helps in securing and expanding market share.

Strategic brand management provides different ways to

influence the decisions of (potential) customers. Accelerators

are mainly located in the determinants WANT and CAN. The

customers’ knowledge can be increased through targeted

information management and communication policy. An

adequate price policy supports opening up resources and

funds. However, the most important starting point for brand

management is the WANT and thus the decision maker’s

needs, expectations and prospect for success.

According to the differentiation potentials which were

identified for IFCO, it was necessary to charge the brand

with content and emotion as well as account for particular

opportunities lying within the application and development

of products. The brand already had the prerequisites for its

charging with content and emotion. Reconciling with the

brand’s target state showed that not a redefinition of the

brand was required, but rather a well-directed emphasis on

the brand’s core attributes.

After having re-defined IFCO’s entrepreneurial vision and

mission, it was agreed to base the logistics provider’s

communication on the four pillars Solutions, Business,

Environment and People. In the process of developing IFCO

towards an even more emotional and dynamic brand,

POWERGROUP created the slogan and key visual IFCO

MOVES, which are used for IFCO’s product campaigns

worldwide.

98


99



101



BUSINESS LOCATION

DEVELOPMENT & MARKETING

103


BUSINESS LOCATION

DEVELOPMENT & MARKETING

In our consulting activities for various international localities

we determine expansion opportunities, with special

consideration for the respective country-specific situation.

We use our expertise in the respective areas to the benefit

of all involved key players in the decision-making triangle

of business, science and politics. Our goal is to design a

complementary positioning and brand concept based on a

holistic view of the location.

104


105


BERLIN SCIENCES 2015

The aim of the “Berlin Wissenschaft 2015” (Berlin Sciences

2015) project was an efficient marketing strategy for

the scientific region of Berlin-Brandenburg. The project,

accompanied by POWERGROUP, provides scientific

institutions in the region with a common communication

platform and serves to strengthen the interconnectedness of

the actors and to position the city as a place of science and

innovation on a national and international level.

The universities of Berlin are at the focus of the “Berlin

Sciences“ brand to be established: As part of the brand

building process, the then university presidents Prof. Dr.

Dieter Lenzen (Free University of Berlin), Prof. Dr. Hans Jürgen

Prömel (Humboldt-University of Berlin) and Prof. Dr. Kurt

Kutzler (Berlin Technical University) agreed in a declaration

of intent on actively supporting the “Berlin Sciences” brand

to be established, and on a closer collaboration of science

and business.

106


107



IN-DEPTH INTERVIEWS

At the centre of the initial project phase of “Berlin Sciences

2015” was the analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of

the Berlin science hub. In order to identify these accurately

and to illustrate perspectives for the future, around 40

decision-makers from the sectors of science, business and

politics of the region were interviewed.

The results led to concrete recommendations for the further

marketing process of the science region and were published

in the study “Berlin Sciences 2015 (Part 1): Inventory of the

Strengths and Weaknesses of the Berlin science hub”.

Many of the respondents believed that science, business

and politics in Berlin had not yet sufficiently grown together.

Individual strength factors stood for themselves and thus

could not achieve synergetic effects.

“Berlin and Charité as a scientific centre of modern Europe –

that’s an idea I really like.”

Prof. Dr. Detlev Ganten, Charité – Berlin University of Medicine

“Berlin needs vision, not nostalgia.”

Prof. Dr. Dieter Lenzen, Free University of Berlin

“All too often, the self-sufficiency of science has become one of the main reasons

for insufficient networking with the business sector.”

Volkmar Strauch, former State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Senate Department for Economics, Labour

and Women

“This shall be our motto: create jobs from knowledge.”

Prof. Dr. Klaus Brake, author of „Die BerlinStudie - Strategien für die Stadt“ (The Berlin Study – Strategies

for the City)

“Berlin is like a cappuccino: On the top there is a lot of foam which has not

blended with the coffee. Berlin is the same: The politicians, diplomats, trade associations

and recent arrivals are far from connected with science and Berliners

themselves.”

Klaus Kubbetat, Commerzbank AG

109


Prof. Dr. Paul Achleitner

Allianz AG

Dr. Josef Ackermann

Deutsche Bank AG

Dr. Wulf H. Bernotat

E.ON AG

Dr. Rolf-Ernst Breuer

Deutsche Bank AG

“Germany can do it –

Dr. Ulrich Möllers

Bode Chemie/Beiersdorf AG

Steffen Naumann

Axel Springer AG

Prof. Dr. Heinrich von Pierer

Siemens AG

Reinhard Pöllath

Tchibo Holding AG

Karl Pohler

IFCO Systems


Dr. Gerhad Cromme

ThyssenKrupp AG

Albrecht Ehlers

Hochtief AG

Dr. Hubertus Erlen

Schering AG

Prof. Dr. Ulrich Lehner

Henkel KGaA

Berlin does it better“

Dr. Werner Müller

RAG Aktiengesellschaft

Prof. Dr. Robert Schmucker

Schmucker Technologie

Hubert Graf von Treuberg

Ernst & Young AG

Werner Wenning

Bayer AG

Alexander von Witzleben

Jenoptik AG

111


BRAND MAP ©

Semiometry is an approach for determining the specific

value profiles of brands, products and target groups as well

as the reflection of the image of a brand or a product range

through the value profiles of certain groups.

The basics of the semiometric approach in the model

developed by Jean-François Steiner in the 1980s go back

to the theory of semiotics.

Conducted by a panel of experts, the symbiotic analysis

evaluates relevant institutions and/or brands. The semiotic

analysis is impartial. It involves no subjective and preferential

judgements, focussing instead on the decoding of the

brand’s characteristics as seen in the market place.

Semiometry, which has been further developed by the

POWERGROUP and extended to marketing and sales, is

based on the assumption that value concepts and specific

attitudes of people can be mapped and measured through

the assessment of terms.

The results of the semiotic analysis are thereby located

in a semiometric space. The space spans over two polar

dimensions which represent the basic dimensions of human

motives that structure our perception of the world.

BERLIN IS

fast, pulsating, creative, boundless, tolerant, exciting, optimistic, unique, magnetic,

extroverted, inquisitive, international, challenging, supporting, electrifying, dynamic,

chaotic, dirty, broken, irresponsible, in a muddle.

112


113

BERLIN

CREATIVE – LIVELY – BOUNDLESS

Xenophil

Xenophob

Ratio

Emotio

conjointly

pacific

careful

sensible

understanding

elegant

playful

dreamy

exciting

fast

mobile

inquiring

intellectual

disciplined

critical

earnest

formal

mutinous

provocative

amicable

caressing

stormy

familiar

consistent

assimilated

obedient

bureaucratic

moderate

dignified

heavy

aristocratic

serious

distanced

civilised

sophisticated

technological

analytical

creative

abstract

grey

law-abiding

classic

interrogative

manly

synthetic

material

busy

hard working

meek

respectful

confident

innovative

clear

relaxed

rural

domestic

motherly

close

divine

believing

calm

empathetic

helpful

prosperous

loyal

affectionate

sociable

cheerful

protective

green

round

happy

laughing

jolly

light

golden

ornamental

delightful

appreciative

artistic

humorous

cuddly

natural

generous

sensuous

intimate

sexual

romantic

intense

tender

sweet

extravagant

musical

poetic

aromatic

progressive

energetic

powerful

unconventional

sensual

sensational

exhilarating

adventurous

fervent

dramatic

short-lived

wild

naked

plain

cosy

sentimental

aggressive

threatening

mighty

dominant

noble

fragile

peaceful

sensitive

mild

rewarding

valuable

provident

holy

inventive

slender

fine

near

beautiful

gentle

optimistic

clever

eternal

new

creating

pure

simple

humble

polite

efficient

firm

secure

reliable

honest

benign

caring

modest

wise

honourable

experienced

traditional

thrifty

neat

diligent

regulated

fair

forgiving

straight

convenient

just

concrete

productive

precise

patient

diplomatic

cooperative

nostalgic

admiring

brave

logical

fastidious

authoritative

commanding

magical

ambitious

cool

challenging

doubting

assertive

metallic

independent

elitist

scientific

self-assured

courtly

angular

rigid

hard

bossy

superior

immobile

persistent

martial

sly

dangerous

confusing

mysterious

modern

fresh

covetous

solid

spontaneous

dynamic

flexible

moody

urban

different

peculiar

pugnacious

headstrong

perfidious

determined

boundless

conspicuous

sporty

explosive

immeasurable

mystical

infinite

disorderly

unknown

lonely

red

rich

austere

reasonable



115


SCIENCE MARKETING

BERLIN – DAS MAGAZIN AUS DER HAUPTSTADT (THE

MAGAZINE FROM THE CAPITAL), which was jointly

issued by the Berlin Partner GmbH, the agency jetzt:netz

Magazin Verlagsgesellschaft Süddeutsche Zeitung mbH

and POWERGROUP, was one of the first measures which

was developed in the framework of the “Berlin Sciences

2015” project. The magazine provided information on

future-oriented topics and the potential of the capitol. Each

issue highlighted a topic important for the city and provided

with the journalism of popular science the content and

results of in-depth interviews performed by POWERGROUP

for marketing Berlin as a business site. Interviews were

conducted with Berlin-based personalities in science,

business and politics.

The issues with a focus on science and design appeared

in an edition of 1.2 million copies and were included in the

following major national daily newspapers: Süddeutsche

Zeitung, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Tagesspiegel and

Handelsblatt. BERLIN Magazin was financed exclusively by

sponsoring.

116


117



BRAND SYMPOSIUM

At the focus of the brand symposium “Berlin Sciences” was

the development of a common brand for the science location

of Berlin with which its capabilities were to be bundled and

strengthened. Around 40 leading representatives from research

and educational institutes in Berlin and Brandenburg as well as

from politics participated in the event. They discussed improved

marketing opportunities for the Berlin science hub and concrete

models for the structure of the “Berlin Sciences” brand. Strategic

recommendations for the formation of a “Berlin Sciences” brand

were derived from the results of the symposium. The study also

formed the basis for a creative contest opened to students of the

universities of Berlin and Brandenburg for the visualisation and

application of the common brand known as “Berlin Sciences”.

Only the common brand can combine excellence and

communicate on a level of general perception. Communication

on a broad basis, increasing awareness of the science hub and

quality attribution from the outside form the basis for a higher

level of recognition of science by business and an opportunity

for expansion of the demand for scientific services from Berlin.

Participants at the symposium, led by members of Berlin Partner

and POWERGROUP, represented Berlin‘s science, business

and political communities; they included, among others,

Universität der Künste Berlin, Technische Universität Berlin,

Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Fachhochschule für

Technik und Wirtschaft Berlin, OTA Hochschule, Technische

Fachhochschule Berlin, Urania Berlin, Berlin-Brandenburgische

Akademie der Wissenschaften, Max-Delbrück-Centrum

für Molekulare Medizin, Evangelische Hochschule Berlin,

Fachhochschule für Wirtschaft Berlin, Humboldt-Universität

Berlin, Freie Universität Berlin, BioTOP Berlin, IBB Investitionsbank

Berlin, IHK Berlin, WISTA-Management, IGAFA

Initiativgemeinschaft Außeruniversitärer Forschungseinrichtungen

in Adlershof, CDU faction, SPD faction, Senate Department for

Science, Research and Culture, Senate Department for Trade,

Labour and Women.

119



CREATIVE COMPETITION

As part of the “Berlin Sciences 2015” brand building

process, the first step towards a visual composition of the

common Berlin science brand was a students‘ creativity

competition. With this, the contents of the first series of

interviews and the brand symposium were adopted and

creatively implemented.

64 designs from students all over Germany were submitted

and evaluated by a panel of senior representatives from the

business, science and design sectors. The winning designs

provided the impetus for second-phase work done by a

team formed of laureates, jury members and brand experts

under the direction of POWERGROUP, in order to complete

the logo design.

DESIGN PANEL MEMBERS

Prof. Werner Aisslinger, Studio Aisslinger

Marcus Botsch, Büro Botsch

Dr. Silke Claus, Internationales Design Zentrum

Tim Edler, Realities United

Thomas Ingenlath, Volkswagen Design Centre

Mateo Kries, Vitra Design Museum

Prof. Nils Krüger, büro+staubach

Patricia Poetis, POWERGROUP

Stefan Rothert, Design Union

Michael Sailstorfer, Artist

Thomas Willemeit, Graft

Ursula Wünsch, Designer

121


MIMETIC MODULATION ©

The new logo for the science brand “Berlin Sciences” is

characterised by a 3D ring shape; its colour can be adapted

to the guidelines of the respective institution.

The open ring form represents diversity and development

as well as boundlessness and interdisciplinarity; it touches

on integration ideas and symbolises expansion options,

despite the closed nature of the system, and as such meets

the requirements of a logo as a seal of quality.

The mimetic modulation © of the logo in the form of adaptation

of the colour to the respective participating academic

institution a) is an innovative and unique solution for a brand

used by many partners and b) demonstrates both diversity

and willingness for change, movement and communication.

Mimetic modulation © indicates the characteristic of the

“Berlin Sciences” logo to actively correspond visually with

a partner logo by taking up and reflecting its central colour

theme. Here we see a visual manifestation of the principle of

individual brands of scientific institutions which collaborate

under the mantle of the common brand, and retain their own

identity and thus are reinforced by the science brand.

Three dimensional

ambitious, dynamic, targeted

International name

Mimetic Modulation:

colours adaption to suit partners

Character of a quality seal

Dichromatic

three dimensional ring-form

open on two sides

determined and yet

borderless and prepared for interchange

open to change and expansion

122


SCIENCE PORTAL

www.berlin-sciences.com

With BERLIN SCIENCES, Berlin Partner GmbH established a brand for the

Berlin scientific community which represents the combined potential of the

scientific location and forms the first contact point for business. The Internet portal

www.berlin-sciences.com serves as a communication platform with the BERLIN

SCIENCES Navigator which contains the most important information on scientific

institutions in Berlin.

123



MEDICINE &

HEALTH

125


MEDICINE &

HEALTH

Medicine and health is a domain of science marked by discussion

of “patients as customers” and “hospitals as brands”. We develop

brand, marketing and communication concepts for our customers

which take into account the scientific bases, sensitive areas and legal

guidelines. The objective is the development of concepts while taking

the medical focal point – the person – into consideration.

126


127


LOGISTICS OF KNOWLEDGE ©

THE RIGHT INFORMATION

AT THE RIGHT TIME

AT THE RIGHT PLACE

IN THE RIGHT QUALITY

FOR THE RIGHT APPLICATION


LOGISTICS OF KNOWLEDGE ©

Logistics in the traditional sense comprises all steps of the

physical bridging of time and space for goods and/or

persons: planning, organisation, monitoring, handling and

control. Risks are all interfaces which disrupt the flow and can

upset the logistics chain. Seamless bridging of the “knowledge

logistics interfaces” therefore requires, in addition to the “goods

logistics”, a logistics operation which in particular focuses on

people in general, their handling of information and acting:

LOGISTICS OF KNOWLEDGE ©

Logistics of Knowledge © focuses on the knowledge user himself

and on actions where knowledge of economics matters.

The following aspects are in the foreground:

• The systematic identification and description of usage

context

• The user-oriented communication and transfer of

knowledge

• The definition and review of channels and correspondents

of the communication of knowledge

• Action results as feedback: the evaluation and critical

examination of the knowledge users with the knowledge

• The continuous optimisation of the knowledge (learning

system, benchmarking, fine-tuning, etc.)

• The inclusion of emotional factors to prevent friction losses

during the mediation of rational knowledge.

129


KNOWLEDGE

COMMUNICATION

Hospitals are places of medical care, of science, or nursing

and rehabilitation, of education, of supply and disposal, as

well as places of business.

Physicians, medical and nursing staff, administrative

employees and patients apply specific knowledge in various

contexts.

When it comes to the context of “Administration / Purchasing”,

much biochemical and usage information is not germane;

but information on cost-saving potential over short exposure

times, on the other hand, is relevant.

For physicians, nurses and cleaning staff, the instructions

must be available in a simple and self-explanatory manner,

because, during the workflow, there isn’t enough time for

elaborate studies of a product description.

PACKAGING DESIGN: ALL COMMUNICATION

BEGINS WITH THE PRODUCT

Refocussing on the originator’s brand: The close proximity

to the brand name of the product means that the originator

is moved into focus and upgraded. The name of the

manufacturing company is explicitly named in the footer.

The product claim is emphasised by placement below the

brand name, colour coding and a central icon.

The product name is located centrally underneath the icon

and has relatively greater weight compared with the product

brand name, in order to prevent confusion.

Each category is assigned an icon which indicates the scope

of usage of the product. In some cases, products are suitable

for several areas of application (hands and skin / body).

130


131



133



BUSINESS STRATEGY

The BODE products were integrated in the existing

HARTMANN product catalogue and they complement the

product spectrum for hospitals, doctors and nursing homes.

This raised the question of whether or not – and if yes, how –

BODE should continue to be positioned as a manufacturer’s

brand.

The BODE SCIENCE CENTER, devoted to science, was

founded as a result of the strategic consultation provided by

POWERGROUP – its creative and communicative approach

was also accompanied by the designers of POWERGROUP.

The establishment of the BODE SCIENCE CENTER as a

neutral information and customer-specific consulting source

could contribute to increasing the HARTMANN Group’s

sales when appropriately considered in the sales strategy.

“For us, the acquisition of Bode is a strategically important step which supports

our focussed growth strategy enormously. This offers new opportunities for us

to expand our offers in the domain of disinfection. Bode enjoys a very good

reputation in the market. The synergy effects are thus obvious.”

Dr. Rinaldo Riguzzi, CEO PAUL HARTMANN AG, October 2008

“Beiersdorf can open good perspectives for its subsidiary with the sale of

HARTMANN and also ensure consistent continuance of the success in the

international growth markets in the domain of skin and beauty treatment.”

Thomas-Bernd Quaas, CEO Beiersdorf, October 2008

135



137



FAST MOVING

CONSUMER GOODS

139



FAST MOVING

CONSUMER GOODS

In an increasingly tougher and international competitive

environment it is even more vital to create sustainable brand

values in order to bind customers to the product range with a

brand loyalty concept. It is all the more necessary to delight the

customers with innovative products and ensure brand loyalty as

a complementary strategy in addition to brand building.

141



RACING SHOE

Zalando has one of the largest online shoe selections; the

SympaTex membrane is unbeatable in breathability, wind

and waterproofing in sport and outdoor clothing.

The design goal was to combine the most important

elements of the Zalando & SympaTex brands with the

vehicle. POWERGROUP’s designers faced the challenge of

creating an unusual design which combines these elements

and is both technically possible and catches the attention of

the media.

The great challenge: to take into consideration the radical

3-D form of a racing car and find a design vocabulary which

correlates to the dynamics of the car plus guarantees the

recognisability of a shoe and SympaTex membranes.

The POWERGROUP team rose to the challenge with fervour

and intense engagement. The first step was to make a model

in the scale of 1:10 which formed the basis of the transfer of

three-dimensionality to a two-dimension graphic format. The

upper material of the shoe was laid on as a pattern for the

car-wrapping foils background.

The design was defined directly on the car. The goal was

not only to integrate the 3-D form of the car, but to take costs

into consideration: replacing parts of the wrap, if needed,

with a minimum of effort. After completion of the printing,

the design was transferred to the entire vehicle using the foil

wrapping technique.

The unique and unmistakable innovative design of the racing

shoe generated considerable media attention without

extra marketing efforts. That was particularly the case with

motorsport as the ADAC used the racing-car in a large

number of announcements and illustrations used to promote

ADAC Motorsport.

Particularly noteworthy is the continuing placement of the

racing car on the start-page of ADAC Motorsport, the portal

for all of the races they support. This portal serves as the

ideal basis for increasing the awareness of Nici Pohler as

well as effective marketing communications for the sponsors

Zalando and SympaTex, not to mention an optical upgrading

of the racing series.

The racing shoes upon which the design was based were

sold out at Zalando’s online store within a few days.

143



145



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149


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151



SUSTAINABILITY &

SOCIAL WELFARE

153


SUSTAINABILITY &

SOCIAL WELFARE

We develop projects for our customers in the interest of

the assumption of social responsibility. In this way these

companies contribute to sustainable development which

goes far beyond existing legal requirements. In this respect,

we work in the domains of trend screening, product strategy

and brand and marketing concepts, develop portfolio plans

and sponsoring concepts in the culture domain and assume

co-operation management.

154


155



THE MUSIC EDUCATION

PROJECT “OPER ÜBER LEBEN © ”

The music education project OPER ÜBER LEBEN© has the

aim of promoting students from all social backgrounds. An

innovative pedagogical concept introduces these youths

to the music and the cultural world of the opera. They are

inspired by the diverse cultural world of the opera, fostering

integration among the youths and opening up personal

and professional opportunities as well as perspectives for

the future. Undiscovered talents and / or particularly gifted

youths will be stimulated by the sophisticated field of opera.

The successful pilot project was launched as part of the

Mozart Festival at the Bavarian State Opera. A total of

109 children from 4 classes in secondary modern schools

participated. The workshops, in which the children were

encouraged to play characters from the operas Abduction

from the Seraglio and The Magic Flute, were conducted by

Rainer Karlitschek (dramatist for children / youth work at the

Bavarian State Opera). In the meantime, they have become

an integral part of the children’s / youth programme at the

opera.

157



THE 100 POOREST

GERMANS

Every year the various media provide reports on the “100

richest Germans”, the “100 most beautiful people” and

the “Top of...”. In Autumn 2004, the Süddeutsche Zeitung

magazine converted this idea to a report on the “100

poorest Germans” and, in a poignant documentary, reported

on 100 Germans who have to live on the fringe of society as

a result of tragedies.

The issue of poverty eradication was discussed among the

Poetis family. Together, they developed a project idea and

provided start-up financing. The idea was presented to the

Munich-Solln Lions Club. The club took over the administration

of donations, while Roland Schütz assumed co-ordination

as the club’s activity officer. Dr. Poetis is responsible for

marketing and the strategic conception of the project.

With the good connections to the Süddeutsche

Zeitung magazine, free advertising was procured. The

POWERGROUP creative team designed the first adverts;

public awareness of the campaign increased. Countless

readers sympathised and felt compelled to help the “100

poorest Germans” with donations.

Thus, the idea of helping the “100 poorest Germans” as

a symbol for helping the needy in Germany was adopted,

and the initial funds became available.

In the next step, a strategy had to be defined how the

acquired means could be used long-term, sustainably and,

where possible, throughout Germany. It also had to be

determined how sponsors could be won from the economy,

in order to reach more people.

Jürgen Gessner, a long-time supporter of the food banks,

advised the participants to take a closer look at the food bank

idea. In particular, he reported on the central problem of the

“food banks”: the transportation of the products – without

disruption to the cold chain – using expensive vehicles. The

idea of supporting the food banks in a joint campaign with

vehicle financing, was born.

The Munich-Solln Lions Club collected further donations and

took over part of the financing of the first vehicle, whereby the

total was doubled by StiftungLife and was supplemented by

the Munich food bank’s own funds. The total sum amounted

to 50% of the list price – together with a generous donation

from Daimler, this provided the purchase price for the first

vehicle.

Poetis and Schütz decided to expand the principle into a

system, in cooperation with the two partners StiftungLife and

Daimler. During events and by contacting other Lions, the

attention of other clubs was drawn to the campaign and its

potential. The fellow Lions were cordially invited to help the

local food bank through their club. Initial donations for two

vehicles soon followed from Lions Club Pullach and Lions

Club Munich Opera. The idea grew.

The districts’ relief agencies were contacted and asked for

grants by the Solln Lions member Dr. Reinhardt. He organised

presentation dates in district meetings; articles appeared in

the club magazine Der LION; Schütz also wrote to the local

Lions Clubs directly. This allowed the campaign to grow

beyond the sphere of the Lions in Solln, and it reached clubs

throughout Germany.

Since the beginning of the campaign, Lions Clubs throughout

Germany have put more than 300 food bank vehicles (with

a total value of 13 million Euros) on the road.

As a second major step, the project was internationalised

by including additional partners. Food bank vehicles were

sponsored in Austria, Spain and Great Britain. This is the

proof that Business Design Thinking also works perfectly in

charitable activities of NGOs.

159



WORLDWIDE

RESPONSIBILITY

Encouraged by the good experiences with the project the

“100 poorest Germans”, the Munich food bank contacted

POWERGROUP with a request for a donation for the

purchase of a trash compactor.

On closer inspection, it turned out that the food banks had a

massive problem to contend with – the disposal of tonnes of

cardboard disposable packaging.

There arose the question of whether or not there could be

other measures to prevent these mountains of cardboard

from amassing. Poetis got in contact with the board of the

company IFCO, a market leader in RPC pooling logistics,

and together they developed the idea to provide the food

banks – in addition to the delivery vehicles – with foldable

reusable containers and thereby ensuring that they are

no longer dependent on disposable packaging made of

corrugated cardboard for the transportation and storage of

food.

Owing to their long life and 100% recyclability (compared

to conventional packaging) the reusable containers

offer additional advantages which were confirmed by

independent studies:

• Cooling of the transported fresh goods through a

ventilated design, resulting in reduced spoilage of food.

• Optimum utilisation of storage and transport areas via

folding and stacking options.

• Conservation of resources (e.g. up to 53% less

greenhouse gas emissions compared with the same

volume of disposable packaging).

Inclusion in the IFCO sanitation cycle also allows for foodsafe

cleaning which complies with the demanding hygiene

requirements of the HACCP standard.

To date, the WORLDWIDE RESPONSIBILITY project has

provided around 120,000 green reusable containers

to more than 80 food banks in Europe, North and South

America.

161



163



PATTY´S CHILD CLINICS

The project Patty’s Child Clinics aims to expand the existing

medical infrastructure of the Rural Health Centres in Pakistan

so that gratis hygienic pre- and postnatal care can be offered

even in the country’s remotest areas.

Initiator Patricia Poetis describes the planned successive

expansion of the network of clinics as follows: “We want the

clinics to be fitted with modern equipment in order to provide

comprehensive pre-natal diagnoses and post-natal care,

because the first year of an infant’s life is critical. We are

glad that the first Patty’s Child Clinic, located in Chillianwala

which is in the Mandi Bahuddin district, is already in an

advanced stage of planning.”

Earlier this year, the Bavarian Honorary Consulate of

Pakistan, the Christian Blind Mission and the Lions Clubs

Germany have signed a framework agreement to build

25 clinics for women and children in Pakistan in the next

5 years. The CBM, the German Lions Clubs and the

Honorary Consulate have been engaged for several years

in reconstruction in Pakistan, which suffered a devastating

flood catastrophe four years ago.

CBM director Rainer Brockhaus looks forward to the

cooperation with pleasure: “We thank the Lions Clubs and

the Honorary Consulate for their support. Together we make

things happen and serve many Pakistanis who need help.”

The Patty’s Child Clinics project – an initiative of the Lions

Club München-Pullach – arose out of Patricia Poetis’ desire

to establish a permanent charitable facility in Pakistan which

is able to provide targeted help at the local level. Honorary

Consul Dr. Pantelis Christian Poetis’ wife was deeply

involved in the ‘Pakistan needs us now!’ fundraising drive

started by the Consulate and the Lions Clubs to help in the

flood catastrophe of 2010. The drive raised over 150,000

Euros which, among other things, went to rebuild schools in

Charsadda and Faisalabad.

165


The leader of the German reconstruction project team receives a warm welcome in the Charsadda district, January 2012

Festive opening ceremony for a girls' school in the Manzooray region, January 2012


Festive opening ceremony for a boys' school in the Manzooray region, January 2012

Reconstruction project team with the German embassy in Islamabad, Nov 2011

Rebuilding ruined houses in the Charsadda district (before; Nov 2010)

Rebuilding ruined houses in the Charsadda district (after; Feb 2012)

Family standing in front of their newly constructed house in the Charsadda district, Feb 2012

In the Manzooray reconstruction region, February 2012

167


THE RACE GOES ON

Should not a 10-year compendium also have, other than

a review of the events of the past decade, a look into the

future?

While the red threads of innovative strategy, creative

marketing/sales and analysis-based M&A have run the

POWERGROUP since its founding, the expertise needed in

our clients’ fields of activity has changed in the same degree

that our clients’ tasks or projects have changed.

Energy on the Rise

As was the case during its privatisation, the energy sector

is in constant flux. Although we are currently engaged

with renewable wind, water and solar energy, signs of the

next giant steps, hydrogen technology and fuel cells, are

beginning to appear on the horizon.

Growth through Knowledge

European technology companies have set their sights

on using their own know-how as major export hits. It’s a

great pleasure for us to accompany them on the way to

markets which were recently held to be no-go areas. There

are interesting perspectives opening in Pakistan which are

related to our consular activities: the soon to be founded,

in cooperation with the German embassy in Islamabad,

Association for German-Pakistani Economic Relations. This

organisation, which we have been assigned to guide, will

unite German companies and Pakistani companies with a

presence in Germany in an effort to promote and expand

the economic relationships between the two countries.

Medicine and Competition

Competition among companies in the medical and healthcare

branch continues to intensify, not in the least because of

changes in socio-political and legal parameters. Compliance

with EU norms and the Globally Harmonized System of

Classification and Labelling of Chemicals represents a

considerable challenge which cannot be mastered by the

reduction of product lines or by cost-cutting.

Quality instead of Quantity

The consumer goods companies which we represent are

faced with a tense competitive situation. The need to initiate

confidence-building measures to convince consumers of

the quality of their goods —be it in the B2C or B2B area—

indicates an altered sense of their brand identities.

We look forward to another exciting year and challenging

projects with you, our clients. As your constant partner, we

take great pleasure in the further development of our own

colleagues brought on by the POWERGROUP’s continual

transformation.

Sincerely yours,

Pantelis Christian Poetis


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2004

2014

2014


2014

2004

2014

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