CPF Magazine Winter 2021 Issue

cpfnational

A national network of volunteers, parents and stakeholders who value French as an integral part of Canada. CPF Magazine is dedicated to the promotion and creation of French-second-language learning opportunities for young Canadians.

CANADIAN PARENTS FOR FRENCH

WINTER 2021

$6.95 • FREE FOR MEMBERS

NEW REALITY,

NEW LEARNING

OPPORTUNITIES!

MEET THE RECIPIENTS

OF THE CPF AWARDS

OF RECOGNITION

“SAY OUI”

TO BECOMING A

FRENCH TEACHER

IN ONTARIO


CPF YOUTH YOUTH ACTIVITY ACTIVITY PAGE


Magazine

CANADIAN PARENTS FOR FRENCH

WINTER 2021

www.cpf.ca

WINTER 2021

Table of Contents

CONTRIBUTORS

JP Michel, Corinne Barrett Dewiele,

Jason D. Edgerton, and other authors and

organizations, as noted in their articles.

EDITORIAL MANAGER

Marcos Salaiza

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Stripe Graphics Ltd.

PRINTING

Trico Evolution

SUBMISSIONS

Canadian Parents for French

1104 - 170 Laurier Ave. W.

Ottawa, ON K1P 5V5

(613) 235-1481, www.cpf.ca

Advertising: Cathy Stone

Canadian Parents for French

Email: advertise@cpf.ca

CPF Magazine is published three times per

year for members of Canadian Parents for

French. Our readership includes parents

of students learning French as a second

language, French language teachers,

school board or district staff, and provincial,

territorial and federal government staff

responsible for official languages education.

CHANGE OF ADDRESS

To signal a change of address,

contact Canadian Parents for French

at (613) 235-1481, or email:

cpf.magazine@cpf.ca

Editorial material contained in this

publication may not be reproduced

without permission.

Publications Mail Agreement No. 40063218

Return undeliverable mail to Canadian

Parents for French at the address above.

To become an online subscriber, email

cpf.magazine@cpf.ca. For an online version

of this issue, visit www.cpf.ca.

FEATURES

3 Victims of Its Own Success:

The Perpetual Challenges of French Immersion

Programs in Canada

6 The Krystina Baranowski Fund

Farewell – Catherine Davies

12 FindingLife

16 SparkPath: A New Approach to Career Discovery

REGULAR ARTICLES

2 PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

7 CPF BRANCHES: FSL TEACHER RECRUITMENT

“Say Oui” To Becoming a French Second Language

Teacher in Ontario

10 CPF PROGRAMMING

New Reality, New Learning Opportunities!

14 CPF AWARDS

Meet the Recipients of the CPF National Awards

of Recognition 2020

15 CPF PARTNER RESOURCE

Festivals d'hiver et orthographe /

Wintry Festivals and Spelling Quiz

18 CPF EVENTS

CPF Network Virtual Conference

20 KEY CPF CONTACTS ACROSS CANADA

This issue of CPF Magazine is printed

on 70lb Endurance Silk, using vegetable

based inks. The paper is FSC certified by the

Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®), meaning

it comes from well-managed forests and

known sources, ensuring local communities

benefit and sensitive areas are protected.

Canadian Parents for French is a nationwide, research-informed, volunteer organization

that promotes and creates opportunities to learn and use French for all those who

call Canada home.


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

H

appy New Year to you all. Let me start

by introducing myself. I am a proud French

second-language francophone and was

elected President of CPF National last October. It

is an honour for me to address the readers of this

magazine for the first time.

What a year 2020 was… I never would have

thought when last year started that we would be

living through a pandemic while facing ongoing

world challenges such as racial inequity and the

climate crisis, plus our own, such as lack of access

to FSL programs, teacher recruitment and retention

and linguistic (in)security. We must all face these

challenges individually, but also together as

communities, provinces/territories and as a country. As we turned

the page to a new year (finally, it is 2021!), it is clear we are only

getting started.

These challenges do not exist in silos and are all a part of CPF's

work. They force us to ask tough questions. What else can we do?

What else should we do? How do we ensure our work continues?

How do we put positive measures in place to ensure our efforts have

their intended impacts? As we ask ourselves these questions and

start to dig deeply, I believe the answers offer great opportunity.

If we focus on the COVID-19 pandemic for a moment, it has

created devastation in our lives and communities. I would like to

take this opportunity to thank all the frontline workers who continue

COLLÈGE SAINT-CHARLES-GARNIER

DON’T MISS THE BEST SUMMER

OF YOUR LIFE!

FRENCH IMMERSION SUMMER CAMP

IN QUEBEC CITY

FROM JULY 4 th TO AUGUST 6 th 2021

You are between 14 and

17 years old, have fun with

us this summer learning

French and discovering a

new culture!

to keep us safe in different ways. Yet, along with this

hardship, comes the opportunity to develop new

ways of working and delivering projects through a

variety of new methods. The CPF Network Virtual

Conference 2020 is an excellent example of this.

As an attendee, I was impressed by the number

of sessions, the use of technology, the flexibility

of the scheduling and the overall engagement

throughout—I learned so much! What an opportunity

to connect with others across Canada to learn and

grow together. Already, I cannot help but ponder

how we can use what we have learned about a virtual

conference and find ways to combine the joy of

building or renewing friendships in-person, with the

accessibility and flexibility of a virtual offering.

As we move forward as a CPF Network, we must continue to ask

ourselves how we can continue to do better. This does not mean we

are not doing great work—simply that there is always room to improve

and 2020 highlighted what we do well and where there are still gaps.

My hope and goal, for us all in 2021, is that we do exactly that—take

what 2020 showed us and improve it, fix it and make it better, both

within and outside the CPF Network. Please continue to stay healthy

and to take care of yourself. Restez en santé et à bientôt. n

DERREK BENTLEY

CPF NATIONAL PRESIDENT

Important CPF Network Updates

New Appointments to the

National Board of Directors

At the 44th Annual General Meeting (October 2020),

CPF announced the appointment of their new President

and Vice-President to the National Board of Directors.

Derrek Bentley will serve as National President, he was

previously Vice-President and also served as a Board

Director for the CPF Manitoba Branch.

► No minimum level of

French required

► French lessons each

morning of the week

► Housing in residence:

single rooms

► Many activities, games,

pedagogical visits and

excursions

► More than 400 students

from all around the world

CONTACT US:

international@collegegarnier.qc.ca

+1 418 681-0107 ext. 305

garnier-international.com

KATE PETERS

NATIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT

Kate Peters will serve as

National Vice-President, she

previously served as Treasurer

on the National Board and as

Board Director on the CPF

Alberta Branch.

Outgoing President

Nancy McKeraghan, who

served three years in the

position, will continue to serve

her term in a mentoring and

supporting role as part of the

CPF Network’s succession and

planning initiatives.

2 CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021


victim

OF ITS OWN

success?

The Perpetual Challenges of French Immersion Programs in Canada

BY DR. CORINNE E. BARRETT DEWIELE PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITÉ SAINT BONIFACE (MANITOBA) AND

DR. JASON D. EDGERTON ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, ST. JOHN’S COLLEGE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA

T

he popularity of French immersion

(FI) programs has risen dramatically

across Canada in the past couple of

decades. The Government of Canada

reports that Canada saw a 52% increase in

FI enrollment between 2003 and 2013.

However, the rising popularity of FI

is itself a source of significant challenges.

Since its inception four decades ago,

FI programs have often struggled to

meet demand, and in many jurisdictions

where demand exceeds available seats,

enrollments have had to be restricted.

Some of the challenges that prevent

FI programs from ‘scaling up’ to meet

demand include a shortage of qualified

teachers who speak the language fluently

enough to teach FI, a lack of physical

space in a school, a lack of adequate

resources written in French and a lack

of funding to improve those (often

costlier) resources. Let us briefly examine

each challenge before suggesting some

possible solutions.

French Immersion Teacher Shortage

One of the most persistent and welldocumented

challenges to offering

quality FI programming is a lack of

qualified teachers. The scarcity of FI

teachers is not a surprise as, according

to the Government of Canada i Job Bank,

92% of French Language/French Language

Teacher Bachelor of Education recent

graduates find employment in their

chosen field, with only 3% stating they

were unemployed (the other 5% were

not looking for jobs).

Some of the crucial factors behind this

chronic teacher shortage are: the unequal

distribution of Francophones across the

country, provincial requirements regarding

the study of French, the high demand for

Francophones in other economic sectors

and the challenging nature of predicting

what type of person would choose to

become a teacher as a career choice ii .

This shortage is further magnified when it

comes to finding qualified supply or on call

FI teachers; given that there are already

too few teachers to fill full-time positions,

the pool of supply/on call teachers

qualified to teach FI is even smaller.

continued >>

CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021 3


The staffing shortage is accentuated,

yet again, when it comes to hiring French

speaking support services teachers, such

as counsellors and resource teachers.

Exceptional students registered in FI

programs are sometimes assisted in

their learning by Anglophone specialists

who are unable to provide supports in

French. Accessibility and inclusion are the

two major issues associated with special

education in the FI program (for many

types of diverse learners) and the inability

to employ personnel fluent in French is

problematic for both.

There is a concern that a shortage

of qualified FI teachers reduces the

standards for teaching French as a second

language in some immersion programs iii .

FI programs require professionals trained

in both teaching pedagogy as well as

having a solid linguistic ability. Teachers

are the primary models of the language

for their students. Without effective

language competency, teachers struggle

to prepare and deliver their lessons, or

to correct grammatical errors of their

students iv . There is a fear, that hiring

teachers without strong pedagogical,

linguistic and cultural competence

leads to a disservice of the students

and the FI program.

Lack of Physical Space

Inadequate space for the number of

students who wish to be enrolled in FI

is a common problem. In Manitoba, for

example, many FI schools are bursting

at the seams as school boards scramble

to find space to accommodate growing

FI enrollment numbers. Parents, from

both the FI and the English language

programs, are generally displeased with

changes at the schools that attempt to

solve overcapacity problems by moving

students to other schools that are further

from home.

Lack of Adequate French as a Second

Language Teaching Material

Unlike Français (French first-language)

students, FI students are not firstlanguage

learners and often do not have

the benefit of a parent that speaks French

at home and are not surrounded by

rich examples of the French language

(e.g. reading material, music or television

shows). Resources that are used in

Français programs will not suffice in

French as a second language (FSL)

classrooms. FI teachers at all grade

levels are often frustrated by the fact

that they must search for resources that

are adapted to a language level that is

accessible for their students, and teachers

see this as one of the most difficult tasks

of teaching in FI classrooms.

Consequently, in order to satisfy

the cultural and language needs of their

students in a province with an Anglophone

majority, FI teachers are often required

to create their own materials, adapt their

own materials from French first-language

programs or translate the materials used in

English language programs v . The lack of

appropriate FSL teaching material further

compounds the FI teacher shortage

problem, as having to create or adapt

materials for use in the classroom is a

large task that can push some teachers to

leave FI.

Technological resources are also

problematic in the FI stream. More often

in dual track schools, but sometimes

in milieu schools in provinces with an

Anglophone majority, the technological

tools that are purchased are English tools:

English keyboards, software that is based

or purchased in English where directions

or tabs cannot be translated (e.g., Kahoot,

Word, PPT) or a lack of French-speaking

technological support personnel vi . There

is also a dearth of learning software at a

level appropriate for FI students.

Finally, resources geared specifically

to FI students have always been more

costly than corresponding English

resources. It is, after all, (even if growing)

a niche market. Textbooks, computer

applications, library books, magazines,

graphic novels, in effect anything that

the students must read, require an

adaptation to a second language learner

level, and such material has little or no

resale value outside of the school setting.

In short, it generally costs more to make

the FI program comparable with the

English program in terms of quality of

educational resources.

Viable solutions?

Although many of the noted challenges

have dogged FI since its inception, the

extent of these has been magnified in

recent years by the growing popularity of

FI. The continued success of FI will require

viable solutions to these ongoing issues.

One strategy that many school

districts have adopted is to try to recruit

new FI teachers very early in their

graduating year at university – in

January and February of the year

previous to the September start-up.

What the districts discover, however,

is that there are not enough bilingual

graduates for all the open positions.

In the past, districts attempted to fill

positions with teachers from Europe

and from Quebec. Currently, the shortage

of FSL teachers is everywhere including

in Quebec. There are recruitment

initiatives taking place in Europe as well

as other French speaking countries. But

this is not always a perfect solution.

These teachers must undergo additional

training to qualify as FSL teachers, as the

requirements are different than teaching

French as a mother tongue.

Recently, the federal government

recognizing the serious FI teacher

shortage across the country, and intent

on promoting Canada’s two official

languages, allocated funds for the

recruitment of additional FI teachers in its

latest Action Plan on Official Languages.

The Canadian Heritage plan will provide

$31.3 million over four years, begun in

2019-2020, enabling recruitment of more

FI teachers. vii In this vein, one possible

recruitment strategy is to offer additional

bursaries to French universities to

4 CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021


encourage more FI high school graduates

to pursue teaching in French. Similarly,

school districts could invest in students

who are ready to pursue teaching as a

career by paying for one university course

per year for the students; the student

would repay the district by teaching for it

for three years after graduation. Another

possibility is a credit-earning mentoring

program for high school students who

would go one afternoon per cycle during

their final year in high school to help a

veteran FI elementary teacher in the

classroom. This ‘job shadowing’ by the

high school student may lead to the

discovery that teaching is a viable career

option. Lastly, students with capacity in

French would also feel more encouraged

if the remuneration offered to teachers

was improved (i.e. more attractive

compensation for the number of required

hours) and comparable with other fields

that require five years of study or more at

a university.

Teachers themselves can help FI

programs as well. If certain certified

teachers do not have the ease of language

that they desire, they could enroll in parttime

immersion programs in existence

at many universities across Canada.

Further, if attendance was funded by the

school district, teachers would be even

more encouraged to take the course for

improvement. By investing in the teacher,

the district improves its FI program.

Teachers can also help with the lack of

resources by continuing to post their

translated/adapted FI teaching materials

on blogs, Pinterest, educational and other

Internet sites.

Regarding the issues of space for FI

programs and resources, governments

and school districts need to be willing to

relocate students to buildings of a more

appropriate size, when needed, despite

parental complaints and community

backlash. They should consider what is

in the best interests of the children and

ensure that the space can accommodate a

stimulating learning environment. Money

must be reallocated to purchase the more

costly FSL resources to meet FI programs’

French-language technology needs. As

governments have encouraged the reeling

in of drug prices, so should they monitor

the prices of FI resources and intervene

on the part of FI educators when the costs

become exorbitant.

Hopefully some of these strategies

can help ease the burden on FI programs

because, despite ongoing challenges, FI

enrollments continue to grow in the wake

of rising demand. As former Canadian

Official Language Commissioner (2000-

2016) Graham Fraser observed, FI is a

program that “has enriched the lives of

millions of Canadians [and is] one of the

most successful Canadian educational

experiences available” viii . Ultimately, its

continued success will depend on the

degree to which we are able to resolve

its attendant challenges. n

i Government of Canada. (2020). Job Bank. Retrieved from

https://www.jobbank.gc.ca/studentdashboard/13.1325/LOS05

ii Jacks, D. (2018). Répondre aux besoins du marché du travail en

enseignement du français langue seconde en Ontario. Ottawa; Canada :

Canadian Parents for French.

iii Association canadienne des professionnels de l’immersion (ACPI). (2018).

Rapport final: Consultation pancanadienne. Repéré à

https://www.acpi.ca/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Vol40_n1_

Printemps_2018_final_fr_web-1.pdf

iv Bayliss, D., & Vignola, M. J. (2007). Training non-native second

language teachers: The case of anglophone FSL teacher candidates.

Canadian Modern Language Review, 63(3), 371-398.

v Lapkin, S., MacFarlane, A., & Vandergrift, L. (2006). Teaching French

in Canada: FSL teachers’ perspectives. Ottawa, ON: Canadian

Teachers’ Federation.

vi Carr, W., Lapkin, S., Larson, E. J., Desgroseilliers, P. & Masson, M. (2019).

ACCÉDER AUX POSSIBILITÉS: Étude sur les difficultés liées à l’offre et

à la demande d’enseignants en français langue seconde au Canada.

Retrieved from

https://www.clo-ocol.gc.ca/sites/default/files/acceder-possibilite-fls.pdf

vii Government of Canada. (2018). Investing in our future 2018-2023:

Action plan for official languages. Retrieved from

https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/pch/documents/services/

official-languages-bilingualism/official-languages-action-plan/

action-plan.pdf

viii Fraser, G. (2016). Of course French immersion is not perfect.

Retrieved from

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/of-course-frenchimmersion-is-not-perfect/article30394202

@OLP_PLO_Canada

CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021 5


THE

Krystina Baranowski

À L’UNIVERSITÉ DE SAINT-BONIFACE

In November 2020, Dr. Krystina Baranowski, a long time French teacher, passed

away. Her career spanned more than 4 decades of teaching, she was also

a strong advocate of French education and a close friend of CPF having most

recently served on the CPF Manitoba Branch Board of Directors.

With her passing and as a tribute to her love of French language, a bursary was

created with Université de Saint Boniface (USB), where she was a teacher for

30 years. Krystina made many contributions to educational activities at Saint

Boniface while also impacting the overall French educational landscape in Manitoba.

While she was raised in an English-speaking home, she became interested

in French at a very early age, she studied French literature at the University of

Manitoba, where she got the opportunity to go to France to work as an English

assistant and to improve her French.

Upon returning to Canada, she enrolled at USB to do a master’s degree. The

dean at the time and current Commissioner of Official Languages, Raymond

Théberge, encouraged her to stay and work as a teacher. n

If you are looking to support French in Manitoba, we encourage you to honor Kristina’s legacy

by donating to her bursary at USB. For more information and to make a donation, please visit:

https://ustboniface.ca/giving/krystyna-baranowski-fund.

UNIVERSITÉ DE SAINT-BONIFACE IS A FRENCH LANGUAGE UNIVERSITY IN MANITOBA, YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE FUND

WILL SUPPORT THE DIFFERENT PROGRAMS TAUGHT IN FRENCH WHILE ALSO HELPING FRENCH THRIVE IN THE PROGRAM.

FUND

FAREWELL

CATHERINE DAVIES WITH

SENATOR RAYMONDE GAGNÉ AT

THE 4TH ANNUAL FSL AWARENESS

BREAKFAST, OTTAWA, ON.

Catherine Davies who served as Branch Executive Director of CPF Manitoba for more than

17 years, stepped down in January 2021. The CPF MB Branch has grown remarkably under her

leadership. Catherine is well respected by colleagues, funders, partners, board of directors and staff.

She led with great ideas, but was also the first to roll up her sleeves to offer help in getting the job

done. Catherine shared freely and has been strongly supportive of all CPF Network collaboration

initiatives. CPF National notes that she has been a remarkable asset to our organization. We

acknowledge her steadfast commitment to CPF and wish her success in the future.

À la prochaine!

6 CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021


CPF BRANCHES FSL TEACHER RECRUITMENT

Your FSL teaching

career starts here.

Say Oui

To Becoming an

FSL Teacher in Ontario

SHOW ME

WHY

SHOW ME

HOW

Canadian Parents for French Ontario is excited to announce the

launch of “SayOui.ca” — a new website that encourages youth

to explore becoming a French second language teacher.

Student enrolment in the French

immersion (FI) program in Ontario

has enjoyed a 5.6 percent average

annual growth rate for fourteen

consecutive years. As more Canadians

understand the benefits of official

language bilingualism, the need to boost

the supply of qualified core French and

French immersion teachers in Ontario’s

60 English school boards is of critical

importance.

The new website will help boost the

number of French second language (FSL)

teachers in Ontario by inspiring secondary

and postsecondary students to explore

this career path.

The objectives of SayOui.ca are to:

> Promote greater awareness of the

pressing demand for FSL teachers as

a valued profession;

> Identify many experiential programs

for youth to enhance French language

skills while studying;

> Outline the educational paths to become

a teacher in Ontario with proficiency

in French and qualifications to teach

French as a second language in

the province;

> Provide links to all Faculties of Education

in Ontario offering programs that

lead to FSL teaching positions and

highlight the unique characteristics

of these programs.

The show me why section focuses on

these five elements:

1 FSL teachers are in high demand

2 Pride in acquiring a unique skill set

3 Flexibility of work schedule and holidays

4 Making a difference in students' lives

5 Security in salary, benefits, and pension

Take the Quiz – It’s fun!

The interactive quiz provides insight

into whether the profession is a good

fit for you. Wondering if your French is

strong enough? The site provides links to

current opportunities to build your French

proficiency and confidence along the way.

CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021 7


CPF BRANCHES FSL TEACHER RECRUITMENT

The new website will help boost the number of FSL teachers in Ontario by

inspiring secondary and postsecondary students to explore this career path.

The show me how section has a visual roadmap describing

sequential steps to achieve the goal of becoming a FSL teacher.

It gives information about Ontario’s universities, where to get a

degree, and how to get credentials.

SayOui.ca includes a lesson plan for teachers linked to the

grade 9 to grade 12 curricula in Guidance and Career Education,

core, extended, and French immersion classes.

We are grateful for the participation of an advisory

committee, a focus group and more than ten partner

organizations that have joined us in promoting SayOui.ca by

sharing information with their members in their newsletters,

on their websites, and on social media.

The next step is to enhance our promotional campaign to

the public at large and work with Faculties of Education to ensure

more opportunities open up for youth to pursue a Bachelor of

Education degree.

We invite you to check out SayOui.ca and start a conversation

with your child or students. Take the quiz today!

Canadian Parents for French Ontario gratefully acknowledges

the financial support of the Government of Canada and the

Government of Ontario for making this initiative possible. n

8 CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021


BECOME AN FSL TEACHER.

Find out how at SayOui.ca


CPF EVENTS PROGRAMMING

New Reality, New Lear

With the advent of COVID-19 school

closures, CPF has been adapting

all of its programming to the new

virtual reality, from Concours d’art oratoire to

the CPF Network Conference and offering more

resources online.

As students across Canada moved to

stay-at-home learning and online classes,

FSL students were among the most impacted

adding a whole new layer of challenges to

learning a new language. The need for resources

was evident as was the difficulty in adequately

supporting their child, especially for parents

who do not speak French.

The CPF Virtual French Tutoring program

started in spring 2020 with three pilot sites

in Ontario and as of September 2020, it is

now offered all across Canada. There are

approximately 500 students enrolled between

the ages of 6 and 14 years of age. They are

supported by more than 400 volunteers who

are at least 16 years old, bilingual and residing

in nine provinces.

Children spend one hour per week in a one-onone

session with a French speaking volunteer

tutor. Sessions take place virtually and so a

computer, camera, microphone and internet

connection are required. This is not an academic

program following a pre-determined curriculum.

They can work on whatever skills are identified as

needing the most improvement - reading, writing,

speaking, help with homework. Additionally,

registered students also have the opportunity of

practicing French through different activities like

small group conversation and book clubs. n

10 CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021


CPF PROGRAMMING

CPF EVENTS

ning Opportunities!

As students across

Canada moved to

online classes and

classroom teaching

was disrupted, French

second language

students were among

the most impacted as

it added a whole new

layer of challenges

to learning a

new language.

To learn more, you can contact your

CPF Branch directly. A new cohort

got underway in January 2021 and

the next group is scheduled for

April 2021.

NEW YEAR

New After School French Club

To complement the Virtual French

Tutoring, CPF has also launched

a new pilot After School French

program called the WIGUP Club

– this is for students interested

in independent learning using a

wonderful and safe multimedia

platform.

The WIGUP Club is open to

youth ages 9-14, who can access

more than 2000 videos in French

from around the world and on

different topics. It allows the

student to engage with French

speakers and work on tasks known

as “CreaCtivités”, which range from

photo projects to video interviews

that are to be shared on WIGUP.tv.

Every month, kids will unravel

their creativity and build confidence

in French as they meet other kids

from across the country. They will

explore and complete different

projects and be entered into draws

for prizes. The WIGUP Club is a

great complement to FSL students’

education as it focuses more on

the creative and social aspects of

learning a language.

The WIGUP Club pilot program

runs until March 31st, 2021 and

is free to all members – as CPF

is subsidizing the usual $25

monthly membership fee. The only

requirement is that the student

has to commit to participation for

a three-month period. For more

information about the Club or

to register, please visit the

CPF National website.

Stay tuned to CPF National’s

social media channels and to your

local Branch for more activities and

contests as they are launched! n

CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021 11


ELIA SAIKALY is a bilingual filmmaker and explorer whose

mission is to inspire people and help them live their most

meaningful life through his adventures. Elia’s journey is inspiring

and a great example of determination for young students.

Breaking world records, summiting Mount Everest,

surviving avalanches, these are only some of Elia’s

accomplishments and it is through these events that he

is able to help students discover their own journey.

In 2005, Elia travelled to Nepal with his friend Dr. Sean

Egan, who was trying to become the oldest Canadian to ever

scale Mt. Everest, he died trying to reach the summit. This

event was life changing for Elia, who had never climbed a

mountain before. He decided to honour Sean’s life by starting

a legacy project in his memory: FindingLife.

FindingLife started as a film project to share Dr. Egan’s life

journey but evolved organically into an organization that connects

students in the classroom to expeditions and adventures around the

world, in English and French. It is now a full-fledged interactive K-12

learning platform that combines adventure, technology, education

and charitable initiatives to inspire positive change in youth.

From the safety of their teacher-supervised classrooms,

students from both language groups embark on real-time

adventures and use social media to communicate and actively

participate in exciting expeditions.

12 CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021


FindingLife’s mission is to inspire

positive change in youth by bringing

the world right into their classrooms.

Besides participating in unique learning

opportunities, students are also able to

make a tangible difference in the lives of

others through fundraising campaigns.

Since 2005 Elia has been able to

inspire young students through

different adventures made possible

by FindingLife:

O FindingLife on Mt. Everest – more than 20,000

Canadian students followed Elia’s journey on his

way to the top summit.

O Mount Kenya – six Canadian students were paired with

students in Kenya as Elia and the team set their sights on

the highest peak in Kenya. Students witnessed not only

Mt. Kenya’s climbing but also Elia’s commitment to

giving back as he and his crew built classrooms for a

Kenyan community.

O Ascending Cho Oyu – students in Ottawa were inspired

by Elia’s adventure in Tibet, climbing the 6th highest

mountain on Earth.

O ePals on Mt. Everest – Elia took the popular ePals

community to Everest, where he connected students to

his thrilling adventure, all while filming a TV show and of

course, climbing to the summit!

O Other campaigns have had students raise money for

different causes like: a well in Kathmandu, an orphanage

in India, a new school in Banhaku and much more.

These are only a few examples of what FindingLife offers, it

creates immersive educational experiences by connecting students

in the classroom to world-class expeditions. These adventures have

helped students set their own goals and believe in themselves.

For FSL students, this is also a great opportunity to connect with

students across Canada in both languages and practise French.

Elia shared his journey during the CPF Network Virtual

Conference 2020 and he highlighted the importance of defining

from a very young age your own journey, as he sometimes

missed direction while growing up, he was able to find his life’s

purpose and that is why he is passionate about helping young

students do the same. n

Elia is currently in Pakistan on his way to

climb K2, the second highest mountain

in the world, to follow his most current

adventures, check out his Instagram

account, @eliasaikaly.

To learn more about FindingLife, Elia’s

journey or upcoming adventures for

your students, visit findinglife.ca and

eliasaikaly.com.

Université d’Ottawa | University of Ottawa

FRENCH IMMERSION

at uOttawa

A unique opportunity

with unparalleled support!

• French immersion available in 86 undergraduate programs

• Open to core, extended and French immersion students

• Special courses to make the transition to bilingual

university studies

• An extra $1,000 per year for studying bilingually

• An authentic bilingual environment in Canada’s capital

immersion@uOttawa.ca

www.immersion.uOttawa.ca

CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021 13


CPF AWARDS

MEET THE RECIPIENTS OF THE

CPF National Awards

of Recognition 2020

In October, in conjunction with the CPF Network Conference, Canadian Parents for French National recognized

three individuals who have contributed significant service to the organization and who have demonstrated

leadership in the advancement of French second language education and the promotion of linguistic duality.

These individuals often noted for their positive influence on others, have demonstrated a commitment to the

CPF mission, vision and values through their leadership, partnership building, and collaboration within their

respective communities and on a broader national, network scale.

It is because of our members, volunteers and staff that CPF is able to thrive and deliver its mandate.

Meet the three recipients of the CPF National Awards of Recognition 2020:

Dr. Matthew Hayday, Historian, author

and professor at the University of Guelph,

recipient of the CPF Distinguished Life

Membership, for sharing CPF’s mission

in a way that validates and motivates

advocates in advancing the promise of

bilingualism for children and in Canada

and for this personal investment and

willingness to share his expertise that

has helped CPF prosper. His professional

research has included 2 major books

"Bilingual Today, United Tomorrow"

(2005 McGill-Queen's University Press)

and "So They Want Us to Learn French"

(2015 UBC Press) on the history of

language policy in Canada.

Shannon Nelson, of Edmonton, Alberta,

recipient of the CPF National Volunteer

Award, for her more than 20 years

involved in the organization, sustaining

a CPF Chapter, leading at the Branch

level and putting her expertise to work in

obtaining successful fundraising and grant

applications which allowed French to

flourish in Grande Prairie, Alberta.

Candas Resch, recipient of the

CPF J. Elmer Hynes Staff Excellence in

Leadership Award, for her professional

service and financial skills at the CPF

Alberta Branch, ensuring its growth and

continued success by virtue of leading,

beyond the expected scope of work, in

event planning and management.

Join us in congratulating the three award recipients

for their leadership contributions. Félicitations!

14 CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021


CPF PARTNER RESOURCE

Festivals d'hiver

et orthographe

Wintry Festivals and Spelling Quiz

With unique festivals happening across the country all winter long, we have every reason to bundle up,

get outside and embrace all that our snowy Canadian winters have to offer!

But before you trade your blanket for your snow pants, test your spelling knowledge with our quiz!

Each of the 10 sentences below features a Canadian winter festival. See if you can choose the

correct spelling for the missing word.

1

2

Pendant

3

Le

4

Le

5

Le

Vous pourrez patiner sur la plus grande patinoire du

monde et jouer sur un ____________ terrain de jeu

hivernal au Bal de neige, qui a lieu chaque année en

février dans la capitale nationale.

a. imense

b. immanse

c. immense

la compétition Ice on Whyte qui a lieu à

Edmonton, les équipes de ___________ concurrentes

ont 34 heures pour transformer 15 blocs de glace en

une œuvre d'art.

a. sculpteurs

b. sculteurs

c. sculpteur

FROSTival de Fredericton a de quoi amuser petits et

grands : il comprend notamment des visites de _________

d'art, une journée d'art en famille et une fête en patins!

a. galleries

b. galléries

c. galeries

Festival du Voyageur met en valeur le patrimoine

francophone du Manitoba et propose un concours

de barbus, des ____________ en traîneau à chiens

et bien plus encore!

a. rendonnés

b. randonnées

c. randonées

festival SnowDays de Banff donne une rare

occasion d'assister à une épreuve de skijoring,

ou ski ____________ pendant laquelle des équipes

de skieurs de fond sont tirées par des chevaux

le long de l'avenue Banff.

a. attellé

b. atellé

c. attelé

6

Le

7

Au

8

Le

9

Inauguré

10

Yukon Sourdough Rendezvous offre des activités

pour le moins ____________ comme un concours de

cheveux gelés, le lancer de scie à chaîne et le lancer

de tronc d'arbre.

a. inédites

b. innédites

c. inédittes

festival Toonik Tyme d'Iqaluit, qui met à l'honneur la

culture inuite, la température ____________ est parfaite

pour construire des igloos et courir en traîneau à chiens.

a. artic

b. artique

c. arctique

Carnaval de Québec vous invite à rencontrer

Bonhomme dans son ____________ de glace, à

participer à un atelier de sculpture sur glace et

à prendre un bon bain de neige!

a. palais

b. pallais

c. palet

en 1898 par un amateur de ski

____________ le Rossland Winter Carnival,

qui a lieu en Colombie-Britannique, serait le

plus ancien festival d'hiver du Canada.

a. Norvégien

b. norvégien

c. norvègien

À l'occasion du Winter Festival of Lights de Niagara,

on peut parcourir en voiture un itinéraire de huit

kilomètres magnifiquement __________ par plus

de trois millions d'ampoules.

a. illuminé

b. illumminé

c. illuminné

Source: Language Portal of Canada, Translation Bureau, Public Services and

Procurement Canada, http://www.canada.ca/our-languages CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021 15


SPARKPATH

HOW TO PREPARE YOUR TEEN FOR JOBS

THAT DON’T EXIST YET

“What do you want to be

when you grow up?”

It seems like a simple and harmless

question. In fact, it is probably one of the

most common questions adults will ask

children from a very young age. From

parents to teachers and other relatives,

our society is focused on ensuring kids

know what their professional path will be.

But by asking this question, we are

not getting students to think broadly

about their future. Instead, we are

sending a limiting message: you only get

to be one thing later in life. When the

truth is, they will have many different

jobs over the course of their lives.

And although you might be thinking

that we have all experienced friends and

family asking that big question (We have!)

and that it is normal (It shouldn’t be!), we

need to start changing that mentality in

order to prepare the next generations,

in hopes that they live meaningful lives

where their careers will help them

achieve a greater purpose.

As children become teens and teens

become adults, they get closer to making

their decision. Some of them feel lost as

they can’t figure out what it is that they

want to do in life. A first step is to decide

what to study, but many, even after

obtaining their degree, are faced with an

16 CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021


uncertain future and an ever-changing

job market.

That is what SparkPath aims to

change. SparkPath is an organization that

helps better prepare the young for the

world or for work by exploring challenges.

Its founder JP Michel, who, since 2009

has helped high school and university

students develop their potential, helps

them set ambitious career paths that look

beyond job titles.

JP proposes what he calls the

“Challenge mindset”, which switches the

traditional approach to choosing a career

by focusing on real-world challenges,

not on job titles. Because in fact, the

problems that are hard to solve stick

around but the companies and types or

people that work on them change.

To support the mindset, SparkPath

has developed the “Challenge Cards,”

available in English and French, which are

an innovative tool that helps students

find the challenges and problems that they

want to work on. The cards are used by

high schools and colleges across the world.

The cards picture present-day

challenges like “engineering better

medicine” or “redesigning the healthcare

system.” While you might be thinking that

for those two examples the choices are

clearly a career in medicine or biology,

the cards help students realize that many

other jobs are needed to solve those

challenges. For example, the project

managers that keep tabs on people, the

people in human resources who hired

them, the people who look after the

equipment, etc., all work on the same

problem. Because yes, indeed, you can

be an accountant helping redesign the

transportation system.

The cards help reformulate the

question from “what do you want to be

when you grow up” to “what are the

problems that you want to solve,” which

according to its founder is a great way to

inspire youth as it allows them to try to

be the best for their job, even if it doesn’t

exist yet.

This new mindset has proven to be

helpful to students. In fact, in a case study

with grade 10 students from Ashbury

College in Ottawa, 89% of students

mentioned that the Challenge Cards

opened the doors to new possibilities.

On top of that, 96% of students enjoyed

doing the card sort. n

JP Michel is on a mission to change the way we prepare

people for their careers. His work in human resources consulting

gave him the opportunity to work with and learn from

some of the world’s largest organizations. JP took these

lessons learned to start his company, SparkPath, where he

does career and leadership development with youth and

leaders in both official languages. JP has a master’s degree

in industrial-organizational psychology and is the recipient

of the 2017 Outstanding Career Professional award from the

Career Professionals of Canada. JP was a keynote speaker at

the CPF Network Virtual Conference 2020.

To find out more about the Challenge mindset, you can visit

www.mysparkpath.com.

FOR MORE INFO

info@campt.ca

1.888.882.1889

VIRTUAL FRENCH

CLASSES, CAMPS

AND TUTORING

• Grade Specific Curriculum

• All French levels welcome

• Groups or Private

campt.ca

FRENCH DAY

CAMPS IN THE GTA

• Multiple Covid-Compliant Locations

• Fun Experiential Programs

• Learn To Love French!

brouilletacademy.ca

CampAd_v4.indd 1

2020-12-14 12:59 PM

CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021 17


CPF EVENTS

CPF Network

VIRTUAL Conference

In October, for the first time ever, the CPF Network Conference took place entirely online.

More than 85 sessions, 300 registered delegates and 18 sponsors made it a total success.

A

dapting the Network Conference

to a virtual format proved to be

a challenge at first, but in the

end, it allowed us to reach a wider

audience and to diversify the content.

Raise Your Flag for French was the title

of the 2020 edition, which included

topics like linguistic security, remote

and hybrid learning, mental health

during the pandemic and updates on

the FSL teacher recruitment and

retention projects underway to

address FSL education issues.

Feedback from Conference

delegates and long-time CPF members

was overwhelmingly positive. Many of

them shared with us that they were at

first doubtful about this new format but

were really pleased with the platform

and the content. However, they all

agreed that they missed the social and

networking aspect (in person) of the

traditional conference.

The Conference

at a Glance

The Conference started by having Keith

Spicer, Canada’s First Commissioner of

Official Languages chat about his time

as Commissioner, the Official Languages

Act and of course, CPF’s history. We were

also joined by the current Commissioner,

Raymond Théberge.

Parents were also thrilled to

hear inspiring keynotes from Olympic

medallist Clara Hughes, career coach

JP Michel and Filmmaker Elia Saikaly,

as they presented clear examples to

motivate children in their education and

their future. To learn more about Elia

and JP’s sessions, checkout the articles

on pages 12 and 16. Workshops about

language acquisition and practicing

French in the era of remote learning

were complemented by exhibitor

sessions sharing university programs,

language bursaries and other youth

opportunities.

New on the program, we included

socio-cultural activities for the whole

family to enjoy together. These ranged

My teenage daughter loved Clara’s keynote, as a


parent I was pleased to see that the conference

content could be of interest for the whole family.


Adam W. writes:

Salut!! Félicitations pour une très

belle journée!! Clara was incredible,

inspiring, so much wisdom that

I think we all needed to hear,

and Derrek’s session just now

with Amy and Ahdi was so

thought provoking.

Charles Z. writes:

I have joined many sessions.

My daughter is only 6 years old,

but we put the virtual concert on

last night, while she and her mom

played some games, and listened

to the concert at the same time.

It was really nice.

18 CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021


CPF EVENTS

from bilingual magic shows to French

concerts and movies to a Family French

Trivia Night. Without a doubt one of the

special surprises of the week was the

100% Franco Amérique French music

concert, made possible by our partner,

the Centre de la Francophonie des

Amériques.

While we hope we can someday go

back to meeting everyone in person, we

are very pleased with the results and the

response we got from our members. n

It has been an


honour to listen

to Keith Spicer.

His chat was

very nostalgic. ”

Be Brave, Speak French!

Linguistic Security

Advocacy Brief

The CPF National Research Support Working Group launched

the new advocacy brief “Be Brave! Speak French!” which tackles

linguistic security, one of our biggest challenges. This became

evident during other sessions. For example, Robert Talbot,

Research Manager at the Office of the Commissioner of Official

Languages, presented a survey about linguistic insecurity in the

federal government.

By the end of the week, delegates discovered so many new

resources and tools to continue advocating for FSL education and

had the opportunity for plenty of discussions with like-minded

individuals including to chat with the National Board of Directors. n

EDU-INTER FRENCH SCHOOL

IN QUEBEC CITY

Treat yourself or your loved ones to a 100% French immersion

in Quebec City. French programs for all ages with different activities

every day. On vous attend à Québec!

Adult programs

(16 years and over)

• Core and Intensive

programs available

• Small groups that allow more

speaking opportunities

• Multiple French levels are

available at all times

Complete your immersion

program by staying with one

of our homestay families

• Practice your French with

real “Québécois”

• Learn firsthand about Quebec’s

rich culture and history

• Enjoy a private room and a meal

plan during your whole stay

Can’t come right now?

Don’t worry, we have the

perfect virtual option for you!

Day and evening sessions

are available.

Teen and High School programs

(10 to 17 years)

• 10 different French summer

camp options (multiactivities,

sports, arts and much more)

• Residence and homestay

accommodation are available

• Students from 43 different

countries participate every year

• Semester and academic years

in French are possible through

our local high schools

Learn more

about Edu-inter!

learningfrenchinquebec.com

info@edu-inter.net

CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021 19


KEY CPF CONTACTS ACROSS CANADA

National office

1104 - 170 Laurier Ave. W., Ottawa, ON K1P 5V5

T: 613.235.1481

cpf@cpf.ca cpf.ca

Quebec office & Nunavut support

P.O. Box 393 Westmount, Westmount, QC H3Z 2T5

infoqcnu@cpf.ca qc.cpf.ca

British Columbia & Yukon

227-1555 W 7th Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1S1

T: 778.329.9115 TF: 1.800.665.1222 (in BC & Yukon only)

info@cpf.bc.ca bc-yk.cpf.ca

Alberta

211-15120 104 Ave. NW, Edmonton, AB T5P 0R5

T: 780.433.7311

cpfab@ab.cpf.ca

ab.cpf.ca

Northwest Territories

PO Box 1538, Yellowknife, NT X1A 2P2

cpf-nwt@northwestel.net nwt.cpf.ca

Saskatchewan

303-115 2nd Ave. N., Saskatoon, SK S7K 2B1

T: 306.244.6151 TF: 1.800.561.6151 (in Saskatchewan only)

cpfsask@sasktel.net sk.cpf.ca

Manitoba

101-475 Provencher Blvd., Winnipeg, MB R2J 4A7

T: 204.222.6537 TF: 1.877.737.7036 (in Manitoba only)

cpfmb@cpfmb.com mb.cpf.ca

Ontario

103-2055 Dundas St. E., Mississauga, ON L4X 1M2

T: 905.366.1012 TF: 1.800.667.0594 (in Ontario only)

info@on.cpf.ca on.cpf.ca

New Brunswick

PO Box 4462, Sussex, NB E4E 5L6

T: 506.434.8052 TF: 1.877.273.2800 (in New Brunswick only)

cpfnb@cpfnb.net nb.cpf.ca

Nova Scotia

8 Flamingo Dr., Halifax, NS B3M 4N8

T: 902.453.2048 TF: 1.877.273.5233 (in Nova Scotia only)

cpf@ns.sympatico.ca ns.cpf.ca

Prince Edward Island

PO Box 2785, Charlottetown, PE CIA 8C4

T: 902.368.3703 ed@cpfpei.pe.ca pei.cpf.ca

Newfoundland & Labrador

PO Box 8601, Stn A, St. John’s, NL A1B 3P2

T: 709.579.1776 ed@cpfnl.ca nl.cpf.ca

TF: 1.877.576.1776 (in Newfoundland & Labrador only)

From a Safe Distance, Celebrate

French... Here, There & Everywhere!

D'une distance sécuritaire, célébrez

le français... Ici, là & partout!

20 CPF MAGAZINE WINTER 2021


Réputée pour sa qualité d’enseignement

Résultats scolaires supérieurs

Le plus haut taux de diplomation en Ontario

Le choix de sept parents sur dix

Recognized for its quality of teaching

Superior academic results

Highest graduation rates

The choice of 7 out of 10 francophone parents


The method that decodes the language.

read.

write.

speak

understand

lire.

écrire.

parler

comprendre

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