24 Seven August 2021

cyacyl

24 Seven is a monthly, free magazine for personal growth, professional development, and self-empowerment. The approach is holistic, incorporating mind, body, soul, and spirit. As philosopher Francis Bacon said, “Knowledge is power.” Use this information to live your best life now.




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EDITOR IN CHIEF

Joan Herrmann

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Lindsay Pearson

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Matt Herrmann

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Chris Giordano

Andrea Valentie

Oliver Pane

CONTRIBUTORS

Naz Beheshti

Lorie Gardner, RN, BSN, NBC-HWC

Gayle Gruenberg, CPO-CD, CVPO

Joan Herrmann

Anant Joshi, DPM

Linda Mitchell, CPC


FROM THE EDITOR

In a world where beauty is often defined

by how we look, it can be challenging to

see ourselves in a positive light. We’re sold

products to make us thinner and prettier,

always telling us that we are not good the

way we are. These messages can destroy

a woman’s self esteem and lead her to

undertake a variety of unhealthy practices.

I recently had the opportunity to speak

with Michelle Phillips, a celebrity makeup

artist, who has worked for many years

helping women look good on the outside. But

it’s what she has witnessed doing that job that

has led her to now help women transform

their inside first. Michelle has seen some of

the most beautiful women in the world beat

themselves up picking out what they believe

are their flaws or inadequacies. According to

Michelle, no matter how externally attractive

they are, they never feel beautiful. She has

come to believe that beauty is not a size, it’s

not a specific look or a certain age … beauty

is an attitude!

In our conversation, Michelle and I talk

about ways we can learn to see who we truly

are at our core, and we present strategies

to cultivate self love and a positive way of

seeing ourselves.

Listen to the conversation with Michelle:

www.cyacyl.com/shows/michelle-phillips.

— Joan Herrmann


MICHELLE PHILLIPS

ISSUE NO.130


INSIDE THIS

ISSUE

ON THIS MONTH’S

COVER

FOUR WAYS TO RAISE YOUR

HAPPINESS SET POINT

BY JOAN HERRMANN

PAGE 12

MICHELLE PHILLIPS INSPIRES WOMEN TO NOT JUST

LOOK AMAZING, BUT TO BE AMAZING.

LISTEN TO MICHELLE ON CYACYL:

www.cyacyl.com/shows/michelle-phillips

BEFORE WE CAN PRESS RESET,

WE HAVE TO PRESS PAUSE

BY NAZ BEHESHTI

PAGE 18

AWAKEN TO THAT POWERFUL MIDLIFE YOU:

SHIFTING TO MIDDLE AGE AND BEYOND

BY LORIE GARDNER

PAGE 24

TURN OBSTACLES INTO OPPORTUNITIES

BY LINDA MITCHELL

PAGE 28

WORDS ARE POWERFUL

BY GAYLE GRUENBERG

PAGE 32

ORTHOTICS FOR CHILDREN

BY ANANT JOSHI, DPM

PAGE 36

AUGUST 2021

24 SEVEN MAGAZINE



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ISSUE

NO.130

AUGUST

2021

WHAT

MAKES

YOU

HAPPY?

Just about everyone wants to be happy. Aristotle said,

“Happiness is the meaning and the purpose of life, the

whole aim and end of human existence.” If happiness is

something we strive so hard to attain, and if it is truly the

end all and be all of life, then why does it elude so many?

Written by Joan Herrmann


T

There is a pervasive myth that we

can be happy when we achieve (fill in the blank). I’ll be

happier when I lose weight. I’ll be happier when I get a

better job. I’ll be happier when I have more money in the

bank. I’ll be happier when I get married. And the list goes

on and on.

But happiness doesn’t depend on achievements, goals,

money, relationships or anything external. None of these

things will make us happy for the long haul. They provide

a short-term spike in happiness followed by a quick

return to normal, where we begin the search externally

for the next big thing. For many, this becomes the cycle

of their life. So, why does this happen?

Recent research has shown that we each have a

happiness set point, which is based 50 percent on

genetics; 10 percent on circumstance; and 40 percent

on intentional activity, such as habits, thoughts and

behavior. This set point is where we are most comfortable,

and where we tend to hover. When we get what we want,

we are elevated and feel happy for awhile, but then we

return to our set point.

To achieve true happiness, we must raise this set point!

The science of epigenetics teaches that we have more

control than originally thought over our genes, that they

can be influenced by changing our habits. So when you

factor in the genetic component, up to 90 percent of our

set point can be influenced by our habits. That gives us

tremendous power over the way we feel.

According to Marci Shimoff, author of Happy for

No Reason, people who are truly happy have an inner

state of peace and well being that doesn’t depend on

their circumstance. They have different habits. She

recommends that to elevate our set point, we have to

practice what she calls happiness habits.

Here are a four ways we can make change that lasts:

Don’t believe everything you think. The brain is

wired to pay more attention to whatever it perceives

as threatening to survival. Specialized circuits register

negative experiences immediately in emotional memory.

This is known as the negativity bias and is what most

of us experience daily. Out of our 60,000 to 70,000

thoughts per day, approximately 80 percent are negative.

Our patterns of thought ultimately determine how happy

we are in life. Become mindful of them and make sure

they serve you well.

Savor positive experiences. According to Dr. Rick

Hanson, author of Hardwiring Happiness, “The brain

is like Velcro for negative experiences and Teflon for

positives ones.” Experts say it takes 20 seconds for a

positive experience to stick long enough to create a new

neuro pathway in the brain, much longer than it take for

a negative experience to stick. Spend time enjoying the

little things; eventually they will make a big difference.

Practice gratitude. Be grateful for what is working. We

get more of what we focus on, so focus on what works.

Look for the tiny things usually taken for granted and

feel appreciation for them. Write at least five blessings

down daily in a gratitude journal.

Forgive others. We cannot be happy when holding on

to anger and resentment. Forgiveness is a process that

includes letting go of negative emotions, thoughts, and

behaviors, and replacing those with positive thoughts,

emotions, and behaviors toward the offender. As Paul

Boese said, “Forgiveness does not change the past, but

it does enlarge the future.” Release the pain and let it go.

About The Author

JOAN HERRMANN

Joan Herrmann is the creator of the Change Your Attitude…

Change Your life brand and host of the radio show and podcast,

Conversations with Joan. She is a motivational speaker and the

publisher of 24 Seven magazine.

To Learn More Visit:

www.JoanHerrmann.com



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August 2021 Issue

Before We Can Press Reset,

We Have to Press Pause

Written by Naz Beheshti

F

Finding a state of clarity and

awareness in a setting designed to encourage mindfulness

— a yoga studio, a meditation session, whatever works for

you — is a good start. Bringing that clarity and awareness

with you into the rest of your life, especially to your most

challenging moments, is the powerful, ultimate goal.

When mindfulness becomes part of our very being, it

becomes portable. We can take it with us anywhere. When

mindfulness informs our life choices, small and large, it

becomes mindfulness in action. Once we get in the habit

of making strong choices, the ripple effects travel far and

wide. One mindful choice begets another. In business,

active choices produce sounder strategy and a stronger

vision and culture.

First, however, we have to break the cycle of disconnection

and distraction. We have to step away from the noise of

the world, from the noise of our minds. When we find

ourselves slipping into stress, into self-sabotage, into

sleepwalking mode — anything that disconnects us from

our authentic Self — we must pause. Organizations often

need to pause as well. Under the pressure of competition

and high turnover, we can find ourselves defaulting into

crisis-management mode, putting out individual fires and

losing sight of the big picture.

Sometimes that pause is literally just a pause: taking a

moment to gather ourselves before a crucial meeting or

presentation. Sometimes that pause is a walk in the park,

a weekend retreat, a sabbatical. My six-week trip to India

was an extended pause. I needed to step back, reassess,

and renew. The small steps I had taken to be happier and

healthier were a start, but not enough. My life needed a

deliberate jolt for me to achieve the liberation I craved.

I was struggling with heartache and feeling complacent

and trapped in my corporate career. I longed to deepen

my mindfulness practice, connect with my higher Self,

and start a new life. My trip was both a pause and a

catalyst — a conscious effort to shake up my life. It was a

much-needed reset.

However long or short, the pause sets the stage for the

next step. It carves out space and time for us to breathe.

A conscious breath is the best way to become present and

aware. Try it now. Take a deep, steady breath and then

slowly exhale it all out. How does that feel?

Taking a mindful breath is like hitting the reset button.

It calms us both physically and mentally and gives us

a moment to reason and gain perspective. It is about a

physical breath, yes — but so much more. We also allow

our thoughts and feelings to breathe, our heart and mind

to reconnect. We become aware of our bodies and of how

our thoughts and emotions manifest physically.

We are now ready to make a mindful choice. The path

to a conscious choice is straightforward but rarely easy.

That hard truth was brought home to me on my very first

night in India.

My destination was Rishikesh, a small town in the

Himalayan foothills known as the “Yoga Capital of the

World.” First, I had to fly into New Delhi, the capital

of India, a teeming city often cloaked in heavy smog. I

arrived at three in the morning, exhausted from the long

flight. After waiting in vain for the hired car service, I

headed to a van at the front of a line of taxis. The driver

was hunched over the wheel. I tapped on the window and

startled him out of his slumber. He frantically rolled down

the window, looking disheveled and disoriented. My gut

told me not to get into the car, but I was desperate to get

to my hotel.

I quickly regretted my decision. The driver seemed to

literally be asleep behind the wheel. He weaved in and

out of traffic and brushed up against the median of the

poorly lit street. My heart racing, I dug my nails into

the upholstery, sure this night was going to be my last. I



have experienced harrowing taxi rides in New

York City and in the Middle East, where it is

typical to drive on the sidewalks. They paled

in comparison.

When the driver finally pulled into what

appeared to be an abandoned alley, my

stomach lurched. I imagined the worst and

braced to make a run for it or to defend

myself. Thankfully, two people were walking

in our direction, so I hurriedly rolled down

the window and asked if they knew where my

hotel was, the map shaking in my hands. We

were just around the corner from the hotel.

The driver had turned one street too soon.

Trembling, I gathered my luggage, made it to

the hotel, and collapsed on the bed of my dingy

room.

As I struggled to regroup, my mind ran in

circles, which happens to all of us in stressful

or fearful moments. I was tempted to chastise

myself for climbing into the taxi against my

better judgment; to chastise my-self for being

paranoid and distrustful; to tell myself that

this was a bad sign; to convince myself that

I should be grateful for my job and not yearn

for something more. In the end, I resisted the

urge to fall into the rabbit hole. I was here for

a reason. I realized my only task was to return

to the moment at hand.

I paused. I observed what was happening

in the room, in my mind, and in my heart,

without judgment: I’m sitting on a bedcover

with stains on it. The room smells like mildew.

I’m halfway around the world from home. I’m

exhausted, alone, and afraid. I wasn’t harmed.

I’m closer to Rishikesh and will be there soon.

I will be okay.

That pause is a small, essential first step. It

seems so simple but can be so difficult. The

gravity of the rabbit hole can be hard to resist.

As our thoughts spin and accelerate, we feel

ourselves pulled in. The pause creates space

for us to breathe, to return to the moment, to

return to ourselves and our intention.

Mindfulness is sometimes conflated with

bliss. We see someone effortlessly striking

a cross-legged lotus pose, eyes closed, face

beaming with contentment. Sometimes, that is

the image of mindfulness. Yet we really need

mindfulness when the journey gets messy

and the path ahead is unclear. Sometimes

the picture of mindfulness is a dingy hotel

room in New Delhi after a terrifying taxi ride.

Or a pristine boardroom during a heated

debate. Mindfulness is too valuable a tool to

From The Story

“The gravity

of the rabbit

hole can

be hard to

resist. As our

thoughts

spin and

accelerate,

we feel

ourselves

pulled in.”

be left in the meditation room or on the yoga

mat. As leaders, we must incorporate mindful

principles into both our individual practice and

our organizational practice.

How often do you find yourself unable to

pause? Unable to break the cycle?

Say you notice that your performance at

work has hit a wall. You are no longer on your

game in the way you would like to be. This is

not a time to scold yourself, but rather to pause,

to reassess, to reset. You might find yourself

irritable and prone to losing your patience. This

is a sign you have depleted your reserves, that

you have not devoted sufficient time to keep

the well of your resilience full. This is a time to

pause, to reset, to restore.

Or perhaps, as I did, you might notice yourself

sliding into autopilot. You sleepwalk through

your day, relying on quick fixes to boost your

energy. This is a time to pause, to step back,

to remember your purpose and return to your

intention.

Resetting starts with a pause, even if that first

step can sometimes feel like a stumble.

About The Author

NAZ BEHESHTI

Naz Beheshti is the author of Pause, Breathe,

Choose: Become the CEO of Your Well-Being. She

is an executive wellness coach, speaker, Forbes

contributor, and CEO and founder of Prananaz, a

corporate wellness company improving leadership

effectiveness, employee engagement and wellbeing,

company culture, and business outcomes

Excerpted from the book from Pause Breathe

Choose: Become the CEO of Your Well-Being.

Copyright ©2021 by Naz Beheshti. Printed with

permission from New World Library —

www.newworldlibrary.com.

To Learn More Visit:

www.NazBeheshti.com


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Awaken To

That Powerful

Midlife You:

Shifting To

Middle Age

And Beyond

Written by Lorie Gardner, RN

I

It is easy to fall into the trap

of adopting a mindset of decline when you hit

middle age. Your body may start to remind

you of some less than desirable aging changes,

such as weight gain, loss of muscle mass, the

appearance of “fine” lines and wrinkles, and

brainpower that becomes a tad questionable!

When you were younger you may have taken

your body, mind, and spirit for granted. You

may have received compliments about your

body’s capabilities, your looks, and brainpower.

These may have provided great satisfaction for

you and a feeling that you got very used to or

took for granted.

Then middle age changes occur, your body

and mind start to change, your role(s) may


change, and before you know

it you don’t feel as relevant

and powerful. Where do

you receive your sense of

satisfaction when those

compliments and power

have nearly disappeared?

Pondering a New Story

of Middle Age

Mary Oliver is a wonderful

poet who has a quote for you

to ponder: “Tell me, what is

it you plan to do with your one

wild and precious life?” It may

be time to:

Take a look at how you

want to age.

Take control of your destiny

and thoughts about your “one

wild and precious life”!

Assess all of the external

sources (that can be fleeting)

you have relied on for a sense

of satisfaction and happiness

and start to dig into some internal sources of

contentment.

Loosen the hold that your youthful self has

on you and create a new story of joy, meaning,

and optimal health despite the aging process.

You may want to review your thoughts and

feelings about aging and determine whether

you have more negative or positive thoughts. Do

you have an outlook of slowing and declining

about aging or do you have a growth mindset?

Do you need to receive praise and approval for

the way you look or what you accomplish to

feel good? This can zap you of energy and the

ability to thrive and grow as you age.

A Change in Focus

What if you could change your focus to

the possibility of a better way to age? A shift

from what the world has you thinking about

to tapping into your powerful inner self. That

amazing inner self may just give you all the

answers and inspiration you need to age with

joy, meaning, and good health. The first step is

to identify your sense of self-responsibility and

ask yourself some important questions:

Do you provide yourself the same amount

of attention that you provide others?

Do you let your responsibilities be

your excuse to not care for your own needs and

get that much-needed quiet time?

From The Story

“That amazing

inner self may

just give you

all the answers

and inspiration

you need to

age with joy,

meaning, and

good health.”

Do you fear being alone or having quiet

time?

Do you look “out there” for all of your

answers or can you sit with yourself and identify

your needs and how to fulfill them?

It may be time to shift your thinking to

finding your answers within.

You Are Creative, Resourceful and Whole

Take a look at what things you can do that

make you feel powerful. Were there any qualities

you had as a young person that you have lost or

forgotten about? Tap into those and see if you

can resurrect them and use them in a way that

works in your life now.

What brings you balance and energy and

do more of that? Is your mind on overdrive

or is it relaxed and clear thinking? Your mind

and thoughts can create havoc or peace! It is

worth being aware of your thoughts and how

they affect you. If your mind is weak or out of

balance, situations are more difficult. If your

mind is strong the same situation becomes an

opportunity.

Midlife Struggles

There is no doubt midlife can come with

struggles, disease, and more. But if you decide

to work on your mindset and your sense of selfresponsibility

to develop more resiliency, you

may not struggle quite as long. In addition,

when you combine a positive mindset with

a powerful sense of self, you are on your way

to tapping into your spirit, a dimension that

can provide such joy and meaning and even

improved health despite a disease or disability!

About The Author

LORIE GARDNER

Lorie Gardner RN, BSN, NBC-HWC, founded

Healthlink Advocates, Inc., to assist people with

all aspects of their healthcare. As private nurse

patient advocates and board-certified health

and wellness coaches, they partner with clients

seeking assistance navigating the complex

healthcare system and those seeking selfdirected,

lasting health improvements aligned

with their values.

To Learn More Visit:

www.HealthLinkAdvocates.com


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ISSUE NO.130 AUGUST 2021

TURN

OBSTACLES

INTO

OPPORTUNITIES

Written by Linda Mitchell


O

Obstacles present themselves daily.

We always have the choice to maintain a calm emotional state

or become rattled. Whether it’s relationship conflict, a health

setback, traffic jam or a lost job, those same two possibilities

exist. Which do you routinely choose? The key is to maintain

your composure as much as possible. But how?

Life transitions, challenges and chaos are all different types

of hurdles, but each present a chance to turn obstacles into

opportunities. Carefully choose your thoughts, mindset and

emotional response in every situation. Try these tips in the

midst of difficult challenges.

Be defiant. On some level, composure is the result of defiance.

It’s the refusal to allow a situation to knock you off center or

intimidate you.

Take responsibility. Something powerful happens when you

choose to take responsibility for a situation: you have the power

to change course or work through things. The result is feeling

less stress and anxiety.

Stay present. In times of turmoil, keep your attention

on your current task. Stay in the present moment. Focus

on what you want to have happen rather than on possible

negative outcomes. To stay present when your mind wanders,

concentrate on your breathing and all the good still available

to you. Practice gratitude for the positive moments, events and

people who make you smile. You can only think about one thing

at a time. Use that fact to your advantage and stay centered on

the positive.

Center on solutions. While some people are masters at

concentrating on their challenges, successful people keep their

emphasis on solutions. The more you practice this, the more

adept you’ll become. What you focus on expands! Amplifying

challenges clouds your vision. Fear, anxiety and anger limit

your ability to see every option and often the most elegant or

simple solution may elude you. You’re at your best when you

stay poised and positive. Self-care and support from others are

of great value here.

While putting these tips into practice, it’s important to

stay objective. Objectivity is the ability to see the situation

accurately, without the influence of emotion, prejudice, or bias.

When you’re observing, you see what’s truly there. When you’re

perceiving, your vision is skewed because you’re witnessing

through the lens of emotion.

Practice objectivity and find more opportunities with these

tips:

Avoid quick reactions. When frightened, a deer either freezes

or runs. Running is a strong instinct, not a thoughtful process.

In fact, it’s so strong that deer often flee from one threat only to

run straight into something more ominous like a busy roadway.

Reacting quickly is the result of instinct. We do it too. Your boss

infuriates you, so you quit. Your spouse makes a mistake and

you verbally unload on them. Reacting quickly is rarely the best

option. When faced with obstacles, take time to thoughtfully

respond rather than react. Honestly assess the situation before

choosing an action.

De-personalize the situation. What advice would you give

a friend? Objectivity is easier to find when you take your ego

out of the equation. Obstacles seem smaller when they feel less

personal. Although we should always try, few people can be

objective at all times. We’re all products of our past, erroneous

thinking and limiting beliefs unless we’ve done the work

to create better choices. The ability to see the truth lays the

groundwork for overcoming obstacles and seeing opportunities.

Above all, your mindset matters. When we believe we have

options and opportunities we absolutely do. When we believe

we don’t, it’s a self-fulfilling-prophecy. As Christopher Reeve

said, “A hero is an ordinary individual who finds the strength to

persevere and endure in spite of overwhelming obstacles.” Turn

your obstacles into opportunities and be your own hero!

About The Author

LINDA MITCHELL

Linda Mitchell is a certified transformational coach, reinvention

expert, speaker, LMT and energy healer. For 20 years she has

operated from a deep desire to help people who feel stuck,

overwhelmed or ready for change to move through life transitions

and challenges with more ease, grace and purpose.

To Learn More Visit:

www.LivingInspiredCoaching.com




August 2021 Issue

Words Are Powerful

Written by Gayle M. Gruenberg, CPO-CD ® , CVPO

D

Do you make mistakes? Are there

things you try to do, feel you don’t do them well, and think

you are a complete and abject failure because of it? When this

happens, do you give up, fall into a depression, retreat into

yourself, possibly for days at a time, hesitant to come out and

try again? What do you say to yourself at these times? Do you

say things like, “I’m so stupid!” or “I’m not good enough” or

“How could anyone love me?”

We are so good at beating ourselves up. If we listen to how

we talk to ourselves, the words we say and the tone we use, we

would cringe if we ever overheard someone speaking that way

to someone else. How many times a day do you recriminate

yourself mercilessly for some small, perceived mistake? You

may not even realize that you’re doing it. And you may not

realize the effect that it has on you – your mind, body, and

spirit.

Consider these Automatic Negative Thoughts (ANTs) about

yourself as poison. Imagine that you’re injecting yourself with

a highly toxic substance every single time you think a negative

thought about yourself. Even one tiny drop of a poisonous

negative thought takes hold and spreads like lightning,

infecting and infusing all other thoughts, emotions, impulses,

and every part of your body with its toxicity. It enters your

blood, nerves, and breath and invades your tissues. You create

narrow neural pathways that shut out any other thoughts or

feelings. You stop caring for yourself physically. You retreat

from contact with other people. Maybe you stop working. You

become negativity incarnate.

Now what would happen if you mindfully caught yourself

having those negative thoughts the moment you have them and

consciously turned them into Automatic Positive Thoughts?

What if you remembered to forgive yourself, and that you

are human, a fallible being, who can learn from making

mistakes? What if you asked yourself, “Is that negative thought

I had about myself actually true? Am I really a useless waste

of space?” What if you said to yourself, “No it isn’t and no

I’m not?” Then added, “I am a worthwhile person, with value,

strengths, and talents. I make mistakes and I learn from them.

I am exceptionally good at the skills I have; I don’t have to be

excellent at everything. I can get help with things I don’t do

well.”

Your body would relax. Your mind would clear. Your cells

would flood with endorphins. You would bring oxygen to your

brain, muscles, and tissues. You would create neural pathways

that allow for creative thinking and possibility. These pathways

would get strengthened, and your brain would literally

change. When you change your brain, you change your life.

Gone are the days of automatic self-recrimination, shaming,

and hiding from the world. Now you can move through the

world with confidence, grace, and a feeling of great capability.

About The Author

GAYLE M. GRUENBERG

Gayle M. Gruenberg, CPO-CD ® , CVPO is the chief executive

organizer of Let’s Get Organized, LLC, an organizer coach, and

the creator of the Make Space for Blessings system.

To Learn More Visit:

www.LGOrganized.com





August 2021 Issue

Orthotics for Children

Written by Anant Joshi, DPM

T

There is nothing like watching

your children play. Whether they’re tearing it

up around the park or imagining their own little

world in your backyard, it is great for their growing

needs. During the past year, due to COVID 19, children

have been less active than ever before.

Taking time to play as a family is a spectacular

opportunity for bonding—one that seems to be

slowly vanishing more and more in our age. A good

bout of activity is a benefit for everyone involved,

kids and adults! This quality time can also be an

opportunity to get a gauge of your child’s gait and

whether there might be any concerns that are worth

checking out.

Let’s face it, children are not always the

most forthcoming with information. During

playtime, though, they let that guard down and

it’s easier to see if they are walking with toes

inward or outward, or may have flat arches. And

if they complain of foot pain or start shying away

from activities they love for things that are less

impactful on their heels, that could be a sign

something is amiss.

Many times, gait abnormalities will be outgrown

as your child develops. These are still conditions

that should be monitored and checked by a

professional, however. When abnormalities do

not start to fade, and especially if pain becomes

an issue, treatment may be necessary. Sometimes,

this treatment involves custom orthotics.


Why would my child need (or not need)

orthotics?

We know that orthotics tend to have a

certain stigma to them. They are for older

people, right? Surely not for kids!

The truth, however, is that children can face

similar needs as adults when it comes to their

foot and ankle health. And when it comes to

correction for an abnormal gait or support for

the arch, forefoot, or heel, custom orthotics

may be the best option.

Each child’s case is different, and it will

take a full examination to determine whether

orthotics should be considered.

As we noted above, symptoms of gait

abnormalities, lack of arches, or pain will at

least initially set orthotics on the table as a

possibility. Additional signs might include

walking only on the toes or heels, consistently

stumbling or tripping over one’s own feet,

or wanting to be carried frequently due to

becoming tired easily.

Another factor that may influence a

diagnosis is family history. Do you or anyone

else in your family experience foot and ankle

problems, especially of a structural variety?

Your child might be predisposed to similar

conditions merely by matter of genetics.

Now, even with many of the above elements

present, orthotics are not immediately

recommended in a great number of cases.

Many children will show abnormal walking

patterns or have flat feet during their

childhood and will outgrow them. All that

is typically needed in these cases is regular

check-ups to make sure the condition is

improving over time. If it is staying static by

a certain age milestone, or becoming worse,

then intervention might be necessary.

In cases where some adjustment or added

support may be necessary, a shoe that is

designed more specifically for feet with those

kinds of needs may suffice in place of an

orthotic.

Long story short? Whether your child needs

orthotics will depend on several factors,

but we will not recommend them unless we

determine they are a viable and necessary

option.

My child needs orthotics. What now?

Let’s get this out of the way first: custom

orthotics are no longer the big, beige, clunky

foot prisons you might have seen in the past.

Most orthotics now come in the form of

From The Story

“Children can

face similar

needs as

adults when

it comes to

their foot and

ankle health.”

inserts that can be placed in your shoes. You

might have seen something similar in the

store—and we might even recommend those

sometimes for basic needs—but they will not

provide the type of individualized control and

support that custom orthotics can.

We have made custom orthotics for many

children, so we are well versed on techniques

that make it a pleasant experience. We use

plaster apparatus to create our molds. They

are effective and, honestly, kind of fun for kids

to stick their feet in!

With a bit of initial commitment, an orthotic

should become a natural fit in your child’s life.

You might find that they might have additional

energy, feel a bit happier, and be more active.

For young patients who already are active,

orthotics in their athletic footwear may

provide less pain and more confidence during

practice and play!

About The Author

ANANT JOSHI, DPM

Anant Joshi, DPM, DABPM, AACFAS, practices

at Advanced Foot Care of New Jersey in Woodland

Park. Dr. Joshi provides extensive podiatry

services including orthotics, foot injuries, and

sports injuries. Additionally, he offers diagnosis

and treatment for ingrown toenails, toenail

fungus, bunions, ankle pain, calluses and more.

To Learn More Visit:

www.footpainnj.com


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