24 Seven November 2021

cyacyl

24 Seven is a monthly, free magazine for personal growth, professional development, and self-empowerment. The approach is holistic, incorporating mind, body, soul, and spirit. As philosopher Francis Bacon said, “Knowledge is power.” Use this information to live your best life now.




Personalized

Actions

T owards

Health

www.prospectfitness.com/path

1004 Beverley Road Brooklyn, NY 11218

347-413-6390 info@prospectfitness.com

www.prospectfitness.com


Allison

Carmen

MAYBE

I can help you?

I am an Author, Business Consultant, Business/Life Coach and

podcaster ready to provide you with the tools to grow or start

your business, find a new career, let go of your stress and

worry, manage life changes or find more fulfillment.

The Best Gift Of Maybe

Published by Penguin Random

House.

Many things are beyond our

control, but the mindset of Maybe

presents a simple, powerful way to

stay connected to what’s possible,

and work to make it happen.

10 Minutes To Less Suuering

Allison Carmen, Self-help author

and Life Coach, presents different

techniques to reduce your stress

and worry in less than 10 minutes!

Event Speaker

Self-help and inspirational speaker available for

conferences, workshops and corporate events.

Life/Business Coaching

Career changes, Reduction of daily stress and worry, Goal

Setting/Implementation, Increased fulfillment in daily

business/personal life.

Business Consulting

Business and financial advice including financial analysis

and marketing for increased profit and expansion.

I have a background in accounting, and I am a licensed

attorney with LLM in taxation. You can find me blogging for

Psychology Today, Huffington Post, Thrive Global

and Mind Body Green.

CHECK OUT WWW.ALLISONCARMEN.COM TODAY!

Contact: ALLISONNALLISONCARMEN.COM

Rates and References upon request


EDITOR IN CHIEF

Joan Herrmann

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Lindsay Pearson

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Matt Herrmann

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Chris Giordano

Andrea Valentie

Oliver Pane

CONTRIBUTORS

Guy Finley

Sean Grover, LCSW

Gayle M. Gruenberg

Joan Herrmann

Linda Mitchell, CPC


FROM THE EDITOR

Many of us look to external objects – things we collect

and acquire – and outside circumstances to make us

feel fulfilled. We assume that those with more material

possessions, bigger houses, nicer cars, larger families,

etc., have more for which to be thankful. However,

research suggests the opposite: it’s not how much you

have, but how you feel about what you have that makes

the difference. That’s why someone who seems to “have

it all” is miserable, while others with very little are full

of joy.

With Thanksgiving around the corner, I am sharing

some strategies that can foster a more grateful heart.

Focus on your gifts and blessings. Think about all of

the things that you do have, not the things you don’t.

There is a wonderful quote that states: “If you have food

in your fridge, clothes on your back, a roof over your

head, and a place to sleep, you are richer than 75 percent

of the world.” Place emphasis on those treasures.

Let go of the past. You can’t change the past, so

worrying about it does nothing for you except rob your

peace today. Learn from your mistakes, vow not to

repeat them, and move on.

Stop comparing yourself to others. Envy is poison for

happiness.

Release yourself from desires for material things.

Possessions are just things. A big house or fancy car

may be nice for the moment, but eventually the newness

wears off and you’re back to being you. What good is the

beach house if you’re miserable in it?

Spend time with the people who lift you up. Surround

yourself with grateful people. Joy is contagious!

— Joan Herrmann


GREGG BRADEN

ISSUE NO.133


INSIDE THIS

ISSUE

ON THIS MONTH’S

COVER

WATCH AND RELEASE YOURSELF FROM

DISTURBING THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS

BY GUY FINLEY

PAGE 12

HOW YOUR UNWANTED FEELINGS ARE HURTING YOU

BY SEAN GROVER

PAGE 18

THE HEART OF FRIENDSHIP

BY JOAN HERRMANN

PAGE 24

GREGG BRADEN IS A FIVE-TIME NEW YORK TIMES

BEST-SELLING AUTHOR, SCIENTIST, INTERNATIONAL

EDUCATOR AND RENOWNED AS A PIONEER IN THE

EMERGING PARADIGM BASED IN SCIENCE, SOCIAL

POLICY AND HUMAN POTENTIAL. HIS WORK REVEALS

DEEP INSIGHTS INTO THE NEW HUMAN STORY, AND

HOW THE DISCOVERIES INFORM THE POLICIES OF

EVERYDAY LIFE AND THE EMERGING WORLD. HIS

RESEARCH HAS LED TO 15 FILM CREDITS AND 12

AWARD-WINNING BOOKS NOW PUBLISHED IN OVER 40

LANGUAGES. GREGG IS THE RECIPIENT OF NUMEROUS

AWARDS INCLUDING THE WALDEN AWARD FOR NEW

THOUGHT, THE ILLUMINATE AWARD FOR CONSCIOUS

VISIONARIES AND HE IS LISTED IN THE UNITED

KINGDOM’S WATKINS JOURNAL AMONG THE TOP 100 OF

“THE WORLD’S MOST SPIRITUALLY INFLUENTIAL LIVING

PEOPLE” FOR THE SEVENTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR.

LISTEN TO THE CONVERSATION WITH GREGG:

www.cyacyl.com/shows/gregg-braden

CULTIVATE AN ABUNDANCE MINDSET

BY LINDA MITCHELL

PAGE 28

IS BEING DISORGANIZED MAKING YOU SICK?

BY GAYLE M. GRUENBERG

PAGE 32

24 SEVEN MAGAZINE



We can help

CONFUSED & UNCERTAIN

ABOUT HEALTHCARE?

INSURANCE & BILLING ISSUES

HEALTH AND WELLNESS COACHING TO

MANAGE CHRONIC ILLNESS

ELDER CARE ISSUES

CARE COORDINATION

TRANSITIONS FROM THE HOSPITAL

TO REHAB OR HOME

MEDICAL GUIDANCE ON DOCTOR’S VISITS,

HOSPITALIZATIONS, SECOND OPINIONS

HEALTHLINKADVOCATES.COM



ISSUE

NO.133

NOVEMBER

2021

WATCH

AND

RELEASE

YOURSELF

FROM

DISTURBING

THOUGHTS

AND

FEELINGS

Written by Guy Finley


A

All of our life experiences have

been trying to teach us a certain grand lesson: Liberation

from our captive condition (whatever that may be in the

moment) cannot come by further deliberating it. We can

see the wisdom in doing nothing toward our own troubled

thoughts and feelings when we realize that the only way

not to be dragged under by these negative states is to stay

out of their life.

In many ways, this kind of watchfulness is a meditation.

It involves our willingness – wherever we are and in

whatever we’re doing, and regardless of what that moment

may be that brings up in us what it does – that to do

nothing in the face of those reactions is the beginning of

a new relationship with them, the beginning of the next

level of meditation.

Because you see, meditation isn’t just sitting someplace

with our eyes closed, quietly contemplating something of

a spiritual nature, or doing whatever discipline we do in

order to make the mind be still. No. That’s not meditation,

at least not the next level that we’re looking at together.

Meditation is a direct relationship with the sum of

ourselves in the moment, where we stand as a witness to

what moves through us instead of becoming its captive

through our reaction to it. In other words, meditation has

nothing whatsoever to do with trying to reconcile some

disturbance in our life. Meditation is our agreement to

allow that disturbance, whatever it may be, to reveal to us

something about ourselves that we don’t know yet. That

revelation is the same as release.

And that is the heart of meditation – being released

moment to moment from a sense of self that doesn’t know

what it’s clinging to.

When it’s time to step back from some reaction that’s

tempting you to jump in and to get out of some jam,

remember to do nothing but watch.

This means whether you’re in your car, at work, at

home, talking to your husband, your wife, be as inwardly

still as you can be toward what you see in front of you.

Why? Because what you see in front of you is always your

reaction to what something in you perceives as being the

source of the disturbance outside of you.

The next level of meditation is to understand the

disturbance is never outside of you, but within a level

of consciousness that is constantly disturbed and then

ceaselessly seeking a solution to its own disturbance.

You don’t need to do anything else. Don’t fall into that

fitfulness that’s pulling you left and right. Don’t accept

the sound and fury of those ten thousand thoughts and

feelings coursing through you as being the proof that

somehow or other you somehow must protect yourself

from them. Just watch it all, and you’ll soon understand

the goodness of that kind of stillness, of that the next level

of meditation.

About The Author

GUY FINLEY

Guy Finley is an internationally renowned spiritual teacher and

bestselling self-help author. He is the founder and director of Life

of Learning Foundation, a nonprofit center for spiritual self-study

located in Merlin, Oregon. He is the best-selling author of The

Secret of Letting Go and 45 other books and audio programs.

To Learn More Visit:

www.GuyFinley.org


DISCOVER

YOUR INNATE WISDOM

AND

CHANGE YOUR RELATIONSHIP

WITH YOUR BODY

IT'S YOUR BIRTHRIGHT TO LOVE THE BODY YOU'RE IN.

CHANGING YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR BODY STARTS WITH SELF-LOVE.

AND THAT - CHANGES YOUR LIFE!

CONTACT US TODAY TO RESERVE YOUR SEAT FOR GROUP OR INDIVIDUAL

SESSIONS ON YOUR SCHEDULE. THE CHOICE IS YOURS.

Follow Us On Social Media

@FindBodyFreedom

ILENE LESHINSKY

FOUNDER

ILENELESHINSKY@GMAIL.COM

Join the Movement Today!

WWW.FINDBODYFREEDOM.COM



WE MAKE YOUR

SOCIAL MEDIA

SIMPLE

S O C I A L M E D I A M A R K E T I N G

F O R B U S I N E S S

smcventures.biz

201-365-7946


ISSUE NO.133 NOVEMBER 2021

HOW YOUR

UNWANTED

FEELINGS ARE

HURTING YOU

Written by Sean Grover, LCSW


Have you ever heard someone yell, “I’m not angry?” If you

have, then you’ve witnessed an unwanted feeling in action.

Disowned feelings are those prickly emotions that you

attempt to block out of awareness. You tell yourself you’re not

feeling them and give them the cold shoulder. Unfortunately,

ignoring unwanted feelings comes at a high cost.

The energy it takes to push away unwanted feelings

frequently leads to:

• Psychic tension that fuels mood disorders, such as anxiety

or depression.

• Psychosomatic symptoms, such as headaches, backaches,

digestive, or stomach issues.

• A loss of vitality, resulting in chronic exhaustion,

inattentiveness, or forgetfulness.

The Top 3 Unwanted Feelings

Though all feelings are valuable, some are more popular

than others. Unwanted feelings are generally unpopular

because they create discomfort or distress. The top three

disowned feelings that I’ve noticed in my psychotherapy

practice are:

1. Anger. The adage, “depression is anger turned inward,”

holds. To deny anger is to deny yourself a propitious source

of energy. Learning to access and focus your anger can relieve

depression and anxiety while also producing revitalizing

bursts of energy and clarity. Learning to process and express

your anger productively is definitely a life-changer.

2. Hurt. As a child, when your feelings were hurt, you

had a good cry and moved on. As an adult, hurt is much

more complex. Admitting that you’re hurt can feel shameful

and humiliating, particularly if you have a history of being

bullied. So you learned to deny hurt to protect yourself from

feeling vulnerable. Ironically, anytime someone proclaims,

“I’m not hurt” it’s very likely that they are. Learning to identify

when you’re hurt and verbalizing it frees you from a cycle of

shame, strengthens emotional boundaries, and elevates selfrespect.

3. Fear. While it’s fun to be afraid while watching scary

movies or visiting amusement parks, unbridled fear causes

escalating anxiety and panic in real life. Few people enjoy the

feeling of being out of control, so when fear strikes, you may

want to deny it or bulldoze over it. Unfortunately, fear denied

invites poor decision-making, destructive risk-taking, and

lapses in judgment.

The Damage Caused by Unwanted Feelings

Denying an unwanted feeling doesn’t resolve it; it simply

drives it out of your consciousness. It still there, but in

hiding. Sooner or later, like an annoying relative who

drops by unannounced, the feeling pops up again. You

find yourself caught in repetitive relationship patterns or

miscommunications.

Every time you disown a feeling, you weaken your sense

of self. You water down your emotions until you don’t

even know what you’re feeling. The fallout is even more

discouraging: identity confusion, unhealthy relationships,

poor boundaries, and chronic disappointment, to name just

a few.

Unearthing and Honoring Your True Feelings

When feelings are honored and expressed, your core sense

of self strengthens; you are more focused and immediate.

Since you’re better attuned to yourself, you’re better attuned

to others. Authenticity becomes your guiding light, making it

much navigate through emotionally charged situations.

Of course, warming up to all your feelings takes time. It’s

a process of evolution—not revolution. Here are a few tips to

get you going.

• Take a deep dive into your feelings. Too often, we move

through life on automatic pilot, zoning out for hours in

front of a computer or numbing ourselves with substances,

mindless television, or social media. To redirect your attention

inward, you’ll need to set aside time for reflection. Journal

writing is a great way to get started. Every time you jot down

your thoughts and feelings, you bring more mindfulness

to your daily life. Feelings become less mysterious or

frightening; understanding your pure feelings fosters personal

enlightenment. Set a timer, write for a few minutes a day, and

slowly increase your journaling time.

• Work with a professional. There are more therapists

in the world than ever before in history. Art therapy, dance

therapy, mental health counseling, support groups, child and

family therapy, couples counseling, sex therapy … the list goes

on and on. And now, with teletherapy and virtual therapy, you

don’t even have to leave your home. If the idea of talking to a

professional is too frightening, start by opening up to a good

friend and sharing feelings that you often keep hidden.

• Reward yourself. Acknowledge your efforts, celebrate your

victories. Changing ingrained behaviors is one of the hardest

things in the world. It’s a lonely battle. That’s why you must

make time to reward yourself. I worked with a young woman

who suffered crippling social anxiety. As she started to assert

herself, she developed many catchphrases to encourage her,

such as “You got this,” “You’ll be glad later,” or “What have I

got to lose?” As she became a cheerleader for her own growth,

she made healthier choices and enjoyed more rewarding

relationships.

About The Author

SEAN GROVER

Sean Grover, LCSW, is a psychotherapist and the author of When

Kids Call the Shots: How to Seize Control from Your Darling Bully

and Enjoy Being a Parent Again.

To Learn More Visit:

www.SeanGrover.com


Need a personal

or professional

plan to ensure

success in your

new normal?

5 Days to

Clarity: Your

Easy Roadmap

Change is

Constant!

Be Prepared

Be Successful

to C.H.A.N.G.E.

Click below for your free Roadmap to

Change

https://bit.ly/LivingInspiredOffer



SMOKING

DOUBLE

CAN

COVID-19

PROGRESSION

IT TIME

ISN'T

QUIT TO

Mary Beth Battaglia

Certified Clinical

Hypnosis Practitioner

Video Hypnosis

Sessions For

Individuals And

Groups

SMOKING

WITH

www.metrohypnosiscenter.com

HYPNOSIS?

Call For A Free

Video

Consultation

201-477-0265


Odette Coronel

Relationship Coach

Do You....

Love your Partner, but know your

marriage could be better?

Always do what you have to do,

NEVER what you want to do?

Are you ready to....

Create the best Marriage possible?

Feel loved, wanted, appreciated?

Feel sexier and more confident?

Put Yourself Last on your

Priority List?

Feel a lack of connection in your

Relationship?

Do all the things you WANT to do?

Live Your Best Life and Become

the BEST Version of You?

Book a FREE Discovery Session

odettecoronel.com/olw


November 2021 Issue

The Heart Of Friendship

Written by Joan Herrmann

W

We hear so much about

marriages, committed relationships, and romantic breakups,

but I believe we neglect to truly understand the dynamics of

what may be the most important relationships in our life –

friendships.

Boyfriends come and go, spouses are replaced, children

grow up and leave the nest, but our friends will be by our side

through it all. If we are blessed, some of them will be with us

from childhood until death; and these people know us better

than anyone else.

We all have friends. Fate brings friend to friend, then leaves

the rest to human nature. We have best friends that stick with

us forever, and we have friends that come into our life for a

brief period and then go on their way. Whichever role they

play, you can be sure they serve a purpose.

According to experts, friendships have a major impact on

our health and well-being. Friends help us celebrate good times

and provide support during the bad times. As philosopher

Aristotle said, “In poverty and other misfortunes of life, true

friends are a sure refuge.”

Friends prevent loneliness and increase our sense of

belonging and purpose. They boost our happiness and improve

our self-confidence. They help us deal with our mistakes.

So … if friendships are so great, why do they cause so much

pain?

The word friend is defined as “a relationship of mutual

affection between two or more people; a person whom one

knows, likes, and trusts.”

We all have a preconceived notion of what a friend should

be; we place expectations on relationships based on our needs.

But sometimes we use the word “friend” to describe anyone

with whom we have contact. We project the intimate bond we

desire onto a person where no deep bond exists.

To avoid the pain of an unrequited friendship, it is important

to recognize that there are different kinds of relationships

and varying degrees of affection attached. When it comes to

friendships it’s not one size fits all.

Some people are great for Friday night outings. Others are

partners for work events. Some people are not willing and/or

able to commit to a relationship on a deeper level. And then

there are the people who offer unconditional love and trust –

they are always there, no matter what. They are the ones by

which we set the standards for everyone else. But, they are a

rare gift, not the norm.

Each of these relationships has a unique purpose for

our life and as such should be valued. Just as a financial

expert advises to diversify investments, the same is true in

friendships. Invite people into your life that bring different

personalities and skills to the table – they will broaden your

horizon and enrich your existence.

But, to avoid heart break, see each relationship for what

it is. Just as you wouldn’t rush into a romantic encounter

without some courting, don’t place too many expectations

on a friendship without getting to know the person. When

you take it slow, you will be able to objectively evaluate the

relationship and the role a person will play in your life so you

won’t be disappointed.

Even if a friendship doesn’t develop the way you want,

acknowledge that you simply have different needs. Treasure

the relationship for what it is and release your expectations;

value the gifts it offers.

Through the pain and through the triumphs, friendships

are the treasure of a life well lived. As Emily Dickinson said,

“My friends are my estate,” and I couldn’t agree more.

About The Author

JOAN HERRMANN

Joan Herrmann is the creator of the Change Your Attitude…

Change Your life brand and host of the radio show and podcast,

Conversations with Joan. She is a motivational speaker and the

publisher of 24 Seven magazine.

To Learn More Visit:

www.JoanHerrmann.com



Life.

Simplified.

201-364-6833 www.LGOrganized.com



Novembe`r 2021 Issue

Cultivate an Abundance Mindset

Written by Linda Mitchell, CPC, LMT

H

Have you caught yourself

thinking with a scarcity mindset? These types of thoughts

come from a scarcity mindset: there isn’t enough, I can’t do

that, it’s already been done, this will never work, it’s too scary,

etc. It’s an easy rabbit-hole to go down but if you catch yourself,

you can flip the switch. What would it be like to adopt an

abundance mindset and squash that scarcity mindset?

An abundant thinker welcomes competition, looks for

collaboration opportunities and feels optimistic about the

future. It’s not about a winner and a loser. There are many

winners because there’s enough for everyone. With an

abundance mindset you’ll feel more in control of your life.

You’ll feel empowered, more engaged and more positive about

life in general.

Those are some pretty great benefits, so let’s start with some

foundational concepts for cultivating one.

Think big and see the big picture. When setting big goals

immediately start believing you’re capable of achieving it.

You’ll see it when you believe it - read that sentence again -

because it’s true!

Positivity is pivotal. An important part of cultivating an

abundance mindset is the practice of finding good in any

situation. Are you a glass half-empty or a glass half-full type

of person? If you’re not quite there, don’t worry. Optimism

is a trait you can develop. You can train yourself to be more

positive and as a result, you’ll also be happier and more

abundant.

Expect good outcomes. In addition to the happiness that

optimism brings, it can also make you wealthier and healthier.

How? When you expect good outcomes, you more readily take

consistent action to make them happen. Foster optimism

daily by squashing the negative self-talk in your head and

choosing more empowering words instead: I can and I will,

I’ve got this, there’s a solution, etc. These positive phrases

prime your subconscious, help re-wire your brain for success

and reinforce self-confidence.

Set a daily intention. Before stepping out of bed, take a

moment to set your intention for the day. There are many

different ways to do this but begin by simply choose a word

or phrase that resonates with the energy, spirit, or attitude

you want to carry throughout your day. This will be your

compass, helping focus your thoughts, energy and time more

effectively.

Celebrate the success of others. When people close to you

achieve something, feel happy for them, even if it’s something

you also want. Just because they have it doesn’t mean you

can’t. The success of others is not your failure; it just proves

it can be done. And, you can too! Recognize that there are

plenty of opportunities and there is enough for everyone. Be

proactive and keep an open mind. Remain in the energy of

celebration, possibility and expectation.

Practicing gratitude is another important piece. Every

morning name one reason you’re grateful for the day ahead.

Every evening before bed identify at least one thing you’re

grateful for. When you dwell in gratitude regularly, you

expand the positive circumstances, relationships and energy

in your life. The more you practice gratitude the more you’ll

find to be grateful for – it’s a self-fulfilling prophecy which

certainly leads to more abundance and a more joyful state

of being.

Abundance is about much more than money and finances.

An abundance mindset is about the expansion of possibility.

It’s about the expectation of success, joy, love, good fortune

and enjoyable relationships. Adopt an abundance mindset

and watch each of these expand in your life!

About The Author

LINDA MITCHELL

Linda Mitchell is a board-certified coach, speaker, intuitive healer

and LMT. She empowers people who are stuck, overwhelmed,

or ready for change, to move through life’s transitions and challenges

with more ease, clarity, confidence and purpose as they

release stress and struggle and step into their highest purpose.

To Learn More Visit:

www.LivingInspiredCoaching.com





Is Being

Disorganized

Making

You Sick?

Written by Gayle M. Gruenberg

I

If you’re living with clutter and chronic

disorganization, you may literally be taking

your life in your hands.

Being surrounded by clutter takes a toll

on your physical well-being. Having piles of

clothes, paper, and general “stuff” on the floor,

tables, counters, in closets and cabinets, and

even under furniture is dangerous. It creates

hazards that can cause tripping and falling,

which can lead to broken bones and the inability

to call for help. Things stacked to the ceiling

can fall, causing a concussion or more serious

traumatic brain injury. Blocked entrances

and exits prevent emergency responders from

being able to access a space easily.


Clutter that has existed for

a long time or that blocks air

circulation from windows

or ductwork, collects

dust, which contributes to

respiratory ailments.

An overstuffed kitchen

is an obvious fire hazard.

Abandoned food and food

wrappers attract rodents

that munch on paper and

clothes, then leave their

droppings. These droppings

give off toxins that get into

the lungs when inhaled

and cause hantavirus, a

serious respiratory disease.

Decaying food also attracts

insects, such as flies, which

carry myriad diseases.

Clutter often causes and

is caused by anxiety and

depression, one aspect of

which is low self-esteem,

which leads to neglecting

one’s personal care. Showering and brushing

one’s teeth may go by the wayside. Improper

oral health can contribute to cardiovascular

disease, dementia, and many other physical

conditions.

Low self-esteem can manifest in having

no energy to exercise, a disinterest in proper

nutrition, and an erratic sleep schedule. These

contribute to impaired cognition and executive

function, making decisions and follow-through

more difficult, which leads to even more

clutter. Sleep deprivation alone is linked to

many physical challenges, including weight

gain, heart disease, impaired immunity, and

diabetes.

A cluttered space and a lack of systems

causes stress and produces the hormone

cortisol, which governs many important bodily

functions.

Cortisol regulates the amount of glucose,

insulin, potassium, and sodium in the blood,

and affects the metabolism of fats. Prolonged

elevated levels of cortisol, therefore, put

increased stress on the liver, kidneys, and small

intestine.

Cortisol affects the absorption of calcium,

which decreases bone formation, contributing

to osteoporosis. Cortisol also down-regulates

the production of collagen, the protein that

forms most of the body’s connective tissue

From The Story

“Clearing

clutter and

getting

organized

creates more

than just a

pleasant living

or working

environment,

it literally

improves your

health and

prolongs

your life.”

(cartilage, tendons, ligaments, and skin).

Cortisol works with adrenaline to create

memories of short-term emotional events, a

means to remember what to avoid in the future.

Long-term exposure to cortisol damages cells

in the hippocampus of the brain, resulting in

impaired learning.

While cortisol prevents the release of

substances in the body that cause inflammation,

it also weakens the immune system by

preventing the growth of T-cells, white blood

cells that fight infection, leaving the body

vulnerable to disease.

Clearing clutter and getting organized creates

more than just a pleasant living or working

environment, it literally improves your health

and prolongs your life.

About The Author

GAYLE M. GRUENBERG

Gayle M. Gruenberg, CPO-CD ® , CVPO, is the chief

executive organizer of Let’s Get Organized, LLC, an

organizer coach, and the creator of the Make Space

for Blessings system.

To Learn More Visit:

www.LGOrganized.com




More magazines by this user
Similar magazines