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Jan 2022. Blues Vol 38 No. 1

Jan 2022. Blues Vol 38 No. 1 FEATURE STORIES • New Year Resolutions for 2022 • Remembering Those We’ve Lost to COVID • Remembering Those We’ve Lost to LOD Deaths • Feature Story: They Didn’t Make it • Special Memorial Insert - Officers we Lost in 2021 DEPARTMENTS • Publisher’s Thoughts • Editor’s Thoughts • Your Thoughts • News Around the US • War Stories • Aftermath • Open Road - NYPD Orders Mustang E’s • Healing Our Heroes • Daryl’s Deliberations • HPOU - From the President, Douglas Griffith • Light Bulb Award • Running 4 Heroes • Blue Mental Health with Tina Jaeckle • Off Duty with Rusty Barron • Ads Back in the Day • Parting Shots • Now Hiring - L.E.O. Positions Open in Texas • Back Page - Meet the Commish

Jan 2022. Blues Vol 38 No. 1
FEATURE STORIES
• New Year Resolutions for 2022
• Remembering Those We’ve Lost to COVID
• Remembering Those We’ve Lost to LOD Deaths
• Feature Story: They Didn’t Make it
• Special Memorial Insert - Officers we Lost in 2021
DEPARTMENTS
• Publisher’s Thoughts
• Editor’s Thoughts
• Your Thoughts
• News Around the US
• War Stories
• Aftermath
• Open Road - NYPD Orders Mustang E’s
• Healing Our Heroes
• Daryl’s Deliberations
• HPOU - From the President, Douglas Griffith
• Light Bulb Award
• Running 4 Heroes
• Blue Mental Health with Tina Jaeckle
• Off Duty with Rusty Barron
• Ads Back in the Day
• Parting Shots
• Now Hiring - L.E.O. Positions Open in Texas
• Back Page - Meet the Commish


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The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 1


FOUNDED IN 1984

JANUARY 2022

FEATURES

26 New Year Resolutions for 2022

30 Remembering Those We’ve Lost to COVID

32 Remembering Those We’ve Lost to LOD Deaths

36 Feature Story: They Didn’t Make it

- Special Memorial Insert - Officers we Lost in 2021

ON THE COVER

Our Feature story this month,

“They Didn’t Make it” is an expose

on the Officers We Lost

in 2021.

SPECIAL INSERT

A Memorial to the Officers

we lost in 2021 and a salute

to all Texas Peace Officers

we lost in 2020 & 2021.

DEPARTMENTS

6 Publisher’s Thoughts

8 Editor’s Thoughts

10 Your Thoughts

12 News Around the US

50 War Stories

54 Aftermath

58 Open Road - NYPD Orders Mustang E’s

60 Healing Our Heroes

62 Daryl’s Deliberations

64 HPOU - From the President, Douglas Griffith

66 Light Bulb Award

68 Running 4 Heroes

70 Blue Mental Health with Tina Jaeckle

72 Off Duty with Rusty Barron

76 Ads Back in the Day

80 Parting Shots

82 Now Hiring - L.E.O. Positions Open in Texas

136 Back Page - Meet the Commish

50 54

BLUES MENTAL HEALTH

BY DR. TINA JAECKLE

70

2 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 3


FOUNDED IN 1984

OUR TEAM

MICHAEL BARRON

founder & publisher

MICHAEL BARRON

editor-n-chief

REX EVANS

contributing editor

JESSICA JONES

creative editor

RUSTY BARRON

outdoor editor

DR. TINA JAECKLE

contributing editor

DARYL LOTT

contributing editor

SAM HORWITZ & JOHN SALERNO

contributing editors

DOUGLAS GRIFFITH

HPOU contributing editor

AMBER ROBERTS

BAILEY BARRON

sales team

OUR CONTRIBUTORS

T. EDISON

contributing writer / light bulb

OFFICER D. SULLIVAN

warstory/aftermath

JOHN MURRAY

contributing writer

JOE RUBINO

contributing writer

RICK SUBEY

contributing writer

KATIE MULVANEY

contributing writer

DAVID GRIFFITH

contributing writer

MARK PRICE

contributing writer

The BLUES Police Magazine is published monthly by Kress-Barr, LLC, PO Box 2733, League City Texas 77574. The opinions

expressed in some articles, op-eds, and editorials are those of the author and do not reflect the opinion of

The BLUES or its parent company. Rebuttals or submission of news articles and editorials may be submitted to: The

BLUES Police Magazine @ thebluespdmag@gmail.com. The entire contents of The BLUES are copyrighted and may

not be reprinted without the express permission of the publisher. The BLUES logo is a Trademark of Kress-Barr, LLC.

4 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 5


FROM THE PUBLISHER’S DESK

michael barron

Happy New Year

This issue marks the beginning

of our 38th year of serving

law enforcement in Texas and

beyond. Our digital format has

taken us farther than any of us

could have possibly imagined.

While we haven’t reached our

goal of 100,000 readers a month,

we came close at 92,400.

This past year, The BLUES

became the Largest “all-digital”

Police Magazine in the U.S. With

an average page count of 140

pages and 90,000+ readers, The

BLUES ranks highest in a group

of over 30 police related magazines.

Quite an accomplishment

if you consider this digital format

is only 2 years in the making.

In fact, we published more

pages of content in those 24

months, then seventeen years of

the printed issues of the Blues.

For individuals seeking a

career in law enforcement or

officers looking to make a lateral

move, the BLUES is THE place

to search for LE job opening. On

average, there are listings for

over 200 jobs and recruiting ads

from dozens of departments. In

fact, The BLUES is credited with

influencing hundreds if not thousands

of officers in their search

for a law enforcement job. If

you’re a recruiter for a Texas law

enforcement agency, the BLUES

should be number one on your

list to promote your department.

Another milestone for 2021 I

hope is never repeated is the

sheer number of deaths of law

enforcement officers, 479 for the

year. That’s 94 more than the year

before. And COVID accounted for

322 of those souls in 2021. That’s

THREE HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO

of our brothers and sisters in

Blues that died in one year to a

pandemic that has claimed nearly

one million lives since it began

in 2020. But let’s not overlook the

fact we lost 157 officers outside

of COVID. The loss of one officer

is horrible, 157 is unbearable.

Inside this month’s memorial

issue, you’ll find a special insert

dedicated to these fine men and

women. We hope you will take

time to look at each and every

photo. Remember their faces, the

departments they served, and

say a prayer for the families they

left behind.

On the last page of the Memorial,

you’ll find links to various

fund raisers and non-profit organizations

that aid families. Please

support these organizations as

best you can. They provide valuable

resources as well as morale

support to the spouses and children

of fallen officers.

Finally, to answer the most

asked question we have at The

BLUES “how do I get a copy of

the BLUES each month?” There

are several ways. First off as

stated at the beginning of this

editorial, The BLUES is a ‘digital’

magazine. We do not print any

copies. The reason being is the

cost. To print 90,000 copies with

over 140 pages and distribute

MICHAEL BARRON

those 90,000 copies would cost

close to $85,000 a month. So obviously

we aren’t returning to a

printed edition anytime soon. But

the world is all digital and we

are following the future.

You can get a FREE copy of the

BLUES sent to your email each

month by simply going to our

website “bluespdmag.com” and

clicking on the subscribe tab at

the top. Again, the subscription is

FREE.

We also post a link to our

Facebook page “BluesPoliceMagazine”

as soon as the monthly

edition goes live. This link is

shared with over 100 other police

related websites on FaceBook as

well as our Instagram page

@thebluespolicemagazine.

Finally, I’d like to thank all our

readers for making The BLUES

the largest of its kind in the US

and celebrating the beginning of

our 38th year. We couldn’t have

arrived here without you. Cheers!

6 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 7


FROM THE GUEST EDITOR’S DESK

rex evans

It’s All About Sacrifice

For some, a career in Law Enforcement

means Service, Protection,

Defending the Innocent

and bringing those who wrong

others, to Justice. To others, it’s

the fulfillment of a lifelong dream

or the continuation of a family

who, for generations wore a

badge.

Whatever the reason you decided

to wear a badge, the fact

remains, you did or still do so. A

lot of sacrifice went into that decision.

The Pre-Academy testing.

The “Academy Life” and of course,

the job itself. Sacrifice is something,

we all have in common. If

you’ve been a cop for five years

or more, worked the streets the

entire time, you definitively know

sacrifice.

You’ve got the blazing hot,

humid days and nights of summer

along the Gulf Coast. The

sub-freezing, blinding snowstorms

in Montana. Crazy, wild

big-city nights in New York, Los

Angeles and Miami. All of which,

in their own special way, demand

a high degree of sacrifice.

Then of course, there’s the

suburban and rural brothers and

sisters in Law Enforcement. Long

hours because well, you’re it.

There is no one else to call or

other Divisions and Districts from

which to pull from. A call comes

in, you go out. It really is simple

math.

That’s the “Professional” side of

sacrifices to those wear a badge

must make. Let alone, the “personnel”

side. You know, gone

from home all the time. Working

two and three extra-jobs so your

significant other and kids can

have everything you never had.

Maybe it’s so your family can live

in a great neighborhood and the

kids can go to a great school.

Whatever the reason, those sacrifices

all take a toll.

None of the above even begins

to touch on the sacrifice we

make from time to time, in that

we can’t say or speak our mind

to anyone. We just watch the

blatant stupidity, raw hatred and

senseless violence go about our

communities. We just smile and

say nothing.

Of course, there’s also the

supervisor part of this equation.

They’re the good ones. The bad

ones. The micro-managing ones.

The “I don’t know” ones and the

worst kind of supervisor of all,

the pure evil ones. Those who live

to make others under their “Command”

as miserable as possible.

Why? Because they think it’s

fun. To endure the roller coaster

supervision of Law Enforcement

requires an exorbitant degree of

patience, prayer and sacrifice.

There’s one kind of sacrifice

most don’t like talking about.

That’s the sacrifice we make

when one of us doesn’t come

home at the end of our shift. It’s

the kind of sacrifice which tends

to make all the other sacrifices

seem small. Almost, unimportant.

If anyone ever tells you “Police

Work” is just another government

job which only requires you to

breath, walk and talk at the same

time. Feel free to…well, no. Don’t

do that. But be mindful of all the

sacrifices you’ve made. Remember

the long nights, hard days

and moments of pure heartbreak

you’ve endured. Remember that

sacrifice comes with a high price

and something else…

Sacrifice comes with the nobility

making this old world just a

little bit better today than it was

yesterday. And, no one would’ve

been the wiser tomorrow, had it

not been for you. Your sacrifices

in this career, in this life are deep

and oftentimes, hurtful to those

around you. And yet, I would beseech

you to understand throughout

the history of mankind, cops

are the ones who’ve always made

the greatest of sacrifices for the

many.

You my friend, are one of the

few. And I am eternally grateful

for you. Thank you for all you do,

all that you’ve lost and for all you

may have to give. Let your heart

be still and may God’s Grace and

Mercy be with us all, always.

Ready To Serve You

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

your thoughts

Instead of being in a rush

during this time, let’s take a

moment to slow down and remember

the true meaning and

purpose of this particular holiday.

Let’s remember to be humble

and thankful for the many

blessings we have received this

year while seeking ways to share

those gifts with the precious

family members and friends in

our lives.

With grateful hearts, let’s make

this Christmas a time of true joy

and celebration with all those

we come in contact on a daily

basis. Jesus is the Reason for the

Season.

KAT D GARCIA

LAW ENFORCEMENT & RETIREMENT

I know that often we set specific

goals this time of year

concerning weight loss, finances,

and much more in our lives we

feel will better us and our families.

Someone recently asked

me what caused me to save for

retirement when I was a younger

officer. I’m guessing they were

looking for some type of advice

from a salty veteran that I may

have encountered when I entered

the career of law enforcement,

but that wasn’t the case. I

grew up poor and went to over

twenty different schools as a

youth, and my father switched

careers regularly as we switched

living arrangements. My father

was a great man in many aspects,

but finances weren’t his

strong point in life, most likely

because his father didn’t set the

example and guide him in the

value of a dollar. I realize this

even more now that I’ve grown

older and see what money can

do for me and my wife. I say this

tidbit of information because I’ve

seen the veteran officers in our

profession hoping to make it to

the thirty-year mark where the

golden carrot will solve all their

problems. Many times this same

individual had health issues

because of all the stress-related

illnesses that come with being in

law enforcement for an extended

period, not to mention the

stress caused on relationships

along the way.

I would be that officer in the

locker room that would do my

best to tell the younger officer

that starting a supplemental

retirement was necessary for

them to exit the profession when

the time came. I had a few that

listened to the advice, but most

seemed to have that enthusiastic

bright-eyed look where they

never saw themselves getting

older and leaving. I too was that

twenty-two-year-old officer

fresh from the police academy

that was ready to make my mark

on law enforcement, but I also

had the previous example mentioned

that caused me to think

about my future. My father was

also older at the time and often

spoken to me about lessons he

had learned and the value of

saving for the future.

There will be some of you

that may read this article and

are about to graduate the police

academy and are now making

more money than you’ve ever

made. You now have the urge

to show your accomplishments

with buying the newest sixty

thousand dollar truck while

you and the love of your life

search for your forever home,

not thinking about the financial

stress that will soon be realized.

I’m not perfect by any means

with finances and have made

some of the same mistakes I’m

talking about in this article. I

want you to consider your decisions

now so you’re not one of

those veteran officers with only

the department pension while

thinking about the golden carrot.

The solution to the financial

issue is most often not solved

by how long you work, but how

you plan and spend while you’re

still young. The decisions and

path you follow now will either

lead you to be that 30-year guy

hoping to make it out with some

years still left to enjoy retirement

or one that has planned

and can now leave at a younger

healthier age. I always say never

take financial advice from a cop,

but I wanted to provide you with

some examples when talking

about that new shiny truck.

The new 60k truck will cost

you about $999.00 a month with

a $1,000 down payment with a

good credit score for 72 months.

This payment now translates into

you paying $71,928 big ones to

prove to your family and friends

that you’re successful in life. You

could, however, take that same

amount for six years and place it

into an investment vehicle at an

average of a 7% return, putting

approximately $89,970.00 in your

pocket. I know some of you have

already made this leap and are

making this payment each month

for that new vehicle that has

now lost its value and appeal.

You can still make a life change

by selling that vehicle and buying

a vehicle where you can pay

cash, which now translates into

your money working for you by

building a financial future. You

can run these same type numbers

for purchasing that new

home, and you’ll soon realize the

importance of the 15-year mortgage

Vs. the 30-year mortgage.

You could take half the money

for that new truck and place it

into a retirement account based

on a 7% return for twenty years

that now becomes $255K. That

money could now yield you

approximately $1,500 a month

before taxes for about 40 years,

and this doesn’t include your

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pension. The financial decisions

you make now as a young officer

will lay the path for how long

you’ll be in this profession and

the quality of life you have.

There are so many couples that

breakup over stress created from

financial decisions they made

while they were young. There

are plenty of lenders that will

give you money and let you buy

the size home that leaves you

and your spouse house poor, but

don’t fall into that trap. I really

have great concern for our youth

that are now taking on huge

financial debt to pay for a degree

in a field of study that won’t

lead them to a better future.

The student loan debt at the

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10 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 11


AROUND THE COUNTRY

COMING SUMMER 2022

NEW YEARS EVE

20% of NYPD, Out With COVID

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — More

than 20% of the New York Police

Department was out sick Thursday

December 30th due to coronavirus

(COVID-19), according to

the NY Post.

On Friday morning, New Year’s

Eve, NYPD received 7,270 sick

calls — the most for any day in

2021 and similar to the amounts

seen at the beginning of the pandemic

in April 2020, sources told

FOREWORD

the Post.

To those that wore it, no explanation is necessary. For life behind the badge is like no other. It is a line that once

Nearly 2,600 members of the

you cross, you can never go back. The line between right and wrong, happiness and sadness, and finally life and

NYPD have tested positive for

death.

It isn't for everyone, nor should it be. God created it, not for those who chose it, but for those that are chosen. It

coronavirus this month, sources

is these brave souls who trade their happiness, their security, their fears, their love, and even their life for you.

said.

When life itself is in question they must answer. When death is imminent, they must stand tall. In the face of

The Post reported that the

danger, they must endure. When all is said and done, there really isn't much that separates us from them, but a thin

NYPD is requiring officers who

blue line.

had regularly scheduled days off

•••

Being a cop meant everything to me. It was something I dreamed of as a kid. No, my parents weren’t cops but

to work over the holiday weekend.

The same scenario played out ment, healthcare and airlines.

I remember the day the notice came in the mail that said I'd been accepted into the Police Academy. It was

provide testing for COVID-19. ment but all branches of govern-

my grandfather was. He was my hero and someday I wanted to walk in his footsteps.

On Wednesday, Dec. 29th, the at police departments all across It’s like the summer of 2020 all

the happiest day of my life or so I thought. Now that I look back, I'm sure it was definitely the day my life changed

Daily News reported that 30% of the country. Agency after agency over again.

and changed in a way that would never be the same. Once that badge is pinned on, life itself is suddenly different.

the city’s EMS members and 17% reported dozens of officers calling

in with COVID.

It starts out as euphoric, on top of the world and invincible. Later it becomes one of disgust, then mistrust, finally

resentment. Your entire perspective changes and never again is life and death seen in the same light. You see how

of its firefighters were out sick.

precious life is and how fast it can be taken and by those who have little or no respect for it. Life behind the badge

FDNY Commissioner Daniel Nigro

said the reduced workforce Department as well as several of

probably heard that life as a cop, is hours and hours of boredom interrupted by seconds of sheer terror. It’s more

In Harris County, the Sheriff’s

is many things to many people. All are affected by it. Some good, some bad, some you just never know. You’ve

has “stressed” the department’s the area constables’ offices, had

like years of boredom, interrupted by hours of terror. At one time or another we all remember being scared. Really

ranks.

deputies working overtime to fill

scared, so scared you're literally in suspended animation awaiting what surely must be the end of life as you know

it. When it comes, it comes in slow motion almost surreal. What seems like hours happens in seconds and lasts for

This came as the FDNY shared in for the nearly 28% that were

years. They say fear is good, but true fear the kind that hangs in the air like the smell of ozone after a lightning strike

messages on Twitter asking out with COVID.

is anything but healthy.

residents to only call 911 if they The latest Omicron variant is

But those who live without fear aren't really living. They've accepted their own demise and are simply waiting for

are experiencing a medical need, sweeping across the country and FREE SUBSCRIPTION

the bus to take them home. And that's one bus you don't want to get on.

adding that ambulances do not affecting not only law enforce-

CLICK HERE

•••

The following chapters take you through a cop’s world. A world of pimps and whores, lovers and killers, robbers

12 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE and rapists, muggers and burglars, and just plain thieves. But be forewarned. The What BLUES maybe POLICE be erotic MAGAZINE one minute 13

can be deadly the next. For see in their world, life is just as long as the turn of the next page.


AROUND THE COUNTRY

HEROIC LAKEWOOD CO. OFFICER

ENDS COLORADO SHOOTING SPREE

By Jon Murray and Joe Rubino

The Denver Post

LAKEWOOD, Colo. — When a

gunman opened fire inside a Broadway

tattoo parlor Monday night, the

shooting spree that would zigzag

through Denver and Lakewood was

just getting started.

Less than an hour later, the rampage

ended with his death on the

streets of Lakewood’s upscale Belmar

shopping district, as the final

gunfight with a police officer —

herself injured — shattered a pizza

restaurant’s two large windows,

sending shocked diners diving for

cover behind overturned tables.

Investigators recover evidence

from a window frame outside a

Xfinity store Tuesday, Dec. 28, 2021,

in Lakewood, Colo., one of the

scenes of a shooting spree that left

several people dead—including the

suspected shooter Monday evening—and

left a few more people

wounded.

“One of my pizza cooks was

crawling on the ground, coming

around the corner,” said Tyler

Gunderson, the front-of-the-house

manager for The Rock Wood-Fired

Pizza on West Alaska Place, east of

Wadsworth Boulevard.

When it was all over, five of the

victims in Monday’s shooting spree

had died and another two had sustained

serious injuries, including the

officer, in one of the most unusual,

confounding multiple-victim shoot-

ings the metro area has seen.

Lyndon James McLeod, 47, was

identified by police as the gunman

Tuesday. He was reported by a

lobby security guard at one condo

building in Denver to be wearing

clothing that impersonated “a police

officer in tactical gear with a

police logo and badge and carrying

a rifle,” according to an email sent

Tuesday to residents of One Cheesman

Place.

While still investigating Tuesday,

authorities publicly withheld

any ideas they had about McLeod’s

motives. But where he aimed his

gun did not appear to be random:

Among the victims were four shots

inside tattoo parlors, both at the

one in Denver and at other locations

miles away in Lakewood.

“The victims were known to the

offender,” Denver Police Department

Commander Matt Clark said,

though in one case, he added, his

targeting was based on an apparent

grudge with a hotel in the Belmar

district. There he shot a woman who

happened to be working the front

desk, just minutes before his own

death. The clerk died Tuesday.

Denver police received the first 911

call about violence on Broadway near

First Avenue at 5:25 p.m., Clark said.

They arrived at Sol Tribe Custom

Tattoo and Body Piercing to find two

victims inside: owner Alicia Cardenas,

44, and Alyssa Gunn Maldonado,

who both died.

Alyssa’s husband, Jimmy Maldonado,

a piercer at Sol Tribe, was injured

and had escaped onto the street,

Clark said. He was in critical condition

Tuesday night. All three were

identified to The Post by family and

friends.

Within minutes, police received

a report of a new crime scene —

where the gunman had forced entry

into a home near West Sixth Avenue

and Bannock Street. A nearby van

also was set on fire, he said.

“He pursued the occupants

through the residence, which is also

a part of a business,” Clark said, but

they escaped unharmed.

The gunman set off again.

His next target was the 19-story

condo building overlooking Cheesman

Park, just south of East 13th

Avenue at North Williams Street.

The email sent to residents of

One Cheesman Place by building

management outlined what building

managers understood to have

happened. The gunman showed up

wearing the police gear and carrying

the rifle, the email says, and the

security guard in the lobby cooperated

with his demands by escorting

him to a floor of the building he

requested — where the gunman

“forced himself into the unit and

committed the shooting.”

One man was killed, police said,

but his identity hasn’t been released.

The security guard “escaped

to another unit and called 911,” the

email said.

Back down in the lobby, the gunman

fired his gun to exit through the

secured door. On Tuesday morning,

three bullet holes, labeled with

evidence markers, left a pattern of

web-like cracks running up one of

the glass doors.

Travis Leiker, the president and

executive director of Capitol Hill

United Neighborhoods, an advocacy

group for the area, said he was in

the group’s headquarters just across

Williams Street on Monday night,

leading an online meeting, when he

heard those gunshots.

By the time police arrived, the

gunman was long gone, heading

back west.

But just minutes later, at 5:49

p.m., other Denver police officers in

an unmarked car spotted the Ford

A True American Hero

Lakewood Police Agent Ashley Ferris

Econoline van he was reported to

be driving on West 13th Avenue

near Interstate 25, Clark said.

After an exchange of gunfire at a

dead-end at West Eighth Avenue

and Zuni Street, he said, the gunman

escaped onto I-25 after firing

shots that “disabled” the police

vehicle.

His next stop: Lucky 13 Tattoo

and Piercing, a shop in a shopping

center at Kipling Street and West

Colfax Avenue in Lakewood. At

5:58 p.m., security video from the

adjacent In and Out Liquor store

recorded the gunman stopping his

van in the drive lane, walking into

the store holding what looks like a

gun. He exited just 10 seconds later,

driving off.

In that time, he shot and killed

tattoo artist Danny “Dano” Scofield,

38, according to Lakewood Police

Department spokesman John

Romero.

The gunman drove about four

miles southeast, to the Belmar

shopping district. Lakewood police

agents spotted his van at 6:04 p.m.

near a Wells Fargo Bank branch at

14 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 15


West Alameda Avenue and South

Teller Street, Romero said, and attempted

to stop him.

Police and the gunman exchanged

fire, Romero said, and he eluded

capture once again. He abandoned

the van nearby and walked briefly

into a Ted’s Montana Grill, just

south of the bank, displaying his

gun but not firing it. Then he walked

deeper into Belmar, a newer development

of movie theaters, big-box

stores and urban buildings fronting

walkable streets that have large

parking lots and garages behind

them.

About three blocks away, near the

corner of South Vance Street and

West Alaska Drive, he entered the

Hyatt House hotel, Romero said.

The gunman “had a very brief

conversation with the front desk

worker,” Romero said. “He then

shot the front desk worker several

times.”

Sarah Steck, 28, was hospitalized

and died of her injuries on Tuesday,

he said.

Nearby diners and shoppers

sought cover as the gunshots rang

out. Within two minutes, McLeod

was confronted by Lakewood police

officer Ashley Ferris on the street

nearby.

After Ferris ordered him to drop

the gun, Romero said, he approached

her and opened fire, hitting her once,

in the abdomen, as other shots shattered

the pizza restaurant’s windows.

Ferris then shot him, killing him.

“I can’t overemphasize enough

the heroic actions of our Lakewood

police officer Ashley Ferris,” Romero

said. “In the face of being shot, in

the face of danger, she was able to

not only save others from this terrible

tragedy but also neutralize the

threat.” c)2021 The Denver Post

16 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 17


AROUND THE COUNTRY

Mass State Trooper Fired

Over COVID, Speaks Out

“This was my dream job to be a state trooper, and I’ve never brought any

shame to this organization. It’s definitely disappointing and heartbreaking.”

By Rick Sobey

Boston Herald

BOSTON — The first Mass State

Police trooper who was given

the ax over the state’s coronavirus

vaccine mandate is speaking

out about the “humiliating”

experience and termination

process.

Timothy Barry, 29, said he’s

still “in disbelief” after he was

yanked out of a State Police

training class in late October

and stripped of his police gear

in front of about 40 fellow

troopers. He had not gotten a

COVID-19 shot by the mid-October

deadline.

The Marine Corps veteran, who

was assigned to the State Police

Mounted Unit, then became the

first trooper to get recommended

for termination.

“I was singled out at the State

Police Academy, and now being

the only one recommended for

termination, I definitely feel singled

out,” Barry told the Herald

this week.

“I’ve been in disbelief,” he

added. “This was my dream job

to be a state trooper, and I’ve

never brought any shame to this

organization. It’s definitely disappointing

and heartbreaking.”

The Quincy resident recounted

his Oct. 28 experience at the

State Police Academy in New

Braintree.

Barry drove the two hours out

to the training class and was

then “blindsided” in front of the

class. He had submitted a religious

exemption for the vaccine

but was in limbo, he said.

“I was pulled out of a class of

30 to 40 people, and they didn’t

try to discreetly pull me out,”

Barry said. “I had to empty out

my cruiser as the entire class

was looking at me, like I did

something bad.

“I had to surrender all my

police tools,” he added. “It’s not

like I committed a domestic or a

violent crime. It was really over

the top... It was humiliating.”

He was relieved of his duties,

placed on unpaid leave, and was

then later recommended for termination

over the vax mandate.

Barry was a statie for three

years, first working on the roads

as a trooper and then assigned

to the Mounted Unit. He was

previously a police officer in

Bedford for five years and is a

third-generation law enforcement

officer.

“Between my military years in

the Marine Corps, as a local police

officer and as a state trooper,

I’ve never been disciplined,” Barry

said. “In an era where you want

police accountability, why is this

why you’re getting rid of quality

troopers?

“I’ve worked hard to get here,”

he added. “It’s something I’ve always

wanted, and for an agency

that wants to be the most elite in

the state and the nation, why are

you getting rid of good troopers

for this?”

Barry volunteered at the Bedford

VA for over half a decade and

volunteered for the Special Olympics,

with events like the torch

run as a local police officer.

He taught religious education

for five years and was a

Eucharistic minister. He was

unsuccessful at getting a religious

exemption for the vaccine.

To try to get the exemption, he

went in front of a “trial board”

court hearing, which was made

up of a State Police captain and

lawyer.

“They’re not priests,” Barry

said. “They’re not rabbis. They’re

just two random people. A lot

of these things just weren’t

thought out.”

He doesn’t know of any religious

exemption that has been

accepted.

“Personally, I think that mandating

the vaccine and going

against someone’s religious

beliefs is a violation of your

civil rights,” Barry said. “This

has violated my rights and many

others.”

He said he would have complied

with regular COVID testing.

“I definitely would have been

OK with that,” Barry said.

A spokesperson for the Executive

Office of Public Safety and

Security on Wednesday deferred

comment to Mass State Police.

A Mass State Police spokesperson

did not immediately respond

to questions — including how

many State Police troopers are

facing termination over the vax

mandate, and if the state plans

to pull other states out of training

classes and strip them of

their gear.

“It’s just not right,” Barry said,

later adding, “A real shame.”

18 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 19


AROUND THE COUNTRY

R.I. Police Commission Adopts

Policy to Prevent “Gypsy” Cops

The policy inactivates an officer’s certification

the moment they leave a police department.

By Katie Mulvaney

The Providence Journal

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Members

of the commission that oversees

police standards and training

in Rhode Island have watched

reports of rogue officers leaving

one department only to be

promptly hired at another play

out in recent years nationwide.

With that in mind and “out of

an abundance of caution,” the

Rhode Island Commission on

Police Officers Standards and

Training adopted a policy this

year intended to prevent socalled

“wandering officers” or

“gypsy cops” from landing in a

Rhode Island police department

without undergoing a review.

The five-member commission,

which sets policies and

standards for certification and

training for police in Rhode Island,

implemented a policy that

inactivates an officer’s certification

the moment he or she leaves

a police department. The officer

must then apply to be recertified

by the commission in order to

take on active status at another

department.

RIPOST REQUIREMENTS BE-

FORE JOINING A NEW AGENCY

The rules require the officer to

produce a letter of good standing

from the previous agency

and meet other criteria before

joining a new agency. The policy

is intended to stop troubled

officers from resigning from one

department to avoid being fired

and restart their careers with

clean hands a few towns over.

“At the end of the day, we are

trying to prevent police officers

from moving from place to place

without a check,” Jamestown

Police Chief Edward A. Mello,

chairman of the commission,

said in an interview with The

Journal last week.

The Rhode Island rule replaces

a long-standing policy that an

officer’s certification would remain

intact for three years after

that person left an agency, Mello

said. Rhode Island does not have

a list of officers who have left

their positions due to misconduct.

“We want to be sure there’s

a review process between that

break,” he said. “This is a stop

gap measure to ensure good

police.”

The new policy has taken effect

as the commission, known

as the RIPOST, is seeing a growing

number of officers seeking

a lateral transfer from one

agency to another in the Ocean

State — an attractive option as

recruitment has been difficult,

Mello said. Advantages include

that seasoned officers bring with

them professional experience

and training.

“It’s a challenging hiring time,”

said Mello, who’s last three

department hires included two

transfers.

POLICE DE-CERTIFICATION

INDEX

In addition to the letter of

good standing, officers seeking a

transfer must undergo a psychological,

drug and medical exams,

submit to a background check,

and verify that they aren’t in the

National De-certification Index, a

national registry of certificate or

license revocation actions relating

to officer misconduct.

The index, which police in

Rhode Island use to vet outof-state

applicants, currently

lists 31,000 disciplinary actions,

according to Michael Becar,

executive director of the International

Association of Directors

of Law Enforcement Standards

& Training, which oversees the

database.

Although Rhode Island’s new

policy inactivates an officer’s

certification, that individual’s

name cannot be added to the index

because it is not a de-certification

due to misconduct, Becar

said. Rhode Island does not have

a list of officers who have left

their positions due to misconduct,

according to Mello.

Rhode Island is one of four

states nationally whose standards

and training commission

doesn’t have the authority under

state law to decertify a police

officer, a process that essentially

strips that person of his or her

badge.

It joins New Jersey, Hawaii, and

California, though state lawmakers

there passed a measure

in September empowering that

state to suspend or revoke a

certificate on specified grounds.

Those include the use of excessive

force, sexual assault, making

a false arrest, or participating

in a law enforcement gang, as

well as demonstrating an abuse

of power or bias based on race,

national origin, religion, gender

identity or sexual orientation,

or disability. The California law

takes effect in January.

From Becar’s perspective, it

is important for the RIPOST to

have the authority to de-certify

problematic officers to prevent

misconduct and an unwitting

agency experiencing a black eye

and civil liability due to officer

misdeeds.

“They need the authority to

investigate officers who have

committed misconduct, to terminate

their license,” Becar said.

“If they don’t have the authority,

there’s nothing to stop that officer

from going from agency to

agency.”

The association recommends

as model de-certification policies

that incorporate an independent

investigation by the commission

and an appeal process,

as seen in Arizona and Oregon.

“It’s a very fair hearing into

whether misconduct occurred,”

Becar said.

But to Mello, de-certification

can only work if every state is

empowered to revoke an officer’s

badge and then ensure the misconduct

is entered into the national

database. The states must

require, too, that each department

check that database before

hiring an officer, he said.

“There’s no point in de-certification

unless every state is

de-certifying,” Mello said

‘A STEP IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION’

For now, Sid Wordell, executive

director of the Rhode Island Police

Chiefs’ Association, says the

new policy “is a step in the right

direction.”

“Ultimately, everybody believes

there should be a de-certification

process,” Wordell said.

Harrison Tuttle, executive director

of BLM RI PAC, agrees that

the policy represents a step in

the right direction.

“While we celebrate this victory

today, tomorrow we go back

to work,” Tuttle, who is running

for General Assembly, said in an

email.

The BLM RI PAC will stand

with the state’s Black and brown

communities and continue to

call for the repeal of the Law Enforcement

Officers’ Bill of Rights

in Rhode Island, he said. He welcomed

the chance to meet with

the Police Chiefs’ Association “to

do a full analysis on how this

policy change works in practice

... as we plan to hold them accountable.”

Legislation to amend the Law

Enforcement Officers Bill of

Rights failed to pass last session

after advocates, interest groups

and lawmakers were unable to

reach agreement on key details.

©2021 www.providencejournal.com.

Visit providencejournal.

com. Distributed by Tribune Con-

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20 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 21


AROUND THE COUNTRY

1 Illinois Officer Killed, 1 Critically

Wounded in Hotel Shooting

A manhunt is underway in

Kankakee County, IL, after one

police officer was killed and

another was critically wounded

in a shooting Wednesday night,

Dec. 29th at a hotel in the village

of Bradley.

Around 9:40 p.m. Wednesday,

Bradley Police responded to the

Comfort Inn hotel after a call

about dogs barking in an unattended

vehicle in the parking lot.

Police said the officers located

the vehicle and the possible

owner inside a hotel room. Both

officers were shot after trying to

talk with the people inside the

room, Bradley police confirmed.

Bradley Police Sgt. Marlene

Rittmanic, 49, died at the hospital

and Officer Tyler J. Bailey, 27,

was critically wounded.

Police said an arrest warrant

was issued for 25-year-old

Darius Sullivan in connection

with the shooting, NBC Chicago

reports. They are also looking for

another person of interest believed

to be involved in the case.

A $10,000.00 reward is being

offered for information leading to

an arrest.

On Thursday, Dec. 30, The Bradley

Police Department issued the

following Press Release:

On Wednesday, December

29thth, 2021, at approximately

21:41 hrs. the Bradley Police

Department responded to the

Comfort Inn 1500 north State

Route 50, for reported dogs

barking in an unattended vehicle

which was parked in the parking

lot. Upon arrival officers located

a vehicle and a room inside the

hotel where the possible owner

of the vehicle was staying.

Officers initiated conversation

with the subjects in the room

and while during conversation

the officers were attacked by the

subjects occupying the room,

whereas both officers were shot.

Both officers were transported

to nearby hospitals where one

officer has died, and the other

is in critical condition and is

currently undergoing surgery.

Identities of both officers are

held pending notification.

An arrest warrant has been

issued for a Darius D Sullivan M/B

06/21/1996. We are also looking

for another person of interest

that we believe was involved

with the case.

Bradley Officer Tyler J. Bailey

IS PROUD

TO SUPPORT

FOR HOUSTON CITY COUNCIL

22 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 23


AROUND THE COUNTRY

FIRST LEO DEATH OF 2022

Wayne County IL. Deputy Killed in

Shooting; Suspect is in Custody.

A suspect in the fatal shooting

of a Wayne County, Illinois deputy,

has been taken into custody.

The Wayne County Sheriff’s

Office (WCSO) says the shooting

happened around 5:00 a.m.

on December 29th when Deputy

Sean Riley was dispatched to a

motorist assist on Interstate 64

near the Illinois-Indiana border.

WCSO says that when another

officer got to the scene, Deputy

Riley was found dead. Deputy Riley’s

squad car was missing from

the scene of the shooting and

found abandoned along I-64.

Around 1:40 p.m., authorities

said that one suspect, later identified

as 40-year-old Ray Tate of

Hopkinsville, Kentucky, had been

taken into custody in connection

to the shooting death of Deputy

Riley.

The Illinois State Police believes

Tate carjacked a semitruck

near the area where Deputy

Riley’s patrol vehicle was

found abandoned - forcing the

driver of the truck to take him to

a gas station in St. Peters, Missouri,

before a series of other

car jackings, robberies, and

shootings occurred.

ISP says that Tate is suspected

of then traveling back into

Illinois with a kidnapped victim

in another stolen vehicle,

which was found

at a home in rural

Carlyle.

Police believe

Tate then committed

a home invasion

in Carlysle, taking

the homeowner and

the other kidnapped

victim hostage.

Both of the hostages

were rescued

and uninjured, and

Tate was taken to

the Clinton County

Jail where he’s

being charged with

First Degree Murder.

After Deputy

Riley’s autopsy

was performed in

Evansville, dozens

of law enforcement

officers escorted

him back home to

Illinois.

Funeral arrangements

had not been

announced at the

time of publishing.

The BLUES and an

all our brothers and

sisters in Blue here

in Texas offer our

sincerest condolences

to the Riley

family.

NC Trooper crashes at traffic stop, killing

another trooper who was his brother.

By Mark Price

A state trooper and a civilian

motorist were killed in a car crash

that involved the trooper’s brother

— who is also a state trooper,

according to the N.C. Department of

Public Safety.

It happened just before 9 p.m.

Monday, Jan. 3, at a traffic stop in

Rutherford County, southeast of

Asheville.

Investigators identified the trooper

who died as John S. Horton, a 15-

year veteran assigned to Rutherford

County.

The identity of the civilian driver

has not been released as of Jan. 4.

Horton died when his brother,

Trooper James N. Horton, was

responding to assist him in a traffic

stop near the intersection of High

Shoals Church and Goodes Grove

Church roads, officials said.

Trooper John Horton, a fifteen-year

veteran assigned to Rutherford

County, was transported to a

Spartanburg hospital where he died

of his injuries.

“Trooper James Horton lost control

of his vehicle upon approaching

the traffic stop,” officials said.

“James Horton collided with the

stationary patrol vehicle and subsequently

struck Trooper John Horton

and the detained driver who were

standing along the roadside.”

The detained driver died at the

scene.

“Trooper James Horton was taken

to a local hospital for minor injuries

and has since been released. The

North Carolina Trooper John Horton

two involved troopers are brothers,”

state officials said.

Details on road conditions were

not released, but the crash happened

after a day of snow, sleet and

quick-dropping temperatures in the

mountains.

“Our hearts are broken with the

loss of our friend and our brother,

Trooper John Horton,” State Highway

Patrol Commander Col. Freddy

L. Johnson Jr. said in a news release.

“For all involved in this tragic

event the coming days will undoubtedly

be difficult, but we are

committed to stand alongside with

them with our thoughts, prayers

and unwavering support.”

24 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 25


Now that 2022 is here, many

people are unsurprisingly talking

about their New Years’ resolutions.

Some choose to focus on

personal goals, some choose to

focus on professional, and others

choose to focus on a mixture

of both. Having resolutions to

go into the new year with are

always a great idea as they can

have lasting positive effects on

many aspects of your life. If

you’re a police officer, there are

plenty of great resolutions to

make that can do wonders for

your professional development.

Here are a few great New Year’s

resolutions for you to consider.

1. KEEP IN TOUCH WITH YOUR

COMMUNITY

Few academics or law enforcement

executives agree on

what community policing is or

looks like, or how it should be

managed.

I’ve heard it said (sometimes

out of my own mouth), that before

the 1990s when federal dollars

followed anything labeled

“community-oriented policing

and problem solving,” we just

called it “police work.”

However, it is articulated or put

into practice, it means connecting

with the people you serve

in a way that builds trust and

solves problems. Take a look at

the dozens of articles online that

feature community policing and

social media tips to see if you

find a new way you can connect.

I cannot say enough about

the importance of volunteering

in the community you police.

People who volunteer are active

in their communities and are the

type of people we need spreading

the truth about our profession.

Being a public servant

should not stop when you take

the uniform off – volunteering

keeps you connected to the community

you are policing.

2. GO TO A TRADE SHOW

Trade shows are another great

new year resolution police officers

can easily take advantage

of. The law enforcement field

constantly has new tech and

products emerging that can improve

your performance on the

job. Attending the various trade

shows is a great way of getting

to see all of the new developments

and many times, getting

to test them as well.

The big three shows are: the

SHOT Show, ILEETA and IACP.

SHOT - The Shooting, Hunting,

and Outdoor Trade show (from

whence the SHOT acronym is

derived) is purely a trade show

and restricted to users and purchasers

for law enforcement,

military and outdoor products.

It is the only show I haven’t been

to, although I’m hoping to rectify

that this coming January in Las

Vegas. The dates of this year’s

show are January 18-21 in Vegas.

New Year Resolutions for 2022

• KEEP IN TOUCH WITH YOUR COMMUNITY

• GO TO TRADE SHOWS

• BOOST YOUR CAREER

• GET FIT & RESILIENT

• BE A BETTER CRIME FIGHTER

• BE SAFE & READ MORE IN 2022

• GO HOME SAFE TO YOUR FAMILY AFTER SHIFT

ILEETA (International Law Enforcement

Educators and Trainers

Association) - hosts an annual

training conference for its

members. The 2022 conference

is in St. Louis, March 14-19 and

features a product and equipment

show from major makers

and suppliers of law enforcement

equipment and technology.

If you want to hear the leading

police trainers on relevant topics

and see the latest in cop stuff,

ILEETA should be worked into

your personal or department

budget and calendar. Several

episodes of the Policing Matters

on Police1.com’s podcasts are

featured interviews with ILEETA

instructors.

One of the leading police

training classes at ILEETA in 2019

taught the Importance of being a

‘predator’ in a deadly confrontation.

A lot of different scenarios

police officers learn in response

to aggression used to be and still

is, unfortunately, to step back

and to create distance or reactionary

gaps. Although there may

be a time when this is appropriate,

normally we operate in very

close proximity to the subject.

And oftentimes it’s too late to go

backward. When you start going

backward, you begin to act like

prey. Unfortunately, when you

begin to act like prey, things go

in one direction: from bad to

worse.

IACP - The IACP (International

Association of Chiefs of

Police) 2022 conference is in

Dallas, October 15-18 and while

the conference is for members

only, the trade show is open

to law enforcement with credentials

after registration for a

pass, regardless of whether you

are an IACP member or attend

the conference sessions. You’ll

see everything from holsters to

helicopters, as well as informational

exhibits on services and

agencies you can network with

for your agency’s success. If you

are a trainer or have purchasing

authority, you don’t want to miss

this expansive trade show if you

have the opportunity.

2. BOOST MY CAREER

Check out the website Police1.

They offer hundreds of articles

on leadership and career success

as well as content from writers

who know the keys to getting

hired and promoted. These

seasoned officer’s aka writers,

provide valuable nuggets worth

their weight in gold for getting

you where you want to be. You’ll

find good counsel for solid, ethical

service that will give a boost

to anyone’s career and provide

guidance for your police retirement.

If you’re already in leadership,

you’ll find the voice of experience

of police leaders who have been

at the boss’ desk or in a supervisor’s

patrol car. With every

decision being scrutinized by a

reporter’s explosive headline or

a malcontent’s viral video, you’ll

want to hear from Police1’s writers

on topics in the news.

Top police training tip on” How

to improve your odds for promotion

in 2022”:

If I were a chief executive today,

I would evaluate promotional

candidates on their knowledge and

understanding of the issues that

create the greatest challenges

within the geopolitical arena. For

example, a clear understanding

of de-escalation and less-lethal

force options would be critical to

a police leadership role in the year

2022 and beyond.

3. GET MORE FIT AND RESILIENT

The BLUES is proud to have three

well known professionals on

its roster of columnists. Dr. Tina

Jaeckle, Samantha Horwitz and

John Salerno all provide valuable

insight into the mental health and

well-being of our readers. Each

month these seasoned professionals

dive into what it takes to keep

you safe both mentally as well as

physically.

26 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 27


2022 NEW YEAR RESOLUTIONS

Officer suicide, police fatigue,

stress-related maladies, healthy

relationships and care for injured

officers are all topics we need

to be familiar with. As a police

veteran, I can testify that open

discussions of these issues are

relatively new to the police profession.

Staying current on best

practices to keep yourself and

your brother and sister officers

healthy and serving well is a

survival skill, not just a warm

feeling.

Top police training tip on “How

to enjoy your life while avoiding

death by a thousand cuts”:

Some officers never learn to

accept positive critique. Instead,

they become defensive and internalize

anger toward anyone

who has the nerve to try to make

them better cops. If you can learn

to appreciate constructive criticism

from FTOs, assistant district

attorneys and supervisors

instead of letting it anger you, it

will eliminate a major irritant in

your life. It may also make you a

better cop.

4. BE A BETTER CRIME FIGHTER

One of my observations over

the years is that no knowledge

is lost in police work. I remember

a former meat cutter turned

deputy sheriff who was able to

solve a poaching case due to his

knowledge of how the game had

been field dressed, a cop who

was a coin collecting hobbyist

whose knowledge was key in

solving a burglary, and a farm

boy who spotted a stolen farm

implement that an urban officer

might never have recognized.

Top police training tip on” Writing

effective case summaries”:

One of the best ways to introduce

an investigation is by writing

an effective case summary,

which lays out your investigation

and findings succinctly and in an

orderly, logical and easy to read

format. This allows the prosecutor

to quickly gain a solid understanding

of the facts of the case,

as well as any potential defenses.

5. BE EVEN SAFER & KEEP

READING IN 2022

There are literally thousands of

online resources available to law

enforcement today. Of course,

we want you to continue reading

The BLUES each month, but online

police sites like Police1.com

and Policemagazine.com keep

you informed on a daily basis of

what’s happening in the world

of law enforcement. Also spend

time reading and studying Police

Survival techniques.

Many of PoliceOne’s digital

pages are devoted to issues

related to tactics, training and

legal updates around the use of

force and officer safety. Their

writers give significant attention

to active shooter, ambush and

major incident response. Because

these events are statistically rare

but could happen to any agency

or even a single officer, a review

of this knowledge base is time

well spent.

Top police training tip for “Preventing

active shooter drills from

going sideways”:

It’s not uncommon for a drill to

be executed then simply ended

without a plan for a thorough,

all-encompassing debrief. Make

sure you have a debriefing plan

in place so you can identify what

went right, spotlight what can be

refined and learn from what may

have gone wrong.

7. GO HOME TO YOU FAMILY

SAFE & SOUND AFTER SHIFT

Your number one goal should

always be “do your job to the

best of your ability and always,

always go home safe and sound

at the end of your shift.”

You may work in a safe, quiet

town where not much happens

or just the opposite where

a shooting or SWAT call is an

hourly occurrence. You are not

Superman, and you are not bullet

proof. On average, there are

at least one or two officers shot

in the line of duty every day in

America. One of those will not

make it. As a collective group,

we need to reduce the number

of officers that don’t make it

home to their families. EVERY-

ONE needs to make it home. Be

safe, be consistent, be vigilant,

and use your training. Your family

needs you and we need you.

Welcome

to

2022

28 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 29


REMEMBERING THOSE WE’VE LOST

Officers Lost Due to COVID in December 2021

DEPUTY SHERIFF

CLAY LIVINGSTON

SENIOR POLICE OFFICER

ERIC LINDSEY

POLICE OFFICER

THEODORE JAMES OHLEMEIER

DETECTIVE

JOSEPH POLLACK

CORPORAL

JACK LEE GUTHRIE, JR.

POLICE OFFICER

JEREMY MARTIN WILKINS

OFFICER

CHAD P. CHRISTIANSEN

SERGEANT

KEVIN REDDING

DETECTIVE SERGEANT

GARY R. TACCONE

30 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 31


REMEMBERING THOSE WE’VE LOST

Lost in the Line of Duty

Police Officer Richard Houston, II

Mesquite Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Friday, December 3, 2021

Age 46 Tour 21 Years Badge # 821

Police Officer Richard Houston was shot and killed while responding to a disturbance

in the parking lot of a grocery store at 1500 S Beltline Road. During

the investigation, a man produced a gun and opened fire on Officer Houston at

about 1:40 pm. Both Officer Houston and the subject were critically wounded

in the exchange of gunfire. Officer Houston was transported to a local hospital,

where he succumbed to his injuries.

Officer Houston had served with the Mesquite Police Department for 21 years.

He is survived by his wife, two daughters, and one son. His father had served

with the Mesquite Police Department.

Police Officer Zachary Cottongim

Louisville Metro Police Department, Kentucky

End of Watch Saturday, December 18, 2021

Age 29 Tour 7 Years 2 Months Badge # 7239

Police Officer Zachary Cottongim was struck and killed by an automobile as he

attended to an abandoned vehicle on the side of I-64 near the Mellwood Avenue

exit. He was standing on the side of the highway when he was struck by a passing

vehicle. Officer Cottongim was taken to the University of Louisville Hospital

where he succumbed to his injuries.

Officer Cottongim had served with the Louisville Metro Police Department for

seven years. He is survived by his wife and two children.

Deputy Jailer Robert Daniel

Graves County Jail, Kentucky

End of Watch Friday, December 10, 2021

Age 47 Tour N/A Badge # N/A

Deputy Jailer Robert Daniel was killed when a large tornado struck a building he

was working in while supervising inmates on work release. Deputy Jailer Daniel

was supervising seven inmates who were participating in the work release program

at the Mayfield Consumer Products’ candle factory at 112 Industrial Drive.

A large tornado that had tracked over 200 miles across multiple states struck

the city of Mayfield. Deputy Daniel guided inmates and employees into the

shelter. Almost all 100 people were in the shelter ahead of him when the roof

collapsed and killed him and numerous employees. Without the risks that he

took to save others, more employees from the factory would have been killed.

All seven inmates were rescued from the rubble; however, one escaped after

being treated at a local hospital. Dozens of people in multiple states were killed

as a result of the tornado.

Officer Daniel is survived by his four daughters, three sons, seven grandchildren,

two brothers, and father.

Police Officer Mia Danielle Figueroa-Goodwin

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department, NC

End of Watch Wednesday, December 22, 2021

Age 33 Tour 6 Years Badge # N/A

Police Officer Mia Figueroa-Goodwin was killed when a tractor-trailer struck

her patrol car on southbound I-85 near W.T. Harris Boulevard. She was blocking

traffic on the interstate at the scene of a previous crash when the tractor-trailer

struck her patrol car at about 3:30 am.

Officer Figueroa-Goodwin had served with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police

Department for over six years and was assigned to the University City Division.

She is survived by her husband and three children ages 3, 1, and 4 months.

32 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 33


REMEMBERING THOSE WE’VE LOST

Lost in the Line of Duty

Police Officer Keona Holley

Baltimore City Police Department, Maryland

End of Watch Thursday, December 23, 2021

Age 39 Tour 2 Years Badge # N/A

Police Officer Keona Holley succumbed to gunshot wounds sustained on December

16th, 2021, when she was ambushed in the 4400 block of Pennington

Avenue. She was sitting in her patrol car at about 1:30 am when two men

approached from behind and opened fire, shooting her multiple times. Both men

then went to another location approximately 10 miles away where they murdered

another man who owed one of them $100.Officer Holley was transported

to a local hospital where she remained in critical condition until succumbing to

her wounds on December 23rd, 2021.

Officer Holley had served with the Baltimore City Police Department for two

years. She is survived by her four children, parents, and sister.

Deputy Sheriff Sean Riley

Wayne County Sheriff’s Office, Illinois

End of Watch Wednesday, December 29, 2021

Age 23 Tour N/A Badge # N/A

Deputy Sheriff Sean Riley was shot and killed after responding to assist a

motorist near mile marker 115 on I-64 at about 5:00 am. Another officer responding

to back him up found him suffering from fatal gunshot wounds and

his patrol car was missing. The subject later abandoned the patrol car on I-64

before fleeing to St. Peters, Missouri, where he carjacked and shot a citizen. The

man then abandoned the vehicle before stealing another vehicle and returning

to Illinois. He was taken into custody in the early afternoon.

Deputy Riley is survived by his wife and three children.

Agent José Ferrer-Pabón

Puerto Rico Police Department, Puerto Rico

End of Watch Friday, December 24, 2021

Age 44 Tour N/A Badge # 35961

Agent José Ferrer-Pabón was killed in a vehicle crash on PR-110 near Rafael

Hernandez Airport in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, at about 12:30 am.

He was returning to the station at the end of his shift when an oncoming vehicle

traveling at a high rate of speed lost control and struck his patrol car head-on.

Agent Ferrer-Pabón and both occupants of the other vehicle were killed in the

collision.

Agent Ferrer-Pabón was assigned to the Stolen Vehicles Division.

Sergeant Marlene Rittmanic

Bradley Police Department, Illinois

End of Watch Wednesday, December 29, 2021

Age 49 Tour 14 Years Badge # N/A

Sergeant Marlene Rittmanic was shot and killed as she and another officer

investigated a noise complaint at the Comfort Inn at 1500 Illinois 50. The officers

had responded to the motel at approximately 9:30 to investigate reports

of barking dogs that were left unattended in a vehicle. They located the room

where the vehicle’s owner was staying and contacted the occupants. During

the encounter, the occupants attacked and shot both officers, killing Sergeant

Rittmanic. The other officer suffered a serious gunshot wound to the head.

The occupants fled the motel and remain at large.

Sergeant Rittmanic had served with the Bradley Police Department for 14 years.

She is survived by her wife.

34 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 35


BY MICHAEL BARRON

THEY DIDN’T MAKE IT

On Saturday, March 26, 2016, Des Moines Police Officer’s

Susan Farrell and Carlos Puente-Morales were killed

when their patrol car was struck head-on by a wrong

way, drunk driver on I-80, at mile marker 117.

They were transporting a prisoner from Council Bluffs

back to Des Moines when the crash occurred. Both officers,

the prisoner, and the driver of the wrong way vehicle

were all killed.

Officer Farrell had served with the Des Moines Police

Department for only five months and had previously

served with the Polk County Sheriff’s Office for 11 years.

Now I’m sure you ask what these two officers have to

do with a 2021 Memorial for Fallen Officers. After all

this was almost six years ago and as tragic as this was,

nearly 1576 officers have died in the line since that bleak

Saturday. But what is noteworthy for this special Memorial

Edition of The BLUES is the eulogy that Des Moines

police Chief Dana Wingert gave at Officer Farrell’s funeral.

If you have not seen this eulogy, (CLICK HERE TO

WATCH) watch it at least once. It is hard viewing, but

you will learn more about the soul of what makes a

police officer and others who serve in public safety in

those 9 minutes, 41 seconds than you would in a thousand

hours of academy classes.

36 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 37


“So why get in this business If this is how it ends?

You sign on because you know that you’re making a

difference and it would be chaos without you.”

On Saturday March 26, 2016, Chief Dana Wingert looked

out the window of his office in the Des Moines police

station, one of the worst days in the department’s history.

He stared at the police car parked across from the station.

A black shroud with a blue sash through the center

stretched across the cruiser’s windshield. Fellow officers

put the car there as a memorial to fellow officers Susan

Farrell and Carlos Puente-Morales. A tribute to the two

officers who had died in a fiery head-on crash on Interstate

80 near Waukee shortly after 12:30 a.m.

Throughout the day, people came and laid flowers on

the hood of the car and planted signs and wreaths in the

ground in front of the vehicle’s wheels and bumper. A soft

rain fell. At one point, Wingert saw a man kneeling in

prayer by the car. The man, a stranger to Wingert, prayed

for 40 minutes in the rain.

“With the rain on my window, he couldn’t see the tears

when he walked away,” Wingert said. “A lot of people are

hurting. Not just us. “

There was no foggy glass to hide Wingert’s grief as he

delivered the first of two eulogies for his fallen officers

that following Wednesday at Lutheran Church of Hope in

West Des Moines. Sadness shook his body. He shifted anxiously

on his feet as he spoke for nearly 10 minutes at the

memorial service for Farrell. His voice quivered at times.

But in the midst of that pain, Wingert rose to the occasion.

Near the end of the talk, Wingert asked everyone in

attendance who serve in public safety to stand.

38 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 39

38 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 39


“Bear with me,” he said. “I just need you for a second.”

Scores of police officers, sheriff’s deputies, dispatchers,

firefighters and medics rose.

“So why get in this business?” he asked. “If this is how

it ends, if this is what it’s all about, why sign on?

“Regardless, if you’re fighting fires, fighting crime or

providing medical care to save lives, you sign on because

you know there are people that depend on you,” he continued.

“You sign on because you know that you’re making

a difference and it would be chaos without you. You

sign on because you truly care about the welfare of others.

Don’t ever forget for a second why you signed on.”

Wingert then asked Farrell’s widower, Jesse Farrell, a

Pleasant Hill police officer, and his family to stand. He

asked them to look around at the scores of public safety

servants standing in the room.

“Don’t just look at the sheer numbers,” Wingert said.

“Look into their eyes. They signed on because there are

people like this in this room that will always be there for

you. It is who we are. It is what we do. There is nothing

quite like it. And Officer Susan Farrell will always be a

part of this family.”

Those in attendance applauded for nearly 10 seconds.

In the midst of honoring the fallen, Wingert found a way

to inspire those left to carry on. Wingert paused as the

Farrell family and the public safety officers sat down.

Weariness marked his face.

He looked like a man who could add up the minutes

of sleep he’d had over the last five days and never quite

reach a full hour. Yet the compassion and strength of the

Des Moines police chief shone through.

He drew a deep breath. And then he said goodbye.

“They didn’t make it...Those are the words that

we’ll never forget. But I stand here before you today

to argue that statement … because Officer Susan

Farrell and Officer Carlos Puente-Morales did make

it. And now they sit in God’s house, and they watch

over us, and they guide us, and they will for all of our

days.”

40 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 41

40 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 41


“Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be

called the children of God.”

2020 TEXAS OFFICERS

KILLED IN THE LINE OF DUTY

Wingert closed his eulogy with the simple sentence that

began it: “They didn’t make it.”

“Those are the words that we’ll never forget,” he said.

“But I stand here before you today to argue that statement

… because Officer Susan Farrell and Officer Carlos Puente-Morales

did make it. And now they sit in God’s house,

and they watch over us, and they guide us, and they will

for all of our days.”

He closed with a quote from Jesus Christ’s Sermon

on the Mount, one of the Beatitudes, from Matthew 5:9:

“Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called the

children of God.”

Wingert gathered his crumpled, tightly rolled notes and

exited the podium before the torrent of emotion clearly

bubbling beneath the surface burst forth on the pulpit.

The chief sat down, emotionally and physically spent. Yet

a day later, somehow, he had to find the strength to stand

again to honor another fallen officer.

This scene, funerals for hundreds of officers from across

the country, played out week after week, year after year.

On average almost one a day for the past two years. And

police chiefs just like Chief Dana Wingert had to tell the

surviving families that their son or daughter, husband or

wife, mother or father, that “I’m sorry, they didn’t make it.”

Police Officer

Nicholas Lee Reyna

Deputy Sheriff

John Andrew Rhoden

Deputy Sheriff

Cornelius B. Anderson

Police Officer Alan

Daniel McCollum

Police Officer

Jason Michael Knox

Police Officer Sheena

Dae Yarbrough-Powell

Deputy Sheriff

Richard E. Whitten

Deputy Constable

Caleb Daniel Rule

Investigator

Lemuel Delray Bruce

Senior Deputy

Christopher Korzilius

Police Officer

Ismael Z. Chavez

Sergeant

Harold Lloyd Preston

Deputy Senior Deputy Sheriff

Christopher Richard E. Whitten Korzilius

Police Officer

Edelmiro Garza, Jr.

Sergeant

Sean Sebastian Rios

** All Photos provided by OPMP.ORG WEBSITE Copyrighted ©The Officer Down Memorial Page

42 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 43

42 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 43


These past two years have been especially difficult

with over 581 officers losing their lives to COVID alone.

This horrible pandemic has claimed more police officer’s

lives in the past two years then the previous three

years combined. And unfortunately, it continues to this

day with no end in sight.

The following chart is a tragic reminder of how many

brothers and sisters in Blues we’ve lost in 2020 & 2021.

“Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be

called the children of God.”

2021 TEXAS OFFICERS

KILLED IN THE LINE OF DUTY

Police Officer

Mitchell Aaron Penton

Trooper

Chad Michael Walker

Sergeant

Stephen Jones

Deputy Sheriff

Samuel A. Leonard

Sergeant

Joshua Blake Bartlett

Police Officer

Andrew “Andy” Traylor

Senior Police Officer

William Jeffrey

Deputy Constable

Kareem Atkins

Senior Patrolman

Sherman Otto Benys, Jr.

Police Officer

Richard Houston, II

** CHART provided by OPMP.ORG WEBSITE Copyrighted ©The Officer Down Memorial Page ** All Photos provided by OPMP.ORG WEBSITE Copyrighted ©The Officer Down Memorial Page

44 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 45

44 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 45


Each month, The BLUES dedicates an entire section

to fallen officers from across the U.S. For those Texas

officers we attend the funerals and do our best to

create a lasting memory within our pages for the families

of the Fallen to hold on. And to show respect and

sadness for our brothers and sisters in Blue. But this

year, we wanted to do more. So, we created a special

section with the photos of every officer that lost their

life in 2021. Unfortunately, it’s quite lengthy. But please

take the time to look at each and every photo and say a

prayer for their families both blue and blood.

For the families, I offer my sincerest condolences and

want you to know that you have hundreds of thousands

of Blue family here to support you and care for

you. The BLUES has a special hot line for you to call

24/7 if you need anything, and I mean anything at all.

We will use every resource at our disposal to assist

you. We’d also like to thank the good folks at Officer

Down Memorial Page(ODMP.org) for providing all the

information and photos seen here.

I leave you with the following:

The police officer who puts their life on

the line with no superpowers, no X-Ray

vision, no super-strength, no ability to fly,

and above all no invulnerability to bullets,

reveals far greater virtue than Superman -

who is only a mere superhero.

ELIEZER YUDLOWSKI

2020 - 385 Line of Duty Deaths

254 - to COVID

** CHART provided by OPMP.ORG WEBSITE Copyrighted ©The Officer Down Memorial Page

2021 - 487 Line of Duty Deaths

327 - to COVID

** CHART provided by OPMP.ORG WEBSITE Copyrighted ©The Officer Down Memorial Page

46 46 The The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 47


** CHART provided by OPMP.ORG WEBSITE Copyrighted ©The Officer Down Memorial Page

48 48 The The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 49 49


FROM THE PUBLISHER’S DESK

michael barron

In this special Memorial Tribute,

we pay homage to the 872

men and women of law enforcement

that made the ultimate

sacrifice in 2020 and 2021.

They lost their lives protecting

the lives of a public they didn’t

even know.

Eight Hundred Seventy-Two

brave officers, men and women

whose backgrounds and stories

are as diverse as our nation

itself, gave their lives to protect

our safety and to defend

our freedoms. They are forever

bound together by an unbreakable

bond of valor. They each

gave, as Lincoln said, the “last

full measure of devotion” to the

country we love so dearly.

To the husbands, wives, parents,

children, siblings, friends,

and fellow officers who have

been touched by the lives we

honor, you have been called

upon to bear a special burden.

And, though there is no speech

or ceremony that can ease your

pain, we present this special

Tribute to honor their courage

and to fill your hearts with our

gratitude.

The word vigil derives from

the Latin word for “wakefulness.”

It means, literally, “a

period of purposeful sleeplessness.”

That is, in a sense, what

we are here to do: to refuse to

sleep, to refuse to forget the

heroes we’ve lost or their work

that remains undone.

Though we may grieve, we

must emphatically reject despair.

Unlike most other careers,

the brave men and women

who embark upon a life in law

enforcement know fully that

they might one day be called

upon to lay down their lives in

the call of duty. Those we honor

today made that choice willingly.

Indeed, they embraced it.

And that is why their ultimate

sacrifice means so much. They

served and sacrificed for a

purpose far greater than themselves.

There is no truer definition

of a hero.

For all those officers who

read this today, who continue

to answer the call to keep our

country safe, you know that every

kiss from your spouse, every

hug from a child, every visit

with a parent, means a little

bit more. So please honor the

lives of your fallen colleagues

by giving as much of yourself to

your loved ones as you give every

day in service to the citizens

of your city, county or state.

We all know that without their

love and support, your service

would not be possible. Family is

everything.

It is up to all of us to bear

true witness to the bravery and

sacrifice made by the heroes

we honor today by remembering

that we all have a personal

role to play in keeping our

neighborhoods safe and our

nation secure. We must take

responsibility for the problems

we face in our communities and

take a stand against crimes both

large and small. We must help

each other in times of need, and

we must teach our children the

difference between right and

wrong.

The candles we lit last May

at Police Memorials around the

country, did not burn for long, but

they remind us that we must all

be the keepers of the flame once

borne by our fallen heroes. Let us

bring this light back to our cities,

our neighborhoods, our streets,

and our homes. Let us light the

darker corners of our country

where crime still thrives, where

children live in fear, and where

law enforcement is threatened.

I’ve attended many a vigil for

fallen officers these past two

years, but now is the time we

must be vigilant. It’s time we bind

ourselves together with a new

bond, a new goal of making our

country a safer place to live. Let

us continue to honor our fallen

heroes every day.

We read in the Scriptures,

“Greater love has no one than

this, that a man lay down his life

for his friends.” Let us remember

these words today and always.

And, in deepest gratitude, let us

be secure in the knowledge that

our fellow officers rest in peace

and in a place of honor.

May God bless the men and

women who have given their

lives in service to our nation.

Thank you and God Bless you all.

Ask me for a free insurance review.

Remembering

our

First Responders

who’ve made the

Ultimate Sacrifice

Honoring Our Fallen Officers

To the family and friends of all fallen officers,

we are sorry for your loss and are

forever grateful for the sacrifices you and

your family have made.

Our staff is here to assist you in any way

we can, so please call or come by and let

us know what we can do.

Sean Mertz

713-852-6500

5311 FM 1960E, Ste F

Humble, Tx 77346

Subject to terms, conditions and availability. Savings vary. Allstate Property and Casualty Insurance Co. © Allstate Insurance Company


FROM THE GUEST EDITOR’S DESK

rex evans

Since January of 2020

through December of

2021, a total of 872 Law

Enforcement Officers have

lost their lives in the Line

of Duty. These incredible

men and women gave

everything of themselves,

so that others might go on

living.

You’re seeing the right

number. 872. Just under

1,000 people, good

people who were just

like you and I. They left

their homes, families and

friends to serve and protect

their respective communities.

Each of them,

finding within themselves

the strength to face the

age-old dangers of police

work, coupled with the

new invisible and deadly

threat of COVID.

Some of these men and

women were beaten, shot,

stabbed, struck by a motor

vehicle or drowned.

Others, by some medical

condition which occurred

while they were in the

performance of their duty.

Then of course, there are

the hundreds of Law Enforcement

Officers who

fell from the effects of

COVID and the terrible

toll this virus takes upon

the body.

If you were to review the

“ROLL CALL” of names,

you’d see behind each

name was a face. A son or

daughter. A husband or

wife. A mothers or father.

You’d see the loss of these

amazing people who, just

like you and I, wore a

badge, was not only profound

in their respective

communities but throughout

the Nation.

Not since records have

been kept and monitored

with regards to Law Enforcement

Officer Deaths,

have there ever been such

extreme numbers. In a

very real sense, our profession

has skyrocketed, not

only being the most dangerous,

but the deadliest.

Therefore, I wish to convey

my deepest sympathy

to the families of these

fallen officers. I know

these past two years have

been extremely trying and

difficult for every who

carries a badge. But I ask

you to please never give in

or give up. What you do

matters. What all of us do,

matters.

For the only thing between

us and those that

would harm us is a Thin

Blue Line. It is that Thin

Blue Line that binds us

together and gives up

strength to carry on the

memory of those we’ve

lost.


Let Us Pray for Our Police Officers

A Police Officer’s Prayer: Author Unknown

Oh Almighty God,

Whose Great Power and Eternal Wisdom

Embraces the Universe,

Watch Over All Policemen and

Law Enforcement Officers.

Protect Them from Harm in the Performance of

Their Duty to Stop Crime, Robberies,

Riots, and Violence.

We Pray,

Help Them Keep Our Streets and

Homes Safe Day and Night.

We Recommend Them to Your Loving Care

Because Their Duty is Dangerous.

Grant Them Your Unending Strength and

Courage in Their Daily Assignments.

Dear God,

Protect These Brave Men and Women,

Grant Them Your Almighty Protection,

Unite Them Safely with Their Families

After Duty Has Ended.

Amen.

Psalm 23 - The Lord is my Shepherd

The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.

He makes me lie down in green pastures;

He leads me beside still waters;

He restores my soul.

He leads me in right paths for his name’s sake.

Even though I walk through the darkest valley,

I fear no evil;

For you are with me;

Your rod and your staff - they comfort me.

You prepare a table before me in the presence

of my enemies;

You anoint my head with oil;

My cup overflows.

Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all

the days of my life,

And I shall dwell in the house of the Lord my

whole life long.


Sergeant Gordon William Best

North Myrtle Beach DPS

End of Watch Friday, January 1, 2021

Sergeant Daniel Marcus Mobley

DeKalb County Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, January 2, 2021

Constable Cecil Nunley

Sequatchie County Constable’s Office

End of Watch Saturday, January 2, 2021

Lieutenant Jeff Bain

DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, January 3, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Nicholas Howell

Henry County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, January 3, 2021

Sergeant Randall Sims

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Sunday, January 3, 2021

Special Deputy Marshal Havonia Denise Holley

United States Marshals Service

End of Watch Tuesday, January 5, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Jonathan David Price

Marion County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Wednesday, January 6, 2021

Police Officer Jay Hughes

Kalispel Tribal Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, January 6, 2021


HONORS, RESPECTS AND REMEMBERS

OUR FALLEN POLICE OFFICERS

Police Officer Brian David Sicknick

United States Capitol Police

End of Watch Thursday, January 7, 2021

Sergeant David G. Crumpler

Henry County Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, January 7, 2021

First Sergeant Timothy Lee Howell

North Carolina Highway Patrol

End of Watch Thursday, January 7, 2021

Lieutenant William Lyle Gardner

Denver City Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, January 7, 2021

Conservation Officer Steven Reighard

Iowa Department of Natural Resources

End of Watch Friday, January 8, 2021

Police Officer Arturo Villegas

Alamo Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, January 10, 2021

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Police Officer Tyler Britt

Chandler Police Department

End of Watch Monday, January 11, 2021

Sergeant Brian Roy LaVigne

Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Monday, January 11, 2021

Agent Luis A. Marrero-Díaz

Puerto Rico Police Department

End of Watch Monday, January 11, 2021


Agent Luis X. Salamán-Conde

Carolina Municipal Police Department

End of Watch Monday, January 11, 2021

Agent Eliezer Hernández-Cartagena

Carolina Municipal Police Department

End of Watch Monday, January 11, 2021

Police Officer Melton “Fox” Gore

Horry County Police Department

End of Watch Tuesday, January 12, 2021

Sergeant Frederick H. “Butch” Cameron

Fairfax County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, January 12, 2021

Detective Sergeant Stephen R. Desfosses

Norton Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Police Officer Hector Moya

Newark Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Chief of Police Tony M. Jordan

Middleburg Borough Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Investigator Richard Anthony Sepolio, Sr.

Harris County District Attorney’s Office

End of Watch Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Police Officer Joseph Henry Montgomery

Arizona State University Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, January 14, 2021


Corporal Christine Peters

Greenbelt Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, January 14, 2021

Constable Sherry Kay Langford

Henderson County Constable - Precinct 1

End of Watch Thursday, January 14, 2021

Lieutenant Treva Preston

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Friday, January 15, 20211

Corrections Officer IV Alfred Jimenez

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Friday, January 15, 2021

Police Officer Jerry Steven Hemphill

Lanier Technical College Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, January 16, 2021

Sergeant Edward John Marcurella, Jr.

Colleton County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Saturday, January 16, 2021

Lieutenant John Reynolds

Garden Grove Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, January 17, 2021

Corrections Officer Joseph A. Martini

Ulster County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, January 17, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Adam Gibson

Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department

End of Watch Monday, January 18, 2021


Corrections Deputy II Ralph Edward Serrano

San Diego County Probation Department

End of Watch Monday, January 18, 2021

Court Bailiff Gerald “Bear” Smith

Pahrump Justice Court

End of Watch Monday, January 18, 2021

Police Officer Brandon M. Stalker

Toledo Police Department

End of Watch Monday, January 18, 2021

Warrants Officer Toby Keiser

Knox County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Monday, January 18, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Jacinto R. Navarro, Jr.

Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, January 19, 2021

Officer Byron Don Shields

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Wednesday, January 20, 2021

Lieutenant Robert Van Zeyl

Suffolk County Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, January 20, 2021

Lieutenant Frank Arnold

Office of Protective Services

End of Watch Friday, January 22, 2021

Special Agent Wayne Douglas Snyder

Georgia Department of Corrections

End of Watch Saturday, January 23, 2021


Lieutenant Juan Rafael Rivera-Padua

Puerto Rico Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, January 23, 2021

Special Deputy Marshal Craig Alan Kriner

United States Marshals Service,

End of Watch Saturday, January 23, 2021

Captain Michael D’Angelo Garigan

Gordon County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, January 24, 2021

Sergeant Charles F. Dotson

Baton Rouge Police Department

End of Watch Monday, January 25, 2021

Deputy Sheriff II Frank Gonzalez Holguin, III

Tulare County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Wednesday, January 27, 2021

Auxiliary Sergeant Louis M. Livatino

Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Wednesday, January 27, 2021

Correctional Officer John Michael Bowe

Missouri Department of Corrections

End of Watch Wednesday, January 27, 2021

Director of Field Operations Beverly Good

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Thursday, January 28, 2021

Sergeant Tommy W. Cudd

Union County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Thursday, January 28, 2021


Sergeant Jeffery Robert Smith

Berry College Police Department,

End of Watch Friday, January 29, 2021

Special Agent Robert Allan Mayer, Jr.

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Saturday, January 30, 2021

Sergeant William Brautigam

New York City Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, January 31, 202

This Memorial Tribute is dedicated to

Natividad “Nat” Gutierrez

Co-Founder of the BLUES

May 18, 1953 - August 17,2021

Special Agent Jimmie John Daniels

Federal Bureau of Investigation

End of Watch Monday, February 1, 2021

Correctional Officer Juan Llanes

Miami-Dade County Department of Corrections

End of Watch Monday, February 1, 2021

Sergeant Grace A. Bellamy

Georgia Department of Corrections

End of Watch Monday, February 1, 2021

Lieutenant Michael Boutte

Hancock County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Monday, February 1, 2021

Special Agent Laura Ann Schwartzenberger

Federal Bureau of Investigation

End of Watch Tuesday, February 2, 2021

Special Agent Daniel Alfin

Federal Bureau of Investigation

End of Watch Tuesday, February 2, 2021


Detention Officer Robert Perez

Harris County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, February 2, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Jack Edward Gwynes

Nassau County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Wednesday, February 3, 2021

Agent Juan Rosado-López

Puerto Rico Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, February 3, 2021

Corrections Officer IV Vicky James

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Wednesday, February 10, 2021

Investigator Eddie B. Hutchison, III

Walker County Criminal District Attorney’s Office

End of Watch Wednesday, February 10, 2021

Special Deputy Marshal Hugh Boyd Bennett

United States Marshals Service

End of Watch Wednesday, February 10, 2021

Patrolman Darian Jarrott

New Mexico State Police

End of Watch Thursday, February 4, 2021

Correctional Lieutenant III Anthony Lynn Hardie

North Carolina DPS

End of Watch Saturday, February 6, 2021

Detective Pedro Junior “Pete” Mejia

Pasadena Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, February 6, 2021

Chief of Police Timothy John Sheehan

California Borough Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, February 11, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Donald Raymond Gilreath, III

Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Friday, February 12, 2021

Police Officer Mitchell Aaron Penton

Dallas Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, February 13, 2021

Officer Cesar Dangaran Sibonga

y - Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Sunday, February 7, 2021

Special Deputy Marshal Vincent A. Gala, Jr.

United States Marshals Service

End of Watch Monday, February 8, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Ross Dixon

Cambria County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, February 9, 2021

Officer Genaro Guerrero

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Monday, February 15, 2021

Corrections Officer IV Tawiwo Obele

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Tuesday, February 16, 2021

Major Esteban “Stevie” Ramirez, III

Bell County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, February 16, 2021


Deputy Constable Manuel Phillipe De La Rosa

Hays County Constable’s Office, Precinct 2

End of Watch Tuesday, February 16, 2021

Sergeant Richard Paul Brown

Fresno Police Department,

End of Watch Wednesday, February 17, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Michael Magli

Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Wednesday, February 17, 2021

Reserve Deputy Constable Martinus Mitchum

Second City Court of New Orleans Constable

End of Watch Friday, February 26, 2021

Police Officer Dominic Jared Winum

Stanley Police Department,

End of Watch Friday, February 26, 2021

Captain Justin Williams Bedwell

Decatur County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Monday, March 1, 2021

Police Officer Horacio Dominguez

Miccosukee Tribal Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, February 21, 2021

Lieutenant Eugene Lasco

Indiana Department of Correction

End of Watch Sunday, February 21, 2021

Natural Resources Officer Jason Lagore

Ohio Department of Natural Resources

End of Watch Tuesday, February 23, 2021

Police Officer II Jose Luis Anzora

Los Angeles Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, March 3, 2021

Corrections Officer III Tracey Adams

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Saturday, March 6, 2021

Officer Crispin San Juan San Jose

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Parole Officer Troy K. Morin

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Tuesday, February 23, 2021

Officer Carlos Mendoza

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Wednesday, February 24, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Thomas Albanese

Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department

End of Watch Thursday, February 25, 2021

Officer Jesse Peter Madsen

Tampa Police Department

End of Watch Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Sergeant Barry Edwin Henderson

Polk County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Stanley “Allen” Burdic

Douglas County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Thursday, March 11, 2021


Police Officer Gary Hibbs

Chicago Heights Police Department

End of Watch Friday, March 12, 2021

Border Patrol Agent Alejandro Flores-Bañuelos

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Monday, March 15, 2021

Captain Justin Williams Bedwell

Decatur County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Monday, March 1, 2021

Senior Master Trooper Todd Anthony Hanneken

Illinois State Police

End of Watch Thursday, March 25, 2021

Corporal Kyle Jeffrey Davis

Washington County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Thursday, March 25, 2021

Trooper Joseph Gallagher

New York State Police

End of Watch Friday, March 26, 2021

Police Officer Kevin Valencia

Orlando Police Department

End of Watch Monday, March 15, 2021

Sergeant LaShonda Owens

Northampton County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Thursday, March 18, 2021

Police Officer Matt North

Bernice Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, March 20, 2021

Sergeant Shane Owens

Broward County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Saturday, March 27, 2021

Trooper Chad Michael Walker

Texas Department of Public Safety

End of Watch Sunday, March 28, 2021

Reserve Deputy Sheriff James Driver

Monroe County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Monday, March 29, 2021

Police Officer Eric Huston Talley

Boulder Police Department

End of Watch Monday, March 22, 2021

Chief of Police Fred Alan Posavetz

Clinton Township Police Department,

End of Watch Monday, March 22, 2021

Correctional Officer Robert McFarland

Iowa Department of Corrections

End of Watch Tuesday, March 23, 2021

Corrections Officer Luis Arturo Hernandez, Sr.

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Police Officer William Francis Evans

United States Capitol Police

End of Watch Friday, April 2, 2021

Lieutenant James Kouski

Hometown Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, April 3, 2021


Police Officer Brent Nelson Hall

Newton Grove Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, April 3, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Joseph Brandon Gore

Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Saturday, April 3, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Christopher Wilson Knight

Bibb County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, April 6, 2021

Corrections Officer Jimmy Garcia

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Thursday, April 15, 2021

Police Officer David Parde

Lexington Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, April 18, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Terry Dyer

Madison County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Sergeant James K. Smith

Iowa State Patrol

End of Watch Friday, April 9, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Thomas Patrick Barnes

Jefferson Davis County Sheriff’s Department

End of Watch Saturday, April 10, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Carlos Antonio Hernandez

Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, April 11, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Alexander Gwosdz

Harris County Sheriff’s Office,

End of Watch Thursday, April 22, 2021

Lieutenant Adam Dale Whisenant

Division of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco

End of Watch Tuesday, April 27, 2021

Police Officer Anastasio Tsakos

New York City Police Department

End of Watch Tuesday, April 27, 2021

Border Patrol Agent Christopher Shane Simpkins

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Monday, April 12, 2021

Detective Harry O. D’Onofrio

New York City Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Detention Deputy Mark Edward Anderson

Olmsted County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Thursday, April 15, 2021

Corporal Keith Heacook

Delmar Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Sergeant Chris Ward

Watauga County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Logan Fox

Watauga County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Wednesday, April 28, 2021


Police Officer Christopher Farrar

Chandler Police Department

End of Watch Friday, April 30, 2021

Detention Services Officer Michael Wall

Los Angeles County Probation Department

End of Watch Friday, April 30, 2021

Patrol Officer David Alan Marshall

Texas Christian University Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, May 1, 2021

Deputy Sheriff James Herrera

Denver Sheriff’s Department

End of Watch Sunday, May 16, 2021

Lieutenant Adam Gustafson

West Fargo Police Department

End of Watch Tuesday, May 18, 2021

Superintendent Scott D. “Slip” Mahoney

Delaware County Park Police and Fire Safety

End of Watch Tuesday, May 18, 2021

Sergeant John Burright

Oregon State Police

End of Watch Tuesday, May 4, 2021

Border Patrol Agent Freddie Vasquez

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Saturday, May 8, 2021

Detective Luca Benedetti

San Luis Obispo Police Department

End of Watch Monday, May 10, 2021

Police Officer Chris Oberheim

Champaign Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, May 19, 2021

Police Officer Jeremy Brinton

Nogales Police Department

End of Watch Friday, May 21, 2021

Corporal Thomas Wade Frazier

Artesia Police Department

End of Watch Friday, May 21, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Samuel Alexander Leonard

Concho County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Monday, May 10, 2021

Sergeant Stephen Jones

Concho County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Monday, May 10, 2021

Police Officer Jimmy Inn

Stockton Police Department

End of Watch Tuesday, May 11, 2021

Police Officer Christopher Scott “Scotty” Triplett

Memphis Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, May 22, 2021

Detective Stephen Christopher Arnold

Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, May 23, 2021

Conservation Officer Sarah Ann Backer-Grell

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

End of Watch Monday, May 24, 2021


Deputy Sheriff Daniel “Duke” Trujillo

Denver Sheriff’s DepartmentEnd of Watch

Wednesday, May 26, 2021

Trooper John Harris

Mississippi Department of Public Safety

End of Watch Friday, May 28, 2021

Border Patrol Agent Juan Manuel Urrutia

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Friday, May 28, 2021

Deputy Sheriff William H. Smith

Baldwin County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, June 6, 2021

Police Officer Steven L. Rodriguez

New York City Police Department,End of Watch

Wednesday, June 9, 2021

Sergeant Erasmo García-Torres

Puerto Rico Police Department,

End of Watch Thursday, June 10, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Dustin Kyle Speckels

Hays County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, May 30, 2021

Police Officer Ginarro Allen New

Phoenix Police Department

End of Watch Monday, May 31, 2021

Sergeant Dominic Vaca

San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department

End of Watch Monday, May 31, 2021

Police Officer Alexandra Brenneman Harris

Seattle Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, June 13, 2021

Sergeant Paul Keith Mooney

Texas Department of Public Safety

End of Watch Monday, June 14, 2021

Police Officer Joseph William Burson

Holly Springs Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, June 17, 2021

Detective Ryan Park

San Diego Police Department

End of Watch Friday, June 4, 2021

Detective Jamie Huntley-Park

San Diego Police Department

End of Watch Friday, June 4, 2021

Police Officer Enmanuel Familia

Worcester Police Department

End of Watch Friday, June 4, 2021

Sergeant Thomas E. Sawyer

Hammond Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, June 17, 2021

Correctional Officer Gabriel Forrest

Washington State Department of Corrections

End of Watch Thursday, June 17, 2021

Sergeant Rick Entmeier

Fort Smith Police Department

End of Watch Friday, June 18, 2021


Texas Peace Officers

Police Officer Lewis Franklin Cantey

Grand River Dam Authority Police Department

End of Watch Friday, June 18, 2021

Lieutenant Clinton Joseph Ventrca

Corinth Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, June 20, 2021

Police Officer Gordon Beesley

Arvada Police Department

End of Watch Monday, June 21, 2021

Police Officer Jason Timothy Swanger

Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, June 24, 2021

Police Officer Kevin Apple

Pea Ridge Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, June 26, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Anthony Redondo

Imperial County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Saturday, June 26, 2021

The BLUES Police Magazine was founded

in Humble, Texas in 1984. For 38 years

The BLUES has called Texas home and

covered every aspect of law enforcement

during that time. We’d like to honor all the Officers

from Texas that lost their lives in 2020 & 2021

with these special memorial pages.

Lieutenant Leslie Lentz

Missouri Department of Corrections

End of Watch Thursday, July 1, 2021

Detective Jon Alexander Cooke

Hollywood Police Department

End of Watch Friday, July 2, 2021

Police Officer Clinton Adolphis Martin

Alpharetta Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, July 3, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Detective Greg Ferency

Terre Haute Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, July 7, 2021

Captain Clay Morsell Germany

Wichita Police Department

End of Watch Friday, July 9, 2021

Police Officer William Earl Collins, Jr.

Doyline Police Department

End of Watch Friday, July 9, 2021

Police Officer

Nicholas Lee Reyna

Lubbock Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Saturday, January 11, 2020

Sergeant Joshua Blake Bartlett

Lubbock County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Thursday, July 15, 2021

Detective Juan Alfonso “John” Delgado

Bay City Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, July 15, 2021

Officer Ruben Facio

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Saturday, July 17, 2021

Reserve Deputy Sheriff Tom Larry Hoobler

Childress County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Saturday, July 17, 2021

Sergeant Sonny Lee Orbin

Missouri Department of Corrections

End of Watch Sunday, July 18, 2021

Police Officer Ricky Neal Roberts

McLennan Community College Police

End of Watch Monday, July 19, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Deputy Sheriff Ray W. McCrary, Jr.

Shelby County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, July 20, 2021

Officer Michael Andrew Sillman

Marion County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, July 20, 2021

Correctional Officer Robert Lewis Welch, III

Missouri Department of Corrections

End of Watch Thursday, July 22, 2021

Police Officer

Alan Daniel McCollum

Corpus Christi Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Friday, January 31, 2020

Police Officer J. Adam Ashworth

St. George Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, July 22, 2021

Sergeant Jeremy Brown

Clark County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Friday, July 23, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Phillip Jesse Campas

Kern County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, July 25, 2021

Corrections Officer IV Daniel Giorgi

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Sunday, July 25, 2021

Police Officer Marquis Dewon Moorer

Selma Police Department

End of Watch Tuesday, July 27, 2021

Police Officer Ryan Andrew Bialke

Red Lake Nation Police Department

End of Watch Tuesday, July 27, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Lieutenant Matthew D. Razukas

New Jersey State Police

End of Watch Tuesday, July 27, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Justin Smith

Burt County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Wednesday, July 28, 2021

Lieutenant Gilbert Clayton McClure

Texarkana Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, July 28, 2021

Deputy Sheriff

Richard Edward Whitten

Liberty County Sheriff’s Office, Texas

End of Watch Monday, February 3, 2020

Trooper Micah David May

Nevada Highway Patrol

End of Watch Thursday, July 29, 2021

Police Officer Jonathan M. Gumm

United States Department of Defense

End of Watch Thursday, July 29, 2021

Supervisory Border Patrol Agent Daniel P. Cox

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Saturday, July 31, 2021

Police Officer Lewis Andrew “Andy” Traylor

Austin Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, July 31, 2021

Border Patrol Agent Edgardo Acosta-Feliciano

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Saturday, July 31, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Shaun Christopher Waters

Harris County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, August 1, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Corrections Officer Maurice “Reese” Jackson

Robertsdale Police Departmen

End of Watch Tuesday, August 3, 2021

Sheriff Lee D. Vance

Hinds County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, August 3, 2021

Police Officer Scott Russell Dawley

Nelsonville Police Department

End of Watch Tuesday, August 3, 2021

Senior Deputy

Christopher Scott Korzilius

Travis County Sheriff’s Office, Texas

End of Watch Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Police Officer George Gonzalez

United States Department of Defense

End of Watch Tuesday, August 3, 2021

Police Officer Brian Russell Pierce, Jr.

Brooklyn Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, August 4, 2021

Deputy Sheriff James Morgan

Baxter County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Thursday, August 5, 2021

Police Officer Bryan Christopher Hawkins

Lake City Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, August 5, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Brandon A. Shirley

Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Thursday, August 5, 2021

Police Officer Ella Grace French

Chicago Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, August 7, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Lieutenant Lonny Hempstead

Lafayette County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, August 10, 2021

Lieutenant Dale Sylvester, Jr.

Port Wentworth Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, August 11, 2021

Reserve Sergeant John Richard Bullard, Jr.

Independence Police Department,

End of Watch Wednesday, August 11, 2021

Sheriff

Kirk A. Coker

Hutchinson County Sheriff’s Office, Texas

End of Watch Sunday, March 29, 2020

Correctional Deputy Michael Andrew Nowak

Leon County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Thursday, August 12, 2021

Captain Ramsey O’Dell Mannon

Effingham County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Thursday, August 12, 2021

Correctional Officer Dennis Bennett

Missouri Department of Corrections

End of Watch Thursday, August 12, 2021

Narcotics Agent Robert Daye Daffin, Jr.

George County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Thursday, August 12, 2021

Special Agent Gregory Cleveland Holland

United States Department of Veterans Affairs

End of Watch Friday, August 13, 2021

Police Officer Juan Manuel Gomez-Lopez

Pelham Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, August 14, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Police Officer Jennifer B. Sepot

Fort Lauderdale Police Department,

End of Watch Saturday, August 14, 2021

Trooper Lazaro R. Febles

Florida Highway Patrol

End of Watch Saturday, August 14, 2021

Sergeant Ryan J. Proxmire

Kalamazoo County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, August 15, 2021

Police Officer

Justin Read Putnam

San Marcos Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Saturday, April 18, 2020

Officer Robert Craig Cloninger

Mount Gilead Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, August 15, 2021

Sergeant Steven Mazzotta

Lee County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Monday, August 16, 2021

Detective Raymond Orion Williamson

Pasco County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Monday, August 16, 2021

Police Officer Robert Alan Williams

West Palm Beach Police Department,

End of Watch Monday, August 16, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Dennis W. Dixon

Catawba County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Monday, August 16, 2021

Border Patrol Agent Ricardo Zarate

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Monday, August 16, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Police Officer Jason Raynor

Daytona Beach Police Department

End of Watch Tuesday, August 17, 2021

Officer Yokemia L. Conyers

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Wednesday, August 18, 2021

Sergeant Joe Olivares

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Wednesday, August 18, 2021

Deputy Sheriff

John Andrew Rhoden

Bell County Sheriff’s Office, Texas

End of Watch Sunday, April 26, 2020

Police Officer Edward Perez

Miami Beach Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, August 19, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Eric Otis Ritter

Moore County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Thursday, August 19, 2021

Sergeant John Harris

Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Thursday, August 19, 2021

Sergeant Kuo-sheng “Johnny” Wang

South Houston Police Department,

End of Watch Thursday, August 19, 2021

Officer Monica J. Riola

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Friday, August 20, 2021

Sergeant Frank Tobar

Palm Bay Police Department

End of Watch Friday, August 20, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Sergeant Patrick Wayne Madison

Coral Springs Police Department

End of Watch Friday, August 20, 2021

Detective Rodney L. Davis, Sr.

Waycross Police Department

End of Watch Friday, August 20, 2021

Correctional Officer Darryl “Scout” Goodrich, Jr.

Washington State Department of Corrections

End of Watch Friday, August 20, 2021

Police Officer

Jason Michael Knox

Houston Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Saturday, May 2, 2020

Deputy Sheriff Harry “Buddy” Hutchinson

Blount County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Saturday, August 21, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Jody Hull, Jr.

St. Johns County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Saturday, August 21, 2021

Corrections Deputy Kevin Kokinis

Branch County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, August 22, 2021

Trooper James J. Monda

New York State Police

End of Watch Sunday, August 22, 2021

Detective Manuel Christopher Widner

Paris Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, August 22, 2021

Patrolman Matthew Adam Jimenez

Beeville Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, August 22, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Reserve Police Officer David Ruiz

Dallas Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, August 22, 2021

Sergeant Tomas Infante, Sr.

Harris County Constable’s Office - Precinct 6

End of Watch Sunday, August 22, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Christopher Broadhead

Polk County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Monday, August 23, 2021

Sergeant

Lionel Q. Martinez, Jr.

Alamo Colleges Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Officer Erik James Skelton

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Tuesday, August 24, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Roger A. Mitchell

Sullivan County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, August 24, 2021

Chief of Police Kenneth Kirkland

Colquitt Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, August 25, 2021

Captain Joseph Manning

Wayne County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Wednesday, August 25, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Christopher Jay Bachelor

Hall County Sheriff’s Office,

End of Watch Wednesday, August 25, 2021

Sergeant John Lee Trout, Sr

Bernice Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, August 25, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Corrections Deputy Lakiesha Tucker

Shelby County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Wednesday, August 25, 2021

Senior Police Officer Randolph Boyd, Jr.

Austin Police Department,

End of Watch Wednesday, August 25, 2021

Sergeant Clay Garrison

Port of Galveston Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, August 25, 2021

Deputy Constable

Caleb Daniel Rule

Fort Bend County Constable’s Office - Precinct 4, Texas

End of Watch Friday, May 29, 2020

Police Officer Brandon Ard

Orange Beach Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, August 26, 2021

Police Officer Harminder Grewal

Galt Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, August 26, 2021

Correctional Officer Trainee Whitney Cloud

Florida Department of Corrections

End of Watch Thursday, August 26, 2021

Deputy First Class Paul Luciano

Flagler County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Thursday, August 26, 2021

Senior Sergeant Steve Urias

Austin Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, August 26, 2021

Sergeant Christopher Ray Wilson

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

End of Watch Thursday, August 26, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Detective Anthony Standley

Oyster Creek Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, August 26, 2021

Police Officer Michael Weiskopf

St. Petersburg Police Department

End of Watch Friday, August 27, 2021

Corrections Officer James N. Henry

Hays County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Friday, August 27, 2021

Police Officer

Ismael Z. Chavez

McAllen Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Saturday, July 11, 2020

Trooper Sean C. Hryc

Florida Highway Patrol

End of Watch Saturday, August 28, 2021

Sergeant Jason Donaldson

Caldwell County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Saturday, August 28, 2021

Patrolman Shane Green

Sheridan Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, August 29, 2021

Border Patrol Agent Chad E. McBroom

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Sunday, August 29, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Clint Robin Seagle

Clay County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, August 29, 2021

Patrol Officer Edgar “Buddy” Pales, Jr

Owasso Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, August 29, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Captain Michael J. Stokes

Houston County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Monday, August 30, 2021

Public Safety Officer Dustin Michael Beasley

North Augusta Department of Public Safety

End of Watch Monday, August 30, 2021

Deputy First Class William Diaz

Lee County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, August 31, 2021

Police Officer

Edelmiro Garza, Jr.

McAllen Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Saturday, July 11, 2020

Police Officer Freddie Joe Castro

Overland Park Police Department

End of Watch Tuesday, August 31, 2021

Police Officer Trey Copeland

Cotton Valley Police Department

End of Watch Tuesday, August 31, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Carlos David Ortiz

Colorado County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, August 31, 2021

Lieutenant Robert Travelstead

Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Wednesday, September 1, 2021

Sergeant Daniel Eugene Watts

Jacksonville Beach Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, September 1, 2021

Police Officer Gregory R. Young

Vernon College Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, September 1, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Sergeant Brian Mohl

Connecticut State Police

End of Watch Thursday, September 2, 2021

Senior Officer David Bryant Saavedra

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Thursday, September 2, 2021

Sergeant William Jeffery Yancey

Lake City Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, September 2, 2021

Deputy Sheriff

Cornelius Bernard Anderson

Harris County Sheriff’s Office, Texas

End of Watch Sunday, July 12, 2020

Investigator Richard Wendell Humphrey

Baldwin County District Attorney’s Office

End of Watch Friday, September 3, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Jody Smith

Carroll County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Friday, September 3, 2021

Detective Sergeant Derek E. Sidwell

Overton County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Friday, September 3, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Ronald Rudy Butler

Bexar County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Friday, September 3, 2021

City Marshal Michael Allen Keathley

West Police Department

End of Watch Friday, September 3, 2021

Corrections Officer IV Honorato Antones

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Friday, September 3, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Detective Tom Breedlove

Hernando County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Saturday, September 4, 2021

Detention Officer Tara Leanne Cook

Whitfield County Sheriff’s Office,

End of Watch Saturday, September 4, 2021

Police Officer Edgar Morris

Collierville Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, September 4, 2021

Police Officer

Sheena Dae Yarbrough-Powell

Beaumont Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Sunday, August 9, 2020

Sergeant Matthew Chandler Moore

Arkansas Highway Police,

End of Watch Sunday, September 5, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Michael Neau

Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office,

End of Watch Sunday, September 5, 2021

Police Officer Robert Troy Joiner

Ector County Independent School District Police

End of Watch Sunday, September 5, 2021

Parole Officer II Huey P. Prymus, III

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Sunday, September 5, 2021

Parole Officer Broderick Richard Daye

Department of Correctional Services

End of Watch Tuesday, September 7, 2021

Corrections Officer V Glenn Skeens

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Tuesday, September 7, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Corrections Deputy II Rodrigo Delgado

San Diego County Probation Department

End of Watch Wednesday, September 8, 2021

Investigator Dusty Wainscott

Grayson County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Wednesday, September 8, 2021

Police Officer Bonnie Nicole Jones

Danville Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, September 9, 2021

Investigator

Lemuel Delray Bruce

Houston Fire Marshal’s Office, Texas

End of Watch Friday, October 16, 2020

Police Officer David A. Horton

Darien Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, September 11, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Darrell Lamar Henderson

Shiawassee County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Saturday, September 11, 2021

Sergeant Gino Caputo

Barrington Police Department ,

End of Watch Saturday, September 11, 2021

Detective Charles C. Vroom

Nassau County Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, September 12, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Robert Craig Mills

Butler County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, September 12, 2021

Police Officer Stephen Jones

Barnwell Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, September 12, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Special Agent Dustin Slovacek

Texas Department of Public Safety

End of Watch Sunday, September 12, 2021

Corrections Officer III Echo Rodriguez

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Sunday, September 12, 2021

Lieutenant James Guynes

Monroe County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Monday, September 13, 2021

Sergeant

Harold Lloyd Preston

Houston Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Police Officer Noah Ryan LeBlanc, Sr.

Laguna Vista Police Department

End of Watch Monday, September 13, 2021

Sergeant Shad Hammond

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Monday, September 13, 2021

Corrections Officer V Jose A. Hernandez

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Monday, September 13, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Willie Earl Hall

Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, September 14, 2021

Officer Blaize Madrid-Evans

Independence Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, September 15, 2021

Corrections Officer V Chris Watson

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Wednesday, September 15, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Sergeant Steven Lee Marshall

Chatsworth Police DepartmentEnd of Watch

Thursday, September 16, 2021

Police Officer Michelle Gattey

Georgetown Police Department,

End of Watch Thursday, September 16, 2021

PLieutenant Earnest Oldham

Plano Police Department

End of Watch Thursday, September 16, 2021

Sergeant

Sean Sebastian Rios

Houston Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Monday, November 9, 2020

Captain David Edwin MacAlpine

New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Friday, September 17, 2021

Police Officer Carl Proper

Kings Mountain Police Department

End of Watch Friday, September 17, 2021

Lieutenant John Stewart

Lake City Police Department

End of Watch Friday, September 17, 2021

Sergeant Richard John Frankie

Fort Bend Independent School District Police

End of Watch Friday, September 17, 2021

Trooper Brian Pingry

Florida Highway Patrol

End of Watch Saturday, September 18, 2021

Corporal Gregory Campbell

Richmond County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Saturday, September 18, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Lieutenant Brandi Stock

Brooklet Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, September 19, 2021

Police Officer Jimmie Alexander Shindler

Memphis Police Department

End of Watch Monday, September 20, 2021

Senior Police Officer William Jeffrey

Houston Police Department

End of Watch Monday, September 20, 2021

Police Officer

Mitchell Aaron Penton

Dallas Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Saturday, February 13, 2021

Sergeant Sherman Peebles

Muscogee County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Tuesday, September 21, 2021

Sergeant David Miller

Clarksville Police Department

End of Watch Wednesday, September 22, 2021

Police Officer Joseph J. Kurer

Fond du Lac Police Department,

End of Watch Wednesday, September 22, 2021

Border Patrol Agent Luis H. Dominguez

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Thursday, September 23, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Luke Ryan Gross

Hancock County Sheriff’s Office,

End of Watch Thursday, September 23, 2021

Senior Corporal Arnulfo Pargas

Dallas Police Department,

End of Watch Thursday, September 23, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Corporal Charles Wayne Catron

Carroll County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Thursday, September 23, 2021

ISenior Deputy Phillip David Barron, Jr.

Victoria County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Friday, September 24, 2021

Police Officer Anthony Christopher Testa

West Palm Beach Police Department

End of Watch Saturday, September 25, 2021

Trooper

Chad Michael Walker

Texas Highway Patrol, Texas

End of Watch Sunday, March 28, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Matthew Locke

Hardin County Sheriff’s Department

End of Watch Saturday, September 25, 2021

Corrections Officer IV Charles Hughes

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Saturday, September 25, 2021

Border Patrol Agent David B. Ramirez

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Sunday, September 26, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Joshua Moyers

Nassau County Sheriff’s Office,

End of Watch Sunday, September 26, 2021

Corporal Robert Wayne Nicholson

Clark County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, September 26, 2021

Police Chief Donald Hall

Magnolia Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, September 26, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Undersheriff Jeffrey Montoya

Colfax County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch Sunday, September 26, 2021

Police Officer Brian L. Rowland

Pittsburgh Bureau of Police

End of Watch Sunday, September 26, 2021

Police Officer Gregory Lynn Triplett

Waverly Police Department

End of Watch Sunday, September 26, 2021

Sergeant

Stephen Jones

Concho County Sheriff’s Office, Texas

End of Watch Monday, May 10, 2021

Trooper Eric T. Gunderson

Washington State Patrol,

End of Watch Sunday, September 26, 2021

Border Patrol Agent Alfredo M. Ibarra

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Monday, September 27, 2021

Patrol Officer Howard K. Smith, III

Owasso Police Department

End of Watch Monday, September 27, 2021

Sergeant Joshua Wayne Stewart

Sullivan County Sheriff’s Office,

End of Watch Monday, September 27, 2021

Police Chief Derek Scott Asdot

Green Cove Springs Police Department

End of Watch Tuesday, September 28, 2021

Sergeant Michael Todd Thomas

Griffin Police Department,

End of Watch Tuesday, September 28, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Sergeant Logan Davis

Iron County Sheriff’s Office, Missouri

End of Watch Tuesday, September 28, 2021

Sergeant Donald William Ramey

Transylvania County Sheriff’s Office, NC

End of Watch Wednesday, September 29, 2021

Corrections Lieutenant David W. Reynolds

Butler County Sheriff’s Office, Ohio

End of Watch Thursday, September 30, 2021

Deputy Sheriff

Samuel Alexander Leonard

Concho County Sheriff’s Office, Texas

End of Watch Monday, May 10, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Teresa H. Fuller

Wilson County Sheriff’s Office, Tennessee

End of Watch Thursday, September 30, 2021

Senior Inspector Jared Keyworth

United States Marshals Service,

End of Watch Friday, October 1, 2021

Captain James Anthony Sisk

Culpeper County Sheriff’s Office, Virginia

End of Watch Friday, October 1, 2021

Sergeant Nick Risner

Sheffield Police Department, Alabama

End of Watch Saturday, October 2, 2021

Police Officer Darrell Dewayne Adams

Memphis Police Department, Tennessee

End of Watch Saturday, October 2, 2021

Corrections Officer V Melissa Maldonado

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Sunday, October 3, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Group Supervisor Michael G. Garbo

Drug Enforcement Administration

End of Watch Monday, October 4, 2021

Police Officer Julio Cesar Herrera, Jr.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department, NC

End of Watch Monday, October 4, 2021

Corrections Officer Vassar Richmond

Bartlett Police Department , Tennessee

End of Watch Monday, October 4, 2021

Sergeant

Joshua Blake Bartlett

Lubbock County Sheriff’s Office, Texas

End of Watch Thursday, July 15, 20211

Corrections Officer V Thomas Scott Collora

Texas Department of Criminal Justice Texas

End of Watch Tuesday, October 5, 2021

Corrections Officer IV Garland Chaney

Texas Department of Criminal Justice, Texas

End of Watch Tuesday, October 5, 2021

Sergeant John R. Lowry

Suffolk County Sheriff’s Office, New York

End of Watch Wednesday, October 6, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Dale L. Wyman

Hardeman County Sheriff’s Office, Tennessee

End of Watch Wednesday, October 6, 2021

Officer Victor Donate

- Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Thursday, October 7, 2021

Corporal Timothy Michael Tanksley

Alto Police Department, Georgia

End of Watch Friday, October 8, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Corporal Dylan McCauley Harrison

Alamo Police Department, Georgia

End of Watch Saturday, October 9, 2021

Master Trooper Adam Gaubert

Louisiana State Police, LouisianaEnd of Watch

Saturday, October 9, 2021

Master Deputy William Edward Marsh

Rowan County Sheriff’s Office, North Carolina

End of Watch Sunday, October 10, 2021

Reserve Deputy Sheriff

Tom Larry Hoobler

Childress County Sheriff’s Office, Texas

End of Watch Saturday, July 17, 2021

Sergeant Michael D. Rudd

La Paz County Sheriff’s Office, Arizona

End of Watch Monday, October 11, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Juan Miguel Ruiz

Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office, Arizona

End of Watch Monday, October 11, 2021

Detention Officer Anthony Nicoletti

Mohave County Sheriff’s Office, Arizona

End of Watch Monday, October 11, 2021

Lieutenant William Oscar McMurtray, III

Burke County Sheriff’s Office, North Carolina

End of Watch Monday, October 11, 2021

Correctional Officer IV Toamalama Scanlan

Fresno County Sheriff’s Office, California

End of Watch Tuesday, October 12, 2021

Deportation Officer Bradley K. Kam

Immigration and Customs Enforcement

End of Watch Tuesday, October 12, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Police Officer Ty Alan Powell

Windsor Police Department, Colorado

End of Watch Wednesday, October 13, 2021

Command Sergeant Richard Arnold McMahan

Columbus Police Department, Georgia

End of Watch Wednesday, October 13, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Oliver Little

Floyd County Sheriff’s Office, Kentucky

End of Watch Wednesday, October 13, 2021

Police Officer

Lewis Andrew “Andy” Traylor

Austin Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Saturday, July 31, 2021

Police Officer James Edward Simonetti

Carnegie Mellon University Police, Pennsylvania

End of Watch Wednesday, October 13, 2021

Sergeant Raquel Virginia Saunders

Amarillo Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Wednesday, October 13, 2021

Sergeant William Warren Gay

Bibb County Sheriff’s Office, Georgia

End of Watch Thursday, October 14, 2021

Deputy Constable Kareem Atkins

Harris County Constable’s - Precinct 4, Texas

End of Watch Saturday, October 16, 2021

Detective Rodney L. Mooneyham

Denton Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Saturday, October 16, 2021

Police Officer Yandy Chirino

Hollywood Police Department, Florida

End of Watch Sunday, October 17, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Police Officer Ryan Andrew Hayworth

Knightdale Police Department, North Carolina

End of Watch Sunday, October 17, 2021

Police Officer Andrew Robert MacDonald

Grand Prairie Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Monday, October 18, 2021

Investigator Tracy Joe Dotson

Dallas County District Attorney’s Office, Texas

End of Watch Tuesday, October 19, 2021

Investigator

Dusty Wainscott

Grayson County Sheriff’s Office, Texas

End of Watch Wednesday, September 8, 2021

Trooper Ted L. Benda

Iowa State Patrol, Iowa

End of Watch Wednesday, October 20, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Donald Albert Poffenroth

Pershing County Sheriff’s Office, Nevada

End of Watch Wednesday, October 20, 2021

Sergeant Miguel Rodriguez

Office of Agricultural Law Enforcement, Florida

End of Watch Thursday, October 21, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Joshua J. Welge

Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office, Florida

End of Watch Thursday, October 21, 2021

Sergeant Richard Charles Howe

Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, Pennsylvania

End of Watch Thursday, October 21, 2021

Trooper Dung X. Martinez

Pennsylvania State Police, Pennsylvania

End of Watch Thursday, October 21, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Sergeant Michael David Dunn

Amarillo Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Friday, October 22, 2021

Police Officer Jason Michael Belton

Erie Police Department, Pennsylvania

End of Watch Sunday, October 24, 2021

Border Patrol Agent Rafael G. Sanchez

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Sunday, October 24, 2021

Senior Police Officer

William Jeffrey

Houston Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Monday, September 20, 2021

Police Officer Stephen Evans

Burns Police Department, Kansas

End of Watch Monday, October 25, 2021

Police Officer Tyler Timmins

Pontoon Beach Police Department, Illinois

End of Watch Tuesday, October 26, 2021

Police Officer Thomas Kristopher Hutchison

Haltom City Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Wednesday, October 27, 2021

Senior Officer Mathew L. Lyons

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Thursday, October 28, 2021

Staff Sergeant Jesse Sherrill

New Hampshire State Police, New Hampshire

End of Watch Thursday, October 28, 2021

Lieutenant David Formeza

Perth Amboy Police Department, New Jersey

End of Watch Thursday, October 28, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Police Chief Buddy Crabtree

Ider Police Department, Alabama

End of Watch Saturday, October 30, 2021

Sergeant Timothy Werner

Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, Pennsylvania

End of Watch Tuesday, November 2, 2021

Detective Sergeant Gary R. Taccone

Erie Police Department, Pennsylvania

End of Watch Wednesday, November 3, 2021

Deputy Constable

Kareem Atkins

Harris County Constable’s Office - Precinct 4, Texas

End of Watch Saturday, October 16, 2021

Deputy Sheriff John Edward Moon

Waller County Sheriff’s Office, TX

EOW: Wednesday, November 3, 2021

Senior Patrolman Sherman Otto Benys, Jr.

Kingsville Police Department, TX

EOW: Thursday, November 4, 2021

Border Patrol Agent Anibal A. Perez

Customs and Border Protection

End of Watch Friday, November 5, 2021

Correctional Officer Juan Cruz, Jr.

Fresno County Sheriff’s Office, California

End of Watch Friday, November 5, 2021

Sergeant Scott M. Patton

Robinson Township Police Dept., Pennsylvania

End of Watch Saturday, November 6, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Lena Nicole Marshall

Jackson County Sheriff’s Office, Georgia

End of Watch Monday, November 8, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Police Officer Paramhans Dineshchandra Desai

Henry County Police Department, Georgia

End of Watch Monday, November 8, 2021

Sergeant Dominic Guida

Bunnell Police Department, Florida

End of Watch Tuesday, November 9, 2021

Lieutenant Chad Owen Brackman

Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office, Arizona

End of Watch Wednesday, November 10, 2021

Senior Patrolman

Sherman Otto Benys, Jr.

Kingsville Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Thursday, November 4, 2021

Detective Michael J. Dion

Chicopee Police Department, Massachusetts

End of Watch Wednesday, November 10, 2021

Corrections Officer V Kevin Dupree

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

End of Watch Thursday, November 11, 2021

Police Officer Michael D. Chandler

Big Stone Gap Police Department, Virginia

End of Watch Saturday, November 13, 2021

Master Trooper Daniel A. Stainbrook

Wisconsin State Patrol, Wisconsin

End of Watch Monday, November 15, 2021

Corrections Officer Rhonda Jean Russell

Blair County Prison, Pennsylvania

End of Watch Wednesday, November 17, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Frank Ramirez, Jr.

Independence County Sheriff’s Office, Arkansas

End of Watch Thursday, November 18, 2021


Texas Peace Officer

Code Enforcement Officer Adam Ray Arbogast

Parsons Police Department, West Virginia

End of Watch Thursday, November 25, 2021

Police Officer Henry Laxson

Clayton County Police Department, Georgia

End of Watch Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Constable Madison “Skip” Nicholson

Wilcox County Constable’s Office, Alabama

End of Watch Wednesday, December 1, 2021

Sergeant

Richard Houston

Mesquite Police Dept., Texas

End of Watch Friday, December 3, 2021

tective Antonio Antoine Valentine

St. Louis County Police Department, Missouri

End of Watch Wednesday, December 1, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Clay Livingston

Elbert County Sheriff’s Office, Colorado

End of Watch Friday, December 3, 2021

Police Officer Richard Houston, II

Mesquite Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Friday, December 3, 2021

Detective Joseph Pollack

Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Colorado

End of Watch Thursday, December 9, 2021

Corrections Officer Robert Daniel

Graves County Jail, Kentucky

End of Watch Friday, December 10, 2021

Senior Police Officer Eric Lindsey

Austin Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Sunday, December 5, 2021


Police Officer Theodore James Ohlemeier

Colwich Police Department , Kansas

End of Watch Wednesday, December 8, 2021

Corporal Jack Lee Guthrie, Jr.

Dallas College Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Thursday, December 9, 2021

Police Officer Jeremy Martin Wilkins

Chandler Police Department, Arizona

End of Watch Friday, December 17, 2021

Police Officer Zachary Cottongim

Louisville Metro Police Department, Kentucky

End of Watch Saturday, December 18, 2021

Officer Chad P. Christiansen

Volk Field Security Forces, Wisconsin

End of Watch Saturday, December 18, 2021

Sergeant Kevin Redding

Haverford Township Police Department, PA

End of Watch Monday, December 20, 2021

Police Officer Mia Goodwin

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department, NC

End of Watch Wednesday, December 22, 2021

Police Officer Keona Holley

Baltimore City Police Department, Maryland

End of Watch Thursday, December 23, 2021

Agent José Ferrer-Pabón

Puerto Rico Police Department, Puerto Rico

End of Watch Friday, December 24, 2021

Supervisory Border Patrol Agent Martin Barrios

United States Border Patrol, U.S. Government

End of Watch Monday, November 29, 2021

Lieutenant Matthew A. Vogel

Hudson County Sheriff’s Office, New Jersey

End of Watch Monday, December 27, 2021

Sergeant Christopher Mortensen

Wilkes-Barre Police Department, Pennsylvania

End of Watch Monday, December 27, 2021

“When a police officer is killed, it’s

not an agency that loses an officer,

it’s an entire nation.”

Chris Cosgriff, ODMP Founder

Corporal Mike Sanchez

Amarillo Police Department, Texas

End of Watch Monday, December 27, 2021

Deputy Sheriff Sean Riley

Wayne County Sheriff’s Office, Illinois

End of Watch Wednesday, December 29, 2021

Sergeant Marlene Rittmanic

Bradley Police Department, Illinois

End of Watch Thursday, December 30, 2021


BY LT. BOB EVANS

In Case You Missed it Last Month

“The Christmas That Almost Wasn’t”

The following story is true.

No names were changed

because no innocent people

were involved.

My story takes place on

Christmas Eve many years ago.

I had been a cop for more than

30 years and was a Lieutenant

assigned to nights. With all

the time I had in I could have

been on days with weekends

off and pushing paper all day,

but I’d spent my entire life on

the street.

It was where I felt more

comfortable. It was my

home, I guess. My kids were

all grown, and I had 4 failed

marriages behind me. Yeah,

I could retire but I had absolutely

nothing to retire to. The

streets were my home, and I

couldn’t see myself anywhere

else…. working or otherwise.

Hell, if I weren’t a cop, I’d

probably be homeless living

on the streets.

But despite my acceptance

of being here forever,

the weeks leading up to the

night of this story were what

seemed like the beginning of

the end for me. Sounds confusing,

I know, but let me start

from the beginning.

It was early December in

the late 80’s. Like I said I was

the lieutenant assigned to

nights and in our department

the nightshift lieutenant was

pretty much the night sheriff.

I was in charge of everybody

and everything. But I had been

doing it so long that it really

didn’t seem like that big of a

deal anymore.

But more of all the ole heads

were retiring and every day

I had increased youngsters

showing up at roll call. The

sheriff decided that in order to

fill vacancies he would accept

lateral transfers from other

departments. Since we paid

more than the surrounding

departments these kids (actually

young men and women

in their late 20’s) came over

in droves. Everyday there was

someone new and of course

they all came to nights.

The latest transfer was this

young man from a PD up

north. A real go getter. Reminded

me of me at that age.

His name was Randy Jones.

Jones was married and had

just had a brand-new baby

girl. Wasn’t even 3 weeks old.

The boy posted pictures of

that girl all over the station.

He was the proud papa for

sure.

But he was from a PD, and

this was the sheriff’s department.

We did things differently

and Jones had his own idea

about how it ‘should’ be done.

I had to sit that boy down

several times during those

first few weeks and just say

look, ‘If you want to stay here

and be successful you have to

follow the book. Otherwise,

I’m going to have to talk to the

sheriff and send you back to

the PD.” Broke my heart because

he was really a good

kid just stubborn. Reminded

me when I started. The dayshift

sergeant moved him to

days for a week, just to teach

him OUR ways.

Now here it was Christmas

Eve and Jones was back at

working the nightshift with

me again.

Anyway, it was about 3am

when a silent alarm dropped

in a warehouse on the

northside of the district. I was

only a couple blocks away and

Jones must have been sitting

in the parking lot because he

advised he was about to go

out on it. I advised dispatch I

was backing him up and was

a couple minutes out.

Jones arrived and advised

he had an open rear door, as

I was pulling up to the rear.

We agreed we would clear

the building starting towards

the right and work our way

to the front. This was one of

those flex space warehouses

with storage on the back and

offices in the front and they

weren’t really that large. As

soon as we stepped inside,

we heard movement near the

front. Other than our flashlights,

it was pitch black in the

damn place. Suddenly a bright

piercing light following by a

deafening boom appeared in

front of us…. we were taking

fire from multiple locations.

I was literally firing into the

dark. I just kept firing in the

direction of the muzzle blast

until there weren’t anymore. I

stood there in the dark, shining

my flashlight to see what

or who was there and 20 feet

away I saw two bodies on the

ground, blood now running

across the bare concrete.

Unit 204 I have shots fired

and two suspects down. I

need EMS and backup.

Where is Jones? “Jones?”

“Unit 204 to Jones, where are

you?

“Jones where the fuck are

you? I began running all over

the warehouse to see where

he was and as soon as I

turned a corner, there he was.

Laying in a pool of blood.

“Officer down, officer down,

Unit 204 I have an officer

down.”

Jones? As soon as I knelt

down, I could see that a round

had hit him in the neck and

50 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 51

50 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 51


struck an artery. He had bled

out in seconds. The first round

those assholes fired went right

through the thin portion wall

and hit him. He was down

within seconds of us entering

that room. He never said a

word. He didn’t get a chance

to fire a single shot.

Somehow by the grace of

God, I hit both the suspects in

the dark and they both went

down as well. I was the lone

survivor. That’s a term I would

hear over and over again.

Within seconds, I had deputies

arriving from all over.

Sirens. I could hear sirens everywhere.

Ringing in my ears

and sirens. The scene was just

so surreal. Dust. Red and blue

lights bouncing off the walls.

Blood running across the bare

concrete floors. Bodies motionless

on the floor. And this

young deputy at my side. I just

sat there and waited for the

EMTs.

“Lieutenant…Lieutenant…

Lieutenant….?”

“What??”

“Sir you need to get up and

let them work on Jones.”

I stood up and watched the

EMTs from the firehouse squad

that was just blocks from

here begin working on him,

but they stopped really before

they started. There was

nothing they could do. He was

gone.

I notified dispatch to send

me detectives, crime scene

and notify the sheriff.

But I WAS the night sheriff,

and I knew what I had to do. It

was my job to notify the next

of kin, spouses or parents of

a deputy killed in the line of

duty. In my 30+ years, I had

only had to do it once. But

this was different. This young

man was dead on my watch.

Standing 10 feet from me. It

was my responsibility to keep

him safe and I failed. I failed

him, his wife, and his baby

girl.

The truth is, I shouldn’t have

left the scene. I had just shot

and killed two suspects. I had

a dead deputy on the ground

20 feet from the dead crooks.

The DA shoot team would

be enroute and so would

the sheriff. Maybe the sheriff

should go to Jones’ and make

the notification?

Nope. It was my job and my

job alone, I had to do what I

had to do. Without realizing it,

I had pulled off the highway

and pulled up under an old

railroad crossing underpass.

I was trembling and crying

uncontrollably. It was at that

moment that I felt like my life

had ended. A young man was

dead because of me. I was his

supervisor; his backup and he

was dead. I was old and at the

end of my career and he was

just getting started. It should

be me on that floor. God got

this wrong. I should be dead. I

should be dead.

I found myself under that

bridge, with my gun in my

hand. I was praying that God

would forgive me for everything

that happened that night

and what I was about to do.

It was at that instant I heard a

voice say, “Mister are you ok?”

I turned around and standing

there before me was this

young couple holding a baby.

“What? Where did you two

come from? What are you doing

down here?”

“We have no other place

to be. We lost our home in a

fire and we’ve been camping

under this bridge for a while

now. What are you doing here

officer? Are we in trouble? Are

you hurt? You’re bleeding!”

No, you’re not in trouble. I

just needed a minute to think.

I guess I ended up here. And

it’s not my blood.”

“Officer, maybe you should

sit down a minute. Let us get

you something hot to drink,

it’s freezing out here.”

As I sat down with them

under that bridge, I saw this

young couple that had to be

about the same age as Jones

and his wife. Here they were

on Christmas Eve living in

a tent under a bridge comforting

ME. Making ME take a

minute. I listened to their story

and how they ended up there

and when the young man

finished his story, he looked at

me and said, now tell us how

you ended up here …. with us.

For the next few minutes, I

shared what had transpired

that evening. That I was on

my way to tell a young mother

and wife, her husband

wasn’t coming home. And I

guess I stopped to gather my

thoughts and ended up here.

I didn’t tell them I was seconds

away from ending my

own life. I thanked them for

their kindness and asked them

if I could take them to a shelter

and they declined. They

said they were happy to be

together, be safe under that

bridge, and knew God would

keep them safe until they

could find a new home.

I left them there and drove

to Jones’ house. As I pulled

up the sheriff was just pulling

up as well. I walked up to

him, and he hugged me said,

“You know you shouldn’t be

here. You have about a dozen

detectives and DA shoot team

looking for your ass.”

“Yes sir, I know. But this is

my job too, and he died on my

watch. Under my command.”

“Bob. I know. Let’s do this

together.”

The next few days were a

blur. The following week we

buried Deputy Jones. After the

funeral, I drove to that underpass

to make sure my young

new friends were ok, but the

tent was gone and so were

they. I guess God found them

that new home. As I was turning

around under the bridge, I

saw something where the tent

had been. I got out of my car

and picked up a cross that had

been formed from branches

and twigs. It had a red ribbon

tied around it and a small

piece of dirty paper tied to the

top with the words:

On this spot God saved us

from ourselves and gave us a

new beginning.

52 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 53

52 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 53


WORDS BY UNNAMED OFFICER

A Cop, a Flight Nurse and Two Endings

I read your feature story last

month, “the Christmas that

almost wasn’t” (reprinted in

this month’s War Story) and

it brought me back almost 20

years when I had nearly the same

experience.

I too had lost a partner who

was standing less than five feet

from me when a sniper’s bullet

ripped through his vest and

killed him instantly. It was the

single worst moment of my life.

The emotions from that day still

haunt me but thankfully I’ve been

able to move past it and have a

somewhat normal life.

It wasn’t Christmas Eve but

rather New Year’s Eve 1999. Yes,

the new millennium was upon

us, and we expected it to be a

busy night. I had been on the

force at the time for nearly 20

years and worked the night

shift by choice. My kids were all

grown, and I was at the end of

a third failed marriage. Working

nights for me was my way of

coping with the emptiness I had

in my life at the time.

On this night and for the previous

30 days, I had a rookie riding

with me after his FTO was injured

in an off-duty car accident.

And truthfully, I didn’t mind. After

20 years of riding by myself I

kind of enjoyed the company and

I also liked the idea of imparting

my knowledge into this young

officer’s mind.

But the FTO program of 1999

isn’t like what you probably have

today. It wasn’t that regimented,

it was more like, ‘ride with

me kid and I’ll show you how it’s

done’ kind of thing. But this kid, I

say kid he was 24, was actually

doing a great job. He had spent

almost 4 months on the evening

shift with his FTO and was about

to be cut loose. So, thirty days

with me and he was ready to go

solo. I’ll dispense with his last

name in case his family might

read this magazine and just use

his first name Randy.

On the night of the shooting,

Randy and I were answering

one disturbance after another.

As you can imagine on this New

Years, everyone was drunk and

getting rowdy. One by one we

were clearing calls. I guess after

the 10th one or so, we became

complacent and weren’t paying

as much attention as we should

have been.

We were dispatched to a call

on our city’s far east side that

was on the extreme east side of

our assigned district. But all the

district cars on that side were

tied up and we took the call to

help them out. Same call as all

the rest. Neighbor called in to

report loud noises, fireworks and

unknown persons possibly firing

guns into the air. More people

are killed on New Years from

falling bullets than any other day

of the year.

We arrived at the complainant’s

house and didn’t see

activity outside nor did we hear

any fireworks or guns being

discharged. As we walked to the

front door, a man in his fifties

opened the door and began

telling us about the neighbors

across the street and how they

had been outside earlier and

were firing guns into the air and

raising all kinds of hell.

It was at that moment that

a single gunshot rang out and

Randy fell forward onto the

man’s porch. I grabbed him by

his vest and drug him behind

a car that was parked in the

driveway less than twenty feet

away. I yelled at the man to go

back inside and go to the back

of the house.

“Unit 10E50 shots fired, officer

down, officer down, I need

backup and EMS NOW…. NO

send me Care Flight he’s not

breathing”

“All units assist the officer,

officer down, I repeat officer

down at 103 East Third, all

units Code 3 Officer Down.”

“Unit 10E50 Care Flight has

been dispatched”

In the seconds, maybe minutes

following that first shot,

the suspect fired several more

rounds towards us hitting the

car we were behind as well

as the sides of the complainant’s

house. It was surreal in that you

could hear the rounds hitting

near us and seconds later you

heard the rifle shot. I fired several

shots towards the suspect, but

he was over 50 yards away and

it was pointless to keep firing. I

focused my attention on trying

to stop Randy’s bleeding and

trying CPR.

But the rounds kept ricocheting

off the concrete and unless

I moved into a better position, I

was going to take a round myself.

I heard the sirens in the distance

and knew help would be

here soon. But we had to survive

NOW.

I fired two more rounds towards

the house and dragged

Randy farther up the driveway

to another vehicle parked beside

the house. Seconds later units

started arriving and the suspect

fired several rounds at their cars.

Then he ran in the house and that

was the last I saw of him and the

end of the shooting. He barricaded

himself in the house and after

a 4-hour standoff with SWAT,

shot himself in the head with a

9mm.

Care Flight arrived and they

worked on Randy all the way

to hospital, but I knew he was

gone. I had rode in the helicopter

with him and was there when

his wife arrived. She and I had

met a few days prior at a Christmas

luncheon, and she ran up to

me in the ER. I didn’t realize it,

but I was covered in blood, and

said I’m so sorry but they did everything

they could. I’m sooooo

sorry. She fell to the floor, and I

54 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 55


sat on the floor holding her. My

life, her life, would never be the

same.

It was late afternoon before I

finally got a ride home. My house

was as empty as my heart. My

kids had all gone back to their

respective homes in other states.

I was alone with my thoughts

and sense of failure. Here was

this rookie counting on me and

he was dead. Because I didn’t do

my job of protecting him. I was

ready to give up. It wasn’t the

first time I had thought about

ending my life but today was

different. The thought of attending

another funeral, having

everyone look at me with glaring

eyes thinking ‘he’s responsible

for Randy’s death’ was more than

I could bare.

I had my gun in my hand. No

notes. No final goodbyes. Just

ready to end it. Then the doorbell

rang. At first, I sat in the dark and

hoped whoever it was would go

away. But they kept ringing and

knocking and calling my name.

I didn’t recognize the voice, but

it was obviously a female. So, I

put the gun down and opened

the door. It was the Flight Nurse

from Care Flight.

“What are you doing here

Amy?”

“I knew you would need someone

to be with. I have been

where you are dozens of times

in the past year. Officers gunned

down, involved in accidents or

whatever and I couldn’t save

them no matter how hard I tried.

So, I know what you’re going

through, and I knew I had to

come see you. Can I come in?”

We sat and talked for hours.

She held me and I held her. She

cried and I cried, and we cried

together. Not only did we spend

that New Year’s Day together, but

we’ve also spent 20 more after

that. Amy and I have been married

for 20 years. She saved my

life. Now we are both retired and

travel the country. If this story

changes just one life, saves just

one officer from taking his or her

life, then recounting my story

was worth it.

I’ve left my name off the email.

Who I am isn’t important, my

story is. I hope you’ll run it in

your magazine to make a difference

in someone else’s life.

56 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 57

56 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE


CLICK TO WATCH

THE OPEN ROAD

by Michael Barron

New York City just spent $11.5M

on 184 Mustang Mach-E GT SUVs

New York City is buying 184

Mustang Mach-E SUVs for law

enforcement and emergency

response as part of the largest

purchase of all-electric vehicles

to date, city officials announced

Wednesday.

The vehicles, which will arrive

in the Big Apple by June 30, will

replace gas-powered vehicles

currently used by the New

York Police Department, the

New York City Sheriff’s Office,

the Department of Correction,

the Department of Parks and

Recreation, the Department of

Environmental Protection, NYC

Emergency Management, and

the Office of the Chief Medical

Examiner.

The 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E

GT achieves 270-mile EPA-estimated

range, the company

announced June 23, 2021.

The city will spend $11.5 million

on initial orders, said a news

release from the New York City

Department of Citywide Administrative

Services.

That price tag averages to approximately

$62,500 per vehicle.

Law enforcement vehicle costs

include significant retrofitting for

safety and equipment.

“Smart investments in fleet

electrification will help New

York City break its dependence

on fossil fuels,” Dawn Pinnock,

acting commissioner of the NYC

DCAS, said in the news release.

This latest purchase is an

attempt by New York City to

achieve an all-electric fleet by

2035 in its push to reduce carbon

emissions that contribute to

respiratory illnesses and greenhouse

gases that lead to climate

change, New York City officials

said in the news release.

Keith Kerman, NYC chief fleet

officer, said the news release,

“This order of all electric Mach-

Es will enable our law enforcement

agencies to put electric

models to the full test and work

out maintenance, lights and sirens,

charging, and other operational

issues.”

The New York City news release

initially refers to the

Mach-E but the pricing portion

of the news release refers to

the Mach-E GT, which is a high

performance vehicle. The Free

Press has reached out to the city

agency for clarification. A Ford

spokesman confirmed the fleet

order is for the Mustang Mach-E

GT.

In September, the 2021 Mustang

Mach-E became the first

all-electric vehicle to pass

Michigan State Police testing that

included acceleration, top speed,

braking and high-speed pursuit

and emergency response handling,

Ford announced.

The Mustang Mach-E GT has

been clocked going 0-60 mph in

3.8 seconds.

Tests by the Michigan State

Police and Los Angeles County

Sheriff’s Department establish

standards that law enforcement

agencies all over the country use

to evaluate vehicles.

The Mustang Mach-E GT models

purchased will have a range

of 270 miles. The city has installed

29 fast chargers for the

NYPD and 103 chargers citywide

with plans to add 275 more chargers

in 2022.

Dr. Jason Graham, acting chief

medical examiner, said working

both in public health and criminal

justice requires safe and efficient

transportation during the

city’s “most challenging times.”

New York City has more than

1,070 chargers, including fast,

solar and mobile chargers, the

news release said. Installation of

chargers, including those made

available for public use, continue

to be installed.

Ford CEO Jim Farley tweeted

immediately after New York City

released the news Wednesday,

“As America’s leading maker of

police vehicles, @Ford is proud

the City of New York is adding

the Mustang Mach-E GT to the

NYPD fleet.”

He also retweeted a NYC

government tweet that said,

“NYC DCAS is making the largest

electric vehicle purchase for law

enforcement and emergency

response use to date, taking another

step towards achieving an

all-electric municipal fleet and

helping the City divest from fossil

fuels and reduce emissions!”

The Dearborn automaker has

long established itself in the

law enforcement community

as a trusted supplier of police

cars and SUVs, which generate

significant revenue for the automaker.

The Police Interceptor,

a highly modified Ford Explorer,

is perhaps the most high-profile

current vehicle.

Ford provides about two-thirds

of police vehicles in the U.S., according

to sales data.

58 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 59


A BADGE OF HONOR

healing our heroes

Be Your Own Advocate.

EDITOR: The following column

originally appeared in the BLUES

October 2021 Issue.

Recently, John Salerno and I

had the pleasure of interviewing

a subject matter expert in the

area of post-traumatic stress.

The organization she is with

does a lot of research and connects

grassroots organizations

together to fill the gaps where

treatment for stress, post-traumatic

stress and mental health

might not be available for first

responders. During our discussions

we talked about the gaps

that still exist for law enforcement

officers; The size of the

agency, the willingness of the

command staff to provide support

to its officers, and budget.

We all agreed on one major

point. It is still up to us to ask

for the help when we realize we

need it or if another officer or

supervisor approaches us. We

must rid our vocabulary of the

word “FINE” and bust through the

stigma. There is a huge advantage

here that sometimes gets

overlooked. The reality is that

you are not trapped by your

command staff or organization.

You can go outside your agency

for assistance.

Over the years, the “control”

that our agencies exercised in

the area of mental health and

wellness or the outright “suck

it up” mentality influenced and

bolstered the stigma associated

with asking for help for stuff

going on in our heads. No one

wanted to risk being assigned to

“the rubber gun squad,” or have

other officers question our fitness

for duty. The solution - say

nothing, ever. As the suicide rate

increased, the need to provide

assistance of some kind was addressed

by some agencies. Those

agencies who took on the battle

to help officers with their mental

health sort of figured it out.

I say sort of because the stigma

continued to lurk in the shadows.

Officers were not going to ask

to “go to the department shrink”

or the in-house employee assistance

program. Why? Confidentiality.

Their “stuff” would be

known throughout the department.

Officers were left with a

no-win, no-way-out solution.

Again, say nothing, ever.

Over the years as some departments

saw command staff retirements,

it seemed to usher in

a new, younger, and more open

personnel. The discussion of a

budget for mental health and

the creation of a Mental Health

Liaison officer began. However,

most officers that we have spoken

to and departments we have

visited have that liaison officer in

an office right next to the Chief

or Assistant Chief. So, while the

open-door policy to get help

for mental health was there, we

were told that officers were not

going to go to that office simply

because of the proximity to the

command staff where a conversation

might be overheard or

where questions might linger

when the officer walked out of

the liaison’s office. The solution,

say nothing ever.

While these changes were

occurring, the grassroots programs

started. The realization

that while the departments were

trying, it was easier for an officer

to go outside his/ her agency

for assistance. The grassroots

program provided confidentiality,

which meant that the officer

could get the help without the

fear of reprisals or questions. In

fact, many of the officers I met

while I traveled to speak at conferences

confided in me that they

went outside their agency and

were on the path to healing, all

the while successfully maintaining

their jobs and family life.

As some departments continued

their awareness journey to

aid their officers, the grassroots

programs continued to grow.

Some of them with the ability

to offset department budgets

which meant the departments

could rely on them to help their

officers. The departments were

on a “need to know” information

stream. Only if an officer stated

they were going to hurt themselves

or someone else was the

department informed. Confidentiality,

anonymity, and a comfort

level were provided to the

officer. As a result, we started to

see dents in the stigma.

When departments created

Peer Support programs, those

that were successful saw a

decrease in suicides and an

increase in positive outcomes

for the officers. Supported from

the top, with an emphasis on

ZERO reprisals by the department,

officers could get the help

they asked for. The result. The

dents in the stigma grew larger.

As the command staff’s awareness

grew about the positive

outcomes for their officers, the

indicators showed that the department

functioned better. And

a good functioning department

means a healthy department.

Are these “successful” departments

the outliers? Maybe.

The hope is that the grassroots

programs and the departments

work together to continue to put

dents in the stigma, ultimately

smashing it completely one day.

What we still do know for sure

The BLUES

Delivered to Your

Email Every Month

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CLICK HERE

is you are your best advocate. As

hard as it may be, you must be

the one to reach out and ask for

help. The grassroots programs

like A Badge of Honor are here

to assist at every level. We allow

you to be in control of your

mental health journey, leaving

behind the one thing that still

hampers some requests from

within the department…STIGMA.

So, find the courage to be your

own advocate. And remember,

your journey may help to save

another brother, sister, and/or

BLUE family. You are not alone.

Samantha Horwitz is a regular

contributor to The Blues Police

Magazine. She is a 9/11 first

responder, former United States

Secret Service Agent, speaker,

and author. She and her business

partner, ret. NYPD detective John

Salerno created A Badge of Honor,

a 501(c)(3), post-traumatic stress

and suicide prevention program

for first responders. John and

Sam host MAD (Making a Difference)

Radio each Wednesday 7pm

central live on FB @Makingadifferencetx.

For more about Sam and

the wellness and resiliency workshops

for first responders, visit

ABadgeofHonor.com.

CLICK OR SCAN HERE

60 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 61


DARYL LOTT

daryl’s deliberations

Merry Christmas? Happy New Year?

Merry Christmas and Happy New

Year? Hmm... I don’t know about

that. A Winsome Christmas and

Better New Year? Maybe. I’ve been

thinking of what an appropriate

sentiment would be in a time of

anxiety. No year is guaranteed to

be better than its predecessor, but

we always wish it to be so. We

celebrate the holidays in worldwide

style: from Bethlehem’s silent

night to a Times Square carnival a

week later. As Americans, we take

comfort in our reliable schedule of

celebrations. Indeed, all the citizens

of the world have similar traditions

that provide comfort in various

cultures.

The Christian calendar has been

secularized so as not to offend

other belief systems. January 1st is

celebrated worldwide. I know there

are other new year’s days in other

countries, but January 1st is recognized

as the official first day of

the new year. The globalization of

the world’s transportation, communications,

and commerce systems

demand a common clock and

calendar. Likewise, the globalization

of communicable disease creates

a common thread of anxiety for

everyone. All of God’s children are

hurting. I wondered if the Ghost of

Christmas Past could enlighten me

about previous generations’ struggles

with unsettling times.

The Ghost of Christmas Past

revealed one Christmas and New

Year’s Day that was different than

all the others. The Christmas of 1941

was the one that wins the dubious

prize for sheer uncertainty and

frightfulness. America had been

mauled by Japan in a diabolical

surprise attack at Pear Harbor on

December 7th—just 18 days before

Christmas. The Philippines were under

siege and it was all but certain

that American forces were going to

be captured by the notoriously cruel

Japanese army. The Pacific Fleet

was in disarray and the sunken and

still smoking battleships sitting on

the Hawaiian harbor sea bottom

could not provide a quick response.

The Atlantic fleet was being hammered

by German U-boats in ocean

battles that left merchant ships

blazing within sight of coastal

cities like New York and Boston. The

indispensable life line of supplies

between America and England was

very much endangered. Many lives

were being lost in the rough cold

seas of the North Atlantic.

In a bold move, Prime Minister

Winston Churchill made the perilous

sea journey from London to

Washington in order to visit President

Franklin D. Roosevelt. The men

had talks regarding a common war

strategy to defeat Germany and

Japan. There was a feeling that the

Christmas and New Year holidays

should be cancelled. This was not

as extreme as it might sound to

our modern ears. The United States

had to gear up wartime production

in what was to be a fight with

very powerful adversaries who

wanted to destroy freedom around

the world. We all know that the

Christmas and New Year holidays

may only be two days on the calendar,

but those are normally “dead

weeks” for most business and government

operations. Many private

and public sector executives did not

want to lose those valuable weeks

of initial productivity. England had

already been at war for over two

years and their production capacity

was at 100%, but the British people

were at the end of their rope.

Anything that would delay the much

needed supplies and support would

cost British lives. American productivity

had to be quickly geared up

into overdrive. Lives depended on it.

As Roosevelt pondered the unthinkable—cancelling

Christmas,

an executive spoke up. “The holiday

isn’t for us. It’s to honor the Christ

Child. It’s His holiday—not ours.”

Exactly. Roosevelt ordered that

federal holidays not be cancelled. In

the longer term, the people would

be energized by honoring God.

On Christmas Eve, Roosevelt and

Churchill addressed the freedom

loving peoples of the world from

the balcony of the White House.

We would join the fight against evil

until our last energy was spent. The

men then ceremonially lit the White

House Christmas tree. The brotherhood

of free peoples would engage

a ruthless and determined enemy.

Roosevelt and Churchill saw a

much needed opportunity to get

our allied efforts off on the right

foot. The notion that our countries

needed each other was no

longer simply a theory. In addition

to the losses America suffered in

the Pacific, the British were being

handed some cruel defeats as well.

“Fortress Singapore” was considered

impregnable by sea invasion

as it was on the southern tip

of the Malay Peninsula. However,

the Japanese figured if they could

land much farther north, then their

troops could, believe it or not, ride

bicycles south and defeat the British

army at Singapore. Japanese troop

ships were dispatched to invade the

Malay Peninsula and the soldiers

inside would race their bicycles to

the British back door. The British

countered the move by sending a

battleship, “HMS Prince of Wales”,

and a cruiser, “HMS Repulse”, to

destroy the Japanese troop ships at

sea. These most powerful of British

warships became the first capital

ships in history sunk in the open

ocean by aircraft alone. The British

Empire was dealt a staggering blow

that weighed heavily on the minds

of Roosevelt and Churchill (both

were Navy men at heart). What to

do!

The devastating losses that both

nations suffered in December highlighted

the reality that the war was

going to be long and hard. There

was no dream of a quick victory

before the next winter. Roosevelt

and Churchill knew that the death

toll would far exceed the 15 million

of the Great War. They knew that

“Happy New Year” was not going to

be appropriate for the foreseeable

future. They knew that the possibility

of America and the British Empire

losing the war was conceivable.

Allied victory was not inevitable.

What could they do to start this

joint endeavor?

Roosevelt and Churchill happened

to be members of the same Protestant

Church—the Church of England

(as it is called in England) and the

Episcopal Church (as it is called in

America). The men reasoned, like

George Washington before them,

that anything they did without God’s

Providential leadership would be

fruitless. All of our citizens, young

and old, black and white, healthy

and infirm, Jew and Gentile, had to

be engaged in the initial response.

New Year’s Day 1942 would be,

by Presidential Decree, a National

Day of Prayer. The idea was simple,

but genius. If the war was going to

be an existential conflict between

good and evil, then good people

were going to have to pray. The

prayer wasn’t the usual plea for

forgiveness and remorse for failings.

The prayer, according to the

president and prime minister, was a

prayer to make our nations worthy

of being called good. Our nations

had to ask God for his blessing of

making us worthy to be on His side.

The two leaders prepared themselves

and went to George Washington’s

own Anglican/Episcopal

church on the Day of Prayer. They

sat down in the general’s own pew

and got right with God. They asked

their Heavenly Father to take their

nations’ heartfelt responses to a

monstrous evil and make them

worthy to be called good. American

and British citizens echoed the

prayers of their respective leaders.

Our parents and grandparents

wanted to be counted as worthy to

fight evil in the name of Goodness.

They did not ask the Father to take

the bitter cup of war from their

lips; they only wanted to be worthy

of the struggle. Perhaps that’s why

they have been called the “Greatest

Generation.” The Americans and

the British would never forget the

Christmas of 1941– it was fraught

with anxiety.

Perhaps we should ask ourselves

if we are praying the right prayers.

As we pray for COVID victims and

their families, we are hopeful that

vaccines and therapies can stop the

pandemic. We hope that the world’s

people, including the most poverty

stricken and isolated, can soon

receive immunity from this disease.

Perhaps in this time of anxious

uncertainty, we should pray that we

are worthy to help our neighbors

in need. Maybe, just maybe, we

should pray that we are worthy to

give our neighbor a cup of water in

His name. I believe that is what my

grandparents did—and yours did,

too.

An appropriate greeting during

this time may be to wish everyone a

Happier New Year. In doing so, may

we recall Tiny Tim’s timeless words

that conclude the Dickens classic,

“God bless us, every one!”

62 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 63


HOUSTON POLICE OFFICERS UNION

from the president

Happy New Year – a year HPD

begins with short staffs on the streets

Going into the new year, we always

get excited and look forward

to starting out fresh and getting

things “in order”. This year was

no different as we rang in the new

year trying to stay positive. It can

often be hard to look forward to a

new year when we have so many

big issues that we are facing as an

organization.

First and foremost are the staffing

issues that we are seeing at every

station across the city. I worked

New Year’s eve at Southeast and roll

call consisted of about six people

for early side and another six for

late side for two districts. We were

non-stop the entire night!

Our manpower issues are being

exacerbated by the current Covid

is spike. We had over 420 officers

out as of New Year’s Day which is

leading to dangerous situations on

the streets. We must do everything

we can to protect ourselves, but

the realities are that most of us will

contract it at some point and most

will be just fine.

But this does not help our current

numbers on the streets. The closing

of the red book, as much as we hate

it, is a necessity right now and have

urged the chief

to open it back

up as soon as

he possibly

can. We need

bodies just to

make sure that

everyone on

the streets will

have back-up

when needed.

The sooner

our healthy officers

get back to

work, the faster

the red book

will open back

up.

I have reached

out to the chief

and asked that

we look at

an overtime

program just

to assist patrol.

No targeting

DOUGLAS GRIFFITH

offenders, just to run calls.

We know that at any one time in

this city, there are calls stacked up

for hours and our officers are doing

an incredible job just trying to keep

up. We will continue to push for

more officers on patrol, as that is

where it is most dangerous.

This could even be harder to deal

with over the next few months with

retirements. There is a possibility

that we could be under 5,000 officers

by summertime.

With rising crime, low staffing,

low morale and a closed red book it

can be hard to look at the positive.

Unlike other departments, HPD is

a true family. We will continue to

support each other and have our

brothers and sisters’ backs. We

will get past this and move forward

as we have done so many times

before.

I am proud of our members and

the work you all continue to do.

Here is to a healthy and happy

NEW YEAR!

ALL FIRST RESPONDERS & VETERANS

YEAR END SPECIAL

Purchase 2-row LEATHER SEATS COVERS

Receive FREE SEAT HEATERS

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64 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 65

CLICK HERE FOR WEBSITE


NOT SO BRIGHT AWARD

light bulb award

Let’s Go Brandon - 2022

By Michael Barron,

BLUES Publisher

Looking back on 2021, it was a

shit-show in Washington. Whether

you’re a democrat or a republican,

voted for Joe or not, there’s

no denying this man is totally incompetent

and should not running

our country.

When they coined the phrase

“the most powerful man in the

world” they almost certainly did

not ever imagine Joe Biden would

be ‘that man.’

Rather than go on and on detailing

all Joe’s blundering acts in

2021, I’ll just offer my insight and

opinion on one aspect of his 12

months in office – COVID.

This whole pandemic has been

a giant cluster in my opinion. It’s

certainly divided us AGAIN. The

Vaxers vs the non-Vaxers. The believers

and non-believers. Maskers’

vs non-Maskers.

I firmly believe everyone is entitled

to his or her choice when

it comes to COVID. If you want

to take a chance on not getting

vaccinated, then that should be

your right. No government agency,

be it National, State or Local

should have the right or the power

to force you to decide on what

medical procedure or preventative

medicine to take. That decision

should be yours and yours alone.

But Uncle Joe, the left-wing

nut jobs in Congress and a moron

named Fauci, think they have the

right to force you to ‘follow the

science’ and do it their way. For

the last two years, America has

gone along with ‘their way’ and as

a result we’ve lost 577 officers due

to COVID. It’s obvious that ‘their

way’ isn’t working.

I’m no expert and I do not have

all the answers. But having been in

law enforcement all these years,

I’m smart enough to gather the

facts and determine what is real

and what isn’t. This is what I believe

to be the truth:

1. This pandemic and the COVID

virus are real. How it became

about is certainly important and

of course we as a nation need to

get to the bottom of it and punish

those involved in the event it was

Yes Joe, we’re still here.

intentional.

2. Both parties of our government

have handled the pandemic

as if it were a political football

rather than the crisis it is. Many

good things were in fact done in

2020 by then President Trump.

He cut through all the BS and red

tape and ordered Pharma to come

up with a vaccine by the end of

2020 and they did. The reason they

did was money. The government

paid trillions of dollars to the big

Pharma companies to create a

drug in months that would have

taken years if it weren’t for the

money.

3. Some believe that the vaccines

“What in the hell am I doing here? I need to go back to the basement!”

are dangerous and it’s a world

order to cleanse the world of its

growing population. This growing

group believes that in two years

everyone who has been vaccinated

(2/3s of the earths population)

will die. Mass genocide. That’s

why they won’t get vaccinated.

4. These same individuals also

believe that hundreds of thousands

that have taken the vaccine

have died as a result. In other

words, the vaccine killed them

not COVID. In our cover story this

month, 577 officers died of COVID

in 2020 and 2021. I’ve had people

tell me they all died because they

were vaccinated. NO! They died

because they weren’t vaccinated

and most had some underlying

medical condition. NONE died as a

result of being vaccinated.

5. What I do believe is that there

are members of congress including

Uncle Joe, that are using this

pandemic to further their own

agenda. As long as they can continue

to scare Americans, they can

control them and manipulate their

daily lives.

6. I believe this pandemic may

in fact last years. The Bird Flu of

1918 lasted 2 years and killed 50

million people worldwide before

it finally dwindled to a few hundred

cases a year. We can not let

any pandemic control our lives or

cause us to live in fear of simply

going outside. Or going to the grocery

store or church. You should

be free to decide what your own

destiny is. If you believe in getting

vaccinated, then do it. If not, then

that’s your decision. But if you get

COVID or whatever the next damn

disease will be, you owe it to your

fellow human beings to stay away

from them and protect them from

you. That is YOUR responsibility.

You don’t need any government

agency ordering you to quarantine.

You should have enough common

sense and common decency to do

that on your own.

7. Finally, Uncle Joe needs to

use the money he conned out

of Congress to send a test kit to

every man, woman and child in

America. In fact, send them 2 or 3

or as many as they require to test

themselves as often as necessary

to prevent them from unknowingly

spreading COVID. Make all drugs

FREE and readily available to anyone

who tests positive. If preventive

drugs become available, then

they should be free as well.

All of this is my opinion which

I have a right to express. Each of

you has a right to disagree and

provide your own insight into

what should or should not be

done. That’s what is great about

America. The right of free speech

and expression. We also should

have the right as Americans to

choose our own fate and decide

what’s best for us and our family.

But that freedom doesn’t give you

the right to infect other Americans.

Be responsible & Be Safe.

66 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 67


unning 4 heroes

Total Miles Run in 2021: (as of 12/30/21): 325

Total Miles Run in 2020: 401

Total Miles Run in 2019: 376

Overall Miles Run: 1,102

2021 Run Stats:

Total Miles Run for 2021 fallen LEO’s (Non COVID-19): 159

Total Miles Run for 2021 fallen Firefighters (Non COVID-19): 73

Total Miles Run for 2021 fallen COVID-19 Heroes: 30

Total Miles Run for 2021 fallen Canada LEO’s: 2

Total Miles Run for 2021 Non Line of Duty Deaths: 13

Total Miles Run for 2020 Fallen LEO’s: 24

Total Miles Run for 2020 Fallen Firefighters: 6

Total Tribute Runs by State for 2021: 18

States/Cities Zechariah has run in:

Zechariah

Cartledge:

a True American Hero

Florida - Winter Springs, Lake Mary, Clearwater, Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, Orlando, Temple Terrace, Blountstown,

Cocoa, Lakeland, Daytona Beach, West Palm Beach, Starke

New York - New York City, Weedsport

Georgia - Cumming, Augusta, Savannah

South Carolina - North Myrtle Beach, Charleston, Sumter

Pennsylvania - Monaca

Illinois - Springfield, Naperville, Glen Ellyn

Texas - Houston (2), Fort Worth, Midland, New Braunfels, Freeport, Madisonville, Irving, Sadler, San Antonio

Kentucky - Nicholasville

Arkansas - Bryant, Hot Springs, Springdale, Prairie Grove

Nevada - Henderson

California - Mt. Vernon, La Jolla

Arizona - Mesa

North Carolina - Concord, Raleigh

Virginia - Norton, Richmond

Tennessee - Bristol

Delaware - Milford

Minnesota - Arden Hills

Indiana - Sullivan, Spencer

Mississippi - Grenada, Olive Branch

Missouri - Springfield

Iowa - Independence, Des Moines, Cedar Rapids

68 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 69


DR. TINA JAECKLE

blue mental health

Law Enforcement Suicide and the Need

for Transparency as a Catalyst for Change.

While access to effective

mental health services for law

enforcement officers has significantly

improved over the last

two decades, we continue to

struggle with compiling accurate

statistics on the true number(s)

of those in the field who

die by suicide. Although open

dialogue on officer suicide has

also become more accepted over

time, there is still a great need

for law enforcement agencies

to approach an actual suicide in

a transparent manner. Countless

agencies remain culturally

ingrained in the need to hide an

officer suicide by omitting the

details of the cause of death. We

must practice this transparency

in order to confront the shame

and secrecy of suicide. Our

ability to help and heal officers

who are struggling can only be

effectively built on a foundation

of truthfulness and promotion

of acceptance of the actual

humanness behind the badge.

Fortunately, the tide appears to

be turning as demonstrated by

the press releases of the events

surrounding three recent tragic

suicides in Florida. I applaud the

leadership of these agencies in

approaching these devastating

losses in a compassionate, yet

direct manner and highly urge

other agencies to do the same. It

is an essential way to spread the

message that it is “Ok not to be

Ok”.

Hillsborough County Sheriff’s

Office (HCSO) (FL) Deputy Christopher

Former died by suicide

on Wednesday night, December

29, 2021, according to his department.

One of the 49-yearold

deputy’s family members

contacted the HCSO 911 Center

shortly after 7 p.m. and told the

operator that Deputy Former had

threatened suicide in a phone

call, the sheriff’s office said in a

press release on Thursday. HCSO

deputies responded to Deputy

Former’s Mira Lago home and

spoke with him briefly before

the veteran deputy barricaded

himself inside the residence. Attempts

to convince Deputy Former

to exit the home peacefully

were unsuccessful. At approximately

11 p.m., SWAT officers

entered the residence and found

Deputy Former dead from an

“apparent self-inflicted gunshot

wound,” the HCSO said in their

press release.

“My deepest condolences go

out to Deputy Former’s family

and those that knew and loved

him,” Hillsborough County Sheriff

Chad Chronister said. “While

this is a difficult time for our

Sheriff’s Office family, it is times

like this where we rely on each

other and the community for

support. Together we will grieve

and try to make sense of what

happened.”

DR. TINA JAECKLE

Deputy Former served the

HCSO for 23 years and was most

recently assigned to the Ruskin

area as a community resource

deputy. “He was a guardian at

heart,” longtime friend John-Michael

Elms told the Tampa Bay

Times. “He wanted to protect

people from those bad things out

there and I think he did it wonderfully

for over 20 years.” “You

go into that profession because

you want to help people, and

what I saw of him on the job, he

never developed that stereotypical

cynicism that some do in

those kinds of jobs,” Elms added

“He always looked for the best in

people.” In addition to his service

as a law enforcement officer,

Deputy Former was also a U.S.

Army veteran, the Tampa Bay

Times reported. He leaves behind

two grown children, Elms said.

The St. Lucie County Sheriff’s

Office (FL) announced Tuesday,

January 3, 2022, that two of its

deputies died by suicide in the

last week. Deputy Clayton Osteen

attempted suicide on New

Year’s Eve and was removed

from life support by his family

days later on Sunday. In the wake

of his death, Deputy Victoria

Pachero took her life, according

to the sheriff’s office. She shared

a 1-month-old son with Deputy

Osteen. “Words cannot express

the tremendous loss we all feel

after losing these two members

of our Sheriff’s Office family,”

Sheriff Ken Mascara said in a

statement. “To the general public,

and sometimes even myself,

it’s easy to view law enforcement

as superhuman...but let’s

not forget that they’re human

just like us. “Law enforcement

deal with not only the day-today

stress we all face but also

the stress of those whom they

serve in our community, which

can sometimes be very challenging.

“While it is impossible for us

to fully comprehend the private

circumstances leading up to this

devastating loss, we pray that

this tragedy becomes a catalyst

for change, a catalyst to help

ease the stigma surrounding

mental well-being and normalize

the conversation about the

challenges so many of us face

on a regular basis.” Very well

said sheriff. The nation grieves

with you.

Please do not hesitate to reach

out for assistance at any time at

the following law enforcement

numbers, contacts, and agencies:

Copline (www.copline.org),

1-800-COPLINE; Humanizing the

Badge (contact@humanizingthebadge.com);

and Safe Call Now

(www.safecallnowusa.org),

206-459-3020.

70 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 71


RUSTY BARRON

off duty & outdoors

Be Ready to Move on Late Season Doves

Between Christmas and New

Year’s Eve, I took my annual trip

to Uvalde, Texas for our endof-the-year

dove hunt with

friends and family. Without a

question, the trip reinforced

that hunting late season doves

in South Texas is the best because

the birds are hard to

predict and that makes getting

a limit challenging, and

certainly not a guarantee. So

many may wonder why would

you want the hunt to be hard,

to a point that is makes getting

a limit difficult? While I have

never been to Argentina to hunt

doves where shooting hundreds

of doves a day is a guarantee,

I have been in Uvalde, Texas

in the early part of dove season

and feel confident I could

take a hundred or so birds in

a day if legal. While I love

hunting when the sky is filled

with Whitewing Doves pouring

into the field in front of you

at tree-top level, I also don’t

want my hunting to be over in

20 minutes. That is why I like

hunting late season with many

variables that makes the dove

hunting challenging. I will do

my best to explain.

Fog. As I made my way

through the early morning

hours, I stopped at my son’s

house to pick him and his gear

up and noticed it was getting

foggy. From an hour outside of

Houston all the way to Uvalde,

it was foggy. It has been my

experience that foggy afternoons

make for unpredictable

and usually slow hunts and this

year proved this lesson to be

true. Because you never know

what time the birds will start

to fly when it is foggy, we got

in the field early, around 2:30

pm. By 3:30 we had only seen

an occasional dove buzz us

heading into the field. By 4:00,

we had one dove among four

hunters. I felt I had to change

something, so I decided to

move to another corner of the

field where I had seen some

birds flying. This move helped

some, but by sunset I ended my

first hunt with only 3 of my 15-

bird limit, two of which came

from the “grand finale flight”

of doves coming off the field

heading to the oaks to roost as

the fog finally lifted. Unfortunately,

some things you cannot

control and hunting doves in

heavy fog or light rain, usually

does not end well for the

hunter. However, I would still

rather be in the field waiting to

see if the birds start to fly and

catching an occasional lonesome

dove vs not going at all.

Besides, this was only day 1 of a

Austin Barron, Rusty Barron, Brandon Barron and Jared Blake

3-day hunt.

Second morning, new area,

new field with a different problem,

but similar result. This is

the short version of my second

morning hunt. After a slow

start with that first afternoon

hunt, our host decided to move

us to another field in Knippa,

Texas for this morning’s hunt.

We had a large group and we

spread out along one end of the

field cover two corners and the

long stretch of field between.

About an hour into the hunt, I

had not even fired a single shot

and those around me only a

couple of shots at the single

birds that were catching most

of us by surprise. But there was

a pattern emerging to the hunters

who were getting shots.

They were all in one corner of

the field where the doves were

coming in and going out of the

field. They were shooting a lot

of shells and I was only getting

an occasional shot. Many

members of our group moved

closer to that corner, but I

hesitated to crowd the already

crowded group getting all the

shots, so I moved beyond them

to another corner of the field

but still ended up after the

morning hunt having only fired

8 shots and no birds to show

for it. I know that when you

can, you must move to the birds

and in this case, I waited too

late to make my move.

After lunch we decided to try

yet another field in Ulvade for

both Whitewings and Mourning

Doves. We preceded to get set

up in a similar fashion as the

last field…stretching our group

from one corner to another to

wait for the afternoon flight.

As we were setting up, I noticed

birds flying at the other

end of the field. So not wanting

to wait this time, I told my

group I was taking a walk to

check things out. Within minutes

of arriving at the other

end of the field, I realized this

was the hot corner to be in.

Mourning Doves were piling

into the field, and I was shooting

as fast as I could reload and

pick up downed birds. It didn’t

take long for my boys to show

up because I taught them to

go where the birds are, don’t

72 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 73


wait to see if they will also be

coming to you. That afternoon

hunt ending with limits of birds

for my boys and I and for those

others who came to the sound

of gunshots. The rest of the

group that stayed where they

were dropped off, never fired a

single shot. That night I dinner,

I shared my experience with

those who did not come down

to my end of the field that next

time they must come to where

the birds are.

For the last morning hunt,

our host gave us a choice. Hunt

the first field we hunted in the

fog where the birds never really

flew but he still believed held

a lot of birds or get up early

and hunt this same field where

we found so much success. My

boys and I were the only ones in

our group who opted to get up

early and hunt this same field

at sunrise. The others decided

to hunt the first field closer to

the lodge. Our decision proved

to be the right one. Mourning

Doves started flying shortly

before sunrise and the Whitewing

Doves showed up around

9:00. Again, my boys and I left

the field with limits with the

doves still flying in and out

of the field well into the late

morning hours. I did learn later

that morning that many who

hunted closer to the lodge did

also get limits from the early

morning flight of the Mourning

Doves. A late Christmas gift to

bring all of us back again next

year just like a great golf shot

makes you forget the rest of

your game and brings you back

for more.

Overall, this was a great trip

with great memories that will

have to last me another year

until we return for the late

2022 dove season. If you get

the chance still this year, dove

season goes until January 14 in

the Central zone and until January

21 in the South zone.

Just remember to move to

where the birds are, not where

someone thinks they will be

based on some past experience.

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74 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 75


ADS BACK IN THE DAY

76 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 77


ADS BACK IN THE DAY

78 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 79


THERE ARE NO WORDS

parting shots...

...pardon our humor

80 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 81

The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 81

80 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE


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82 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 83


EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS

• Paid Vacation

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• Certification Pay

ALDINE ISD POLICE DEPT.

now accepting applications for:

Dispatcher

Salary starting at $32,690,

no experience required.

TO APPLY VISIT

WWW.ALDINEISD.ORG

OR

Contact the Personnel

Department at

281-985-7571

OR

Contact Sergeant R. Hall at

281-442-4923

HIRING PROCESS

• Oral Board Panel Interview

• Complete Personal History Statement

• Psychological Evaluation

• Medical Examination

• Interview with the Chief of Police

84 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 85


BEDFORD POLICE DEPARTMENT

WE'RE

HIRING!

AND

RECRUIT

POLICE

LATERAL

OFFICERS

Requirements

Be eligible for certification from TCOLE (Texas

Commission on Law Enforcement). (Please refer to Texas

Administrative Code Title 37 Chapter 217.1 for clarification.)

Must be 21 or older (at the time of certification)

Must have a valid Texas Driver’s License (or ability to

obtain)

30 hours college credit from an accredited college (college

requirement waived if certified peace officer OR two years

active duty military experience with an honorable

discharge)

Step

Police Salary

Police Recruit (No certification) - $58,242

Police Recruit (TCOLE-certified) - $61,155

Police Officer - $64,351- $80,257

Hourly

Annual

1 $30.93 $64,351

2 $32.09 $66,765

3 $33.30 $69,268

4 $34.55 $71,865

5 $35.84 $74,560

6 $37.19 $77,356

7 $38.58 $80,257

Eligible lateral applicants will be placed on the Step Plan

based on their years of experience as a full time Police

Officer at a paid Police Department.

Incentives

*College education pay for Associates Degree and above

*TCOLE certification level pay

*Foreign language pay

*Tattoo and facial hair friendly

us:

Contact

pd.recruiting@bedfordtx.gov

2121 L. Don Dodson Dr.

more info and to apply online, visit:

For

https://bedfordtx.gov/503/Join-BPD

Bedford, TX 76021

www.bedfordpolice.com

86 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 87


OFFICER / PUBLIC SAFETY RECRUIT

POLICE

perform preventive patrol, law enforcement, traffic control & other related duties

to

Non-Certified Recruit

$60,231.83

Certified Officer (Step 1)

$68,000

February 1st at 1PM

Tuesday,

February 2nd at 9AM

Wednesday,

February 3rd at 6PM

Thursday,

February 4th at 1PM

Friday,

competitive benefits:

Highly

Pension, Social Security,

TMRS

medical plans, dental,

2

life insurance, LTD,

vision,

vacation, sick, and

paid

plus much more!

holidays,

School Diploma or GED

High

Certified: 30 hours

TCOLE

or 2 years full-time TX

college

experience

police

Lateral Entry Pay

Longevity & Certification Pay

Non-Certified: 30 hours college

Pay scale:

$57,000 (as a non-certified Cadet) up to $82,762, depending on certification

BENEFITS

• Supportive leadership and community

• Civil Service

• 12-hour shifts for patrol division

• 3-day weekend approximately twice a month

• Take-home vehicles

• Tattoos permitted

• Longevity Pay – $4/month for each year of service;

maximum of $1,200/year

• TCOLE certificate pay

• Paid sick leave with unlimited accumulation

• Vacation – 15 days/year

• Holidays – 10 paid and 2 additional floating holidays/year

• Group health insurance with deductible, flexible spending accounts,

and Section 125 options

• Life insurance, long‐term disability and workers’ compensation

• Optional life insurance and deferred plans are also available

• Retirement plan with the Texas Municipal Retirement System

• Employee contributes 7%, city matches 2:1

• Opportunity to attend training schools

• Equipment and uniforms are furnished, including regulation weapon

• Employee Assistance Program

• Post Police Academy pay - $58,469 @ 28.11/hour

• On-duty fitness time provided

Apply By: Thursday, January 27, 2022

www.burlesontx.com/jobs

Testing Dates (assigned by January 28th):

Saturday, February 5th at 9AM

Use link above for details:

Test study guide purchase

Job information

Online application instructions &

required documents to upload

Questions: 817-426-9643 or hr@burlesontx.com

The City of Burleson is an Equal Opportunity Employer

To learn more about hiring details,

qualifications, and application instructions, visit: Bryantx.gov/PDJobs

88 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE

The City of Bryan is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 89


CITY OF CARROLLTON

Firefighters’ and Police Officers’

Civil Service Commission

Announces

POLICE DEPARTMENT

Entrance Examination Test Date: December 11, 2021

REGISTRATION ENDS ON:

December 11, 2021 at 9:00 a.m.

Examination Date: Saturday, December 11, 2021 at

9:00a.m. - Written Exam

To register go to: www.cityofcarrollton.com/police

Complete the online registration to be submitted electronically to:

Carrollton Police Department

2025 East Jackson Road

Carrollton, Texas 75006

Phone: 972 466 3028

Website: www.cityofcarrollton.com/police

Email: policedevelopment@cityofcarrollton.com

City of Carrollton is an Equal Opportunity Employer

90 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 91


salary

starting

$50,000

"Protecting those who will change the world."

CRANDALL ISD POLICE DEPARTMENT

Police Officers

now hiring

Benefits Include:

Full Time Employment

Full Medical Insurance Options

Teacher Retirement System

Summers Off

Paid Holidays

*Spring Break, Thanksgiving, Christmas

Overtime Opportunities

certified officers only

See full infomation at:

www.crandall-isd.net

92 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 93


94 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 95


GALVESTON

COUNTY

SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Seeking Individuals Who Are Interested in a Rewarding Career in Corrections

Begin Your Career Today!

GALVESTON COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE ESTABLISHMENT OF ELIGIBILITY

Position: Corrections Deputy I

Bureau/Division: Corrections/Jail

Title/Rank: Corrections Deputy/Deputy I

Reports to: Sergeant - Corrections

Starting Salary: $47,715.20

JOB RESPONSIBILITIES

Maintains the security of the facility by conducting security checks, settling disputes, and performing cell searches and

inspections; conducts outside perimeter checks.

Preparation and proper completion in the documentation of inmate records.

Issues inmate meals, clothing, linens, and personal items.

Supervise inmate programs (recreational, legal, health care, visitation and religious services)

Prepares reports on jail and inmate activities, enforce inmate handbook rules.

Supervises inmates performing such assignments as cleaning and maintaining the jail facility and continuously observe

locations and activities of inmates.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

High School / GED Certificate and must be at least 18 years of age.

Must be a U.S. Citizen and resident of the contiguous United States for a period of time sufficient to conduct a

background investigation.

Must be able to work days, nights, weekends, holidays and mandatory shifts when needed.

Must be able to work during natural disasters and or under declarations.

Must possess a valid Texas driver's license and an acceptable driving record as determined by the Galveston County

Sheriff's Office in effect at the time of application.

Must have favorable employment history. All information given regarding past employment will be thoroughly checked

Must have a stable credit history.

Must possess good computer skills and demonstrate comprehensive reading and comprehension skills.

No conviction above a Class B Misdemeanor or a Class B misdemeanor within the last 10 years nor have been on or

currently on court-ordered community supervision or probation for any criminal offense and no Family Violence

convictions of any level.

Applicant must pass all phases of the required testing.

Must be eligible for licensing by the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement (TCOLE) for the position applied for, if not

presently licensed.

TO APPLY

An applicant interested in any of GCSO position shall first download, complete and return

the Application Packet, per the instructions on the downloadable form.

The Application Packet can be found at SHERIFF.GALVESTONCOUNTYTX.GOV

What:

When:

Where:

Register:

Basic Requirements:

• Basic:

Become a Haltom City

Police Officer

Starting Salary: $63,776 ($30.66 hourly)

Police Officer Civil Service Entrance Exam

Saturday, February 26, 2022, check-in begins at 8:00 a.m.; test begins at 9:00 a.m.

W. G. Thomas Coliseum – 6108 Broadway Ave. Haltom City, TX 76117

Complete the Police Exam Registration form at WWW.HALTOMCITYTX.COM/REGISTER

Those without internet access may call 817-222-7029 to register. Contact Detective Spillane

with questions at 817-222-7029 or mspillane@haltomcitytx.com.

Veterans and Certified Officers eligible for additional points on exam day. Visit the City’s

• High School Diploma/GED;

• valid Texas Driver’s License;

• 21 years of age at time of licensure

Physical Readiness Test:

website for details.

REGISTER PRIOR TO THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2022

A physical readiness test will be conducted on the same day and at the same location as the written exam.

The physical readiness test will begin immediately following the written test for applicants who pass the

written exam. All Police Officer applicants are required to pass the Department’s physical readiness test to

continue in the application process. The physical readiness test consists of rowing 2000 meters on a Concept2

Rower. Testing requirements will be age, gender, and weight adjusted. Visit tiny.cc/xnoksz for a

demonstration of the basic techniques.

The City of Haltom City does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, genetic information, veteran status or

disability in employment or the provision of services.

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

• Certification: No certification required

• Experience: None required.

JOIN US

VISIT SHERIFF.GALVESTONCOUNTYTX.GOV TO APPLY!

96 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 409.763.7585 : SO.EMPLOYMENT@GALVESTONCOUNTYTX.GOV

The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 97

The Galveston County Sheriff’s Office is an Equal Opportunity Employer

CONTACT US

Posting #22-006 Police Officer; Posted 01/04/2022


FILL YOUR DEPARTMENTS’

OPEN POSITIONS

LATERAL DEPUTY

Pay scale:

$57,000 (as a non-certified Cadet) up to $82,762, depending on certification

BENEFITS

• Supportive leadership and community

• Civil Service

• 12-hour shifts for patrol division

• 3-day weekend approximately twice a month

• Take-home vehicles

• Tattoos permitted

• Longevity Pay – $4/month for each year of

service; maximum of $1,200/year

• TCOLE certificate pay

• Paid sick leave with unlimited accumulation

• Vacation – 15 days/year

• Holidays – 10 paid and 2 additional floating

holidays/year

• On-duty fitness time provided

• Group health insurance with deductible, flexible

spending accounts, and Section 125 options

• Life insurance, long‐term disability and workers’

compensation

• Optional life insurance and deferred plans are

also available

• Retirement plan with the Texas Municipal

Retirement System

• Employee contributes 7%, city matches 2:1

• Opportunity to attend training schools

• Equipment and uniforms are furnished, including

regulation weapon

• Employee Assistance Program

• Post Police Academy pay - $58,469 @ 28.11/hour

Important

Information

Application Deadline:

January 14, 2022

Written exam:

January 21, 2022

To learn more about hiring details, qualifications, and application instructions, visit: Bryantx.gov/PDJobs

The City of Bryan is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

FOR ONLY $250,

FOR 6 MONTHS.

REACH 1/2 MILLION

POTENTIAL CANDIDATES.

98 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 99


Must be at least 21 years of age with High School diploma or equivalent.

Must meet physical, mental & educational standards set by the State and

the department.

Current Basic Peace Officer certification from TCOLE.

https://www.huttotx.gov/DocumentCenter/View/780/Certifiedinitial-application-Police-Officer-2021?bidId=

HUTTO POLICE

DEPARTMENT


BENEFITS

RETIREMENT—TMRS with City match ratio of 2 to 1 after 5-year

vesting period.

SIGN ON BONUS—$ 2,500.00

SPECIALY/CERTIFICATION PAY :

Intermediate Peace Officer—$ 50.00 per month

Advanced Peace Officer—$ 100.00 per month

Master Peace Officer—$ 150.00 per month

Bilingual—$50.00 Level 1,$75.00 Level 2 per month (after testing)

*Crash Reconstruction—$ 50.00 per month

*EMT/Paramedic—$ 50.00 per month

*Firearms Instructor—$ 50.00 per month

*Field Training Officer—$ 130.00 bi-weekly

*Hutto Response Team—$ 130.00 bi-weekly

*Officer in Charge—$ 130.00 bi-weekly



EDUCATION:

Associates Degree—$ 50.00 per month

Bachelors Degree—$ 125.00 per month

Masters Degree—$1 75.00 per month

UNIFORMS/EQUIPMENT—All necessary equipment, including

AR-15, Shotgun, TASER and Body Armor. Also included is a

$400.00 annual uniform allowance per officer.

LEAVE ACCRUALS—12 paid Holidays, 80 hours of Vacation, 96

hours of Sick Leave annually.



TAKE HOME CAR—Upon completion of Field Training Program,

officers living within 25 miles of Hutto, TX are authorized to

take their police vehicle to their residence.

STARTING SALARY—$ 58,880.00 (May vary based on experience.)

*upon approval

We want YOU to

join our team!

PATROL

TRAINING UNIT

STREET CRIMES

INVESTIGATIONS

COMMUNITY

RESOURCE

CRIME SCENE

CRASH

RECONSTRUCTION

HUTTO RESPONSE

TEAM

BIKE PATROL

K9

BECOME A JEFFERSON, TEXAS POLICE OFFICER

SEEKING LICENSED TEXAS PEACE OFFICERS

A PROFFESSION THAT’S REWARDING

FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES:

LOCATION:

TMRS RETIREMENT

TAKE HOME CAR PROGRAM

MEDICAL INSURANCE

106 NORTH ALLEY STREET

JEFFERSON, TEXAS 75657

FOR MORE INFO CALL US: (903) 665-2432

100 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 101


we're

WE’RE HIRING POLICE OFFICERS!

Starting Pay

$53,000

hiring!

Jailer/Corrections Officer

Jailer/Corrections Officer

Starting Pay $43,950

Starting Pay $43,950

• Officers work 12 hour shifts and have every other 3 day weekend off

• Incentive pay for Intermediate, Advanced or Master TCOLE certifications

• Incentive pay for Field Training Officer certification

• Incentive pay for college degrees: Associates, Bachelors or Masters

• After 5 years of service, employees receive longevity pay

• City of Jonestown provides 11 paid holidays

• Vacation leave accrues at the end of the first 2 weeks of employment at a rate of 3.08 hours for each 2-week

pay period worked in a calendar year, totaling 10 working days each 12 months

• Sick leave accrues to total 12 days every 12 months

• Insurance: hospitalization, medical, dental, vision and life insurance

• Retirement: Texas Municipal Retirement Systems, 7% with a 2:1 match by the City of Jonestown

Officers will be trained and certified as Marine Safety Enforcement Officers to patrol the north shores of Lake Travis.

For Questions, call

For Questions, call

1800 Ridgemar Dr.

1800 Ridgemar Dr.

For more information

512-267-7007

policeinfo@jonestowntx.gov

www.jonestowntx.gov

(817) 202. 2974

(817) 202. 2974

Cleburne, TX 76031

Cleburne, TX 76031

102 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 103


• NOW HIRING •

• TCOLE CERTIFIED OFFICERS •

Do you have what we are looking for?

TRUST • INTEGRITY • PURPOSE

*5-year lateral maximum starting salary- does not include certification pay or assignment pay

CURRENT PAY STRUCTURE

GENEROUS CERTIFICATION PAY ASSIGNMENT PAY

PLENTY OF PART-TIME WORK AVAILABLE

GREAT SUPPORT FROM OUR CITIZENS

To apply, go to https://www.cityofkennedale.com/813/Recruiting

For more information you can also visit-

The Kennedale Police Department at: www.cityofkennedale.com/99/Police

The City of Kennedale at: www.cityofkennedale.com

104 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 105


General Duties

This is a full-time, sworn, shift position, with the uniformed patrol division. This job requires multi-tasking in essential duties that

includes protecting the city’s residents and property; proactive patrol; answering calls-for-service; traffic control and enforcement;

traffic collision investigation; community policing programs and other duties as assigned.

Minimum Qualifications

Applicants must have over 3 years of service as a regular peace officer as defined by the Texas Commission on Law

Enforcement (TCOLE) at a department of similar or larger size. Officer must still complete the field training program and a

probationary period with the department. See the Hiring Disqualifiers on the website (www.leandertx.gov/police/page/recruitingemployment).

Disqualifiers are also listed on the Personal History Statement. Currently licensed out-of-state officers in good

standing must be licensed by TCOLE by the testing date.

Selection Process

Applicants completing an online application and meeting all minimum qualifications, passing a physical ability test, and passing a

written aptitude test, will then be required to turn in a completed Personal History Statement. Applicants should obtain the

Personal History Statement (PHS) from the department or the department’s website. The personal history statement requires

items such as certified birth certificate; copy of diplomas or GED; certified transcripts; copy of military discharge; court orders (as

appropriate). Documents will not be returned. Incomplete PHS may result in disqualification. For any issues regarding obtaining

necessary documents by the deadline for PHS, contact the recruiter.

Candidates will then sit for an oral board interview, with an element of the interview being a three to five minute oral presentation

to the board. All applicants must pass a criminal and personal background investigation. Top candidates after the oral board and

background will then sit for an interview with the chief or designee. Candidates selected for the chief’s interview will be notified of

the date and time. Selected candidates by the chief will be placed on an eligibility list for conditional job offers.

Policy on Reapplication

Applicants for sworn positions that were temporarily disqualified for any of the listed reasons may reapply for posted positions at

least six months after the application posted due date unless specifically notified in writing at the end of the selection process that

the disqualification was permanent. A new application must be submitted at that time. Disqualified applicants will be notified of the

reason for the disqualification.

Salary

Officer III starting pay is $32.33 ($67,246.40 annualized) plus benefits. Special duty/special assignment incentive pay.

Educational Incentive or TCOLE Certification Incentive pay. Language Proficiency Incentive Pay. Field Training Officer Pay.

Annual Longevity Pay. Moving Reimbursement Pay.

Application Deadline

Applications are only accepted online through governmentjobs.com/careers/leandertx Personal History Statement can be

found on-line at www.leandertx.gov/police/page/recruiting-employment or at the Police Department, 705 Leander Drive, Leander,

TX 78641. Application deadline is February 4, 2022 at Noon. Physical ability test and written test will be on February 5, 2022.

Personal History Statements are due the day of Oral Boards, which are February 9, 2022. EOE.

106 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 107


108 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 109


The Reserve Peace Officer is a voluntary position with the Lockney Police Department. Each volunteer

must be able to commit 24 hours a month and attend training as needed. The City of Lockney is located

in Floyd County, northeast of Lubbock County. Lockney Police Department was re-established this year

and looking fill Reserve Positions.

Job Requirements

• Must have TCOLE Basic Peace Officer's License.

• All applicants must be a U.S. Citizen and 21 years of age.

• Valid Texas Driver's License with acceptable driving record.

• All qualified applicants MUST complete a Personal History Statement in order to be considered

for the position.

• Qualified applicants must submit to a pre employment written and physical agility test, drug

test, psychological and physical examination as well as a criminal background check.

• All qualified candidates must be of good moral character and able to communicate with the

public, be available for shift work, weekends and holidays.

* ALL EQUIPMENT AND UNIFORMS (EXCEPT

FOOTWEAR) ARE PROVIDED TO RESERVES.

Apply Today!

https://drive.google.com/file/d/12H129HNiSARhmikVbfhIX-tLd-NiGh1b/view?usp=sharing

(806) 810-0500

Email Personal History Statement to cfitzwater@cityoflockney.com or Mail to 305 N Main Street.

Lockney, TX 79241

110 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 111


Memorial Villages Police Department

Bunker Hill • Piney Point• Hunters Creek

Police Officer

EOE/M/F/D

5+ Years Patrol Experience Required

The Memorial Villages Police Department (Located on the West Side of Houston) currently has

openings for experienced officers who are self- motivated and enthusiastic about community

policing. We have overwhelming support of our communities and encourage our officers to be

proactive and innovative.

$1500 Sign on Bonus

Starting Salary Range

$71,351 – $82,980 (DOQ)

• Healthcare Insurance, DHMO Dental, Vision – 100% paid for employee, 75% for

spouse/dependents.

• Paid long-term disability and life insurance for employee, with additional life insurance

available for spouse/dependents.

• Health Savings Account with departmental contributions up to $4200 annually

• TMRS Retirement 2 to 1 match, 7% Employee ,14% Employer Contribution.

• 457 Plan with employer contribution of 2% of annual salary

• Bi-Lingual Pay (2.5% of Base salary)

• Shift Differential Pay $3600 annually

• Tuition reimbursement

• Longevity Pay up to a max of $2400 annually at 10 years of service.

• College Education incentive up to $3000 for a master’s degree

• LEMIT or FBI NA pay $1200 annually.

• ECA (Emergency Care Assistant) $1300 Annually, training provided to each employee.

• 12 hour shifts with every other Friday, Saturday, and Sunday off.

• Officer certification pay, Intermediate, Advanced, and Master up to 7.5% of Salary.

To learn more or apply, visit our website at www.mvpdtx.org

Or contact Sgt. Owens 713-365-3711 or lowens@mvpdtx.org

Or Commander E. Jones 713-365-3706 ejones@mvpdtx.org

11981 Memorial Dr. Houston, Texas 77024

112 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 113


114 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 115


Oak Ridge North Police

Department

Chief of Police

27424 Robinson Rd.

Tom Libby Conroe, Tx. 77385

(281)292-4762

The Oak Ridge North Police Department is currently accepting resumes for the position

of Police Officer. The Department serves the City of Oak Ridge North 24 hours a day, 7

days a week. The Police Department is comprised of 1 Chief, 1 Patrol Lieutenant, 1

Administrative Lieutenant, 1 Detective Sergeant, 1 Administrative Sr. Officer, 2 Patrol

Sergeants, 1 Environmental Sergeant and 8 Patrol Officers.

Minimum Requirements:

Hiring Process:

Job Description:

1. TCOLE certified as a Texas Peace Officer.

2. 21 years of age or older.

3. Possess a valid Texas Driver’s License.

4. High School Diploma or G.E.D. certificate.

5. United States Citizen.

6. Honorable Discharge from the U.S. Armed Forces.

7. Vision correctable to 20/20.

8. Able to read, write and speak English language.

9. No Felony convictions or Class B or above in the last 10

years.

1. Submit resume to Lt. Barry, dbarry@oakridgenorthpdtx.us

2. Physical Agility Test.

3. Oral Board.

4. Background Investigation.

5. Firearms Qualification.

6. Conditional Job Offer upon successfully passing the

TCOLE mandated Medical/Drug Screening and

Psychological Examination.

1. Provide for public safety by maintaining order, responding

to emergences, protecting people and property, enforcing

motor vehicle and criminal laws, and promoting good

community relations.

2. Identify, pursue, and arrest suspects of criminal acts.

3. Prepare incident report, arrest reports and accident

reports.

4. Ability to work 12 hour shifts or other shifts.

5. Enforce applicable traffic laws of The State of Texas.

6. Enforce Ordinance Violations of the City of Oak Ridge

North.

Starting pay for an Oak Ridge North Police Officer is $59,073 annually. Additional pay

is awarded depending on qualifications, TCOLE certifications, and college degrees.

Oak Ridge North Police Department is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not

discriminate on race, sex, religion, color, origin, or creed.

116 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 117


Ochiltree County Sheriff's Office

We’re Hiring!

$3,600 Sign on Bonus

Deputy Sheriff Position

Ochiltree County Sheriff’s Office is accepting applications for Deputy Sheriff. Applicants must be TCOLE

Certified and pass a ridged employment/background investigation.

Ochiltree County Sheriff’s Office is a professional and dedicated Law-Enforcement Agency located in the top of

the Texas Panhandle. The county is approximately 900 square miles with a county population of over 10,000

people We strive to serve out citizens with Honesty, Integrity and Pride. We have recently moved into a beautiful

new state of the art Law Enforcement Facility. We offer a very competitive salary ranging from $48,300-$58,000

(DOQ).

Benefits Include

$3,600 Sign-On Bonus

Take Home Units with MDT’s, Radar, and Department Issued Weapons

Vest, Uniforms, Duty Gear, and Phone Allowance

Employee Insurance is provided free, with Very Reasonable Family Coverage

Retirement: 7% employee contribution matched at 11.3% by County

Family Gym Membership, Including Racquetball, Pool and Weight Room

Certificate Pay Increases for Intermediate, Advanced and Master Certificates

Longevity Pay and Paid Overtime

Salary: Police Officer (Commissioned or Graduated the Academy)

Entry $48,000

Completion of FTO $48,500

1 st Anniversary $49,000

2 nd Anniversary $50,000

3 rd Anniversary $51,000

4 th Anniversary $52,000

5 th Anniversary $54,000

Lateral Pay Scale Available (Year for Year)

Additional Compensation:

Certificate Pay

Intermediate $45 monthly ($540 annually)

Advanced $75 monthly ($900 annually)

Master $110 monthly ($1320 annually)

Bilingual Certification $45 monthly ($540 annually)

Longevity Incentive $7 per month of employment with City – No

limit

Take home car program

for officers who reside in

the city limits.

Benefits:

TMRS Retirement: 7%, 2-1, match, 20 year, vested in 5 years

Medical: City pays 100% premium, family plans optional

Life: City pays 100% premium, family plans optional

Vacation: 2 weeks annually starting – incremental increases to 5

weeks annually at 15 years of service.

Sick leave: Accrues at 4.66 hours a month up to 240 hours

9 paid Holidays a year

Longevity Pay: $7 for each month

Contact

Ochiltree County Sheriff's Office

Attn: Sheriff Terry Bouchard

511 S Ash

Perryton, TX 79070

(806)-435-8000

txsheriff@ochiltree.net

Application is available on website:

http://www.co.ochiltree.tx.us/page/ochiltree.Sheriff

Apply in person or online

@

www.riveroakspd.com

4900 River Oaks Blvd

River Oaks TX 76114

APPLICATION DEADLINE

***OPEN UNTIL FILLED***

12 Hour Shifts, Every-Other Weekend Off

118 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 119


MAKE A

DIFFERENCE

IN YOUR

COMMUNITY

We are looking for outstanding individuals to

join our team! As a Pearland Police Officer your

mission will be to prevent crime and disorder, build

partnerships within the community, and positively

impact the quality of life for all our residents.

CITY OF PEARLAND, TEXAS

• Competitive Salary • Outstanding Training

• Career Advancement • Exceptional Benefits

The City of Pearland is one of the fastest growing

communities within the region. Pearland is located

approximately 20 minutes south of Downtown Houston

and the current population is approximately 130,000

residents.

JOIN OUR TEAM

HIRING POLICE OFFICERS AND CADETS

$5,000 Hiring Incentive for T.C.O.L.E Certified Police

Officers who qualify with at least 2 years of experience.

TEST DATE:

SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 8:30 A.M.

Register by: April 12.

Pearland Recreation Center & Natatorium

4141 Bailey Road, Pearland, TX 77584.

Doors Open: 7:15 a.m. No admittance after 7:45 a.m.

Candidates must park in the north parking lot.

SOCIAL DISTANCING MEASURES WILL APPLY

• Attendance limited to first 150 arrivals

• Mandatory temperature checks

• Masks required, hand sanitizer available

• Candidates seated 6 feet apart



•Be a citizen of the nited tates able to read,

write, and speak the English language

• Have a high school diploma or equivalency certificate .E.. certified by

the issuing agency with:

0 credit hours with a cumulative PA of 2.0 or higher on a .0 scale from an accredited

institute of higher learning or

- Minimum 24 months of active duty service with an honorable discharge authenticated by

a Member 2 or Member orm 21 or

15 credit hours with a cumulative PA of 2.0 or higher on a .0 scale in addition to Basic

Peace Officer Certification from TCOLE or

An Intermediate Peace Officer Certification from TCOLE

• Valid driver’s license with acceptable driving record

• Must meet all legal requirements necessary to become a licensed Peace Officer by the Texas

Commission on Law Enforcement TCOLE.

• Be between 21 and 5 years of age at the time of the examination or

• Be between 18 and 21 years of age if the applicant has received an associate’s degree or 60

semester hours of credit from an accredited college or university or has received an honorable

discharge from the armed forces of the nited tates after at least two years of active service.

: Cadet $1. hourly Police Officer $2. hourly.






April 12, 2021. Applications will not be accepted after this date.

Submit applications online by visiting pearlandtx.gov/careers.

THE CITY OF PEARLAND IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

pecial accommodations are available when necessary to aord equal opportunity to participate

in testing. Please make request in writing, five business days prior to the test date to City of

Pearland, HR Department, 3519 Liberty Drive, Pearland, TX 77581.

or questions regarding the application process please contact Terene uddsohnson at

281.652.1617 or hr@pearlandtx.gov.

List will remain in eect for one 1 year or until exhausted, whichever is sooner.

120 The For BLUES additional POLICE information MAGAZINE and to register for an upcoming Civil Service Exam, visit

The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 121

pearlandtx.gov/PDCareers


HIRING

WE'RE

Starting Officer Pay $57,690 - Top Out $81,840

QUALIFICATIONS:

TCOLE Certified

21 Years of Age

High School

Diploma/ GED

Valid TX Drivers

License (at date of

hire)

US Citizen

*FOR A FULL LIST OF JOB

DETAILS AND QUALIFICATIONS

VISIT POLICEAPP.COM*

Uniform Provided

City Issued Cell Phone

College Tuition/Book

Reimbursement

TCOLE Certification Incentive

Education Incentive

BENEFITS

Night Shift Differential

10 Paid Holidays

Longevity Pay

Employee Gun Buy Back

Program

& More!

122 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 123


$53,560 - $64,896

($25.75 - $31.20/hourly)

• LATERAL ENTRY WITH HIGHER STARTING SALARY

• TUITION REIMBURSMENT

• 8 HOUR ROTATING PATROL SHIFTS

• EMPLOYER PAID MEDICAL, DENTAL, VISION, AND LIFE INSURANCE

• EXCELLENT RETIREMENT PLAN WITH 2-1 MATCH

• NEWER MODEL ASSIGNED TAKE HOME VEHICLE

• CITY PAID SMARTPHONE

• $360 A YEAR IN UNIFORM & EQUIPMENT ALLOWANCE

• PROMOTIONAL OPPURTUNITIES

• ABLE TO LIVE ANYWHERE IN SCURRY COUNTY

• PAYROLL DEDUCTION PROGRAM FOR WEAPONS AND EQUIPMENT

• TATTOOS AND FACIAL HAIR ALLOWED

PRIDE | HONOR | INTEGRITY | COMMUNITY | INNOVATION

Equal Opportunity Employer

400 37TH STREET

Follow us @SnyderTexasPD

SNYDER, TX 79549

WWW.CI.SNYDER.TX.US

124 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 125


126 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 127


The City of Victoria

invites applications for the position of:

Police Officer or Senior Police Officer

Salary

$48,045 - $68,500 Annually DOQ

Location

Victoria, TX

Job Type

Full-Time

JOB SUMMARY

The Victoria Police Department is hiring qualified police officer candidates to join our

team and to help enhance the livability of our community. VPD sets the bar for

professionalism, innovation and a progressive approach to our policing strategies. Our

workforce of more than 115 officers and 32 civilian support personnel are a dedicated,

enthusiastic group of professionals who proudly serve over 65,000 Victoria residents.

The Victoria Police Department offers a competitive salary and retirement structure,

great health benefits, and many other incentives such as paid time off and departmentissued

uniforms and equipment.

Officers have lateral and promotional opportunities. Regardless of the assignment, you

will work in an environment that fosters leadership, teamwork and courteous service to

our community.

No prior law enforcement experience is required but must be certified as a TCOLE

Peace Officer. Upon employment, you will participate in the City of Victoria Police

Department Field Training Program. You will receive specialized training from some of

the finest officers in law enforcement.

Salary amount offered will depend on qualifications. Lateral pay scale recognized for

Senior Police Officers. This is a non-exempt position.

Applicants currently attending a TCOLE Academy are encouraged to apply.

Employment eligibility will require successful completion of the Academy courses and

certification as a TCOLE Peace Officer.

To learn more about this exciting opportunity and to apply, visit

www.victoriatx.gov

128 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 129


City of Wylie

Police Department

OFFICER SALARY RANGE: HIRING PROCESS: BENEFITS:

Non Certified Police Recruit Pay : $62, 370.00

YEARS OF SERVICE ANNUAL SALARY

1 Year—Step 0 $66, 626.06

2 Years—Step 1 $68, 291.71

3 Years—Step 2 $69, 999.00

4 Years—Step 3 $71, 748.98

5 Years—Step 4 $73, 542.70

6 Years—Step 5 $75, 381.27

7 Years—Step 6 $77, 265.80

8 Years—Step 7 $79, 197.45

9 Years—Step 8 $81, 177.38

10+Years—Step 9 $83, 206.82

ADDITIONAL COMPENSATION:

Certification Pay: Up to $1,800 annually

Field Training Officer Pay: $2, 400 annually

Bilingual Pay: $1 ,200 annually

• Complete and submit a City of Wylie

job application: https://

www.governmentjobs.com/careers/

wylietexas

• Written Exam (exempt for Laterals)

• Physical Agility Test

• Complete and submit a Personal

History Statement

• Oral Board Panel Interview

• Background Investigation

• Police Chief Interview

• Polygraph Examination

• Psychological Evaluation

• Medical Examination

RECRUITING CONTACT:

Wylie Police Department

2000 North Hwy 78

Wylie, TX 75098

Sergeant Mark Johnson

mark.johnson@wylietexas.gov

972-429-8013

• City Paid Medical/Dental/Vision

• Texas Municipal Retirement System

(TMRS) 14% City Contribution

• Paid Time Off (Vacation and Sick Time)

• City Paid Uniforms

• City Paid Training

• Life Insurance and AD&D

• Long Term Disability Insurance

• Employee Assistance Program

• Longevity Pay

• Tuition Reimbursement

• Free Recreation Center Membership

• Deferred Compensation Plan

• Ancillary Benefits Available (Aflac,

Avesis, and More)

Wylie Police Department Mission: Our mission is to impact the quality of life, by providing a professional

level of service that will foster, support, and build relationships with those we serve.

https://www.wylietexas.gov/police.php

130 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 131


WOHPD

Westover Hills Police Department is supported

by the community and city council. We have a

low crime rate and call volume. Westover Hills

will provide a great opportunity to a Police

Officer applicant who is interested in community

policing with a strong sense of service.

APPLY NOW

We have two (2) Police Officer vacancies:

POLICE OFFICER

- $60,000/year

- Sick leave 14 days/year

- Paid holiday 12 days/year

- Paid vacation 2 weeks annually

- 12 h/shifts, 3 days off every other weekend

- Retirement fund 7% 2:1

- Life, health, dental and vision insurance

- Uniform allowance

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

- US citizen

- High school diploma or GED

- TCOLE certified Peace Officer

- Valid & current TX driver’s license

Please email lback@westoverhillspd.org for information.

12/16/2021

132 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 133


134 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE

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