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JUNE 2022. Blues Vol 38 No. 6.1

JUNE 2022. Blues Vol 38 No. 6.1 FEATURES 26 We Will Never Forget the 21 Lives Lost in Uvalde 30 INSERT: Texas School District Chief’s Conference 46 INSERT: Visit Galveston Island this Summer 52 COVER STORY Remembering Deputy Adam Howard 58 COVER STORY - 100 Club of Houston Awards Banquet DEPARTMENTS 6 Publisher’s Thoughts 8 Editor’s Thoughts 10 Guest Commentary 12 Letters 14 News Around the US 78 Remembering Our Fallen Heroes 82 War Stories 84 Aftermath 86 Open Road 90 Healing Our Heroes 92 Daryl’s Deliberations 94 HPOU - From the President, Douglas Griffith 96 Light Bulb Award - May Dora’s Wish Come True 98 Running 4 Heroes 100 Blue Mental Health with Dr. Tina Jaeckle 102 Ads Back in the Day 106 Parting Shots 108 Now Hiring - L.E.O. Positions Open in Texas 142 Back Page

JUNE 2022. Blues Vol 38 No. 6.1
FEATURES
26 We Will Never Forget the 21 Lives Lost in Uvalde
30 INSERT: Texas School District Chief’s Conference
46 INSERT: Visit Galveston Island this Summer
52 COVER STORY Remembering Deputy Adam Howard
58 COVER STORY - 100 Club of Houston Awards Banquet

DEPARTMENTS
6 Publisher’s Thoughts
8 Editor’s Thoughts
10 Guest Commentary
12 Letters
14 News Around the US
78 Remembering Our Fallen Heroes
82 War Stories
84 Aftermath
86 Open Road
90 Healing Our Heroes
92 Daryl’s Deliberations
94 HPOU - From the President, Douglas Griffith
96 Light Bulb Award - May Dora’s Wish Come True
98 Running 4 Heroes
100 Blue Mental Health with Dr. Tina Jaeckle
102 Ads Back in the Day
106 Parting Shots
108 Now Hiring - L.E.O. Positions Open in Texas
142 Back Page

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The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 1


FOUNDED IN 1984

JUNE 2022

COVER 1

Honoring fallen HCSO Deputy Robert Adam

Howard, killed in a tragic traffic accident.

COVER 2

Coverage of the 68th Annual 100 Club of

Houston Awards Banquet.

FEATURES

26 We Will Never Forget the 21 Lives Lost in Uvalde

30 INSERT: Texas School District Chief’s Conference

46 INSERT: Visit Galveston Island this Summer

52 COVER STORY Remembering Deputy Adam Howard

58 COVER STORY - 100 Club of Houston Awards Banquet

DEPARTMENTS

6 Publisher’s Thoughts

8 Editor’s Thoughts

10 Guest Commentary

12 Letters

14 News Around the US

78 Remembering Our Fallen Heroes

82 War Stories

84 Aftermath

86 Open Road

90 Healing Our Heroes

92 Daryl’s Deliberations

94 HPOU - From the President, Douglas Griffith

96 Light Bulb Award - May Dora’s Wish Come True

98 Running 4 Heroes

100 Blue Mental Health with Dr. Tina Jaeckle

102 Ads Back in the Day

106 Parting Shots

108 Now Hiring - L.E.O. Positions Open in Texas

142 Back Page

82 84

HEALING OUR HEROES

SAM & JOHN

90

2 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 3


FOUNDED IN 1984

OUR TEAM

MICHAEL BARRON

founder & publisher

MICHAEL BARRON

editor-n-chief

REX EVANS

contributing editor

JESSICA JONES

creative editor

RUSTY BARRON

outdoor editor

DR. TINA JAECKLE

contributing editor

DARYL LOTT

contributing editor

SAM HORWITZ & JOHN SALERNO

contributing editors

DOUGLAS GRIFFITH

HPOU contributing editor

BILL KING

contributing editor

BREANNA BEVIL

BAILEY BARRON

sales team

OUR CONTRIBUTORS

T. EDISON

contributing writer / light bulb

get your

FREE SUBSCRIPTION

to The BLUES, scan the

QR code or click here.

OLIVER NORTH

contributing writer

DAVID GOETSCH

contributing writer

SUZIE ZIEGLER

contributing writer

BROOKE TAYLOR

contributing writer

PAUL GOLDENBERG

contributing writer

MICHAEL GIPS

contributing writer

WILLIAM SKEEN

contributing writer

4 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 5


FROM THE PUBLISHER’S DESK

Two Covers for June

Honor the Fallen & Celebrate the Heroes.

This month, we chose to do

something we rarely do. Have

two different covers for our

June 2022 issue. We had already

elected to feature the

100 Club of Houston Award Recipients

on the cover, when our

brother in Blue, Harris County

Deputy Howard was tragically

killed in a traffic accident.

Please join me in celebrating

our 100 Club Heroes and our

fallen brother Deputy Robert

Adam Howard.

HARRIS COUNTY SHER-

IFF’S DEPUTY ROBERT ADAM

HOWARD

Our brothers and sisters in

Blue are still in shock after the

horrific accident that claimed

the life of Harris County Deputy

Robert Adam Howard on

Wednesday, May 11th.

Howard, a member of the

SO’s gang unit, was reportedly

transporting evidence when

his marked vehicle slammed

into the back of a tractor-trailer

that was parked on the left

shoulder of the Tomball parkway

near Spring-Cypress Road.

Images from the crash

showed Howard’s patrol vehicle

split in two, with the

left half crumpled behind the

18-wheeler, and the other

half on the outside lane of the

freeway. The images were so

horrific, it made us all stop and

realize how fragile life really is.

“We’re devastated that we’re

losing such a great teammate

described as a workhorse,

having a great personality,

funny, and just outgoing,” said

Sheriff Ed Gonzalez, according

to local TV station ABC 13.

“We have a lot of heavy hearts

here.”

The 27-year-old was remembered

by his peers as

being a determined leader in

his unit, with one co-worker

describing his work ethic as

being: “The first one in the door

… and the last one to leave at

the end of the night.”

Howard’s partner, Deputy

Raymond Garivey, told reporters

how fortunate he felt to

have had him not only as a

partner, but a best friend.

“Just a phenomenal person.

You know when we prayed

together with the crew, you

know, we had to thank the Lord

for allowing us into his life.

He was just one of those type

of people,” said Garivey, who

worked alongside Howard for

the past three years and had,

by his own admission, only

made it out of some tough situations

because of his partner.

“My little protector,” Garivey

said of his 6ft 5in partner.

MICHAEL BARRON

“I’ve had some terrible scenes

where if it wasn’t for Howard,

I wouldn’t be home with my

kids.”

Beginning on Page 52 we

honor Deputy Howard with

images from his funeral and

memorial service. Our hearts

go out to his wife, his family

and all his brothers and sisters

in Blue.

68TH ANNUAL 100 CLUB

AWARDS BANQUET – CELE-

BRATING OUR HEROES

For 68 years, not counting the

two missed due to COVID, the

100 Club of Houston has held

an annual awards banquet to

honor heroes from Houston

area law enforcement and fire

departments. These fine men

and women are the best of the

best. They’ve gone beyond the

call of duty and showed us all

of what true heroes are made

of.

100 Club Executive Director

William Skeen has these

remarks about the upcoming

awards banquet:

“As we proudly honor this

year’s award recipients, I am

once again humbled. Not only

by the tremendous selflessness,

commitment, and bravery

of all our officers and firefighters,

but also by the support of

our exceptionally generous 100

Club members.”

“I am humbled by the extraordinary

responsibility of

representing an organization

that boasts almost 30,000

members. And I am energized

daily by our mission to make a

positive impact in the lives of

dependents who have lost a

loved one, provider, and family

member. So let me be the first

to congratulate our 35 Heroes

Awards Recipients for 2022. It

is truly well-earned recognition

for a job well done.”

“And since we were not able

to have our annual in-person

banquet the last two years because

of the Covid pandemic,

we invited the 2020 and 2021

Heroes Award Recipients from

those two years, to be in attendance

at this year’s banquet as

well. I also wish to sincerely

thank any and all who helped

make these awards possible,

as well as our members for

your ongoing support. And as

always, I thank you, our heroes,

for all that you do every

day.”

Congratulations to all the

Recipients. You can read more

about their individual stories

beginning on page 58

LAST MINUTE ADD: TWO

LOSERS, ONE PRESIDENT

As if loosing 19 children and

2 teachers isn’t bad enough,

we have two lowlife, scum bag

politicians that use this horrible

shooting as a bully pulpit

to further their anti-gun sentiment.

One of which I’m sad

to say is supposed to be our

commander in chief.

As President, Biden is supposed

to lead us in times of

trouble. When bad things happen

to good, people he’s the

guy who extends his arms and

wraps us around the idea that

if we stick together, we can

fight evil and win.

NOPE, not this piece of crap.

He addresses the nation and

for about 90 seconds, he acts

like the fatherly figure, expressing

how it feels to lose

a child. He knows fist hand

what that’s like. But rather than

continue to be the loving father

figure saying it will be OK, he’s

gets angry and starts blaming,

you guessed it, guns. And gun

lobbyist. Trying to use every

word his poor feeble mind can

read off the teleprompter to

blame someone for 21 people

dying.

He couldn’t even wait until

they are buried. He had to

seize the moment to further

his party’s agenda to push gun

control. That’s just disgusting

even for Biden.

And speak of disgusting,

there’s another pig in the

spotlight and many of you no

doubt witnessed it live. Lowlife

shit head Beto O’Rourke

interrupts a press conference

where the governor is trying

his best to hold it together and

starts yelling “those 19 deaths

are on you governor.”

Another left-wing nut job

that wants to take ALL our

guns away. The one positive

thing to come out of that

presser was Beto pretty much

torpedoed his chances of getting

elected in Texas.

6 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 7


FROM THE GUEST EDITOR’S DESK

CONGRATULATIONS

Congratulations Sgt. Frazier

Over the last week, there’s

certainly been more than enough

negative news enveloping us all. I

decided there’s no reason for me

to just be another person adding

fuel to an already excruciatingly,

destructive fire.

Thus, here’s something positive

for a change. Being back

to “Chief Life” has given me the

opportunity to once again, recognize

people for outstanding

job they do. Probably one of the

more favorite things as a Chief, I

get to do.

On June 8th, 2020 one of

the Officers for this agency

responded to a Mental

Health Crisis Call. Upon

arrival this Officer found

a male had climbed a tall

radio tower and was in an

obvious mental health crisis.

Wasting no time, the Officer

took off his bulky gear and

weapons, climbing to where

the male was, on the tower.

(Now, right about here

would be difficult for any of

us) This Officer positioned

himself just below the male

and then, placed himself

between the male and the

open, interior area of this

tower.

He (the Officer) listened to

the male explain his crisis

and underlying circumstances.

The Officer offered the male a

bottle of water and the conversation

continued. After some time,

the male agreed to come down

from the tower. However, he was

incapacitated and unable to do

this on his own.

Once again, without thinking

of his own safety, this Officer

demonstrated extreme compassion

and bravery. He climbed

further up the tower and then,

assisted the male down to the

ground level where the male was

transported to an area facility for

assistance.

To be clear, I am no advocate of

just climbing up a 100-foot tower

for any reason. However, this is

no way diminishes what this Officer

accomplished, under some

of the most trying and desperate

of circumstances.

Also, keep in mind our area

of operation is very rural, miles

REX EVANS

from any municipality with a Ladder

Truck or Tower Truck which

could’ve assisted in this rescue.

So, it was my privilege today

to, issued this agency’s

first ever, Lifesaving Award

for an Officer. And with that,

I’ll just say, “Thank you,

Sergeant Brandon Frazier.

Thank you for your courage,

commitment, and compassion

for others and, for your

Duty to serve and protect

others.”

I’ll wrap it up with this

note, with all the terrible

tragedies and disheartening

news as of late, it is easy to

become lost. And not remember,

good people, still

do good things. It is now

perhaps, more important

than ever, we do not forget

or simply dismiss our Law

Enforcement Officers when

they excel. Especially when,

not only have they done what

we’ve asked of them to do, they

have risen far above what anyone

could’ve ever hoped they could

do.

8 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 9


READERS SPEAK OUT

guest commentary

The Biden Regime is

Wrecking America

BY OLIVER NORTH AND

DAVID GOETSCH

Recently, we charged

President Joe Biden’s leftist

energy policies and pathetically

weak leadership

with undermining America’s

economy and financing Russia’s

genocide in Ukraine. But

the damage wrought by this

president is not limited to

Ukraine, pain at the pump or

flaccid foreign affairs. All the

policies of this hapless tool

of the left are destroying the

America we love and serve.

Since day one of his presidency,

Biden and his socialist

puppet masters have tried

to deflect blame from themselves

to others for major

problems they created for the

American people. Their latest

scapegoat is Vladimir Putin.

The Russian war criminal

can be blamed for much, but

not the domestic crises afflicting

We the People of the

United States. Biden’s weasel-worded

attempts to hide

his ineptitude deceive no one.

Americans paying historically

high prices for food, fuel and

other essentials while enduring

empty retail store shelves

aren’t fooled by political spin

in Biden’s teleprompter.

To demonstrate how bad

things have become under

this career politician masquerading

as president, we

offer factual comparisons in

two key areas: national sovereignty

and our economy.

These comparisons show

where things stood when

Biden became president and

where they stand now.

By definition, a sovereign

nation has authority over its

territory and borders. Biden

surrendered America’s national

sovereignty on his first

day in office when he dismantled

policies and programs

his predecessor put

in place to regain control

of our southern border lost

during the Obama-Biden administration.

Biden shut down constructing

a border barrier, stopped

U.S. Immigration & Customs

Enforcement professionals

from doing their duty and

eliminated an agreement

with Mexico’s president to

keep cross-border immigrants

in Mexico until they

completed U.S. asylum applications.

Now, Biden wants

Title 42, a law protecting

Americans from COVID-19

infection from immigrants,

to lapse.

In December 2020, Donald

Trump’s last month in office,

there were 62,041 illegal

immigrant encounters

on our southern border. In

Biden’s first month in office,

this arose to 75,316. In his

first full year in office, illegal

immigrant encounters at our

southern border exceeded 2

million. The numbers continue

to rise. Thanks to Biden’s

open border policies, our

once sovereign nation is now

overrun by drug cartels, sex

traffickers, violent criminals

and illegal immigrants from

almost every country on

earth.

Despite COVID-19, Biden

inherited American economic

growth and employment

unprecedented in our lifetimes.

He could have left well

enough alone and allowed

our economy to continue

growing, but his socialist

handlers had other plots and

plans. These included eliminating

fossil fuels, canceling

student loan debt, funding

his enormously expensive

infrastructure program with

nothing to do with infrastructure,

paying citizens to

refuse the dignity of work

through his deceptive American

Rescue Plan and “Build

Back Better” program promising

to rebuild what didn’t

need to be rebuilt.

Biden’s socialist economic

policies are crushing hardworking,

middle-income

Americans, our nation’s majority

demographic. In 2020,

the last year of the previous

administration, inflation was

just 1.23% and falling. Since

Biden took office, inflation

has risen to over 8% and

climbing, the worst inflation

rate since 1982. Americans

paid $2.37 per gallon for

gasoline on Biden’s first day

in office. We now pay more

than $4.00 per gallon in most

states and as much as $7.00

in some places.

Biden’s socialist policies

are making home ownership

impossible for millions of

Americans. In 2020, before

Biden took office, the average

price of a home in the U.S.

was $391,900. Now, the same

house costs $453,700. Prices

continue to rise.

Worse still, the explosion

in violent crime means we

are all less safe here at home

than at any point in our lifetimes.

© 2022, Creators.com

10 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 11


READERS SPEAK OUT

your views

ONE DAY, IT COULD BE YOU

If you haven’t already heard

it, by the end of today you will

hear that the first three officers in

Uvalde are cowards for not going

in the school even though they

were being shot at. I’m going to

tell you a story that no one has

ever heard in its entirety. I don’t

know what you will think of me

afterwards, and I don’t care.

I just got back from testifying

in federal court in Ft Worth. You

can’t carry a weapon in federal

court so I had my Browning

Hi Power stuck in the back of

my belt. No holster. I was going

home to change out of my suit

and didn’t need a holster just

then.

I heard on my radio that there

was a hostage situation at

MHMR. I didn’t work Patrol, I

didn’t work Day Shift, it wasn’t

my business. I went anyway.

When I got there I saw the Day

Shift Lieutenant, several patrol

officers, two detectives, the

Chief of Police, what was the

assistant chief at the time and

others I don’t remember. I looked

for someplace to go and saw

that no one was in the room beside

the office where the hostage

situation was. I don’t remember

if anyone told me anything about

who was inside the office with

the closed door. I pulled my gun

out and I’ll let you figure out who

told me to put it up. I didn’t like it

but I did it.

I thought about getting on a

chair and removing a ceiling

panel so I could peek under a

ceiling panel in the closed office.

I looked up the hall where a big

meeting with the rank was going

on. They had to be making a

plan. That’s what rank does.

I looked back at the closed

door. I saw the handle start to

turn. I was ninety degrees to the

door and couldn’t see inside the

office. I waved my hands wildly

and pointed at the door. The rank

scattered and the Chief of Police

dived over the reception area

counter.

I watched the door come open

and a psychiatrist that I knew

slowly came into my view. His

neck tie was standing out horizontally

behind him. I saw a

hand, then a gun to the back of

the psychiatrist’s head, then the

face of the guy holding the gun.

The gunman looked around. He

looked at me. We were six feet

apart. He had a gun and I didn’t.

The hostage taker started

to pull the psychiatrist back

into the office. The psychiatrist

turned pretty quickly and

grabbed for the gun. The psychiatrist

was middle aged, short

and fat. The hostage taker was at

least 6’ 2” and fit. The psychiatrist

was going to lose, but it is safe

to assume he thought someone

would come to help him.

I did.

Right here is the part of the

story that matters. If one person

makes a move, others will follow.

If no one moves first, no one

moves at all. It’s easy to say you

would move since you don’t have

to. That’s all I have to say about

that.

I grabbed the gun as I went

in. In a split second I saw it was

a small caliber semi-automatic.

It wasn’t the first time I had

thought about something similar

happening. I knew if one round

was fired with me holding the

slide the gun wouldn’t cycle and

wouldn’t fire another round. I

moved one hand to the slide and

squeezed the gunman’s other

hand that was on the trigger. I

had the gun pointed up as far

as I could, but he was taller and

stronger than me so the gun

wasn’t pointed straight up. I took

the chance and made the gun

fire. I was hoping for a click that

meant the gun wasn’t loaded,

or nothing happened at all that

meant the safety was on or the

gun wasn’t even cocked. My plan

was to pull my gun once his gun

was disabled and shoot him in

the head, but that didn’t happen.

A detective got there and

added his hands to mine just as

I made the gun go off. Luckily

his hand wasn’t in front of the

barrel, because the gun went off

and fired a round into the ceiling.

One more detective came in

the door and all four of us went

down against the wall of the

office before I could get my gun

out. By then we were in a pile on

the floor and it was too dangerous

to shoot.

A few seconds later the gunman

was on the bottom, I was

on top of him trying to choke

him to death with my forearm,

five or six people were on top of

me and the Chief of Police was

trying to twist my right leg off at

the knee because my leg was the

first leg he saw.

No one has ever heard the full

story because I never told the

full story. Now I’m old, lots of

the others involved are dead and

I don’t really give a shit who

knows at this late date.

The point of the story is you

don’t have time to think about it

because that takes too long and

there won’t be a second chance

if you miss the first one. That

psychiatrist thought someone

would save his life and that was

my job. It was everyone else’s

job, too, but they didn’t go. It was

two or three seconds before anyone

else showed up and in two

or three seconds the door would

be closed again and maybe the

psychiatrist would die. Maybe

everyone else thought they

would save him, but they didn’t.

If you weren’t there, you don’t

know what you would do.

If you were there, you still

don’t know what you would do.

Don’t judge other people from

behind a keyboard.

Ben Brown

THOUGHTS TO ALL BROTHERS

IN BLUE

As the nation mourns the tragedy

in Uvalde, Texas at Robb Elementary

School, the tragedy also

effected members of the law

enforcement family. Uvalde Consolidated

Independent School

District Police Officer Ruben

Ruiz tragically lost his wife Eva,

who was killed protecting her

students. Uvalde County Sheriff’s

Office Deputy Felix Rubio’s

10 year old daughter Alexandria

“Lexi” Rubio, was also one of the

victims. our thoughts and prayers

are with our brothers in blue

and their families during this

gut-wrenching time. Please keep

them and all the families effected

by this unspeakable tragedy

in your thoughts and prayers and

give them strength as they try to

get through each day. They say

it takes a village to raise a child,

but it’ll take the nation to help

these families move forward.

WRONG MOVE CHIEF

There is a big issue with the

school police chief down grading

the call to barricade suspect.

Anyway you look at it kids would

be bleeding out in there. Live

kids were killed n there calling

for help while the shooting was

going on I think there is a big

issue there.

Tobe Whitley

SERIOUSLY? MENTAL ILL-

NESS?

How about mental illness,

easy access to weapons and

the over saturated weapons on

the streets! Not just one thing

.. all three .. the NRA creates

the problem by saturating our

streets with weapons then come

up with the solution of arming

more people so more weapons

… haha!!! Genius!! Not every mass

murder has had mental issues

… just like not every gun owner

will become a mass murderer

… it only takes one live changing

dramatic event in a persons

lives and BOOM!!!! They become a

mass murder .. never had a mental

issue or diagnosed with mental

illness and all of a sudden…

he was because the person became

a mass murder first!! Take

the dude who lost his life savings

in Vegas .. or the dude that

lost his job at the post office ..

or what about the dude that lost

his mind over road rage .. or the

murderers that went to El Paso,

the church and grocery store to

murder out of hate! ….. naw .. it’s

not only mental illness… it’s all

the above … but hey … let the

NRA tell us that what are country

needs is more weapons on

the streets.. let them continue to

saturate our streets with more

weapons .. let’s make it safer lol


AROUND THE COUNTRY

TRAGIC ACCIDENT

Harris County Deputy Slams into Rear of a Parked18-Wheeler

HARRIS COUNTY, Texas - A

Harris County sheriff’s deputy

has died after a crash with an

18-wheeler on State Highway 249

near Spring Cypress on Wednesday

May 11.

Deputy Robert Adam Howard,

was taken to the hospital in

critical condition, where he later

passed away from his injuries,

said Sheriff Ed Gonzalez.

“Our hearts are broken as we

announce the passing of our Deputy

Robert Adam Howard, who

succumbed to his injuries after

a crash that occurred this afternoon,”

Sheriff Ed Gonzalez said in

a news conference. “Our hearts

are very heavy at this moment.

We’re devastated that we’re losing

such a great teammate, described

as a workhorse described

as having a great personality,

funny, and just outgoing, a wonderful

friend.”

According to the sheriff, Dep.

Howard was traveling northbound

on 249 near Spring Cypress in

his HCSO Chevrolet Tahoe SUV

to drop off some evidence at a

station.

There was an 18-wheeler, with

around a 40,000-pound load, that

was parked on the shoulder of

the roadway but was not blocking

a moving lane of traffic.

Investigators believe the deputy

clipped the rear of the

18-wheeler.

“For unknown reasons, our

deputy operating the vehicle

veered slightly into the inside

shoulder of 249, and unfortunately

the front driver’s side

of our police Tahoe impacted

the rear passenger side of the

parked semi-trailer,” said Lt.

Simon Cheng with the Harris

County Sheriff’s Office Vehicular

Crimes Division. “The deputy

sustained serious injuries on

scene. Unfortunately, his vehicle

after hitting the semi-trailer

also bounced into the second-from-inside

lane and struck

a Chevrolet Silverado.”

There were reportedly four

total vehicles involved in the

crash.

“It was a pretty horrific impact,”

Sheriff Gonzalez said. “He eventually

succumbed to his injuries.”

27-year-old Deputy Howard

was assigned to the HCSO Gang

Unit. He had been part of the

agency since August 2019.

Deputy Howard, who grew up

in Jersey Village, is survived by a

wife and two young children, a

2-year-old girl and a 5-year-old

boy.

“He leaves behind a wife, he

leaves behind a mother and father,

a sister, cousins, extended

family and of course, his family

in blue as well,” the sheriff said.

“I’m told that as he left his home

earlier today to get to work,

his last act was to play with his

2-year-old daughter, just carrying

her and embracing her.”

14 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 15


AROUND THE COUNTRY

GCSO SGT. HIT BY

CAR ON BOLIVAR

Sergeant John Hamm was among those injured

during 2022 Go Topless Jeep Weekend event.

By Brooke Taylor

GALVESTON COUNTY, Texas - It

was a insane weekend in Galveston

County as thousands convened

on Bolivar Peninsula for

the “Go Topless” Jeep weekend.

“It was chaos, it strained us,

we had our hands full,” said

Chief Deputy Dennis Macik with

the Galveston County Sheriff’s

Office.

A sergeant with Galveston

County was seriously injured

during the event and had to be

Life Flighted to UTMB in Galveston.

According to the sheriff’s office,

Sgt, John Hamm suffered two

broken legs, an injured arm,

and lacerations after investigators

say he was hit by a car and

thrown into the windshield. The

56-year-old underwent surgery

for his right leg and must have

another surgery on his left leg.

His recovery is expected to be

long.

The driver of that vehicle has

been identified as 22-year-old

Darius Gilbert, who is facing an

aggravated assault charge with

a deadly weapon. His bond has

been set at $100,000.

Sergeant Hamm was directing

traffic out of the road when the

crash happened, according to

the sheriff’s office.

Hamm also broke his arm and

had some injuries to his head,

which hit the windshield. As for

other incidents over the weekend,

there were plenty.

An estimated 40,000 people

showed up to Crystal Beach on

Saturday May 21 for the unsponsored

Jeep event.

Galveston County Sheriff Henry

Trochesset said as of Sunday

afternoon, the total arrests for

the weekend were at 175 during

the four-day event, 17 of which

were felonies. Most of the people

were charged with driving while

intoxicated and public intoxication.

SGT. JOHN HAMM

The huge crowd also stretched

emergency services. Eight people

had to be flown out of the

area for injuries and roughly 30

people had to be taken to the

hospital by ground.

Most of the incidents were

considered minor injuries, but

two were considered to be major

traumas.

“It was anything from someone

passing out, intoxicated, to being

punched by someone else, fall-

ing of ATVs, golf carts,” Chief

Deputy Macik said.

The sheriff says DPS and the

constable’s office did send

over additional help, but the

crowd was still pretty massive.

Roughly 100 deputies with

the Galveston County Sheriff’s

Office worked the event, and

double the number of deputies

responded to patrol calls.

Deputies worked 16- to 18-hour

shifts, according to Macik.

“We worked a lot of people

a lot of hours this weekend,”

Macik said.

Macik added despite the injuries,

he believed their response

went well and it was nothing

they haven’t dealt with previously.

In 2021, more than 200

people were arrested during the

event.

“We had the resources there,”

Macik said. “There was EMS services,

ambulances, additional

ambulances to transport people,

the helicopter.”

Regardless of how many resources

are in place, Macik said

it’s ultimately up to the people

who attend.

“That’s their behavior if they

want to come and behave like

they did this weekend,” Macik

said. “As you can see, we enforce

the law and do it the best

way we can, but it’s up to the

person and act responsibly

and not stand on the hood of a

vehicle and fall off after they’ve

been drinking all day.”

The Galveston County Sheriff’s

Office is also asking anyone

who would like to donate

to the sergeant to send to:

50 Club of Galveston County,

Attn: Sgt. John Hamm, P.O.

Box 56, Galveston, Texas 77553.

FUNDRAISER FOR

SGT. JOHN HAMM

Galveston County Sheriff’s Sgt. John Hamm was severely

injured while working a special event on Bolivar Peninsula.

He has a long road to recovery and if you would like to make

a donation to assist his family with medical needs, please

click on the link below and in the blank labeled BUSINESS

NAME, write SGT. JOHN HAMM.

DONATE

16 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 17


AROUND THE COUNTRY

BUY HOMES FOR $0 DOWN.

Bill in Congress would let First Responders

buy a home for $0 down.

By Suzie Ziegler

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — A

bipartisan bill sponsored

by Senators Marco Rubio

(R-Florida) and Jon Ossoff

(D-Georgia) aims to make

homeownership more attainable

for first responders

and teachers. Rubio held a

press conference during National

Police Week to highlight

the bill he first introduced

in October 2021.

“It’s a law designed to help

the people who help us,” Rubio

told Fox News on Sunday.

“They’re struggling in many

parts of this country to be

able to afford to live in the

cities that they’re serving.”

The HELPER Act (Homes for

Every Local Protector, Educator

and Responder) would

provide a one-time, $0 down

home loan option for civil

servants, ABC 10 reported.

First responders must have

served at least four years to

qualify for the program, according

to Fox News.

Police leaders celebrated

the bill, saying it could attract

more officers to expensive

housing markets.

Gus Papathanasiou, the

chairman of the U.S. Capitol

Police labor committee, said

the bill could help alleviate

the police recruiting crisis.

“These are incredibly difficult

times to recruit young

men and women to law enforcement,”

Papathanasiou

told Fox News. “The HELPER

Act gives us an important

tool to help officers access

the housing market and have

their slice of the American

dream, which is homeownership.”

The tragedy in Uvalde has touched us all. The loss of these young children and

teachers is heartbreaking. Our hearts bleed for the parents who have to lay

For 38 years, The BLUES Police Magazine has served the law enforcement

these young souls to rest. If you were on this scene, the images of this horrible

community in Texas. Each month, we highlight the men and women in

tragedy are forever etched in your mind. No matter how hard you try, you can

law enforcement and their sacrifices for their community. Sometimes

never

they

forget

pay the

what

ultimate

you saw.

sacrifice

After covering

with their

this

life.

event

Other

and

times,

speaking

these men

with

and

parents

women and first are responders, injured duty The BLUES and lose wants the ability to do more to work than their just extra report jobs what

happened. and provide We want for their to do families. everything Thankfully we can some to support non-profit not only groups the and families

who individuals lost loved hold ones, fundraisers but all the for first these responders officers, who and were The BLUES involved is happy in one to way

or another. promote Please these events. donate But whatever we want you to can. do more. The BLUES So beginning will join this forces month, with

other The non-profits BLUES has in set Uvalde up a special to determine assistance the best fund use whereby of these our funds readers and can ensure

donate they benefit money the to assist families these and officers first responders. and their families. The BLUES The will BLUES be donating currently

$500 has to over this 100,000 fund. Let’s readers break each the month. goal of If $100,000 everyone and donated show only Uvalde

the first

how $1 much a month, we care. we could raise over $1 million a year. Let’s do our part and

make a difference. God Bless our First Responders and God Bless our

readers for making a difference.

CLICK HERE TO DONATE

18 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 19


AROUND THE COUNTRY

YOU CAN’T HIDE

THE BORDER IS COMING TO YOUR TOWN

By Paul Goldenberg and

Michael Gips

Communities far from the

border are confronting complex

criminal issues spawned by the

unbridled flood of illegal migrants

In Sheriff Kieran Donahue’s

County, fentanyl, methamphetamine

and heroin from Mexico

flow freely. Overdoses are spiking.

Families are fracturing. Human

trafficking is taking its toll.

Follow-on crime is affecting an

already fragile economy.

Sheriff Donahue isn’t in McAllen,

Texas, Las Cruces, New Mexico,

Bisbee, Arizona, or anywhere

else along the 1,954 miles that

the U.S. and Mexico share as a

border. In fact, he’s about as far

away as you can get – Canyon

County, Idaho, which sits just

west of Boise.

Every conceivable record related

to migrant crossings, rescues

and deaths is reaching historical

heights for 2022.

HE’S NOT AN OUTLIER.

Like Sheriff Donahue, law

enforcement officials in communities

far from the border are

confronting complex criminal

issues spawned by the unbridled

flood of illegal migrants, many

of whom are victims of human

trafficking and smuggling operations

run by the cartels. County

sheriffs and police departments

facing budget cuts and rising

crime, by no choice of their own,

now find themselves assuming

law enforcement national security

duties for which they are

ill-prepared and inadequately

equipped. Every conceivable

record related to migrant

crossings, rescues and deaths

is reaching historical heights

In March alone, an estimated

62,000-plus border-crossers

from Mexico eluded authorities;

referred to as “gotaways.”

Comparatively, FY2021 saw an

estimated 400,000 “gotaways”

compared to 300,000 in the first

six months of FY2022. [3, 4] And

it’s likely to get worse when

the current administration lifts

Title 42, a statute that prevents

border crossings and authorizes

removals to stop the spread of

COVID-19.

CARTELS BROADENING THEIR

SPHERE OF INFLUENCE

An unprecedented increase in

deadly drugs like fentanyl, gang

activity and human trafficking

across all 50 states reflect expanding

interests as the cartels

seek to broaden their sphere of

influence. They are now offering

wads of cash to American

teenagers to use their or their

parents’ vehicles to travel

south to load migrants and

then transport them to preset

destinations throughout the

country. [5] The young drivers

are coming from suburbs,

cities and rural areas across

America.

The recruitment of these socalled

“loaders” is occurring

where parents aren’t looking;

multiplayer online video

games and youth-oriented

apps such as TikTok, Instagram

and Snapchat. First-person

shooter games are particularly

ripe targets because the

audience is overwhelmingly

male, fascinated with weapons

and perhaps intoxicated

by the prospect of real-life

action. Tragic accidents are

mounting. Thirteen migrants

recently died in a crash in Imperial

Valley, California, in a

vehicle believed to be operated

by a teenaged loader.

Cartels have mastered

social media for recruitment,

a page taken out of the

playbooks of ISIS and other

radical Islamic and white

supremacist organizations

and openly recruiting adolescents

to do their bidding. This is

not an idle comparison: I (author

Paul Goldenberg) previously led

DHS’s Foreign Fighter Task Force

and can directly attest that the

similarities for recruitment used

by traditional extremist groups

and the cartels are striking.

Within a matter of months, ISIS

achieved inordinate success in

building a caliphate by leveraging

social media as their primary

recruiting tool, with glamour and

excitement as partial rewards.

Just as ISIS recruited from the

Arab world and beyond – pulling

many youths from Western

backgrounds – the cartels are

succeeding in luring loaders

from as far away as Los Angeles,

Chicago, and my home state of

New Jersey.

Cartels have cleverly calculated

– and correctly so – that

federal authorities will not

devote resources to investigating

or charging U.S. minors leaving

local police, many of whom

have little experience managing

border-related criminality, left

to handle the chaotic and deadly

aftermath. Social media platforms

contacted by concerned

law enforcement officials have

either been nonresponsive or

indifferent.

Nonetheless, the loaders themselves

are just the leading edge

of the crisis. Their excursions

correspond with the surge in

human trafficking and illegal

importation of fentanyl. In fact,

in a recent report, the U.S. Commission

on Combating Synthetic

Opioid Trafficking stated bluntly:

“One fact is clear: The availability

of illegally manufactured synthetic

opioids supplied to meet

the country’s appetite for narcotics

is a national crisis. These

drugs are destroying lives and

harming communities at historic

levels.” [6] And they are coming

from Mexico in droves. Fentanyl

is killing people in places as

distant as Spokane, Washington,

and Bangor, Maine. Police,

sheriffs, emergency workers and

healthcare workers in midwestern

and northeastern hamlets

are dealing with addiction and

overdose problems in their communities.

THE IMPACT ON BORDER

COMMUNITIES

These days, in addition to

fulfilling routine calls for service,

dedicated law enforcement

officials such as Cochise

County Sheriff Mark Dannels and

his valiant deputies, particularly

those assigned to the Sabre

Team now find themselves the de

facto defenders of the American

frontier. They work their regular

crime-fighting shifts safeguarding

the citizens of the county,

then, when the sun sets over the

desert terrain, they travel to the

border region, in many instances

the frontier may lie just a few

hundred feet from the patios of

their own homes. Deputies ad-

20 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 21


vised us that their families routinely

witness illegal migrants

traversing their lands, some in

military camouflage.

We’ve noted conversations

with rugged ranchers, whose

only desire is to work the land

and make a living for their

families, dismally describe the

onslaught of migrants crossing

their properties, leaving behind

a sea of crumpled plastic bottles,

feces, old diapers, chicken

bones, slaughtered cattle, food

containers and in some cases

corpses. Some locals are considering

leaving the lands their

families have labored for generations.

Nevertheless, never once

did I hear from either the Sheriff,

deputies and ranchers that they

were not sympathetic to the human

tragedies taking place, the

trafficking, death, and sustained

harm that both citizens and migrants

alike have suffered.

MANY FACETS TO THE CRISIS

There are many facets to

this crisis. It’s about the toll on

migrants, loaders, communities

and local law enforcement

officers risking their lives each

day. It’s about toddlers dumped

at the feet of officers, or worse,

in desolate regions of the desert,

to divert CBP attention so

adults can slip across the border

elsewhere. It’s about fentanyl

and the mounting death toll. It’s

about police, sheriffs, emergency

workers and healthcare

workers dealing with addiction

and overdose in faraway communities.

It’s about the national

guardsman who died in his attempt

to save three migrants and

the federal officers and others

who have succumbed to suicide

due to stress and depression.

[7, 8] It’s about the dedicated

and intrepid members of CPB,

HSI and others working in DHS

growing frustrated and despondent

due to political posturing

by leadership. And it’s about so

much more.

Alongside the war in Ukraine,

the border crisis has become

one of the greatest disasters in

modern American history. Law

enforcement leaders hundreds

of miles from the border must

realize the crisis will likely reach

their jurisdictions.

WHAT NON-BORDER JURIS-

DICTIONS CAN DO

Exactly, how, then, can local

law enforcement hundreds of

miles away from the border become

part of the solution?

Sheriff Dannels, current chair

of the National Sheriff Association’s

Southern Border Security

Committee, shared several key

recommendations for law enforcement

agencies throughout

the United States to consider.

Educating citizens about the

See Something, Say Something

campaign related to human

trafficking and drugs is critical.

Cartels have an extensive reach,

so it’s paramount that we inform

officers about the complexities

of the opioid crisis and its potential

nexus to cartels.

The RAND Corporation report

“Law Enforcement Efforts

to Fight the Opioid Crisis” provides

detailed recommendations

agencies can implement.

[9] Examples include increasing

the frequency and scope of drug

screens in death investigations to

identify novel opioids and their

effects and applying data from

rapid analysis of seized materials

to inform public health and

law enforcement interventions.

The International Association

of Chiefs of Police offers another

resource, a recently released

toolkit of Enhanced Collaborative

Model (ECM) protocol development

checklists that provides

a list of items human trafficking

task forces should consider

when developing their own protocols.

Lastly, law enforcement

agencies small and large need

to train select officers in recognizing

and interpreting emerging

threats radiating from social

media platforms. Organizations

such as the Network Contagion

Research Institute (NCRI) provide

training, expertise and technology

to address trends and provide

comprehensive forecasting

capabilities.

We don’t escape border issues

by not being near the border.

Sheriff Donahue’s words ring

true for many and are a harbinger

for the rest of us:

Border issues are driving the

criminality in our streets and

rural areas as well as unprecedented

numbers of overdoses,

including overdose incidents and

even deaths inside our jails,”

he explains. “My jurisdiction is

not unique in the threats we are

facing. This border crisis will

continue to get worse, and it is

affecting every single city, county,

and borough in the United

States, whether we are talking

about drug, human and or sex

trafficking”

If your jurisdiction has been

fortunate enough to have been

spared, now is the time to prepare.

The border is coming to

your door.

22 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 23


AROUND THE COUNTRY

MEALER WINS RUNOFF

Alexandra Del Moral Mealer to Face Lina Hidalgo

in November Race for Harris County Judge.

HOUSTON - Former Army Captain

Alexandra del Moral Mealer has

decisively defeated Vidal Martinez

by capturing more than 75 percent

of the vote in a Republican primary

runoff election for Harris County

judge.

“I am extremely proud to have

earned the Republican nomination

for Harris County Judge,” Mealer

said in a statement. “I was nominated

with a broad, diverse coalition

of support, and we will continue to

build on this incredible momentum.”

Unofficial totals posted by Harris

County indicate Mealer captured

85,498 votes: more than three times

Martinez’s 27,810.

A graduate of West Point, Mealer

served with an Army bomb squad in

Afghanistan and later earned business

and law degrees from Harvard

University. She worked in energy

finance after settling in Houston

with her husband and is the mother

of two young children, but left

the private sector to run for county

judge.

In what became an increasingly

heated runoff campaign, Martinez

criticized Mealer for having only

lived in the area for six years while

touting his long history of serving

on multiple boards in Harris County.

Martinez drew heavy backlash from

the community after he attempted

to discredit Mealer with a photograph

Fidel Castro signed for her

grandfather Armando del Moral in

1952.

The incident prompted a response

from popular local radio icon Michael

Berry, who lambasted Martinez

on air and drew attention to his

campaign donations to Rep Sheila

Jackson Lee (D-TX-18), former Rep.

Rick Noriega (D-Houston), and even

incumbent Harris County Judge

Lina Hidalgo, as well as Democratic

political action committee Act Blue

Texas.

Although she trailed in fundraising

before the nine-way GOP Primary

in March, Mealer outraised Martinez

over the past two and a half

months, reporting $959,653 in total

political contributions last week.

She frequently impressed supporters

with extensive knowledge and

understanding of county finances.

Mealer will now face incumbent

Judge Lina Hidalgo, who has received

praise as a rising Democratic

Party star and reported $1.5 million

in total political contributions as of

February 2022.

Prior to her surprise victory in

2018 with less than 50 percent of

the vote, Hidalgo worked as a medical

interpreter at the Texas Medical

Center in Houston and volunteered

for the Texas Civil Rights Project. A

graduate of Stanford University, Hidalgo

also worked for international

media group Internews.

Amid public outcry over rising

crime, Hidalgo has pushed funding

for alternative programs such as the

$50 million initiative to fight crime

by adding sidewalks, streetlights,

and trees to blighted neighborhoods.

24 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 25


WE WILL NEVER FORGET

26 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 27


By Michael Barron

MASSACRE IN UVALDE – KIDS SLAUGHTERED

IN UVALDE- All hyped up headlines by the

main steam media. Truth is the media doesn’t

care about the kids, they want the scoop, the

ratings, the sound bites, some morsel their

competitor doesn’t have. And get that live as

quick as possible. Whether it’s factual isn’t

even required. Just that someone on the scene

said it is good enough to go with.

Remember, the news media hates cops.

They will look for every reason in the world

to second guess you, judge you, question your

every move, and then crucify you at every

turn. The news media is not our friends. Remember

that. I said all that to say this.

The most important thing to know about

this shooting in Uvalde is that 19 precious

children lost their lives. Two caring, loving

teachers also lost their lives protecting those

children. That’s what really matters today.

Hell, the crime scene hadn’t been cleared, nor

had the ME even arrived to process the victims

when EVERYONE started second guessing the

responding officers and why they did what

they did. For God sakes, let’s at least grieve

before we cast judgment.

As we go to press with this issue, it’s been

a week since this tragedy took place. The

timeline and narrative have changed multiple

times. If in fact after all investigations

are complete and it turns out the incident

commander, who appeared to be ISD Police

Chief Pete Arredonda, did in fact order everyone

to stand down while they waited on

backup, then he was wrong and he should

be terminated. The rules since Columbine

have changed and we all have been trained

to charge the shooter even if its just you by

yourself. That’s the deal.

I can understand the general public criticizing

the actions of the officers on scene

that day, because they have no idea what it’s

like to have bullets flying past your head. It’s

easy to Monday morning quarterback when

you’ve never been in combat. But what I can’t

fathom is all the cops, both active and retired,

lashing out on social media. “Why didn’t they

do charge the guy? Why didn’t the breakout the

windows, create a diversion and have someone

take him out? Why did it take so long to get a key?

Who the fuck needs a key? We kick doors all the

time, you mean you guys couldn’t kick this door.

Why did you even let him get inside the school?”

Blah, Blah Blah. Not saying these aren’t valid questions,

but the truth is, we weren’t there. Bullets

aren’t flying as you read this now.

In the heat of battle, you instantly do what you’ve

been trained to do. You act. You don’t sit and plan,

you implement what you been trained to do with

an active shooter. If you haven’t been to a ALERRT

class, then you need to take it this summer. You

need to know what to do, how to do it and when.

It may only be YOU that arrives first. It may just be

you that has to take the guy out. You need to have

a plan in your head and be prepared to execute it.

Period.

If have any second thoughts about being ‘that’

officer that has to face death head on and save innocent

lives, you need to reevaluate your career as

a cop and find another line of work. Because in today’s

world, that’s the job. You run towards danger,

while getting everyone else out of harm’s way.

In the days, weeks and months to come. We

will learn what really happened on May 24th, at

Robb Elementary School, in Uvalde Texas. We will

know what actions responding officers took, and

what could have been done to save those 21 lives.

Changes will be made. Some officers may be fired.

Others, hopefully everyone involved, will be retrained

to better handle active shooter’s and save

more lives in the future.

In the meantime, we need to rally around the

entire town of Uvalde. Wrap our arms around the

families who lost their baby girls and precious little

boys. Pray for the officers that had to make split

second decisions and live with the outcome for the

rest of their lives. Pray for the person that left a

door unlocked that will forever blame themselves

for this horrible event. Pray for the officers that had

to process the scene and carry those lifeless little

bodies out of the building. Pray for all the first

responders, medical staff, doctors and nurses, that

tried their best to save as many lives as possible.

And finally pray for those hospitalized fighting for

their lives and God forbid they don’t join the other

21 in heaven.

28 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 29


Texas School District Chiefs Association

Member/Conference in San Antonio, June 9-12

Marriott Riverwalk Hotel

HISTORY OF THE TEXAS SCHOOL

DISTRICT CHIEF’S ASSOCIATION

The Texas School District Police Chiefs Association began

in 1996 when a group of school district police chiefs from

Houston and the surrounding area held a luncheon for the

purpose of discussing mutual concerns and sharing ideas.

The chiefs continued to have quarterly meetings, on an informal

basis, until the decision was made in 1997 to form the

Southeast Texas School District Police Chiefs Association.

The intent of the group was to promote the professionalizing

of school district policing and to collectively resolve problems

faced by these law enforcement agencies. During this

time, school district police departments were a relatively new

concept and many were experiencing problems associated

with non-traditional police organizations.

CONFERENCE

GUIDE

In furtherance of the goal of professionalizing school district

policing, the Association sponsored its first annual training

conference in 1998. The event was held at the Aldine

School District in Harris County and attracted over 100 participants

from many parts of the state. The conference was

such a success that it has continued to be held each year.

In 2001, the group voted to change the name to the Texas

School District Police Chiefs Association in order to promote

the standardization of school district policing on a statewide

basis.

30 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 31

30 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 31


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Member/Conference in San Antonio, June 9-12

Marriott Riverwalk Hotel

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32 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE www.tangotango.net

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Texas School District Chiefs Association

Member/Conference in San Antonio, June 9-12

Marriott Riverwalk Hotel

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The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 35


Texas School District Chiefs Association

Member/Conference in San Antonio, June 9-12

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36 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 37


Texas School District Chiefs Association

Member/Conference in San Antonio, June 9-12

Marriott Riverwalk Hotel

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40 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 41

40 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 41


Texas School District Chiefs Association

Member/Conference in San Antonio, June 9-12

Marriott Riverwalk Hotel

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42 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 43

42 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 43


Texas School District Chiefs Association

Member/Conference in San Antonio, June 9-12

Marriott Riverwalk Hotel

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44 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 45

44 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 45


What to Do This Summer?

Head Down to

Galveston Island

Attractions

Galveston Island is home to some of the

best attractions Texas has to offer, including

Moody Gardens, Schlitterbahn

Waterpark, the Historic Pleasure Pier,

unique museums, dazzling Victorian architecture,

and 32 miles of sun-kissed beach-

Historic Buildings & Homes

Although most of the original structures are long gone, the

stories of early islanders live on in renovated structures

and new establishments created in memory of the past.

Galveston Beaches

With 32 miles of shoreline and a variety of

parks, Galveston Island offers something for

every kind of beachgoer. And with warm Gulf

waves from spring through October, there’s

plenty of time to explore each beach’s unique

personality. Whatever your sunseeking fancy,

Galveston has a beach for you.

46 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE

The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 47


Head Down to

Galveston Island

Katie’s Seafood House

2000 Wharf Rd Galveston, Texas

(409) 765-5688

For more than 20 years, Katie’s Seafood

Market has provided the highest quality

seafood to Galveston locals and visitors.

In September of 2019, Katie’s husband,

Buddy, opened Katie’s Seafood House

right next to the store. The market supplies

the restaurant with its fresh seafood,

which is a unique attribute among

restaurants and takes each dish to the

next level. Stop in for a delicious shrimp

platter and enjoy a house cocktail next

time you in Galveston!

Where to Stay?

The BLUES recommends:

Casa Del Mar Beachfront Suites

Be the hero of your family vacation! With

a relaxed vibe, beautiful views of the Gulf

of Mexico and steps from the beach,

Casa del Mar is ideal for a family vacation

or weekend getaway. Each suite offers a

private balcony, a small living room with a

queen sleeper sofa, a studio kitchen, private

bedroom, and junior bunks for small

kids.

The Spot

3204 Seawall Blvd Galveston, Texas

(409) 621-5237

Island Famous: Five Venues, One Spot: The

Spot, Tiki Bar, SideYard, Rum Shack and

Squeeze! You can’t go wrong at The Spot, Galveston

Island’s premier beachfront dining and

entertainment destination. Dive into a mouthwatering

burger or fresh seafood, grab a beer

and find a sweet spot to relax inside or out on

our multi-level beachfront patios. Whether you

want to catch the game on one of our many

HDTVs or enjoy the sparkling views of the Gulf

of Mexico, every seat’s the best seat in the

house. It’s the perfect setting to hang out with

your friends and meet new ones.

Tours & Sightseeing

Whether you prefer to stroll down quaint

alleyways by foot or trot through the streets

in a carriage, all paths can lead you on an

unforgettable journey back in time. You’ll

be entertained and enlightened by knowledgeable

guides giving tours on foot,

carriage, shuttle or even boat. If you prefer

to do you own thing, we’ve assemble

self-guided tours of popular sights with

maps designed for mobile devices.

Rudy & Paco Restaurant and Bar

2028 Postoffice St., Galveston, TX

Phone: (409)762-3696

When visiting Galveston Island, you simply

can’t miss the Island’s most unique

dining experience, Rudy & Paco. Awarded

Top 100 Restaurants of 2017 and Top 100

Romantic Restaurants of 2018, Rudy &

Paco features grilled seafood and steak

with a South and Central American sabor.

Relax and unwind with your favorite

cocktail while enjoying delicious Antojitos.

Whether you’re dining for a special

occasion or just grabbing a drink at the

bar, coming to Rudy & Paco will surely

be an experience like no other.

48 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 49


Head Down to

Galveston Island

TRAIN RIDES

EVENT VENUE

Galveston Railroad Museum

Visit the Galveston Railroad Museum to learn the history of the golden age of rail and experience

the excitement of bygone days. Interactive activities include walking through a

railroad post office, sleeping cars, dining and baggage cars. Visit the fully restored train depot

and enjoy current exhibits as well as hands-on fully operational signal lights, learn the

Legacy of the Railroad including the story of the Pullman Porter, view a rare railroad calendar

collection, artwork and the take selfies with the lifelike alabaster sculptures that depict

depot passengers in period dress. Step inside a telephone booth, lift the receiver to your

ear and overhear their conversations. Don’t miss additional exhibits located on the railyard

and board a caboose for a real train ride! The Galveston Railroad Museum is family friendly

and has something for all ages to enjoy! Check our online schedule for upcoming events.

Home of the popular Christmas holiday family event The Polar Express Train Ride, pajamas

are encouraged for the full experience that runs November thru December. Membership at

the Galveston Railroad Museum is loaded with benefits including Polar Express early bird

ticket purchase. In addition, members enjoy year- round access to the museum and enjoy

discounts in the museum store and at special events. Don’t miss the train! For additional

information go to www.GalvestonRRMuseum.org or call (409) 765-5700.

EXHIBITS

Established 1983

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409-765-5700

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50 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 51


HONORING A FALLEN HERO

DEPUTY ROBERT ADAM HOWARD

“Our hearts are broken as we announce the

passing of our Deputy Robert Adam Howard, who

succumbed to his injuries after a crash that occurred

this afternoon,” Sheriff Ed Gonzalez said

in a news conference. “Our hearts are very heavy

at this moment. We’re devastated that we’re losing

such a great teammate, described as a workhorse

described as having a great personality,

funny, and just outgoing, a wonderful friend.”

Deputy Robert Adam Howard

Harris County Sheriff’s Office

End of Watch: Wednesday, May 11, 2022

52 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 53


HONORING A FALLEN HERO

DEPUTY ROBERT ADAM HOWARD

54 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 55


HONORING A FALLEN HERO

DEPUTY ROBERT ADAM HOWARD

56 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 57


68th HEROES AWARDS BANQUET

Thursday, May 26, 2022

EST. 1953

®

Message from William F. Skeen, Executive Director

As we proudly honor this year’s award recipients, I am once again

humbled. Not only by the tremendous selflessness, commitment, and

bravery of all our officers and firefighters, but also by the support of

our exceptionally generous 100 Club members.

I am humbled by the extraordinary responsibility of representing an

organization that boasts almost 30,000 members. And I am energized

daily by our mission to make a positive impact in the lives of dependents

who have lost a loved one, provider, and family member.

So let me be the first to congratulate our 35 Heroes Awards Recipients

for 2022. It is truly well-earned recognition for a job well done.

Since we were not able to have our annual in-person banquet the

last two years because of the Covid pandemic, we invited the 2020

and 2021 Heroes Award Recipients from those two years, to be in

attendance at this year’s banquet.

I also wish to sincerely thank any and all who helped make these

awards possible, as well as our members for your ongoing support.

And as always, I thank you, our heroes, for all that you do every day.

With warmest regards,

William F. Skeen Executive Director

Law Enforcement Award Recipients 2022

Rookie of the Year

Deputy Jacob B. Hayden .............................. Montgomery County Constable Pct 5

Officer of the Year

Sergeant Gabriel Alvarez .............................. Bryan Police Department

K-9 Deputy Ethan R. Kahla............................ Chambers County Interdiction Unit

Detective Cody J. Burk ..................................Chambers County Sheriff’s Office

Deputy Larry Llamas .....................................Harris County Constable’s Office Pct 4

Deputy Brandon Morales.............................. Harris County Constable’s Office Pct 4

Deputy Noe Rodriguez Jr................................Harris County Sheriff’s Office

Senior Police Officer Neey Gutierrez ............ Houston Police Department

Senior Police Officer Dan R. Johnson............ Houston Police Department

Senior Police Officer Christopher McCain..... Houston Police Department

Senior Police Officer Diego Morelli............... Houston Police Department

Senior Police Officer Jorge Morin Jr............. Houston Police Department

Sergeant Michael Vance................................Houston Police Department

Trooper Craig Hunter.................................... Texas Department Public Safety

Special Agent Jamie Neault.......................... Texas Department Public Safety

Trooper Drew A. Stoner................................ Texas Department Public Safety

Trooper Joshua C. Strawn............................. Texas Department Public Safety

58 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 59


EST. 1953

®

Starting January 1, 2021, Deputy

Jacob Hayden began his first full

year as a solo deputy. As a member

of the Precinct 5 Patrol Team,

he quickly was noticed for his

outstanding work ethic and possessing

skills beyond the expectations

of someone his training and

experience. He has made himself

a vital member of his agency and

the community he serves.

He is also part of the Precinct 5

Special Response Team, assisting

in multiple search warrants and

call outs. He located and cleared

102 active fugitive warrants within

the Precinct 5 area and completed

129 hours of Texas Commission of

Law Enforcement (TCOLE) training

in addition to everything else he

accomplished in his rookie year

as a law enforcement officer. His

performance in 2021 has been

that of a seasoned deputy and has

shown that he has a bright future

in law enforcement. In addition,the

work ethic and achievements that

were made during 2021 by Deputy

Hayden have also brought great

recognition to his agency.

On February 25, 2021, Sergeant

Gabriel Alvarez organized

a rescue crew of officers to

rescue other officers who were

being fired at by a suspect at an

apartment complex. The suspect

was firing at the officers out

of an apartment window. Sergeant

Alvarez commanded an

armored personnel carrier (APC)

to rescue the trapped officers.

He rallied his people together,

came up with a quick reaction

plan and went with his men

into the line of fire. Upon seeing

two officers in harm’s way and

despite seeing a suspect actively

shooting at these officers, he

opened the APC’s door, exposing

himself to the line of fire to get

the attention of the trapped officers

and ushered them to safety.

Sergeant Alvarez distinguished

himself with valor during this incident

and saved fellow officers’

lives at the risk of his own which

made the difference in resolving

a live shooter incident.

DEPUTY JACOB B. HAYDEN

MONTGOMERY COUNTY CONSTABLE PCT. 5

SERGEANT GABRIEL ALVAREZ

BRYAN POLICE DEPARTMENT

60 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 61


EST. 1953

®

K-9 DEPUTY ETHAN R. KAHLA

CHAMBERS COUNTY INTERDICTION UNIT

TROOPER CRAIG HUNTER

TEXAS DEPT. OF PUBLIC SAFETY

DETECTIVE CODY J. BURK

CHAMBERS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

62 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 63

62 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 63


EST. 1953

®

On August 12, 2021, Detective Cody Burk,

K-9 Deputy Ethan Kahla were advised of an

armed car jacking involving a shot Harris

County deputy, heading to their jurisdiction.

Deputy Burk located the vehicle and

began a pursuit and was later joined by

Deputy Kahla in the pursuit. The suspect

began firing at both deputies during the

pursuit. The suspect avoided a set of stop

sticks that nearby DPS troopers had set

and Trooper Hunter join the pursuit. Trooper

Hunter used his patrol car to hit the

suspect’s vehicle head-on, disabling it and

ending the chase and the suspect was shot

and killed. Trooper Hunter was life-flighted

from the scene to receive immediate medical

attention and made a full recovery.

64 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 65


EST. 1953

®

In August of 2021, Deputy Brandon Morales

and Deputy Larry Llamas were working a night

shift and responded to a suspect trespassing in

a Walmart parking lot. As the deputies arrived,

the suspect exited his vehicle and began shooting

at them. The deputies chased the suspect

on foot as he was continuing to fire back at

them. The suspect eventually stopped, turned

around, and began shooting at the deputies

and they were forced to return fire to stop the

threat. The deputies acted with bravery and

extraordinary heroism during their pursuit and

gunfight with an armed adversary and were

fully aware of the imminent threat to their lives

and danger to nearby civilians.

DEPUTY BRANDON MORALES

HARRIS COUNTY CONSTABLE PCT. 4

DEPUTY LARRY LLAMAS

HARRIS COUNTY CONSTABLE PCT. 4

66 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 67


EST. 1953

®

DEPUTY NOE RODRIGUEZ, JR.

HARRIS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

On October 21, 2021, Deputy

Noe Rodriguez, Jr. was called to

a situation in southeast Harris

County where a homicidal and

suicidal husband, armed with a

hand gun, was holding his baby

hostage and threating his wife,

the baby’s mother. The subject

appeared to be homicidal and

suicidal causing his wife to fear

for her life and their baby’s life.

The suspect refused to come

outside or give up the baby. Over

the course of an hour and a half,

Deputy Rodriguez remained

calm and spoke with the suspect

in Spanish, using deescalation

techniques and finally convinced

the suspect to give him the baby,

allowing the SWAT team to take

the suspect into custody a short

time later. Deputy Rodriguez

utilized the fundamentals of the

Harris County Sheriff’s Office

training in crisis intervention and

deescalation and exercised one

of the agency’s core values to

“Protect our citizens with honor

and courage”.

On July 5, 2021, Officer Samuel

Cleveland and Senior Officer

Christopher McCain were dispatched

to a disturbance call at

an apartment complex in Kingwood.

After determining that

there had been an altercation

over a parking space, the officers

located the suspect at his apartment.

After a brief conversation at

his front door, the suspect pulled

a weapon and shot Officer Cleveland

three times. Senior Officer

McCain rushed inside to subdue

the suspect and the suspect

pointed the pistol at Senior Officer

McCain. Senior Officer McCain

forced the suspect to the ground

and dislodged the weapon from

the suspect, then placed him into

custody. Senior Officer McCain

began emergency first aid on

Officer Cleveland by applying a

tourniquet to his arm which was

bleeding profusely. While still

maintaining control of the suspect,

Senior Officer McCain found

another wound on Officer Cleveland

and began applying pressure

until emergency personnel

arrived. The attending physician

confirmed that the quick emergency

first aid given by Senior

Officer McCain saved the life of

Officer Cleveland.

SENIOR POLICE OFFICER CHRISTOPHER MCCAIN

HOUSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT

68 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 69


EST. 1953

®

SERGEANT MICHAEL VANCE

HOUSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT

SENIOR POLICE OFFICER DON R. JOHNSON

HOUSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT

SENIOR POLICE OFFICER NEEY GUTIERREZ

HOUSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT

70 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 71


EST. 1953

®

On September 20, 2021, Sergeant Michael Vance, Senior

Police Officers Dan Johnson, Neey Gutierrez, Diego Morelli,

and Jorge Morin executed a felony warrant when the suspect

opened fire. The officers were part of the Houston Police

Department’s Major Offenders Unit, which serves high-level

felony arrest warrants considered to be the “most serious.” As

the officers made contact with an occupant of the residence,

they were met with a barrage of gunfire. Senior Officer William

Jeffrey was mortally wounded and Sergeant Vance sustained

multiple bullet wounds as the suspect continued to shoot at

the officers, using a fully automatic pistol. After over a hundred

rounds were exchanged, the suspect was contained and died

at the scene. The officers demonstrated extraordinary bravery

and valor while continuing to engage the fugitive, knowing that

two of their members were down.

SENIOR POLICE OFFICER DIEGO MORELLI

HOUSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT

SENIOR POLICE OFFICER JORGE MORIN, JR.

HOUSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT

72 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 73 73


EST. 1953

®

On August 17, 2021, Special Agent Neault was

a tactical medic as part of a Special Response

Team that was called in to help other agencies in

Burleson County with a barricaded suspect. Trooper

Strawn was called in to assist. The suspect exited

the residence and fired his handgun two times,

striking Trooper Strawn. Trooper Strawn fired back

at the suspect even though he had been shot

twice. Trooper Strawn was bleeding profusely from

his arm and Special Agent Neault evacuated him

to a casualty collection point and called for assistance.

Special Agent Neault applied a tourniquet to

stop the bleeding and checked him for additional

wounds. In another incident, Special Agent Neault

also saved a man’s life that had his leg severed

below the knee by a train, by applying two tourniquets

and administered IV fluids to stabilize the

man while waiting for a helicopter to transport him

for treatment.

SPECIAL AGENT JAMIE NEAULT

TEXAS DEPT. OF PUBLIC SAFETY

TROOPER JOSHUA C. STRAWN

TEXAS DEPT. OF PUBLIC SAFETY

74 74 The The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The

The BLUES

BLUES POLICE

POLICE MAGAZINE

MAGAZINE 75

75


EST. 1953

®

On February 20, 2021,

Trooper Stoner was on

his way to work when he

witnessed a man getting

shot multiple times in the

chest by another man.

Trooper Stoner stopped his

patrol vehicle and followed

the man with a gun inside

the house. He confronted

the man and ordered him

to the ground and to drop

his weapon, which he did.

Once he was apprehended,

Trooper Stoner found

a female victim on the

floor who had been shot

in the back. He made sure

she was still alive so he

could render aid. He then

secured the shooter in his

patrol vehicle and assisted

EMS when they arrived.

On behalf of the entire staff here at The BLUES, we wish to

congratulate each and every one of these brave officers who

truly represent the best of the best and are true heroes.

Sgt. Michael Barron (RET)

Founder & Publisher,

The BLUES Police Magazine

TROOPER DREW A. STONER

TEXAS DEPT. OF PUBLIC SAFETY

76 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 77 77


REMEMBERING THOSE WE’VE LOST

Lost in the Line of Duty

Patrol Officer Brian Lee Sember

Ottawa Police Department, Illinois

End of Watch Sunday, April 3, 2022

Age 49 Tour 23 Years Badge # 31 Veteran

Patrol Officer Brian Sember died from complications as the result of contracting

COVID-19 in the line of duty.

Officer Sember was a United States Marine Corps veteran and had served with

the Ottawa Police Department for 23 years. He is survived by his two children.

During his service with the U.S. Army, Senior Inspector Keyworth escorted the

riderless horse during President Ronald Reagan’s funeral.

Police Officer Darryl Wayne Fortner

Vestavia Hills Police Department, Alabama

End of Watch Wednesday, April 6, 2022

Age 53 Tour 25 Years 5 Months Badge # 815

Police Officer Darryl Fortner died from complications as the result of contracting

COVID-19 in the line of duty.

Officer Fortner had served with the Vestavia Hills Police Department for over

seven years and previously served 20 years with the Birmingham Police Department.

He is survived by his wife, son, daughter, three grandchildren, mother, and

sister.

Sergeant Nicholas W. Tullier

East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff’s Office, Louisiana

End of Watch Thursday, May 5, 2022

Age 46 Tour N/A Badge # T-82

Sergeant Nick Tullier succumbed to injuries sustained six years earlier when he

was ambushed by a subject outside a convenience store at 9611 Airline Highway

shortly before 9:00 am. Officers had received reports of a subject walking

along the roadway carrying a rifle. As responding officers arrived in the area,

they were ambushed by the subject. Corporal Tullier was critically wounded.

Deputy Sheriff Brad Garafola of the East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff’s Office,

Corporal Montrell Jackson, and Police Officer Matthew Gerald, both of the Baton

Rouge Police Department, were shot and killed. Two other officers were wounded.

The subject was shot and killed by other responding officers.

Sergeant Tullier was posthumously promoted to Sergeant. He is survived by his

parents, his two sons, two brothers, and five nephews.

Deputy Sheriff Walter Donald Jenkins, Jr.

Rockdale County Sheriff’s Office, Georgia

End of Watch Wednesday, May 11, 2022

Age 54 Tour 24 Years Badge # 2893

Deputy Sheriff Walter Jenkins was struck and killed at about 9:30 pm while

directing traffic at the intersection of Highway 138 and Highway 212. He was

transported to Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta, where he succumbed to his

injuries. Deputy Jenkins was wearing a reflective vest when he was struck by a

vehicle traveling east on Highway 138. The juvenile driver has not been charged.

Deputy Jenkins had served with the Rockdale County Sheriff’s Office for over

a year and previously served with the College Park Police Department for 22

years. He is survived by his mother, daughter, two sons, former wife, and two

sisters.

78 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 79


REMEMBERING THOSE WE’VE LOST

Lost in the Line of Duty

Deputy Sheriff Robert Adam Howard

Harris County Sheriff’s Office, Texas

End of Watch Wednesday, May 11, 2022

Age 27 Tour 3 Years Badge # N/A

Deputy Sheriff Robert Howard was killed in a vehicle crash when his patrol car

struck the back of a tractor-trailer that was parked on the left shoulder of the

Tomball Parkway near Spring Cypress Road. He was transporting evidence as

part of a criminal case when the crash occurred at about 2:00 pm.

Deputy Howard had served with the Harris County Sheriff’s Office for three

years and was assigned to the Gang Unit. He is survived by his wife, two children,

parents, and sister.

Chief Deputy Sheriff Jody Wayne Cash

Calloway County Sheriff’s Office, Kentucky

End of Watch Monday, May 16, 2022

Age 44 Tour 22 Years Badge # 2

Chief Deputy Jody Cash was shot and killed in front of the Marshall County

Sheriff’s Office at 52 Judicial Drive in Benton at 2:10 pm. He was escorting a

prisoner when the man shot him. The prisoner was also shot and killed during

the incident. Chief Deputy Cash was taken to a local hospital, where he succumbed

to his wounds.

Chief Deputy Cash had served with the Calloway County Sheriff’s Office for

1-1/2 years and had previously served eight years with the Kentucky State

Police, six years as the Assistant Chief of the Murray State University Police Department,

and six years with the Caldwell County Sheriff’s Office. He is survived

by his wife and two children.

Border Patrol Agent Daniel Salazar

United States Border Patrol, U.S. Government

End of Watch Tuesday, May 17, 2022

Age 40 Tour 4 Years Badge # N/A

Border Patrol Agent Daniel Salazar was killed in a single-vehicle crash on the

Bell Valley Truck Trail near Campos, California. He was responding to investigate

a sensor that had been activated in the area when his Jeep Wrangler patrol

vehicle left the roadway and overturned in a rugged area. Another agent located

the wreckage at about 5:30 am.

Border Patrol Agent Salazar had served with the United States Border Patrol for

four years and was assigned to the El Cajon Station. He is survived by his wife

and son.

Senior Corrections Officer Daniel Sincavage

New Jersey Department of Corrections, New Jersey

End of Watch Thursday, May 19, 2022

Age 41 Tour 20 Years Badge # N/A

Senior Corrections Officer Daniel Sincavage was killed in a vehicle crash on

Route 47 in Maurice River Township at about 10:45 pm. He and another officer

were driving from one section of the Southern State Correctional Facility to

another when his vehicle left the roadway, struck a tree, and became engulfed

in flames.

Officer Sincavage had served with the New Jersey Department of Corrections

for 20 years. He is survived by his wife and three children.

80 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 81


By A.L. Jones

war stories from IA

Most of my readers know that

I have been around longer than

dirt. Thirty-five years to be exact.

I am the old man in the department.

The dinosaur (the other

names may not be printed and a

few the officers hold copyrights

to) the one that has seen it all,

the one that tells true stories

that are too wild to have happened,

and the one who has

heard it all - not. As long as there

are police, there will be police

stories. They are more commonly

known as War Stories.

War stories are commonplace

in all sectors of police work. I

worked in Internal Affairs for

the longest time and the stories

we tell are no different. Only

we are actually laughing with

the accused not at them. Sooner

or later, everyone will screw

up. Usually with a little help

of a co-conspirator who influenced

the officer at the time. The

co-conspirator is usually intoxicants

beer, wine, Jack (Daniels),

or some other illegal substance.

Though humorous in most of

the following, the officers were

severely punished up to and

including termination. Here are

a few on the many I’ve heard or

experienced.

LOST IN SPACE

An officer failed to report for

duty for several days. The supervisor

made the obligatory phone

calls and visited the home to

ensure the safety and well-being

of the officer. The supervisor

made no contact with the officer

or his patrol vehicle. A few days

later the officer returned to work

with the following explanation:

While on the way home from

the end of his shift, he became

extremely ill and drove himself

to a hospital in the state capital

(names and cities removed) that

was some 50 miles away. He

has in hand an excuse from the

hospital, stating he was treated

released after 3 days.

The chief of police became

suspicious and initiates an investigation.

The first thing to raise

the scale of suspicion is that the

city he lives in, had a reputable

hospital. The investigation revealed

that the officer left work

and met his girlfriend. She had

enough cocaine to keep them

going for a few days. The officer

having never taken cocaine goes

on a magical mystery tour with

the girlfriend. Three days later,

the light in the old brain goes on

and he knew he had better come

up with a good story. Girlfriend

types a fake excuse and has it

notarized. You have to admit they

tried. Sadly, the bosses didn’t buy

the story and he was fired.

GHOSTS

An officer is out on the road

in a secluded part of a county.

He was the only officer on duty

after midnight. He had served

in that capacity for many years.

He was bored and did not have

enough to keep him entertained.

One evening the officer puts a

call for help in that shots were

fired at him while he was seated

in his patrol car. The entire state

responds, all off duty officers are

summoned, and the state investigation

unit is notified.

The officer told investigators

he was checking a man walking

on the roadway. Before he

could leave his unit, the man

pulled a automatic pistol from

his pants and began firing. The

officer slumped into the passenger

seat to avoid being shot.

After the shots were fired the

man flees into a wooded area

and the officer chased the man

eventually losing him. The officer

described the man that he shot

at him with a 1911 semi-automatic

firearm. All six rounds are

placed perfectly dead center

over the steering wheel. Just one

problem, no semi-automatic pistol

shell casings were found on

the roadway. In fact no casings

were found anywhere. On the

other hand, the lead projectiles

recovered from the front seat of

the patrol car were .38 caliber.

Ballistics from the officer’s .38

backup pistol were a perfect

match. As Bill Engval would say -

Here’s your sign.

PARTY ANIMAL

One officer loved to party. He

was first there and last to leave

any party thrown by fellow officers.

There was to be a party

one weekend night. The officer

was going to be there. However,

earlier in the day he and a

few buddies were working at

one of the officer’s homes. Beer

and Jack (Daniels) were flowing

most of the day. The officer,

already intoxicated, decided to

drive his take home car to the

party. He took what he thought

was an alternative route - the

railroad track would be quicker.

Two miles later all four tires are

deflated, the front end destroyed,

as well as the transmission. He

left the car next to the railroad

and walked the rest of the way.

He was taken home by one of

the designated drivers who had

no idea of what transpired. Next

day he awakens to find his take

home car gone. He did not remember

a thing. A report was

made, and a BOLO issued. A train

crew found it within hours. Moral

of this story if you do something

like this at least remember

where you left it.

There are lots more stories in

this old brain, but I’m old and

retired and I need a nap.

82 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 83

82 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 83


Drunk Mom Kills 6yr Old Daughter

In my 10 years on the street,

I've responded to probably

thousands of car crashes and

road accidents. Most are very

minor, or even if they look

bad, most have no injuries

or only minor injuries. Cars

are designed to basically fall

apart to absorb impacts and

they do their job well. But

sometimes speed doesn't

matter. Seatbelt use or other

factors determine whether

it’s a fatal accident.

Probably the worst crash

I've ever responded to, for

me at least, involved two

pedestrians, a mother and

her 6-year-old daughter. The

driver was actually doing

everything right (for once).

He was going the speed limit

(45mph), had the right of

way, everything. Unfortunately,

this dumb drunk b**ch had

decided at about 11pm that

she wasn't drunk enough.

So, she takes her small child

with her to the gas station to

get a 40 oz., then proceeded

to lead the child across the

street into oncoming traffic.

Because she was so drunk,

she just couldn't process

what she was doing. The

daughter, trusting her mother

completely, stepped out into

the road with the mom. Mom

only sustained minor injuries.

A broken leg, a broken

arm, and minor scrapes. The

little girl however was killed

instantly. She was thrown

about 30 feet through the air

and landed in the roadway.

I feel lucky that I wasn't the

first officer on scene. Two of

our guy’s left work early that

night to go home and decompress.

I'll always remember

this crash. Seeing that little

girl laid out on the road with

EMS, Fire, and police surrounding

her trying their best

to help. There were a lot of

tears from first responders.

I've never seen so many crying

at a scene in public before,

or since.

The mother was locked up

and not allowed to attend the

funeral. The father was no

longer in the picture, but the

little girl’s relatives came to

pay their respects. But what

struck me the most and will

forever be etched in my memory,

were the hundreds of

first responders from all over

the state that came to mourn

the loss of this precious little

girl. Never have I seen such an

outpouring that didn’t involve

a fellow first responder.

I guess we all have moments

like these that will last

a lifetime. The horrible memory

of that little girl laying

broken in the street, her mom

so drunk, she had no clue that

her baby girl was gone. The

paramedics that worked on

them both and the anger they

had towards the mom and

tears they shed for the little

girl. And the bond they all

shared at the funeral, saying

goodbye to someone

they barely knew.

How in the hell do you

pick up the pieces and

move on to yet another

devasting scene? And do

this over, and over again?

Because it’s what God

chose us to do. To be there

in the worst of times and

be the heroes that save the

day. We do it because it’s

our calling. Not because we

want to, but because we

have too. It’s what we do.

I’ll close with this. When

you think you can’t go on?

That you can no longer be

that hero and you feel like

you are out of options. Stop

and call one of the many

first responder hotlines and

share your feelings with

someone who can relate to

what you’re going through.

DO NOT BECOME A STATISTC

of officers taking their own

lives. We need you. They need

you. Your family needs you.

Take whatever time you

need to regroup, refresh, and

rejoin.

84 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 85


THE OPEN ROAD

by Michael Barron

PATROL CARS

LEFT TO DIE

PURSUIT 2 ENROUTE

This former pursuit car has long struggled at the hands of Mother Nature,

and yet unlike the car directly next to it, it still wears a set of tires that hold

air. This picture shows the effects that maintenance can have on a car’s

exterior, as cars used in official capacities like police and fire departments

are often kept cleaned, waxed, and sparkling. With plenty of rust forming,

this cop car is just about beyond saving—and yet, compared to

its neighbor, the exterior paint has held up much better over the years,

which should serve as inspiration for car owners who think that waxing

their vehicles is a waste of time.

Junkyards all over the world are

full of cars, trucks, and SUVs that

have been neglected, abandoned,

or demolished in accidents. There

they sit, exposed to the hot sun and

harsh weather while slowly being

eaten by rust and accumulating

dust. Every vehicle has a point at

which it has run the course of its

life and has become simply too

outdated or beat-up to restore or

refurbish. Official service vehicles

used by the police, fire fighters,

sheriffs, and highway patrol are

often maintained at a much higher

level than daily drivers owned by

commuters. After all, the authorities

need to be able to depend on their

vehicles to perform flawlessly when

they need to quickly respond to an

emergency, deploy to the scene

of an accident, or of course, tail a

criminal during a high-speed chase.

Almost every police car on the

roads leaves the yard each morning

absolutely spotless, while under the

skin, its mechanical components

have been gone over with a finetoothed

comb. And yet, after the

course of a rough day on the job,

plenty of cop cars will limp back

home covered in dents, dings, and

dust—while some might not even

make it home at all. The life of an

official vehicle certainly isn’t easy,

and plenty end up in a state beyond

the point of repair. Photographers

searching for great subjects have

often found police cars that appear

to have simply been abandoned at

some point, left to slowly die.

PLYMOUTH BEFORE THE HEMI

Exactly when many of these abandoned police cars began their

struggle will always remain a mystery. But this Plymouth looks like

it was simply parked out back next to barn—it's not like it was hidden

in a dark forest or anything, but clearly everyone forgot all about

the car. Still, despite the elements, this piece of split-window history

features a bit of brightwork that still shines in the sunlight, although

most of its surfaces are clearly covered in rust patches and dust that

has accumulated over the years. Of course, as automobiles developed

in the ensuing decades, keeping this car running would have been an

increasingly futile effort.

86 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 87


BOSTON’S FINEST

Part of the reason that police cars are eventually scrapped or sold

at auction is due to the hard lives that they lead. Most drivers may

have, at some point, noticed that cops don't turn off their cars when

they are on duty. Leaving the car running not only allows for quicker

response times, but also saves the engine (and starter motor) from

having to be started and stopped all the time, which conserves fuel

as well as reducing wear and tear. From chasing criminals to daily

patrols, police cars are on duty just as much as their drivers, and

despite high build qualities, they can only last so long.

RUN FLATS

This country is lucky enough to have Dodge Chargers being increasingly utilized as

police cruisers, but most of the world's police, big Detroit muscle is a ways off. Of

course, several countries in the Middle East have also turned to high-end supercars,

like Lamborghinis, so that they can catch wealthy speed demons enjoying

their otherwise unbeatable supercars and presumably make cops in more average

countries jealous. Comparing this compact car that's been abandoned after

receiving minor damage in the line of duty to a supercar is a bit ridiculous. After

all, it doesn't even have run-flat tires, fancy wheels, or an aero kit.

TWO-TONE RUST COLOR

Most drivers think that snow and the salt used to melt it are the

absolute worst thing for their cars' longevity, but in reality heat is

often the bane of a vehicle's existence. Just take a look at any car

that's lived its life in the desert, where the sun beats down and cracks

plastic parts, ruins rubber trim, oxidizes paint remarkably quickly,

and ruins tires in almost no time at all. Compared to the chemicals

that most regions use to melt snow, which can be rinsed off at a car

wash any time the weather turns terrible, the sun that destroyed this

abandoned cruiser is typically a car's consistent adversary.

PRE-GHOST CROWN VIC

This Crown Victoria is well on its way to wearing a matte black finish,

although not in the fashion that many drivers these days would hope

to wrap their fancy sports cars. With the popularity of matte wrap

jobs, and even gold or chrome wraps, there has also been a rarer

segment of the population that wraps their cars in a color scheme

to mimic the effects of long years spent in harsh weather. But rather

than waste a few thousand bucks to get that faux-rust look, this

Crown Vic has simply been left outside for the weeds to grow around

it while its black paint slowly fades to a dark brown.

RESERVES CAR

The fact that so much of the glass on the lights of this abandoned police car

remain intact seems like something of a miracle. With rust on just about every

surface, flat tires, and chrome pieces that look about to drop right off the body,

somehow all those blue and red lenses have weathered the test of time. Imagine

being flagged down by a cop car today with an aggressive lighting kit like this,

rather than the standard rooftop set. Especially at night, the entire area would be

lit up in a kaleidoscope of flashes—perhaps so many lights were necessary in the

era before electronic loudspeakers were fitted to every police cruiser.

ANOTHER DWI CONTACT

The life of a State Trooper in Utah is definitely not easy. With so much

of the state barely populated by humans, and long stretches of roadway

that see little, if any, traffic on a daily basis, maintaining the constant

vigilance necessary to remain safe for an entire day of driving

must be a challenge. Hopefully, the driver of this Charger was simply

sacrificing his car during the course of duty, otherwise it almost looks

like a semi truck may have sideswiped the rear end and caused such

catastrophic damage. Dodge Chargers certainly aren’t fragile cars, so

something big was definitely involved in this collision.

88 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 89


A BADGE OF HONOR

heal ing our heroes

Asking the Follow Up Questions:

How to Support Those we Work With.

By Samantha Horwitz

As I walked into the classroom

to speak to a sheriff’s recruit

class located in rural Texas

about stress and post-traumatic

stress, all thoughts were on the

tragic events in Uvalde, Texas.

For me personally, I thought

about the chaos on 9/11. More

than 20 years has passed, and

in the blink of an eye I was right

back there remembering people

running through the streets, the

jumpers from World Trade Center

Tower 1, and the survivor’s

guilt of not being able to save

more that day.

I shared my memories with

the recruits and how an event so

far removed can bring forward

trauma from the past. Our brain

is an amazing organ. Its storage

capacity for the unimaginable is

frightening and exciting.

The conversation turned into

a discussion on awareness

and how we can support each

other after trauma. The law

enforcement officers and first

responders in Uvalde, Texas

who exchanged gunfire with the

shooter and those first on the

scene will need to be supported

by their departments over the

next days, weeks, and months.

Once the CISM teams leave, the

funerals end, and the investigation

concluded what then? Uvalde

will never be the same and

neither will the law enforcement

officers and first responders.

As part of the team at A Badge

of Honor, our workshop addresses

the things we miss as law

enforcement officers and first responders

inside our own departments.

We are trained to capture

the details and document

crime scenes, yet we sometimes

miss what is going on with our

own partners and co-workers.

How many times have we heard

reports of an officer completing

suicide and those closest saying,

“I noticed recently that he / she

was showing up late for work, I

should have said something.” We

are so quick to jump into action

for strangers, yet when it is one

of our own, we hesitate. Why? I

posed that question to the recruits.

Here is a list of a few of

the answers they gave me:

• Stigma.

• I do not want to get them in

trouble.

• I am afraid I might make

things worse.

I have been trapped in the prison

of post-traumatic stress, one

of the biggest things I did was

self-isolate. I did not talk to anyone

and if someone asked me if I

were okay, I would respond with,

“I’m fine.” There was no follow

up, no asking another probing

question. How many of you reading

this have either told someone

you were “fine” when you were

SAMANTHA HORWITZ & JOHN SALERNO

not, or received “I’m fine” as a

response from someone else?

What your partner, your

co-worker, your friend, needs

for you to do is challenge an

“I’m fine” response with, “Are

you sure? Because I have noticed

that you seem really angry, really

distracted, you never hang out

anymore, whatever the change

in behavior is.” Being specific,

stating what you observe will

usually garner a response in return

where the person will open

up. Once open, stress is released.

When stress is released, then

there is hope. Where there is

hope, there is not feeling alone

anymore and a strong possibility

that you just saved someone’s

life.

I often talk about courage in

our workshops. Our training

creates courage that is almost

unconscious. It allows us to run

into burning buildings and toward

gunfire. That courage is

easy to muster. The greatest

courage we can show is the

courage to ask the follow up

question to, “I’m fine.” And the

courage to ask for help.

It is important that our

departments start creating

changes in the way they deal

with trauma. We cannot keep

telling one another that we

have each other’s backs and

then turn away when we need

to talk about the calls that are

causing us nightmares and

stress. Once command staff

in our departments decide to

face the reality that trauma

is real, that post-traumatic

stress is real, and that our

brains were not designed to

handle the levels of traumatic

incidents and then create

outlets for us like peer support

or partnerships with

organization that can bring in

resources, will we be able to

finally do away with the stigma

that has robbed us of 1,051

first responders since 2017,

bluehelp.org. It is time that our

profession creates meaningful

change.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Samantha Horwitz is a regular

contributor to The Blues Police

Magazine. She is a 9/11 first

responder, former United States

Secret Service Agent, speaker,

and author. She and her business

partner, retired firefighter

and NYPD detective John Salerno

created A Badge of Honor, a

501(c)(3), non-profit post-traumatic

stress awareness and

suicide prevention program for

first responders. John and Sam

host MAD (Making a Difference)

Radio, Wednesdays 7pm central

live on FB @Makingadifferencetx.

For more about Sam

& John and the wellness and

resiliency workshops for first

responders, visit ABadgeofHonor.com.

Delivered to Your Inbox

Every Month FOR FREE

90 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 91


DARYL LOTT

daryl’s deliberations

Number Four Thousand, Four

Hundred, and Seventy Four

Memorial Day seems to me to

gain more importance very year.

Maybe it’s because as one ages,

thoughts of mortality and life

experience generally reveal just

how fragile life is. In our country,

Memorial Day marks the beginning

of Summer, but in doing so,

remembers the ends of life for

the people who gave their “last

full measure of devotion,” as

President Lincoln so eloquently

put it. Gold Star Families gather

to remember the loved ones lost

in the never ending fight between

good and evil. Those sacrifices

are beyond the description

mere words attempt to convey.

Every jubilant victory in battle

is tempered with the thoughts

that not everyone survived. In my

own family, the Battle of Midway

and the Air War Over Hitler’s

Germany produced tide turning

victories for our country, but our

family lost a sailor (Garland Lott)

on the “USS Yorktown” and an

airman (Edgar Lott) on the B-17

“Lady Liberty.” Neither body was

recovered. In the case of missing

or unrecoverable remains,

our country honors the fallen

with symbolic resting places as

they are memorialized on official

cenotaphs. Garland’s name

appears on the cenotaph at the

National Cemetery of the Pacific

in Hawaii. Edgar’s name is etched

on the cenotaph at the Netherlands

American Cemetery not

far from where his aircraft was

blown out of the sky.

Cenotaphs are not the exact

same as a memorial. A cenotaph

only contains the names of

the missing or those with unrecoverable

remains. The largest

and most famous cenotaph in

Texas is located at the Alamo.

The Alamo defenders’ bodies

were unceremoniously burned

in a pyre by a madman dictator.

Therefore, the sacred cenotaph

in the Alamo Plaza is their symbolic

final resting place.

This Memorial Day I draw your

attention to a photo accompanying

this essay. I encourage the

reader to study the young man

pictured in the photograph. At

first glance he appears to be a

handsome lad with a bright future.

One could say he represents

the blossoming of the best of

American youth.

His hometown is listed as

Greensboro, North Carolina. I can

tell you that he played outside

linebacker on the Northeast H.S.

Rams football team. He was their

team captain and graduated in

the Class of 2006. After high

school, he attended college, but

found out that it wasn’t really for

him. He joined the Army in 2009.

He didn’t have to go too far

from home as he was assigned

to the 82nd Airborne Division out

of Fort Bragg, North Carolina. He

went to Iraq as a Specialist with

the 2nd Brigade Combat Team.

Specialist David E. Hickman was

on a police type of patrol in

Baghdad. He was patrolling in an

armored vehicle when a roadside

bomb exploded and ripped

through his patrol vehicle. Specialist

Hickman has the distinction

of not only being a brave

and dedicated soldier, but his

is the last combat death in Iraq.

As such, I consider this gallant

young man to be representative

of all of our loved and lost

Americans in Iraq.

There were a total of 4,474

young Americans who gave

their lives in the War on Terror

in Iraq. They did not sell their

lives cheaply. There were 23,984

enemy combatants killed in

Iraq, leading to freedom for the

Iraqi people and security in our

homeland.

The other photo that accompanies

this essay is of the only

memorial at this time to those

Americans who paid the ultimate

price in Iraq and Afghanistan. It

is called the “Northwood Gratitude

and Honor Memorial” and

it contains the names of all the

fallen heroes of Iraq and Afghanistan.

The memorial is located in

Irvine, California. There are other

active funding projects to honor

our heroes of the War on Terror

in other locations. If any reader

feels so inclined to donate, I am

sure the projects are worthy.

Have a blessed Memorial Day

and enjoy the freedom you

posses as a result of others

who were willing to give everything

they had to provide

it. Remember the Gold Star

families who bear a disproportionate

burden in the quest

for freedom and justice among

men and nations. God Bless the

United States of America.

92 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 93


HOUSTON POLICE OFFICERS UNION

from the president

TRANSFORMATIONAL CHANGE

What does it look like?

I am hearing a lot about this

new “transformational change”

classes that is provided by

way of the Being First group.

While I support anything that

improves our department, let

me be clear when I say this, no

change will come to the rank

and file without the command

staff being direct, respectful,

and transparent. I respect

most of the command staff and

understand that running the department

is a difficult one. You

must walk a tight rope, one

that allows you to play politics

with the community and still

have the respect of the troops.

I truly believe that you can do

both and be an effective leader.

When I speak with the membership

the top three issues are

morale, discipline, and manpower.

All three are tied together,

as discipline and manpower

are the two things that

directly affect morale. Manpower

has been low for as long

as I can remember but we have

always been able to handle the

job. It is getting to the point

now that we will not be able to

provide some of our basic services

if this lack of hiring and

retention continues. I am not

blaming our Mayor and Council

as they have provided the

funding for all the classes we

can fill. Retirements are up and

recruiting is down. I truly do

not blame anyone who wants

to leave the department in the

current state of affairs and understand

the hesitancy by some

to join a police department.

Discipline is the largest issue

that we deal with on a regular

basis. Currently the department

takes every complaint

and conducts an investigation.

Unfortunately, once a complaint

is initiated, they will pick

out every little infraction and

you will be cited with it. This is

where morale suffers the most.

Everyone knows that if they receive

a complaint, they will get

“hit” with something. Real or

perceived, the fear of discipline

is the largest driver of morale

in this department. I will say

that there are many cases that

are cleared information after

the body camera proves the

allegations did not happen, but

the department does a poor job

of letting people know that.

We have been blessed that

our department has not been

defunded like other cities,

but when we can’t recruit it

hursts us all. Sadly, I predict

in the near future that some of

these specialized units will be

back to running calls because

there are not enough officers

DOUGLAS GRIFFITH

in patrol. I predict that we will

lose more officers and be below

5000 by the end of the

year. This will get worse before

it gets better and no form

of change in this department

can fix that issue. As long as

the vocal activists are out there

blaming law enforcement for

all of the world’s problems, we

will continue to have issues

hiring and retaining officers.

Transformational change

sounds all warm and fuzzy,

but in reality, our department

needs to define what this

change is and what it will look

like once completed. Until we

have a clearly defined goal and

a direction in which to reach

that goal, transformational

change is nothing but a catch

phrase.

94 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 95


NOT SO BRIGHT AWARD

lig ht bul b award

MAY YOUR WISH

COME TRUE DORA

by Bill King

In a jaw-dropping tweet and

press conference this week,

County Judge Lina Hidalgo said

that she expects to be indicted in

connection with the now infamous

vaccine outreach contract scandal.

At a press conference, Hidalgo

went much further, calling out

Harris County District Attorney

and fellow Democrat, Kim Ogg, for

conducting a “politically motivated”

investigation. Hidalgo’s

six-minute diatribe is hard to follow

but she makes several statements

that are blatantly false.

First, she alleges that the fact

the investigation is being conducted

during her campaign is a

priori evidence that it is politically

motivated. That, of course, is

complete nonsense. The alleged

crimes did not come to light until

Commissioners began to ask for

details about the contract last fall.

So, the investigation has only been

ongoing for about eight months

which is hardly unusual. Also,

according to my sources, Hidalgo’s

office refused to voluntarily hand

over documents to the District

Attorney’s office, regarding the

contract resulting in the necessity

to bring in the Texas Rangers

to subpoena them, delaying the

investigation. If Hidalgo and her

staff had nothing to hide, why not

voluntarily turn over the documents

and expedite the process?

Second, Hidalgo alleges that

the District Attorney’s office gave

a motion to revoke her chief of

staff’s bail to the press before it

was given to his attorney. Her sole

“evidence” for this assertion is that

a reporter called the defense attorney

before he had seen the motion.

This proves absolutely nothing.

All of the reporters following this

story are daily checking for court

filings in the case. It is not at all

unsurprising that a reporter might

see it online before a copy made it

to a defense attorney’s desk.

She also claims that the District

Attorney’s Office has been litigating

the case in the press while she

was supposedly “forbidden from

responding.” Of course, she was

never forbidden by the legal process

from responding. Her lawyers

may have told to keep quiet.

Certainly, after her performance at

the press conference last week you

can see why they might.

But in fact, it was Hidalgo who

dispatched her attorneys to make

her case to media outlets that she

believed would be sympathetic.

Her lawyers met with Texas

Monthly, the Texas Tribune and the

Houston Chronicle, providing each

documents which they have refused

to hand over to investigators

voluntarily. It is Hidalgo’s team, not

the District Attorney’s office, that

has been aggressively trying the

case in the press.

She went on to allege that “we

have state media and local media

that have reported on how the allegations

are . . . based on a distortion

of the facts.” But those stories

reported on how Hidalgo’s attorney’s

alleged that the charges were

based on distorted facts. Each of

the stories pointed out numerous

contradictions and inconsistencies

in the story being spun by Hidalgo’s

lawyers. Even the normally

Hidalgo-fawning Houston Chronicle

editorial board concluded that

while the documents presented by

Hidalgo’s lawyers cast some doubt

on the bid-rigging allegations, they

did not clear her and that serious

questions remained.

Toward the end of the press

conference, after a question from

a reporter pointing out that Hidalgo

and Ogg were both Democrats,

Hidalgo’s comments descend in a

nearly indecipherable rant about

the “they” who are coming after

her. While continuing to lambast

Ogg, she throws in references

to Ted Cruz, Mike Lindell and

Steve Hotze for good measure. Of

course, she did not mention that

Ogg’s office just indicted Hotze.

But apparently notwithstanding

that “they” are all in some great

cabal to derail her efforts to shepherd

Harris County into her progressive

utopia.

I think it is important to understand

that the corruption alleged

regarding the vaccine contract is

different from the garden variety

cronyism and influence peddling,

which are so endemic in our state.

This corruption is born in the hubris

of zealots so convinced of their

righteousness that any means justify

the ends, even if those means

violate the law. I actually fear this

type of corrupt more. The inability

of ideological zealots to engage in

critical self-examination leads to

the pursuant of policies based on a

religious-like belief regardless of

real-world consequences. I think

this is the reason we are seeing

such widespread dysfunction of

Harris County government from

election administration to IT failures

to the breakdown of the criminal

court system and the hellish

conditions in the Harris County jail.

I have no idea if Hidalgo will be

indicted on the vaccine contract.

The facts set out in the affidavit of

the Texas Ranger attached to the

application for the search warrant

certainly show that Hidalgo was

intimately and directly involved

in the effort to steer the contract

to Elevate Strategies. But clearly

something happened last week

that rattled Hidalgo. I suspect her

attorneys found out that someone

close to her is cooperating with

investigators. If so, her concerns

may be well founded.

96 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 97


HONORING FALLEN HEREOS

“Honoring our fallen heroes through running while providing financial support to the families of our

fallen Heroes, First Responders injured in the Line of Duty and Safety Equipment to K9s in need.”

Zechariah

Cartledge:

a True American Hero

Grants Awarded to Injured First Responders: 32

Total Amount Awarded: $277,500

Funds Awarded to Families of Fallen Heroes: 16

Total Amount Awarded: $165,000

Funds/Equipment Awarded to K9 Officers: $10,000

2022 Run Tracker:

Total Miles Run in 2022: (as of 5/25/22): 142

- Zechariah - 139

- Giuliana - 1

- Jayden - 2

Total Miles Run in 2021: 325

Total Miles Run in 2020: 401

Total Miles Run in 2019: 376

Overall Miles Run: 1,244

- - - - - - - - - -

2022 Run Stats:

Total Miles Run for 2022 Fallen LEO’s (Non COVID-19): 50

Total Miles Run for 2022 Fallen Firefighters (Non COVID-19): 40

Total Miles Run for 2022 Fallen Canada LEO’s: 0

Total Miles Run in 2022 for Fallen COVID-19 Heroes: 18

Total Miles Run for 2021 Fallen LEO’s: 21

Total Miles Run for 2021 Fallen Firefighters: 2

Total Tribute Runs by State/Country: 8

States/Cities Zechariah has run in:

Florida - Winter Springs, Lake Mary, Clearwater, Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, Orlando, Temple Terrace, Blountstown,

Cocoa, Lakeland, Daytona Beach, West Palm Beach, Starke, Melbourne

New York - New York City, Weedsport • Georgia - Cumming, Augusta, Savannah

South Carolina - North Myrtle Beach, Charleston, Sumter • Pennsylvania - Monaca

Illinois - Springfield, Naperville, Glen Ellyn • Texas - Houston (2), Fort Worth, Midland, New Braunfels, Freeport, Madisonville,

Irving, Sadler, San Antonio • Kentucky - Nicholasville • Arkansas - Bryant, Hot Springs, Springdale, Prairie Grove

Nevada - Henderson • Kansas - Overland Park • California - Mt. Vernon, La Jolla • Arizona - Mesa

North Carolina - Concord, Raleigh • Virginia - Norton, Richmond • Tennessee - Bristol, Bartlett

Oklahoma - Stilwell (2) • Delaware - Milford • Maryland - Towson • Minnesota - Arden Hills • Indiana - Sullivan, Spencer

Mississippi - Grenada, Olive Branch • Missouri - Springfield, Rolla, Joplin • Iowa - Independence, Des Moines, Cedar Rapids

District/Countries/Territories:

Washington D.C. • Puerto Rico - San Juan

98 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 99


DR. TINA JAECKLE

blue mental health

Shattered: Moral Injury and

the Uvalde, Texas Tragedy

“It looked like a war zone. Complete

chaos and trauma and young,

innocent victims literally everywhere.

We didn’t even know where

to begin. We were also in shock”.

These were the words spoken to

me during a recent debrief with a

first responder who was present in

the moments following the mass

casualty disaster in Uvalde, Texas on

May 24, 2022. Much like the critical

incident that occurred at Sandy

Hook Elementary School in Newtown,

Connecticut on December 14,

2012, the nation was stunned and in

disbelief that this could occur and

impact our children so heavily. The

survivors, relatives of the victims,

and first responders from Sandy

Hook have openly expressed their

anger and frustration that this could

happen… again. Between these

two major events, thirty-nine of the

forty-seven victims were children.

In the days following the Uvalde

shooting, the response by law

enforcement has now taken center

stage and the United States Department

of Justice recently announced

that they will be conducting an indepth

investigation. It is important

to note that numerous law enforcement

and first responder agencies

were on scene and the attempts to

coordinate were extremely challenging.

It will undoubtedly take

time to fully understand the timeline

and decision-making processes that

impacted the ultimate outcome.

However, there are some consistently

shared emotions among

many of these officers, a sense of

complete and utter helplessness to

tactically save these children. This

can lead to a state of psychological

distress called moral injury.

While there is significant research

into understanding moral injury and

its effects, most of these studies

have been geared toward military

members and veterans. There is,

however, also evidence of moral

injury in law enforcement, given

the potential to witness or experience

a traumatic event. Police

officers routinely encounter criminal

and violent acts as part of their

jobs. Consistent exposure to these

stressors can have a significant

impact on an officer’s physical and

mental well-being. Some potential

stressors that officers have identified

include the inability to rescue a

seriously injured victim, the use of

force on a suspect, lethal or otherwise,

or following orders that go

against their personal beliefs, such

as breaking up a protest. Additionally,

it is common for officers to

have feelings of emotional exhaustion

and depersonalization. Due to

these factors, as well as the symptoms

discussed above, such as selfblame,

anxiety, and remorse, law

enforcement officers are likely to

experience burnout. This may result

in the decision to leave the policing

field altogether.

As I was authoring this article, I

contacted a colleague and clinician,

Andy Carrier (Retired Captain,

Georgia Department of Public

Safety and current Chief Operating

Officer of Valor Station, Augusta,

Georgia) who is currently offering

critical incident stress management

DR. TINA JAECKLE

and peer support services to first

responders in Uvalde, Texas. We

discussed the significant issue of

moral injury and he shared that he

has already observed this is some

of the law enforcement officers he

has encountered. He further noted

that the current national scrutiny on

the law enforcement response has

complicated the emotional and psychological

reactions and fall out for

the officers impacted by this crisis.

As we spoke, Andy shared that the

funeral services for the victims have

now begun, adding an additional

layer of sadness and remorse to this

tragedy.

It is essential to gain a deeper

understanding of the potential

symptoms indicating the presence

of moral injury. These include, but

are not limited to, social withdrawal

and alienation; aggression;

lack of trust in self or others; loss

of religious faith; loss of trust in

morality or meaning; a sense of

powerlessness or resignation; relationship

issues; depression; anxiety;

anger; revenge seeking; shame;

guilt; self-loathing; remorse; feelings

of being damaged, worthless,

helpless; nightmares; flashbacks;

intrusive recollections; sense of loss

of identity or role; reduced empathy

or wanting to interact with others;

impairment in social, personal and

occupational functioning; increase

in substance use; and suicidal ideation.

In addition, there is a great

deal of overlap between moral

injury and posttraumatic stress

disorder (PTSD). Both begin with

an event that is often life threatening

or harmful to self or others.

Guilt and shame are core features

of moral injury and are also symptoms

of PTSD. The betrayal and loss

of trust that could be experienced

with moral injury are also common

features of PTSD.

What can be done to assist in

healing from moral injury? While

treatments for moral injury are

still in development, there has

been some success through the

use of cognitive behavioral therapy

emphasizing forgiveness and

self-compassion to reduce anxiety

and depressive symptoms for officers.

The same treatment has also

fostered post-traumatic growth. In

addition, practices like meditation,

mindfulness, resilience skills, exercise,

and healthy eating are helpful,

but they often do not address the

root cause of moral injury. Most importantly,

moving away from avoidance

and speaking openly about

one’s experience is often the first

step of moving beyond moral injury.

Those with a moral injury should

reach out to a trusted individual

who will not judge their experience.

This could be a family member,

close friend, support group of those

with similar experiences, a religious

or spiritual leader, or a therapist.

This outside perspective can help

validate the person’s feelings and

provide a more forgiving outlook.

Awareness of the risks of moral

injury among those in law enforcement

can encourage preventive

actions and highlight the need for

timely support. Moral injury in law

enforcement is a growing issue that

clearly requires more research and

examination. For more information

on this issue, I encourage you to

refer to the following article: Papazoglou,

Konstantinos et al. “The

Role of Moral Injury in PTSD Among

Law Enforcement Officers: A Brief

Report.” Frontiers in psychology

vol. 11 310. 4 Mar. 2020, doi:10.3389/

fpsyg.2020.00310

To all the law enforcement officers,

first responders, the Uvalde

community, and the families of

the victims, we at the BLUES Police

Magazine send our thoughts and

prayers for comfort and guidance

during this very difficult journey.

100 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 101


ADS BACK IN THE DAY

102 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 103


ADS BACK IN THE DAY

104 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 105


THERE ARE NO WORDS

parting shots...

... pardon our humor

106 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 107

The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 107

106 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE


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Katy Police Department Get Info Telecommunicator 07/26/2022 - 5pm

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Hurst Police Department Get Info Police Dispatcher 07/27/2022 - 5pm

Sugar Land, the “Sweetest City in Texas,” is one of the state’s most diverse, progressive, and

responsive municipal organizations and one of the best places to live, do business, work, and

visit. Located 20 miles southwest of downtown Houston, Sugar Land boasts some of the

nation’s best master-planned communities, parks, trails, and world-class medical facilities.

Additionally, Sugar Land consistently ranks among the most beautiful and safest cities in the

nation.

Reporting to the Assistant City Manager, and with the support of 199 FTEs (174 sworn officers),

and two (2) Assistant Chiefs, the Chief is responsible and accountable for the development,

implementation, and continuous improvement of all SLPD goals, objectives, policies,

procedures, and priorities of the department.

Sugar Land seeks a collaborative, visionary, law enforcement executive who possesses

excellent people skills. This member of the City’s leadership team will offer strong critical

thinking skills, supported by a record of building and maintaining solid relations in the

community. The successful candidate will develop and maintain credibility, trust, and respect

internally with employees throughout the organization and externally with officials, community

leaders, citizens, and representatives from other law enforcement agencies at the local, state,

and federal levels.

The ideal candidate will have a Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice, Police Science, Public

Administration, Business Administration, or a closely related field. The candidate should have at

least ten (10) years of professional experience, of which five (5) years must have been as the

assistant or deputy chief in an agency similar to the SLPD (or a larger community). A valid

Texas Commission on Law Enforcement (TCOLE) Advanced or Master Law Enforcement

Officer Certification or a comparable certification from another state (must be able to obtain

TCOLE certification within 6 months) and Possession of a valid Texas driver’s license (must

obtain a Texas driver’s license within 2 months of employment) is required. A Master’s degree

and graduation from a command leadership program such as the FBI National Academy,

Southern Police Institute, Senior Management Institute for Police, LEMIT’s Leadership

Command College, or a similar program desired, but not required

The City of Sugar Land offers a comprehensive total rewards package that includes a base

salary in the $150,000 – $175,000 range, depending on qualifications and experience.

We invite qualified professionals to click on the link below to review the desired traits, attributes,

characteristics, qualifications, and apply at

https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/bakertilly/jobs/3606223/chief-of-police-sugarland-texas.

Application review begins on Friday, July 22, 2022. For more information about

this outstanding career opportunity contact edward.williams@bakertilly.com or call (214) 842-

6478.

For more information about the City of Sugar Land, please visit https://www.sugarlandtx.gov/

The City of Sugar Land is an Equal Opportunity Employer

110 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 111


EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS

• Paid Vacation

• Sick Leave

• Paid Holidays

• Personal Days

• Compensatory Days

• Certification Pay

ALDINE ISD POLICE DEPT.

now accepting applications for

Full-Time Police Officers

MUST HOLD A CURRENT TCOLE

PEACE OFFICE CERTIFICATE

Salary starting at $50,000

with no experience

TO APPLY VISIT

WWW.ALDINEISD.ORG

OR

Contact the Personnel

Department at

281-985-7571

OR

Contact Sergeant R. Hall at

281-442-4923

HIRING PROCESS

• Physical Agility Test

• Written Exam

• Oral Board Panel Interview

• Complete Personal History Statement

• Psychological Evaluation

• Medical Examination

• Interview with the Chief of Police

112 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 113


BECOME A BAYTOWN

PATROL OFFICER!

STARTING PAY:

$67,320/YEAR

$1,500 SIGNING

INCENTIVE!

SALARY

(YEARLY)

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

PAID LEAVE

Probationary Patrol Officer $67,320

5 Year Patrol Officer $81,073

9 Year Patrol Officer $93,694

Annual salary increases up to a max of

$93,694 with longevity pay

Modified Lateral Pay Scale for Peace

Officers from time at immediately

preceding Law Enforcement Agency

CERTIFICATION PAY

Intermediate PO Certification $92.08

Advanced PO Certification $157.08

Master's PO Certification $212.33

RELOCATION

(MONTHLY)

Health Insurance

Dental Insurance

Vision Insurance

Life Insurance

Employee Wellness Center

Training and Fitness Facility

Retirement Plan (7% Mandatory with a

2:1 match; 20 year retirement)

457 Deferred Compensation Plan

Tuition Assistance and Academy Tuition

Reimbursement

City Vehicle Program

Uniforms/Equipment Provided with

Annual Allowances

15 Vacation days accrued per year

(civil Service Status)

10 City Holidays per year

1 Personal day per year

15 Sick days accrued per year

15 days of Military Leave per year

EDUCATION PAY

Associates $50

Bachelors $100

Master $125

SPECIALTY/ SKILL PAY

(MONTHLY)

(MONTHLY)

Relocation Expenses Reimbursed

Bilingual in Spanish $50

WWW.BPDCAREERS.ORG 281-420-5354 281-420-6660

114 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 115

For additional information please scan the QR code to go to our recruiting website!


EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS

• Paid Vacation

• Sick Leave

• Paid Holidays

• Personal Days

• Compensatory Days

• Certification Pay

ALDINE ISD POLICE DEPT.

now accepting applications for:

Dispatcher

Salary starting at $32,690,

no experience required.

TO APPLY VISIT

WWW.ALDINEISD.ORG

OR

Contact the Personnel

Department at

281-985-7571

OR

Contact Sergeant R. Hall at

281-442-4923

HIRING PROCESS

• Oral Board Panel Interview

• Complete Personal History Statement

• Psychological Evaluation

• Medical Examination

• Interview with the Chief of Police

116 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 117


BEDFORD POLICE DEPARTMENT

WE'RE

HIRING!

AND

RECRUIT

POLICE

LATERAL

Cuero Police Department

OFFICERS

Requirements

Be eligible for certification from TCOLE (Texas

Commission on Law Enforcement). (Please refer to Texas

Administrative Code Title 37 Chapter 217.1 for clarification.)

Must be 21 or older (at the time of certification)

Must have a valid Texas Driver’s License (or ability to

obtain)

30 hours college credit from an accredited college (college

requirement waived if certified peace officer OR two years

active duty military experience with an honorable

discharge)

Incentives

Step

*College education pay for Associates Degree and above

*TCOLE certification level pay

*Foreign language pay

*Tattoo and facial hair friendly

Police Salary

Police Recruit (No certification) - $58,242

Police Recruit (TCOLE-certified) - $61,155

Police Officer - $64,351- $80,257

Hourly

Annual

1 $30.93 $64,351

2 $32.09 $66,765

3 $33.30 $69,268

4 $34.55 $71,865

5 $35.84 $74,560

6 $37.19 $77,356

7 $38.58 $80,257

Eligible lateral applicants will be placed on the Step Plan

based on their years of experience as a full time Police

Officer at a paid Police Department.

Now Hiring for Patrol Officer Position

Department Benefits

13 Paid Holidays

2 Weeks Paid Vacation

Certification Pay

100% Insurance Paid for Employees

Retirement 2 to 1 match (20yr Retirement)

FSA for Employees

Longevity Pay

Equipment & Uniforms Provided Including Duty Weapon w/ Red Dot Sight

Take Home Vehicle Within City Limits

10 Hour Work Shifts

Membership Paid to Local Gym

Department Provided Training

Off-duty Security Opportunities

Cell Phone Stipend

Starting Pay Depends on Qualifications

For more info and to apply online, visit:

us:

Contact

pd.recruiting@bedfordtx.gov

2121 L. Don Dodson Dr.

Bedford, TX 76021

118 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The www.bedfordpolice.com

BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 119

https://bedfordtx.gov/503/Join-BPD

Requirements: Must be TCOLE Certified or currently enrolled in an accredited Police

Academy and pass a background investigation.

Email TCOLE Personal History Statement to sellis@cityofcuero.com


DEER PARK POLICE

DEPARTMENT

Deer Park, Texas

WE ARE HIRING

www.deerparktx.gov

Police Officer

Dispatcher

Public Safety Attendant - Jailer

Animal Control Officer

Part time Crossing Guard

Officer Sam Jammas 281-930-2121 or sjammas@deerparktx.org

120 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 121


Forney ISD

Police Department

NOW

HIRING

Police Officers

Description

School-based police officers work

with school administrators, security

staff, and faculty to ensure the safety

and well-being of students at various

campuses. This officer works as the

main security arm of a school.

Experience

SBLE Experience preferred

Demonstrate the ability to

teach & engage with youth

Requirements

U.S. Citizen

Accredited High School Diploma

or equivalent

Valid Texas Peace Officer License

Valid Texas Driver's License

Two or more years of college or

advanced training preferred

Positions starting

at $29.89/hr

Retention Stipends

Clothing Allowance

Health/Childcare Incentive

Paid Training

Lateral Entry

APPLY ONLINE TODAY!

www.forneyisd.net

122 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 123


MANVEL POLICE DEPARTMENT

Patrol Officer

The City of Manvel Police Department is looking to find qualified candidates to fill the ranks of the patrol division.

The City of Manvel is a rapidly growing and diverse community. The current population is estimated at a little over 16000 and is located in the

northern part of Brazoria County along the State Highway 288 corridor approximately 4 miles South of the City of Houston.

The Manvel Police Department has a competitive pay structure for cities of the same size. Salary is based on experience and certification levels.

• The department currently has 32 sworn positions.

• 18 officers currently in patrol with 8 positions added in this fiscal budget year.

• Patrol Salary: $53,704.56 to $68,031.84. Salary is based off experience and certification.

• Certification pay

• 12-hour shifts / shifts rotate every four months. (Modified Dupont Schedule)

• Retirement through TMRS - 7% contribution with a 2:1 match

• Vested after 5 years with the city

• Employee health coverage paid 100% by the city, additional for family

• Health care for employee and eligible dependents through Prime Health Care.

• Personal Time off – Vacation and Holiday accruals

• Paid sick time

Minimum Requirements:

• High school diploma or GED

• Valid Texas Driver’s License with good driving record

• TCOLE certified OR currently enrolled in Academy program

• Preference for LE experience

Hiring Process Includes:

• Written test*

• Physical test *

• Oral board interview*

• Thorough background investigation

• Modified Field Training Program for experienced officers

• One-year probationary period

For more information you can contact The City of Manvel Police Department at 281-489-1212 or email, rcarrlacy@manvelpd.org

WE ARE

HIRING!

BENEFITS

• Free basic Medical, Dental and Vision insurance for

employee

• Free basic Life insurance

• Long Term Disability (LTD)

• Affordable Medical, Dental and Vision benefits for

eligible family members

• Flexible Spending Accounts

• 10 paid holidays per year

• Generous Paid Time Off (PTO) including 10 vacation

days and 13 sick days per year accrued biweekly

RETIREMENT

• Harris County matches your investment at 225%

• 7% of your salary is invested pre-tax in your

retirement account

• Retirement Vesting after 8 years

• Eligible upon earning 75 points (age+years of service)

SALARY SCALE

INCENTIVE PAY

CLASSIFICATION SERVICE HOURLY ANNUAL

DEPUTY I 0-47 $25.22 $52,458

DEPUTY II 48-83 $26.99 $56,139

DEPUTY III 84-119 $28.59 $59,467

DEPUTY IV 120-155 $30.03 $62,462

DEPUTY V 156-191 $31.52 $65,562

LATERAL DEPUTY

REQUIREMENTS

• Must be a licensed Peace Officer by the Texas Commission on Law

Enforcement (TCOLE) in good standing

• Must be currently employed as a first responder Peace Officer

(any break in service will be discussed on a case-by-case basis)

• Must have a minimum of 12 months of consecutive experience as

a first responder Peace Officer at any one agency

• Must successfully pass the Physical Abilities Test (PAT) obstacle

course

• Must pass a thorough background investigation (Criminal

background check, fingerprinting, personal interview, etc.) as

required by TCOLE

• Must pass a physical and psychological evaluation as required by

TCOLE

• Valid Driver’s License (TX by start date)

• Eyesight must be correctable to 20/20, normal color and

peripheral vision

• Correctable normal audible range in both ears

• Firearms qualification

For additional information contact Harris County Sheriff’s Office Recruitment Unit: (713) 877-5250

TO APPLY

124 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE

Bilingual Program $1,800

The BLUES

Harris

POLICE

County

MAGAZINE 125

Receive up to fourteen (14) years of credit for time served! (Restrictions apply)

@HCSOTexas

SCAN THIS CODE

Sheriff’s Office

TCOLE CERTIFICATION

ANNUAL

Intermediate $1,560

Advanced $3,420

Master $6,000

EDUCATION

ANNUAL

Associate Degree $1,320

Bachelor’s Degree $3,180

Master/Doctorate $4,500

HCSOTexas HCSOTexas @HCSOTexas


GALVESTON

COUNTY

SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Seeking Individuals Who Are Interested in a Rewarding Career in Corrections

Begin Your Career Today!

GALVESTON COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE ESTABLISHMENT OF ELIGIBILITY

Position: Corrections Deputy I

Bureau/Division: Corrections/Jail

Title/Rank: Corrections Deputy/Deputy I

Reports to: Sergeant - Corrections

Starting Salary: $47,715.20

JOB RESPONSIBILITIES

Maintains the security of the facility by conducting security checks, settling disputes, and performing cell searches and

inspections; conducts outside perimeter checks.

Preparation and proper completion in the documentation of inmate records.

Issues inmate meals, clothing, linens, and personal items.

Supervise inmate programs (recreational, legal, health care, visitation and religious services)

Prepares reports on jail and inmate activities, enforce inmate handbook rules.

Supervises inmates performing such assignments as cleaning and maintaining the jail facility and continuously observe

locations and activities of inmates.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

High School / GED Certificate and must be at least 18 years of age.

Must be a U.S. Citizen and resident of the contiguous United States for a period of time sufficient to conduct a

background investigation.

Must be able to work days, nights, weekends, holidays and mandatory shifts when needed.

Must be able to work during natural disasters and or under declarations.

Must possess a valid Texas driver's license and an acceptable driving record as determined by the Galveston County

Sheriff's Office in effect at the time of application.

Must have favorable employment history. All information given regarding past employment will be thoroughly checked

Must have a stable credit history.

Must possess good computer skills and demonstrate comprehensive reading and comprehension skills.

No conviction above a Class B Misdemeanor or a Class B misdemeanor within the last 10 years nor have been on or

currently on court-ordered community supervision or probation for any criminal offense and no Family Violence

convictions of any level.

Applicant must pass all phases of the required testing.

Must be eligible for licensing by the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement (TCOLE) for the position applied for, if not

presently licensed.

TO APPLY

An applicant interested in any of GCSO position shall first download, complete and return

the Application Packet, per the instructions on the downloadable form.

The Application Packet can be found at SHERIFF.GALVESTONCOUNTYTX.GOV

LATERAL DEPUTY

JOIN US

VISIT SHERIFF.GALVESTONCOUNTYTX.GOV TO APPLY!

126 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 409.763.7585 : SO.EMPLOYMENT@GALVESTONCOUNTYTX.GOV

The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 127

The Galveston County Sheriff’s Office is an Equal Opportunity Employer

CONTACT US


Now Hiring

OFFICERS

TCOLE Certified Peace Officers

Our fast-growing City shows a trending decrease in crimes based

on four offenses from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting.

Benefits

Hutto ranked one of the

safest cities in Texas.

Retirement

2-to-1 City match with TMRS

Take-home Patrol Car

For officers living within 25 miles

Top-of-the-line Equipment

and Technology

Beards and Tattoos Allowed

Additional Pay

+

+

Starting Salary

$61K to $65K*

Annual Leave Accruals

12 paid holidays, 80 hrs vacation, 96 hrs sick leave

Multiple Positions Available

A wide variety of units and assignments available

Education Pay up to $175/month

Specialty/Certification up to $260/month

To learn more or apply, visit or scan

https://linktr.ee/huttopd

Questions? Email: PDrecruiting@huttotx.gov

Sign On Bonus!

$2,500

128 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 129

* Or more depending on experience


Memorial Villages Police Department

Bunker Hill • Piney Point• Hunters Creek

Police Officer

EOE/M/F/D

5+ Years Patrol Experience Required

The Memorial Villages Police Department (Located on the West Side of Houston) currently

looking for experienced officers who are self- motivated, innovative, and enthusiastic about

community policing.

Starting Salary Range

Effective Jan 2023

Hiring Bonus $1500

Night Shift Differential $3600

ECA $1300

Basic Peace Officer

Starting $83,459

Hiring Bonus $1500

Night Shift Differential $3600

Master Peace Officer

ECA $1300

Bi-Lingual 2.5% of base pay

College up to $3000 (Masters)

Up to $94,164

Healthcare Insurance, DHMO Dental, Vision – 100% paid for employee, 75% Paid for

spouse/dependents.

Paid long-term disability and life insurance for employee, with additional life insurance

available for spouse/dependents.

Health Savings Account with departmental contributions up to $4200 annually

TMRS Retirement 2 to 1 match, 7% Employee ,14% Employer Contribution, 20 Year Retirement

457 Plan with employer contribution of 2.5% of annual salary

Tuition reimbursement

Longevity Pay up to a max of $2400 annually at 10 years of service.

ECA (Emergency Care Assistant) $1300 Annually, training provided to each employee.

12 hour shifts with every other Friday, Saturday, and Sunday off.

To learn more or apply, visit our website at www.mvpdtx.org

Or contact Sgt. Owens 713-365-3711 or lowens@mvpdtx.org

Or Commander E. Jones 713-365-3706 ejones@mvpdtx.org

11981 Memorial Dr. Houston, Texas 77024

130 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 131


132 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 133


MAKE A

DIFFERENCE

IN YOUR

COMMUNITY

We are looking for outstanding individuals to

join our team! As a Pearland Police Officer your

mission will be to prevent crime and disorder, build

partnerships within the community, and positively

impact the quality of life for all our residents.

CITY OF PEARLAND, TEXAS

• Competitive Salary • Outstanding Training

• Career Advancement • Exceptional Benefits

The City of Pearland is one of the fastest growing

communities within the region. Pearland is located

approximately 20 minutes south of Downtown Houston

and the current population is approximately 130,000

residents.

JOIN OUR TEAM

HIRING POLICE OFFICERS AND CADETS

$5,000 Hiring Incentive for T.C.O.L.E Certified Police

Officers who qualify with at least 2 years of experience.

TEST DATE:

SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 8:30 A.M.

Register by: April 12.

Pearland Recreation Center & Natatorium

4141 Bailey Road, Pearland, TX 77584.

Doors

WATCH

Open: 7:15 a.m.

FOR

No admittance

UPCOMING

after 7:45 a.m.

Candidates must park in the north parking lot.

TEST DATES IN 2022

SOCIAL DISTANCING MEASURES WILL APPLY

• Attendance limited to first 150 arrivals

• Mandatory temperature checks

• Masks required, hand sanitizer available

• Candidates seated 6 feet apart

134 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE For additional information and to register for an upcoming The Civil BLUES Service POLICE Exam, MAGAZINE visit 135

pearlandtx.gov/PDCareers


136 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 137


City of Wylie

Police Department

OFFICER SALARY RANGE: HIRING PROCESS: BENEFITS:

Non Certified Police Recruit Pay : $62, 370.00

YEARS OF SERVICE ANNUAL SALARY

1 Year—Step 0 $66, 626.06

2 Years—Step 1 $68, 291.71

3 Years—Step 2 $69, 999.00

4 Years—Step 3 $71, 748.98

5 Years—Step 4 $73, 542.70

6 Years—Step 5 $75, 381.27

7 Years—Step 6 $77, 265.80

8 Years—Step 7 $79, 197.45

9 Years—Step 8 $81, 177.38

10+Years—Step 9 $83, 206.82

ADDITIONAL COMPENSATION:

Certification Pay: Up to $1,800 annually

Field Training Officer Pay: $2, 400 annually

Bilingual Pay: $1 ,200 annually

• Complete and submit a City of Wylie

job application: https://

www.governmentjobs.com/careers/

wylietexas

• Written Exam (exempt for Laterals)

• Physical Agility Test

• Complete and submit a Personal

History Statement

• Oral Board Panel Interview

• Background Investigation

• Police Chief Interview

• Polygraph Examination

• Psychological Evaluation

• Medical Examination

RECRUITING CONTACT:

Wylie Police Department

2000 North Hwy 78

Wylie, TX 75098

Sergeant Mark Johnson

mark.johnson@wylietexas.gov

972-429-8013

• City Paid Medical/Dental/Vision

• Texas Municipal Retirement System

(TMRS) 14% City Contribution

• Paid Time Off (Vacation and Sick Time)

• City Paid Uniforms

• City Paid Training

• Life Insurance and AD&D

• Long Term Disability Insurance

• Employee Assistance Program

• Longevity Pay

• Tuition Reimbursement

• Free Recreation Center Membership

• Deferred Compensation Plan

• Ancillary Benefits Available (Aflac,

Avesis, and More)

Wylie Police Department Mission: Our mission is to impact the quality of life, by providing a professional

level of service that will foster, support, and build relationships with those we serve.

https://www.wylietexas.gov/police.php

138 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 139


STARTING SALARY

$56,160 $57,824 $60,008 $62,400 $64,792 $67,184 $69,680 $72,384 $74,880 $77,480 $80,080

High School Diploma

or G.E.D.

Minimum age of 21

Must hold a valid

Texas Driver’s License

Current valid TCOLE

certification

At Hire

At

6 mos.

end

year 1

end

year 2

end

year 3

end

year 4

end

year 5

end

year 6

end

year 7

end

year 8

end

year 9

GET STARTED

LOCATED 5 MILES WEST OF

DOWNTOWN AUSTIN

$3,000

140 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE 141


142 The BLUES POLICE MAGAZINE

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