Views
5 years ago

writers in prison committee report - PEN Canada

writers in prison committee report - PEN Canada

DAWIT ISAAK ethiopia

DAWIT ISAAK ethiopia “We don’t release him. We don’t take [him] to trial. We know how to deal with him and others like him and we have our own ways of dealing with that.” ERITREAN PRESIDENT ISALAS AFEWORKI dawit isaak is one of a group of independent journalists to have disappeared into the Eritrean prison system after a government crackdown in 2001. They were imprisoned without charge, and subject to harsh treatment, including torture. Nine of them were adopted as honorary members by PEN Canada. Four of those are believed to have died in prison. Isaak was born in October 1964 in what was at the time part of Ethiopia. To escape the violence of the Eritrean war of independence he went to Sweden in 1987, where he gained dual Swedish-Eritrean citizenship. He returned to his homeland in 1991, when Eritrea gained de facto independence, and founded the country’s first independent newspaper setit, and worked as a reporter for the publication. In 1998 a border dispute between Eritrea and Ethiopia sparked a fresh round of violence and Isaak again sought refuge in Sweden, this time settling his wife and children there. The conflict had provoked a great deal of criticism of the Eritrean government and in 2001, an open letter signed by fifteen government ministers calling for democratic 2000s reform was delivered to the government. The letter (along with general commentary) was covered in the independent Eritrean media including setit. The government response was to arrest those who signed the letter, and those who published it. In November that year the local Swedish consul held a brief meeting with Isaak in jail. Later, in April 2002, the Committee to Protect Journalists reported that Isaak had been hospitalized suffering from injuries sustained through torture. In November 2005 he was released from prison, but hopes that he would be allowed to return to Sweden were dashed when he was re-arrested two days later. Dawit Isaak remains in prison. In February 2009 it was reported that he was seriously ill. Isaak’s case has attracted a great deal of attention in Sweden, since he is a citizen of that country. In an interview with Swedish television last year, Eritreatn president Isalas Afeworki was asked about his whereabouts. “I don’t know,” he said. “I don’t even care where he is or what he is doing. He did a big mistake.” PEN CANADA 39

Handbook for Writers in Prison - PEN American Center
PEN Canada Annual Report 2007
Annual Report 2007 - Women's Affairs Technical Committee
Report of the ad hoc Committee on the Review of Chapter 9 and ...
22nd GENERAL REPORT OF THE CPT - European Committee for ...
Occupation - International Committee of the Red Cross
International Markets 2009 report - Telefilm Canada
Friendship Committee Leverkusen – Lukajange Annual Report 2008
Corporal Punishment Report Outline - Redress
membership committee report - PEN Canada
PEN Canada Annual Report 2011
Writers in Prison Committee chair's notebook 4 - PEN International
International PEN Writers in Prison Committee half-year ... - Pen-Kurd
Writers in Prison Committee chair's notebook 3 - PEN International
Writers in Prison Committee chair's notebook 1 - PEN International
CANADA IN AFGHANISTAN Report of the Standing Committee on ...
PEN Canada Annual Report 2004
PEN Canada Annual Report 2013
English PEN Readers & Writers Training Seminar
"PENS Report" of the APA - Stanford Prison Experiment
CCAU Report backgrounder - Writers Guild of Canada
Prison Service - European Committee for the Prevention of Torture
Cork Prison Visiting Committee Annual Report 2005 (PDF – 9KB)
Prison Voices II - The John Howard Society of Canada
Download Testimony - Senate Foreign Relations Committee
The Right to Health in Prisons - Swiss Human Rights Book
Report of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination ...
Select Committee on the Increase in Prisoner Population Final Report
Limerick Prison Visiting Committee Annual Report 2006 - The ...
program report - Saskatchewan Writers' Guild