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THURSDAY, OCTOBER <strong>12</strong>, <strong>2023</strong><br />

SPORTS<br />

Doris Lemngole’s ‘improbable’ journey<br />

VOLUME CXXX | ISSUE IV<br />

<strong>The</strong>odore Fernandez<br />

Staff Writer<br />

If you had told crosscountry<br />

runner Doris<br />

Lemngole three years<br />

ago that she would be a<br />

two-time SEC Freshman<br />

of the Week destined for<br />

NCAA and Olympic glory,<br />

she would have started<br />

laughing.<br />

<strong>The</strong> concept is just<br />

so improbable. She was<br />

an 18-year-old living in<br />

Kapenguria, Kenya, with<br />

no clue how her life would<br />

pan out.<br />

But then she started<br />

running. And she realized<br />

she was good at it. Really<br />

good.<br />

“I started running in<br />

high school,” Lemngole<br />

said. “I liked running. And<br />

I was fast. Very fast. <strong>The</strong>n I<br />

went to camps. We trained<br />

at these camps during<br />

school breaks. And then<br />

I graduated in 2021 and I<br />

went to camp in Iten.”<br />

Iten, Kenya, is one of<br />

the most significant places<br />

in the history of running.<br />

It’s where Colm O’Connell,<br />

“the godfather of Kenyan<br />

running,” settled down in<br />

1976, leaving his home in<br />

SPORTS<br />

Tommy Camp<br />

Contributing Writer<br />

With less than two<br />

weeks until the RGK<br />

Tide Tipoff, the men’s<br />

and women’s wheelchair<br />

basketball teams are ready for<br />

their <strong>2023</strong>-2024 campaign<br />

to begin.<br />

Both teams are defending<br />

national champions for<br />

the men’s and women’s<br />

leagues and look to keep<br />

the program’s well-known<br />

winning culture going for this<br />

year’s season.<br />

“<strong>The</strong> ultimate goal is to<br />

win a national championship<br />

again this year. That’s the<br />

big one. Also, to just play our<br />

best and live up to the Bama<br />

standard,” freshman Mary<br />

McLendon said.<br />

One reason that Alabama<br />

stays so far ahead of the<br />

Ireland to become one of<br />

the greatest trainers of<br />

all time.<br />

He has coached 25<br />

world champions and<br />

countless Olympians. And<br />

he has also ensured that<br />

Iten is the place that any<br />

Kenyan with any chance<br />

of becoming a big-time<br />

runner will be sent<br />

to train.<br />

So that’s where<br />

Lemngole went. She ran<br />

there for over a year<br />

in preparation for her<br />

upcoming NCAA career.<br />

She started competing in<br />

the Diamond League, an<br />

elite series of track and<br />

field races and events.<br />

She even placed fifth in<br />

the Kip Keino Classic in<br />

Nairobi back in February,<br />

earning herself $<strong>12</strong>50 in<br />

prize money (this is not an<br />

NCAA violation, as bylaws<br />

allow runners to earn<br />

money in Diamond<br />

League events.)<br />

But this year it was<br />

time to move on. She<br />

signed with the <strong>Crimson</strong><br />

Tide on July 6 to the<br />

excitement of all of<br />

UA wheelchair basketball teams look to repeat as national champions<br />

competition with its 20<br />

national championships<br />

across all adapted athletics<br />

sports is its facility. Stran-<br />

Hardin Arena is the biggest<br />

facility in the world dedicated<br />

to adapted athletes.<br />

It is one of the many<br />

reasons incoming freshmen<br />

like McLendon and Gabriel<br />

Taylor chose to bring their<br />

talents to Tuscaloosa.<br />

State-of-the-art facilities,<br />

including weight training,<br />

are essential when picking a<br />

college to play for, especially<br />

in a sport that requires as<br />

much upper-body strength as<br />

wheelchair basketball does.<br />

“Majority of our workouts<br />

focus on shoulders, arms and<br />

chest so that we can get the<br />

wheels going fast and get the<br />

ball in the hoop,” Taylor said.<br />

With these facilities, the<br />

program can use them as<br />

Alabama cross-country runner Doris Lemngole participating in a race at the Joe Piane Invitational on Sept. 29, <strong>2023</strong>. Courtesy of UA Athletics<br />

her future coaches and<br />

teammates.<br />

“We knew she was<br />

something special coming<br />

in,” assistant coach Nick<br />

Stenuf said.<br />

Lemngole’s first race<br />

came in the Southern<br />

Showcase back in<br />

September. To say that<br />

she dominated would be<br />

an understatement. She<br />

finished first in the 5K<br />

with a time of 16:<strong>12</strong>.10,<br />

a full 30 seconds ahead<br />

of second place. In fact,<br />

the gap between second<br />

place and her teammate<br />

McKenzie Hogue, who<br />

finished 17th, was closer<br />

than the gap between first<br />

and second.<br />

<strong>The</strong> performance<br />

earned Lemngole her first<br />

SEC Freshman of the<br />

Week award.<br />

And how did she<br />

follow that up? By going<br />

to South Bend, Indiana,<br />

and winning the women’s<br />

blue 5K at the Joe Piane<br />

Invitational, beating out<br />

North Carolina State<br />

senior Kelsey Chmiel by<br />

10 seconds to secure her<br />

second career win in as<br />

many races.<br />

leverage when recruiting<br />

players to come to <strong>The</strong><br />

University of Alabama instead<br />

of other schools. Alabama<br />

can get cream-of-the-crop<br />

players and bring in high<br />

school national champions,<br />

like McLendon and Taylor,<br />

and keep the winning culture<br />

going by bringing in winners.<br />

Both the men’s and<br />

women’s teams return a<br />

majority of their players from<br />

their national championship<br />

runs the season before. One of<br />

the returning players, junior<br />

Eric Francis, is excited for his<br />

new leadership role on<br />

the team.<br />

“This year, I want to be a<br />

good team leader and bring<br />

up the younger guys. We<br />

want to play as a team and<br />

play as a brotherhood and<br />

win UA another national<br />

championship,” Francis said.<br />

“To be honest, she’s still<br />

raw talent,” Stenuf said.<br />

“What she’s doing right<br />

now, she’s just scraping<br />

the surface of what she’s<br />

capable of. I don’t think<br />

she’s anywhere near her<br />

full potential.”<br />

That is a scary thought<br />

for opposing runners<br />

everywhere. Rarely do<br />

freshmen come into a<br />

program and have the kind<br />

of immediate impact that<br />

Lemngole has had.<br />

“She takes every bit<br />

of coaching advice and<br />

adapts to it,” Stenuf said.<br />

“That’s what will help<br />

her get to that next level.<br />

And she will. You look at<br />

her talent-wise and workethic-wise,<br />

and it’s clear<br />

that she’ll not only be one<br />

of the best NCAA runners,<br />

but she’ll also make a<br />

mark on the world stage.”<br />

And there is no event<br />

in sports that signifies<br />

“world stage” more than<br />

the Olympics.<br />

“That is my goal,”<br />

Lemngole said. “I want to<br />

run for Kenya.”<br />

Her coach once again<br />

backed her up.<br />

“I know the Olympics<br />

are on her mind. And<br />

Alabama’s winning culture<br />

is not just because of the<br />

players or the facility, but<br />

also the coaching staff the<br />

program has put together.<br />

Both head coach Ford<br />

Burttram and assistant coach<br />

Michael Auprince played<br />

their collegiate wheelchair<br />

basketball careers for<br />

Alabama before becoming<br />

coaches.<br />

Burttram and other<br />

Australians on the team at<br />

the time recruited Auprince,<br />

who is from Australia, to<br />

Alabama and Auprince went<br />

on to play overseas afterward.<br />

Auprince returned to the<br />

United States, heard about an<br />

open coaching position with<br />

UA Adapted Athletics, and<br />

took the job.<br />

“When the previous<br />

assistant coach left, I got<br />

a call from the guys here,<br />

I think that 100% is a<br />

realistic goal for her to<br />

pursue, and we’re going to<br />

help her get there,”<br />

Stenuf said.<br />

At the end of the<br />

day, the Olympics are<br />

very far away. And in<br />

the meantime, there is<br />

business to attend to<br />

in Tuscaloosa.<br />

“I want to win. I want<br />

to be a champion here,”<br />

Lemngole said when<br />

asked about her goals at<br />

Alabama.<br />

And her teammates are<br />

right behind her.<br />

“Her smile is super<br />

contagious,” junior Macy<br />

Schelp said. “She’s really<br />

had a positive impact on<br />

this team. We all love her<br />

and we love seeing her<br />

succeed.”<br />

<strong>The</strong> sky is the limit<br />

for Lemngole.<br />

“Her work ethic and<br />

her character match her<br />

talent. She’s the kind<br />

of person that anybody<br />

would be blessed to meet<br />

and get to know,” Stenuf<br />

said. “I’m really excited to<br />

continue working with her<br />

and see what she’s capable<br />

of, not only as a runner<br />

but also as a person.”<br />

and they knew I wanted to<br />

coach and that I knew the<br />

system they were going to be<br />

running. Now I get paid to do<br />

something I love,” Auprince<br />

said.<br />

Burttram and Auprince<br />

both bring experiences to the<br />

Alabama Adapted Athletics<br />

program they can spread to<br />

their players, turning them<br />

into role models for the team.<br />

“Right now, I look up to<br />

Coach Auprince the most<br />

because he has played<br />

internationally for years so<br />

he just knows more about the<br />

game,” Taylor said.<br />

After the RGK Tide Tipoff<br />

scrimmages on Oct. 13, the<br />

<strong>Crimson</strong> Tide hosts the ABC<br />

Medical Classic at Stran-<br />

Hardin Arena with the<br />

women playing a game each<br />

day Oct. 27-28 and the men<br />

playing two games on Oct. 28.<br />

Take classes at Shelton State as a Transient Student.<br />

Visit sheltonstate.edu to apply and register!<br />

INSIDE NEWS 2A SPORTS 5A<br />

CULTURE 2B<br />

OPINIONS 4B


2A<br />

news<br />

How Reading Allies is helping literacy in elementary students<br />

Makayla Maxwell<br />

Race and Identity<br />

Reporter<br />

EDITORIAL STAFF<br />

Editor-in-Chief<br />

Managing Editor<br />

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and Inclusion Chairperson<br />

Chief Copy Editor<br />

Assistant Copy Editors<br />

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Assistant News Editors<br />

Culture Editor<br />

Assistant Culture Editor<br />

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Assistant Sports Editor<br />

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Assistant Photo Editor<br />

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<strong>The</strong> <strong>Crimson</strong> Wh is the community newspaper of <strong>The</strong> University of Alabama. <strong>The</strong> <strong>Crimson</strong><br />

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All material contained herein, except advertising or where indicated otherwise, is Copyright<br />

© <strong>2023</strong> by <strong>The</strong> <strong>Crimson</strong> <strong>White</strong> and protected under the “Work Made for Hire” and “Periodical<br />

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without the expressed, written permission of <strong>The</strong> <strong>Crimson</strong> <strong>White</strong>.<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>Crimson</strong> <strong>White</strong>, Copyright © <strong>2023</strong><br />

Reading Allies is a<br />

nonprofit literacy<br />

program developed to<br />

help children reach gradeappropriate<br />

reading<br />

levels. Through oneon-one<br />

individualized<br />

tutoring, the program<br />

aims to help first, second<br />

and third grade students<br />

through community-based<br />

teaching.<br />

Claire Stebbins, codirector<br />

of Reading Allies,<br />

explains why this program<br />

is so important to young<br />

students.<br />

“<strong>The</strong>re’s a ton of<br />

research and data that<br />

says why reading on<br />

grade level by the end of<br />

third grade is so critical,”<br />

Stebbins said. “One of<br />

these being that students<br />

who are not reading on<br />

grade-level by the end of<br />

third grade are four more<br />

times likely to drop out of<br />

high school.”<br />

Since beginning the<br />

organization in 2017,<br />

Stebbins has seen a lot<br />

of growth. It started with<br />

15 kids, and now there<br />

are over 350 elementary<br />

students in the program.<br />

“It was a collaboration<br />

of the Rotary Club of<br />

Tuscaloosa, the Honors<br />

College and just a few<br />

really engaged civic<br />

leaders that asked, What<br />

would happen if we took<br />

our lowest, struggling<br />

readers and individualized<br />

lessons for them?”<br />

Stebbins said. “We really<br />

took it and started just as<br />

an informal process where<br />

the Rotary Club provided<br />

the initial funding, and we<br />

Ashlee Woods<br />

editor@thecrimsonwhite.com<br />

Carson Lott<br />

managingeditor@thecrimsonwhite.com<br />

Ronni Rowan<br />

engagement@thecrimsonwhite.com<br />

Jeffrey Kelly<br />

dei@thecrimsonwhite.com<br />

Jack Maurer<br />

Sarah Clifton<br />

Cassie Montgomery<br />

Victor Hagan<br />

letters@thecrimsonwhite.com<br />

Ethan Henry<br />

newsdesk@thecrimsonwhite.com<br />

Maven Navarro<br />

Jacob Ritondo<br />

Savannah Ichikawa<br />

culture@thecrimsonwhite.com<br />

Gabriella Puccio-Johnson<br />

Abby McCreary<br />

sports@thecrimsonwhite.com<br />

Bella Martina<br />

Natalie Teat<br />

Riley Thompson<br />

Natalie Marburger<br />

Shelby West<br />

Augustus Barnette<br />

worked with 15 children<br />

at Martin Luther King<br />

Elementary and it was just<br />

a wild success.”<br />

Since then, Reading<br />

Allies has expanded<br />

to different schools<br />

across Tuscaloosa, and<br />

has amassed over 600<br />

volunteers.<br />

According to Dalis<br />

Lampkins, a doctoral<br />

student studying political<br />

science, volunteers first<br />

help the kids with reading<br />

activities, then a few<br />

writing exercises to help<br />

them reach the required<br />

literacy level.<br />

“Volunteers work with<br />

the same student every<br />

week, so that they have<br />

that familiarity, and they<br />

are always really excited<br />

when we come in the<br />

morning and get to spend<br />

some time with them,”<br />

Lampkins said.<br />

Lampkins has<br />

volunteered with Reading<br />

Allies for three years<br />

now and has loved the<br />

experience so far.<br />

“It’s been really<br />

wonderful for me because,<br />

being a Ph.D. student,<br />

I’m obviously very busy,”<br />

Lampkins said. “So, I like<br />

being able to take that<br />

time each week to go<br />

where I’m not working<br />

on my dissertation or<br />

anything on campus.<br />

I’m just at Southview<br />

[Elementary School]<br />

spending time with a<br />

student, working with<br />

them on their reading<br />

and writing.”<br />

According to both<br />

Stebbins and Lampkins,<br />

Letter from the editor:<br />

When will guns become less<br />

important than students’ lives?<br />

Ashlee Woods<br />

Editor-in-Chief<br />

This fall, colleges across<br />

the country will partake<br />

in homecoming festivities.<br />

Students, parents and<br />

alumni come together to<br />

celebrate each other and life<br />

at the college they attend.<br />

But, for some,<br />

homecoming looked vastly<br />

different.<br />

On the night of Oct. 8,<br />

two students were shot<br />

at Bowie State University<br />

in Prince George’s County,<br />

Maryland, in the midst of<br />

the university’s homecoming<br />

celebration.<br />

This happened five days<br />

after five students were shot<br />

45 minutes away at Morgan<br />

State University on Oct. 3.<br />

Following the shooting, all<br />

homecoming activities were<br />

canceled.<br />

“This was such a<br />

senseless act of violence<br />

perpetrated on our<br />

community after what<br />

was a family-filled and fun<br />

evening of celebrating the<br />

pageantry and beauty of<br />

our students,” Morgan State<br />

University president David K.<br />

Wilson wrote in a statement<br />

following the shooting. “But<br />

Morgan is a strong family<br />

and we will march on with<br />

determination to keep<br />

moving on.”<br />

A time meant for bonding<br />

a community further<br />

together was instead spent<br />

in mourning. Once again,<br />

lives were permanently<br />

changed. A campus was<br />

changed, and once again,<br />

there’s little hope that true<br />

Courtesy of Reading Allies<br />

the time requirement<br />

for all volunteers is one<br />

30-minute session a week.<br />

<strong>The</strong> organization allows<br />

volunteers to choose the<br />

days and time that they<br />

wish to attend, but most<br />

volunteers end up wanting<br />

to do more than one<br />

session.<br />

“A lot of volunteers are<br />

returners, people that I<br />

have been with the entire<br />

time,” Lampkins said. “And<br />

even my people who didn’t<br />

return to Southview, it’s<br />

because it didn’t fit their<br />

schedule. I know that they<br />

are at other schools.”<br />

Programs such as<br />

Reading Allies are growing<br />

in importance since the<br />

Alabama Literacy Act went<br />

into effect earlier this<br />

year. Proposed in 2019, the<br />

act went into effect at the<br />

beginning of the <strong>2023</strong>-24<br />

school year.<br />

change will come.<br />

While these events aren’t<br />

connected, they underscore<br />

a deeply rooted problem<br />

in the U.S. — a lack of gun<br />

control.<br />

Mass shootings have,<br />

unfortunately, become a<br />

microcosm of American<br />

society. A shooting occurs,<br />

people mourn, there are<br />

cries for gun reform, gun<br />

reform doesn’t come and the<br />

cycle restarts.<br />

A constant, vicious cycle<br />

that only continues to<br />

happen because people in<br />

public office in the U.S. have<br />

made this one thing clear:<br />

Guns will always be more<br />

important than people's<br />

lives.<br />

Some leaders in the U.S.<br />

have made efforts to unite<br />

a campus community after<br />

a shooting has occurred.<br />

In Florida, governor Ron<br />

DeSantis directed $1.1<br />

million toward campus<br />

security at Edward Waters<br />

University and funds<br />

for the victims’ families<br />

following a shooting at a<br />

local Dollar General. <strong>The</strong><br />

Florida Department of Law<br />

Enforcement started visiting<br />

the campus, monitoring<br />

social media for threats and<br />

working with the university<br />

to assess its security.<br />

Following the shooting at<br />

University of North Carolina,<br />

Chapel Hill, North Carolina<br />

Gov. Roy Cooper stated that<br />

the state would provide<br />

support to the institution<br />

and Chancellor Kevin<br />

Guskiewicz would offer<br />

counseling services for the<br />

campus.<br />

According to an article<br />

from WSFA <strong>12</strong>, between<br />

10,000 and <strong>12</strong>,000 third<br />

grade students are at<br />

risk of being held back in<br />

Alabama due to this new<br />

law. In the article, Alabama<br />

State Superintendent<br />

Eric Mackey says that the<br />

current score needed to<br />

advance to the fourth<br />

grade is a 435, and he<br />

expects the Alabama State<br />

Department of Education<br />

board will raise it next<br />

year.<br />

“That will mean by the<br />

end of the school year, a<br />

student that’s not reading<br />

at a certain level will have<br />

to repeat the third grade<br />

until they meet that level,”<br />

Stebbins said.<br />

According to Stebbins,<br />

the ultimate goal is<br />

to expand outside of<br />

Alabama, and hopefully<br />

grow to be a national<br />

<strong>The</strong>se steps are decent<br />

measures, but in the grand<br />

scheme of life in the U.S.,<br />

these measures address the<br />

symptoms of a problem, not<br />

the root cause.<br />

While attacks on higher<br />

education campuses are<br />

somewhat rare, hard to<br />

define and not tracked, that<br />

doesn’t mean they don’t<br />

happen. Furthermore, it<br />

shouldn’t mean that we<br />

should continue to sit idly<br />

by while people's lives are<br />

constantly ripped away<br />

needlessly.<br />

Until this country truly<br />

and effectively addresses the<br />

gun control problem it has,<br />

it tells its citizens that the<br />

access to guns and weapons<br />

of mass destruction are<br />

always more important than<br />

their safety. This country<br />

is telling students across<br />

the country that they don’t<br />

deserve the peace of mind<br />

at school they so desperately<br />

want.<br />

My heart aches for the<br />

victims of the Morgan State<br />

and Bowie State shootings.<br />

Those campuses will never<br />

be the same after this. It’s<br />

times like this where we<br />

feel the most helpless,<br />

wondering if there is<br />

anything we as citizens can<br />

truly do.<br />

But it shouldn’t have to be<br />

up to us.<br />

<strong>The</strong> leaders we elect<br />

need to step in and ensure a<br />

safe and protected learning<br />

environment. Otherwise, the<br />

violent cycle will continue to<br />

permeate all aspects of our<br />

lives.<br />

nonprofit organization.<br />

“<strong>The</strong> goal in Tuscaloosa<br />

city and county has always<br />

been to serve every single<br />

Title I school in those<br />

school districts,” Stebbins<br />

said. “And, by next fall, we<br />

will have accomplished<br />

that goal faster than we<br />

ever thought possible. ...<br />

We’ve created trainings to<br />

go to other communities<br />

around the state of<br />

Alabama and outside<br />

as well to show that we<br />

have a proven model. So<br />

hopefully one day there<br />

will be a Reading Allies<br />

Birmingham, or a Reading<br />

Allies Montgomery.”<br />

Stebbins encourages<br />

anyone who wishes to<br />

volunteer to visit the<br />

Reading Allies website and<br />

fill out the volunteer form.


news<br />

UA works on finding a space for first-generation college students<br />

3A<br />

CW / Shelby West<br />

Ava Morthland<br />

Staff Writer<br />

University of Alabama<br />

officials have made a<br />

concerted effort to make<br />

the University a more<br />

welcoming institution for<br />

first-generation college<br />

students.<br />

Despite this progress,<br />

however, some students<br />

still see room for<br />

improvement.<br />

At the University,<br />

first-generation college<br />

students are defined<br />

as any students whose<br />

parents did not graduate<br />

with a four-year degree<br />

in the United States. This<br />

includes students whose<br />

parents graduated with<br />

a two-year degree and<br />

students whose parents<br />

graduated outside of the<br />

United States.<br />

Legacy Scholars is<br />

a program for firstgeneration<br />

UA students.<br />

Randi Hamm is the firstgeneration<br />

program<br />

manager and has been<br />

in her position for a<br />

year now.<br />

I have a vision and dreams<br />

for the first-gen community<br />

at UA, and it’s been<br />

beautiful to be able to start<br />

to implement them.<br />

Randi Hamm<br />

First-Generation<br />

Program Manager<br />

“We find that firstgen<br />

students need a<br />

community in their first<br />

year so that they find the<br />

sense of belonging here at<br />

UA as quickly as possible,<br />

which is a basic need<br />

for all college students,”<br />

Hamm said. “We look at it<br />

as our first-gen students<br />

are creating a new legacy<br />

for their family and for<br />

anyone who’s going to<br />

follow behind them.”<br />

According to Hamm,<br />

first-generation students<br />

make up nearly 25% of<br />

the UA undergraduate<br />

population.<br />

Legacy Scholars holds<br />

community dinners,<br />

scholarship and FAFSA<br />

workshops, and, for the<br />

first time this year, a week<br />

of celebration for firstyear<br />

students.<br />

Hamm said that it<br />

has been a challenge<br />

to share the program’s<br />

message and resources<br />

with sophomores and<br />

upperclassmen because<br />

before this year Legacy<br />

Scholars hadn’t existed in<br />

the same capacity.<br />

Hamm said that they<br />

were able to meet over<br />

500 students during Bama<br />

Bound this summer and<br />

that Legacy Scholars has<br />

evolved its event itinerary.<br />

Along with Legacy<br />

Scholars, there is also a<br />

dedicated space on the<br />

third floor of Hewson<br />

Hall for first-generation<br />

students.<br />

For its efforts to<br />

support first-generation<br />

students, the University<br />

was recognized as a Firstgen<br />

Forward Institution<br />

by the Center for Firstgeneration<br />

Student<br />

Success in 2022.<br />

“<strong>The</strong> First-Gen<br />

Forward designation is<br />

a national honor that<br />

recognizes institutions<br />

of higher education<br />

who have demonstrated<br />

a commitment to<br />

improving experiences<br />

and advancing outcomes<br />

of first-gen college<br />

students,” Monica Watts,<br />

associate vice president of<br />

communications for the<br />

University, wrote in<br />

an email.<br />

However, firstgeneration<br />

students still<br />

have concerns about their<br />

place on campus.<br />

Applying to college and<br />

finding resources<br />

For some students,<br />

knowing about the college<br />

application process and<br />

the resources available to<br />

them once they arrived on<br />

campus was a challenge.<br />

Adriana Cadavid, a<br />

sophomore from Colorado<br />

Springs, is a member of<br />

Legacy Scholars who came<br />

to the University for its<br />

political science program.<br />

While applying to<br />

college, Cadavid relied on<br />

her counselors, peers and<br />

teachers for help because<br />

her parents didn’t<br />

attend college.<br />

Similarly, Meghan<br />

Kellem, a freshman<br />

majoring in business<br />

management, said that<br />

she was unsure of where<br />

to start when applying<br />

to college as a firstgeneration<br />

student and<br />

was unaware of the full<br />

extent of the opportunities<br />

that were offered at<br />

the University.<br />

Clarissa Ramos, a<br />

freshman majoring in<br />

Spanish and member of<br />

Legacy Scholars, said that<br />

while her time at Legacy<br />

Scholars thus far has been<br />

helpful, she wasn’t told<br />

about many opportunities<br />

for first-generation<br />

students<br />

on campus.<br />

Ramos also stated that<br />

she feels that most of the<br />

support first-gen students<br />

need but don’t get is<br />

support before setting foot<br />

on campus.<br />

“Making more<br />

prospective students<br />

aware of these<br />

opportunities and<br />

programs to help them<br />

thrive on campus can<br />

encourage them to see<br />

themselves here,” Watts<br />

wrote.<br />

Fourie van Rooyen is<br />

a sophomore majoring in<br />

aerospace engineering.<br />

He went to high school in<br />

South Africa and said he<br />

applied to the University<br />

after a couple of friends<br />

recommended it.<br />

Rooyen said that during<br />

Bama Bound, scholarships<br />

for international and<br />

first-generation college<br />

students weren’t talked<br />

about.<br />

Similarly, Kellem said<br />

she isn’t aware of any<br />

scholarships available to<br />

her now.<br />

For first-gen students,<br />

there are six dedicated<br />

scholarships which the<br />

University describes as<br />

“highly competitive.”<br />

Resources for first-gen<br />

students can be found on<br />

the Capstone Center for<br />

Student Success website.<br />

Hamm said that<br />

through Legacy Scholars,<br />

she tries to connect<br />

students to existing<br />

opportunities and<br />

resources that are in their<br />

specific colleges.<br />

Even when some firstgeneration<br />

students’<br />

families are made aware of<br />

scholarship opportunities,<br />

not all of them may be<br />

able to understand them.<br />

Cadavid said that<br />

information about<br />

scholarships is offered<br />

only in English, but that it<br />

would be helpful for it to<br />

be in other languages.<br />

Hamm said that Legacy<br />

Scholars does not have<br />

any formal programming<br />

in Spanish but has several<br />

students who would be<br />

“more than happy” to<br />

help any student and<br />

their family who need<br />

communication<br />

in Spanish.<br />

“I think there’s always<br />

some more things that we<br />

could change because I’m<br />

not in any first-generation<br />

organizations on campus,”<br />

Kellem said. “I don’t<br />

receive as many of those<br />

resources and so I do<br />

think they should be more<br />

widely accessible to people<br />

who aren’t necessarily in<br />

those clubs or groups.”<br />

Support and community<br />

on campus<br />

Finding out how to fit<br />

in on campus was the<br />

biggest challenge, Ramos<br />

said.<br />

Some first-generation<br />

students have said that<br />

although their parents can<br />

offer a general sense of<br />

support, it is not the same<br />

support that students with<br />

college graduates in their<br />

family can receive.<br />

Adam Brooks is an<br />

associate professor of<br />

communication studies<br />

at the University and<br />

is a mentor for Legacy<br />

Scholars.<br />

“Sometimes first-gen<br />

students think that they<br />

have to solve all the<br />

problems themselves<br />

because they oftentimes<br />

don’t have that<br />

First-generation<br />

students make up<br />

— Randi Hamm<br />

25%<br />

of UA<br />

undergraduates.<br />

supplemental resource by<br />

their families to be able<br />

to call to say, ‘Hey, this is<br />

whats happening,’” Brooks<br />

said.<br />

Hamm emphasized that<br />

the program is optional,<br />

but that she encourages<br />

students to join if they<br />

recognize its benefits.<br />

Hamm said that her goal<br />

is to develop a community<br />

of support that students<br />

can turn to and feel safe<br />

asking questions and<br />

expressing concerns.<br />

“I have a vision and<br />

dreams for the first-gen<br />

community at UA, and<br />

it’s been beautiful to be<br />

able to start to implement<br />

them,” Hamm said.<br />

Brooks said being<br />

a mentor for Legacy<br />

Scholars has a personal<br />

significance to him.<br />

“As a first-generation<br />

college student myself,<br />

who’s now a professor, it<br />

is a wonderful full-circle<br />

moment to be able to kind<br />

of be the support system<br />

that maybe I wish I would<br />

have had when I was a<br />

student,” Brooks said.


4A<br />

news<br />

NPHC to take a step back in time for annual step show<br />

Makayla Maxwell<br />

Race and Identity<br />

Reporter<br />

<strong>The</strong> UA National Pan-<br />

Hellenic Council will<br />

host its annual step show on<br />

Friday, Oct. 13, at Coleman<br />

Coliseum.<br />

<strong>The</strong> show will feature<br />

performances from the<br />

eight NPHC organizations<br />

on campus; this year, the<br />

show is titled “A Step Back in<br />

Time,” and the performances<br />

will draw inspiration from<br />

’90s and 2000s sitcoms.<br />

According to a description<br />

on the University’s ticket<br />

office website, the step show<br />

will feature performances<br />

with “series of intricate<br />

dance steps, vibrant music<br />

selections, and elaborate<br />

show themes.” <strong>The</strong> show will<br />

also include performances<br />

from other on-campus<br />

organizations.<br />

TJ Rodgers, a senior<br />

majoring in news media,<br />

serves as the vice president<br />

of NPHC and the director<br />

of this year’s step show.<br />

Rodgers said he hopes<br />

everyone who attends gets a<br />

sense of nostalgia from the<br />

sitcoms being highlighted.<br />

“This year, the name of<br />

the show is ‘A Step Back in<br />

Time,’ and we plan to pay<br />

homage to the Black sitcoms<br />

we grew up on,” Rodgers<br />

said. “<strong>The</strong> fun part about<br />

that is the crowd is able to<br />

figure out which one they’re<br />

[the performers] doing and<br />

get excited. I feel like it’s<br />

going to be a very fun<br />

atmosphere.”<br />

Rodgers said his role this<br />

year means a lot to him<br />

because he’s following in the<br />

footsteps of his sister, who<br />

directed the step show<br />

in 2021.<br />

“Last year was so much<br />

fun, and the year before that,<br />

when my sister did it, was<br />

amazing too,” Rodgers said.<br />

“She did it her senior year,<br />

and I just want to put on a<br />

great show as well, but also<br />

one-up her a couple<br />

of times.”<br />

Rodgers, a member of<br />

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity,<br />

Inc., said he hopes audiences<br />

will appreciate the hard<br />

work of the performers who<br />

he says have been practicing<br />

their routines since<br />

Zeta Phi Beta performs during the 2022 step show. Courtesy of the UA NPHC<br />

school started.<br />

In a joint statement,<br />

the members of Zeta Phi<br />

Beta Sorority, Inc., last<br />

year’s winners among the<br />

sororities, expressed their<br />

excitement to perform<br />

this year.<br />

“We’ll forever cherish<br />

that unforgettable moment<br />

when our names were called<br />

on stage,” the statement<br />

read. “It was the realization<br />

that not only had we<br />

seen something special in<br />

ourselves, but others did as<br />

well. We can’t wait to show<br />

everyone our hard work<br />

again this year!”<br />

Some students are excited<br />

to see how organizations will<br />

interpret this year’s theme<br />

following last year’s<br />

step show.<br />

“This is something I<br />

look forward to every year,”<br />

Sydney Williams, a senior<br />

majoring in psychology,<br />

said. “Every year it keeps<br />

getting better and better, and<br />

it’s always fun to see how<br />

the different organizations<br />

include the theme.”<br />

Williams said she’s<br />

excited to see all of the work<br />

put into the performances,<br />

especially from her friends<br />

who are performing.<br />

“<strong>The</strong>y’re spending hours<br />

trying to put on a good show<br />

for everybody, and have been<br />

for months now, so I hope<br />

everyone who goes to the<br />

show will appreciate that,”<br />

Williams said.<br />

<strong>The</strong> show will start at<br />

7:30 p.m.


news + sports<br />

5A<br />

New sports-themed resort coming to Tuscaloosa<br />

Abby McCreary<br />

Sports Editor<br />

Josie Wahl<br />

Contributing Writer<br />

Sports Illustrated and<br />

Travel + Leisure have<br />

joined forces to start a chain<br />

of sport-themed resorts in<br />

college towns and decided<br />

that Tuscaloosa will be their<br />

starting point.<br />

News of the resort, which<br />

is planned to be built in 2025,<br />

was met by differing reactions<br />

from the student body and<br />

Tuscaloosa community.<br />

“It’s a mixed-use<br />

development: It’s condos,<br />

it’s a hotel, it’s dining, it’s<br />

restaurants, which is on the<br />

forefront of where most new<br />

venues and new athletic<br />

venues are going,” Carla<br />

Blakey, the undergraduate<br />

program coordinator of sport<br />

management, said.<br />

According to the Travel +<br />

Leisure website, many of the<br />

resort’s features, including<br />

the vacation ownership<br />

clubs, were designed based<br />

on previous Sports Illustrated<br />

content.<br />

A variety of entertainment<br />

options will be available<br />

to Tuscaloosans, such as a<br />

fitness center, an indoor area<br />

for concerts and parties, an<br />

upscale club ideal for alumni<br />

gatherings, and a spa.<br />

A Hall of Champions will<br />

also be included in the resort,<br />

commemorating the legacy<br />

and heritage of local leaders<br />

and legends through an<br />

integration of iconic Sports<br />

Illustrated content, according<br />

to Steven Goldsmith, a<br />

spokesperson for<br />

Travel + Leisure.<br />

“<strong>The</strong> Sports Illustrated<br />

brand will drive engagement<br />

A rendering of the new Sports Illustrated Resort slated to be built in Tuscaloosa. Courtesy of Sports Illustrated<br />

and interest with loyal sports<br />

travelers looking to have<br />

a long-term relationship<br />

with their teams and<br />

communities,” Goldsmith<br />

said. “This resort is going to<br />

make Tuscaloosa an even<br />

more desirable destination.”<br />

According to Kimberly<br />

Severt, the director of the<br />

UA hospitality and sport<br />

management programs,<br />

experiences have been shown<br />

to drive purchasing behaviors,<br />

and this resort wants to<br />

capitalize on sporting<br />

experiences.<br />

“If people are coming here<br />

for game day, having another<br />

immersive experience<br />

only adds to that overall<br />

experience,” Blakey said. “If<br />

anything, when you look<br />

at the college fanbase, it’s<br />

unique. <strong>The</strong>re’s just a different<br />

level of passion when it<br />

comes to college fans.”<br />

Tuscaloosa is able to<br />

depend on the passion of the<br />

Alabama fanbase since, on<br />

average, each home football<br />

game in 2022 brought in $20<br />

million to $25 million.<br />

Not only is the resort<br />

expected to have an economic<br />

impact, but some expect it to<br />

have an educational one<br />

as well.<br />

“<strong>The</strong>y’ve reached out<br />

to me wanting to get our<br />

hospitality students and<br />

sport management students,”<br />

Severt said. “It’s going to be a<br />

great place for our students to<br />

do internships.”<br />

However, not all students<br />

are excited about the<br />

new resort.<br />

TJ Rodgers, a senior news<br />

media major, said the resort<br />

will cause more issues<br />

for students.<br />

“You have to think about<br />

the students,” Rodgers said.<br />

“<strong>The</strong>re’s barely any parking<br />

and there’s barely any places<br />

to live.”<br />

Allison Sanchez, a junior<br />

news media major, agreed<br />

that Tuscaloosa is running out<br />

of room.<br />

“It’s going to be a big new<br />

attraction,” Sanchez said.<br />

“It’s going to bring a lot more<br />

people, and we don’t have<br />

space for more.”<br />

Jacob Pickle, a senior<br />

majoring in economics and<br />

the president of <strong>Crimson</strong><br />

Chaos, sees the attraction<br />

as a positive. Pickle said the<br />

resort has potential to drive<br />

interest for Alabama sports<br />

like basketball.<br />

“<strong>The</strong>re’s a lot more traffic,<br />

and I think the resort will help<br />

with that too,” Pickle said. “I<br />

think it’s going to be awesome<br />

to have the resort as another<br />

way to boost up the city<br />

of Tuscaloosa.”<br />

<strong>The</strong> resort is planned to be<br />

located on Rice Mine Road.<br />

At this time the pricing for<br />

rooms is unavailable.<br />

“It's only fitting for Sports<br />

Illustrated to launch their<br />

OnCampus resort concept<br />

in #Tuscaloosa, home to @<br />

AlabamaFTBL and one of<br />

the best college game day<br />

experiences in the country,”<br />

Mayor Walt Maddox wrote in<br />

a post on X, the social media<br />

platform formerly known as<br />

Twitter. “I appreciate the work<br />

of Councilor Crow and the<br />

City team to bring this to life.”<br />

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sports<br />

Power of Pink games empower women fighting breast cancer<br />

1B<br />

Bella Martina<br />

Assistant Sports Editor<br />

Former Alabama<br />

gymnastics head coach<br />

Sarah Patterson never<br />

battled breast cancer, but<br />

she felt strongly for those<br />

who were affected and<br />

didn’t have the means to<br />

treat themselves.<br />

As a consistent helping<br />

hand in the Tuscaloosa<br />

community, Patterson<br />

inspired her athletes<br />

and fellow colleagues to<br />

give back to those less<br />

fortunate as well.<br />

“I feel that if we can<br />

instill that quality, that<br />

characteristic of giving<br />

in our athletes when<br />

they are 18 to 22, and<br />

they have the sense of<br />

accomplishment that<br />

working in the community<br />

gives,” Patterson said in<br />

an interview with the<br />

Medalist Club, the booster<br />

organization for Alabama<br />

gymnastics. “<strong>The</strong>n when<br />

they graduate and go out<br />

into the world, they will<br />

have gained so much<br />

from that experience that<br />

they will always be giving<br />

people.”<br />

So, the Power of Pink<br />

initiative was born.<br />

Every year, several<br />

Alabama athletic<br />

programs, such as soccer,<br />

volleyball, gymnastics and<br />

women’s basketball, host<br />

Power of Pink games and<br />

meets to show support for<br />

breast cancer victims<br />

and survivors.<br />

Power of Pink history<br />

Patterson hosted the<br />

first Power of Pink meet<br />

in February 2005 against<br />

Auburn. She dedicated<br />

the meet to breast cancer<br />

awareness while asking<br />

attendees to “Think Pink,<br />

Wear Pink.”<br />

<strong>The</strong> stands of Coleman<br />

Coliseum were blushed<br />

as fans showed up and<br />

showed out to the meet<br />

in their various shades of<br />

pink. That season, many<br />

of the top gymnastics<br />

programs in the nation<br />

followed Alabama’s lead<br />

and hosted events of<br />

their own.<br />

<strong>The</strong>n, in 2007, the<br />

cause spread outside of<br />

gymnastics to include<br />

women’s basketball.<br />

<strong>The</strong> “Think Pink” week<br />

was introduced by the<br />

Women’s Basketball<br />

Coaches Association<br />

in February to support<br />

breast cancer research<br />

on campuses and in<br />

communities.<br />

Other sports, such as<br />

soccer and volleyball, have<br />

also begun hosting Power<br />

of Pink games during<br />

the month of <strong>October</strong>.<br />

Some schools even have<br />

Members of the Alabama soccer team lift the Iron Bowl of Soccer trophy. CW / Riley Thompson<br />

special pink jerseys for the<br />

athletes to wear, including<br />

Alabama.<br />

<strong>2023</strong>-24 Power of<br />

Pink preview<br />

This year, Alabama<br />

soccer hosted its annual<br />

Power of Pink game on<br />

Thursday, Oct. 4, against<br />

Auburn. <strong>The</strong> <strong>Crimson</strong> Tide<br />

is approaching even more<br />

competitive play with the<br />

progressing season, but<br />

head coach Wes Hart said<br />

this game meant a lot,<br />

not only for the in-state<br />

rivalry, but the cause it<br />

supports as well.<br />

“<strong>The</strong> fact that there’s<br />

a trophy on the line,<br />

the Iron Bowl of soccer,<br />

makes for some energy,”<br />

Hart said before the<br />

game. “And Power of Pink,<br />

our team always gets<br />

really excited about that<br />

game, it’s a special game<br />

raising awareness for<br />

breast cancer. It’s a fun<br />

opportunity to play a great<br />

opponent, a great rival<br />

on a special day. We’re<br />

excited.”<br />

Coaches, athletes and<br />

fans alike look forward to<br />

the games every season,<br />

with each one holding<br />

a different aspect of the<br />

game as their favorite. For<br />

midfielder Macy Clem,<br />

her favorite part of the<br />

Power of Pink games is the<br />

famous pink jerseys.<br />

“I love <strong>October</strong> and the<br />

pink games and being able<br />

to celebrate anyone who<br />

has breast cancer, had<br />

breast cancer, and pink is<br />

my favorite color,” Clem<br />

said.<br />

At last year’s Power of<br />

Pink match for Alabama<br />

volleyball, the <strong>Crimson</strong><br />

Tide faced LSU and walked<br />

away with a three-set<br />

win. Although any SEC<br />

matchup is guaranteed<br />

to draw attention, libero<br />

Victoria Schmer touched<br />

on the game’s alternate<br />

importance.<br />

“It’s a great opportunity<br />

to represent something<br />

bigger than ourselves,”<br />

Schmer said. “It’s a great<br />

way to bring awareness<br />

to the subject and play<br />

for something bigger than<br />

ourselves for one game<br />

out of the year.”<br />

This year, volleyball’s<br />

Power of Pink match<br />

will be played against<br />

Mississippi State on Oct.<br />

27 at 6 p.m. CT.<br />

<strong>The</strong> other Power of<br />

Pink events this <strong>2023</strong>-24<br />

season will be Alabama<br />

gymnastics against<br />

Georgia on Feb. 23, and<br />

women’s basketball, but<br />

the program has not<br />

announced its date yet.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Pink impression<br />

An idea that was born<br />

almost 20 years ago still<br />

impacts countless women<br />

today, and athletes across<br />

the board recognize the<br />

deeper meaning of the<br />

games that honor them.<br />

“It’s valuable to<br />

recognize breast cancer<br />

survivors and people<br />

battling breast cancer<br />

right now, and so I think<br />

just knowing there’s<br />

something more to play<br />

for beyond just the game<br />

is also powerful,” Alabama<br />

soccer defender Marianna<br />

Annest said.<br />

Patterson’s impact<br />

has helped raise over<br />

$2.1 million for the DCH<br />

Breast Cancer Fund,<br />

which has changed the<br />

lives of countless women<br />

in the West Tuscaloosa<br />

community who are<br />

fighting breast cancer.<br />

If you would like to<br />

donate to the Power of<br />

Pink cause, a check can be<br />

mailed to:<br />

DCH Foundation,<br />

809 University Blvd. E.,<br />

Tuscaloosa, AL 35401<br />

<strong>The</strong> DCH Breast Cancer<br />

Fund should be noted<br />

on the memo line of the<br />

check.<br />

Power of Pink Events<br />

Women’s Volleyball vs. Mississippi State<br />

Oct. 27 @ 6 p.m. CT<br />

Gymnastics vs. Georgia<br />

Feb. 23 @ TBA<br />

Women’s Basketball<br />

TBA<br />

Alabama gymnastics team celebrating against Auburn in Coleman Coliseum on Feb. 3, <strong>2023</strong>.<br />

CW / Jennifer Stroud


2B<br />

culture<br />

<strong>The</strong> Divine Nine and the creation of a more inclusive campus<br />

Brandon Smith<br />

Race and Identity<br />

Reporter<br />

Zara Morgan<br />

Contributing Writer<br />

<strong>The</strong> National Pan-Hellenic<br />

Council, also known<br />

as the “Divine Nine,” is a<br />

group of nine historically<br />

Black sororities and<br />

fraternities, eight of which are<br />

represented at the University.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Divine Nine has a<br />

rich history, starting even<br />

before the NPHC’s founding<br />

at Howard University. While<br />

the NPHC was founded in<br />

1930, member organizations<br />

such as Alpha Kappa Alpha<br />

Sorority, Inc. and Alpha Phi<br />

Alpha Fraternity, Inc., were<br />

founded in 1908 and 1906,<br />

respectively. <strong>The</strong> Divine Nine<br />

serves as an agent to raise<br />

“community awareness and<br />

action through educational,<br />

economic and cultural service<br />

activities,” according to the<br />

NPHC website.<br />

<strong>The</strong> founding sororities and<br />

fraternities were Alpha Kappa<br />

Alpha, Delta Sigma <strong>The</strong>ta<br />

Sorority, Inc., Zeta Phi Beta<br />

Sorority, Inc., Kappa Alpha Psi<br />

Fraternity, Inc. and Omega Psi<br />

Phi Fraternity, Inc..<br />

In 1931, two fraternities<br />

were added to the NPHC,<br />

Alpha Phi Alpha and Phi<br />

Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.<br />

In 1937, Sigma Gamma Rho<br />

Sorority, Inc. was added to<br />

the roster and the NPHC was<br />

incorporated under Illinois<br />

state law.<br />

<strong>The</strong> youngest member<br />

of the Divine Nine, Iota Phi<br />

<strong>The</strong>ta Fraternity, Inc. was<br />

added in 1997.<br />

<strong>The</strong> University of Alabama<br />

gained its first chapters of the<br />

Divine Nine in 1974, which<br />

was also the same year that<br />

the majority of the NPHC<br />

sororities and fraternities<br />

began at <strong>The</strong> University.<br />

<strong>The</strong> NPHC starts its year<br />

off with a convocation that<br />

all interested members are<br />

required to attend. From<br />

there, each sorority and<br />

fraternity has its own process<br />

for membership intake during<br />

various times throughout the<br />

school year.<br />

Car’Liz Mims, a senior<br />

majoring in management<br />

information systems and a<br />

member of Zeta Phi Beta, and<br />

Jade McGee, the vice president<br />

of Delta Sigma <strong>The</strong>ta and a<br />

management information<br />

systems major, spoke about<br />

the NPHC’s three pillars:<br />

scholarship, sisterhood and<br />

brotherhood, and service.<br />

“Education is a<br />

requirement to be a part of<br />

the organization,” Mims said.<br />

“Any student should at least<br />

be pursuing a bachelor’s<br />

degree at the bare minimum.”<br />

Mims and McGee<br />

emphasized the importance<br />

of sisterhood and<br />

brotherhood by looking back<br />

at the origins of the NPHC.<br />

<strong>The</strong> organization was created<br />

to unite the Black community<br />

and organize social action as<br />

they faced the “problems of<br />

history,” referring to American<br />

segregation, racism and<br />

gender inequality.<br />

It was because of<br />

brotherhood that the first<br />

Black SGA president was<br />

elected. Cleophus Thomas<br />

was a member of Kappa<br />

Alpha Psi. His election was<br />

made possible by the support<br />

of his fraternity and NPHC<br />

brothers and sisters.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Divine Nine has played<br />

a major role in the Civil Rights<br />

Movement. On the national<br />

level, Alpha Phi Alpha has<br />

notable alumni who helped<br />

change the civil rights<br />

landscape, including Martin<br />

-Fun Environment<br />

-Competitive Pay<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>The</strong>ta Sigma chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. was one of the first Black Greek<br />

organization on campus. CW / Caroline Simmons<br />

Luther King Jr., Andrew Young<br />

and Jesse Owens.<br />

<strong>The</strong> NPHC also has various<br />

programs that promote<br />

higher education within the<br />

Tuscaloosa area.<br />

“We have our ‘Go to<br />

High School, Go to College’<br />

program, which promotes<br />

secondary education and<br />

college education amongst<br />

our communities to younger<br />

children in elementary,<br />

middle and high school,”<br />

Kenneth Kelly, a junior<br />

majoring in news media and<br />

a member of Alpha Phi<br />

Alpha, said.<br />

Another historic tradition<br />

for the Divine Nine<br />

fraternities and sororities<br />

is the annual step show, a<br />

celebration that is at least<br />

40 years old. According to<br />

McGee, the event serves as a<br />

recruiting effort, and students<br />

and alumni are encouraged to<br />

attend. Stepping and strolling<br />

is a traditional art form that<br />

has origins in the African<br />

diaspora.<br />

“It was an art form<br />

amongst the tribes that lived<br />

over in the West African<br />

region, to use their body<br />

to make different types of<br />

sounds and movements to<br />

communicate with each<br />

other,” Kelly said. “That was<br />

one of the various things that<br />

have been passed down from<br />

what survived the Atlantic<br />

Slave Trade, and it has been<br />

passed down throughout<br />

generations of slavery.”<br />

Service is the social action<br />

and philanthropy that NPHC<br />

organizations do to give<br />

back to the local community.<br />

Delta Sigma <strong>The</strong>ta hosts<br />

educational forums in<br />

Tuscaloosa, and members do<br />

service projects for Tuscaloosa<br />

and the surrounding areas.<br />

Every year, the NPHC has a<br />

“give-back” event, usually<br />

a gala to fundraise for the<br />

American Heart Association.<br />

Malea Benjamin, a senior<br />

majoring in political science<br />

and communication studies<br />

and a leadership fellow for<br />

Alpha Kappa Alpha, said<br />

she takes a lot of pride in<br />

being a member of the NPHC<br />

Why you should join our team<br />

-Employee Discount<br />

-Flexible Schedule<br />

and enjoys being in Alpha<br />

Kappa Alpha because of<br />

the educational and service<br />

opportunities that it provides.<br />

Some of the opportunities<br />

that Benjamin has come<br />

across include donating<br />

women’s sanitary products,<br />

educating high schoolers<br />

on voter registration, and<br />

community service at the<br />

Salvation Army.<br />

To Benjamin, having a visible<br />

presence, especially on<br />

sorority row, is an important<br />

part of showing the progress<br />

that the University of<br />

Alabama has made toward<br />

making all students feel seen<br />

and heard.<br />

“Not that it’s as bad as it<br />

used to be, but I still think it’s<br />

important to show how much<br />

things have changed and the<br />

strides that we’re making to<br />

make Black students feel seen<br />

and heard and uplifted, and<br />

to be authentically Black,”<br />

Benjamin said.<br />

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COSTUMES<br />

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Original coupon must be<br />

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with any other ooer.<br />

Expiration 10/24/23<br />

Next to Michaels<br />

659-239-6601


culture<br />

3B<br />

Mercedes-Benz International hosts Oktoberfest 5K in Tuscaloosa<br />

Angel Scales<br />

Contributing Writer<br />

On Oct. 28, Mercedes-<br />

Benz International will<br />

be holding an Oktoberfestthemed<br />

5K race to benefit<br />

the American Cancer<br />

Society. <strong>The</strong> event will<br />

start promptly at 9 a.m. at<br />

Temerson Square and will<br />

last about an hour, ending<br />

back at the Square.<br />

Tanya Cabiness,<br />

a representative for<br />

Mercedes on the board<br />

of the American Cancer<br />

Society, gave a brief<br />

overview of the event.<br />

“<strong>The</strong> American Cancer<br />

Society is very special to<br />

Mercedes-Benz because<br />

cancer affects everyone,<br />

and it can affect you,<br />

affect your family, friends,<br />

loved ones, colleagues,<br />

and probably has, and if<br />

it hasn’t, it probably will,”<br />

Cabiness said. “So, we<br />

feel it’s very important<br />

to be a good steward of<br />

our community, as far as<br />

programs that affect the<br />

community around us.”<br />

Mercedes<br />

works with<br />

several outreach<br />

programs and<br />

nonprofits to<br />

stay involved in<br />

the community.<br />

<strong>The</strong><br />

Oktoberfest 5K<br />

is one of the programs<br />

that the company has<br />

started to get community<br />

involvement in.<br />

This is the biggest<br />

run they’ve done so far,<br />

according to Mercedes-<br />

Benz event director<br />

Carmen Eichhorn. She said<br />

the event generally starts<br />

with the runners meeting<br />

at Temerson Square about<br />

30 minutes before. <strong>The</strong><br />

University of Alabama’s<br />

ROTC program, along with<br />

some singers from the<br />

University, will play the<br />

national anthem before<br />

the bell goes off to signal<br />

the start of the 5K<br />

at 9 a.m.<br />

At the Oktoberfest<br />

celebration following the<br />

run, traditional German<br />

snacks will be served, such<br />

as German sausage and<br />

chocolate-covered fruits,<br />

provided by Peterbrooke<br />

Chocolatier.<br />

Cabiness said there will<br />

be live music before and<br />

after the race.<br />

“Our DJ is Anderson<br />

Brooks; he will be set up in<br />

Courtesy of Mercedes-Benz International<br />

front of Jack Brown’s<br />

Beer and Burger Joint,<br />

getting the crowds excited<br />

and pumped up, ready to<br />

run,” Cabiness said.<br />

After the race,<br />

Oktoberfest will take place<br />

at Druid City Social. <strong>The</strong>re<br />

will be a medal ceremony<br />

for the top runners. Mayor<br />

Walt Maddox will speak,<br />

and a representative from<br />

Mercedes-Benz will tap a<br />

keg to signify the start of<br />

the official Oktoberfest<br />

celebration.<br />

When asked what they<br />

think Oktoberfest is best<br />

known for, Cabiness and<br />

Eichhorn both agreed that<br />

beer is a big part of the<br />

tradition. Eichhorn noted<br />

the cultural impact of<br />

the festival.<br />

“Mercedes employees<br />

that are in the German<br />

culture at a German<br />

company, you hear about<br />

German traditions, you<br />

talk to German colleagues<br />

at work,” Eichhorn said.<br />

“It should be something<br />

for our expats. Or even<br />

American colleagues,<br />

something that everyone<br />

is excited about because<br />

it’s a very German culture<br />

that we push forward even<br />

within an American or a<br />

German company, being in<br />

America trying to combine<br />

various cultures.”<br />

<strong>The</strong> event has several<br />

sponsors, including<br />

Buffalo Rock, Rusken<br />

Packaging Inc., Ingenics<br />

Consulting and Piggly<br />

Wiggly. <strong>The</strong>se companies<br />

are partnered with<br />

Tuscaloosa Tourism<br />

and Sports, which<br />

will be sponsoring the<br />

Oktoberfest festival.<br />

Cabiness and Eichhorn,<br />

along with Molly<br />

Blomeley-Hamby,<br />

a wellness supplier<br />

for Mercedes-Benz, all<br />

expressed why they feel<br />

the cause is important to<br />

the community.<br />

“For me, it’s personal,”<br />

Cabiness said. “I lost<br />

my mother to breast<br />

cancer a little over four<br />

years ago. I just think<br />

it’s really important<br />

for Mercedes because<br />

we want to make sure<br />

that we are connected<br />

to our community and<br />

environment.”<br />

Cabiness said she never<br />

had cancer in her family<br />

prior to her mother’s<br />

diagnosis, and getting that<br />

awareness out, especially<br />

since <strong>October</strong> is breast<br />

cancer awareness month,<br />

is important to her.<br />

“Get your screenings,<br />

get your mammograms,<br />

and do what you need<br />

to do to make sure that<br />

you’re healthy,” Cabiness<br />

said. “Make sure you're<br />

doing things to catch<br />

cancer or symptoms early.<br />

Make sure that you're<br />

taking care of yourself,<br />

and it will be well<br />

worth it.”<br />

Blomeley-Hamby<br />

mentioned the importance<br />

of community and<br />

togetherness.<br />

“I think it’s good to<br />

get us all together, doing<br />

something fun instead<br />

of working and sitting<br />

around and working<br />

on a computer,”<br />

Blomeley-<br />

Hamby said.<br />

<strong>The</strong><br />

Oktoberfest<br />

5K shows that<br />

Mercedes wants<br />

to create bridges<br />

internally<br />

between team<br />

members, the community<br />

and the German culture.<br />

“It also shows that a big<br />

company like Mercedes<br />

focuses on community<br />

outreach programs, and<br />

they encourage team<br />

members to be involved,”<br />

Eichhorn said. “Especially<br />

the fact that our CEO is so<br />

supportive of this, I think<br />

says a lot about working<br />

at Mercedes.”<br />

Cabiness said she<br />

wants everyone to know<br />

that Oktoberfest is open to<br />

families and people of all<br />

ages. <strong>The</strong> event is based<br />

around fun and overall<br />

celebration.<br />

A celebration of Native American history at Moundville<br />

Caroline Simmons<br />

Contributing Photographer<br />

From Oct. 4-7, people gathered at the Moundville<br />

Archaeological Park to partake in the 35th annual Moundville<br />

Native American Festival. Known as one of the largest<br />

celebrations of Native American communities in Alabama,<br />

the four-day event offers attendees the chance to meet Native<br />

American artisans, see traditional dances and listen to stories<br />

and music. <strong>The</strong> festival also featured ways to support local<br />

Native American businesses at the ancient city on the Black<br />

Warrior River.


4B<br />

opinion<br />

<strong>The</strong> garbage in, garbage out of campaign finance<br />

Chance Phillips<br />

Contributing<br />

Columnist<br />

Sen. Robert Menendez,<br />

D-N.J., was indicted Sept.<br />

22 for allegedly pocketing<br />

hundreds of thousands of<br />

dollars in bribes, including<br />

literal bars of gold. However,<br />

those who pay attention to<br />

Alabama politics may have<br />

some trouble figuring out<br />

what exactly Menendez<br />

did wrong.<br />

In Alabama, ever since<br />

Gov. Robert Bentley signed<br />

Senate Bill 445 into law in<br />

2013, corporations are free<br />

to donate as much money<br />

as they want to political<br />

candidates.<br />

Thanks to SB 445, Gov.<br />

Kay Ivey’s reelection<br />

campaign received an<br />

eye-popping $235,000 in<br />

donations from Alabama<br />

Power. That’s almost a<br />

quarter of a million dollars<br />

from the same Alabama<br />

Power that, according to the<br />

American Council for an<br />

Energy-Efficient Economy, is<br />

in contention for the least<br />

efficient utility company in<br />

the country.<br />

In 2018, Alabama Power<br />

was fined $1.25 million<br />

for polluting groundwater.<br />

Five years later, in <strong>2023</strong>,<br />

the Alabama state<br />

government is still trying<br />

to give Alabama Power<br />

a sweetheart deal so the<br />

company doesn’t have to<br />

properly and safely dispose<br />

of their coal ash.<br />

Bentley allowing<br />

corporations to flood<br />

elections with cash<br />

has supercharged this<br />

seemingly quid pro quo<br />

approach to policy making.<br />

Of course, political<br />

campaigns need to raise<br />

money somehow: to pay<br />

for ads, to hire campaign<br />

staff and to host rallies. I’ve<br />

personally donated to more<br />

than a couple candidates<br />

for public office in my home<br />

state of Virginia.<br />

But a system where<br />

corporations, PACs and the<br />

super rich handpick which<br />

candidates have a fighting<br />

chance is both unjust<br />

and undemocratic. When<br />

companies getting lucrative<br />

public contracts donate<br />

thousands upon thousands<br />

of dollars to the campaigns<br />

of the people who approve<br />

those contracts, we need<br />

to be asking some hard<br />

questions.<br />

Here in Tuscaloosa,<br />

every single sitting city<br />

councilor accepts donations<br />

from companies that do<br />

business in Tuscaloosa,<br />

including businesses that<br />

bid for public contracts.<br />

For example, J.T. Harrison<br />

Construction Company<br />

was recently awarded a<br />

$7.3 million contract to<br />

build a new YMCA. J.T.<br />

Harrison Construction and<br />

its founder and president,<br />

Tim Harrison, donated<br />

to the campaigns of City<br />

Councilors Cassius Lanier,<br />

Norman Crow and Raevan<br />

Howard in 2021, as well as<br />

Mayor Walt Maddox.<br />

<strong>The</strong>y might not have<br />

received bars of gold, but<br />

I would sure feel awfully<br />

grateful to anyone who gave<br />

me $500 or $1,000. Councilor<br />

Lanier was absent from<br />

the Sept. <strong>12</strong> City Council<br />

meeting, but neither<br />

Crow nor Howard recused<br />

themselves from the vote to<br />

tentatively award the YMCA<br />

construction contract.<br />

Both voted to give $7.3<br />

million to J.T. Harrison<br />

Construction Company.<br />

Am I saying the<br />

Tuscaloosa City Council<br />

isn’t following Alabama’s<br />

competitive bid law to<br />

the letter? No, I’m not. J.T.<br />

Harrison Construction was<br />

the lowest of five bidders<br />

for the YMCA contract.<br />

But federal government<br />

contractors are expressly<br />

barred from making any<br />

political contributions for<br />

good reason.<br />

Democratic politics don’t<br />

just require the absence<br />

of impropriety. <strong>The</strong>y<br />

require the absence of the<br />

appearance of impropriety.<br />

When Tuscaloosa<br />

residents know real estate<br />

companies donate tens<br />

of thousands of dollars<br />

to the mayor and to City<br />

Council members, they may<br />

start doubting whether<br />

the city government has<br />

purely selfless reasons for<br />

its horrifying inaction on<br />

Tuscaloosa’s housing crisis.<br />

Worst of all, some members<br />

of Tuscaloosa’s current city<br />

council haven’t even tried to<br />

avoid the appearance<br />

of impropriety.<br />

Going into the last week<br />

of May 2021, more than<br />

a month after the runoff<br />

elections, City Councilor<br />

Matthew Wilson’s campaign<br />

had a balance of $0.65.<br />

That week, he received two<br />

donations of $1,250, one<br />

from Pride PAC II and one<br />

from T-Town PAC II. On May<br />

28, Wilson repaid $2,500 in<br />

loans he had made to his<br />

own campaign, leaving the<br />

campaign once again with a<br />

balance of $0.65.<br />

Did anything illegal<br />

happen? No, of course<br />

not. PACs are meant to<br />

give money to campaigns,<br />

Wilson had loaned a<br />

lot of money to his own<br />

campaign, and paying off<br />

debt is a valid campaign<br />

expenditure.<br />

It is also completely<br />

accurate to say that a<br />

month after Wilson was<br />

elected, thousands of<br />

dollars from two PACs run<br />

by Michael Echols ended up<br />

in Wilson’s pockets. Before<br />

the election, Echols’ PACs<br />

had exclusively been giving<br />

money to one of Wilson’s<br />

opponents, Katherine<br />

Waldon, and not to Wilson.<br />

Free from impropriety?<br />

I believe so. Free from the<br />

appearance of impropriety?<br />

Of course not. After all,<br />

donating to a campaign a<br />

month after an election<br />

won’t change which<br />

candidate was elected.<br />

In my opinion, the only<br />

thing it could possibly<br />

change is what the new<br />

city councilor thinks of you<br />

and your business interests.<br />

Politicians can and should<br />

refuse donations that<br />

come with strings or from<br />

unethical sources.<br />

Josh Taylor, the treasurer<br />

for Pride PAC II and T-Town<br />

PAC II, said in an email that<br />

“all contributions to and<br />

expenditures from each<br />

PAC are properly disclosed<br />

and in compliance with the<br />

Alabama Fair Campaign<br />

Practices Act and are public<br />

record available from the<br />

Alabama Secretary of State.”<br />

Wilson did not respond<br />

to <strong>The</strong> <strong>Crimson</strong> <strong>White</strong>’s<br />

requests for comment.<br />

Besides helping<br />

politicians pocket<br />

thousands of dollars from<br />

<strong>The</strong> Tuscaloosa City Hall is located downtown. CW / Jennifer Stroud<br />

wealthy donors, laissezfaire<br />

campaign finance<br />

regulations make it almost<br />

impossible for dissatisfied<br />

voters to enact meaningful<br />

change.<br />

On the rare occasion<br />

that a sitting city councilor<br />

is ousted, voters will find<br />

the same monied interests<br />

backing the new candidate.<br />

Freshman City Councilor<br />

John Faile, dubbed a<br />

“political newcomer” by<br />

Tuscaloosa News, was<br />

supported by the same<br />

PACs and businesses that<br />

bankrolled just about every<br />

other candidate: United<br />

PAC, BIZPAC, Pride PAC II<br />

and Weaver Rentals.<br />

Even though a fair<br />

percentage of donations<br />

in the 2021 City Council<br />

races were from individual<br />

donors, the average<br />

donation from an individual<br />

was $426.91. People able<br />

to donate hundreds of<br />

dollars to a candidate for<br />

City Council simply aren’t<br />

representative of the wider<br />

Tuscaloosa population.<br />

For voters and not<br />

wealthy political donors<br />

to pick Tuscaloosa’s<br />

City Council, we need<br />

campaign finance reform.<br />

But if campaign finance<br />

regulations with real teeth<br />

could even get passed<br />

when Alabama politicians<br />

love their corporate cash<br />

so much, they’d have<br />

to pass scrutiny with a<br />

Supreme Court irrationally<br />

squeamish about public<br />

election financing and limits<br />

on campaign contributions.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Supreme Court<br />

has made it more than<br />

clear in recent years that<br />

it thinks any attempt to<br />

help grassroots candidates<br />

compete with corporate<br />

stooges is unconstitutional,<br />

unless it stops corruption.<br />

At the same time, the<br />

court has been gradually<br />

redefining corruption and<br />

making it easier for venal<br />

public officials to stuff their<br />

pockets, all while justices<br />

treat themselves to free<br />

trips on billionaires’ private<br />

jets and yachts.<br />

Thanks to the Supreme<br />

Court, Seattle, Washington,<br />

and Oakland, California,<br />

have had to pioneer a new<br />

way to help candidates<br />

compete with corporate<br />

cash. Both cities are giving<br />

residents free vouchers to<br />

donate to local political<br />

campaigns. Candidates can<br />

cash in these vouchers to<br />

run campaigns without<br />

begging for donations from<br />

local businesses and PACs.<br />

This is an obviously<br />

flawed solution, but we<br />

desperately need to do<br />

something, anything, about<br />

the campaign finance status<br />

quo. Right now, to fund<br />

a competitive campaign<br />

candidates need tens of<br />

thousands of dollars from<br />

businesses, PACs and<br />

wealthy donors, and voters<br />

are supposed to just naively<br />

assume this won’t affect<br />

their decisions once<br />

in office.<br />

Are the businesses<br />

donating tens of thousands<br />

of dollars to Alabama’s<br />

politicians really just<br />

expressing principled<br />

political preferences? Or do<br />

they want a quid for their<br />

quo, a public contract for<br />

their metaphorical gold<br />

bars, a license to pollute for<br />

their $235,000?<br />

Michael Echols said it<br />

best: “Do people expect<br />

anything in return for<br />

making contributions? If<br />

they don’t, I’m proud of<br />

them.”<br />

Contributors to City Councilors’ Campaigns<br />

in 2021 Election Cycle (by Amount Donated)<br />

Student Media Launch Dates<br />

Alice Magazine<br />

November 9, <strong>2023</strong> @<br />

Monarch Espresso Bar<br />

7 to 9 p.m.<br />

1956 Magazine<br />

November 8, <strong>2023</strong> @<br />

John England Hall<br />

6 to 7:30 p.m.<br />

CW / Chance Phillips


opinion<br />

We need to work to make campus a safe place for free speech<br />

5B<br />

Students from various campus organizations gather on the Quad to protest Matt Walsh’s “What is a Woman” tour event on Oct. 27, 2022. CW Archive<br />

Garrett Marchand<br />

Contributing<br />

Columnist<br />

In an increasingly<br />

polarized country, it<br />

is hard for students not<br />

to feel that the same<br />

polarization plagues us at<br />

<strong>The</strong> University of Alabama.<br />

It seems many of us even<br />

think it is unsafe to share<br />

our opinions, especially in<br />

the classroom.<br />

What is especially<br />

interesting is that much<br />

of this fear seems to come<br />

from a self-perception<br />

that each of us holds a<br />

minority perspective on<br />

any given issue, with<br />

conservative students<br />

seemingly believing that<br />

the campus leans liberal<br />

and liberal students<br />

seemingly believing<br />

that the campus leans<br />

conservative.<br />

This contradiction<br />

causes everyone, on both<br />

the right and the left, to<br />

feel more uncomfortable<br />

sharing their views than<br />

they probably should.<br />

It cannot be ignored,<br />

however, that there is an<br />

issue with free speech<br />

on college campuses,<br />

especially at <strong>The</strong><br />

University of Alabama. <strong>The</strong><br />

2024 College Free Speech<br />

Rankings conducted by the<br />

Foundation for Individual<br />

Rights and Expression and<br />

College Pulse dropped the<br />

University to 154th out of<br />

248 colleges ranked. This<br />

was a drop from 81st in<br />

the 2022-23 report.<br />

This same study also<br />

found that there are about<br />

1.5 liberal students for<br />

every conservative student<br />

at the University. Although<br />

there are more liberal<br />

students overall, the<br />

University ranked 192nd<br />

in tolerance for liberal<br />

speakers and 65th in<br />

tolerance for conservative<br />

speakers.<br />

It seems that while<br />

more people hold liberal<br />

views on campus,<br />

liberal students do not<br />

feel as comfortable as<br />

conservative students in<br />

sharing their opinions.<br />

Those on the right<br />

often believe that<br />

suppression of free speech<br />

affects them in particular<br />

due to the increasing<br />

prevalence of diversity,<br />

equity and inclusion<br />

policies nationwide. With<br />

a University of Alabama<br />

professor citing campuswide<br />

diversity, equity<br />

and inclusion initiatives<br />

as a reason for leaving<br />

the University, this<br />

perceived left-wing push<br />

by administrators on many<br />

campuses has catalyzed<br />

the fear that conservative<br />

students are unsafe to<br />

speak on campus.<br />

While this fear can<br />

be justifiable, the survey<br />

from FIRE shows it is<br />

not solely a conservative<br />

phenomenon, and a fear<br />

of speaking one’s mind<br />

crosses party lines<br />

and perspectives.<br />

<strong>The</strong> survey from<br />

FIRE also found that<br />

Shop Boots,<br />

Jeans, & Hats<br />

at <strong>The</strong> Wharf<br />

in Northport<br />

67% of UA students<br />

are at least “somewhat<br />

uncomfortable” sharing<br />

their views on a<br />

“controversial political<br />

topic during an in-class<br />

discussion.” It found<br />

further that 45% of “very<br />

liberal” students and a<br />

majority of “somewhat<br />

liberal” to “very<br />

conservative” students,<br />

including “moderates,”<br />

share this fear across<br />

campuses nationwide.<br />

Here, we see what<br />

I believe to be a bigger<br />

problem than diversity,<br />

equity and inclusion<br />

policies or a student body<br />

hostile to free speech —<br />

people have a natural<br />

tendency to think they are<br />

in an environment where<br />

it is unsafe to share their<br />

point of view.<br />

Sometimes, this may be<br />

a problem with individual<br />

instructors or classes.<br />

However, it could also be<br />

the case that students<br />

are generally influenced<br />

by what they hear from<br />

the media, their peers<br />

and others who say they<br />

cannot openly share<br />

their views for fear of<br />

retribution.<br />

<strong>The</strong> thought of<br />

polarization seems to have<br />

created an elevated fear<br />

of retribution for sharing<br />

one’s beliefs that, while<br />

present on some level,<br />

appears to be a bigger<br />

problem in our heads than<br />

it is in reality.<br />

It is important to note<br />

that this perception is<br />

cross-political: Moderate,<br />

conservative and liberal<br />

students are all afraid of<br />

sharing their views. A poll<br />

by Intelligent found that<br />

around 50% of moderate,<br />

liberal and conservative<br />

students “refrain from<br />

speaking up about<br />

political or social issues<br />

in the classroom out of<br />

concern for potential<br />

consequences.”<br />

When students across<br />

the political spectrum<br />

feel fear of speaking their<br />

minds in classrooms, there<br />

is an issue beyond one<br />

side suppressing the other.<br />

This trend is what<br />

many political scientists<br />

call the Spiral of Silence.<br />

In general terms, this<br />

theory suggests that<br />

people fear social<br />

isolation and thus have<br />

an exaggerated fear<br />

of going against what<br />

they perceive to be the<br />

prevailing opinion in a<br />

group environment, thus<br />

causing them to feel that<br />

their perspective is in the<br />

minority and therefore not<br />

share it, preventing others<br />

who may feel the same<br />

from sharing their views.<br />

This can present itself<br />

in settings where the<br />

person who speaks first<br />

sets the trend for how<br />

a discussion goes with<br />

others who speak after<br />

choosing to echo similar<br />

points of view and others<br />

opting to remain silent as<br />

to their actual perspective.<br />

Simply put, there<br />

is a severe problem on<br />

college campuses: People<br />

are afraid to share their<br />

opinions on any issue that<br />

can be perceived<br />

as controversial.<br />

However, this problem<br />

may be exacerbated by an<br />

ever-increasing belief that<br />

the state of free speech on<br />

campus is worse than it is.<br />

<strong>The</strong> only way to break out<br />

of this cycle is for students<br />

to be more open about<br />

their thoughts in class and<br />

be willing to take a risk<br />

and stand out against the<br />

perceived group belief.<br />

<strong>The</strong>re is always the<br />

chance that a group or<br />

teacher may lean against<br />

one’s opinion politically,<br />

but that is no reason to<br />

hide one’s own beliefs for<br />

fear of being shut down<br />

for one’s thoughts unless<br />

there is actual evidence<br />

of retaliation.<br />

Ideally, professors need<br />

to be increasingly aware<br />

of any perceived bias on<br />

their part or that of the<br />

group. Instructors must<br />

work overtime to ensure<br />

students feel comfortable<br />

sharing their points of<br />

view no matter where<br />

someone may be on the<br />

political spectrum. Yes,<br />

the problem seems to be<br />

worse than it is.<br />

However, perception is<br />

reality, and that perception<br />

needs to be changed by<br />

strong leadership from<br />

professors who set the<br />

environment in which<br />

their class exists.<br />

This is our water.<br />

Help UA protect it.<br />

Only rain down the drain.<br />

For questions, comments, or concerns<br />

about Storm Water, contact<br />

Environmental Health & Safety<br />

220 Mcfarland Blvd N (205)-752-2075<br />

(205) 348-5905 | ehu.ua.edu | @EHS_UA

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