Bachelor's programmes in Business and Economics | 2009

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Bachelor's programmes in Business and Economics | 2009

Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009

• BSc International Business

• BSc Economics and Business Economics / International Business Economics

• BSc Economics and Business Economics / International Economic Studies

• BSc Economics and Business Economics / Infonomics

• BSc Fiscal Economics

• BSc Econometrics and Operations Research

Language of

instruction:

English


2 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009 1

Contents

Message from the dean 2

Maastricht 3

Maastricht University 4

The Faculty of Economics and Business Administration 6

BSc International Business 17

BSc Economics and Business Economics 21

BSc Economics and Business Economics / International Business Economics 22

BSc Economics and Business Economics / International Economic Studies 24

BSc Economics and Business Economics / Infonomics 26

BSc Fiscal Economics 29

BSc Econometrics and Operations Research 33

Application procedure and deadlines 36

Preparation 38

Financial matters 39

Maastricht University is signatory of the “Code of conduct with respect to

international students in Dutch higher education”. More information about

this code of conduct is available at www.internationalstudy.nl.

All programmes in this brochure are accredited by the Accreditation

Organisation of the Netherlands and Flanders (NVAO). For more information

on NVAO, please visit www.nvao.nl.


Message from the dean Maastricht

You are ambitious. Your goal is to gain qualifications

recognised as the best worldwide. And you want to pursue

your ambition at a top school in a vibrant environment

where motivated students from all over the world benefit

from top-of-class teaching and learning methods. If these

are your goals, then Maastricht University is definitely the

right choice for you. The Faculty of Economics and Business

Administration offers you the chance to learn from the

best: leading authorities in research and education with a

reputation for academic excellence.

There are many features that make Maastricht University a

unique place to live and study. Possibly the most important

is its internationalism: our students come from countries

far and wide; our teaching staff is diverse; our programmes

all have an international focus; we have links to companies

and institutions in other countries; and almost all courses

are taught in English.

Maastricht University is famous for its pioneering learning

methodology. Small tutorial groups and a personal

academic relationship with your teachers ensure that you

get the most out of your learning experience. This applies

whether you are a prospective bachelor’s or master’s

student; of course, we also offer courses at postgraduate,

executive and doctorate level. If you choose to apply to

Maastricht University, we hope your time here will be

challenging and motivating, but also fun.

Our reputation has also been hallmarked by the prestigious

Triple Crown accreditation. The faculty is proud to be one

of a very select group of around 1% of business schools

worldwide to be accredited by the European Foundation

for Management Development (EQUIS), the Association to

Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) and the

Association of MBAs (AMBA).

Last but not least, the city of Maastricht itself offers

you a cosmopolitan place to live, which is steeped in

European history. Beautiful and charming, there really is

no better place to soak up student life and prepare for your

professional career.

On behalf of all the faculty staff, I hope this brochure

provides you with a good starting point for information

about Maastricht, the university, the faculty, our

programmes and the details of our academic offering.

We look forward to welcoming you here.

Prof. Jos Lemmink

Dean of the Faculty of Economics and Business

Administration

International and innovative

Maastricht and its university are truly international.

Located on the River Meuse, we are at the meeting point of

the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany. Maastricht is just

a stone’s throw from cities such as Brussels, Liege, Aachen,

Cologne, and Düsseldorf, while Amsterdam, Paris and

London are all within a couple of hundred kilometres. As

you stroll through its cobbled streets, you’ll hear dozens of

different languages.

Unsurprisingly, our city has become synonymous with

Europe and the European Union, especially following

the signing of the Maastricht Treaty in 1992. Maastricht

University reflects that international orientation. If you

choose to study here, you will come into contact with

students and professors from all over the world. You will

also have the opportunity to intern and gain experience at

European institutions and international businesses.

Although Maastricht’s population of around 120,000 is

relatively small, the city has a rich history, culture and social

life, as well as plenty of opportunities for outdoor activities. In

parallel, its reputation for innovation in the fields of science,

technology and the arts have put it at the forefront of Europe.

In the same way that Maastricht is safe yet vibrant, the faculty

offers a secure yet challenging learning environment. Take the

opportunity to live, work and study in this stimulating, unique

and international city.

2 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009 3


Maastricht University

Diverse and dynamic

Founded in 1976, Maastricht is the youngest university in

the Netherlands, but it has already achieved a reputation

for excellence in academic programmes and learning

methods. The international calibre of you, its students,

gives the university its vitality, diversity and dynamism.

A unique learning approach

Maastricht University has become famous for its approach

to learning and teaching. As a student here, you will benefit

from small classes of only 12 to 14 students, close working

relationships with your teachers and a highly interactive

style of learning.

Our approach to the learning process involves the use of

real-life cases in the classroom. This method has several

unique features: it brings you to academic resources

actively, rather than through passively listening to lectures

or reading papers. It provides you with practical, concrete

examples of the academic theory you study. It allows

you to interact with your peers and teachers, giving you

immediate feedback on your learning process. And it

means that you develop your own deeper, more personal

understanding of the concepts. While your teachers are on

hand to facilitate, the responsibility for learning is yours.

Training the best future graduates

The benefits of this learning approach, more commonly

known as ‘problem-based learning’, are multiple.

• You are learning continuously – unlike the lecture-

based approach at some universities, learning takes

place throughout the whole course, not just before

exam time.

• You get out what you put in – the courses are challenging

and demanding, but more effort equates with better

results.

• You gain a better idea of the value of knowledge,

through taking responsibility for your own, and others’,

learning experiences.

• You gain an understanding of your own learning

processes, becoming more aware of what works for you.

• You learn valuable ‘real-life’ management skills:

managing yourself, others, resources and situations.

• Group work affords the potential for conflict situations

you may need to handle the clash of diverse opinions

and cultures.

• You learn to meet deadlines and produce deliverables,

such as PowerPoint presentations, reports and research

projects.

• You learn to make decisions as well as to reflect on the

way you made them.

• You benefit from the freedom to develop your own

interests.

It goes without saying that these advantages will carry

you forward in your future career. Time management,

management of yourself and others, the ability to give

and receive constructive criticism, dealing with conflict

situations: all are characteristics of desirable employees.

Maastricht University graduates have been evaluated by

companies for whom they work. They stated that graduate

competencies in personal and team management, risktaking

and decision-making skills are higher than those

from other universities. Our graduates are generally

thought to be more mature and entrepreneurial than

others, with the ambition to build their own careers and to

take every opportunity to learn.

Constant improvement

An outstanding choice

“Maastricht University was one of the best academic

choices I’ve ever made. It provides a unique and

enriching academic environment that takes

learning to the highest level through small studentto-professor

ratios, a learning approach which

maximises student interaction and critical thinking

and, above all, a population of students from

across the globe who contribute their valuable and

diverse professional and academic experience to the

classroom.”

Rebecca Galloway, United States

International Business student

Although this learning method has become world-renowned,

the teachers at Maastricht University are continuously

carrying out research into the methodology so that you

benefit from the most up-to-date developments. All teachers

are trained in this learning method, with follow-up specialised

courses enabling your teachers to improve their skills

continually.

Maastricht University monitors its graduates’ progress in the

job market after six months, two years and five years. We

also develop new learning initiatives to meet the changing

needs of the labour market, and then implement these in the

learning environment. This means that you will benefit from

continuously improving programmes, courses and ways of

learning.

4 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009

5


The Faculty of Economics and Business Administration

Academic excellence

Maastricht University’s Faculty of Economics and Business

Administration is well known for the quality of its academic

education and research, both within the Netherlands and

internationally. All except one bachelor’s programme, Fiscal

Economics, are taught in English, allowing you to study not

just at an internationally reputed university, but also in an

international language.

Internationally accredited and

highly ranked

The Faculty of Economics and Business Administration

has been recognised by several external, independent

organisations for the quality of its teaching staff, worldrenowned

learning methodology, academic excellence,

research and facilities. A bachelor’s degree from the faculty

is a passport to your future: reputed and recognised

internationally, our rankings and accreditations are proof

that you’re receiving the best possible quality of education.

The top reputation of your degree will enhance your career

opportunities around the world.

A top-ranked school of economics and business

“The Triple Crown accreditation from EQUIS, AACSB

and AMBA confirms once more that the educational

programmes and related services at the Faculty of

Economics and Business Administration are truly

world class.”

Zijun Jiang, China

Alumnus, Lecturer in General Economics at Maastricht

University, the Netherlands

Accreditation Organisation

of the Netherlands and

Flanders (NVAO)

All bachelor’s and master’s programmes at the faculty

have been accredited by the NVAO, the Flemish-Dutch

accreditation agency for academic education. Maastricht

University has also been accredited by the NVAO for

its research master’s programmes in both economics

and business science. This independent organisation

acknowledges the content of the programmes and the

research quality of the teachers.

www.nvao.net

Association to Advance

Collegiate Schools of

Business (AASCB)

We are one of approximately 40 European institutions to

have been internationally accredited by this prestigious US

association, which is considered the hallmark of excellence

in management education.

www.aacsb.edu

Beta Gamma Sigma Honor Society

We are proud to have a chapter of the Beta Gamma Sigma

(BGS) Honor Society at the faculty. This is a prestigious

international business society to which only AACSBaccredited

universities are invited to provide members.

Membership is open to the very best in business, which

means those who graduate with a grade point average of

8.5. Achieving this honour not only signifies recognition

of outstanding academic achievement; it also provides

networking and career opportunities.

www.betagammasigma.org

European Quality

Improvement System (EQUIS)

The European Foundation for Management Development

awarded the faculty the EQUIS quality stamp, a leading

international system of quality assessment, improvement

and accreditation of higher education institutions in

management and business administration.

www.efmd.org

Association of MBAs (AMBA)

AMBA accreditation of the MBA degrees at the faculty

means that we have been internationally recognised for

best practice in our MBA programmes.

www.mbaworld.com

Choice Guide for Higher Education

(Keuzegids Hoger Onderwijs)

This authoritative national evaluation guide ranked

the International Business programme first in 2008, a

top spot that the programme has held for several years

now. The Economics, Econometrics and Fiscal Economics

programmes have also been ranked first based on last

year’s assessment.

www.keuzegids.org

6 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009 7

Elsevier

The leading Dutch business magazine Elsevier has awarded

the faculty’s Economics and International Business

programmes the number one spot for several years

running.

www.elsevier.com

Financial Times

The Financial Times ranked the International Business

programme 28th in the top 40 such programmes offered

at European institutions. The faculty climbed as high as the

third place in the category ‘value for money’.

rankings.ft.com/masters-in-management

Centre for Higher Education Development (CHE)

The faculty’s Economics programme ranked top in 12 out

of 13 criteria measuring student satisfaction using this

German interactive ranking system. The International

Business programme also ranked highly.

ranking.zeit.de


The right choice

Close connections to the

corporate world

A bachelor’s degree from the Faculty of Economics and

Business Administration is already a great springboard

for your future career. However, the university boasts

many other links to the corporate world in which you

can participate.

SME Portal

The SME Portal brings together students looking for

assignments and research projects within small and

medium-sized companies and companies looking for

extra help and expertise in or around the Maastricht

area, including Belgium, France and Germany. Most of

the projects are short term, which means they are easy to

combine with studying.

www.unimaas.nl/mkbportal

Alumni Network

The Alumni Network is made up of some 7,500 graduates

from the faculty who now work in companies worldwide.

The network allows not just alumni but also current

students and other members of the faculty to keep in

touch via ‘alumni circles’ in the Netherlands, Belgium,

Germany, the UK, the US and China.

www.alumni.unimaas.nl

“The main reason I decided to study in Maastricht is

because the university is the most international in

the Netherlands. I already knew that I wanted to go

abroad after my studies, and Maastricht fitted these

plans. Furthermore, the learning approach forces you to

think about and use the information that you gather.

Maastricht’s relaxed atmosphere, many bars and

restaurants, and the beautiful nature surrounding the

city make it one of the best places to spend your life as a

student!”

Marc van der Chijs, the Netherlands

Alumnus, Co-founder and board member of Todou.com,

CEO of Spill Group Asia, Angel investor in Chinese

start-ups, China

Career Services

The university’s career centre is on hand to provide you

with advice on your study choices and career opportunities.

To get ahead in the employment market, you can benefit

from interview training and feedback on your CV and

covering letters.

www.loopbaancentrum.unimaas.nl

Study associations

As a student of the faculty, there are several active

associations that you can join. Initiated by students

themselves, they are linked to various programmes or

disciplines, and provide study support, exposure to real-life

business situations, career advice and recruitment events.

• 3MA (Maastricht Management/Organisation

Association) bridges the gap between economic theory

and business practice. You can take part in events such as

the Maastricht Business Days, 3MA Congress,

Consultancy Day, Commercial Day, in-house days,

training programmes and recruitment dinners.

www.3ma.nl

• FS Focus organises workshops, congresses, study trips,

company visits and recruitment events for students in the

fields of accounting, control or finance.

www.fsfocus.nl

• Vectum offers students of econometrics insights into

real-world business situations; you will benefit from

direct links with companies through the annual Vectum

Congress, in-house days and presentation dinners.

www.vectum.nl

• IES Network offers students of infonomics and

economics lectures on current economic events and

excursions to economic institutions.

www.iesnetwork.nl

• First, the Fiscal Economics study association, organises

company trips – often abroad – and work experience

opportunities.

www.efm-online.nl

• Eloquent aims to motivate students from the entire

faculty to maintain a critical perspective on both their

studies and their extracurricular activities. Eloquent

publishes a lively, entertaining quarterly magazine.

www.eloquent.nl

• AIESEC, the world’s largest international student

association, offers tools to develop your potential and

positively impact society. To gain insights and knowledge

of cultural differences, foreign languages and

customs, you can apply for management or development

traineeships. ‘Make a Move’ career week is a four-day

event that aims to bring students to the labour market.

8 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009 9

www.aiesec.nl

• Integrand offers internships, work assignments, business

courses and other activities that will help familiarise you

with the world of work whilst studying.

www.integrand.nl

• Unipartners is an academic consulting firm working

on business-oriented projects for various companies.

Get involved in market research, company and project

evaluations, logistical, strategic, law and regulation

projects as well as writing business plans.

www.unipartners.nl/maastricht

• Research Project Maastricht is an annual project open to,

and run by, up to 14 high-potential students. Working on

a non-profit basis, the team spends three months

(plus one month travelling time) in emerging markets

conducting research on behalf of Dutch companies.

Through intense contact with the business world, you

will gain valuable work experience and learn to come up

with solutions to real-life problems.

www.researchproject.nl

Research Project in Indonesia

“Instead of studying abroad, I’m going to do a

research project in Indonesia. I’m one of several

students from other disciplines who have been

contracted to analyse whether it’s profitable for

Western companies to trade with Indonesia. We’re

spending four months there and we’ll get the same

credits we would if we studied abroad, but it’s

a great opportunity and a practical way to gain

experience.”

Marjolein Buss, the Netherlands

International Business student


Excellent education

At the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration,

teaching is as important as research. And the two are

inextricably linked. Leading researchers and scholars

directly contribute to the content of the programmes you

will be studying. This means that your education will be

innovative, up-to-date and relevant to the issues at the

cutting edge of today’s hot research topics.

Study abroad

All bachelor’s programmes (except the BSc Fiscal

Economics) require you to study abroad for one semester in

your third year at one of our 130 partner institutions. These

include the Stern School of Business at New York University

(USA), Universidad del Pacífico, Lima (Peru), Università

Commerciale Luigi Bocconi, Milan (Italy), University

of Stellenbosch (South Africa), National University of

Singapore (Singapore) and University of Sydney (Australia).

For a complete list of partner universities visit:

www.unimaas.nl/feba

The experience not only allows you to learn from different

sources via different methods of teaching; it also gives

you the opportunity to learn about a different culture and

potentially to pick up a new language. In some cases, it’s

even possible to do an internship abroad instead. All of

these opportunities will give you an advantage over other

graduates in your future international career. Whatever you

choose, you can obtain 26 European Credit Transfer System

(ECTS) credits or more towards your degree.

Once you are studying at the faculty, the International

Relations Office will be able to assist you with planning

your trip abroad.

Honours programme

Designed for excellent students who want to broaden

and deepen their knowledge and understanding, the

honours programme is a supplementary programme that

prepares students to fulfil key roles in social and scientific

developments. The top 10% of first-year students can apply

at the start of their second year. The honours programme

runs parallel to the regular programme in the second

and third years. Students in the honours programme are

assigned an academic advisor to support them in their

academic development.

www.unimaas.nl/feba/honoursprogramme

Double-degree programmes

Having completed your bachelor’s, do you want to further

your career by obtaining a master’s degree from not one

but two top institutions? At Maastricht University, you

have the opportunity to do a so-called ‘double-degree

programme’ in conjunction with one of our top partner

institutions. These include:

• EDHEC Business School, France – at this top business

school, with campuses in Lille and Nice, you can spend

the last semester of your bachelor’s programme as an

exchange student if you are studying for any bachelor’s

degree at the faculty. You will continue with your

master’s programme at EDHEC studying for any of the

programmes offered at the institution. You will

then return to Maastricht to complete your master’s

programme; all programmes offered at the faculty are

eligible. The double-degree master’s programme with

EDHEC takes just one year.

• Queen’s School of Business, Canada – at this cutting-

edge school in Kingston, you can spend the last semester

of your bachelor’s programme as an exchange student

if you are studying for the bachelor’s programme

International Business or the bachelor’s programme

Economics and Business Economics at the faculty.

You will continue with your master’s programme at

Queen’s studying for the master’s programme in Global

Management offered at the institution. You will then

return to Maastricht to complete your master’s

programme; only the master’s programme International

Business – graduate option ‘free master’ is eligible.

The double-degree master’s programme with Queen’s

takes a little over one year, resulting in minimal study

delay.

• Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium – in Louvain-

la-Neuve you can take part of your master’s programme

at the Université catholique de Louvain studying the

Master en sciences économiques orientation générale

à la finalité spécialisée. You will then return to Maastricht

to take the other part of your master’s programme at the

faculty studying the master’s programme International

Economic Studies or the master’s programme

Econometrics an Operations Research. A double-degree

master’s programme with this institution takes two

years and is accessible to bachelor’s graduates from both

the faculty and other universities.

All of our partner institutions have at least two

international accreditations (see page 6), are leading in the

economics and business fields in their country and offer

great academic opportunities that represent an additional

benefit for students.

A double-degree programme is demanding as well as

rewarding. With partner institutions with which we have

a contract, the same number of students from the partner

institution as FEBA may be selected to come to Maastricht

to study. Only the students with the strongest academic

records and the highest levels of ambition and motivation

from both institutions will be selected!

www.unimaas.nl/doubledegrees

Two excellent degrees

“The double-degree programme provided me

with the opportunity to work on certain areas of

knowledge that I had not yet studied in depth at

EDHEC Business School. I am greatly impressed by

the high academic standard and the outstanding

international reputation of the Faculty of Economics

and Business Administration. As a result of my

double-degree qualification, I was offered a job at

Merrill Lynch – and I have EDHEC and FEBA to thank!”

Julien Potier, France

Alumnus, Investment Banking Analyst at Merrill

Lynch London, United Kingdom

10 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009

11


Reputation for research

Good quality research builds the reputation of the

university, which means that your degree is worth more.

Almost all of your teachers also carry out research so you

benefit from the most up-to-date, innovative, highest

quality learning experience. In short, you’re getting more

than just a textbook education.

There are three unique features that define the research

being carried out in the faculty. Firstly, the integration

between business and economics defines both the research

and the way the programmes are structured. Secondly,

both research and programmes look at their subject matter

from both an external and an internal perspective. For

instance, the programme covering human resources looks

at external labour markets as well as the internal structure

of teams. And lastly, characteristic of the faculty is the

blend of applied work and fundamental theory. For our

researchers and our students, this combination is vital.

Key disciplines in which research is currently being carried

out include:

• Economic theory;

• Finance and econometrics;

• Human resource and labour markets;

• Technology and innovation;

• Marketing;

• Accounting and corporate governance;

• Information and operations management.

The faculty’s research is regularly assessed by the

Association of Universities in the Netherlands (VSNU);

programmes have consistently been rated four or five out

of five.

State-of-the-art facilities

University library

Right in the centre of Maastricht, just a five-minute

walk from the faculty, you will find the state-of-the-art

university library. Its excellent facilities include:

• an extensive book and magazine collection;

• study areas, with or without computers;

• 320 computers;

• 80 laptop connections;

• an ICT service desk;

• group spaces;

• large tables to spread out your materials;

• different noise levels, from low to absolute silence;

• ergonomically-designed equipment;

• electronic databases;

• a wide range of electronic documents and journals –

where licences permit, these can also be accessed from

home as well as other campus locations.

www.ub.unimaas.nl

Student advice

For general study support, look no further than the study

advisors. You can go to them for advice on the structure

and organisation of the programmes, rules and regulations,

planning or choosing your studies. If, for personal reasons,

you either can’t complete your studies or need more time

to do so, the study advisors are also here to help you.

Language Centre

Your education comprises more than just the academic

discipline you choose to study. The Language Centre offers

a broad range of affordably-priced language courses from

beginner to advanced level in 13 languages, including

English, Dutch, Russian, Arabic and Chinese.

www.languages.unimaas.nl

12 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009 13


08.30 - 09.30

09.30 - 10.30

10.30 - 11.30

11.30 - 12.30

12.30 - 13.30

13.30 - 14.30

14.30 - 15.30

15.30 - 16.30

16.30 - 17.30

Average week of a first-year student

Monday

Self-study

Self-study

Lecture Quantitative

Methods

Lecture Quantitative

Methods

Lunch

Preparing tutorial

group

Preparing tutorial

group

Preparing tutorial

group

Preparing tutorial

group

Tuesday

Tutorial Marketing &

Organizations

Tutorial Marketing &

Organizations

Group work in

library

Group work in

library

Group work in

library

Group work in

library

Self-study

Self-study

Self-study

Wednesday

Lecture Marketing &

Organizations

Lecture Marketing &

Organizations

Preparing tutorial

group

Preparing tutorial

group

Break

Tutorial Quantitative

Methods

Tutorial Quantitative

Methods

Self-study

Self-study

Thursday

Tutorial Marketing &

Organizations

Tutorial Marketing &

Organizations

Group work in

library

Group work in

library

Group work in

library

Group work in

library

Break

Extra tutorial

Quantitative

Methods

Extra tutorial

Quantitative

Methods

Friday

Lecture Quantitative

Methods

Lecture Quantitative

Methods

Self-study

Self-study

Break

Tutorial Quantitative

Methods

Tutorial Quantitative

Methods

There are several different types of courses that you

will follow during the course of your degree, whichever

programme you choose. Having completed each element,

you will receive a certain number of European Credit Transfer

System (ECTS) credits, which contribute towards a total of 180

for your entire bachelor’s degree (see table below). One credit

represents a study load of 28 hours.

• Skills training (4 ECTS) – this comprises a short, practical

course usually at the end of each semester.

• Compulsory courses (6.5 ECTS) – all students must follow

certain compulsory courses in their first and second years.

See course outlines of individual programmes for details of

the compulsory courses that apply to each programme.

• Electives (6.5 ECTS) – in your third year, you will be able to

choose from various elective courses that relate to your

specialisation. See course outlines of individual programmes

for details of the elective courses that apply to each

specialisation.

• Quantitative methods (4 or 6.5 ECTS) – these courses

provide an introduction to methodological topics that are

quantitative in nature: mathematics, statistics and

computer science.

• Study Abroad (26 ECTS) – with the exception of Fiscal

Economics students, all students spend one semester

studying abroad at a partner institution in the third year.

Alternatively, you can do an internship abroad, worth 26

ECTS.

• Internship (4 ECTS) – you have the opportunity to replace a

skills training course worth four ECTS credits with an

internship. As part of the Infonomics programme, you can

even organise an extended international internship instead

of your study abroad.

• Capstone assignment/bachelor’s thesis (4 ECTS) – the

bachelor’s programmes end with an independently written

essay of approx. 4,500-5,000 words, called a capstone

assignment. The topic you choose should be consistent with

your specialisation and/or elective. Econometrics and

Operations Research students must write a bachelor’s thesis

instead.

For more information, see the study guide at:

www.unimaas.nl/feba/studyguide

14 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009 15

Restaurant

At Mensa, the faculty’s restaurant, you can buy a wide

range of affordable meals and snacks. Every day, you can

choose between two hot meals, a vegetarian dish, salads,

sandwiches, drinks and many other delicious options.

Student Services

For student support services not related to your

programme, Student Services is here to help. You can

approach any of the advisors about matters relating to

registration, studies, professions, career planning, financial

assistance and sports.

www.ssc.unimaas.nl

If you are a prospective student from outside the EU,

you can visit the International Service Desk for help

in applying for a visa, opening a Dutch bank account,

finding accommodation, applying for insurance and so on.

The International Service Desk also coordinates several

scholarship and grant programmes.

The academic year

The academic year is divided into two semesters. Each

semester comprises two periods of eight weeks and two

periods of two weeks. During the eight-week periods,

you will follow two courses at the same time. The twoweek

periods are intended for ‘additional’ courses, such

as research methods and techniques, training courses or

skills training. The content of the first and second year is

the same for all students. This period is designed to give

you the academic basis you will need for the rest of the

programme. You will begin to specialise in your third year.


“Giving you the knowledge and skills required

for an international business career.”

Bachelor of Science in International Business

Business without borders

Are you curious about what’s going on in the business world? Do you watch the news and want to play

a part in creating it? Do you question how people’s behaviour affects individual companies, whole

industries, and national and international economies? Then International Business is made for you.

Why should you choose International Business?

Who you are as a person is as important as what you

know about a topic. That’s why a bachelor’s programme in

International Business does not just focus on the strategy,

resources, organisation, marketing, management, finance

and accounting required to make a business run. It also

teaches you the skills you need to put those things into

practice – like conflict management, leadership, teamwork,

presentation skills and more.

In your first two years, you will follow compulsory courses

in a broad range of international business areas, such

as logistics, human resources, marketing and finance.

All these are essential to making a business successful.

For example, Apple’s successful iPod could not have

been produced without a budget to set up a new branch

within the corporation (Finance) and the procurement

of raw materials (Supply Chain Management). It needs

people to manage internal processes (Organisation/

Human Resources) and transportation (Supply Chain

Management). Furthermore, the company needs

marketing and sales employees to sell the iPod (Marketing)

and people to manage the money from those sales

(Accounting). An information system is needed to

provide valuable data to every department (Information

Management). Based on sales and profitability figures, the

product is evaluated and recommendations for the future

are developed (Strategy).

As part of your third year, you will spend one semester

studying abroad. You’ll also have opportunities to contact

real companies at ‘business days’ organised by study

associations, do research projects and follow an internship,

usually at the end of your bachelor’s programme. If you’re

interested in the world of international business, this

kind of international experience will set you ahead of the

competition.

What will you learn?

Having completed this programme, you will be able to:

• understand the ‘value chain’ from input to output (see

iPod example);

• demonstrate an awareness of, and confidence in,

yourself – your working style, your reaction to situations

and your degree of self-discipline;

• deal with others, in terms of managing conflict situations,

demonstrating leadership and teamwork skills;

• observe and analyse the society in which you live, being

aware of the outside world in which companies operate.

Is International Business right for you?

As well as the standard admission requirements

(see page 36), you should:

• be confident about making up your own mind and

expressing your own opinions;

• be willing to contribute to the class, not just passively to

receive information;

• be inquisitive about current affairs and what’s going on

in the world in general;

• have an interest in developing self-awareness, while

being able to listen to others;

• be flexible about working in teams with people from

different cultures;

• be curious about people, be it consumers, investors or

employees;

• have an affinity for numbers.

16 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009

17


Case International Business: McDonalds’ business philosophy

Over the past few years, McDonalds has been exposed to strong

external and internal pressures. External pressures included increased

competition and healthier lifestyles. An internal issue was the corporate

culture designed around making money from renting store locations

to franchisees rather than focusing on selling fast food. The company

wanted to switch its business philosophy to focus on Customer

Relationship Management (CRM): this analyses customers’ needs, wants

and demands in order to create, deliver and communicate value.

What are your career prospects?

Around 90% of bachelor’s graduates go on to do a master’s

in their chosen area of specialisation. Moreover, the

international nature of your bachelor’s programme means

that you could study for your master’s at any number of

international universities. The broad subject areas and

skills that you will learn at Maastricht University will allow

you to work in a wide variety of industries and positions.

What you choose will largely depend on your area of

specialisation and of course your own interests.

Graduates have found positions in:

• multinationals, such as Shell and Daimler AG;

• consultancy firms, such as Cap Gemini and Accenture;

• human resource departments;

• marketing departments;

• accountancy firms, such as Ernst & Young,

PricewaterhouseCoopers, KPMG, Deloitte Touche

Tohmatsu;

• financial institutions, such as Fortis, Deutsche Bank and

JP Morgan;

• their own businesses.

Course outline

There are certain compulsory courses within this

programme, as well as skills training and electives.

18 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009

19

Year 1

Term 1

2

Economics

and Business

Term 2

Year 2

Term 3

Term 4

Year 3

Term 5

Term 6

1

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

4

5

6

International Business

Management of

Organisations and

Marketing

Accounting

Skills Training: Philosophy of Science

Strategy

Finance

Quantitative

Methods I

Quantitative

Methods II

Fundamentals of

Supply Chain

Management

Skills Training: Management Game

Finance and

Accounting

Global Business

International

Marketing

Management

Skills Training: Quantitative Methods III

Corporate

Governance

Management of

Operations and Product

Development

Business

Specialisation

Course

Business

Specialisation

Course

Skills Training: Elective

Skills Training: Elective

Study Abroad

Capstone Assignment

Management of

Organisations

Management

Information Systems

Human Resource

Management

1 Business Elective

1 Economics,

Quantitative, Law or

Ethics Elective

Fast facts

Fitting the international bill

“I was lucky enough to study abroad for a year at

school, and I knew I wanted to continue studying in

another language with people from other cultures.

I also had a lot of interests and didn’t yet know

which area I wanted to specialise in. International

Business at Maastricht fitted the bill perfectly –

internationally oriented in culture, content and

language.”

Julie Schreinemacher, the Netherlands

International Business student

• Programme title: BSc International Business

• Language of instruction: English

• Duration: 3 years full time

• Start date: 1 September 2009

• Available places: 500

• Application deadlines: selection procedure 1 April 2009 (250

places); lottery 15 May 2009 (250 places)

• Study abroad: compulsory in the third year, in the first or

second semester

• Study load per week: 8 hrs classes; 12 hrs group work; 20 hrs

individual study. Total 40 hrs.

• Learning method: problem-based learning; guest lectures;

presentations; assignments; papers

• Assessment method: written exams; final papers; group

participation

• You can obtain 180 ECTS credits in three years

• Continuing master’s programmes at FEBA without

additional admissions requirements:

MSc International Business and MSc Management of

Learning. You can also continue your studies with other

master’s programmes, but additional requirements may

apply.

Further information:

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/bachelors

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/masters

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/studyguide for course information

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/numerusfixus for selection

procedure

• Student Recruitment and Communications Office:

+31 43 388 2055 or bachelorinfo@efb.unimaas.nl

NB. The details of this programme could change;

before applying, please check www.unimaas.nl/feba/bachelors

for the latest information.


“International economists are the decision makers

of the future.”

Bachelor of Science in Economics and Business Economics

A dynamic combination of economics and business

Why do consumers buy the products or brands that they do? What effect do government policies have on

consumer behaviour? How can individual businesses influence consumer choices and policy decisions? These

are some of the business questions that occupy economists. If they occupy you too, this programme is for you.

Why should you choose Economics and Business

Economics?

Economics and Business Economics focuses on two

main areas: Business Economics covers problems within

companies and how to solve them. Economics looks at

broader problems that relate to individuals, governments,

national and even international economies.

Within this programme, you can choose from the following

specialisations:

• International Business Economics

• International Economic Studies

• Infonomics

You can find details of these specialisations on the

following pages. Whichever you choose, you will follow

the same courses in your first year. These cover a broad

range of business and economics topics such as finance,

accounting, international economic relations, micro

and macroeconomics, organisation and marketing as

well as skills such as presentation, communication and

quantitative skills. This will allow you to make a wellinformed

decision about which specialisation you are

interested in pursuing in your second and third years.

Is Economics and Business Economics

right for you?

As well as the standard admission requirements

(see page 36), you should:

• be internationally orientated;

• have an affinity for maths;

• have an interest in politics and its impact on individuals

and businesses;

• be proactive and a self-starter;

• enjoy learning through teamwork and practical

examples.

What are your career prospects?

Graduates have found positions in:

• governmental and non-profit organisations;

• private companies;

• the financial sector;

• consultancy roles;

international institutions.

20 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009

21


Specialisation

International Business Economics

Using an economics toolkit to solve business problems

Do you watch the news and question why prices of resources change? Do you ask yourself what the effect

of this will be on companies? Do you question how governments and private businesses can influence

these things? International Business Economics does just that – find out more!

Why should you choose International Business

Economics?

International Business Economics has two clear elements:

1. Economics – this looks at how we allocate resources

within a particular market. It’s about understanding

why an economy works in the way that it does by seeing

the links between events. For instance, how has the

Dutch economy reacted to the US credit crisis?

2. Business – looks at how individual businesses react

to events. How should they react? Are they successful?

To explain what happens and why, we use an economic

model, compare it with business reality and adjust the

model accordingly.

In the International Business Economics programme,

you will look at how businesses interact with their

environments. You will use business tools, such as strategy,

finance and accounting alongside economic tools, such as

quantitative skills and economic modelling in order to solve

real-life business problems.

In your first year, you will follow a wide range of courses

that all Economics and Business Economics students will

take. In your second year, you will study certain compulsory

International Business Economics courses, while in your

third year you will be able to choose between electives. All

students study abroad for one semester of their third year.

Case International Business Economics: The effects of off-shoring

Globalisation has encouraged cost-based competition among production

locations around the world. In early 2008, Finnish company Nokia

announced its intention to move production facilities from Bochum,

Germany to Cluj, Romania. Following the plant closure, there were

protests, threats of boycott and political pressure directed at the

company. It eventually agreed to a substantial pay-off to compensate

employees. What are the lessons Nokia should take away from this? How

should a multinational company evaluate the total costs of production

in a particular location? Should a relatively disadvantaged location like

Bochum use financial incentives to attract foreign investment? These are

the kinds of questions you will discuss during the programme.

What will you learn?

Having completed this programme, you will be able to:

• use the tools you have acquired to identify and solve

business problems;

• successfully communicate your proposed solutions to

others;

• analyse business problems within a wider economic

context.

Is International Business Economics right for you?

As well as the standard admission requirements

(see page 36), you should:

• be open-minded;

• be willing to help others and work as a team;

• be internationally-orientated;

• be energetic, proactive and self-motivated;

• have basic maths skills.

An economics profile or economics courses at school are a

plus but not required.

What are your career prospects?

As an International Business Economics graduate, your

career opportunities are broad. You will have a good idea

of how organisations work, and you’ll have the tools to

analyse and solve their problems. Finding creative solutions

not only involves understanding the business; it also

involves presenting and communicating your proposed

solution in order to persuade decision-makers that it’s the

right one.

Further to the skills you’ll learn during your degree courses,

there are several extracurricular opportunities for you to

get involved with real companies: workshops, career days

and internships are all on offer.

Graduates have found positions in:

• multinationals, such as Shell and Daimler AG;

• consultancy firms, such as Cap Gemini and Accenture;

• accountancy firms, such as Ernst & Young,

PricewaterhouseCoopers, KPMG, Deloitte Touche

Tohmatsu;

• financial institutions, such as Fortis, Deutsche Bank, JP

Morgan;

• pension funds, such as ABP;

insurance companies, such as Allianz;

• government or non-profit organisations, such as

Ministeries, European Commission, European Central

Bank, United Nations.

Course outline

There are certain compulsory courses within this

programme, as well as skills training and electives.

22 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009 23

Year 1

Term 1

Term 2

Year 2

Term 3

Term 4

Year 3

Term 5

Term 6

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

4

5

6

International Business Economics

Management of

Organisations and

Marketing

Microeconomics

Industrial

Organisation

Accounting

Skills Training: Philosophy of Science

Macroeconomics

Finance

Banking

Financial Markets

Skillls Training: Quantitative Methods III

Marketing and

Supply Chain

Management

International

Business Strategy

Quantitative

Methods II

International

Economic Relations

Skills Training: Economy Game

Business

Specialisation Course

Business

Specialisation Course

Skills Training: Elective

Skills Training: Elective

Study Abroad

Quantitative

Methods I

Accounting

Managerial

Economics

Quantitative

Business

1 Information

Management Elective

1 Economics,

Quantitative

or Accounting

and Information

Management Elective

Capstone Assignment

Fast facts

Communication through learning

“I chose Maastricht University having attended an

open day. Everyone was open and communicative

about what they were studying. I now know that it’s

the unique learning approach that gives students

those skills. It was only later that I decided I wanted

to combine economics with business and follow this

specialisation.”

Gijs Hesen, the Netherlands

International Business Economics student

• Programme title: BSc Economics and Business Economics

• Specialisation: International Business Economics

• Language of instruction: English

• Duration: 3 years full time

• Start date: 1 September 2009

• Study abroad: compulsory study abroad in the third year, in

the first or second semester

• Study load per week: 8 hrs classes; 12 hrs group work; 20 hrs

individual study. Total 40 hrs.

• Learning method: problem-based learning; guest lectures;

presentations; assignments; papers

• Assessment method: written exams; final papers; group

participation

• You can obtain 180 ECTS credits in three years

• Continuing master’s programmes at FEBA without

additional admissions requirements:

MSc International Business, MSc Infonomics,

MSc International Economic Studies, MSc Financial Economics

and MSc Management of Learning. You can also continue your

studies with other master’s programmes, but additional

requirements may apply.

Further information:

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/bachelors

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/masters

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/studyguide for course information

• Student Recruitment and Communications Office:

+31 43 388 2055 or bachelorinfo@efb.unimaas.nl

NB. The details of this programme could change;

before applying, please check www.unimaas.nl/feba/bachelors

for the latest information.


Specialisation

International Economic Studies

Public and private policy making through strategic decisions

Do you think issues such as the aging population, education, taxation and house prices are important?

Do you question why financial crises happen and how they impact individuals, businesses and national

and global economies? International Economic Studies gives you the tools to discuss and analyse all of

these issues.

Why should you choose International Economic

Studies?

International Economic Studies looks at economic problems

from two perspectives: on the one hand, you will look at

how the behaviour of individual consumers and investors

impacts the economy. On the other hand, you’ll look at

broader economic forces like government policies, national

monetary policies and economic development, and how

these affect the individual. To get this balance, sociology

and psychology courses are part of the core curriculum –

a unique element to this specialisation.

Moreover, the study association ‘IES network’ organises

additional guest lectures and international study trips,

which are integrated into the programme and for which

you receive ECTS credits. All International Economic Studies

and Infonomics students are automatically members of the

association, but you can also actively participate in helping

to organise events – great experience for your CV!

In your first year, you will follow a wide range of courses

that all Economics and Business Economics students will

take. In your second year, you will study certain compulsory

International Economic Studies courses, while in your

third year you will be able to choose between electives. All

students study abroad for one semester of their third year.

Great preparation for competition and

regulation consultancy

“Following my bachelor’s and master’s qualifications

in International Economic Studies, I’m now working

for a competition and regulation consultancy in

London. In job interviews with economic consultancies, `

I was questioned on basic economic concepts and had

to apply them to hypothetical cases. The problem-based

learning method was brilliant training for this –

I couldn’t recommend it more.”

Carina Lange, Germany

Alumnus, Economist, Competition and Regulation

Consultancy, London

What will you learn?

Having completed this programme, you will be able to:

• demonstrate knowledge of exchange rates and national

monetary policies;

• understand the mechanisms behind global markets;

• understand the growth of economies – how and why

they grow, their historical context, how you can use this

to forecast the future, how education affects the growth

of an economy and so on;

• understand the effect of the behaviour of individuals on

society from a socio-economic perspective.

Is International Economic Studies right for you?

As well as the standard admission requirements

(see page 36), you should:

• have a theoretical mindset;

• enjoy in-depth analysis;

• have an affinity for maths and an analytical approach;

• have an interest in politics and welfare.

What are your career prospects?

As well as real-world case studies that you will cover in your

courses, the guest lectures organised via the IES network

are designed for a broader audience, including students

from other programmes. They cover topics and careers that

you might be interested in pursuing in the future.

Graduates have found positions in:

international institutions, such as the OECD;

• the EU and other governmental institutions, such as

central banks and cartel authorities;

• the World Bank;

• private-sector companies, such as those in the telecoms

sector;

• the financial sector;

• strategic, advisory or consultancy roles – advising a bank

about a merger or takeover, for instance.

Course outline

There are certain compulsory courses within this

programme, as well as skills training and electives.

Management of

Organisations and

Marketing

Microeconomics Accounting

Skills Training: Philosophy of Science

Macroeconomics

24 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009 25

Year 1

Term 1

Term 2

Year 2

Term 4

Finance

Term 3

2

Macroeconomics and

Economic Policy

Year 3

Term 5

Term 6

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

4

5

International Economic Studies

Quantitative

Methods I

Quantitative

Methods II

International

Economic Relations

Skills Training: Economy Game

Microeconomics:

Choices, Markets and

Welfare

Productivity

Theories of

Social Order

Public Economics

Skills Training: Elective

Skills Training: Elective

Study Abroad

Quantitative

Methods III

International

Economics

Institutions, Behaviour

and Welfare

Skills Training: Elective

IBE Elective IES Elective

QE Elective IES Elective

6 Capstone Assignment

Fast facts

International opportunities

“When I started my bachelor’s degree, I didn’t

know I wanted to specialise in International

Economic Studies. But I discovered that I preferred

the economics side to the business side after the

first year. Moreover, there are lots of international

opportunities: I’ve just returned from a study trip

to Vietnam and I’m about to study abroad for a

semester in Canada!”

Anne Hilger, Germany

International Economic Studies student

• Programme title: BSc Economics and Business Economics

• Specialisation: International Economic Studies

• Language of instruction: English

• Duration: 3 years full time

• Start date: 1 September 2009

• Study abroad: compulsory study abroad in the third year, in the

first or second semester

• Study load per week: 10 hrs classes; 10 hrs group work; 20 hrs

individual study. Total 40 hrs.

• Learning method: problem-based learning; (guest) lectures;

presentations; assignments; essays

• Assessment method: written exams; final essays; hand-in

exercises; group participation; presentation

• You can obtain 180 ECTS credits in three years

• Continuing master’s programmes at FEBA without additional

admissions requirements:

MSc International Business, MSc Infonomics,

MSc International Economic Studies, MSc Financial Economics

and MSc Management of Learning. You can also continue your

studies with other master’s programmes, but additional

requirements may apply.

Further information:

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/bachelors

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/masters

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/studyguide for course information

• Student Recruitment and Communications Office:

+31 43 388 2055 or bachelorinfo@efb.unimaas.nl

NB. The details of this programme could change;

before applying, please check www.unimaas.nl/feba/bachelors

for the latest information.


Infonomics

Infonomics

Specialisation Course outline

The economics of the digital age

Do you question how Google can make money when it provides a free service and uses very little

advertising? Are you interested in the effect of MP3 downloads on the music industry? Do you wonder

how Microsoft’s Windows products succeed in dominating the global market despite fierce competition in

today’s global economy? If you think about these issues, then Infonomics is the right choice for you.

Why should you choose Infonomics?

Infonomics uniquely combines economics with business

from an Information Technology (IT) perspective. This

means that, on the one hand, it looks at how businesses

use IT to stay ahead of the competition. On the other hand,

it looks at how government policies stimulate innovation,

and the effect of this on people’s lives.

Infonomics is a broad programme in the sense that it

covers individual companies as well as national and

international economies. It’s also specialised in the sense

that it focuses on the role of IT.

In your first year, you will follow a wide range of courses

that all Economics and Business Economics students will

take. In your second year, you will study certain compulsory

Infonomics courses. While in your third year, you will be

able to choose between some electives, and between

studying or following an internship abroad.

Case Infonomics:

Examining the economic implications of illegal music downloads

Lots of music fans use the Internet to find and download music. As a

result, global takings from CD sales have fallen. Music companies are

now trying to enforce intellectual property rights more strongly. From an

economic perspective, a solution to the problem of illegal downloading

could simply be to publish new music files for free. Could a strategy like

this actually be profitable? As an Infonomics student, you will examine

this sort of current issue and its wider economic implications.

What will you learn?

Having completed this programme, you will be able to:

• evaluate information systems in an economics context;

• assess the quality and value of information and

information systems, and plan how to improve the

economic value of both;

• understand the economic and social environment in

which IT functions, and its impact on this environment;

• apply theories in economics, business and management;

• understand how to organise information so it can be

turned into a valuable resource for organisations.

Is Infonomics right for you?

As well as the standard admission requirements

(see page 36), you should:

• be fascinated by the latest technologies, such as mobile

phones, iPods, MP3s and so on;

• be interested in how newly developed Internet

applications change the way business in general, as well

as specific businesses, are organised;

• be an analytical person who also likes learning about

tangible examples;

• be curious about how new technologies affect our lives,

as individuals, companies and society at large.

Studying an economics profile or IT course at school is a

plus but not a requirement.

What are your career prospects?

All of today’s biggest businesses are in IT – look at

Microsoft and Google, for instance. But there’s still a high

demand for IT people in general, and especially those who

can translate the technologies that are available into action

plans for businesses in order to keep them competitive in

today’s global market. In doing so, Infonomics graduates

actively combine their acquired knowledge from both

Economics and Business.

Graduates have found positions in:

• planning and policy making in the field of IT;

• IT consultancy;

• large multinationals, such as Cap Gemini, Accenture, SAP,

Business Objects, Shell and Vodafone;

• the EU and other governmental institutions;

• IT project management, eventually leading to positions

as an IT Manager or Chief Information Officer.

There are certain compulsory courses within this

programme, as well as skills training and electives.

Management of

Organisations and

Marketing

Microeconomics Accounting

Skills Training: Philosophy of Science

Macroeconomics

26 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009 27

Year 1

Term 1

Term 2

Year 2

Term 5

Term 6

Finance

Term 3

2

ICT, Organisation

and Income

Term 4

Year 3

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

4

5

6

Infonomics

Quantitative

Methods I

Quantitative

Methods II

International

Economic Relations

Skills Training: Economy Game

Introduction into the

Information Society

Skills Training: Elective

Free Elective Free Elective

Information, Justice

and the Political

Process

Study Abroad

or Internship Abroad

Capstone Assignment

Knowledge

Management

Skills Training: Quantitative Methods III

Productivity

Network

Economics

Management

Infomation Systems

Information

Management

QE Elective

Skills Training: Elective

ERP and Business

Intelligence Systems

Fast facts

Meeting business and technical goals

“I chose to do an internship at a business intelligence

company in Ireland. I was involved in a project to

create a particular piece of software, responsible

for communicating between the programmers (in

Vancouver) and the business users (in Ireland and

Paris). I had to document the business requirements

and translate these into the programming

requirements – keeping both the business

stakeholders and the programmers happy was not

an easy task, but the project was a success!”

Billy van der Ende

Infonomics student

• Programme title : BSc Economics and Business Economics

• Specialisation: Infonomics

• Language of instruction: English

• Duration: 3 years full time

• Start date: 1 September 2009

• Study abroad: choice between studying abroad and doing an

internship abroad in the third year, in the first or second semester

• Study load per week: 8 hrs classes; 12 hrs group work; 20 hrs

individual study. Total 40 hrs.

• Learning method: problem-based learning; guest lectures;

presentations; assignments; papers

• Assessment method: written exams; final papers; group

participation

• You can obtain 180 ECTS credits in three years

• Continuing master’s programmes at FEBA without additional

admissions requirements:

MSc Infonomics, MSc International Business,

MSc International Economic Studies, MSc Financial Economics

and MSc Management of Learning. You can also continue your

studies with other master’s programmes, but additional

requirements may apply.

Further information:

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/bachelors

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/masters

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/studyguide for course information

• Student Recruitment and Communications Office:

+31 43 388 2055 or bachelorinfo@efb.unimaas.nl

NB. The details of this programme could change;

before applying, please check www.unimaas.nl/feba/bachelors

for the latest information.


“There is growing demand for skilled fiscal

economists who can interact on a senior level

with accountants, tax lawyers and management.”

Bachelor of Science in Fiscal Economics

Taxation with a strong economics foundation

Do you wonder how the government can regulate house or oil prices through taxation? Are you interested in

law as well as economics? Do you want to get involved in politics? Fiscal economics covers all these things,

so read on!

Why should you choose Fiscal Economics?

The effect of taxation is all around us. It makes the price of

products and services more expensive and, depending on

the rate of taxation, more or less affordable. It affects the

labour market (how much people are paid), the housing

market (where they can afford to live), the oil market

(whether they can afford to drive a car, for instance), the

corporate market (how the money that companies make

affects the national – or international – economy) to name

just a few key markets. In short, people, taxation, politics,

law and economics go hand in hand.

Studying Fiscal Economics will give you a background in

economics and tax law. Your first year will be broad in

scope and made up of various compulsory courses. Your

second and third years will focus more specifically on fiscal

economics, and you will have the opportunity to choose

some elective courses. You are not obliged to study abroad

or to take an internship, but you can organise these things

if you wish. Fiscal economics gives you the freedom to steer

your academic career in the direction you choose.

Whatever your areas of interest are, Fiscal Economics will

give you a good background for any master’s programme in

an economics or legal field, or a combination of the two.

What will you learn?

Having completed this programme, you will be able to:

• understand the influence of tax on people’s decisions;

• explain the interaction between economics and taxation.

Is Fiscal Economics right for you?

As well as the standard admission requirements

(see page 36), you should:

• have an interest in politics, such as labour markets,

house prices, and so on;

• want to interact with what’s going on in the news and

apply your studies in the real world;

• be curious and enjoy working out puzzles.

28 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009

29


Case Fiscal Economics: The impact of tax on the oil market

Oil prices are currently volatile. When they rise, transport companies go

on strike, demanding they be reduced. When they fall, demand for oil

increases. Fiscal Economists look at what the government can do to revive

the market – should they lower taxes on oil to re-create demand, or

increase taxes to force innovation in new energy sources?

What are your career prospects?

There’s currently a shortage of fiscal economists, so

demand is high and prospects are excellent. As a fiscal

economist, you can work on two sides of the same coin: as

a tax inspector you can maximise the collection of taxes for

the government; as a tax advisor, you can minimise taxes

paid by companies. Both positions use the same toolkit, but

for different purposes.

As part of your bachelor’s programme, there are many

other ways in which you can gain work experience and

find out about companies. Firms visit the faculty to give

presentations, and the Fiscal Economics study association

‘First’ organises company trips – often abroad – and work

experience opportunities. Moreover, if you choose to do

your master’s in Fiscal Economics at Maastricht University,

you can write your thesis on a particular company.

Graduates have found positions in:

• tax inspection;

• tax advisory or management roles;

• tax consultancy (own business);

• notary firms;

• the big 4 audit firms: KPMG, Ernst & Young,

PricewaterhouseCoopers and Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu;

• multinationals such as DSM, Unilever and Shell;

• tax departments for national governments or the

European Commission.

Course outline

There are certain compulsory courses within this

programme, as well as skills and electives.

Management of

Organisations and

Marketing

30 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009

31

Year 1

Term 1

Term 2

Year 2

Term 3

Term 4

Year 3

Term 5

Term 6

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

4

5

6

Fiscal Economics

Microeconomics

Kostprijsverhogende

Belastingen

Accounting

Skills Training: Philosophy of Science

Macroeconomics

Finance

Hoofdzaken Formeel

Belastingrecht

Vennootschapsbelasting

Nederlands

Internationaal

Belastingrecht

Skills Training: Elective

Quantitative

Methods I

Quantitative

Methods II

International

Economic Relations

Skills Training: Economy Game

Privaatrecht

Financial Markets

Openbare Financiën

en Public Choice

Skills Training: Quantitative Methods III

Design of

Tax Systems

International

Financial Accounting

Structuur Loon- en Inkomstenbelasting

Skills Training: Elective

Accounting II

Inleiding

Ondernemings- en

Faillissementsrecht

Winst uit

Onderneming

Internal Control and

Accounting Information

Systems

Elective

Skills Training: Presentation Skills

Fast facts

A winning combination

“I was interested in a lot of things when I was applying

to university – politics, law, economics and more – so

Fiscal Economics really stood out for me as the right

choice. Taxation isn’t just about money – it’s about

government laws, policies and regulations, and

people’s behaviour in the markets – and about the

way that all those things impact the economy.”

Rein Hoefnagels, the Netherlands

Fiscal Economics student

• Programme title: BSc Fiscal Economics

• Language of instruction: English and Dutch

• Duration: 3 years full time

• Start date: 1 September 2009

• Study abroad: optional

• Study load per week: 8 hrs classes; 12 hrs group work; 20 hrs

individual study. Total 40 hrs.

• Learning method: problem-based learning; guest lectures;

presentations; assignments; papers

• Assessment method: written exams; final papers;

group participation

• You can obtain 180 ECTS credits in three years

• Continuing master’s programmes at FEBA without additional

admissions requirements:

MSc Fiscal Economics and MSc Management of Learning.

You can also continue your studies with other master’s

programmes, but additional requirements may apply.

Further information:

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/bachelors

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/masters

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/studyguide for course information

• Student Recruitment and Communications Office:

+31 43 388 2055 or bachelorinfo@efb.unimaas.nl

NB. The details of this programme could change;

before applying, please check www.unimaas.nl/feba/bachelors

for the latest information.


“Econometrics can be applied to everything

from business to finance, and from macro to

microeconomics.”

Bachelor of Science in Econometrics and Operations Research

Applying mathematical methods to economic problems

Ever wanted to know the secret of solving a Sudoku puzzle? Or if there’s a way you can predict which

companies’ shares are going to go up in value? They may sound like totally different problems, but

econometrics can help you solve both!

Why should you choose Econometrics and

Operations Research?

Econometrics allows you to estimate and predict trends

accurately. That could mean predicting anything from next

year’s inflation rate to the best investments for a pension

portfolio. Operations research, on the other hand, allows

you to allocate time, money or people to a process in order

to meet demand. This could include making sure that

parcels and packages are delivered as quickly and cheaply

as possible across the world. Or it could include scheduling

a lesson timetable in a school so that students get the best

education given a limited number of teachers.

In order to do all of these things, especially on a large scale,

you need models, theories and computer programs to help

you. You also need to understand how people’s behaviour

– employees, consumers or producers, for instance –

affect the market, meaning that these same theories and

programs don’t always work. Studying Econometrics and

Operations Research will give you the tools to modify these

theories and programs yourself, so that you can identify

problems and find real, practical solutions to them.

In your first two years, you are required to study certain

core courses; in your third year, you can choose from

various electives. As part of your third year, you will spend

one semester studying abroad.

What will you learn?

Having completed this programme, you will be able to:

• analyse problems and solve them logically using the

tools that you will acquire;

• translate and apply acquired techniques to different

problems.

Is Econometrics and Operations Research

right for you?

As well as the standard admission requirements

(see page 36), you should:

• be confident in mathematics;

• enjoy logic puzzles;

• be willing to work hard;

• have a strong academic record in a technical profile.

32 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009

33


Case Econometrics and Operations Research:

Everyday econometrics

If you’ve ever bought an airline ticket, you may have noticed that prices

can differ from day to day, going both up and down. Computerised,

flexible ticket pricing has become a major source of revenue for

international airline companies. The idea is simple: lower prices for a

particular flight will increase demand and prevent empty seats. But how

can you predict these effects and how can these predictions be translated

into profit in a competitive environment? These are the kinds of puzzles

that econometricians solve.

What are your career prospects?

A bachelor’s qualification in Econometrics and Operations

Research is a good background for most master’s

programmes in economics-related subjects. Having

completed your master’s, there will be many opportunities

in front of you: lots of students are attracted by the travel

opportunities that a career in a multinational company

gives you. Moreover, the university’s practical, hands-on,

discussion-based approach produces great managers.

Graduates have found positions in:

• large multinationals, such as Philips and DSM;

• technical positions, going on to fill top managerial

functions;

• large finance and pension firms, such as ABP;

• government functions;

• research, especially for PhD programmes.

Course outline

There are certain compulsory courses within this

programme, as well as skills and electives.

Management of

Organizations and

Marketing

34 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009

35

Year 1

Term 1

Term 2

Year 2

Term 3

Term 4

Year 3

Term 5

Term 6

Econometrics and Operations Research

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

4

5

6

Microeconomics

Skills Training: Philosophy of Science

Macroeconomics

Finance

Elective

Elective Advanced Methods II

Skills Training: Elective

Analysis I & Linear

Algebra & Orientation

Analysis II & Probability

Theory & Orientation

Probability Theory

& Orientation

Skills Training: Orientation

Optimization

Programming

Game Theory

and Economics

Skills Training: Second-year Project I

Mathematical

Statistics

Econometric

Methods

Macroeconomics

and Finance

Operations Research

Skills Training: Second-year Project II

Study Abroad

Bachelor’s Thesis

Information, Markets

and Organization

Advanced Methods I

Fast facts

A challenging choice

“Econometrics is one of the most fascinating subjects

I’ve ever studied. Firstly, it connects economic

principles with mathematic theories, which gives

them a solid grounding in the real world; secondly,

it allows you to discover not only how to reach the

solution but also why; and last but not least, it is

certainly challenging! If you like to push yourself, then

econometrics is definitely the best choice for you.”

Zhen Wang, China

Econometrics and Operations Research student

• Programme title: BSc Econometrics and Operations Research

• Language of instruction: English

• Duration: 3 years full time

• Start date: 1 September 2009

• Study abroad: compulsory in the third year, in the first or second

semester

• Study load per week: 8 hrs classes; 12 hrs group work; 20 hrs

individual study. Total 40 hrs.

• Learning method: problem-based learning; guest lectures;

presentations; assignments; papers

• Assessment method: written exams; final papers; group

participation; case studies

• You can obtain 180 ECTS credits in three years

• Continuing master’s programmes at FEBA without additional

admissions requirements:

MSc Econometrics and Operations Research,

MSc Financial Economics and MSc Management of Learning.

You can also continue your studies with other master’s

programmes, but additional requirements may apply.

Further information:

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/bachelors

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/masters

• www.unimaas.nl/feba/studyguide for course information

• Student Recruitment and Communications Office:

+31 43 388 2055 or bachelorinfo@efb.unimaas.nl

NB. The details of this programme could change;

before applying, please check www.unimaas.nl/feba/bachelors

for the latest information.


Application procedure and deadlines

Admission requirements

Dutch diploma

You may be admitted to one of the faculty’s bachelor’s

programmes below if you have a VWO diploma in one of

the profiles listed beneath each programme:

Economics and Business Economics, Fiscal Economics

bachelor’s programmes:

• ‘Natuur en Techniek’

• ‘Natuur en Gezondheid’

• ‘Economie en Maatschappij’

• ‘Cultuur en Maatschappij’

International Business bachelor’s programme:

• ‘Natuur en Techniek’

• ‘Natuur en Gezondheid’

• ‘Economie en Maatschappij’

• ‘Cultuur en Maatschappij’ (incl. WiA1,2/ WiB1)

Econometrics and Operations Research bachelor’s

programme:

• ‘Natuur en Techniek’

• ‘Natuur en Gezondheid’

• ‘Economie en Maatschappij’ (incl. WiB1)

• ‘Cultuur en Maatschappij’ (incl. WiB1)

Non-Dutch diploma

Students who finished their secondary education outside

the Netherlands must have a diploma that is equivalent

to the Dutch VWO diploma. For a comparative overview,

please visit:

www.unimaas.nl > Prospective Bachelor’s students

Application procedure

All bachelor’s applicants should apply via Studielink

www.studielink.nl

In addition, students with a non-Dutch diploma should also

apply directly to Maastricht University. An application form

is available from:

www.unimaas.nl > Prospective bachelor’s students >

Admissions

Exemptions

If you have undertaken previous studies at another

institution, you may be considered for exemption from part

of your chosen bachelor’s programme. If you think you may

be eligible, you can submit a request for entry to a higher

year or credit transfer on the basis of previous education to

Student Services. They will then forward your application

to the Examination Committee, who will decide whether to

accredit your previous studies officially.

Special application procedure for International

Business

The number of places available for the International

Business programme is limited to 500 (‘numerus fixus’). If

the number of applicants exceeds this capacity, there will

be a central lottery selection for 250 places via the national

application office ‘Informatie Beheer Groep’ (IBG). The

remaining 250 places will be allocated to students who

have a high ranking in the selection procedure, as assigned

by the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration,

or to students with a Dutch diploma who have an average

grade of 8 or higher.

For more details on the selection procedure, please visit:

www.unimaas.nl/feba/numerusfixus

For details of the central lottery, please visit:

www.ib-groep.nl

For all applicants

Only complete files will be evaluated and considered for

admission. An application will be considered incomplete if

any of the following items are missing:

• the paper version of the application form;

• a copy of your passport;

• a secondary school degree with a certified transcript of

exam subjects and grades*;

• proof of English language proficiency, a test of English as

a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score, an International

English Language Testing System (IELTS) score, or proof

of being native English speaker is mandatory if you are

a national from a country that is not a member of the

European Union (EU) or European Economic Area (EEA).

A satisfactory TOEFL score implies a score of at least 550

on the paper-based test, 213 on the computer-based test

or 79 on the Internet-based test. A satisfactory IELTS

score implies a score of at least 6.0. You are required to

indicate the Maastricht University code number on the

test form while taking the TOEFL test. The code number

is 7102 for the TOEFL test. No code number is required for

the IELTS test. Please be aware that the TOEFL and IELTS

test scores are only valid for two years.

* However, if you have not yet completed your secondary

school programme when applying for one of our

bachelor’s programmes, you may send your most recent

transcript of exam subjects and grades. Applicants who

have not received their secondary school degree at the

time of evaluation can be admitted conditionally and

have to submit their degree with a certified transcript

of exam subjects and grades before the start of the

programme in order to obtain unconditional admission.

Application deadlines

If you’re applying for a bachelor’s programme starting in

September 2009, it’s important to meet the following

application deadlines:

• 1 April 2009 for students from countries who need a visa or

residence permit;

• 1 September 2009 for students from EU/EEA countries and

Switzerland.

Please note that there are special application deadlines for the

‘numerus fixus’ International Business programme:

• 1 April 2009 if you wish to take part in the selection

procedure;

• 1 May 2009 for the central lottery.

Further information:

For more information about admission requirements for your

chosen programme, please contact:

Maastricht University

Student Services

P.O. Box 616

6200 MD Maastricht

The Netherlands

Phone: +31 43 388 5388

Email: study@unimaas.nl

Internet: www.unimaas.nl

36 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009 37


Preparation Financial matters

Standard tests

Depending on the nationality on your passport, there

are some standard tests we ask you to take to check your

eligibility.

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)

The TOEFL test measures your ability to communicate in

English in colleges and universities. As a non-native speaker

of English, it will test your ability to use and understand

written and verbal English. It is the internationally accepted

standard of academic English proficiency.

www.toefl.org

International English Language Testing System

(IELTS)

IELTS measures your ability to communicate in English

across all four language skills – listening, reading, writing

and speaking. It is designed for people who intend to study

or work in situations where English is the language of

communication.

www.ielts.org

Nederlands als Tweede Taal (NT2)

NT2 exams are designed for non-Dutch speakers to test

their level of Dutch grammar and fluency. This requirement

applies only to applicants to the bachelor’s programme in

Fiscal Economics.

www.nt2examen.nl

Online prior knowledge tests

No matter what secondary school degree you have, you

may want to ensure your level of subject knowledge is

sufficiently high to start your bachelor’s degree. For this

reason, we offer online knowledge tests in certain subject

areas; these will identify if and where you have knowledge

‘gaps’ and suggest online courses that you can follow to fill

them.

Online knowledge tests currently available for all bachelor’s

programmes at the faculty are:

Economics

• Mathematics

These prior knowledge tests are completely online and

can therefore be taken in your own time. They are free of

charge and accessible to all students who have submitted

their application for one of the bachelor’s programmes. See

admission requirements below.

www.unimaas.nl/onlinepreparatorycourse

Online preparatory courses

Having taken one or more online knowledge test, you may

be advised to take online preparatory courses to improve

your level of knowledge on particular topics. These courses

are tailor made to fill your particular needs, as identified by

the prior tests.

These courses are currently free of charge and are

completely online, allowing you to be flexible about when

you choose to study. You should, however, allow three to

four weeks to complete the courses. They also allow you

to contact your teacher and fellow students via online

communities and video conferencing. Surveys have shown

that the average grades of students who have followed

preparatory courses are higher than those who haven’t.

Admission requirements for online knowledge

tests and preparatory courses

The courses are only accessible to prospective students

who have submitted their application for one of the

relevant bachelor’s programmes, irrespective of whether

they have already been admitted.

The time schedule for the online knowledge tests and

preparatory courses is as follows:

For September 2009 intake:

• 1 June 2009 – 31 June 2009: Online knowledge tests

• 15 July 2009 – 31 August 2009: Online preparatory

courses

www.unimaas.nl/onlinepreparatorycourse

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for programmes starting in 2009 are:

• € 1,597 per year for students under the age of 30 who are

EU, EEA or Swiss nationals;

• € 2,058 per year for students over the age of 30 who are

EU, EEA or Swiss nationals;

• € 8,000 per year for students who are not nationals of

the EU/EEA or Switzerland.

These fees are an indication of those that apply for

the 2009-10 academic year; for the most up-to-date

information, please visit:

www.unimaas.nl

Grants and scholarships

We want the best, most-talented students, who are

seeking excellent education and research in a challenging,

international study environment. For this reason, you can

apply for a number of scholarships to study at Maastricht

University. Applications should be sent by 1 April 2009 to

the Board of Admissions.

www.unimaas.nl/feba/scholarships

Grants for international students

The Dutch government and Maastricht University make

grants available for international students wishing to study

in the Netherlands. You will find more information about

the conditions and the application procedures at:

www.nuffic.nl

www.grantfinder.nl

www.unimaas.nl

The European Union offers several scholarship programmes

for both EU and non-EU students. In addition, you should

enquire about any grants, scholarships or funding that may

be available in your country of origin.

You can also contact the UM Scholarship Office to enquire

about your options: scholarships@ssc.unimaas.nl

Top 3% of students study ‘for free’

The top 3% of students are eligible for a scholarship to cover

their tuition fees.

Living expenses

As a student, you will have expenses that are directly related

to your studies, like tuition fees, textbooks and other learning

materials. But your lifestyle will cost money too: you should

take housing, utilities, groceries, insurance and leisure

activities into account.

Maastricht is a small city, so most students spend little money

on transport, preferring instead to walk or cycle. Housing

will be your biggest expense. Dutch universities do not have

on-campus accommodation, so you will need to find housing

privately. Your personal expenses – food, clothing, etc. – will

vary depending on your lifestyle. The table below provides you

with a rough guide:

Living and study expenses

38 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009 39

Accommodation

Groceries

Learning materials

Insurance

Telephone bill

Total

Monthly estimated costs

€300 - €350

€200 - €300

€35 - €50

€35 - €50

€30 - €50

€600 - €700


Notes

40 Bachelor’s programmes in Business and Economics | 2009 41


www.unimaas.nl

Contact information

Maastricht University

Faculty of Economics and

Business Administration

Tongersestraat 53

PO Box 616

6200 MD Maastricht

The Netherlands

Phone: +31 43 388 2055

Email: bachelorinfo@efb.unimaas.nl

Personal appointment:

www.unimaas.nl/feba/contact

Based in Europe, focused on the world. Maastricht University is a stimulating

environment. Where research and teaching are complementary. Where innovation

is our focus. Where talent can flourish. A truly student oriented research university.

Bachelor’s information activities

To get an idea of what being a student at Maastricht University is like, why not

come along to one of our open days or become a ‘student-for-a-day’?

Open days

• Saturday, 8 November 2008

• Saturday, 28 March 2009

• Wednesday, 10 June 2009

‘Student-for-a-day’ opportunities

• Wednesday, 3 December 2008

• Wednesday, 14 January 2009

• Wednesday, 18 February 2009

• Wednesday, 29 April 2009

• Wednesday, 27 May 2009

© 2008 Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, the Netherlands.

Text: The Write Company, Amsterdam | Photography: Pascal Hermans, Hasselt; Arjen Schmitz, Maastricht; Lorraine Bodewes, Maastricht;

Gregor Ramaekers, Maastricht; Bart Groen, Maastricht; Carin Willemsen / Coproductions, Sittard; Joey Roberts, Maastricht; StudioPress/VVVMaastricht |

Concept and design templat: Vormgeversassociatie BV, Hoog-Keppel | Layout and production: Diamedia Minds, Maastricht | Final editing: Anke Wijnen

Although this brochure was made with the utmost care, no rights can be derived from it.

BSR0057

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