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1984-1985 Rothberg Yearbook

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The publication of<br />

<strong>Yearbook</strong> marks the transformation<br />

of One-Year Program<br />

students into OYP alurmi. As<br />

your perspective of the Hebrew<br />

University experience crystallizes<br />

and matures, you may search for the<br />

mast appropriate way of keeping alive<br />

the Jerusalem connection.<br />

This connection will develop different<br />

forms, and on different levels, thus<br />

each individual will in sane way preserve<br />

his own private Jerusalen.<br />

If you wish to maintain a practical link<br />

with the University, we invite you to join<br />

the School of Overseas Students Alurmi<br />

Association. Alurmi are now setting up<br />

regional chapters in various parts of the<br />

United States and Canada. Your affiliation with<br />

such groups will help strengthen the bond betwteen<br />

the University and Alurmi throughout the world.<br />

A growing percentage of ex-OYPers return to<br />

Jerusalem for graduate study: the number 9 awaits<br />

your return. .<br />

Israel Roi<br />

End-of-the year letters are a strange occasion - a<br />

mix of trying to find a way to sun up a rich<br />

complex experience; to say good-bye to a group of<br />

students who gave this school life and meaning<br />

during their stay; and to link this year with<br />

us both to your future and ours.<br />

Perhaps the best way to do all these things<br />

is to thank you all for the work, interest<br />

and enthusiasm that you invested during<br />

this year. It is the highest testimony<br />

to what you will take away with you, and<br />

to the work of your teachers and staff<br />

who helped make it come about. Fran<br />

now on, wherever you go or whatever<br />

you fin a lly do, you are part of the<br />

Hebrew University family. You are<br />

part of a tradition that stretches<br />

backwards into time and into a<br />

future to which, in your own<br />

way, you have now contributed.<br />

This is probably the best<br />

going-away gift that we can<br />

give: the consciousness of<br />

joining this tradition and<br />

having added your own<br />

unique impression. Again,<br />

our thanks, our best<br />

wishes for the future,<br />

and our hope to see<br />

you with us again.<br />

Professor<br />

Zev Klein<br />

4


. . . n m m nbirtN ^ n d<br />

“ The land consumes its inhabitants...” So it is written, so it<br />

is. To touch Israel is to be touched, tantalized torm ented in<br />

turn. The haunting voices of this people, landscape, history<br />

clamor to be heard.<br />

May the touch and voices of this land give strength and light<br />

in the years to come.<br />

o iw oîtf o a riN *<br />

AHARON SINGER<br />

Director, One Year Program<br />

Pick a class...<br />

any class<br />

I<br />

I I<br />

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5


FROM THE DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF STUDENT<br />

ACTIVITIES<br />

When attem pting to view this year in<br />

perspective, one soon realizes that the experience<br />

o f studying in Israel is an amalgamation o f tangible<br />

and intangible links that form an holistic chain.<br />

Jerusalem and its University are symbols of these<br />

indivisible links.<br />

F or it is Jerusalem that is at the heart of<br />

Judaism. The quest for knowledge and<br />

understanding, as symbolized by the Hebrew<br />

University, is as much a part of the Jewish People<br />

as its yearning for freedom and sovereignty.<br />

To capture the essence of these individual links<br />

and the chain in its entirety is, perhaps, an<br />

impossible task. Prophets, poets, travellers and<br />

theologians alike have been consumed by this<br />

awesome challenge for as long as J erusalem has<br />

existed. This yearbook is part of that heritage. Its<br />

editors and contributors have made their attem pt<br />

to grasp the intangible and focus on the tangibles<br />

th at are the true substance o f their experience at<br />

the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. This volume<br />

represents a tangible link in this historical chain<br />

and, in years to come, may serve as an essential<br />

tool for forming even stronger bonds betw een you<br />

and both the tangibles and intangibles that are<br />

synonym ous w ith Jerusalem.<br />

Sometime in the future, each of you will have<br />

to grapple w ith seeking a self-definition for your<br />

bond to Jerusalem and all it symbolizes. It is my<br />

hope that the tools we have provided you w ith and<br />

the opportunities we have offered you will, in<br />

some small measure, help you to forge your own<br />

link in this eternal chain. Moreover, I am<br />

that you will not only succeed in defining your<br />

place in this chain but make a firm com m itm ent to<br />

the future of Israel and the Jewish People that th


7


R<br />

ErLECTI0NS.<br />

Waiting... Walking... Wandering.<br />

Terminal to Terminal<br />

Line to Line<br />

Booming unintelligible the voice overhead<br />

What language?<br />

Situation under Control<br />

my ticket to life is in my hands<br />

Israel —The Third Time<br />

..IN A N EL-AL TERM IN AL<br />

Yarmulkes floating on a sea of heads<br />

but... a mugging...<br />

Lubavitchers screaming “ Tephillin<br />

Tephillin”<br />

° y.<br />

The holy tongue —<br />

1 had forgotten how wonderful<br />

it is listening to the ancient songs.<br />

“ It’s Been a LongiTime Coming.<br />

J. Israel Shuman<br />

Fairfax, Va.<br />

8


i / f < i e l : t h e f i i / l l i m e<br />

Bloodshot eyes gaze through<br />

windows flooded by light,<br />

blue sea shines bright,<br />

low clouds obscure the coast...<br />

Commotion in front,<br />

excited sounds make their way back.<br />

Heart-wrenching cries soon clamor,<br />

Is it Home?<br />

Milk and Honey?<br />

Eyes-sea-landthe<br />

breaking surf,<br />

ivory white beaches,<br />

rolling brown sand dunes,<br />

lush green verdant fields.<br />

We all celebrate!<br />

Crying... Ha’tikva... Our Hope.<br />

Land o f my ancestors,<br />

I have finally arrived.<br />

My long cycle is complete,<br />

and by kissing the land<br />

I am reborn.<br />

HOME, at last.<br />

o n m e bordé r..<br />

(written at the outset of my one year stay in Israel Oct. 29, <strong>1984</strong>)<br />

On the border:<br />

In my mind I can grab the other side.<br />

I t ’s somehow already a part o f me.<br />

I need only to find the path<br />

To connection.<br />

To pass over the border,<br />

And find Israel.<br />

The people<br />

Oh, the people<br />

The undefined chosen<br />

Those flying the jets<br />

Those sitting on the buses<br />

And even the beggars on the corner<br />

They endured the fight and the pain<br />

And remain on the path.<br />

And I am now on the border<br />

To join them.<br />

For I must,<br />

And I am glad.<br />

DAVID BONINGER<br />

Ohio


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Probably one of the best ways to begin the One Year Program is<br />

to play the peculiar and reliable little game called Jewish<br />

Geography. It is the easiest and by far the most popular way to<br />

meet new people and recognize old acquaintances. The S.O.P<br />

(Standard Operating Procedure) goes something like this:<br />

“Er... Excuse me but... wow... you look familiar.”<br />

“Yeah, so do you. Where are you from” ?<br />

“I’m from (place). And you”?<br />

“I live near there, in (place). I think I remember you from:<br />

A. US Y B. Ramah C. NCSY D. FTY E. BBYO F. Other<br />

jp “Far out, its been so long. Remember me? I’m (name).”<br />

B “I’m (nam e).”<br />

From here the conversation naturally turns to memories. Light<br />

boasting, old love lives, and of course, “What are you doing<br />

here”?<br />

Take, for example, these incidents on the El A1 plane before we<br />

taxied for take off:<br />

“Hi, I’m Josh.”<br />

“Hi, I’m Rebecca.”<br />

“Where are you from” ?<br />

“I grew up in Massachusetts but go to the U. Wisconsin/Madison.”<br />

“Wow, I have a real good friend, D.F. Po. You know him? Tall,<br />

gawky, glasses, short hair, journalism school”?<br />

“Does he belong to ZBT”?<br />

“Yes!”<br />

“He took me to a dance at the frat once.”<br />

“How do you know him”?<br />

“High school.”<br />

“Where do you go to school”?<br />

“Oberlin.”<br />

“Really? I know a couple of guys, J.N. and B.R.”<br />

“Sure I know ’em. We were all in the Kosher Coop together.”<br />

From then on our conversation flowed like good wine, not the<br />

Israeli stuff. And, imagine, it was all due to Jewish Geography.<br />

Next sitting on the other side was Heather. Our talk went<br />

something like this: “Gee you look familiar. I’m Heather.”<br />

“Yeah, I know you from somewhere, I’m...”<br />

“You’re Josh, right”? USY Pilgrimage 1981.”<br />

“Yeah, and you’re Heather Zacker, right”?<br />

“How are you”? we said in unison.<br />

“I know I recognized you from somewhere. You look so<br />

familiar.”<br />

Once again Jewish Geography struck. How on earth did El A1<br />

know to put us together? I don’t know, but during our talks<br />

Paula walked up, being a close friend of Heather’s, recognized me<br />

and proceeded to tell me that our families were friends but had<br />

not seen each other in ten years. Very uncanny. Nonetheless it’s<br />

true and the same could happen to you. Just trust in Jewish<br />

Geography.<br />

J. ISRAEL SHUMAN<br />

Fairfax, Va.


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It’s funny how Summer Ulpan ended<br />

Afl '<br />

nearly one year ago, yet m y impressions<br />

o f it are so clear that it seems like<br />

"yesterday. I’ll never forget my first day.<br />

I got up early for my ice-cold shower in<br />

ankle-deep water, cooked m yself breakfast<br />

am idst hordes o f scrawny, begging<br />

kittens, and rushed out to battle the<br />

crowds for a standing-room-only spot on<br />

the 28 bus from Givat Ram to Mt.<br />

Scopus.<br />

When I finally found my way through<br />

the labyrinthian halls o f the Humanities<br />

Building to my classroom it was already<br />

full of a menagerie o f people. Peru,<br />

Scotland, Japan, France, and Holland, as<br />

well as N orth America, were represented.<br />

As a class our first words were, “ Mah<br />

Shim khah?” When the teacher got to my<br />

name she laughed and asked w hether “ was pronounced as Dog or Dag (fish). Either way I lost,<br />

b u t I didn’t feel as bad after I realized that someone else’s name was Ken (p ).<br />

A fter the first class I was exhausted and felt as if I had learned nothing. I just felt so stupid when<br />

the teacher would stand over me, spitting words into my face and im patiently waiting for my<br />

inevitably incorrect answers. O f course by the end of the class the m orah would always look as if she<br />

were going to strangle me out o f frustration.<br />

Just as I had resigned myself to Hebraic failure I ended up sitting next to an Israeli on the bus<br />

home. I tried to speak Hebrew and was actually able to primitively com municate. I was thrilled.<br />

Every day we progressed at breackneck speed and learned amazing am ounts o f Hebrew. Quickly a<br />

strong camaraderie developed between the students and our ex-hapless teacher. It was really rewarding<br />

studying Hebrew, for we received immediate gratification and results from using it with Israelis.<br />

As we worked ourselves into the ulpan schedule the intensity of learning increased. Fortunately this<br />

environm ent was alleviated by the many OSA activities as well as the weekends in Tel-Aviv.<br />

Eventually Ulpan ended and I was relieved to have finally finished the stream o f long classroom<br />

hours. At the same tim e I was sorry to see all of the fun things Ulpan entailed.<br />

W ithin the space of just a few weeks many people jum ped one or tw o Hebrew levels. Their successes<br />

were amazing, as m ost of them had no or vejy little background in the Hebrew language before classes<br />

began. I found Ulpan to be a very rewarding period in which all o f us gained valuable basic skills<br />

allowing us to gain a real feel for Israel and her people.<br />

DOUG MILLER<br />

Amherst, NY


memories<br />

from<br />

theghetto<br />

The bathroom s were simple. A simple shock. The<br />

design was not unique, but rather upsettlingly<br />

similar to those facilities unearthed by archaeologists<br />

throughout the land. Water from each<br />

shower was led through indentations in the floor,<br />

on ditches, to a com m on trough. This trough was<br />

strategically built beneath the sinks so that openended<br />

pipes from each sink could em pty their<br />

contents into the ditch. Em pathy with the ancient<br />

Romans was the result, for daily these ditches<br />

overflowed. These swelling puddles, w ith soap<br />

scum resting above, took the m ost logical course:<br />

across the hall to the kitchen.<br />

The clogging was caused by a simple phenomenon<br />

— cat hairs. Ha-Elef was student dorm itory<br />

in the books, but anyone who has inhabited those<br />

structures knows that in practice there is a larger<br />

population o f cats than students. Every night was<br />

full of shrieks and screams... sounds of turm oil<br />

within our com peting neighborhood of cats. Perhaps<br />

the m ost shocking part of this element of the Givat<br />

Ram experience were the signs that went up on<br />

every entrance, “ D on’t touch the cats, they have<br />

diseases.” Funny — becuase just yesterday there<br />

were tw o cats in our kitchen wandering from one<br />

table to the next, wiping every surface with their<br />

tails. Diseases? And what exactly were those<br />

diseases? We were never certain, but our doubt<br />

caused those felines to become our enemies. We<br />

were at war everyday — coaxing them through the<br />

halls and out the doors... beating them to the<br />

kitchen, slamming our doors right before they<br />

made an entrance. Strongly, in spite of the stressful<br />

situation, the day those cats fell silent the Givat<br />

Ram residents were left uneasy. And what exactly<br />

happened to the cats anyway?<br />

Such shared experiences have a tendency to<br />

unite populations, and this population was united.<br />

Having confronted these daily challenges together,<br />

— this population became a strangely “ united<br />

front.”<br />

STEPHANIE GREENBALL<br />

SARAH COGDELL<br />

Go! Scot!! S K R nm i<br />

13


T H E G R E A T A D V E N T U R E -,<br />

t h e first m o n th<br />

When I volunteered to write about my six-week<br />

sentence at Givat Ram, I thought it would be no<br />

problem to think of some experience that I had<br />

while there. But for some reason, I’ve lost (blocked<br />

out) all memory associated with that place I once<br />

called home.<br />

I think Givat Ram, where we stayed during<br />

summer Ulpan, will always hold a special place in<br />

all our hearts and in all our m inds-except for those<br />

o f you, poor souls, how had to spend your Ulpan<br />

in Haifa.<br />

What follows are some of my favorite m om ents<br />

that I’d like to share. Hopefully, upon reading this,<br />

you too, will remembers your fondest times there.<br />

I rem em ber the mornings of standing in front<br />

of the shower, telling myself that a little cold water<br />

never hurt anyone.<br />

Or standing calmly by m yself and waiting for<br />

the No. 28 bus. And as it approched, being engulfed<br />

by 200 other sleepy souls, all vying for the<br />

same space on that bus.<br />

I also remember being part of that experimental<br />

group that actually lined up to wait for the bus.<br />

Oh, the stories that driver m ust’ve told at the<br />

station that day!<br />

I always used to wonder what it would taste<br />

like if I put a cat in my W onderpot on high heat.<br />

How ’bout that morning when we came out of<br />

the shower and saw that briefcase in the hall, all by<br />

itself. “ No, you go get Amotz, I ’ll run like hell!”<br />

But there were good times at Givat Ram, too.<br />

It was there that I found the true meaning of<br />

Shabbat. Everyone who didn’t catch the last bus<br />

out of Jerusalem got together with his or her<br />

specialty and we tasted new and exotic foods, like<br />

Rochelle’s rice!<br />

I could go on and on, but I w on’t. We all have<br />

the memories we want to keep from our stay there.<br />

So I’ll close with this final thought...<br />

I’ve thought for many hours why we were<br />

forced to endure Givat Ram and the only solution<br />

I could come up with was the sole purpose of our<br />

stay at Givat Ram was to make us appreciate Mt.<br />

Scopus that much m o re. If that was the reason, it<br />

worked.<br />

STEVE JACOBSON<br />

N orthridge,Ca.<br />

14


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18


M y J e w is h E x p e rie n c e<br />

Entry No. 1 :<br />

Well, this past weekend can be defined as one of the most<br />

memorable of my life. I am very drained from all the<br />

activity. I stayed in Baruch Levine’s youth hostel for Rosh<br />

Hashanah and for the following Shabbat Shuva. I stayed<br />

with various families around Jerusalem for the festive<br />

meals. I learned a great deal about myself and about my<br />

Judaism. For example, I learned that we eat a pomegranate<br />

during Rosh Hashanah, so that our mitzvot will increase<br />

like the numerous seeds in the fruit. We also dipped our<br />

challah into honey, so we can be blessed (hopefully) for a<br />

sweet year — as opposed to the usual custom of dipping in<br />

salt, which is symbolic of past sacrifices.<br />

I davened at one of the Sephardic shuls in the Jewish<br />

Quarter on the first day of Rosh Hashanah. They have an<br />

interesting custom of really elaborating the Torah service. I<br />

thought that was very nice, especially since it reminded me<br />

of a story I once heard that goes as follows: “Prayers are<br />

our way of talking to God while Torah reading is actually<br />

God ‘talking’ to us.” Some of their unique customs are<br />

opening the Torah when it is initially taken out, auctioning<br />

off aliyot and shaking a person’s hand after being called up<br />

to the bimah and then immediately kissing their tzitzit.<br />

This is their only way of sharing the honor with others.<br />

Entry No. 2:<br />

My whole life has been building to this time in my life<br />

when I see the clear picture of Judaism. I had always been<br />

intrigued by the Shabbat service, especially the songs. I owe<br />

this early love of Judaism to my parents. My mother would<br />

take me to shul every Shabbat when I was a little boy. As I<br />

grew older, I was able to hold on to my traditional Jewish<br />

values. My six-week tour of Israel two years ago was the<br />

key to unlocking my true Jewish identity. Consequently,<br />

I’m now striving to be a committed observant Jew.<br />

I believe in miracles! The Almighty has been so great to<br />

me that I can’t even count the ways. The Almighty has led<br />

me to the discovery of the truths and pleasures of this<br />

world. Now I have the obligation as well as the opportunity<br />

of returning this kindness by becoming diligent in the study<br />

of Torah. God willing, I can change myself instead of being<br />

changed by outside pressures.<br />

JEFFEY ORKIN<br />

Sharon, Massachusettes<br />

19


Fickleness has never been a trait of mine (at least a<br />

strong one) until the time arrived for me to decide how I<br />

would spend my October break. Before departing for<br />

Israel, I had firmly decided to travel to Greece and Italy<br />

during this break. My firm decisions began to crumble in<br />

Ulpan; I realized how weak my command of Hebrew was<br />

and decided to remain in Israel to strengthen my<br />

language skills and to acquaint myself with Israelis and<br />

their way of life. The best alternative, I thought at the<br />

time, would be to five on a Kibbutz.<br />

Well, after I heard some riveting horror stories about<br />

volunteers on kibbutzim, I changed my mind again.<br />

Simultaneously, I was suffering from a bout of homesickness<br />

and considered popping over to the States for a<br />

brief visit. Finally, one week before vacation, I decided<br />

that I wanted to live with a family on a moshav. The<br />

benefits of a moshav would be threefold: I could fulfill<br />

my childhood dream of living on a farm, I’d cure my<br />

homesickness by living with a family, and I’d experience<br />

one form of Israeli life.<br />

I was set up with a non-English-speaking Yemenite<br />

family with five kids - the epitome of culture shock.<br />

(Maybe I will go to Greece and Italy; it’s not too late...)<br />

So the following week, I headed up to the moshav,<br />

which was ultimately a great experience, although I was<br />

hesitant to think so at first.<br />

I arrived late afternoon on Erev Rosh Hashanah, as<br />

Sarah, the wife and mother of the household, was in the<br />

midst of a last-ditch effort to make the house sparkle<br />

before the New Year. I approached the house in as<br />

graceful a manner as possible: With pools of sweat<br />

gliding down my face, I lugged my suitcase, a totebag,<br />

backpack, purse, and flowers up a never-ending, jagged<br />

hill which the family lived upon.<br />

Sarah greeted me with a hug, kiss, and an offer of<br />

lemonade. (I liked her already.) As I sipped my<br />

lemonade, I observed Sarah’s exhaustive efforts to<br />

maintain the children and the house, and I conveyed to<br />

her my desire to help make life easier for her during my<br />

month stay. Suddenly, the grandmother thrust a mop<br />

into my hands and told me if I wanted to help, I could<br />

start by scrubbing the floor. I quickly felt a cement pit<br />

expand and sink in my stomach. Sarah quickly snatched<br />

the mop from my hands and shot a nasty glance in her<br />

mother’s direction. I wasn’t looking forward to spending<br />

time alone with the grandmother.<br />

While I sat stiffly glued to my seat attempting to<br />

dodge the grandmother’s-*glares, Sarah began to hurl<br />

questions at me-in rapid Hebrew and I wanted to drown<br />

in my lemonade. I -thought the cement pit in my<br />

stomach would drag me through the floor. Sarah finally<br />

grew tired of my “excuse me” ’s and “slower please”,<br />

and guided me to my room. I faintly heard her teeth<br />

gritting behind her polite smile. “Okay” . I thought, “I’ll<br />

try to listen harder next time.”<br />

I began to feel more at ease with signs of familiarity<br />

at dinner time. I was delighted to see chicken soup<br />

simmering on the stove because it was ‘just like home.<br />

After I sampled a spoonful, however, I realized that<br />

Mom never made chicken soup that burned a hole<br />

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ahead-whoever heard of spicy chicken soup? I glanced<br />

around the table and watched in dismay as the kids<br />

plunked raw jalapeno peppers and onions into mouths as<br />

if they were munching on french fries. That night, I<br />

learned the word “harif” , which means “spicy” in<br />

Hebrew.<br />

As I nervously awaited the next course, I tried to<br />

soothe my throbbing gums, tongue, and cheeks with<br />

pita. Sarah served me a heaping portion of what<br />

appeared to be lasagna at first, but under more<br />

scrutinous observations, looked like pine cones in<br />

tomato sauce. My singeing-red checks cooled to palewhite;<br />

I felt like the king’s food sampler —would I die<br />

or survive this meal? I took a bite and didn’t know how<br />

to gracefully spit out the food since there were no<br />

napkins. The family watched in awe — where did this<br />

creature come from? Sarah asked me if I knew what was<br />

piled on my plate and I thought of some very vulgar<br />

replies but managed to restrain myself. She explained<br />

that it was lamb, and a giggle ensued around the table. I<br />

couldn’t understand what was so funny about eating<br />

lamb. She pointed to her backside to clarify which part<br />

of the lamb I ate. “What a relief,” I sighed to myself. “I<br />

thought it was the product and not the body part.”<br />

Finally, the long-awaited bedtime arrived and I<br />

joyfully pulled away from the table and attempted to<br />

constrain my jubilation by slowly slithering out of my<br />

chair and creeping up the stairs to signify my alleged<br />

exhaustion. I relished the peacefulness of my bedroom<br />

but the peacefulness was short-lived. At 3 a.m. and 5:30<br />

a.m., I was awakened by two screeching roosters nestled<br />

comfortably under my window. As I tossed and turned<br />

to regain unconsciousness, the lingering odor of manure<br />

continually pierced my nostrils and disrupted my<br />

attempts to sleep.<br />

My slumber was cut short again at 6 a.m. by the<br />

screams, cries, and whines of the children. I was already<br />

dreading the day and wanted to curl up in my blanket<br />

and land on the shores of Greece. My fickleness was<br />

returning...<br />

Despite my initial discomfort, my stay with the<br />

family was extremely positive and rewarding. They<br />

accepted me immediately; although it took the grandmother<br />

a little longer, she finally came around. In fact,<br />

she started a routine of hugging and kissing me in the<br />

mornings. I didn’t mind, but it was a little disconcerting<br />

when she’d hug me with a dead, half-plucked chicken<br />

hanging limply in one of her hands.<br />

Anyway, I learned a lot about their religious<br />

lifestyle by observing Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, and<br />

Sukkot with them, which was very meaningful to me. I<br />

also learned how to milk a cow and I even witnessed the<br />

birth of one. Most importantly, they opened their home<br />

and their hearts to me and welcomed me into their<br />

family.<br />

Fickleness sometimes pays off.<br />

MELISSA ROSEN<br />

Lakeville, California<br />

20


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TO TRAMP OR NOT TO TRAMP<br />

I spent my first weekend in Haifa going home with my roommate, Tikva. Her family lives in Ashqelon, which is a small town about<br />

55 km south of Tel Aviv. Aside from having a wonderful time while in Ashqelon —meeting my roommate’s family, being fed “real”<br />

food, and being in a “home,” I also had quite an exciting experience getting here.<br />

Tikva asked me to go home with her about half an hour before she was planning to leave. Okay, that wasn’t a problem —I<br />

had money to take a bus and the Ulpan hadn’t begun, so I didn’t have any homework yet. 1 was ready to be on my way. Tikva said<br />

it would take about three hours to get there. We began our escapade on a city bus that left from the University. She had mentioned<br />

something about getting a “tram” after taking the bus to what I thought she called “Freud” street.(Oh no, what a name to mention<br />

to a psychology major!) Okay, a “tram.” I hadn’t been on one of those yet. I had images of the shuttle buses in Santa Cruz, or the<br />

cable cars in San Francisco. What did she mean, a “tram”?<br />

It only took me a few minutes to figure out what she meant by tramming. She was actually talking about that age-old<br />

phenomenon (illegal in the US) of “hitchhiking.” All right, I was getting the picture (as my mother’s voice lingered through my<br />

mind, “Don’t hitchhike, and...”) and was quite calm about the whole thing. After all, I was an experienced Israeli trammer who<br />

travelled this way quite often. I found myself standing at what used to be a bus stop with my index finger pointing in the direction<br />

of Tel Aviv, from where we would continue to “tram” till Ashqelon! It took quite a while before we found someone going to the<br />

right place. Many cars stopped, Tikva asked them something in Hebrew, received either a “yes” or a “no” answer and we hung<br />

around until we found someone going to Tel Aviv. I was still calm. Tikva assured me, and I trusted her.<br />

We ended up getting a ride with a soldier. Tikva got into the front seat with him and I sat in the back of the truck with my<br />

backpack and camera, the wind blowing in my face and, in the background, a Hebrew conversation between Tikva and the<br />

somewhat obnoxious soldier.<br />

This was an experience I’d never forget, I thought, even before we got to Tel Aviv, and I didn’t realize how many more<br />

“trams” it would take to get to Ashqelon. Some people would stop and only be willing to take us a short distance. We finally got to<br />

Tel Aviv and it took about three more trams before getting to Ashqelon. At one point we got a ride from a man driving a big-load<br />

truck. He seemed nice enough to me. He asked Tikva, in Hebrew, where I was from and she explained what I was doing here. I<br />

found Tikva sitting very close to me, although we seemed to have a lot of room. She appeared a little uneasy and the next thing I<br />

knew, she had asked him to pull over and I found myself on the side of a foreign highway, not really knowing where I was. It turns<br />

out the man was an Arab and Tikva didn’t feel safe. Her uneasiness was getting me a bit unsure of myself, but I assured myself that<br />

it would all work out, as it, in fact, did.<br />

Tikva didn’t think I had enjoyed our escapade to Ashqelon and the whole weekend she kept reminding me that we would be<br />

taking a bus on the way back. Although I found the tramming trip quite exciting, new, and unpredicable experience, it was a bit of<br />

a comfort to know that we take a more “conventional” means (in American terms anyway) on the return trip to Haifa.<br />

Hitchhiking, or tramping (it is tramping, not tramming, as I was corrected a few days later) is a prevalent means of transportation<br />

here for both the Israelis and the many students and tourists, though it’s not really for me.<br />

EMILY LEVINE<br />

Monterey, California<br />

23


MINI<br />

M ARV A<br />

t h e n ria fv a<br />

experience<br />

After completing course Marva, I feel that this course should be done by as<br />

many young Jewish people throughout the world as possible. Why? Nearly<br />

every Jew outside Israel has some connection with Israel through family ties,<br />

studying, lectures from the local Rabbi or just hearing about Israel in the<br />

world news. One way or another we pay a great deal of attention to this small<br />

area of land in the Middle East.<br />

A lot of Jewish teenagers come here for a summer holiday. Many<br />

parents donate money and then come to see where it’s going. To see Israel<br />

through the windows of a tourist bus or on top of a hotel balcony, one sees a<br />

country of romance, a new state only 37 years old, surviving against all odds,<br />

filled with heroic stories from recent wars as well as the battles of ancient<br />

Israel.<br />

Course Marva offers an inside look as to how the army works; a little<br />

pain and a lot of motivation is all one needs to participate in this special army<br />

program. The course draws Jews from all over the world and for three months<br />

stresses the concept, (heb.) (togetherness), as well as describing what Israel is<br />

all about.<br />

Several aspects of one’s life in Israel can be fulfilled with happiness and<br />

simple loyalty. Yet there is that other side of life here, the army, which many<br />

people find hard to understand. The concept of the army can be frightening<br />

to a Jew contemplating settling here in Israel. After having participated in<br />

course Marva, the importance and meaning of the army and its relationship to<br />

the whole of Israel was revealed.<br />

Course Marva enables one to view the country through the eyes of the<br />

army. This view results in the formation of strong political opinions, despite<br />

the fact that politics is forbidden in the I.D.F.<br />

Finally, the motivation level in course Marva was extremely high; perhaps<br />

because we realized at the end, that the first war Israel loses will be its last war<br />

ADAM EMANUEL<br />

(with help from an ex-marvanik, Graham)<br />

I wàs asked to w rite ab o u t the M ini-Marva program . I<br />

th o u g h t ab o u t startin g this by joking ab o u t getting up at 5<br />

a.m . and taking cold show ers, b u t since I d o n ’t believe this<br />

program is a jo k e , I’ll n o t jo k e a b o u t it. W ell, m aybe ju st<br />

one or tw o.<br />

Mini-Marva is a ten-day U niversity-Jew ish Agency-<br />

IDF program . Marva and Mini-Marva are organized under<br />

th e fram ew ork o f G adna in th e ID F. Aside from the<br />

H ebrew U niversity, stu d en ts from Tel Aviv, H aifa, and<br />

Bar-llan U niversities also atten d ed ,<br />

T he A rm y base w here our program w as situated was<br />

Tzalm on, near Carm iel. A round the base w ere a num ber o f<br />

A rab villages a n d one k ib b u tz, nam ed L otem . D uring the<br />

ten days we w ere lectured on th e to pography o f the area,<br />

A rab-lsraeli relations, h isto ry , etc. In ad d itio n , on our<br />

to uring day, we visited a D ruze village and w ere invited for<br />

tea at one fam ily’s hom e.<br />

S habbat and th e holiday o f S uccoth fell during our<br />

stay, and as a resu lt, th e physical aspect o f th e program was<br />

less than som e had th o u g h t it w ould be. Every day,<br />

excluding S habbat and S uccoth, we w ere up at 5 a.m . We<br />

had h alf an hour to get ready and be standing at atten tio n<br />

in front o f the flag. At 5 :3 0 we did ab o u t 2 0 m inutes o f<br />

exercises w hich w ere easier than expected b u t still a little<br />

hard, as it is n o t to o w arm o ut at 5;3 0 . A fter exercises<br />

cam e breakfast and m orning inspection. As clean as you<br />

believe you have m ade the place, dirt will be found. The<br />

m ornings w ere the sam e day a fter day, b u t th e afternoons<br />

varied betw een lessons on the M -16 rifle, topography,<br />

tactical m aneuvers, obstacle courses, and hikes. O ne afternoon<br />

w e actually baked pita and m ade tea on our ow n,<br />

w hile th e n i > r m w e r e laughing th eir heads o ff w atching in<br />

the field.<br />

Mini-Marva is n o t th e arm y. Som e say th a t it gives you<br />

a taste o f th e arm y, and w hile 1 w on’t dispute it, I’m n ot<br />

sure how m uch I agree w ith it. Y ou get to play “ soldier”<br />

for ten days, if y o u go on this program , realize th a t for<br />

m ost in Israel, th e period o f playing soldier is th ree years.<br />

D on’t get m e w rong, I’m n o t trying to talk anyone o ut<br />

o f this. It is a great program . T he people from H ebrew U.<br />

becam e closer and we m ade m any friends from Tel Aviv<br />

U niversity as w ell. When we did our field navigation, we got<br />

absolutely drenched and caked w ith m ud, b ut th a t was<br />

part o f the fun.<br />

This is a fantastic program . I th in k everyone should do<br />

it. But d o n ’t th in k o f it as a joke. Everyone will have a great<br />

tim e, ju st keep in m ind th a t in real life it’s 100 tim es<br />

harder, b o th m entally and physically, and after te n days it’s<br />

not over.<br />

HOW ARD IAN SHORE<br />

W illowdale, O ntario<br />

24


The Sinai: a region o f the world which evokes<br />

the image o f some of the world’s roughest<br />

terrain, the passion of Biblical feelings, and a<br />

sense o f history unrivaled for its brutality and<br />

beauty. Israel has been greatly influenced by this<br />

area since her inception as a nation. Moses<br />

received the Ten Com m andm ents here, bringing<br />

together a loose collection of tribes into a<br />

unified people. Israel’s survival as a modern<br />

nation has rested on the peace o f the Sinai.<br />

For many of the One Year Programmers<br />

who have traveled there, the Sinai is their first<br />

contact w ith Egypt. But the Sinai is as different<br />

from Egypt, as Cairo is from Luxor. The journey<br />

into the Sinai begins at Taba, where everyone<br />

experiences the feeling of standing at the crossroads<br />

of nations. A glance behind reveals the<br />

Israeli port o f Eilat, next to it is the Jordanian<br />

tow n of Aqaba, over to the East is Saudi Arabia,<br />

and ahead —Egypt.<br />

As the Sinai bus makes its way down to<br />

Egypt the beauty o f the Sinai becomes apparent.<br />

The deep blue waters o f the Red Sea contrast<br />

sharply w ith the barren, vivid red Sinai m ountains.<br />

As the bus meanders along the coastal<br />

routes and m outain passes, the first glimpse of<br />

the Sinai’s historical site is Coral Island. This<br />

island, holding the ruins of a fort, is just 200<br />

yards from the shoreline. Coral Island served as a<br />

smugglers base right up to the Israeli occupation<br />

in 1967.<br />

Continuing along the highway one can see<br />

the real inhabitants of the Sinai: the Bedouin, a<br />

colorful, hospitable people (don’t m eet them at<br />

night) who are willing to share a cup o f tea with<br />

strangers. These exotic people live a nomadic life<br />

made mobile by the camel. Even though they<br />

have had contact w ith the westerner, you are as<br />

fascinating to them as they are to you. The<br />

Bedouin appear out o f a seemingly tractless<br />

wasteland, willing to take tourists on camel<br />

treks into the forbidding m ountains of the Sinai.<br />

The first of the Sinai’s three major towns<br />

appears: Nuweiba. A ccom odation is available in<br />

palm huts (basically low rent) constructed on<br />

the beach. Here the real fascination of the Red<br />

Sea becomes apparent: coral. One can only<br />

understand the sensation of coral swimming by<br />

actually experiencing it. The variety of multicoloured<br />

fish, the sharp tangles of coral, and the<br />

transparency of the water, blends to create a<br />

pleasing setting which is unique throughout the<br />

world.<br />

The other two Sinai towns offer the spectacular<br />

sport of skin diving. Dahab, situated<br />

approxim ately midway down the coast, is a<br />

welcome sight to one travelling through the<br />

rugged m ountain terrain. Na’ama Bay, located<br />

near Sharem-e 1-Sheikh, offers some of the most<br />

beautiful coral diving in the world. Swimming<br />

amongst its reefs is like taking a scene from the<br />

movie “ Jaw s,” for its spookiness, and a scene<br />

from a science movie, for the fantastic sights.<br />

A trip to the Sinai is never complete until<br />

one has had a chance to visit the jewel of this<br />

region: M ount Sinai. Here Moses the prophet<br />

received G od’s order to free the Israelites from<br />

slavery. Here God gave Moses the commandm<br />

ents which were to be used to govern the<br />

Israelites when they were freed. The beauty and<br />

ruggedness of Mount Sinai blends in with the<br />

surrounding area, helping one to understand<br />

why this m ountain is referred to as the place<br />

where God dwells. The journey ends with a visit<br />

to St. Catherine’s Monastery to see the skulls of<br />

Monks, piled high on top of each other, that<br />

have accumulated over the centuries.<br />

PAUL T. LOOSLEY<br />

Edm onton, Canada


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My Camel<br />

DID YOU PAY<br />

YOUR BORDER<br />

TAXES ?


KHAN al-K H A LILI<br />

(tourist trap]<br />

" M U S K l"<br />

Mister?<br />

FELUCCA !<br />

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27


The Old Country<br />

As we drove closer to the village of my grandparent’s birth,<br />

the Czechoslovak countryside in the foothills of the<br />

Carpathian mountains intrigued me with their calmness and<br />

beauty. The names of the towns we passed through were<br />

familiar Humenne, Michalovce, Medzilaborce, Habura. I<br />

remember Paw Paw and Nanny mentioning the markets and<br />

other memories of these places.<br />

Soon, I realized that we were rapidly approaching my<br />

village. For years I had waited for this moment to see with<br />

my own eyes, the place that my grandparents called home.<br />

We finally crossed the village line and there I was in<br />

Certizne. What a beautiful and simple little shtetl. Was this<br />

for real or was it just a dream? Was I actually walking the<br />

same narrow dirt roads that my Nanny once played in as a<br />

child? Was this really the same house that Paw Paw was<br />

bom in? It seemed so inconceivable to actually stand on the<br />

other side of the world and experience what Paw Paw and<br />

Nanny had told me so far away. If only they could have<br />

lived for a couple more years, I would have had so much to<br />

tell them about their kleine shtetl. The peasants were still<br />

out in the fields cutting and bailing hay. The horses and<br />

wagons still carried their payloads through town. Everything<br />

was the same as when they had left, nothing had changed.<br />

Nothing, except that there were no Jews. All of the<br />

relatives, all of the friends, all gone, not even a trace that<br />

they were once there. Nanny’s house where she was bom,<br />

grew up, and was married, had been destroyed. Only an old<br />

wood picket fence and weed-filled lot remained.<br />

They were so bold to move to another comer of the<br />

world knowing that they would probably never see their<br />

parents again. The night they left, after travelling two hours<br />

by wagon to Humenne, Nanny made Paw Paw turn the<br />

wagon back because she felt that her parents were crying<br />

because their last daughter was leaving them. When they<br />

finally arrived back in Certizne in the middle of the night,<br />

they looked in the candle lit-window only to find that they<br />

were fast asleep. Her heart at rest, they turned around and<br />

began their long and tedious journey to America. Nanny<br />

died, always wondering what became of her Papa, for<br />

during the war the letters had stopped. Nanny, I found out<br />

what Jhey did to your Papa, so old and kind, they led him<br />

off like a sheep to slaughter. Don’t cry Nanny, I cried for<br />

you already; save your tears for me.<br />

Now, the only thing left to do was to go to the<br />

cemetery, to find the graves of their parents and grandparents,<br />

and say Kaddish for them. As I walked towards the<br />

green hills on the outskirts of the village, I came to the<br />

Laborec River which was shallow enough to walk across the<br />

stones in the middle of the stream. I could still see the<br />

wagon wheel marks on the trail where less than 40 years<br />

earlier the Jews would carry the bodies of their loved ones<br />

to their final resting places on this beautiful mountainside<br />

overlooking Certizne.<br />

As I proceeded through the dense woods, I realized<br />

that the cemetery was no longer in a scenic meadow but<br />

was now overgrown with trees and shrubs. There, jetting<br />

out into eternity as countless years fade into a thousand<br />

twilights, the ancient crumbling stones, their shoulders<br />

faltering, lean forward and to one side. Somé feet breaking,<br />

fall cold on their faces. Their inhabitants all reaching out to<br />

no one, weeping, “We were once here, flourishing, even in<br />

the midst of persecution and turmoil, but now we are gone,<br />

and the likes of us never to be seen or heard of again.”<br />

Their home, musty earth and soggy leaves, names fading<br />

with the weather.<br />

As I came across the graves of my great-grandmother<br />

and her parents, the names became blurry as the tears<br />

clouded my eyes and my memory took me back to the<br />

stories that my Paw Paw and Nanny had once told me<br />

about these very people, when I was a child. They did live,<br />

they did have hearts and souls, they were no longer just<br />

ghosts, pictures, or mental images. I’ve found you now,<br />

never to let you go, only to be locked in the vaults of my<br />

memory forever, for I have come home.<br />

MEYER DENN<br />

Bay city, Tx


Q f r ï O O \ d e S ° f °


MISM<br />

When I think of the topic of Zionism I have visions<br />

of Buber, A.D. Gordon, and Heschel setting pen to<br />

paper to begin a Master’s treatise. While by no<br />

means do I consider myself amongst that distinguished<br />

academic fellowship, I believe that I have<br />

something to say on the matter.<br />

I’ve been a member of a number of different<br />

workshops here, including Activism and Chug<br />

Aliya, and it seems that a concrete definition of<br />

the word “Zionism” is always sought. I compare<br />

Zionism or being a Zionist to the concept of<br />

“love.” You can try all you want to describe and<br />

defend it, but when it comes down to it you can<br />

only feel it.<br />

What does this mean? For me, Zionism is a<br />

feeling both emotional and intellectual. Zionism is<br />

loving this place. Zionism is going to Masada and<br />

feeling a lump in your throat when remembering<br />

the sacrifice of long ago. Zionism is looking out<br />

over the Kinneret or the Gulf of Eilat and being<br />

awestruck by the magnificence. Zionism is picking<br />

melons on Kibbutz Saad and working in the<br />

kitchen in Kibbutz Gvulot. Zionism is seeing a<br />

formation of fighter planes and feeling proud that<br />

in a way you are connected with them.<br />

It’s quite a rosy picture that I’ve painted. This<br />

picture is sometimes clouded by ugly politics, war,<br />

aggressivebehaviour,and a seemingly endless bureaucracy.<br />

This is an absolutely gorgeous country,<br />

which I love with all my heart, but which is by no<br />

means perfect. Israel needs Zionists* people who<br />

love her and are willing to work to remove the<br />

clouds that sometimes cover this most beautiful<br />

painting.<br />

HOWARD IAN SHORE<br />

Willowdale, Ontario


'' ,mnn,!DNniu1' '<br />

“Israel,my Friend.<br />

m-c<br />

ÇV \<br />

My friend<br />

I hate to do it<br />

Our friendship just can’t last<br />

the times w e’ve shared together<br />

have faded to the past<br />

I told you it would happen<br />

Our friendship was bound to end<br />

Although I know you care<br />

I don ’t consider you a friend<br />

Please don ’t try to argue<br />

But try to understand<br />

Time can change us<br />

As the tide changes the sand<br />

Our friendship has been lovely<br />

But you see it has to end<br />

For I look at you in a different way<br />

Fve fallen in love with you<br />

My friend.<br />

Anonymous<br />

31


L *<br />

M \ V /<br />

. J » >!><br />

riD L u n i u * n<br />

32


HEBREW CO UR SE<br />

n n n y n Q^omp n n p 1? m u b n n u n m m nynu/n m x<br />

x 1? .m ^ x iu m a y n m y n n 1? n n n n ^ n n n u m m rn x n<br />

■inn n n n n n n a n n x D’um uD a x y i *p Vn m m<br />

m x p n n x n — i n 1? * n m ^nx ,bw m n n n urn m ruur<br />

m p n : n n n y n m nu/xin n x y in n r r a ir n x .nm m n<br />

m ym n nrnnu/ it n n n y n nm nu; y i i m 1 i^ n x .m il1?<br />

by m m m ^nx n T n n rp x p n n x rr m m p i x 1? .m<br />

.n n n m m u r ’n w n n xbn , o t b oionp<br />

•pu/ny n x ,b y j p w xm a m by n n n x n^nnon nxum<br />

^n m \yxi .mnn1? ’n ’n xm n p m box ^m y^ nbun1<br />

,(am x a o n y x^u/n m xn mnn nn) 28X'n n x m np1?<br />

■p^nn m^nnun rx ,28X-n mn nny m ym x 1? box<br />

t> by nxynyy ,n m o n m nnn iy n ’l ’m m yynbnyn<br />

my b T>n p i .(nbon n o u / — mu m u □uj) qVxn mnu/<br />

nbnx xyjm nnm mym xbn m yw n n ^ n n iy m p i is<br />

I 1 by xym nnxn abixnu/ b n n n n iy p p m .nmp<br />

.n u o in m x 1? nonnn<br />

is uynn npn m u y n n n n o u n 1? nmbmn ^m iyy1? nn<br />

myp n m u m abnx1? m xn sp®r i^id .m y i rx ,m p i<br />

m m . n ’x i n n xb> m x t)x .m o n xun m x y m m y m<br />

.□ibo mnnn xbny im n x y in n tpniynb» n n n y y “p bn<br />

iym nnu; nun) m yun m u m u u m in n m m nnn n n x<br />

D ^ n u n n n n m m n n n uymu/u; (n n n y a u n ^ n x m<br />

.□m x mnyxu; n n p n n x i n n m xb> my m um pn .bw<br />

urn bw m um pn bmz/ iy mnnb? nbnm o p x box<br />

.mbmxn<br />

pomp nnnn<br />

piu in ,imn bn<br />

33


c h a n & itw n<br />

/ search m y soul fo r a new answer<br />

b u t m y reply is a continuum o f meaningless words<br />

I f ill the void w ith em pty promises<br />

and stare blankly into the depths<br />

M y thoughts become queasy<br />

Shaken by events o f the year<br />

Reason and rationale dissolve<br />

Am idst m y craving fo r a redemption o f spirit<br />

I grasp fo r the pictures<br />

which unlock the past shackles<br />

Yet m y inner silence is broken<br />

By the im patient outsiders<br />

The silhouettes surround me in suspended animation<br />

M y response is quick & quiet<br />

A cloudy representation<br />

O f m y quarantined emotions<br />

Satisfied, they retreat unchallenged<br />

the b rie f encounter has le ft me numb<br />

Alone / am haunted by the intensity o f m y experience<br />

Yet / refuse to unleash the secrets<br />

Lest they be cast away as forgotten love<br />

Time lingers<br />

/ am trapped amidst m y indecision<br />

To proceed forward or return<br />

There is no question<br />

Only a quivering hesitation and an unw ritten vow<br />

“ I f I forget thee O Jerusalem... ”<br />

ALISA KAGNOFF<br />

N ewport Beach, CA<br />

34


ffîis torp<br />

For all the god forsaken tales o f old<br />

We dw ell amongst the ruins o f yore<br />

Time im m emorial<br />

A nd the gyre o f life repeats itself<br />

Endlessly.<br />

A land o f wars, passions, dreams, desires<br />

“ This is the land which ye shall divide by lo t<br />

A nd neither division nor U nity matters<br />

This is the land<br />

We have our inheritance. ’’<br />

Cover me in emotions o f silk which<br />

Weave through the m arrow o f inexperience<br />

A n d plant an everlasting seed o f Understanding.<br />

The peace which passeth understanding.<br />

Shantih,<br />

We awake suddenly to fin d ourselves<br />

Strangers in a land where<br />

Our pasts Unger<br />

Our present dwells<br />

Our Future lies<br />

the exodus is ours<br />

We have slept on Moses’ M ount<br />

Walked the death tra il o f Christ<br />

D w elt amongst the ruins o f Kings and Queens<br />

Forgotten<br />

We<br />

Have donated history and succored its continuity<br />

A nd We<br />

Have experienced and learned<br />

A nd applied - Absent o f Submission<br />

A nd we have grown in m ind and spirit<br />

We have perceived the importance<br />

The necessity o f the continuation<br />

We have silently realized that the<br />

Contribution is profitable.<br />

A n d the foundations o f our souls<br />

We have b u ilt collectively<br />

Simultaneous<br />

For the love o f a common destination<br />

Hand to hand<br />

Heart to heart<br />

Eye M elt into the eye o f Truth<br />

A n d love alone<br />

O f oneness supremacy, Metamorphosis<br />

" For Beauty is Truth, Truth Beauty -<br />

That is all ye know on earth, and all<br />

and all ye need to know. ’’<br />

ROCHELLE<br />

Toronto, Canada<br />

35


T x ' n y i<br />

w<br />

o<br />

R<br />

HSHOr<br />

Dne of the strongest workshops offered by O.S.A. this year was Chug Aliyah. Many °Y P ers who plan on<br />

naking Aliyah participated in this Chug. We established a “ chevrei” (group) and with Rina as our<br />

eader a support group was formed, with Alyah the com m on denom inator.<br />

Every Monday night the chevrei trekked up to Goldsmith for yet another stimulating debate. Our<br />

speakers varied in their religious, political and social backgrounds, and they also differed in<br />

com m itm ent and in their stance on Aliyah. This led to interesting discussions on various aspects of Aliyah<br />

£ w?U « fascinating and heated debates - not only between the chevrei and the speakers, but among the<br />

" t t g S X had the oportunity to participate in some interesting tiyulim. For example, we<br />

tiyuled to the Negev and visited a development town. We met w ith the young adults of a Bnei Akiva group<br />

to discuss their opinions on Aliyah from a m odern religious outlook. There was<br />

m odern religious settlem ent on the West Bank, where we met with the com m unity s Chief Rabbi Riskm.<br />

was there we made our T.V. debut, appearing on West German T.V.<br />

In short we have all become much more enlightened in regard to our aspirations for A l i y a h and have<br />

c o m e to the realization that, above all, Aliyah is a personal decision. We also hope to see the whole chevrei<br />

back in Israel on Gar’in in ’86.<br />

ALAN RUSONIK<br />

Willowdale, Ontario<br />

36


T rip to the N egev & Officers Training Academ y<br />

Our trip began on a Thursday evening<br />

when madricha Rina Buberoglu and<br />

17 students left Goldsmith for W.UJ.S.<br />

in Arad. We arrived two-and-a-half hours<br />

late, well within Jewish Standard Time.<br />

The visit to W.UJ.S. included a video<br />

presentation on the W.UJ.S. One Year<br />

Absorption Program for university graduates,<br />

and a discussion with some of the<br />

program’s participants.<br />

Early the next morning we picked up<br />

our guide, Zvi Leverich, in Be’er Sheva,<br />

continuing on to Ein Avdat, Ben-Gurion’s<br />

home at Kibbutz Sde Boker, and finally<br />

to Makhtesh Ramon. Late that afternoon<br />

we arrived for a Shabbat stay at an<br />

Officers’ Training Academy. Because most<br />

soldiers were on weekend leave, the camp<br />

had an eerie emptiness. At our orientation<br />

lecture, Zvi outlined the criteria for<br />

grading potential officers. These included<br />

leadership, military thinking and strategy,<br />

combat ability, and physical fitness. He<br />

explained that approximately 30% of the<br />

candidates become officers.<br />

Before dinner, I attended Shabbat<br />

services. It was an overwhelming experience,<br />

a feeling of solidarity with the<br />

soldiers. That evening we participated in<br />

an informal discussion with the soldiers,<br />

many of whom had not met Americans<br />

their own age. They were curious as to<br />

our views of the army: Would we like to<br />

enlist? How would we feel in an army<br />

uniform? It seemed that our responses<br />

did not measure up to their enthusiastic<br />

expectations. We also discussed with them<br />

the controversial Lebanon war, which led<br />

to arguments between the soldiers.<br />

Another topic of discussion was our<br />

Jewish identity. There was some confusion<br />

due to our definitions of this identity.<br />

In general, explained Zvi, the soldier’s<br />

identity is national-cultural, whereas ours<br />

is cultural-religious. He said that the army<br />

is trying to inculcate in soldiers the<br />

national, cultural and religious aspects, in<br />

order to increase the soldier’s identification<br />

with world Jewry.<br />

When the discussion shifted to Aliya,<br />

we did a lot more smiling than talking.<br />

We tried to explain that Aliya is a big<br />

decision, and that new immigrants face a<br />

difficult transition period. We left the<br />

Academy with an adrenaline shot of<br />

Zionism. We hope this energy and vitality<br />

can be exploited to help us make Aliya or<br />

to actively contribute to our Diaspora<br />

communities a stronger Jewish identity.<br />

TERENCE B. SCHWARTZ<br />

N.Y.<br />

37


38


39


in<br />

I have been on almost every OSA tiyul this year and found<br />

the VIP trip to the Galil to be one of the best. VIP stands<br />

for “Very Interesting People,” and the OSA sure showed us<br />

some of the more interesting figures of the Galil. It was a<br />

two-and-a-half day tiyul with many fascinating highlights.<br />

On the first afternoon we visited Ir Ha Vradim (Rose<br />

City), which is an exciting, new, suburban-style settlement<br />

on a hill overlooking Ma’alot. Each plot of land is equipped<br />

with a sophisticated computer, phone, water and satellite<br />

capability hook-up just waiting for a home to be attached.<br />

We found out that we could buy from $24,000; one woman<br />

on our trip was ready to buy, but they just didn’t take<br />

credit car ds( Evidently Karl Malden is not an Israeli figure.)<br />

It was on that day that we realized that an Israeli tour guide<br />

must claim at least once at every site that, ‘ On a clear day<br />

you can see” ", a) the Kinneret, b) the Dead Sea,or c)<br />

Damascus.<br />

Our first night was spent in Ma’alot where we met a<br />

group of Ethiopian junior high school students. An exciting<br />

discussion of Rabbi Kahane ensued, in which our opinions<br />

were drowned out in a sea of screaming voices.<br />

The next day included a tiyul to a Druze village, and a<br />

visit to Amirim, a vegetarian moshav. It was at the moshav<br />

that we were shocked to discover that Bubby s sacrosanct<br />

chicken soup was actually equal to drinking urine. That<br />

didn’t stop us, however, from having a traditional Shabbat<br />

dinner with Hassidic families at Kiryat Chabad in Sefad.<br />

After dinner we all got together in one of the Ascent<br />

Institute’s apartments, ate popcorn, drank imitation rum<br />

and sweet Shabbos wine. The next morning a few of us<br />

were fortunate to wake up, albeit with headaches and other<br />

assorted ailments, for the heater had sprung a gas leak. We<br />

were sick all day.<br />

That night we were redeemed, for our plans to hike to<br />

Rosh Pina didn’t go well, and we got to attend an Ethiopian<br />

celebration. It was wonderful singing, dancing, and using<br />

our Hebrew to communicate. Only afterwards did we make<br />

it to Rosh Pina, where we had an intense pillow fight.<br />

Along with the headaches, the next morning we awoke to<br />

madrich Meron HaCohen’s charming and annoying, “Waky,<br />

Waky!” I am sure that Meron will go down in our annals as<br />

quite an interesting person.<br />

The trip ended with a visit to the first kibbutz -<br />

Degania Aleph, a beautiful place that is located at the<br />

southern tip of the Kinneret. A tour was given by an elderly<br />

lady who emigrated to Israel in 1932 after teaching Hebrew<br />

in Poland for 15 years. She was an inspiring figure who<br />

made Kibbutz life and kibbutz development come alive for<br />

us.<br />

I must say that we all had a great time. Not only were<br />

the people we met very interesting, but our madrichim were<br />

quite bizarre. OSA planned well. I can only hope that we<br />

can all meet more “Very Interesting People.”<br />

STU SCHNEE<br />

Morris Plain, New Jersey<br />

CROSS-CULTURAL PROGRAM<br />

I thought I was hopelessly outclassed. My cross-cultural<br />

student is in graduate school studying English language<br />

comprehension, while' my Hebrew level is a finger nails<br />

Bet —that is, I’m holding on to Hebrew by my fingertips.<br />

What could I offer him? What would I get in return?<br />

Was it worth the investment of time? It has been five<br />

months now into the program, and the results are fabulous.<br />

First: I made a friend. If nothing else, this makes the<br />

program a success for me. Second: my friend benefits<br />

tremendously. We even met during the OYP break. I<br />

sometimes found it difficult to explain his complicated<br />

English texts in easy English, but I found that my<br />

uncomplicated Hebrew could sometimes simplify the task<br />

of explanation. We are trying to schedule even more<br />

meetings each week. Third: I benefitted. The small points<br />

of Hebrew that confused me, the words I couldn’t find in<br />

the dictionary (because I was looking in the wrong place),<br />

and the discipline of reading an article in —hebrew ^ in<br />

preparation for our meetings, have all helped my Hebrew.<br />

My only complaint: that the program started three<br />

months after the beginning of the year.<br />

CARL ROSEN<br />

Miami, Florida<br />

40


High- of th(3 M edia<br />

Lights th e Seminar<br />

SHORESH RESORT<br />

Friday, February 1<br />

10:00 Arrival snack<br />

1:30 Lunch- King David Salon<br />

3:00 Discussions on the balance of power in the media, and the ability<br />

of the press to distort world views through biased reporting<br />

5:00 Evening Snack<br />

6:30 Dinner-King Solomon Grand Ballroom<br />

8:00 Presentation of “NBC‘s Misrepresentation of the Lebanon War”<br />

12:00 Midnight Munchies<br />

Saturday, February 2<br />

9:00 Breakfast —Queen Esther Banquet Hall<br />

10:00 Split up into media groups based on the individual’s responses to a<br />

questionnaire about views on Israel and the PLO. Each of the five<br />

groups is responsible for a video, radio and newspaper presentation,<br />

and neutral reporting<br />

12:30 Lunch —Ben-Gurion Cafeteria 1:30 Guest speakers’ presentations about the West Bank - related<br />

subjects in such a manner as to enable immediate reporting by the<br />

students to their respective media groups<br />

6:00 Dinner —Meir Cocktail Lounge<br />

7:30 Start videotaping, recording and typesetting for media presentations.<br />

Major problem incurred: impossible to combine public<br />

interest with completely unbiased reporting. Also stayed up till<br />

4:00 am<br />

10:30 Panel Discussion with media representatives Peter Frost — ABC<br />

News, Milan Kubic —Newsweek, Martin Himmel —CTV, and Israel<br />

News representative<br />

2:00 Midmorning snack<br />

Sunday, February 3<br />

9:00 Breakfast —Jabotinsky Plaza<br />

10:30 View multi-media presentations<br />

12:30 Farewell snack, and back up to the Scopus on the Hill<br />

GREG SAMUELS<br />

New Orleans, La.<br />

41


So v i e t j e w r y<br />

Last year while we were enjoying the delights of<br />

life in the Diaspora, or the view of Jerusalem from<br />

the Social Science Building, only 908 of the many<br />

Jews wanting to leave the Soviet Union were<br />

allowed to do so. To find out more about them<br />

and how we could help them , some o f us joined<br />

the Soviet Jewry Chug run by Meir Fachler, who<br />

brings a rare intensity to this issue. A lthough there<br />

is only a limited am ount that we can do, one of the<br />

purposes o f our Chug was to raise our consciousness<br />

of the m atter and through us, others. In this it<br />

succeeded.<br />

We m et on Tuesday evenings to discuss the<br />

plight o f Soviet Jew ry or to hear a speaker. For<br />

example, a recent émigré described his life in the<br />

Soviet Union — his arrest, punishm ent and in this<br />

case happy, release. But there is always someone<br />

else — a wife, husband, sibling, close friend —who<br />

has not been let out yet.<br />

Near the end o f the first semester we organized<br />

an evening of Solidarity with Soviet Jewry. The<br />

speakers included Avraham Harman, Yuri Stern,<br />

and Minister W ithout Portfolio Yoske Shapiro.<br />

Harman emphasized the real possibility of a<br />

Holocaust occurring to Russian Jewry. He also<br />

pointed out that there was no need for us to be<br />

scared to help Soviet Jewry by writing letters,<br />

petitions, or by dem onstrating. For Soviet Jews<br />

face far greater risks. He further stated that<br />

although it may seem one person can do only a<br />

little, 10,000 can achieve a lot.<br />

Perhaps the high point of the Chug was the<br />

weekend seminar. Zvi Wolf talked about his trip to<br />

the Soviet Union. Interspersing the talk with<br />

relevant anecdotes, he made his point. The Soviet<br />

Union is really a dreary, oppressive country. “ Those<br />

stories we hear about how bad communism is, are<br />

true,” he said. “ I passed a bleak sports stadium and<br />

saw expressionless spectators file out in nonspontaneous<br />

conform ity.” The Soviet Jew s” are<br />

just like us” and we have an obligation to help<br />

them. He described how, although Hebrew teaching<br />

and culture were suppressed, Soviet Jews strive<br />

against trem endous difficulties to learn what they<br />

can. When he told them he was a Hebrew teacher<br />

and offered his services, his host had him teach 16<br />

or more hours a day — w ithout a break or<br />

socializing. At the same time, they displayed a<br />

keen understanding of very difficult Talmudic<br />

passages which would usually take his Talmud<br />

students days to understand. We can do the<br />

socializing ourselves, they pointed out. A fter lunch<br />

Y osef Mendelevich gave a rambling talk, which still<br />

struck hom e w ith its sincerity. In the evening, Dr.<br />

Zeev Katz related the history o f Soviet Jewry<br />

between 1881-1914. He noted 2,250,000 Jews<br />

emigrated from Russia to the United States,<br />

Canada, Palestine, and other countries, forming the<br />

basis o f western Jewry. A num ber o f people raised<br />

their hands when asked if they were of Russian or<br />

Eastern European descent. In a real sense, the<br />

Soviet Jews are our brothers.<br />

I have to adm it that listening to the plight of<br />

Soviet Jew ry is a disillusioning and depressing<br />

experience, leaving me apathetic at times. One is<br />

not only struck by the callousness of a regime<br />

which has abandoned even ordinary canons of<br />

hum an kindness in its dealings w ith those Jews<br />

who have done no more than apply for an exit visa;<br />

it displays nothing but its intransigence in prohibiting<br />

the emigration o f Jews who have caused no<br />

harm to the Soviet state and whose emigration<br />

would cause it no loss. One wonders w hat one can<br />

do with such a regime. The seminar suggested that<br />

activism in countries such as the United States,<br />

which has a lot of influence over the Soviet Union,<br />

constitutes the main hope. Such countries should<br />

not be allowed to ignore the cause of Soviet Jewry<br />

in the belief that no Jews care about it. That, the<br />

Chug tried to convey to us, is our responsibility, as<br />

much as our task. For, as Baruch Gurevitch, an<br />

Israeli official dealing with Soviet Jewry, pointed<br />

out, “We are doing this as m uch for ourselves as for<br />

them .”<br />

DAVID KING<br />

Australia<br />

42


it was<br />

just an idea<br />

What a crazy idea! !<br />

A m idnight vigil to remind George Shultz<br />

the plight of Soviet Jewry?<br />

Could it be done?<br />

We gathered in the lobby of the Shoresh Hotel,<br />

all very excited about the idea and very determ ined<br />

to accomplish something. And why not? The<br />

whole reason we were there was to take part in an<br />

“ activism” convention.<br />

As everyone called out suggestions, we began<br />

to realize just how many obstacles stood in our<br />

way.<br />

How could we realistically transport two hundred<br />

students to the King David Hotel, where<br />

Shultz was spending the last night of his visit to<br />

Israel?<br />

What were our goals? Did we w ant to risk<br />

offending Shultz, a proven friend of Israel?<br />

In order to insure the success o f the vigil, the<br />

press had to be notified. But would they respond<br />

on such short notice?<br />

For every obstacle that was presented, our<br />

enthusiasm and recognition of our unique opportunity<br />

made us that much more determ ined to create<br />

a meaningful event from a spontaneous idea.<br />

We broke into groups, each group discussed<br />

im portant aspects of the vigil. Posters had to be<br />

made. A letter to Shultz had to be written. The<br />

logistics had to be planned. And we still hadn’t<br />

asked the madrichim.<br />

When we did, they brought up other obstacles<br />

that hadn’t even been considered. We need a police<br />

permit. We’d have to pay for buses to take us to<br />

Jerusalem and back. We weren’t even sure if<br />

Schultz was in Jerusalem! The feasibility of our<br />

goals had to be questioned.<br />

Our next step was to present the idea to the<br />

entire convention. With the support and participation<br />

of everybody, more questions were answered,<br />

and our goals became more defined.<br />

As we anxiously waited for the end of Shabbat,<br />

we all began to realize the undertaking we had<br />

assigned ourselves. By eight-thirty, an air of skepticism<br />

and self-doubt mingled with our excitem ent<br />

and desire for accomplishment.<br />

Two hours later, like a polaroid instant picture,<br />

our fuzzy suggestions of the afternoon were<br />

2 a ra s a s ? -<br />

•O n t>\<br />

«SE S<br />

'>£>0/<br />

becoming clearer. The press had been notified, the<br />

police had said yes, the letter was being com pleted,-<br />

and the buses were on their way! ! !<br />

Before we knew it, it was time for our words to<br />

become actions. We boarded the buses with a<br />

candle in one hand, and a poster in the other.<br />

The bus ride seemed an eternity. Last minute<br />

instructions were given, questions were answered,<br />

and still, in the back of our minds skepticism<br />

remained.<br />

As the excitem ent level constantly rose we<br />

approached our destination. And then, we heard<br />

it... “ Kol Yisrael m ’Yerushalayim...” Our cheers<br />

erupted, we’d made the midnight news! !<br />

When we got there, the scene was like out of a<br />

movie. Police barricades, television cameras, reporters,<br />

photographers, and in front of the hotel, some<br />

official-looking people. We lined King David Street,<br />

silently displaying our posters, our feelings, to Mr.<br />

Shultz, the press, and the countless cars and buses<br />

that passed by us. We weren’t “ saying” a word, but<br />

we were definitely being heard.<br />

We read and presented the letter of support for<br />

Mr. Shultz to one of his aides, thanked him, and<br />

continued our demonstra... uh, vigil, and then<br />

walked to Liberty Bell Park, where, while singing<br />

“ Hatikvah” we realized that we do have a voice,<br />

and we can try to make a difference.<br />

STEVE JACOBSON<br />

Los Angeles, California<br />

43


m Y tittle sister<br />

Last spring I had an interview to come on the One<br />

Year Program at the American Friends of Hebrew<br />

University office. The gentlem an who interviewed<br />

me kept stressing th at the only way to assure a<br />

good year would be if I volunteered. Of course I<br />

said, “ Yes, yes, I really w ant to get involved with<br />

Israelis,” because I w anted to come here, b u t I had<br />

no idea w hat that would mean.<br />

In the fall I was assigned to my little sister,<br />

Ziva. I w ent t a her house, after a disastrous phone<br />

call during which I forgot all my Hebrew. I was<br />

sure that her family thought I would not be able to<br />

com m unicate w ith them . In the first meeting Ziva<br />

stood in the corner and refused to talk to me.<br />

Needless to say, I left feeling, “ This is volunteering” ?<br />

But slowly the situation improved and Ziva warmed<br />

to me. Now, she is my little sister — in fact her<br />

family is my family in Israel. When my m other was<br />

here for Pesach, we w ent to Ziva’s for the Seder.<br />

Despite the language problem (my m other knows<br />

no Hebrew), I saw that now my family from New<br />

York had becom e a part of my family in<br />

Jerusalem.<br />

Our activities are not particularly interesting in<br />

themselves, but somehow we always end up<br />

laughing. We do a rts-a n d -c ra fts, tiyul around<br />

Jerusalem , go to the Biblical Zoo, etc. But Ziva’s<br />

favorite activity is to go into tow n, wander around<br />

in HaMashbir and then have an ice cream. I d on’t<br />

have the words to express how w onderful the<br />

relationship is, but I guess the best I can do is say<br />

th at my little sister is the best little girl in the<br />

world, and that I intend to pack her in my suitcase<br />

at the end of June.<br />

ANNIE KAPLAN<br />

New York, NY<br />

44


nnpnn<br />

r o m<br />

u<br />

. . . n V n<br />

—th a t’s w hat I’ve felt every week for the past<br />

seven m onths th at I’ve taught an art class at Alyn<br />

Hospital, an orthopedic rehabilitation center for<br />

physically handicapped children.<br />

In O ctober, after I decided th at I w anted to<br />

volunteer, I began m y search. As soon as I saw the<br />

smiling faces of these children in wheelchairs<br />

during a tour of Alyn, my decision was made.<br />

I was asked to teach an arts-and-crafts class<br />

in Hebrew to eleven and twelve year olds.<br />

The thought of working w ith Israeli children really<br />

thrilled me although I recognized the obstacles<br />

ahead of me. I was just another American One<br />

Year Program student who spoke Hebrew w ith a<br />

very American accent.<br />

The first day I was a little uneasy because I was<br />

uncertain how I would react tow ards children who<br />

didn’t have full use of their arms and legs. In<br />

addition, I was uncertain of our ability to com m u­<br />

nicate. My initial suspicions were correct. They<br />

mimicked my accent and made fun of my mistakes.<br />

To my relief, however, my fears were unfounded,<br />

and I was only faced w ith the behavior of typical<br />

twelve year olds.<br />

It was a slow process, but gradually we began<br />

to trust each other, and I —as well as they —began<br />

to look forw ard to our weekly visit. Of course,<br />

there were days, when 13 screaming kids, all<br />

wanting my help at once because, “ I can’t draw<br />

this,” or “That fell on the ground,” really made me<br />

question if it was w orth it. Ultim ately, however, I<br />

always came hom e feeling really good inside. We<br />

began working on our project ideas together, and<br />

they started correcting my Hebrew instead of<br />

criticizing it.<br />

My eyes filled w ith tears th at last day when I<br />

entered the decorated room and saw the pride in<br />

their faces because they had baked the cakes<br />

themselves for my farewell party. I’m going to miss<br />

my family at Alyn.<br />

LISA SCHLAR<br />

Phoenix, Arizona<br />

45


HELL<br />

BOUND!<br />

It w as c o ld th a t n ig h t, c o ld e r th a n a n y th in g m y S o u th e r n<br />

C a lif o r n ia n , s u n - p a m p e re d s y s te m w a s u sed to , b u t I h a d<br />

s o m e w h e re t o g o . 1 w a s s ta n d in g a lo n e a t th e b u s s to p ,<br />

b a t h e d in th e c o ld , p e a rly g lo w e m itt in g f r o m th e b ig g e r-th a n -<br />

life e y e s a n d lip s o f a n a d v e rtis e m e n t c o v e rin g o n e s id e o f<br />

th e s h e lte r . E v e ry th in g a b o u t h e r s c re a m e d ja il b a it.<br />

T h e re w e n t th e N o .2 6 , th e d riv e r le a v in g m e in a th ic k<br />

b la c k c lo u d o f n o x io u s fu m e s . 1 c o u g h e d . T h e c o ld w in d<br />

s o o n b le w a w a y t h a t f a m ilia r sm e ll o f L .A . I’d s m e ll th e re a l<br />

s t u f f s o o n e n o u g h , 1 th o u g h t .<br />

T h e w in d h a d fin a lly re a c h e d th e s ta te w h e r e e a c h g u s t<br />

w a s a p h y s ic a l s la p . M y fa c e w a s p u f f e d a n d re d ; 1 h a d lo s t<br />

a ll fe e lin g in it. It w a s 1 0 :0 0 . T w o Is ra e li g irls w a lk e d b y ,<br />

ta lk in g a n d la u g h in g . D a m n ! N o m a t t e r h o w m u c h I le a rn<br />

o r w h a t le v e l I ris e t o , it s t///-s o u n d s C h in e s e t o m e .<br />

A r u m b le . I t w a s c o m in g . I f e l t it f irs t in m y s to m a c h , a<br />

s lig h t u n e a s in e s s , a ti g h tn e s s g rip p in g m y c h e s t j u s t a s rig h t<br />

b e f o r e I ta k e a n e x a m . I saw th e w h ite , s h im m e rin g to p<br />

f lo a t lik e a g h o s t o v e r t h e to p s o f th e b u s h e s a c ro s s f r o m<br />

w h e r e K a h a n e h a d s p e w e d h is f ilth a w e e k e a rlie r. T h is w a s<br />

m y b u s ; I k n e w it b e f o r e I saw th e w h ite N 4 n e x t to th e<br />

T I N ” o n its f r o n t. I c h u c k le d as I re m e m b e r e d w h e n 1<br />

h a d fir s t a rriv e d h e re d u r in g t h e s u m m e r. I w a s in le v el<br />

A le p h d u r in g th e U lp a n ; 1 h a d n e v e r b e e n in Is ra e l b e f o r e . 1<br />

s o u n d e d o u t th e le tte r s “ e h ... g e ...d ...E g g e d ! ” 1 c o u ld n ’t<br />

f o r th e life o f m e fig u re o u t w h e re E g g e d w a s a n d w h y<br />

e v e ry b u s w e n t th e r e . I c a n ’t b e lie v e w h a t a d u m b -a s s I h a d<br />

b e e n .<br />

T h e b u s s c r e e c h e d a r o u n d th e c o r n e r , a lm o s t h it tin g<br />

s o m e o n e — n o th i n g n e w . T h e n w h y d id I fe e l so u n e a s y ?<br />

T h e b u s c a m e r o a r in g u p th e li ttle h ill, th e b o d y b o u n c in g<br />

s id e to s id e o n its w h e e ls , th e re d p a i n t a liv e in th e n ig h t. I t<br />

s la m m e d to a h a lt a t m y s to p , b u r n in g r u b b e r ( o r<br />

s o m e th in g ) in th e a ir. I b le w th e p o s te r g irl a k is s g o o d b y e<br />

a s th e b u s d o o r s re le a s e d th e ir h y d r a u lic m o a n a n d o p e n e d .<br />

T h e b u s w a s o n e o f th e o ld o n e s : w o o d f lo o r , n o s to p<br />

b u t t o n b u t a g re a s y c o r d - b l a c k f r o m a h u n d r e d th o u s a n d<br />

h a n d s y a n k in g o n it — d a n g lin g f r o m th e c e ilin g , a n d th e<br />

h a r d , u n c o m f o r ta b le p la s tic t o r t u r e s e a ts t h a t o n e c a n n e v e r<br />

q u it e s e ttle in t o n o m a tte r h o w m u c h o n e s q u irm s . T h e<br />

d riv e r g ave m e a n a n g ry g la re w ith h is b u r n in g e y e s , a n d<br />

s o u r fro w n . H e w a s d a r k w ith d ir t a n d u n s h a v e n , w e a rin g<br />

la s t w e e k ’s la u n d r y . H is h a t w a s tilte d b a c k , j u s t so . H is<br />

e y e s w e re b lo o d s h o t a n d a n in s a n e , c o ld fire ra g e d w ith in .<br />

T h e b u s s ta n k a n d w a s h o t.<br />

T h e a ir w a s th ic k a n d h e a v y a s in a s te a m b a th , o n ly<br />

m o re s o . H e g r a b b e d m y tic k e t a n d p u n c h e d it w ith a<br />

v e n g e a n c e as h e s la m m e d h is f o o t o n th e g as, th r o w in g h is<br />

h e a d b a c k a n d la u g h in g as h e d id s o . I w o u ld h a v e fro z e n<br />

th e n h a d th e w in d n o t a lr e a d y d o n e s u c h a th o r o u g h jo b o f<br />

it S u ffic e il lo s a y th a t Ih e Ih a w in g -o iil p ro c e s s w as h a lte d<br />

lo r a m o m e n t. “ C o u ld th is b e it” ? m y I r a n lic . m in d<br />

t h o u g h t . C o u ld th is b e t h a t fa b le d b u s t h a t c o m e s a n d p ic k s<br />

a 1 V ?<br />

swf s m -<br />

u p u n w a ry p a s s e n g e rs a t n ig h t? I r e m e m b e re d re a d in g th e<br />

s c ra tc h w a r n in g in t h e b a t h r o o m s ta ll la st w e e k in<br />

G o ld s m ith . It w a s b a r e ly le g ib le : “ B e w a re o f th e N 4 a f te r<br />

1 0 :0 0 p .m .” is w h a t it h a d s a id . 1 th o u g h t it w a s a b a d jo k e .<br />

I tu r n e d to j u m p o u t o f th e s till-o p e n d o o r s , w illin g t o<br />

c h a n c e t h e c o n s e q u e n c e s o f fa llin g o u t o f a b u s m o v in g a t<br />

7 0 M P H . H e saw m e m o v e a n d c lo s e d th e d o o r s . T h e d o o r ’s<br />

m o a n h a d t u r n e d in t o a ta u n tin g c h u c k le . A ll d o u b t h a d<br />

v a n is h e d ; th is w a s it. I tu r n e d a r o u n d t o fa c e th e d riv e r, h is<br />

fa c e w a s re d w ith fe v e r a n d s w e a tin g . A v e in s tu c k o u t fro m<br />

u n d e r n e a th h is f o re h e a d a n d p u ls e d to th e r h y th m o f th e<br />

w in d s h ie ld w ip e rs w h ic h h e h a d j u s t tu r n e d o n . H e tu r n e d<br />

h is h e a d to w a r d s m e . H e w a s th e v e ry im a g e o f D e a th , o n ly<br />

D e a th h a d a b e t t e r o r t h o d o n t i s t . T h e b u s jo l te d fo rw a rd<br />

a n d s e n t m e ro llin g d o w n t h e a isle . T h e d riv e r saw th is a n d<br />

s w e rv e d le f t a n d r ig h t, h it tin g e v e ry p o th o le h e c o u ld fin d .<br />

It w a s im p o s s ib le f o r m e t o re g a in m y f o o tin g . I c ra w le d t o<br />

t h e n e a re s t c h a ir a n d p u lle d m y s e lf u p , h o p in g t o s it d o w n .<br />

N o s u c h lu c k . R u s ty n a ils h a d b e e n d riv e n u p th r o u g h e a c h<br />

s e a t. I o p te d f o r m y o d d s o n th e f lo o r h o ld in g o n t o th e<br />

c h a ir legs.<br />

T h e b u s h a d fille d u p w ith a lo u d s c re e c h in g a n d<br />

w a ilin g f o llo w e d b y a n in te r m itte n c e o f tu n e g u ita r tw a n g s<br />

g o in g u p a n d d o w n s o m e d e m e n te d m u s ic a l scale . O h N o!<br />

T h e d r iv e r h a d tu r n e d t o a lo c a l s ta tio n o n th e ra d io ! N o ,<br />

n o , n o t th a t!<br />

P léa se ! A s I la y th e r e fe v e ris h ly re c itin g<br />

w h a te v e r p r a y e r s I k n e w ( t o o fe w in th is c a s e ), I c o u ld<br />

m a k e o u t th e f a in t o u tlin e o f p h a n t o m p a s s e n g e rs s ittin g in<br />

th e c h a irs .<br />

T h e c h a n n e l s h if te d . “ H a v a li N a g ila h ” s ta r te d t o b la re<br />

o u t f r o m th e o v e rh e a d s p e a k e rs . T h e p h a n t o m s ro s e to th e ir<br />

f e e t a n d s ta r te d t o d a n c e , c la p th e ir h a n d s , a n d s ta m p th e ir<br />

f e e t , o b liv io u s t o th e d riv e r ’s b e s t a t te m p ts t o th r o w th e m<br />

o f f th e ir f e e t. I fe lt s ic k . I h a te “ H a v a h , N agilah.” A t m y<br />

c o u s in ’s B a r M itz v a h a re a lly b a d b a n d h a d p la y e d . T h e le a d<br />

s in g e r w a s a n ig h tm a r is h h y b r id o f P e rry C o m o , M ic k e y<br />

M o u se , a n d S id V ic io u s. T h e y c o u ld p la y o n ly tw o so n g s,<br />

“ F e e lin g s ” a n d “ H a v a h N agilah,” W h e re h a d th is s ta tio n<br />

f o u n d a ta p e o f th is b a n d ? I p a s s e d o u t w ith th a t c h ic k e n<br />

w ire v o ic e s c re e c h in g in m y e a r.<br />

B la c k n e s s .<br />

1 a w o k e th e n e x t m o r n in g w h e n a p o lic e o ffic e r gave<br />

m e a n o t- to o - g e n tle k ic k in th e b a c k — v e ry e ffe c tiv e . I<br />

w o k e u p im m e d ia te ly . I c o u ld h a v e u s e d h is h e lp in se v eral<br />

cla sse s la st s e m e s te r . I h a d b e e n d u m p e d b y th e b u s d riv e r<br />

in L ib e r ty B ell P a rk , m y h a n d s c la m p e d o n to a la m p -p o s t,<br />

m y k n u c k le s w h ite . I lo o k e d a t h im a n d o ffe re d o n ly<br />

g u rg le s a n d c lic k s a s a n e x p la n a tio n . H e s h o o k h is h e a d a n d<br />

to ld m e to g o h o m e . I n o d d e d , h e w a lk e d a w a y , a n d I w as<br />

a lo n e ... a g a in .<br />

J E F F C H E A N<br />

L o s A n g e le s, C a lifo rn ia


B U S ^ 9<br />

Well yes, they do look like ordinary buses. That’s really not<br />

what I mean. In fact, if you happen to be in a hurry, or<br />

preoccupied with the latest national news, they even<br />

perform the same function as your average North American<br />

city bus. But to take them just for transportation is to miss<br />

out on one of the most fascinating aspects of Israeli society.<br />

Take the No. 9 bus for example. If you get on at Mount<br />

Scopus, you shouldn’t have any trouble getting a seat; if<br />

possible try to get the ones facing backwards. (Pregnant<br />

women enjoy sitting forwards and you’ll be most likely to<br />

retain your seat throughout the ride.) Oh, if you do decide<br />

to take the No. 9, please sit quickly; the drivers here find it<br />

fascinating to test how quickly the laws of physics allow a<br />

;moving vehicle to accelerate from 0 to 40 kilometers per<br />

hour. And now all you have to do is sit. Oh, you may have<br />

to squish over a little when a fat American “Oleh” deposits<br />

herself snugly in the seat beside you, but that’s about the<br />

only physical discomfort you’ll be faced with.<br />

You may want to catch a little of the conversation of<br />

the six school children in front of you. Don’t worry about<br />

not having mastered their language; they switch freely back<br />

and forth between English and Hebrew. (And besides,<br />

Michael Jackson is the same in every language.) Hang on<br />

tightly, because by this time you’ll be rounding the bend<br />

into Mea Shearim.<br />

Because the bus is full, all you can see making their<br />

way cautiously down the aisle towards you are six black<br />

hats. As they approach, you can see long black coats, curly<br />

side locks and a variety of red, brown and grey beards<br />

emerging from beneath the hats. Now look beyond their<br />

waists to their knees. Clutching at the pant legs of each<br />

solemn Hassid are two little children, probably boys. Their<br />

heads are shaved but for their two curly side locks, which<br />

the little boy, feeling slightly claustrophobic amongst the<br />

legs of the religious, twirls absentmindedly. His small black<br />

hat and coat, miniature replicas of those his father wears,<br />

may remind you of a Purim costume. Suddenly, the entire<br />

row of black hats moves to one side of the bus. Although<br />

the aisles are much too crowded to know for sure, you can<br />

be relatively certain that two, or perhaps three teenaged<br />

girls (jeans adhering firmly to their posterior portions) have<br />

boarded, giggling.<br />

If you look out the window at this point, you will see a<br />

long street lined with round, wide-brimmed hats bobbing to<br />

and fro frenetically, as well as a multitude of women<br />

sporting knee-length dresses, elbow-length sleeves, and neck<br />

high collars — all provocative flesh securely tucked away.<br />

Little children walk slowly down the streets with smaller<br />

children at their sides. And at this point, please be quiet.<br />

The news is being announced over the radio, and adults and<br />

children are intent on consuming every word.<br />

Well, you’re about to turn onto Jaffa Street. You’ll no<br />

doubt be stunned by the abrupt change from the 19thcentury<br />

atmosphere of Mea Shearim to the modem, trafficridden<br />

streets of center city. If you’d like, you can get off<br />

here — but do it quickly or you’ll miss the opportunity.<br />

Just hop over the plump woman you’ve been sharing your<br />

bench with, scowl at the machine gun-toting soldier who<br />

absentmindedly blocks your passage, and squeeze you way<br />

through the aisle. You may have to push your way out the<br />

door with six or seven hurrying Israelis (just part of the<br />

total experience, really) —you can handle it. Whatever you<br />

do, don’t forget your bag on the bus, or it will be regarded<br />

as a suspicious object and provoke a bomb scare.<br />

So, what do you think? Oh, one more thing... You’ll<br />

have to take the No. 9 back from the city, so go sit down<br />

somewhere quiet and have a stiff drink. You deserve it.<br />

Two rides is a lot for a beginner to undertake in one day.<br />

KARYN MILLER<br />

Quebec, Canada<br />

47


,<br />

ON l$RAEl $ FOREIGN DEPENDENCY<br />

Sand shifting beneath my feet;<br />

I sit on a beached log and watch the waves<br />

Draw designs on the shore, erasing the shapes<br />

As they fall back into the ocean.<br />

White flecks of foam stick to my toes.<br />

A piece of seaweed tangles around my ankle<br />

Until it too is called back to the ocean.<br />

Overhead a seagull flies: a shriek.<br />

It has eaten a fisherman’s hooked bait;<br />

The hook deeply embedded.<br />

The gull flaps overhead trying to free itself.<br />

Each time the gull tries to break loose, he is<br />

Dragged back by the fisherman’s cruel hand.<br />

The fisherman toys with the gull<br />

Leading it around as a child would a balloon<br />

On a string.<br />

The gull’s flapping grows frantic<br />

As it perceives the outcome.<br />

He cries once again and falls<br />

Exhausted to the sand.<br />

The fisherman rips the hook from the gull's beak,<br />

Taking a portion with it: A shriek.<br />

The gull dies, eyes glazing, as it stares blankly<br />

At the fisherman. The wind ruffles its feathers.<br />

The fisherman wipes his nose on his sleeve,<br />

Snorting as he casts his line into the ocean<br />

Again; opening up a fresh sixer of Bud.<br />

Anonymous<br />

48


in q<br />

Jewish^s ta te<br />

Participating in the Arab-Israeli Chug gave me a<br />

new perspective on the State o f Israel in general,<br />

and the situation o f its Arab citizens in particular.<br />

American Jews’ lack o f inform ation on the situation<br />

o f Israel’s Arabs is profound, and the Chug offered<br />

me a glimpse at the knowledge I sorely lacked.<br />

Every Wednesday night the Chug, led by Jeremy<br />

Milgrom, m et to listen to a variety of speakers,<br />

each offering his own viewpoint on the topic. Most<br />

of the speakers were very interesting and provided<br />

inform ation not generally know n by Jews outside<br />

of Israel — the status of Arabs in Israel, their<br />

educational system, etc.<br />

The Chug culm inated in tw o tiyulim , which<br />

incorporated the dry facts we had heard previously<br />

w ith the flesh-and-bones reality of what we were<br />

seeing. The first tiyul was to the Galilee, highlighted<br />

by a visit to the Arab village o f Um-el-Fahm. There<br />

we spent tim e w ith Arab families and acquired<br />

knowledge not transm ittable through a lecturer.<br />

For the first time I saw, smelled, tasted and felt the<br />

world of an Arab in Israel — a truly enlightening<br />

experience.<br />

The second tiyul was more inspiring than<br />

enlightening. It was to a settlem ent outside of<br />

Jerusalem, Neve Shalom, where Arabs and Jews<br />

live together and run an educational program for<br />

Arab and Jewish high school students —a means of<br />

breaking down the barriers between the groups. At<br />

Neve Shalom, the inhabitants work toward integration<br />

and understanding while living it, too.<br />

Thanks to the opportunities offered by the<br />

Arab-Israeli Chug, many of my stereotypes were<br />

broken down. I learned about an im portant problem<br />

in Israeli society - one that I had too often<br />

ignored.<br />

MARSHA CHACK<br />

Chevy Chase, MD<br />

49


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51


With eyes half open, you grab the<br />

towel, slip on the thongs, and head<br />

outside. It’s a cold walk, but well<br />

worth it. At first you received strange<br />

looks, walking through campus<br />

wrapped in a towel. Then they<br />

started catching on and did the<br />

same. In time, there would be<br />

migrations from upper and even<br />

lower Resnick to Building 2.<br />

The name alone became a status<br />

symbol. After all, who can forget<br />

that feeling of turning on hot water<br />

at 9:30 am and actually having hot<br />

water come out from the overhanging<br />

pipe? The water so hot it was<br />

necessary to use cold water, the<br />

pressure so strong it hurt when<br />

opened full blast. 24 hours a day, 7<br />

days a week, Building 2 worked<br />

hard to please Resnickites.<br />

Suddenly the senior citizens next<br />

door left, and the 24-hour-a-day<br />

hot water with them. Occasionally<br />

Grandma would come back for a<br />

visit, but it wasn’t enough. The<br />

migrations stopped. There was nowhere<br />

to go. Building 2 had nothing<br />

to offer except its_ last ace in the<br />

hole — its people. And here’s to<br />

you from Hotel California.<br />

DANNY PINCHASI<br />

BeverlyHills, CA.<br />

52


l i t 1* " * »<br />

'O h<br />

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53<br />

H<br />

Picture: A mass of Israeli students wearing plaid slippers,<br />

waiting impatiently while Overseas Students concentrate on<br />

their urgent phone calls.<br />

Phone No. 1 : Student No. 1 has been trying to reach the<br />

Overseas Operator for 15 minutes. She finally gets through.<br />

“Mommy?! ” (The whole room sighs with relief). “Mommy,<br />

it’s Me!! I’m in Jerusalem!” she screams. “I’m fine. You’d<br />

be so proud, I’m learning all these new dishes and how to<br />

cook... what, my favourite dish? ...yogurt and grapefruit<br />

...oh yes, I do all my own shopping ...prices? Everything is<br />

so cheap here!” The Israelis look on. “Do you think you’ll<br />

come, because if you do I need ...M & M’s, peanut butter,<br />

bagels, tuna fish, granola bars, and I’ll call if there is<br />

anything else. I want peanut M & M’s and crunchy peanut<br />

butter. What? I can’t hear you!” (Turns from the phone<br />

and screams “Everyone SHUT UP! I’M TALKING TO MY<br />

PARENTS!”) “Dad, there are seven other people here —all<br />

talking at the same time ...what-at!!?”<br />

Phone No. 3: “ ...Baruch Ha-Shem, everything is going very<br />

well. Listen, I’ve dropped one of my University classes so<br />

I’ll have more time to spend at the Yeshiva. No, I’m not<br />

becoming a fanatic, Yes, of course I’ll still respect you —I<br />

just want to bring my children up with morals... Yes I know<br />

I don’t have any children yet ...What? NO — DON’T PAY<br />

THE TUITION YET! ... Nuclear fusion just doesn’t seem as<br />

important as it used to...”<br />

Phone No. 5: “...No Operator, this is a collect call to<br />

Canada... not Kenya —C.A.N.A.D.A. No! it’s not a city in<br />

the United States. We are a country. We have our own<br />

government. Our own language, eh? We have our own<br />

currency... Thank you...” (Pause) “MOM? Hi, it’s me.<br />

Listen mom, this is going to be real short. I need you to<br />

send me American Dollars...”<br />

STEPHANIE GREENRLATT,<br />

New York<br />

SARAH COGDELL, Ohio


a P r im e r in %<br />

c/o<br />

|s R A E U W J c O N O M IC S<br />

ECONOMICS E X A M :<br />

IDENTIFY 3 of the<br />

FOLLOWING. . .<br />

1 Inflation<br />

2 Foreign Debt<br />

3 Socialism<br />

4 Bureaucracy<br />

5 Self-Employment<br />

6 Protectionism<br />

What is Socialism? Hanan works hard in the field all day.<br />

Yossi stands on the street comer and smokes Time<br />

cigarettes all day. David came here from Canada 15 years<br />

ago and set up the only profitable business in Israel, and<br />

gave jobs to 500 Israelis. How are these men different?<br />

Hanan earns $300 a week for his kibbutz. Yossi gets $75 a<br />

week from the government. David makes $3000 a week for<br />

his business. How are these men alike? After taxes all of<br />

them earn $75 a week. This system is called Socialism.<br />

Socialists believe that this system makes everyone want to<br />

do something useful for the community. See how many<br />

people are with Hanan in the field? See how many people<br />

run good businesses like David? Isn’t it wonderful? Now<br />

look at how many of Yossi’s friends are with him on the<br />

street corner.<br />

See the Israel foreign debt: Every year it grows, just<br />

like you. See Shimon Pires borrow money from Uncle<br />

Sam? He’s borrowing a dollar; that will coast him 1,000<br />

shekels But Shimon fsn’t worried, Uncle Sam will never ask<br />

Shimon to pay him back, and even if he did, those 1,000<br />

shekels wouldn’t be enough to buy a gumball.<br />

Wait! Shimon is borrowing money from Uncle Sam<br />

again; he’s already spent the dollar he just borrowed. If<br />

Shimon keeps borrowing money from Uncle Sam, he’ll owe<br />

him money forever. But Shimon isn’t worried. Mashiach<br />

will come.<br />

Self-employment: This is an Israeli taxi. The man<br />

driving it is an Israeli taxi driver. Inside the taxi is a meter.<br />

This meter tells the passenger how much he has to pay the<br />

driver. See the man coming out of the hotel? He is a tourist.<br />

He wants to go to the Old City. The ride to the Old City<br />

costs 2,000 shekels on the meter. The taxi driver will offer<br />

to turn the meter off and take the man ot the Old City for<br />

only 2,500 shekels. What a bargain! One second. 2,500<br />

shekels is more than 2,000 shekels. The taxi driver is<br />

stealing from this man. Why isn’t the man upset? Why<br />

should he be? He just got a bargain.<br />

This is the shuk. This is where all the tourists find<br />

bargains, just like the man who rode in the taxi. This man is<br />

Ahmed. He is a cousin of P.T. Barnum. He sells rare<br />

religious objects. Right now Ahmed is selling the Shroud of<br />

Turin to a couple from Oklahoma. The Shroud of Turin is the<br />

only piece of clothing that Jesus was wearing when he died.<br />

It is worth millions of dollars. Today Ahmed is selling it for<br />

$100. Ahmed is doing this because he likes to be friendly.<br />

Ahmed is so friendly that he already sold the Shroud of<br />

Turin 100 times today. Wait! There is only one Shroud of<br />

Turin! Ahmed is selling fakes! Won’t people send the police<br />

after him? They might, but it is very easy to get lost in the<br />

shuk, and besides, if he was ever caught he can tell the<br />

police he didn’t know. After all, Ahmed is a Muslim and<br />

Jesus was a Christian.<br />

DAVID CHASMAN<br />

Chicago, Illinois<br />

54


O U /l eCONOMLC S r<br />

cheap<br />

Bank of Israel<br />

exchange rates<br />

%<br />

55


IN ISRAEL<br />

In Israel, when you get your receipt at the grocery<br />

store, on the bottom is w ritten, “ nu/n Yon1?zftG'iu” —<br />

and i t ’s even on the bathroom walls.<br />

In Israel, when 12 soldiers die in an ambush<br />

suicide attack, you hear the name, age, hometown,<br />

time and place o f the funeral fo r each soldier;<br />

during each news broadcast, a Shlomo A rtzi song<br />

is played on the radio. The bus I was in at<br />

the time was silent, almost peaceful.<br />

In Israel, a 5-year-old boy makes jokes about<br />

Arabs; an 8-year-old asks if you have served in the<br />

army yet.<br />

In Israel, one gets a full,in-depth education on<br />

the concept and term “ Catch-22” — it is the rule in<br />

political, social and economic life.<br />

And only Israel has the privilege to have two<br />

volumes exclusively on Israel, in the field of<br />

psychology: on anxiety and pressure, and their<br />

influence on the individual and society.<br />

For in Israel, we are the chosen peoplç.<br />

D A VID BONINGER<br />

Ohio


m<br />

s a<br />

Israel: the land, the country, the people, and the<br />

spirit. In all these definitions, Israel is the dream<br />

and the reality which is cherished by people of<br />

every faith, nationality and race. Israel, a microscopic<br />

piece o f land in comparison with her<br />

neighbors, is a country exceedingly im portant to so<br />

many, yet fought fo r by so few. Although Israel is<br />

small in number, it is full o f “ ruach” and devotion.<br />

O ut o f hard work, compassion and the spirit o f<br />

Zionism, the State o f Israel was formed from the<br />

ancient land of the Jewish people<br />

I want to express my feelings about Israel, and<br />

why I feel such a strong “ kesher” with this<br />

country. In my lifetim e, the existence o f the State<br />

o f Israel has always been a fact. It is d iffic u lt for<br />

me to imagine the Jewish people and the world<br />

w ithout Israel’s presence. Since her creation in<br />

1948, Israel has played an integral part in world<br />

affairs and has been the bond between Jews in the<br />

Diaspora. Israel is special fo r Jews everywhere in<br />

many different ways. For some Jews, Israel means<br />

safety fo r them and their children. For other Jews,<br />

such as the Russians and Ethiopians, it is a chance<br />

to live a free Jewish life. For others, Israel is that<br />

opportunity to be a part of Jewish history, to be<br />

involved in our own destiny, and to be living where<br />

we can really feel that there is something im portant<br />

enough to live for, and even die for. To me Israel is<br />

all this and more. To pray at the Kotel, walk the<br />

streets o f Jerusalem, speak the language o f the<br />

Tanach, and feel the pride o f our beautiful country^<br />

gives me a special feeling.<br />

I find it impossible to express this true essence<br />

o f Israel. It is a feeling which one must experience<br />

himself. To be part o f such a beautiful country, to<br />

work to make this country better, and to feel the<br />

sense of unity and devotion that keeps Israel strong<br />

is tru ly fulfilling. As Jews with our own land,<br />

army, government, language, culture, and history,<br />

we have obtained a sense o f pride and a realization<br />

that we indeed are one.<br />

I hope in all these words I have succeeded in<br />

conveying my thoughts to you about Israel and its<br />

value to the Jewish people and to the world. Israel<br />

is an example o f a beautiful dream, which after<br />

much work, struggle and destruction has become a<br />

definite reality. In the words ofHerzl, “ If you will<br />

it, it is no dream.”<br />

TAM I LESSER<br />

West Palm Beach, Florida<br />

57


On A s k in g Q u e s t io n s<br />

In thinking of a subject to write about for this yearbook, one in particular seemed to capture the<br />

essence o f the One Year Program. That subject is the art of asking questions. Specifically speaking, the<br />

art of asking questions is simply the act of doing so. For m ost o f us the general question is, and has<br />

been, “What is Israel really about, and what does it mean to m e?” Certainly, no one person has or<br />

knows the answer to this general question, for each o f us has our own idea(s). The beautiful and<br />

exciting aspect of Israel is the way it inspires all of us to ask this question and many others about<br />

Israel, Judaism, relationships, and simply about you and me.<br />

Prior to our arrival in Israel many of us had answers to the many questions. Y et many questions<br />

were unanswerable at home, and coming to Israel was viewed with the hope that the answers would be<br />

found here. Ironically, now that we are here, there seem to be fewer answers and a greater abundance<br />

o f questions. So, while we came to Israel in search o f answers, what we essentially found were only<br />

new questions, still to be answered.<br />

What time does the 4n stop running? When is the superm arket really open? Why is it that we<br />

never have hot water? These are all relatively no questions for all o f us. But, of course, these<br />

questions have answers: (heb.)!<br />

Actually, I’m referring to questions involving our futures — as Jews at hom e and/or in Israel.<br />

Aliyah has been a specific subject that has raised many questions for a majority of us at one point or<br />

another. Why should I move to Israel, along with where, when, and how ^ more questions with fewer<br />

answers.<br />

So, as people began the program asking one another if they would makeAliyah to Israel, we leave,<br />

perhaps for the m om ent, asking the same question. W hether or not we will find the answer to this<br />

question and to all the others remains to be seen. But having been able to ask, ask, and ask has, I<br />

believe, been a special opportunity, perhaps the opportunity of a lifetime. Finally, the best part<br />

about being able to ask so many questions is that we don’t really need to know all the answers, at least<br />

not right away.<br />

JOSHUA TRACEY<br />

Lexington, Mass.<br />

58


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61


The sign-up sheet was just hanging there, pinned to<br />

the wall, like all the other annoncements in OSA.<br />

A t the top o f the page, in bold black letters, a few<br />

vague words about some sort o f trial o f a Nazi war<br />

crim inal were w ritten w ith a request fo r student<br />

volunteers. Those interested were to sign up w ith<br />

Jonathan, who would later contact them.<br />

The procedure was standard. Students came,<br />

signed up, stated practical experience they had<br />

working w ith journalism, television, or publicity,<br />

and were told that in a few weeks they would<br />

receive a letter telling them when the first inform a­<br />

tional meeting would be held. It seemed like<br />

something w orthw hile to do, and, according to<br />

Jonathan, about 60 students had already expressed<br />

their interest. But this certainly was not<br />

the usual volunteer project, even in Israel; the word<br />

"N azi” spelled that out, loud and clear. This<br />

obviously was something very unique, and yet the<br />

thought o f participating in it had my heart beating<br />

so fast and so strong I was afraid Jonathan would<br />

hear it. As I signed up, thoughts quickly began<br />

running through my mind: I had been studying the<br />

Holocaust all year in Mr. Mankowitz's class, and<br />

the thought o f confronting in person what I had<br />

been reading about in books was exciting and<br />

motivating. Coming from a small home town w ith<br />

a few hundred Jews and an apathetic congregation,<br />

I saw this as a "once in a lifetim e o p p o rtu n ity."<br />

Still, my heart kept racing, and by this point I was<br />

sure that Jonathan thought I was ready to go into<br />

convulsions.<br />

A bout six weeks later, I found myself clad in<br />

the black and white dress o f a volunteer, positioned<br />

by the doors of Yad Vashem, greeting guests and<br />

other arrivals. For that day, and the three to<br />

follow , I was to serve as the "dayelet" (hostess) for<br />

the panel and the witnesses as they gave testimony<br />

in "J'Accuse," "A n i Maashim,"or what was better<br />

known among the students as "The Mengele T ria l."<br />

J'Accuse (I accuse in French),an international<br />

convention held in Jerusalem from February 3-6,<br />

was the product of the efforts o f C.A.N.D.L.E.S.<br />

and Netzach, the respective American and Israeli<br />

organization of twins who had survived the deadly<br />

lab experiments of the notorious Dr. Josef Mengele,<br />

in the death camp o f Auschwitz during World War<br />

II. The highlights o f J'Accuse was the public,<br />

revealing testimonies before an international panel<br />

given by these twins and others of the crimes<br />

com mitted by Dr. Mengele.<br />

J'Accuse marked an im portant tim e in the lives<br />

o f these twins and other survivors. For many, it<br />

gave them their first opportunity to give formal<br />

public witness to the horrifying conditions o f the<br />

camps, and specifically the experiments o f Dr.<br />

Mengele, and at the same tim e share their experiences<br />

w ith fellow survivors.<br />

I found the testimonies very powerful. Even as<br />

I w rite this today, almost three months later, I can<br />

vividly recall many of the testimonies of the twins<br />

and others, and the fascination of the audience,<br />

entranced w ith the words of the survivors as they<br />

poured out their darkest and most intimate secrets<br />

on the witness stand. I remember, fo r example, the<br />

inspiring story o f Yona Lux, born in Poland,<br />

developed gangrene in her legs during the nightmarish<br />

death marches from Auschwitz in January,<br />

1945. A t one point, the Nazis threw her into a pile<br />

of dead bodies. Before Lux was finally liberated,<br />

she had survived four different concentration<br />

camps.<br />

The testimonies continued day after day. I<br />

remained positioned at the fo o t of the witness<br />

stand, ready to relay messages to the panel and<br />

staff, or tend to the witnesses at emotional<br />

moments, and when they finished their testimonies.<br />

For three days I listened attentively, but I was<br />

getting tired and moreover, my emotions were so<br />

frayed that I just could not restrain myself any<br />

longer; the tears began to well up in my eyes.<br />

62


Ruth Elias, born in Czechoslovakia was the last<br />

witness. Shortly after she arrived in Auschwitz,<br />

Elias realized she was pregnant. Throughout endless<br />

selections, Elias managed to hide her developing<br />

pregnancy and once was even transported out of<br />

Auschwitz disguising herself as a Czech national.<br />

As she continued her story, the entire auditorium<br />

was silent; Elias spoke w ith great eloquence and<br />

command of her words. I was certainly not the<br />

only one present moved by her testimony. Elias<br />

continued, telling o f her eventual forced return to<br />

Auschwitz, the progression o f her pregnancy, and<br />

the increasing d iffic u lty in masking her swollen<br />

belly. Nearing labor, she was struck w ith the intense<br />

fear of what would become of her and her baby, as<br />

most pregnant women in Auschwitz were sent to<br />

the gas chambers. Ultim ately, Elias gave birth to a<br />

baby girl. During the first evening after the birth of<br />

her daughter a Jewish doctor approached her,<br />

knowing o f the baby's birth. This doctor gave Elias<br />

a syringe, and suggested that she inject her<br />

daughter w ith the lethal drug it contained. This<br />

way, at least Elias herself might be spared from<br />

Mengele's experiments and the threat of death.<br />

Deciding it was best to keep the Nazis from killing<br />

her baby, Elias recalled through a choking voice<br />

how she took her daughter's life and then hid her<br />

body in a nearby pile of dead bodies. She then told<br />

how Mengele had come fo r the baby the very next<br />

morning and was angered by her disappearance.<br />

Elias stepped down from the witness stand maintaining<br />

her composure until she was in the compassionate<br />

arms of her fellow survivors. Interrogator Fri<br />

Terlo broke the silence by thanking Elias for her<br />

testimony. One could see the tears in the eyes of<br />

most of the people in the audience, including panel<br />

member Simon Wiesenthal, a camp survivor<br />

himself.<br />

A t the closing of the testimonies interrogator<br />

Terlo, panel chairman Gideon Hausner, who had<br />

served as prosecutor of the Eichmann Trial, and<br />

other members of the panel, all made appealing<br />

statements demanding Mengele's apprehension. But<br />

the most powerful statements in support of the<br />

need to apprehend Mengele had already been made<br />

by the witnesses themselves.<br />

Yona Lux and Ruth Elias, along w ith tens of<br />

others of Mengele's victims, had already graphically<br />

expressed their need. Although the term "Mengele<br />

T ria l" was largely inaccurate and unencompassing<br />

for the total scope of the many activities of<br />

"J'accuse," it was indeed very appropriate in the<br />

sense of exemplifying Mengele's role in Auschwitz.<br />

Josef Mengele had clearly committed numerous<br />

crimes against the Jewish people and humanity.<br />

And while Mengele remains free, supposedly in<br />

Paraguay, these survivors and their loved ones still<br />

suffer as victims of his experiments and from the<br />

terror of the Third Reich. The terrifying, disturbing<br />

testimonies of survivors had already exhibited this<br />

quite blatantly.<br />

As the child of a survivor, I had already seen<br />

this tragedy in my own experiences, long before I<br />

had ever stepped into the auditorium at Yad<br />

Vashem, and even before I had signed up in the<br />

OSA to volunteer. For these days of personal<br />

contact w ith numbers of survivors and their<br />

children as well, seemed years away from those<br />

two minutes in OSA when I thought my heart<br />

would fail me. By the tim e the festive dinners<br />

marking the close of the convention came to an<br />

end, my heart beats were back to normal.<br />

LISA KLUG<br />

Upland, California<br />

63


Vacation time creeps up again. Where should we go? What awaits us to be<br />

discovered and explored? A spontaneous decision tells us Spain would be an<br />

interesting place. Let’s gol<br />

Sitting on the airplace clutching Let’s Go, feelings of curiosity and anxiety<br />

overwhelmed us, while wondering what new experiences awaited us. Right from<br />

the start we realized that pantomime and smiles would have to be our means of<br />

communication. No wonder we never knew what we were eating.<br />

The excitement began. Museums, alcazars, cathedrals, mezquites. El Greco,<br />

Picasso, Goya all became common names surrounding us everywhere. Whitewashed<br />

homes, cobblestone streets, gardens, and Spanish song and dance filled<br />

each city with beauty. We easily adopted the Spanish lifestyle. Fiesta, sangria<br />

time, bloody bullfights, Flamenco shows, seafood and late intoxicated evenings.<br />

Each city — Madrid, Toledo, Seville, Cordoba, Marbella, Granada, Valencia,<br />

Barcelona — revealed Spain in a unique way through its sites, people and<br />

particular beauty.<br />

Upon reflection, Spain has become one o f the many experiences<br />

contributing to a year filled with unforgettable experiences, boundless opportunities<br />

and constant growth and learning. A year of opportunities in which one<br />

gains by taking advantage of all that s/he desires.<br />

64


" T o o t h b r u s h ” ? “ C h e c k .”<br />

" U n d e r w e a r ” ? “ C h e c k .”<br />

“ P a s s p o r t” ? " C h e c k .”<br />

“ T ra v e lle rs c h e q u e s ” ? “ C h e q u e .”<br />

“ B a n d -A id s ” ? B a rb a ra a s k e d . “ B a n d -A id s ” ?<br />

s c re a m e d .<br />

“ F o r b lis te r s ,” s a id s h e , w ith th e p a s s iv ity o f a w o r ld<br />

tra v e lle r . " C h e c k ,” I c o n c e d e d .<br />

A n d so g o e s th e la s t-m in u te in s p e c tio n o f m y p a c k .<br />

T o m o r r o w , 6 a .m . P A R IS . N erv e s? T h e s to m a c h . E x c ite ­<br />

m e n t? E y e b a lls, p a lm s , k n e e s.<br />

T h e f ir s t m a jo r e x c u rs io n o u ts id e o f Israel s in c e m y<br />

a rriv a l in J u ly , s ix m o n th s e a rlie r. H E L P !<br />

“ D o y o u th i n k t h e p la n e w ill ta k e o f f o n tim e ” ?<br />

“ I’ve n e v e r h e a rd o f a p la n e n o t ta k in g o f f o n tim e<br />

b e c a u s e it w a s c o ld in T e l-A v iv ,” a n s w e rs th e w o rld<br />

tra v e lle r.<br />

T h is is lu d ic ro u s . I k n o w plenty a b o u t p la n e s , a n d<br />

p a c in g , a n d a ir p o r ts , a n d c u s to m s o ffic ia ls . I’v e b e e n<br />

a r o u n d . S o w h y a m I b e h a v in g lik e a 3 -y e a r-o ld ? B e c a u se<br />

I’m e g o in g t o P a ris to m o r r o w . G o t o s le e p . T h e n to m o r r o w<br />

w ill b e to d a y .<br />

T o d a y . W h e re is t h a t sherutl In th e b a c k s e a t, I a m<br />

c o n s id e rin g fo rg iv in g 3 5 s e c o n d s la te . D o e s h e d e s ire m y<br />

fo rg iv e n e ss ? N o w a y . T h r e e to u r is ts w e a rin g “ S h a lo m<br />

Is ra e l” h a ts p ilin g in f r o n t o f th e I n te r C o n tin e n ta l H o te l.<br />

T w o H a sid s g o in g t o N ew Y o r k . A m y s te r io u s m a n w ith a<br />

b r ie fc a s e , m o s t d e f in ite ly c o n ta in in g a b o m b , a n d m y s e lf —<br />

B e n -G u rio n b o u n d .<br />

A ir p o r t. In lin e f o r s e c u r ity c h e c k . C ro w d s o f g ig a n tic<br />

p r o p o r tio n s . “ E x c u s e m e , s ir, c o u ld y o u p le a s e lift y o u r<br />

lu g g age c a r t o f f m y t o e s ” ? " M a d a m e , w o u ld y o u re m o v e<br />

y o u r u m b re lla f r o m m y d e r r iè r e ? ” T h a n k y o u . W h e re a re<br />

F r e d ie a n d J e a n - F ra n c o is ? " D e b !<br />

M y f a v o r ite C a n a d ia n<br />

g irl,” I h e a r in h is c h a rm in g F re n c h a c c e n t. M y f a v o r ite<br />

fro g g y a n d h is b e s t f r ie n d a r e m y tra v e lin g c o m p a n io n s f o r<br />

th e f lig h t. W e h a v e n ’t liv ed in th is c o u n t r y f o r h a lf a y e a r<br />

f o r n o th in g . U sin g o u r b a n k a n d p o s t o ffic e s tra te g ie s w e<br />

s u rv iv e th e im m e n s e lin e u p a n d e m e rg e h a g g a rd b u t in ta c t.<br />

T h e p la n e . W e a r e f in a lly o n th e w a y . I m im ic th e<br />

“ flig h t a t t e n d e n t " as s h e in s t r u f - th e p a s s e n g e rs in th e<br />

e m e rg e n c y p r o c e d u r e s . I a m a p r o . I’v e h e a rd it a h u n d r e d<br />

tim e s . T h e m o u n ta in s o f Y u g o sla v ia r e s t m a je s tic a lly<br />

b e n e a th F r e d d ie a n d m e as w e s p e a k F r e n c h . I n e e d<br />

p r a c tic e d e s p e r a te ly . It h a s b e e n w ell o v e r a y e a r s in c e I<br />

u tte r e d un mot. B re a k fa s t. G ro ss . " H e r e , J e a n -F ra n c o is .<br />

G iv e m in e t o th e m a n b e s id e y o u . H e s till lo o k s h u n g r y .” I<br />

f in is h m y b o o k . T w o h o u r s b e f o r e w e re a c h o u r fin a l<br />

d e s tin a tio n , a n d I’m b o r e d . F r e d d ie is a s le e p a n d J e a n -<br />

F ra n c o is is p ic k in g u p a girl in th e s m o k in g s e c tio n . I h a v e<br />

re a d th e in -flig h t m a g a z in e a d o z e n tim e s . I d e c id e to p la y<br />

w ith m y c u tic le s . I flip a im le ss ly th r o u g h m y p a s s p o rt. M y<br />

U .C ./S a n D ie g o s t u d e n t v isa is th e r e . J a p a n . H o n g K o n g .<br />

M e x ic o . S in g a p o re . T h a ila n d . S in a i. Isra e l. It is all h e re .<br />

S o o n , F r a n c e w ill o c c u p y a s p a c e o n a p in k p ag e.<br />

B lin k . O f f g o e s th e s e a t b e lt sign. “ W a k e u p F re d d ie ,<br />

w e ’re h e r e ! ” W e s c ra m b le t o c o lle c t o u r b e lo n g in g s a n d<br />

p lu n g e o u rs e lv e s in to th e lin e to d is e m b a r k . S tra n g e ly , th e s e<br />

s a m e p e o p le w h o p u s h e d a n d f o r c e d th e ir w a y o n to th e<br />

p la n e s e e m f a r m o re ta m e a n d h u m a n e o n th is E u r o p e a n<br />

tu r f . T h r o u g h a n e n d le s s c o r r id o r t o c u s to m s a n d im m ig ra ­<br />

tio n . P age e le v e n re c e iv e s th e b lo w o f F r e n c h r u b b e r . W hy<br />

c a n th e s e o f fic e rs n o t c h o o s e a b la n k p a g e ? W o u ld O rly<br />

I n te r n a tio n a l a n d T a b a b o r d e r s ta tio n m a k e a g o o d<br />

p a r tn e r s h ip ?<br />

W h e re is h e ? !? L a z y Israeli c o u l d n ’t e v e n d ra g h is b u t t<br />

to th e a i r p o r t to p ic k m e u p ? S p o k e n to o s o o n . R e lie f.<br />

T h e r e h e is, w a itin g , re d ro s e in h a n d . G r e e tin g c e re m o n ie s<br />

c o m p le te d , w e p ic k u p m y p a c k a n d h e a d f o r th e re v o lv in g<br />

d o o rs .<br />

H ey ! I t ’s w a rm a n d s u n n y h e re ! N ice c h a n g e fro m th e<br />

c h illin g , m o n s o o n ic c o n d itio n s I h a d le f t b e h in d in<br />

J e ru s a le m .<br />

W arm w e a th e r a n d s u n d o e s n o t la s t lo n g in P aris, in<br />

F e b r u a r y . N ig h tfa ll. R a in . C o ld . B la h . B la h ? N e v e r in P aris.<br />

F irs t ‘ n ig h t. E v e n in g s tr o ll d o w n C h a m p s-E ly s é e s .<br />

M a g n ifiq u e ! T o m y s u r p ris e (a n d G a d i’s ), I re a lly c a n s p e a k<br />

F r e n c h . I s u p p o s e all th o s e y e a rs o f d e d ic a tio n a n d<br />

p e rs e v e ra n c e (o r f o r c e d s u p p r e s s io n b y a C a n a d ia n s c h o o l<br />

b o a r d ) p a id o ff.<br />

W e ek o n e . N o tr e D a m e , S a c re C o e u r, M o n tm a r tre ,<br />

V e rs a ille s , S t. G e r m a in d e s P res, P ig alle, P lac e d u T e r tr e ,<br />

O p e ra , L o u v re . H o w ? H o w H o w !! In c re d ib le a r c h i te c tu r e<br />

a b o u n d s e v e ry w h e re . W e c lim b b ell to w e r a f t e r b e ll to w e r<br />

u n til all b e g in t o lo o k lik e g ia n t b a g e tte s , s tr e tc h in g<br />

o m in o u s ly t o t h e c lo u d s a b o v e . W e w itn e s s a s o m b re m a ss<br />

in a n a m e le s s C a th e d r a l. T h e c o n t r a s t in r e lig io u s s ig n ific<br />

a n c e , to se v e n m o n th s o f J u d a is m is a lm o s t o v e rw h e lm in g .<br />

A rt? A d r e a m . A d a y in th e L o u v re m a d e lig itim a te b y<br />

th e " S u r v e y o f R e n a is s a n c e A r t in E u r o p e ” ta k e n la s t<br />

W in te r Q u a r te r .<br />

N ig h t life? S p e c ta c u la r! W e s tro ll a lo n g s tr e e ts b u r s tin g<br />

w ith lig h t, s o u n d , la u g h te r a n d e n e rg y . W h a t d o y o u<br />

s u p p o s e th e m o n th ly e le c tr ic ity b ill is fo r th is c ity ? P e o p le<br />

sp ill o u t o f c r o w d e d r e s ta u r a n ts a n d b a rs . W e jo in th e flo w<br />

a n d a re c a p tiv a te d b y its m a g ic.<br />

W e a r e in a v e ry c u t e little r e s ta u r a n t in th e L a tin<br />

Q u a r te r w ith C h e ry l a n d f r ie n d s . T h e s m o k e is th ic k . T h e<br />

d e c ib e l level p e a k s . W a ite rs a n d w a itr e s s e s s c u rry a r o u n d<br />

lik e m ic e , c o n f i d e n t w ith th e ir te r r ito r y . A n o th e r r o u n d o f<br />

K irs b e f o r e d in n e r? C o u ld I re fu s e ? G a d i p o u r s t h e w in e<br />

d e f tly . H e lo v e s b e in g t h e o n ly m a le a t th e ta b le . D e s e rt. A<br />

se x u a l jo k e w ith a n in v e rte d c o n e a n d tw o s c o o p s o f ice<br />

c re a m . S p e c ia lity o f th e h o u s e . S e rv e d to la d ie s o n ly .<br />

S e c o n d w e e k . S id e trip t o N e u c h a te l, S w itz e r la n d to<br />

v isit R o c h . S n o w w a rm s m y C a n a d ia n h e a rt. “ D e a r e s t G a d i,<br />

th a n k s f o r th e h a n d f u l d o w n m y b a c k .” R o c h e lle is in<br />

c h o c o la te h e a v e n . R e m e m b e r th e S u c h a r d f a c to r y ? P riv a te ,<br />

c la n d e s tin e to u r . H o w m a n y a s h tr a y s c a n w e a d o p t fro m<br />

e a c h r a c l e tt e r e s ta u r a n t w e v isit? S w iss a rm y k n iv e s a n d<br />

C o u p e D e n m a rk s , w e th r e e “ d o ” th e to w n . H e a d lin e :<br />

“ H e b re w U . in v a d e s N e u c h a te l! ” O u r la st n ig h t w e c e le b r a te<br />

in a d a r k little p u b . T h e b e e r s te in c o v e rs m y fa c e . G o o d b y e<br />

R o c h . N e x t w e e k in J e ru s a le m .<br />

W e a re b a c k in P a ris f o r la s t- m in u te s ig h ts a n d<br />

s h o p p in g . G e o rg e P o m p id o u C e n tre , M u se e J e u d e P a u m e .<br />

W a lk s a lo n g th e S e in e , la T o u r E iffe l. I s a tis fy m y c ra v in g<br />

f o r n e w c lo th e s . It is f u n n y h o w th o s e th in g s s e e m so<br />

u n i m p o r ta n t in Israel. W e d a s h t o all th o s e p la c e s w e d re a d<br />

t o m iss a n d re v isit th o s e w e lo v e m o s t. M y f a v o r ite s p o t? S t.<br />

M ich e l, th e S o r b o n n e , C a fe S e le c t ( H e m ’s h a n g o u t) .<br />

O u r n e w S w a tc h e s tic k in u n is o n as w e re a liz e t h a t o u r<br />

s o jo u rn is c o m in g to a n e n d . W e a re q u ie t fo r a fe w<br />

m o m e n ts as w e r e f le c t o n all t h a t w e h a v e s e e n , h e a rd ,<br />

s m e lle d a n d e x p e rie n c e d . W e a b s o r b th e la s t s n a tc h e s o f<br />

P a ris ia n life. I a m sad . I d o n ’t w a n t to le av e th is p la c e . I w ill<br />

b e h o m e to m o r r o w . H o m e ? D id I say h o m e ? I m e a n<br />

J e ru s a le m . Is t h a t h o m e ? W ell, w ith p rid e a b o u n d in g , I c a n<br />

a s s e rtiv e ly a n s w e r in th e p o s itiv e . T h a t is a b r ig h t th o u g h t.<br />

Y e s, I w ill b e in o n e o f m y tw o h o m e s to m o r r o w , a n d t h a t<br />

m a k e s le av in g fa r m o r e p le a s a n t.<br />

D E B R A A . K A R P<br />

T o r o n t o , C a n a d a<br />

65


Adventure in<br />

J K F R l<br />

G4<br />

T h e r e w e w e re , ju s t t h e th r e e o f u s a n d o u r g u id e . H u n c h e d<br />

o v e r lik e o ld m e n , w e tr u d g e d s lo w ly th r o u g h th e c r u s ty<br />

s n o w , s to p p in g e v e ry tw o s te p s t o ta k e a f e w w o n d e rfu l<br />

b r e a t h s o f a ir. T h e w in d f e l t s tr o n g a n d b itte r l y c o ld e v e n<br />

th o u g h w e w o re s e v e ra l la y e rs o f c lo th in g . I p ic tu r e d u s in<br />

m y m in d — th r e e d o ts m o v in g a m o n g s t all th is w h ite a n d<br />

d e c id e d w e all c o u ld h a v e b e e n a c to r s in a m o v ie a b o u t t h e<br />

A r c tic . B u t n o , I r e m in d e d m y s e lf a s w e tr u d g e d o n : T h is is<br />

A fric a . A fric a ? !!!<br />

T h e t r u t h is , if a n y o n e w o u ld h a v e a s k e d m e a m e re<br />

w e e k - a n d -a -h a if b e f o r e t h e d a y I ju s t d e s c rib e d , w h e r e M t.<br />

K ilim a n ja ro w a s , I w o u ld n o t h a v e b e e n a b le t o a n s w e r. In<br />

f a c t , g o in g o n a tr i p t o K e n y a a n d T a n z a n ia th i s y e a r w as<br />

c e r t a in l y n o t o n m y a g e n d a . H o w e v e r, o n e e v e n in g I<br />

c a s u a lly m e n tio n e d t o o n e o f m y m o re a d v e n tu r o u s frie n d s<br />

t h a t m y p la n s t o v is it T u r k e y d u r in g th e s e m e s te r b re a k h a d<br />

fa lle n th r o u g h . H e to l d m e t h a t h e a n d a n o t h e r g u y w e re<br />

le a v in g th e f o llo w in g w e e k f o r K e n y a , a n d h a d t o b u y th e ir<br />

ti c k e t s t h e n e x t d a y . H e a s k e d m e if I’d lik e t o jo in th e m .<br />

A n d s o , o n t h e s p u r o f t h e m o m e n t, I d e c id e d t o g o w ith<br />

S ta n A r o n b y a n d R o b H e c h t o n th e ir tr a v e ls t o th e<br />

c o n t i n e n t o f A fric a . I g o t h o m e t h a t n ig h t a n d m y<br />

r o o m m a te h e lp e d m e lo c a te K e n y a in a n a tla s .<br />

T h e tr i p t u r n e d o u t t o b e q u ite a n a d v e n tu r e . W e w e re<br />

a b le t o g e t in t o T a n z a n ia , w h ic h is ju s t s o u th o f K e n y a , a n d<br />

t o c lim b K ilim a n ja ro (“ K illy ” t o th e lo c a ls ). A t 1 9 ,0 0 0 f e e t<br />

i t is A f r ic a ’s h ig h e s t m o u n ta in , o n e o f th e fe w m o n ta in s o f<br />

th is h e ig h t w h ic h c a n b e c lim b e d w ith o u t t h e a id o f r o p e s<br />

o r o x y g e n .<br />

C lim b in g K illy w a s most c h a lle n g in g . I t to o k th r e e d a y s<br />

u p a n d tw o d a y s d o w n . N ig h ts w e re s p e n t in c a b in s w h ic h<br />

a r e s ta t io n e d a t v a r io u s a l titu d e s . W e t o o k o u r o w n s u p p ly<br />

o f f o o d . T h e p a c e w e m a in ta in e d h ik in g u p , e s p e c ia lly a t<br />

t h e h ig h e r le v els, w a s p a in s ta k in g ly s lo w . “ P o ly , p o ly ! "<br />

(S w a h ili f o r “ S lo w , s lo w ” ) ra n g in o u r e a rs w h e n e v e r w e<br />

tr ie d t o in c re a s e t h e p a c e , f o r o u r g u id e w a r n e d u s t h a t tim e<br />

w a s n e e d e d in o r d e r f o r o u r b o d ie s to a d j u s t t o th e a ltitu d e<br />

a n d la c k o f a ir. B y t h e t i m e h e to p w a s w ith in re a c h , w e<br />

w e re all s o to t a ll y d r a in e d o f p h y s ic a l s tr e n g th t h a t it w as<br />

o n ly d e t e r m i n a tio n t o g e t t o t h e t o p t h a t k e p t u s g o in g .<br />

S ta n , R o b a n d I w e re v e ry d e te r m in e d a n d w e d id m a k e it.<br />

A f te r M t. K ilim a n ja ro , R p b r e t u r n e d t o K e n y a f o r a<br />

to u r o f th e n o r th w h ile S ta n a n d I s ta y e d in T a n z a n ia t o go<br />

o n a th r e e - d a y s a fa ri th r o u g h t h e G r e a t R if t V a lle y n a tio n a l<br />

p a r k s a n d p la in s . W e tra v e lle d w ith fiv e o th e r s in a<br />

la n d r o v e r je e p . I t w a s e x c itin g n o t k n o w in g w h a t w o u ld b e<br />

a r o u n d t h e n e x t c o r n e r : a n e le p h a n t? a w a r th o g ? o r a n o t h e r<br />

o f th o s e c ra z y b a b o o n s ?<br />

T h e s e c o n d d a y o f o u r s a fa ri w e w e re d riv in g a lo n g a n d<br />

n o tic e d s o m e b a b y g ira ffe s o n th e s id e o f th e r o a d . W e<br />

d e c id e d t o s to p a n d ta k e s o m e p ic tu r e s . T h a t ’s w h e n it<br />

h a p p e n e d . I h a d b e e n d ilig e n tly w e a rin g m y b u lk y , u n c o m ­<br />

f o r ta b le m o n e y b e l t a r o u n d m y n e c k , e x c e p t w h ile tra v e llin g<br />

in th e la n d r o v e r , w h e n I p la c e d it in m y sm all c a rry in g b a g<br />

in s te a d . I s te p p e d o u t o f t h e t r u c k w ith t h e o th e r s , p u ttin g<br />

m y b a g o n th e s id e o f th e r o a d , a n d to o k a c o u p le o f<br />

p ic tu r e s . W e w e re ail la u g h in g a n d ta lk in g w h e n w e<br />

re - e n te r e d th e tr u c k , a n d it w a s o n ly a f t e r w e 'd b e e n d riv in g<br />

f o r n e a rly te n m in u te s t h a t I re a liz e d I’d le f t m y b a g o n th e<br />

s id e o f t h e ro a d ! Q u ic k ly w e r e t u r n e d t o t h e s a m e s p o t, b u t<br />

- a la s - m y b a g w a s n o t t o b e f o u n d . O u r d riv e r re c a lle d<br />

a n o t h e r to u r i n g je e p p a s s in g u s th e o th e r w a y . M a y b e th e y<br />

h a d p ic k e d it u p . O r p e r h a p s a m e m b e r o f t h e M aasi tr ib e<br />

h a d m a d e o f f w ith it s in c e w e w e re in th e ir h o m e re g io n .<br />

A n y w a y , w h a te v e r h a p p e n e d t o i t , g o n e w a s m y I.D .,<br />

m o n e y , p a s s p o r t, film a n d , y e s , ev e n m y f a v o r ite p in k<br />

s w e a tp a n ts !<br />

It w a s q u ite a fe e lin g t o b e in a fo r e ig n , u n d e v e lo p e d<br />

c o u n t r y s u c h a s T a n z a n ia , w ith e v e ry e s s e n tia l d o c u m e n t<br />

g o n e a n d m y f lig h t h o m e t o Israel in o n ly th r e e d a y s . I h a d<br />

t o g o t o th e C a n a d ia n H ig h C o m m is s io n in N a iro b i, K e n y a ,<br />

w h e r e I’d b e a b le t o g e t a n e w p a s s p o r t. B u t c o u ld I g e t o u t<br />

o f T a n z a n ia a n d in t o K e n y a w ith o u t o n e ?<br />

I m a d e o u t a p o lic e r e p o r t in t h e T a n z a n ia n p o lic e<br />

o f f ic e , w h ic h p ro v e d t o b e r a t h e r c h a lle n g in g s in c e e v e ry o n e<br />

th e r e s p o k e S w a h ili a n d o n ly a b it o f E n g lish . A fte rw a r d s , I<br />

h e a d e d t o th e I m m ig ra tio n O f fic e w h e re th e y s im p ly<br />

s ta m p e d m y p o lic e r e p o r t a n d a s s u re d m e sev eral tim e s t h a t<br />

y e s , I c o u ld c ro s s th e b o r d e r w ith it. S ta n a n d I p ro c e e d e d<br />

to th e b o r d e r t h a t a f t e r n o o n .<br />

A s I tu r n e d o u t , g e ttin g o u t o f T a n z a n ia w a s n o<br />

p r o b le m . G e ttin g in t o K e n y a w a s. T h e o ffic ia l th e r e said I<br />

n e e d e d a p a s s p o r t t o g e t in to K e n y a , a n d d i d n 't s e e m to<br />

u n d e r s ta n d t h a t I n e e d e d t o g e t into K e n y a in o r d e r to g e t a<br />

n e w p a s s p o r t.<br />

A f te r s e v e ra l m in u te s o f r a th e r p a n ic k y<br />

e x p l a n a tio n s o n m y p a r t, h e r e l u c ta n t ly le t m e th r o u g h .<br />

W h e w !!<br />

O n c e I re a c h e d th e H ig h C o m m is s io n e r’s o f f ic e e v e ry ­<br />

th in g w e n t s m o o th ly . A f te r fillin g o u t m a n y fo rm s ,<br />

re c e iv e d a n e w p a s s p o r t w ith in tw o d a y s .<br />

Y es — a n y tr i p w h ic h in c lu d e d c lim b in g M t. K ilim a n ja ro<br />

a n d g e ttin g y o u r p a s s p o r t s to le n in T a n z a n ia w o u ld have to<br />

b e c a lle d a n a d v e n tu r e . D e s p ite t h e s e tb a c k s , it w a s a g re a t<br />

su c c e s s .<br />

I c a n ’t h e lp b u t la u g h n o w w h e n I th in k t h a t<br />

s o m e w h e re in th e w ild o f T a n z a n ia , a M aasi tr ib e s m a n is<br />

w a lk in g a r o u n d , th e e n v y o f h is f r ie n d s , in m y g o o d o ld<br />

p in k s w e a tp a n ts .<br />

M IC H E L E M U R R A Y<br />

V e r n o n , B ritish C o lu m b ia<br />

I


nn ipx<br />

m bnnna .aunna m aay naim nu/aina ,b"inb iyoj D m m uon ba a w io<br />

nya xb y ia p tjKi «arrm sw a© - p i ~b rm baK p a p a pm i bapb maya<br />

— o m a nryiapi paya n r m p ay ■’m a m pntyam i nnw am .tiik bapb<br />

T’a1 nb fjfifi aynn by nynu; •>b\y n ^ m n n .|nrn bbia /'Kb" tib k Dbiai<br />

atyina nnb m byby nb miyb iban ■’biKiy ,a\yina jit m an cpann m ) nbiy<br />

! pypw — nnnty nKn T pm .a\yma tnpn abPtya Kiynb ibainy innK nm<br />

Kym ,nTpj ,aunnn .aanm ik e im on .aurb mymiya •h rm btn hpk<br />

’biy nnu/Kan nubnnn .inn1 paaa □■’bunam nyiy paya ,|ty» biaj m by<br />

rpn Kb ’b\u nnaynty nianb nibty pmn nm nr .nnaya pa aaab nnm<br />

.aaab mpna napaa Tuynniyn Dmyab baK pnm ba mmn ,aiu pa-ba<br />

tk ,aunnb ym n nm ay ur> naiyiKn aiab baK jn n a iy n 25 \y> Dnbiy a\yma<br />

.n m ajn n n T p aa Kb pbu; nnaiynn b\y rpaa m ai .□■’aain n au/ina iy><br />

m np apia ba !i k ...mayb bm nnb p m yun\y ay nnaiK m a a in n nnK a<br />

m aup .non bu; n n y n n m .nm ay p n n ub n m .6.15-a mmya t p t t i 5.30-a<br />

nb iaKa pua onnTyn ba ,n\yp nm ay — dt> ba non<br />

?nam pb p m m m n o n n Tin nyab p’K — m yay m m b nam y nbKum<br />

an v n a ,ntyp m m b 'ynor n o n n .n m m n m m b nbia1 nK myayi Tianb<br />

d k iniK m a n n pain n m nrty m a\yn d k ,pa anK mby u y n b — n n aa<br />

m a y .nKmy w ,naj socrn m n a nm ht dk .bpu/nn by m niyi paon<br />

pim buabm 9.30 ay nm m bu imKa,nb,’bn ay num nbaK .□ ’■nnya 3.00 ay<br />

! aunna nt pa — aaa iniK n n m n n a m n nia ba<br />

mamnn anK dt><br />

■>binty nnbm ba .pa<br />

nm nt .mwan s*P?p ambb<br />

abiy maayn .aKn pmyn<br />

mna bna iniym ma nm<br />

— aaa aiy .Dn\y \yib\yn<br />

ib^Ka yia aum maan<br />

nbiy aiu nn aann nny<br />

nmn nnm ban poa<br />

.nbiyb na\yK Kb nK\y<br />

apab mpn ’b \y> anvna<br />

.airnK tk awKa ainabi<br />

abiy n o ’b :nKn<br />

m u n K ,opj»b<br />

67


I don’t want the friendship<br />

that you and I have come to share<br />

to stand the test of distance.<br />

But our time together will soon be over<br />

and I guess life must go on...<br />

1 just want you to know that<br />

in spite of the miles that threaten<br />

to come between us<br />

I will continue to think of you,<br />

to need you...<br />

longing to see your smile,<br />

hear your laugh,<br />

touch your face,<br />

hold your hand.<br />

How very much I will miss<br />

sharing with you,<br />

and your presence<br />

in my life.<br />

AMEE HUPPIN<br />

Seattle, Washington<br />

68


69


70


71


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TheKahane rally and counter-demonstration presented<br />

the overseas students with yet another picture of the<br />

Arab-Jew conflict we learned so much about this<br />

year. This picture appeared to me, and most students<br />

I spoke with, as ugly, distorted and rather intangible.<br />

I use this strong language because I felt a hatred<br />

which surfaced from participants on both sides of the<br />

demonstration. I felt the fear of some friends who<br />

were forcibly moved by the police. I also felt<br />

disillusioned and confused at not being able to get an<br />

intellectual grasp on the situation, something that<br />

always seemed so important in my liberally educated<br />

background. All of these feelings left me and my<br />

friends with an impression which will undoubtedly<br />

last our lifetimes.<br />

Knesset member Rabbi Meir Kahane of the Kach<br />

party had originally planned to speak on February<br />

26th across from the Resnick Dormitories in response<br />

to a protest the previous week. The first protest was<br />

on behalf of those attempting to prevent Pierre<br />

Yazbak, a Christian Phalangist representative, from<br />

speaking on campus. The students demonstrating,<br />

most of them Arab, felt offended because someone<br />

connected with the Phalangists (responsible for the<br />

killings at the Palestinian refugee camps of Sabra and<br />

Shatilla) was allowed to speak on campus. For about<br />

three hours, they protested by singing Palestinian<br />

national songs and chanting anti-Lebanese Christian<br />

slogans. They offended the Jews present not only by<br />

their choice of songs but by their abuse of the<br />

freedom of speech. A polarization between the two<br />

groups surfaced. Small outbreaks of violence occurred<br />

and several students were arrested.<br />

In response to that incident, Kahane planned the<br />

February 26 demonstration. Because of rain, however,<br />

the demonstration was cancelled and rescheduled for<br />

Thursday, February 28. At about 12:45 that day,<br />

Kahane stood on the northeast corner of Churchill<br />

Street across from the entrance to the University. (He<br />

is forbidden to speak on University grounds . He<br />

began his address to the large, mostly anti-Kahane<br />

crowd by saying, “Shalom, Jews and dogs.” The gist<br />

of his speech was that Arab students who are<br />

affdiated with the PLO should not be at Hebrew<br />

University or in Israel at all, for that matter. Now,<br />

although I have no affinity for the PLO or its<br />

activities, Kahane’s approach to the Arab-Jewish<br />

conflict has always disgusted me, and evokes feelings<br />

of hatred generally foreign to my nature. His presence<br />

that day brought out these feelings, and no matter<br />

how many friends I spoke with afterwards, I could<br />

not explain them away.<br />

The other problematic issue for me was the police<br />

response. Before Kahane was far into his speech, a<br />

few people began throwing rocks. However, it was<br />

c DNF<br />

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not clear who in the crowd initiated the rock-throwing.<br />

The police quickly put a halt to this action by<br />

dispersing the crowd. A few minutes later, for no<br />

apparent reason, both the mounted police and border<br />

police (riot dispersal unit) drove many overseas<br />

students observing the demonstration into bushes and<br />

down a hill, hitting some with billy clubs. I was<br />

almost hit with a club, while some of my friends were<br />

bruised on their head and back. To this day, I do not<br />

understand why the police responded in this way.<br />

In conclusion, Kahane’s anti-Arab rhetoric and our<br />

hatred surfacing in response, as well as the questions<br />

the situation raised as to the nature and limitations of<br />

democracy and the reaction of the “riot control”<br />

police, made the event extremely powerful for those<br />

overseas students present that day. The Arab-Jewish<br />

picture has been drawn with many colors and shapes<br />

over the past year. I have seen some bright colors and<br />

pretty shapes. I felt, unfortunately, that this picture<br />

has been painted with dark colors and distorted<br />

figures.<br />

CHARLES MAYER<br />

San Rafael, California<br />

73


On March fourth, <strong>1985</strong>, m yself and 17 other foreign students<br />

studying in Israel were given the opportunity to m eet President<br />

Chaim Herzog. We represented a cross-section of foreign students<br />

studying at various universities in Israel — One Year Program<br />

students, Mechina (preparatory) students, and students already in<br />

their second or third year of studies. The m ajority of students were<br />

new immigrants or people on the verge of making aliyah (Tem porary<br />

Residents).<br />

First, we were given a tour o f the President’s house and then we<br />

were led to a meeting room in which President Herzog was to m eet<br />

and speak with us. A fter his entrance and introduction, we each<br />

stood and briefly addressed him, in Hebrew, about our personal<br />

background, place and program of study and our future plans.<br />

Having been a young immigrant to Israel himself, Herzog was<br />

faced with the difficulties of absorption into a new society. Thus, the<br />

President was interested in hearing about some of the problem s we<br />

are now facing and discussing those problems. To be sure, the new<br />

immigrant is confronted w ith the difficulties o f learning a new<br />

language, as well as culture shock and acclim ation to a new and<br />

different society.<br />

The President wanted to assure us that carving out a new life in<br />

Israel is, at times, an extrem ely difficult and frustrating process —<br />

however, with hard work and patience it can be a very rewarding<br />

experience. A fter all, look at him!<br />

LAWRENCE LOKMAN<br />

4 Year Program Student


The bedroom door creaks open, light switch flicked on, and<br />

“Let’s go boys! Up!” — or so it sounds —hoarsely called<br />

out. A peep through the window shutters reveals darkness<br />

vainly resisting light’s advance, that time of dawn when<br />

Hebrew University students know better than to be<br />

anywhere but between the sheets.<br />

For one first-year chemistry student, however, this is<br />

not one in a long Une of ordinary study days. Today is<br />

Wednesday, March 6th, and David Bloom is going into the<br />

army.<br />

To be precise, the student/soldier, age 22, is heading<br />

for the first tour of reserve duty, or what is left of it. He<br />

had already served five days the previous week when he was<br />

unexpectedly granted a five-day leave, which he spent with<br />

his parents at their Jerusalem apartment. Now it is time to<br />

rejoin his outfit for the remaining 22 days of his miluim<br />

(reserve duty).<br />

David’s home for the next three weeks will be at an<br />

army base somewhat north of Kiryat Shemona. The Egged<br />

bus bound for Kiryat Shemona departs Jerusalem’s Central<br />

Bus station at 7:00 a.m. today for the 3-1/2 hour trip. The<br />

soldier is expected to meet his comrades no later than<br />

11:00 at a place called Gib or (translation: hero) for transfer<br />

to their army base.<br />

As the Egged makes its way through the Jordan Rift<br />

Valley, many passengers reclaim the slumber lost by the<br />

early morning journey. David, in contrast, is very much<br />

awake. He reflects back on the previous week, his first taste<br />

of reserves. One day was to have been spent jumping out of<br />

airplanes, as David is in the southern Paratrooper Brigade;<br />

although paratrooping under battle conditions is becoming<br />

obsolete, tzanhanim (paratroopers) are periodically drilled<br />

so as not to forget what a cloud looks like from above. “We<br />

get on the bus and go to the airstrip,” he explains in his<br />

broken British, putting down a paperback copy of The<br />

Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. “It’s really early in the<br />

morning, about 6:00, and all of a sudden CRACK!<br />

CRASH! Lightning, thunder, rain, the whole works. We<br />

went, ‘Yeah, awright!’ and it went on like that for half an<br />

hour, and the M ’faked (commander) said, ‘Ha’tzniha<br />

hitbatlah’ (Jumping is cancelled). We weren’t exactly sorry<br />

to hear it, I tell you.”<br />

For the duration of that week, David’s task was to lug<br />

on his back a 50-pound communications system while on<br />

patrol with his unit. “I was so out of shape, I’d be gasping<br />

for breath every five steps,” he says. Deep snowfall in the<br />

area only made the patrol more difficult. David wraps both<br />

hands around his right thigh and yanks upward so that his<br />

foot is off the floor, demonstrating how walking in the<br />

snow was best accomplished. To ease the effort, he got into<br />

the habit of stepping only in footprint depressions made by<br />

those walking before him.<br />

The bus has now arrived in Kiryat Shemona, and a<br />

short taxi ride later David reaches a huge dirt field in Gibor.<br />

Several hundred soldiers are gathered. Some sit at tables<br />

outside small fast food shacks, munching hot dogs or<br />

smoking cigarettes. Across the way, many more soldiers<br />

recline on their tote bags, the green of their uniforms<br />

blending together with the color of their bags. While some<br />

faces are characterized by eyeglasses pulled up over the<br />

head while the eyes are closed, others’ eyes intently pore<br />

over the day’s newspaper or a good novel. The expected<br />

time of transfer, 11:00, is now a four-hour-old memory.<br />

Joe, a husky, bearded American who could double as a<br />

lumberjack, had left his Kibbutz near Beersheva at 5:30 a.m.<br />

but is unperturbed by the delay, knowing that the clock<br />

is set on “Israel Time.”<br />

“Safaris” — open-ended trucks with two benches<br />

running lengthwise down the middle —pull into the lot and<br />

Plugah Bet (B Company) soldiers are ordered to board. Bags<br />

are thrown into the truck, and David and the others ascend.<br />

No sooner have the 20 soldiers been seated than the truck<br />

rumbles to a start and begins the final leg of the soldiers’<br />

day long journey. As the safari climbs an incline, David<br />

points to the left to TelHai, where Josef Trumpeldor and<br />

seven others were killed in 1920 defending the Jewish<br />

setlement.<br />

Another kilometer or so northward and the truck halts<br />

for a security check. It is quickly waved on, and soon David<br />

Bloom and company must look back to see Israel, for<br />

through the front windshield can be seen only the green<br />

hills of Southern Lebanon.<br />

HILLEL KUTTLER<br />

Queens, New York<br />

75


The Goldsmith Building fo r Overseas Students is<br />

often nicknamed "The Goldsmith High School." In<br />

many respects, this is hardly surprising. As a<br />

mechina student, I found the constant reminder<br />

that you cannot be adm itted into Hebrew class<br />

unless you come exactly on tim e, or that if you<br />

miss three classes you are throw n out of that<br />

particular course, to be rather hard fo r one who<br />

thinks that her high school days are now well<br />

behind her.<br />

A fter the initial few weeks, however, those<br />

petty rules are reduced, to insignificance. They are<br />

revealed to be mere trivialities (and perhaps necessary<br />

ones, too). What is far more im portant is the<br />

growing awareness that every single student w ith<br />

whom you m ix has chosen to come to the Hebrew<br />

University. They have left their families and friends<br />

to be w ith other Jews from all over the Diaspora,<br />

take Jewish Studies courses, and experience life in<br />

the Jewish homeland.<br />

Coming from Britain, this is indeed a wonderful<br />

opportunity fo r me. For there, the situation is<br />

most depressing: one is "advised" to remain on the<br />

periphery at school because o f being Jewish, is<br />

surrounded by twice-a-year Jews (i.e., those who<br />

go to shul the first day of Rosh Hashanah and Yom<br />

Kippur), who try desperately to be like "the<br />

others " and is expected to be ashamed of Israel<br />

fo r her crimes, which journalists "expose" daily.<br />

On a different note, the British student at<br />

Goldsmith, unlike most others who get credits for<br />

their endeavours, receives no material rewards.<br />

Nevertheless, the British student is prepared to<br />

work just as hard and to take exams, even if they<br />

seem worthless. And speaking from personal experience,<br />

I know that I have enjoyed studying here,<br />

more than fo r my " A " levels, because I have been<br />

studying fo r the sake of studying and not fo r some<br />

desirable grade, and it is only now that I can<br />

understand why some people look back at their<br />

school days and refer to them as "th e best days" of<br />

their lives.<br />

JIL L IA N DAVIDSON<br />

London, England<br />

76


What did<br />

the barjk teller<br />

SAY ?..<br />

< V m x i u >i<br />

^bot/cf you. / C(r>~h'/ /<br />

— h ^ u e / ccsjcA<br />

C of p c


yySOS<br />

w<br />

’ nNnvy >33!? n a a a n o o i t i o a n n !?d d n >nx*n\y >nnvyn n ’ m io a nnsvyan n x i aN\y ’ 33a<br />

!?nM ,a!?vy oasvyb n a n nibvyn nn!n\y ?nNi in n a w n s w a x n m o m s 3n H t Nn3n!? ond!?<br />

o m s n DV3 7N ravyn as!? .nnm vynn 7111 o a n n n x >rmn Nt?\y >m n!a o!?vyin n!? m N 7N<br />

n 1? dvs 7N .(p’ r u a m w — o m s 3ns ronvyn onyvy nNnn o m o n n i!?’3 N) ’ msnvyn n!?<br />

03 ,Divym^nn o m n n o>\y3N m w i Nb oys 7N ,nvyn!?ra nnt?N nbnn n x n p yinvy!? >ro!?n<br />

!?33 nn>n\y n ’ vynnn nnn\yn m *TNn ’nnnxvy n u n m N !?s\y "pyn 0 1 m tm -ip ran<br />

m .n!?nn nxnvy nnnvy ,n ’ \ynn nnn\y in d ht io n<br />

»np!?nn nnvyn ,*avyy Nin m w ” .*ayn<br />

i i n m o w n p a n ’ n w i pt?nn ’ r to n o m tn m o iN i ’ nytavys .o m s n aaN"i\y nnnvyn m ix<br />

n a n n !?yn nan!? >nta:a\y:> .o ’a ’yn nnnvyi DPnm o m > n ,a\y!? m x n a a ni!?\yn oanavy<br />

n m n a n n !?yn\y >nnvyn n!? .n*nnN ?n!?nnoni >nnnmt?n ,”nn\y 3n"i im 3 71’nn as tm p<br />

n m m in a a n im n n w nnvyrn aN ?“inN or? ban 7onvy \yw n m iN m oNn a n w a n<br />

• o ’ m N!?n 033 ’ n*rn — m a n s ^nnvya n a to x n a *rnN !?n\y ffêfffîfà. 3n 3an!? -ivysNvy n m n<br />

o ip n 7>n .’ t i n ’ Ninvy nivym nn >!?n 33m *rnN !?n a m 3n vyaa Nin nna\y !?vy 3n Nin o m s<br />

naun n m a 3n bw in N n n n x own? !?n n w n ,n m n n n m n n n a to x n Povy o!ayn nnN<br />

ann n x nvuin<br />

p a m p m a m : n xn<br />

p in i»a m a m ba


79


the wall<br />

All the dreams are written there<br />

tucked in between the cracks;<br />

women’s dreams<br />

men’s dreams<br />

a people’s dreams (unburdened backs)<br />

folded in between the mosses<br />

echoing through centuries,<br />

whispers, cries, screams<br />

tunnelled through two thousand years<br />

men’s dreams with side-curls,<br />

women’s dreams with covered heads,<br />

a people’s dreams o f peace, all fears<br />

are there, uncovered<br />

for the wall<br />

for that wall has ears, listens<br />

to the wails o f children<br />

who have sunk their dreams in it,<br />

who stare with sunken eyes —<br />

seeking,<br />

praying for a sign,<br />

maybe this time, maybe this time...<br />

tight-lipped, pursed up inside<br />

tucked in across the surface,<br />

nearly conscious,<br />

waiting.;.<br />

SHARI COOPER<br />

Montreal, Canada<br />

O.JERUSALEM<br />

Jerusalem seems to come with a single promise - that it has a secret. And so they come - the curious, the earnest, the partisan, the<br />

proud —to find it, to learn the span of their own souls by unlocking the secret of Jerusalem. They search beneath the dusty carpet<br />

o f its antiquity, view it from the hills, walk its streets brimming with the clang and grind of a modern city, and they wonder: Can it<br />

be here, between the old and the new, hidden beneath the folds of a caftan or a long black cloak, or perhaps even in the green<br />

fatigues of the young soldiers?<br />

After a time the seeker tires. For all the various marvels, no single sight seems to hold the key, as if the secret were too diffuse<br />

to grab in an instant, as if the years had spread and mixed the wonder to confound those who search for it. But given enough time,<br />

enough frustration and even disillusionment, the truth begins to emerge.<br />

For Jerusalem will not tell its secret; that is its secret. It will not offer up the answer that would end its fascination, but rather<br />

draws out the secrets of those who approach it. Jerusalem does not speak; she listens. History has granted her this sad but special<br />

expertise. She listened to the children of slaves as they stepped from the desert to find her. She listened to the songs of David, to<br />

the laws of the Sages, to the rantings of Herod and the final gasps of Yehuda Halevi. The hills of Tsefat will tell magical tales, the<br />

sands of Sinai majestic ones, but the stones of Jerusalem will not speak. They will keep your yearnings, in crumpled notes or<br />

muttered prayer, as they have kept so many for so long, in sympathetic silence. From all over the world for all the ages of history<br />

people have come to Jerusalem to do no more than speak to stones. The world is not lacking in places which offer remarkable<br />

stories or inspiring adventures, but only here will the homliest, most pedestrian cry be heard with the same respect as the decrees of<br />

Kings and the supplications of the holy. ThJs does Jerusalem shine back your soul, and force you to see its true nature. “There are<br />

sermons in stones,” wrote the poet, but not here; the stones of Jerusalem do not sermonize or moralize —they listen. The stones<br />

remain, addressed by each conquering army, each ardent pilgrim, by youth’s aspirations and old age’s regrets. They hear without<br />

speaking; sometimes, they stand on earth to represent one of the faces of God.<br />

DAVID WOLKE<br />

Philadelphia, Penn.<br />

80


Ü E A<br />

When I first came to Jerusalem last August, I was struck by the<br />

pageantry of the city’s inhabitants. In this 20th-


W 3 X ) i m m ■<br />

■ n t > â<br />

82


83


ia<br />

l n o s<br />

How does one eat a popsicle? Why does white skin get red<br />

and peel when exposed to the sun? How come Jews in<br />

Israel don’t smash all their dishes before Passover? These<br />

are a few of the questions OYP student Rachel Friedberg<br />

and OY'P graduate Daniel Gordon dealt with over<br />

Passover. Rachel and Daniel are two of the 13 students<br />

whom the Office of Student Activities and the Youth Aliya<br />

Department chose to help Ethiopian youth,aged 11-18,for<br />

eleven days in special villages around Israel.<br />

Rachel and Daniel were sent to Hofim, which they feel<br />

is “the best and biggest youth village.” They spent most of<br />

their time taking the 200 Ethiopian children, who usually<br />

traveled with a canteen in one hand and a school book in<br />

thè other, to their Passover tiyulim in the Galil. “The kids<br />

were amazing!” recalls Rachel. “Most of them would be<br />

completely justified if they spent all their time weeping and<br />

moaning, but I never heard them complain. Although a few<br />

have parents living in absorption centers, most of the<br />

children will never see their mothers or fathers again, either<br />

because they are stranded in Ethiopia or are dead. Some of<br />

the children have physical scars from their 300-kilometer<br />

desert treks from Ethiopia to Sudanese refugee camps.<br />

Other children have mental scars from watching their<br />

parents and siblings die from starvation and illness. But<br />

they all manage to stay cheerful.<br />

Arriving at Hofim on April 4, the 5 OYP volunteers<br />

came just in time to help celebrate the young Ethiopians<br />

first Passover in Israel. Although the staff was anxious to<br />

teach the kids new customs, they were careful. They did<br />

not want to repeat the policy of 30 years ago that many<br />

sociologists believe was a deliberate attempt by the Israeli<br />

government to eliminate the language and culture of the<br />

Oriental Jewish immigrants. The night before and during<br />

the Seder, father figure and village coordinator Rabbi<br />

Nachum Cohen explained to the children the reasons<br />

behind the Israeli rituals and prayers. When possible,<br />

traditions of both cultures were honored. For example, a<br />

half-Hebrew, half-Amharic Hagaddah was used. Both Israeli<br />

and Ethiopian songs were sung. And, after the traditional<br />

reading of the Hagaddah, an 11-year-old boy stood up and<br />

chanted from memory in the holy language of Baez for over<br />

20 minutes. His father was a kohen (priest) in his village.<br />

Although the service was stretched out to over four hours,<br />

“.The children stood completely still,” recalls Darnel.<br />

The only thing the staff might have done wrong, say<br />

Daniel and Rachel, was that in teaching the children they<br />

implied that all Israeli Jews keep these customs. The youth<br />

are sheltered from the fact that most Israelis do not observe<br />

Jewish law. “They might get a big shock when they see<br />

Israeli society,” states Daniel. Adds Rachel, "The girls<br />

wouldn’t understand that I usually don’t wear a skirt.”<br />

Most of the kids will learn Hebrew and basic Judaism<br />

at the village for another six months. After that, they will<br />

be sent to special boarding schools. Most hope to go on to<br />

University one day, except for a few who, Daniel points<br />

out, “would prefer to become soccer stars.”<br />

BECCA LEVY<br />

Newton, Mass.<br />

84


H.U. S<br />

f i r s t E th io p ia n s<br />

Of the thousands of Ethiopians who have been<br />

flow n to Israel over the last tw o years under<br />

"Operation Moses," 21 have made their way to<br />

Goldsmith. Although the students are not studying<br />

the One Year Program (since they don't have the<br />

option or desire to return to their homeland after a<br />

year), many strong friendships have formed between<br />

the OYP students and the four-year Ethiopian<br />

students.<br />

One of the students, Ron Alkalie, who arrived<br />

in January <strong>1984</strong>, cried when he first saw the Wall.<br />

" I had read the Second Temple was destroyed by<br />

the Romans. If the rest hadn't been destroyed, we<br />

(the Ethiopian Jews) would not be struggling<br />

outside our country."<br />

Back in Ethiopia, Ron had to hide his religion<br />

from his Christian schoolmates. Although Ron is<br />

sure life is a lo t freer for Jews in Israel, he's not<br />

sure that's always such a good thing. "In Ethiopia<br />

everybody follows what the Priest of the village<br />

says. Here nobody follows the opinion of the<br />

Rabbinate. Everybody goes w ith their feelings and<br />

not w ith the Torah."<br />

Before Ron made it to Israel, he expected all<br />

Israeli Jews to be priests. Even though he had read<br />

as many books as he could about modern Israel, he<br />

never dreamed Jews here would drive on Shabbat<br />

and eat m ilk and meat from the same plates. Ron<br />

feels that Jews in Israel have the right to do what<br />

they want, but if they don't improve or don't<br />

teach their children to keep the Torah, it could be<br />

very dangerous fo r Judaism and Israel. "W hat<br />

happened to the Temple might happen again," he<br />

says.<br />

Ron is waiting fo r his parents, three brothers<br />

and a sister to join him in Israel. If not for the<br />

Israeli government reporting the Ethiopian a irlift,<br />

his nine-member fam ily might be together. "N o<br />

one pushed the government to say anything about<br />

it, and now many people can't come," he states.<br />

Luckily, tw o of his brothers slipped in before<br />

January. "A n d ," Ron adds w ith a smile, "m any of<br />

my friends at the University are like fam ily to me."<br />

The Jewish Agency gives Ron just enough<br />

money each month to pay fo r books, clothes, food<br />

and tuition. When asked if it's d iffic u lt to study in<br />

Goldsmith w ith foreign students, many of whom<br />

have large budgets, he replies; w ith a very diplomatic<br />

grin. "We live as we live and the Americans live as<br />

they live. Everybody cannot live like their<br />

neighbors."<br />

A fter Ron finishes studying economics at the<br />

University, he plans to join the army. Then, if all<br />

goes well, he'll find a good job and settle down.<br />

Even if his wife is not Ethiopian, he plans to teach<br />

his children Amharic, torso dancing, and as many<br />

other Ethiopian traditions as possible. Also, he<br />

would like to publish an Amharic-Hebrew- English<br />

book he is writing about his absorption into Israeli<br />

society.<br />

BECCA LEVY<br />

Newton, Mass.<br />

85


Did you do anything exciting over your semester break?<br />

Egypt? Italy? Sinai? How about sunny California or Cold<br />

snowy Minnesota? Those places were blessed with our<br />

presence for 2-1/2 weeks during our self-extended semester<br />

break.<br />

Jon left first, on the morning of January 31st, on that<br />

“Bargain Airline* —“TOWER-AIR” (Boy are they ever keen<br />

with luggage)-and Joel left that night as a courier for that<br />

marvelous company in Tel-Aviv, AIRAID (03-295655 —<br />

oops, shhh —that’s a secret).<br />

It sure was good to be back in that non-kosher melting<br />

pot.No more of that high-tech, multi-dimensional, out-ofyaihite<br />

Castle/<br />

control broadcasting system we had enjoyed for so long.<br />

This time it was 21 pop stations, 15 punk, 8 rock, 5<br />

classical, 4 heavy metal, 3 turtle doves, 2 reggae, & one<br />

station that broadcasts only on clear nights when it is<br />

possible to see Uranus.<br />

After being in exile for so long, prices really hit us<br />

hard. 8 dollars for the subway(that’s 10,000 Shekels to<br />

you, me & Lorne Greene of Alpo) and 6 dollars for the<br />

most amazing lox omelettes.<br />

—Person 1 : Is that kosher?<br />

— Person 2: Just ask the Halachic Police at<br />

Aish HaTorah.<br />

— Person 1: Aish HaTorah? Is that indoctrination or<br />

education?<br />

— Person 2: Well, according to Aish’s Rosh Yeshiva’s<br />

brother...<br />

Anyhow, the next stop was stereo and camera row. Of<br />

course it is almost completely dominated by American Jews<br />

and Yordim. “A BROKEN WALKMAN? GOOD, WE’LL<br />

TAKE THREE!!”<br />

Ten hours later we were home ih Minneapolis and L.A.<br />

Parents, friends, food, eye-doctor, more food, dentist, the<br />

snow. Have you driven lately? —“IF YOU’RE NOT HOME<br />

BY 11:30, CALL SO I DON’T WORRY.”<br />

The pleasures were majorly phenomenal. M.T.V., a<br />

pulsating hot shower in the morning, CORNED BEEF, a<br />

TELEPHONE, FREE FOOD, and a real newspaper for half<br />

the price of the Jerusalem brand. A ‘slicha’ here, a ‘y°fie’<br />

there and sooner than we knew, our vacation was over.<br />

All in all, our adventure was exciting and fun. But it<br />

was frightening to see how quickly we fit right back into<br />

the ‘American Way’ and Israel became another distant<br />

memory. Let’s all remember our incredibly special year in<br />

Israel. It’s meant a lot to us.<br />

JON r o s s , St. Louis, Pk, Mn.<br />

JOEL MANDEL Chatworth, CA<br />

86


As many o f our fellow OYP.ers took off during the vacations<br />

to the far corners o f Europe, or to see the ancient civilization of<br />

the Nile, some OYP.ers choose to experience a new culture.<br />

Here in Israel they worked on Kibbutzim, thriving com m unities<br />

that have become an im portant part o f the m odern Israeli<br />

society.<br />

Many of us, for many different reasons, decided to<br />

volunteer on Kibbutzim throughout Israel. First, it provided<br />

those of us w ithout families in Israel an opportunity to have an<br />

adopted family in Israel and a place for retreat throughout the<br />

year. It also gave students a “ kesher” (connection) w ith a<br />

family and an institution in Israel for years to come. Second, it<br />

gave us an opportunity to work in Israel, be it in the fields or in<br />

the “ heder ochel” (dining room). Thus we added another<br />

dimension to our experiences in Israel, one different than<br />

touring and studying. Lastly we experienced life on a Kibbutz,<br />

an opportunity to feel part of the collective.<br />

In fact, experiencing a Kibbutz is like experiencing in depth<br />

one part o f the multi-faceted Israeli society. This is due to<br />

different ideological make ups of the Kibbutzim. We were able<br />

to choose from all of the diverse movements. Some students<br />

volunteered on HaShomer HaTsa’ir (secular) Kibbutzim, while<br />

others volunteered on some of the 17 religious Kibbutzim<br />

throughout Israel. Still others volunteered on new Mesorati<br />

(traditional) Kibbutzim in the lower Galilee.<br />

Regardless o f the ideological make-up of the Kibbutzim,<br />

m ost of us came away with positive and rewarding experiences.<br />

We established im portant connections with our Kibbutzim and<br />

w ith the other volunteers as well. We hope that in the future<br />

every student will have the opportunity to experience the<br />

Kibbutz way of life.<br />

ALAN RUSONIK<br />

Willowdale, Ontario<br />

87


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88


THE P-C AFFAIR<br />

Pita and Cheese (P-C) - that’s what Israel means to me.<br />

Sounds strange? Not to any student who has lived in Israel<br />

for more than a week. The first shopping trip is the<br />

beginning of this pita and cheese indoctrination. At the<br />

sight of eight long rows of unfamiliar food, written up in<br />

somewhat foreign Hebrew script, the OYP student balks<br />

and runs for familiar territory. The pita bag is clear with no<br />

writing and the cheese is easily recognizable as well. True,<br />

things other than cheese could be stuffed in the pita, but<br />

the OYPer wanders through the rows of brightly packaged<br />

items with pictures of beaming kibbutznikim and rejects<br />

them all on the basis of fear. However, as he passes through<br />

the dairy section, he sees a flash of yellow through the clear<br />

plastic. Yes, it’s the yellow hard cheese. Why does he<br />

choose that particular cheese? Not because it has the<br />

perfect consistency to melt right into pita, but because it is<br />

the only one that doesn’t have an opaque wrapping.<br />

After this first experiment, the student proudly carries<br />

back his conquest and views himself as the first real pioneer<br />

to make an “almost” grilled cheese sandwich. However,<br />

after the initial exhili,ration of cooking a hot meal (instead<br />

of cold humus or fruit) wears off, disappointment at the<br />

limitations of the cheese filling sets in. He tries to be<br />

imaginative. He tries different aesthetic options: pita'with<br />

cheese on top, pita with cheese on bottom, cheese<br />

surrounding pita, and, if he’s very adventurous, pita with<br />

cheese and some tomatoes and cucumbers (other basic<br />

Israeli staples which need a tribute of their own). But<br />

nothing works, the pita is still pita, the cheese is still cheese<br />

and the taste is still the same.<br />

Yes, he starts to loathe pita and cheese. The very sight<br />

of it causes him to tremble with frustration and longing for<br />

a thick steak dinner (Charthouse perhaps?). So why doesn’t<br />

he eat something else? It is an inexpicable cultural<br />

phenomenon that drives him back to the bread and dairy<br />

section again and again, even after he understands the<br />

previously indecipherable package labeling. The force beckons<br />

him, till he can fight it no longer. He finds himself<br />

leaving the Supersol, every time, with pita and cheese<br />

quivering in his Eagle Sam Olympic grocery satchel!<br />

And as the months go by, the seasoned OYPer accepts<br />

P-C as part of his life. He stops fighting the urge and lets<br />

instinct take over completely. He eats P-C all the time. He<br />

eats it for breakfast, lunch, din - oh, excuse me, gotta go,<br />

my pita and cheese is burning!<br />

SIGAL GOLAND<br />

Pacific Palisades, Ca.<br />

89


FOOD GLORIOUS FOOOI<br />

HUMUS KING /<br />

HUM US KING II<br />

1 falafel, 2 falafel,<br />

3 falafel, 4...<br />

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92


y \K e HO M e j \<br />

It was incredible! So many people, all hurrying in the same direction. By car, on foot, by bus, all with the same<br />

purpose: to reach Har Herzl. The bus we were on was stuck in a giant traffic jam, so we jum ped off and joined<br />

the masses, racing the clock.<br />

Checking our w atches and realizing the late hour, our quick-paced walk became a jog. As we approached<br />

the entrance, I could see the streams of people like ourselves, coming from every direction.<br />

Outside the entrance, faceless people thrust bouquets of flowers into our hands, as if leaving those behind<br />

would somehow signify th at we had been there. We walked hurriedly, just following the others, feeling th at they<br />

knew for w hat it was we were hurrying to.<br />

A nd then it started! It came up as a low wail, but as it continued, it rem inded me of a lonely howl. And<br />

w ith its sound, everything stopped!<br />

All the hurrying masses, all the flower-bearing people, the cars, the trucks, and even the buses stood still.<br />

All thoughts centered around the sound and w hat it was m eant to inspire.<br />

As I looked around, I saw thousands of faces and millions of eyes all echoing the same thoughts...<br />

thoughts of life, thoughts of peace, and thoughts of loved ones who gave their lives for th at peace.<br />

As one visits this place of rem em brance, one is told of those who gave their lives, fighting for this country.<br />

The headstones read not of men and w om en who had spent their entire lives fighting for something they believed<br />

in... but more of boys and girls who should be listed in a college yearbook, not etched in stone marking a final<br />

resting place.<br />

The tim e is very close for us to start packing up and heading back. Home to our families, our friends, our<br />

universities and colleges. It is tim e to start thinking about w hat w e’re going to take back w ith us, w hat we got<br />

from our year in Israel, and how it will help shape our lives back home.<br />

I say, le t’s all take back one m em ory each. N ot just memories of parties, or the hikes, or Ulpan, or the beach,<br />

or even our various travels. But at least ONE memory that will stay with us. Your first glimpse of the Western<br />

Wall, maybe all the candles in peoples’ homes during H anukkah, or the excited faces of children, all dressed up<br />

on Purim.<br />

I’m going to rem em ber the tw o m inutes this nation stood still to honor and remember those who helped<br />

make Israel w hat she is today. I’m going to remember the pride I saw in everyone s eyes, and the pride I felt to<br />

be sharing th at feeling, not as a spectator but as a participant. This is the memory I am taking back w ith me.<br />

STEVE JACOBSON<br />

M nntery Park, California<br />

93


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good friends...great times...


...fond memories<br />

97


P.S. from the PoSt OffiCe<br />

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98


T h e t e m ? aKn<br />

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If you can’t figure out this Hebrew, get a refund from your Ulpan teachers,<br />

or stay here with us until you can read it.<br />

I, in the meantime, will be in the U.S., longing for the great times we’ve<br />

had together: tracing in the Jewish Q uarter the events of the Destruction of<br />

the Temple (on Tish’a B’Av, fasting in the damned heat); climbing up<br />

Masada between midnight and dawn, gazing at the cable car above our heads;<br />

strolling on a warm Jerusalem evening between apartm ent buildings, in the<br />

footsteps of the 1948 soldiers; browsing through King David’s secret papers,<br />

towards midnight, in the spooky Valley of Nuts; watching the sunset beyond<br />

the M editerranean from the roof o f a Crusader castle; dismantling our<br />

skeletons while inner-tube rafting up north.(R ob and I were throw n into the<br />

thorn bushes. My tube is in the Dead Sea by today.)<br />

O ther memories: playing frisbee on a great soccer field outside a Druze<br />

village in the Galil, and sleeping there, and anywhere else; and walking, and<br />

walking: to the wells, to the springs, to the w ater creeks, to the waterfalls<br />

and to the beaches; learning the battles on the Golan Heights, or the<br />

differences between urban and rural settlem ents; learning the West Bank/<br />

Judea and Samaria“balagan” ; being mystified on the stone steps of an alley<br />

in ancient Sefad; teaching some deeply-urbanized, fifth-generation Americans<br />

how to find the north in the pitch-black skies outside. And being sad it all<br />

has ended, but that is only inside.<br />

AMOTZ


X F<br />

« •<br />

□<br />

D ' D<br />

'j h<br />

"Comfortable rocks"<br />

"Comfortable rocks?"<br />

"Yeah. Last night I was so tired from our<br />

hike that I think I slept on comfortable rocks..<br />

But what a great hike it was! On Thursday morning after<br />

Yom Ha'atzmaut, 135 of us boarded our buses, dragging<br />

our knapsacks and shaking off our hangovers on our way to<br />

the OSA's longest hike this year. Sea to Sea we were to go<br />

for four days with only two canteens, a hat, and as much toilet<br />

paper we could carry— the Galilee will never be the same.<br />

We commenced our hike at the Monfort castle (not quite at the<br />

Sea - but who wants an "Almost Sea to Sea" hike anyway). We<br />

then broke into four separate groups, proceeded down the wadi<br />

and began to dream of the sea at the other end. Nights were<br />

spent together devouring meals (special thanks to our cooks),<br />

singing songs, nursing our bruised feet, and trying to find<br />

somewhere to brush our teeth. The days were spent in the<br />

glory of Northern Israeli wadis and mountains* hiking in paradise<br />

and finding well-hidden bushes.<br />

On Saturday night we settled, completely exhausted from 3 days<br />

of hard exercise and little sleep (special thanks to th°*e<br />

mysterious girls who sang until 2 AM the night before), on the<br />

construction site of a newly planned settlement. Settled on<br />

our "comfortable rocks", we gazed at the clear.night sky and<br />

remained unconscious for eight hours. Our mission almost complete,<br />

we reached the Kinneret the next day.<br />

The Sea to Sea hike gave us the opportunity to really<br />

see Israel. It was a special moment in our year, and<br />

will not be forgotten. We must thank Micha and all<br />

the madrichim for their wonderful guidance (and<br />

patience!). We must also thank Benji for not<br />

forgetting to mention hoW( much he enjoyed<br />

the extra salami. Thanks!<br />

MIKE LIEBERMAN<br />

F lem in g to n 1,NJ<br />

100


102<br />

We've had lots o f, workshops Ktcently on hou) to deal with coming home..<br />

I t '6 only a ^ew weeks away! So much le{\t to do... I guess I'V i ju st have, to<br />

come, back heAc boon, because. I neveA got to see the Stalagmite Caves oh.<br />

Rachel's Tomb, and I wanted to go to the Golan but I don't think I ' l l have<br />

tim e!... What's i t going to be lik e to actually take a hot showefi In the<br />

mo fining, ok watch TV? Have an oven? A telephone? A can? ( By the way, have


The blues, reds, and greens of the stage lights blur as my<br />

eyes fill with tears. Drop... and Shlomo Artzi is whole<br />

again. Who is this guy anyway? And what right does he<br />

have to create an ambiance in which I find myself reviewing<br />

my past and contemplating my future in such agonizing<br />

uncertainty?<br />

It all started that morning when I and another 500 One<br />

Year Program students from universities all over Israel<br />

converged on the Givat Ram campus, and began our day at<br />

"HaKesher," The whole day was a Zionist-Activism seminar<br />

filled with "Hasbara" workshops, symposiums, lectures and<br />

lettuce sandwiches.<br />

The topics covered were a microcosm of my year, as<br />

well as all the doubts and uncertainties about my future in<br />

relation to Israel. As a native-born Israeli, who has lived in<br />

the United States since age three, the question of aliya has<br />

hit me very hard. I was brought up to love Israel, but my<br />

growing-up process, and cultural ideas and thoughts, are<br />

tied to the U.S.<br />

Should I be an Israeli in America, or an American in<br />

Israel? My choice of workshops at "HaKesher" indicated<br />

my generally confused state. I first went to "Dealing with<br />

Cultural Re-entry in the U.S." and then attended the<br />

"Considering A liya" workshop.<br />

I spent the whole day going through a series of mental<br />

ups and downs, and finally entered the concert hall in an up<br />

mood, my eyes shining Zionism. The symposium about<br />

Israel and its relationship to the Diaspora had really<br />

inspired me. "Think of living in Israel as a challenge, not as<br />

a hardship, " I thought to myself. I was practically humming<br />

"HaTikva. "<br />

And now, sitting in the second row of the darkened<br />

auditorium, staring at Shlomo Artzi's guitar, reality has just<br />

set in. I had never ever heard any of his songs, but the<br />

whole sound and atmosphere of the concert created just the<br />

right mood for me to tune out and return to the States. I<br />

remembered my first real "date," the prom, the time my<br />

neighbors and I camped out in the front yard. I reviewed<br />

the past 16 years and saw that I didn't want to give up what<br />

I had in the States — friends, immediate family, shopping<br />

malls.<br />

Another tear falls. A tear for what was and can't be<br />

again, for I am too affected by Israel. The blur of light<br />

returns and I go back to all my wonderful visits to Israel,<br />

as well as experiences throughout this year. How could I<br />

deal with no more bus rides to Tel Aviv, no more views<br />

from the Mt. Scopus amphitheatre, and not hearing Hebrew<br />

spoken. All religious aspects aside, how could I go shopping<br />

again on Saturday, or work, between 2 and 4, and not nap.<br />

But most importantly, how could I say goodbye to the very<br />

important friends I've made? The dilemma twirled round<br />

and round in my brain, dancing to the beat of Shlomo<br />

Artzi.<br />

The sound of handclapping and boisterous singing<br />

roused me from my reverie. My Israeli friends next to me<br />

were singing loudly along to what apparently was a very<br />

popular song. They looked so happy and comfortable with<br />

where they were, and what they were doing. They seemed<br />

so secure in their conviction to be living in Israel. I envied<br />

them. Even if I did decide to live in Israel I would be<br />

different.<br />

My "Americanism showed in many small ways, and my<br />

different cultural background and ideas would set me apart.<br />

Despite my tactical command of Hebrew, I didn't understand<br />

many of the private jokes and innuendos. I couldn't even<br />

sing along to a Shlomo Artzi song.<br />

Suddenly I felt remote from them. I didn't know if I<br />

wanted to be in the U.S., but I felt I didn't completely fit<br />

in here, in Israel, either. Where did I belong?<br />

And then my very best friend, an Israeli, took my hand<br />

wordlessly and gave me a hug. The look on his face<br />

definitely did not indicate that he felt I was an outsider. He<br />

smiled at me, and my last tear fell.<br />

So, do I want to be an American Israeli or an Israeli<br />

American? I don't know... When is the next Shlomo Artzi<br />

concert?<br />

SIGAL GOLAND<br />

Pacific Palisades, California<br />

103


or<br />

From the senior member of the One Year Program: Greetings. It’s 4:00 AM and I’m reclining on your standard cot-bed in Idelson<br />

Dorm plugged into my walkman listening to “ - hebrew - ” , trying to collect my thoughts to write about what has been one of<br />

the most memorable years of my life. After my last visit to Israel in 1982,when I attended Ulpan Akiva for one month, I came home<br />

to Tuscon and enrolled in the Intermediate Hebrew class at University of Arizona. In January, a young woman from the American<br />

Friends of Hebrew University came and explained the One Year Program. My professor looked at me and said, Vivian, why not.<br />

and I replied, “Why not!” , , ., ttT) .<br />

The feeling of my family and friends was summed up in the words of my grand-daughter Barrie, when she said, Bubbi, *<br />

you’re leaving when I’m five and you won’t be back till I’m six. Why do you have to go away for such a long time?”<br />

I came to Israel alone. Fortunately my niece met me, brought me to Jerusalem, to Goldsmith to registration, to Shikunei<br />

Ha’Elef - communal showers, bathrooms and kitchens. I gave myself a light pat on the back for adjusting. I didn’t know a soul on<br />

campus when I came. I was accepted as just another student, pushing my way to get on the early morning bus.<br />

What has this year really meant to me? I love you and thank you all and thank you for not just paying deference to me<br />

because of my white hair, but accepting me as a student, friend, sister, mother and Bubbi. Thank you for your help m my studies,<br />

your confidences, and the opportunity for the exchange of ideas between our generations. I wrote to my children that just being<br />

with you has taken at least 40 years from my mental age. How old have you made me feel? 71 - never. 17 - sometimes.<br />

To my teachers, advisors and all others connected with the One Year Program: Thanks for opening my mind to all there is<br />

out there to be learned. Studying will be part of my life from now on. Utopia it has not been. We all know our frustrations, and I ve<br />

made mine known where I hope it will do some good. . . , , k++i0<br />

As I began to prepare myself to take leave of my second home, I look at this beautiful, wonderful complex, important little<br />

land - a microcosm of the world - with admiration for its progress in just 37 years. There are problems Pressures confusion<br />

bureaucracy and attitudes I can’t for the life of me understand, but I must say with my many Israeli friends, We will manage. It<br />

WlU bW t a i w é up the hill from Idelson to Goldsmith, and look out over the beautiful holy city of Jerusalem, I know she has<br />

taken a piece of my heart and will keep it for always, and I shall hold her close to my heart all my life.<br />

VIVIAN SHARKEY<br />

Tuscon, Arizona<br />

104


105


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f s t o —


Israel: a waiting game. Either the Post Office is closed and the bank is open,<br />

or the bank is closed and the Post Office is open. There's the queue in front<br />

of the bank ten m inutes before it opens, or there's the long, jam m edup line<br />

waiting to buy stamps or settle a dorm bill. Now it has become a way of life:<br />

survival of the patient.<br />

107


Are we having fun yet?<br />

F or only 200 shekels a day, you can help little Andy.<br />

sfo *4*<br />

'<br />

I<br />

a Æ Z<<br />

w<br />

H<br />

Twas the night before midterms.<br />

Shmira: Drink and Protect!<br />

Just a bit higher, please<br />

The Second Coming.<br />

108


And if you don’t, I’ll kill you.<br />

109


110


Z j l Question /<br />

Hcm did you know I'd n iss you?<br />

How did you know I'd w rite?<br />

Wry did you do end do that?<br />

Wien I arily said I n ight.<br />

W y did you turn the com er?<br />

Wry did you stop end stare?<br />

Wry do you go aid cb that?<br />

Wien you know th ere's no one there.<br />

Wat mikes ne fe e l incertain?<br />

W at is an ny mind?<br />

Wry did you go end do that?<br />

It happens a ll the tine.<br />

W are did you put that srile?<br />

W are did you get that voice?<br />

Wry did you go end do that?<br />

Wan you knew I had no choice.<br />

Wan do you think you'll grow ip?<br />

Wan w ill I nature?<br />

Wry did you go end do that?<br />

Wan you caulch't have been sure.<br />

M? questions have no onswers<br />

end I night not seen to care.<br />

Did I rea lly go and do that?<br />

Now I know I'm so unfair.<br />

LAURA FISHLER<br />

Rockville, NY.<br />

I Look<br />

I look<br />

end see a nan<br />

Wo does not lock so nuch d ifferen t<br />

Fran other men that I know<br />

His voice soft-speken<br />

His eyes fu ll of expression, yet gentle<br />

His touch warm<br />

He says he is a frien d of nine<br />

I lock at a rare<br />

So foreign to me<br />

That I'm no b le to lock beyond the d ifferen ce<br />

A rare vhidx mikes me cringe<br />

F ills me with pain end anger<br />

hbybe it is a rare I have even learned to hate<br />

Aid th en ...<br />

I meet a men wearing the name<br />

I think I'd lik e the men to be a frien d of nine<br />

But how can he<br />

Wan I hate his name<br />

I'd love to trust the nan<br />

But I ccn 't trust his name<br />

He gives tome so freely<br />

Wry<br />

Wien I too have a name<br />

Aid if we somehow find a way to erase the names<br />

So that we may be friends<br />

Wan we walk together<br />

People would not see us<br />

But only the names we wear<br />

end they would not see that<br />

Wan we erase the names<br />

There is no conflict<br />

Such is life in a world<br />

W are we judge the name not the persan<br />

W are we lock for trust in a person<br />

But cannot lock beyond their name<br />

DAVID GOOSENBERG<br />

San Diego, Ca.<br />

111


cr<br />

Lh< hough 11 could do it<br />

Thought I ’d succeed<br />

Ended up failing<br />

I developed that need<br />

F ought against it<br />

Was told I should<br />

F ought against it<br />

Thought I could<br />

Fooled m y self<br />

Put up a wall<br />

M aybe the inevitable<br />

I was tring to stall<br />

B u t at a certain point<br />

I began to see<br />

I began to realize<br />

I t wasn’t ju st me<br />

and the w alls cam e- t Um<br />

k lin a d ow n<br />

I t is through this door<br />

That I finally see<br />

Thousands o f doors<br />

Just waiting fo r me<br />

The more that I open<br />

The more that I see<br />

I t is better to do<br />

Than to sit and to be<br />

For the game o f life<br />

Will always have doors<br />

B u t the challenge in life<br />

Is in m aking them yours<br />

I t ’s a power, a magic<br />

A trance and a force<br />

I t ’s som ething so strong<br />

I t ’s hard to divorce<br />

BETH ASTOR<br />

Los Altos, CA<br />

I t ’s the land and the people<br />

The history too<br />

The love and the power<br />

O f being a Jew<br />

I t ’s a spell that Israel<br />

U nwittingly casts<br />

Leaving a mark<br />

That will always last<br />

So I stand here now<br />

With a deep-set scar<br />

Realizing things<br />

A re n o t what they are<br />

M y wall is crushed<br />

A n d a need grips m e so<br />

B u t it’s through this need<br />

I have learned to grow<br />

What I thought I wanted<br />

Is im portant no more<br />

M y supposed failing<br />

Has opened a door<br />

112


o le M<br />

e c u o n à<br />

I don’t know where to begin. You want to know what this<br />

year has meant to me. Well, to explain that, I’d have to tell<br />

you about how I’ve changed, about how special the people<br />

are with whom I’ve spent this year, about how interesting it<br />

is to live amidst a different culture for a time, about how...<br />

Okay, so you want me to begin with the facts —what<br />

it was really like to live in Israel. Well, to explain, especially<br />

to someone at home whose conception of this country is<br />

something of an evening news haze, comprised of images of<br />

a battle-torn country filled with two-camel garages; I guess<br />

I’d start by explaining how much my conception of Israel<br />

has changed since the summer. For one thing, living in<br />

Jerusalem is very different from living in Haifa. In Haifa the<br />

One Year Program is more of the authentic “Israeli”<br />

experience, which was great in its place, but is also a bit<br />

dull at times. But Haifa did prepare us. We all came to<br />

realize the full impact of the word “efficiency.” It seems<br />

the word has been removed from the dictionary of every<br />

public worker in Israel. To get a true idea of what this<br />

means, you’d have to stand in line at your nearest post<br />

office, bank or grocery store. I’d say that most of us were<br />

ready to come to Jerusalem, although I certainly don’t<br />

mean to imply that the post offices, banks or supermarkets<br />

are any better here. But Jerusalem is a little America (or<br />

Canada) of sorts, a welcome sight at first. It can, however,<br />

get a bit frustrating at times, not knowing whether to ask<br />

directions of the person standing next to you on the street<br />

in Hebrew or English. Well...<br />

Yet living in Jerusalem has overall been great. I’d say<br />

that most of us complain a little less about Israel now than<br />

we did at first. Although a Jerusalem winter in a dorm that<br />

conserves water, especially hot, and offers heating only a<br />

few hours each day, is not always pleasant, I must say<br />

that despite everything I love it. There’s just something<br />

about the country that’s great. We all did a lot of travelling<br />

during our vacations, but I think that most of us felt that<br />

we were coming home when we hit Ben-GurionAirport. We<br />

didn’t even get as mad at the taxi driver who ripped us off<br />

as we would have normally. We did get angry, however,the<br />

following week when the novelty of being back had turned<br />

into a hard reality.<br />

So you make a lot of jokes, but what did you really<br />

think of this year? I think that everything that you’ll hear<br />

about it, both good and bad, is true, but the only way to<br />

really understand it, is to do it.<br />

MICHELLE BEN-YEHUDA<br />

Sherman Oaks, California<br />

113


IS IT TIME<br />

TO SAY GOODBYE?<br />

V*A W<br />

f f y<br />

Is it really time to say goodbye?<br />

Time to move on, leave Goldsmith behind?<br />

We’ve grown so attached, it dictates all we do.<br />

B ut one question remains, where are floors 1 and 2?<br />

We’ve had a great year and travelled the land<br />

Even Ulpan was an important part o f the plan.<br />

Learning Hebrew, making friends, fun in every way.<br />

How could we forget the good ’ole Givat Ram days?<br />

Weeks full o f class, even some homework no doubt<br />

Shabbat dinners, buses stop —how do we get out?<br />

Parties every other day, tanning with Nesher beer<br />

Thursday happy hour at Pini’s Pub, are all memories we hold dear.<br />

A climb up Masada, on real hike<br />

Tiyul to Tiberias, “rock talk” and the continental plate.<br />

The youth hostel, young girl locked out - memories we can’t erase.<br />

And then ... there’s heinous face.<br />

Its origin is known, its meaning is clear<br />

From banks to Egged buses, to just about everything here.<br />

But w e’ve managed and realized Israel is different than home.<br />

Now we just raise our arms and scream “Ma P it’o m ”<br />

We reacted similarly when told to pack up our things<br />

Up to Mt. Scopus we went, compared to the E lef —a palace for kings.<br />

“The Big Move” the madrichim affectionately called the event.<br />

So time to reclaim all those tapes and clothes which had been lent.<br />

ROTHBERQ<br />

overseas<br />

So within Resnick and Idelson, we quickly settled down.<br />

How nice to roll out o f bed, go to class, no long bus ride across town.<br />

Goldsmith cafeteria became the place to be<br />

For international relations, cheese toast, and a cup o f tea!<br />

Such an interesting place to dwell<br />

Where else but Mt. Scopus can you get to know cats so well?<br />

They ’re about as pleasant as R o ch ’s rice<br />

But be thankful - at least we have no mice.<br />

Semester break Fume and we were quickly out the door<br />

To forget about those papers which w e’d written the day before.<br />

Two weeks in Europe was, surely a must<br />

To clear from our heads the cobwebs and dust.<br />

Since then, Spring Semester has come and gone<br />

Telling us it’s time to move on.<br />

It seems w e’ve done it all, but there’s always more to learn<br />

Whether to live or visit, we promise to return.<br />

CHERYL DAVIS<br />

Louisville, Kentucky<br />

114


1ÉË


116


Don't be<br />

dismayed at good-byes.<br />

A farewell is necessary before<br />

you can meet<br />

From Richard Baph, Illusionsl —Adventures of a<br />

Reluctant Messian\<br />

117


i t i t June. 1 5 th , 19 85, and X r e g r e t to r e l a t e t h a t my yea r a t<br />

"Hebrew U" hai come to a clo A e. How fa A t tim e ^ l i e t . I t AeemA a t o n ly<br />

y e tte r d a y t h a t I to o k my f i r A t buA to Mxheneh Yehuda, A a t I n my fairAt v‘<br />

Ulpan claAA, a te my fiir A t a hoarma, and g e n e r a lly e x p e rie n c e d my liT A t'A<br />

e n co u n te r w i t h iA r a e li A o c ie ty .<br />

I t w o u ld b e o n ly a p p r o p ria te<br />

o r me, a t th iA tim e , to r e f l e c t upon<br />

my y ea r. Hoa i t b een fiul f i l l i n g ? Have i a c h ie v e d a l l t h a t I ’ ve<br />

deA ired? Have I le a r n e d , changed, grown? W ell, o b v io u A ly I made i t<br />

l i v i n g on my own. No, X A t i l l c a n ’t make a d e c e n t p o t oft r i c e , b u t<br />

b a la n c in g a checkbook i t g e ttin g e a A ie r. Ny clo th eA a re c le a n ,<br />

d e A p ite th e {)a c t t h a t my w ardrobe haA changed Aomewhat, i n b o th<br />

appearance and c o lo r . And A u p riA in g ly enough, X can even have a<br />

co n verA a tio n i n Hebrew w i t h Auch eaAe, aA ifc i t w ere my m other<br />

to n g u e .<br />

A t im p o r ta n tly , I have le a rn e d t o r e l y on m yAelfi. I have g a in e d<br />

an in n e r A e l^ -A a tiA f a c t io n o n ly a c h ie v e d th ro u g h a e l f-dependence .<br />

I ’ve l i v e d and le a r n e d th ro u g h a c u ltu r e and p e o p le t h a t i ’ ve alwayA j<br />

w a n ted to fieel a p a r t of,, and now do. Y e t, i ’ ve g a in ed and grown i n a\<br />

moAt p o A itiv e way.<br />

i t i t n ’t ju A t le a v in g p e o p le who i co n A id er Aome o^ my d ea reA t,<br />

c lo A e tt {)rie n d A , t h a t w i l l h u r t, i t i t le a v in g th iA p la c e - th iA<br />

c o u n try and e v e r y th in g i t r e p r e te n tA . i t ’A knowing t h a t X w i l l caA t one'<br />

IxxAt {\inal. g a ze upon th e Old C ity , a tle u A t fo r now. S e n tim e n ta lity A e tA ih \<br />

and X am flo o d e d w ith a m b ig u ity . B u t l i f e l o n g dec tionA need<br />

n o t be made now.<br />

VerhapA Aomeday X w i l l chooAe to<br />

make th iA my homet b u t u n t i l th e n X w x l l<br />

carry t'Ut country in my<br />

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ED ITO R IA L BOARD: Sigal Goland,David King, Barbara Krenik, Hillel Kuttler, Becca Levy,<br />

Paul Loosley, Susan Rose, Lisa Schlar, Joshua Shuman,<br />

STAFF: Rochelle Chester, Lisa Kagnoff, Lisa Klug, Howard Kurtz, Mike Lieberman, Marcy Meyers, Renana Miller, Karen<br />

Spandorfer, Debbie Wachs, Debbie Karp.<br />

A special thanks to Alisa<br />

Weiner for her great yearbook<br />

cover design, and wonderful<br />

graphics; and to Howard and<br />

Charles for their art<br />

contributions.<br />

A special thanks to Lauren<br />

Pulver for her super pictures<br />

and darkroom work.<br />

We also thank all those<br />

who contributed articles, time,<br />

effort, money, etc...<br />

A very special thanks<br />

to Rina and Yonathan<br />

watching the sun rise<br />

w ith us.<br />

119


This <strong>Yearbook</strong> is a student publication of the One Year Program.<br />

Although the <strong>Rothberg</strong> School for Overseas Studies encourages<br />

the project, it takes no responsibility for the <strong>Yearbook</strong>’s content.<br />

This <strong>Yearbook</strong> was made possible by grants from:<br />

The American Friends of the Hebrew University<br />

The Office of Student Activities,<br />

<strong>Rothberg</strong> School for Overseas Students.<br />

The Office of Student Activities wishes to thank the contributors,<br />

staff, and editorial board of this yearbook for giving<br />

their time, talent, creativity and energy . . . in making a quality<br />

volume that reflects this year’s experience on the One Year<br />

Program.


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121


FAMILY & FIRST ADDRESS CITY, STATE/CNTRY ZIP UNIVERSITY<br />

A CRISH SO LO M O N<br />

A D D E L M A N LA U R A<br />

A D E L S T O R P BODIL<br />

A LC O R N LO R N A<br />

A LLE N DAVID<br />

A N E L L O JU L IE<br />

A R O N O V S K Y M IRIAM<br />

A R O N S O N C H E R Y L<br />

A ST O R BETH<br />

A TLA S ROBIN<br />

A V R A M W ESLEY<br />

BA CHM U TH PAU L<br />

BA DER D EREN<br />

B A K ER ANN<br />

B A K ER A N N A<br />

BA LL K A R E N<br />

BA NK S JU D ITH<br />

B A R D A LLISO N<br />

B A R T H O L D Y H EN R IK<br />

BASKIN JO E L<br />

BASSAN M ALCA<br />

BA UM A N A N D R E A<br />

BEA RM O N AM Y<br />

BECK ER JODI<br />

BECK M AN N M A R T IN A<br />

BEH R E PATRICIA<br />

B E IE R SD O R F IN G EBO RG<br />

BEN Y E H U D A M ICHELLE<br />

B E N N E T T JOSEPH<br />

B E R G E R B A R B A R A<br />

BERN STEIN A LY SSA<br />

BETTER JULIE<br />

B ILG ER B E R N A R D<br />

BLACK A N N E T T A<br />

BLEW ER CECILIA<br />

B L O O M B E R G REBECCA<br />

BLUM F R E D E R IC A<br />

B L U M E N FE L D LA U RA<br />

B O G R A D JILL<br />

B O N IN G ER D AV ID<br />

BOSCOW RU TH<br />

B O X E N H O R N DAVID<br />

B O X E N H O R N ELIZABETH<br />

B R A U N LAVINIA<br />

B R ESSEL R A C H E L<br />

B R O O K S S H A R N A<br />

BRO W N E STEV EN<br />

BUSCH KIRA<br />

BU XBA U M C H A R L E S<br />

C A L D E R O N LEWIS<br />

C A R R V A L E R IE<br />

CASSE SARA H<br />

CHABIN LEE<br />

CH ACK M A RSH A<br />

CH AM EID ES D AN IEL<br />

C HASM AN DAVID<br />

CH AZAN LY N ETTÉ<br />

CHEAN JE F F R E Y<br />

C H ER R O N A L D<br />

CH ERN ISS JON<br />

71 PLAY LAND CT.<br />

875 STA ND ISH RD.<br />

87 2TH V A L D E M A R S G A D E<br />

9 14 S H E R L O C K DR<br />

18356C COLLINS<br />

515 M A N N A K EE ST<br />

5545 CH AR FO RD DR<br />

34 STIM SON AVE.<br />

931 A N D O V E R W AY<br />

7600 A R R O W O O D RD<br />

500E IRV ING A PT 621<br />

301 EL M ON TE DR<br />

105 LINDSTORM<br />

9333 M EM O R IA L DR 102<br />

6627 B E V E R L Y CREST<br />

6 6 8 W ESTERN A VE<br />

3 R O SE M A R Y LANE<br />

1237 M A CA U LA Y<br />

22A H ELG ESV EJ<br />

1375 O R E G O N A VE N<br />

PO BOX-6500 PA N A M A 5<br />

74-14 175TH S T R E E T<br />

8614 W E ST M O R E L A N D LN<br />

1174 JU L IA LANE<br />

12 A N D E R L U H E<br />

3443 ESPLA N A D E 457<br />

Q U ID D ESTR. 4 3500<br />

14924 G R E E N L E A F ST<br />

143 N VAN NESS AVE.<br />

24187 W IM BLEDO N RD<br />

217 W EST A V E<br />

22662 LIBERTY B ELLRD<br />

60 G A ISSBERG ST 8280<br />

5778 T R IN IT Y COTE.ST<br />

1618 N AN TA IN ST<br />

112 W A SH IN G TO N AVE.<br />

4 S E A G U L L LN<br />

73 PICAD ILLY RD<br />

7546 BY RON APT 3W<br />

4045 STILM O R E RED<br />

1621 U NION ST.<br />

444 W.F.W. PKWY<br />

444 W.F.W. PKWY<br />

3 C A T H E D R A L GR. W ELLS<br />

10 W A L N U T ST<br />

11591 V A R N A ST<br />

5028 ENC INO AVE<br />

7 LEOPOLD STR<br />

136 W ESTM N STER RD<br />

6 6 6 SH O R E RD A PT 6 C<br />

7 R IV ERV IEW DR<br />

410 G L E N A Y R RD<br />

16-08 212TH ST<br />

8404 ELLIN GSO N DR<br />

147 LAW LER RD<br />

6147 N. RICH M O N D<br />

18 R A H E EN DR KEW 3101<br />

352 N D E T R O IT ST<br />

36 D O V ET A IL CT<br />

33785 MILAN RD<br />

PA TTERSO N , NY<br />

PACIFICA, CA<br />

CO PE N H A G E N , DK<br />

BURBANK, CA<br />

T A R Z A N A , CA<br />

RO CK V ILLE, MD<br />

COLOM BUS, OH<br />

LE XIN G TO N, MA<br />

LOS A HOS, CA<br />

B ETHESD A , MD<br />

M ADISON HT, Ml<br />

SN T A BRBA, CA<br />

ST A M F O R D , CT<br />

H O U STO N, TX<br />

W. BLOOM FLD.M I<br />

ALBA NY , NY<br />

T O R O N T O , ON<br />

CA RM ICH A EL, CA<br />

C O PE N H A G E N , DK<br />

G O L D E N V LY , MN<br />

PANAM A, ZZ<br />

FLU SH IN G , NY<br />

ST. LOUIS P, MN<br />

N B ELLM O RE, NY<br />

F A R A N K F O R T , WG<br />

N. O R LEA N S, LA<br />

KASSEL, WG<br />

SHE R M A N OK, CA<br />

L.A., CA<br />

S H A K E R HTS, OH<br />

ITHACA, NY<br />

W O O D L N D HS, CA<br />

K REU ZLIG , WG<br />

M O N TR E A L , QB<br />

PHI LA, PA<br />

N RTH A M PTO N , MA<br />

PT. W ASHN, NY<br />

G R E A T NECK* NY<br />

ST LOUIS, MO<br />

S. EUCLID, OH<br />

REA D IN G , PA<br />

BRO O K LIN E, MA<br />

BG R O O K LIN E, MA<br />

SOM ERSET, GB<br />

M A R B L EH EA D , MA<br />

G R D N G R O V E , CA<br />

ENCINO, CA<br />

K A RL ST U L E, WG<br />

BKLYN, NY<br />

LONG BEACH, NY<br />

N ORW A LK , CT<br />

T O R O N T O , ON<br />

BAYSIDE, NY<br />

CH EV Y CHSE, MD<br />

W H A R T F O R D , CT<br />

CHICAGO, IL<br />

V ICTO RIA, AU<br />

LOS A N G E L E S C A<br />

THOUS. OAK, CA<br />

H ELM ET, CA<br />

12568<br />

94044<br />

91501<br />

91356<br />

20850<br />

43232<br />

02173<br />

94022<br />

20817<br />

48071<br />

93109<br />

77024<br />

48033<br />

12203<br />

M5P3E7<br />

95608<br />

DK-2000F<br />

55427<br />

5<br />

11366<br />

55426<br />

11710<br />

6000<br />

70119<br />

91403<br />

90004<br />

44122<br />

14850<br />

91364<br />

8280<br />

H4W 1Z3<br />

19146<br />

01060<br />

11050<br />

11023<br />

63105<br />

44121<br />

19604<br />

02167<br />

02167<br />

01945<br />

92640<br />

91316<br />

7500<br />

11218<br />

11561<br />

06850<br />

M5P3C7<br />

11360<br />

20815<br />

06117<br />

60659<br />

90036<br />

91360<br />

92343<br />

U. OF CA LIFO R N IA , D.<br />

PRINCETO N, THEOL.<br />

U. O F C A L IF O R N IA , S.B<br />

U. O F D ELA W A RE<br />

OHIO STA TE<br />

CLA RK<br />

U. O F CA LIFO RN IA , L.A.<br />

T U L A N E UC (NEWCOMB)<br />

U. OF CA LIFO RN IA<br />

U. OF MASS.<br />

U. OF TEXA S<br />

U. OF MICHIGAN<br />

BRA N D EIS U.<br />

Y O R K U.<br />

U. O F CA LIFO R N IA , L.A<br />

LA V ALLE<br />

BRA ND EIS<br />

C O R N E L L UNIV.<br />

U. OF M INN ESO TA<br />

BRA ND EIS<br />

G ER M A N UNIV.<br />

G ERM A N UNIV.<br />

U. OF C A L IF O R N IA , L.A<br />

U. OF C A L IF O R N IA , LA<br />

U. OF MICHIGAN<br />

C O R N E L L U.<br />

U. O F S. CA LIFO R N IA<br />

G ERM A N UNIV.<br />

MC G ILL U.<br />

H A R U A R D<br />

U. OF WISCONSIN<br />

SU N Y U.<br />

H A R U A R D<br />

W A SHIN G TO N U. ST. LOUIS<br />

N O R T H W ESTER N U.<br />

DUK E U.<br />

U. OF PEN NSY LV AN IA<br />

U. OF MASS.<br />

CAM BRIDGE, ENG.<br />

COLUM BIA UNIV.<br />

U. O F CA LIFO RN IA , L A<br />

UNIV. O F C A L IF O R N IA , B.<br />

G ERM A N UNIV.<br />

C O R N E L L U.<br />

UNIV. O F PEN NSY LV AN IA<br />

BRA ND EIS<br />

BRANDEIS<br />

BRANDEIS<br />

BRA ND EIS<br />

U. O F CHICAGO<br />

SMITH U.<br />

STA N FO R D<br />

STA TE COLL. OF C.A<br />

C A LIFO R N IA<br />

CH ESTER R O C H E LLE<br />

CHOI CHANG-MO<br />

CH R IST EN SE N C A R O L<br />

CICCARELLI LA RRY<br />

CIVAN ETHAN<br />

CLEIN G E O F F R E Y<br />

COBB JOD Y<br />

C O G D E L L SARA H<br />

CO HEN LISA<br />

CO M RIE A N D REW<br />

27 SHA M OK IN DR<br />

1574 S. 240<br />

1501 S E R E N A LANE NW<br />

1238 KNO X RD<br />

36 M O G U L DR<br />

370 LIG H TH OU SE PT.<br />

3475 W H ITFIELD AVE<br />

55 H ILLH O U SE RD<br />

6340 C H A R B R A Y PL<br />

DON MILLS, ON<br />

475-44 SEO KY O -DO N G<br />

E. OREM , UT<br />

GIG H A RBO R, WA<br />

W Y N NEW OO D , PA<br />

W ILLOW DA LE, ON<br />

A TLA N TA , GA<br />

CINCINNATI, OH<br />

WINNIPEG, MB<br />

SU R R E Y , BC<br />

M3H-3H7<br />

SEO UL, KO<br />

84057<br />

98335<br />

19096<br />

M 2H2M 7<br />

30328<br />

4 5220<br />

R2V2W 2<br />

V3S5H 6<br />

UNIV. OF T O R O N T O<br />

121<br />

G EO RG ETO W N UNIV.<br />

U. OF PEN NSY LV AN IA<br />

J.T.S<br />

TUFTS-JACKSON<br />

U. O F INDIANA<br />

U. O F M ANITOBA<br />

122


FAMILY & FIRST<br />

ADDRESS<br />

CITY, STATE/CNTRY ZIP U N IV ERSITY<br />

CONN STEV EN<br />

CO O PER SHARI<br />

COSKEY JILL<br />

D AV ID O V ITCH Y A E L<br />

D AVIS C H E R Y L<br />

DE SILVA JAM ES<br />

DE V A H L DAVIS NICOLAS<br />

DELISLE ESTH ER<br />

D EN G L ER KARIN<br />

D ENN M EY ER<br />

D IAM OND A VA<br />

DIECKM ANN CHRISTOPH<br />

D R A K E LA U RA<br />

DUM AN MIRIAM<br />

EISENM AN DEBBIE<br />

EK LO V E M ARK<br />

E L G H A N A Y A N ELIZA BETH<br />

ELIAS HAN N AH<br />

ELKINS JO EL<br />

ELLIS EVE<br />

EM A N U EL ADAM<br />

EN G EL ANJA<br />

EN G E L DAVID<br />

E N G E L H A R D T RUTH<br />

EPSTEIN M ARK<br />

ESTRIN K A Y LA<br />

EVANS M ARTIN<br />

F ED ER M A N RU STY<br />

FEIN B ER G ELIZA BETH<br />

FELD BA U M A U D R E Y<br />

FELD M A N DAWN<br />

FELD M A N SHARI<br />

O N T A R IO<br />

FELD STEIN RU TH<br />

F EN Z HEIDI<br />

FE TH ER STO N JU D Y<br />

F ETT N E R SHELLI<br />

FINK ELSTEIN JO SH U A<br />

FISCH SH A RO N<br />

FISCH ER HEIDI<br />

FISH D AN IEL<br />

FISH LER LA U RA<br />

FLEISH ER SH A R O N<br />

FLEISHM AN DEBBIE<br />

FO LM ER M A R G A R E T H A<br />

F O R D JAM ES<br />

FOX M ELINDA<br />

FOX PAUL<br />

F R ED H O LM M ICHELLE<br />

F R EEM A N B A RBA RA<br />

F R IE D B E R G R A C H E L<br />

F R IED M A N CA R R IE<br />

FRIED M A N JILL<br />

FRIED M A N RISA<br />

FR IED M A N RUTH<br />

F R IED M A N SUSAN<br />

G A N D A L LA U RA<br />

G A R D N E R STEVEN<br />

G A R F IN K E L HAL<br />

G ER SH O N WILLIAM<br />

GIESCKE U RSU LA<br />

G LA TT DAN IEL<br />

G O L A N D SIGAL<br />

G O LD ALLA N<br />

G O L D B E R G D AN IEL<br />

G O L D B E R G FRA N CIN E<br />

G O L D B E R G G A B R IE L<br />

G O LD M A N N M A N U EL<br />

G OLDM IN TZ KEVIN<br />

G OLDSTEIN DAVID<br />

2654 LONE PINE<br />

3558 A D D IN G TO N<br />

18149 CH A R D O N CIRCLE<br />

W. BLM FLD, Ml<br />

M O N TREA L, QB<br />

ENCINO. CA<br />

48033 J.T.S.<br />

H4A 3G 6<br />

91316<br />

MC G ILL U.<br />

U. OF C A L IF O R N IA , S.D<br />

1909 R O LLIN G LANE C H ER R Y NJ 08003 U. OF D ELA W A REE<br />

HLL,<br />

1522 SYLV A N CT<br />

245 D ELA FIELD AVE<br />

6 8 ED W A RD ST<br />

323 DES FRAN CISCA IN S<br />

93 K R EU ZSTR A B E<br />

2725 ENCINO<br />

17 M O N R O E PL ST ISLD<br />

D O M A N E CO V E R D E N<br />

5 8 4 FAIR HILLS DR<br />

100 W A V E R L Y RD<br />

4 8 3 S. N IA G A R A ST.<br />

201 G LEN CED A R RD<br />

250 E. 63 ST<br />

4 CLEV ELY S RD<br />

6341 M A R Y L A N D DR L.A., CA<br />

145 EUCLID<br />

54 DAVIS HILL RD<br />

18 LEIBNITZSTR<br />

1004 M U R R A Y HILL RD<br />

3 AM LUDW IG SBRU N NEN<br />

759 W. 50TH AVE.<br />

8003 139 ST<br />

848 PRESTO N RD<br />

9326 M ERCERW O O D DR<br />

17 EA G LE ST<br />

9102 JO N ES MILL RD<br />

6575 C LE O M O O R E AVE<br />

8508 139 ST<br />

1306 M ERCED ES ST<br />

1877 A R LIN G T O N<br />

11013 ELVIN N.E.<br />

11251 IRO NW OO D CT<br />

315 S O Y STE R BAY RD<br />

6 6 0 PRO SPECT AVE<br />

11A RU TA UTW EG<br />

12603 C LEN D EN N IN G<br />

138 BULSON RD<br />

4410 M ORG A N ST<br />

761 O AK ST<br />

9 A N TH O N D UYCHPLEIN<br />

7115 O R C H A R D<br />

4452 DEVON<br />

35 T R E N O R DR<br />

3905 W. 184 PL.<br />

198 CLA R A CO U R T<br />

3001 M EA D O W BRO O K CT<br />

4759 K EN T AVE<br />

820 M A JO R C A PL<br />

318 CED A R AVE<br />

1617 DAWS RD<br />

25911 S T R A T F O R D PL<br />

14466 W A SING TO N BLV<br />

16243 M A RLOW E WAY<br />

1210 M AM OR DR<br />

537 W. 121 ST<br />

7 N A CH TIG A LLIN STRA SS<br />

35 M A N ZA N ITA CT<br />

1726 M ICHAEL LN<br />

310 A LEXIS NIHON BLV<br />

306 W. CLA R EM O N T<br />

23204 FER N W O O D DR<br />

18816 SAN FE R N D O MIS<br />

2 SPESSANTWEG<br />

2100/407 BAIHURST<br />

12041 C O U N TR Y Q UIRL<br />

LOUISVILLE, KY<br />

NY, NY<br />

SYD N EY , AU<br />

QUEBEC, QB<br />

W E ITRSD T 1, WG<br />

BAY CITY, TX<br />

NEW Y ORK , NY<br />

RIN TELM N , WG<br />

SAN R A FA EL , CA<br />

W YNCOTE, PA<br />

D E N V E R ,C O<br />

T O R O N T O ,O N<br />

NY, NY<br />

LONDON, GB<br />

90048<br />

G LENCOE, IL<br />

WESTON, CT<br />

M OERS, WG<br />

BINGHAM TON, NY<br />

K ARBEN, WG<br />

V A N C O U V ER , BC<br />

ED M ON TO N , AB<br />

E. MEADOW, NY<br />

M ERCER IS, WA<br />

SPRNG VLY, NY<br />

CHEVYCHASE, MD<br />

CA N O G A PK, CA<br />

ED M ONTON, AB<br />

TEAN EÇK , NJ<br />

ANN A RBO R, Ml<br />

A LB U G U ERQ U , NM<br />

CINCINATTI, OH<br />

SYOSSET, NY<br />

W INNEKA, IL<br />

HAM BU RG, WG<br />

TAM PA, FL<br />

RO CKVILLE, NY<br />

RO CKVILLE, MD<br />

WINNIPEG, MB<br />

W A SSENA A R, NT<br />

LINCOLN, NE<br />

LINCOLNWD, IL<br />

N. RO CHELE, NY<br />

T O R R E N C E , CA<br />

N. BAY ONT, ON<br />

CHAM PAIGN, IL<br />

M OTNREAL, QB<br />

L.A., CA<br />

H G H LN D PK, NY<br />

N ORRISTOW N, PA<br />

O AK PARK, Ml<br />

CLEV ELA N D , OH<br />

G R A N G ER , IN<br />

W ILM ETTE, IL<br />

NY, NY<br />

BONN, WG<br />

M ILLBRA F, CA<br />

PAC. PALISA, CA<br />

ST. LA U REN T, QB<br />

PHOENIX, AZ<br />

BEACHW OOD, OH<br />

N O R T H R ID G E, CA<br />

FULD A BRU CH , WG<br />

TO R O N T O , ON<br />

SA RA TO G A , CA<br />

40205 TU L A N E UC (NEWCOMB)<br />

10310<br />

2025<br />

61S2P9<br />

6108<br />

LA V ALLE<br />

77414 U. OF TEXA S<br />

10314 BRO O K LY N C.<br />

326<br />

94901 U. OF CA LIFO R N IA , S.D<br />

19095 BRANDEIS<br />

80224 COLUM BIA U.<br />

M6C3G9<br />

CEGEP<br />

1 0 0 2 1 COLUM BIA U.<br />

9JN E5<br />

U. OF C A LIFO RN IA<br />

60022 U. OF ILLINOIS<br />

06883 U .O F CO LO RA D O<br />

4130<br />

13903 SUNY UNIV.<br />

6367<br />

V6P1 A4<br />

T SR 003<br />

UNIV. OF BC<br />

UNIV. O F WEST. O N TA RIO<br />

11554 UNIV. OF PEN NSY LV AN IA<br />

98040 UNIV. OF W ASHINGTON<br />

10977 LA FA Y ETTE<br />

20815 U. OF M A R Y LA N D<br />

91307 UNIV. OF CA LIFO RN IA<br />

T 5R 0G 7<br />

UNIV. O F W ESTERN<br />

07666 UNIV. O F PEN NSY LV AN IA<br />

48104 U. O F MICHIGAN<br />

87112<br />

45249 UNIV. OF CA LIFO RN IA<br />

11791 J.T.S.<br />

60093 U. OF MICHIGAN<br />

33624 J.T.S.<br />

11570 U. O F MASS.<br />

20853 U. O F M A R Y LA N D<br />

R 3M 3R8<br />

U. OF M ANITOBA<br />

2242TS<br />

68505<br />

60646 UNIV. O F MICHIGAN<br />

10804 SUNY U.<br />

90504<br />

P1B7P1<br />

CEGEP<br />

61821 U. OF ILLINOIS<br />

H3W-1H3<br />

90049<br />

U. OF CALIFORNIA, S.D.<br />

08904 J.T.S.<br />

19401<br />

U. OF M A RY LA N D<br />

48237<br />

U. OF MICHIGAN<br />

44118<br />

46530<br />

O BERLIN U.<br />

60091<br />

U. OF KANSAS<br />

10027 J.T.S<br />

D-5300<br />

94030<br />

U. OF CA LIFORN IA , D<br />

90272<br />

U. OF CA LIFORN IA , LA<br />

H4M 2A3 Y O RK U.<br />

85013 J.T.S.<br />

44122<br />

O HIO STATE<br />

91326<br />

U. OF CALIFORNIA, LA<br />

3501<br />

95070<br />

U. OF CALIFORNIA, SC<br />

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FA M ILY & FIRST A D D R ESS CITY, S T A T E /C N T R Y ZIP UNIV ERSITY<br />

G O L D STE IN HEIDI 3 C L A R E M O N T LANE S U F F E R N , NY 10901 W ELLESLY<br />

G O O D M A N -LAIN IE 7 BU CH A N A N RD M A R B L EH EA D , MA 01945 U.OF MASS.<br />

G O O S E N B E R G D AVID 24125 BESSEM ER ST W O O D L N D H LS, CA 91367 U. O F CA LIFO RN IA , SD<br />

G O T H A R D S H A Y N A 5213 H A R IN G CT M ETA IRE, LA 70002<br />

U. O F G EO R G IA<br />

G O U LD D EB O RA H 110 N. C A ST A N Y A W AY M EN LO PK, CA 94025 W ESLEY A N U.<br />

G R A N T A M A N D A 2 M EA D W A Y S O U TH G A T E LONDON, GB N 146N T<br />

G R E E N B L A T T STEPH A N IE 14 H ER K IM E R AVE JERICH O , NY 11753 D U K E U.<br />

G R E E N E ALISON 213 T R IN ID A D D RIV E TIBU RO N , CA 94920 U. O F CA LIFO RN IA , D<br />

G R IN B E R G R A C H E L 27 SH E N S T O N E RD W ILLOW DA LE, ON M 2R 3B3<br />

G R O B BEATE 2 N A CH TIG A LLE N W E G G EM M V IG HEM , WG 7121<br />

Y O R K U.<br />

G R O SS LEON 539 C H A R L E S ST E. LANSING, Ml 48823 U. O F CHICAGO<br />

G RO SSM A N D AVID 8031 CED A R LAKE RD MPIS, MN 55426 U.OF WISCONSIN<br />

G U N K E L M ECH TH ILD S EM PE R STR 8 8 2000 H A M BU RG , WG 60<br />

G U S T A F SO N CY NTHIA Q TR S M -NA V EL POSTG D M O N TE R Y , CA 93943 U. O F CA LIFO RN IA , D<br />

H A L PE R N N O RE EN 131 C A R TIER ST O TTAW A, ON K2P1K 6<br />

C A R LTO N UNIV.<br />

H A M B U R G E R LA U RA 19027 W ELLS DR TA R Z A N A , CA 9 1356 U. O F CA LIFO R N IA<br />

H A M M ER BA R R Y 2 D OW N EA ST T E R R A C E O R O N O , ME 04473 U. O F CA LIFO R N IA<br />

H A R T M A N H A N N A 6 U N T E R D O R F S T R A LTEN STEIG , WG 6<br />

H A U K L A N D K N U T 5 H ELL EV EIEN BERG EN , NO 5035<br />

HAUSSIG M ICHA EL 14 M EISENSTR. BERLIN, WG 1 0 0 0<br />

H EC H T R O B E R T 842 B A R B A R A DR TE A N EC K , NJ 07666 R U T G E R S<br />

H E N N E T TH O M A S 6 SONNW ENDST. G AU TIN G , WG 8035<br />

H ER M A N A V A -LY N N E 3056 W.24 AVE V A N C O U V E R , BC V 6L-1R6 U. OF B.C.<br />

H E R S H B E R G D EB O RA H 20 V A L L E Y DR ALBA N Y , NY 12208 BOSTON U.<br />

H E R S K O V IT Z N A N CY 3116 O LD G LEN V IEW RD W ILM ETTE, IL 60091<br />

H E R T Z D EB O RA H 3 S H E N A N D O A H DR G R E E N V IL L E , SC 29615 ADELPHI U.<br />

H ID A K A Y O SH IH IK O 8 8 TA N IOZAK I KUM A M U TO , JP 860<br />

H 1L D EB R A B D T C H R ISTO F 6 TA U B E N B E R G EDSTEIN, WG 6270<br />

H IR SH B E R G M ATTH EW 25 PR O SPECT H ILL RD LE XIN G TO N, MA 02173 U. O F W ASHIN G TO N<br />

H IR SH F E L D DINA 7801 M O R IN G SID E DR WASH, D.C., D.C. 2 0 0 1 2 H A R V A R D UNIV.<br />

H IRSH M AN CH AY A 6822 N. S A C R A M E N T O CHICAGO, IL 60645 Y ESH IV A U NIV /STERN<br />

H O F F M A N BRAD 1900 JF K BLVD PHI LA, PA 19103 J.T.S.<br />

HOLM K A T H L EEN R.I.BOX 6 6 6 ST JOSEPH , Wl 54082 U. O F M INN ESO TA<br />

H O L TZ G U D R U N 9 SIMANOW ITSH SC H O R N D O R F . WG 7060<br />

H O RO W ITZ A A R O N 42 W O O D L A N D RD R O SL Y N N Y 11576 U. O F MICHIGAN<br />

H O RO W ITZ EL EA N O R 224 V A L EN TIN E ST W. NEW TON, MA 02165 U.OF MICHIGAN<br />

H O RW ITZ R O B E R T 9724 PORTIS RD PHI LA, PA 1915 TEM PLE U.<br />

HOW E LA W RENCE 1518 SW H A RRISO N P O R T LA N D , OR 97201 STA TE COLL. OF , C.A<br />

C A L IF O R N IA<br />

HUPPIN AM EE 1629 E 46TH SPO K AN E, WA 9 9203<br />

H Y A T T DAVID 3811 B O R L U N D CRCL A N C H O R A G E , AK 9 9503<br />

IHILEVICH TA M AR 615 C LA RK AVE OWOSSO, Ml 48867 U. O F MICHIGAN<br />

JACO BS ANN 23 H A R T DR. N. S. O R A N G E , NJ 07079 A M ERICAN U.<br />

JACO BS R O N IT 125 K EN ILW O RTH PL B R O O K LY N , NY 1 1 2 1 0 SU N Y U.<br />

JACO BSON STEV EN 234 L A D ER A ST M O N T E R E Y P, CA 91754 STA TE COLL. O F, C.A<br />

JA CO BY LIBBIE 2216 STA N B R ID G E LONG BEACH, CA 90815 STA TE COLL. OF, C.A<br />

JACO W ITZ BETH 9 PREST'S M ILL RD O LD BRIDGE, NJ 08857 R U TG ER S-D O U G LA SS U.<br />

J A F F E SA R A 5725 W Y A N D O TTE K AN SAS CITY, MO 64113 U. O F MICHIGAN<br />

F EN SO N PHILLIP 21 GIBBET HILL RD C O V E N T R Y , GB CV 47A J CA M BRID G E ENG.<br />

JER U ZA LM I D AVID 8500 LY N N EH A V EN DR CINCINATTI, OH 45236 U. O F CINCINATTI<br />

J O F F E S A M U E L 1013 ROBW ILL PASS C H E R R Y HIL, NJ 08034 BROWN U.<br />

JO H N ST O N M ELO D Y 12017 A LB ER S ST N. M OLLYW OO, CA 91607 J.T.S<br />

JO N ES R A C H E L 4 Y OU N GS BISE, WGCITY LONDON, GB<br />

K AGAN S H E R R Y 2 BER K EL EY TE R R LIVINGSTON, NJ 07039 C O R N E L L U.<br />

K A G N O F F ALISA 3 R O CK Y POINT RD C O R O N A DEL, CA 92625 W ELLESLEY COLL.<br />

KAHN JUD ITH 7791 SAN M ARCOS BOCCA RATO, FL 33433 N O R T H E A S T E R N U.<br />

KAM IN ER TAM M Y 100 RALPH AVE WHITE PLAI, NY 10606 BROWN U.<br />

K AM M ER R A C H E LLE 6605 INNER DR MADISON; Wl 53705 U. O F WISCONSIN<br />

K AM M ERM AN O LIVIA 6 ROBBINS LANE W ESTBURY, NY 11590 U. O F INDIANA<br />

KAM OW ITZ ANNE 11 JACOBS TE R R A C E NEWTON, MA 02159 BRANDEIS<br />

KAPLAN ANNE 400 EA ST 20 ST. NEW Y O RK , NY 10009 V ASSAR COLL.<br />

KAPLAN REBECCA 709 ST M ICHAEL LN A LTA M ON TE, FL 32714 C LA RK U.<br />

K ARAHASHI FUMI 2722 M URA M ATSU K ITA KA TA , JP<br />

K ARP DEBRA 6 ST R A T H E A R N RD T O R O N T O , ON M 6C1R3 U. O F CA LIFORN IA<br />

K A RP M ICHAEL 4214 N A U G LE D RIVE FAIRLAW N, NJ 07410 T U LA N E UC (NEWCOMB)<br />

KASMAN R O B ER T 73-47 189 ST FLU SH IN G, NY 11366 J.T.S.<br />

K A TZ M ICHAEL 2455 H A RIN G ST BKLYN, NY 11235 SUN Y U.<br />

K A TZ SH A RO N 182 H AD D IN G TO N AVE T O R O N T O , ON M 5M2P8 CEGEP<br />

K A U F E R JULIA 8 1 A MALIBU CO LO N Y RD MALIBO, CA 90265 T U FTS JACKSON<br />

KERSHM A N FRAN CIN E 5503 Q V EEN SLOCH HOU STO N TX, TX 77096 TU FTS JACKSON<br />

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FAM ILY & FIRST ADD RESS CITY, ST A T E /C N T R Y ZIP U NIV ERSITY<br />

K ESHEN BRYAN 271 ACTON AVE DOW NSVIEW, ON M 3H4J2 Y O R K U.<br />

KIM SEONG 26 SA N G DO -D ON G SEOUL, KO 151<br />

KING DAVID 13 H O PEW ELL AVE. SYD N EY , AU 2030<br />

K IRSCH EN BA UM D EBO RAH 133 ON H O L LY D A LE F U L L E R T O N , CA 92631 U. OF C A LIFO RN IA , SD<br />

KITZES DEBBIE 1715 LO N G V A LLE Y N O R T H B R K , IL 60062 U. OF INDIANA<br />

K IY U N A M ILD RED 2776 BOOTH RD H O N O LU LU , HI 96813<br />

K LA SK Y HELAINE 17323 C ITRO N IA ST N O R T H R ID G E, CA 91325 U. OF C A LIFO RN IA , B.<br />

KLEIN BIRGIT 8 A CO RN E LIU SPLA TZ TO EN ISV O RS, WG 4154<br />

KLU G LISA 621 M AY W O O D WAY U PLAND, CA 91786 U. O F CA LIFO RN IA , B.<br />

KNO BLO CH FR ED R IC RD 2 BOX 419 HOCKESSIN, DE 19707 U. O F PEN N SY LV A N IA<br />

K O EN IG LISA 65-09 99 ST R E G O PK, NY 11374 N.Y.U.<br />

K O LTU N NAOMI 147 W E STLA N D AV RO CH ESTER, NY 14618 B A R N A R D U.<br />

KOST JE R A L D 9217 K ILD ARE SKOKIE, IL 60076 U. O F ILLINOIS<br />

K OW ALCYZK OLIWIER 671103 N IEPO D LEG CO SC WARSAW , ZZ<br />

K R A V ITZ H A RO LD 1079 H U N TIN G D O N RD A BINGTON, PA 19001 J.T.S.<br />

K REIN IK B A R BA RA 505 BEACH 136 ST BELLE HARB, NY 11694 C O R N E L L U.<br />

K RIEG CA RO LA 10 V O R D E N G A S S E 10 B U RG BRA CH T, WG 6471<br />

K RISH EF DAVID 2711 YOSEM ITE AVE 6 ST LOUIS P, MN 55416 U. O F M INN ESO TA<br />

KUEPPER B A RBA RA 6 BLUM ENSTR. A CH ERN , WG 7590<br />

KUNIN DAVID 25 G L E N G A R G RD CRO TO N HUD, NY 10520 J.T.S.<br />

K U R T Z H OW ARD 26 BRO A D LA W N DR LIVINGTON, NJ 07039 Y ESHIV A U./STERN<br />

K U T TLE R HILLEL 83-19 116 ST KEW GDNS, NY 11418 Q U E EN S COLL. NY<br />

LAN DO PETER 121 G LEN W O O D RD W H EELING , WV 26003 DICKINSON COLL.<br />

L A N G E V O O R T G RA CE 42 ENKSTEIN 42 EDE, NT 6714BR<br />

LA RK Y JA N N IN E 10869 N O R T H G A T E ST C U LV ER CTY, CA 90230 U. O F CA LIFO RN IA , SB<br />

LASZLO JE N N IF E R RT 1 BOX 226 D URH A M , NC 27705 EM O RY UNIV.<br />

LAZEV SUSAN 82 C H EST E R F IE L D EAST LYME, CR 06333 BRANDEIS<br />

LESSER TAMI 6700 PAM ELA LANE W. PALM BCH, FL 33405 U. O F PEN NSY LV AN IA<br />

LESTER N O R A 1074 PRO SPECT BLVD PASADENA, CA 91103 U. O F CA LIFO RN IA , LA<br />

LEVENSTO N FIONA 12 T R E A T T S RD LN D FLD SYDNEY, AU 2070<br />

LEVIN C A R O L 2298D SIE R R A BLVD SA CRA M EN TO , CA 95825 SPERTU S U.<br />

LEVIN EVE 1408 N K EN TER AVE L.A., CA 90049 H A R V A R D U.<br />

LEVINE EMILY 1741 POLK WAY M O N TE R Y P, CA 91754 U. OF CA LIFO RN IA , SC<br />

LEVINE JA CQ U ELIN E 38-07 PELLIN G TO N DR. FAIR LAWN, NJ 07410 R U TG ER S-D O U G LA SS U.<br />

LEVINE M ICHAEL 925 A U B U R N AVE H IGH LA N DPK , IL 60035 U. O F TEXA S<br />

LEVINE S A R R A 661 O R IO L E PKWY T O R O N T O , ON M 4R2L1 Y O R K U.<br />

LEVINSON S TEFFA N IE 9881 G LO U C E ST ER DR BEV RLY HIL, CA 90210 U. OF CA LIFO RN IA , SB<br />

LEVITT RISA 4 F O R E ST PK CRES T H O R N H ILL , ON L3T2M6 Y O R K U.<br />

LEVY C H A R L O T TE 20415 LEDG ESTO N E SO U TH FIELD , Ml 48076 U. O F MICHIGAN<br />

LEVY N A T H A N IEL 14326 SOUTH PARK SH A K ER HTS, OH 44120 G EO R G E TO W N U.<br />

LEVY REBECCA 23 LAKW OOD N EW TON MA, MA 02161 S W A R TH M O R E U.<br />

LEVY STEPH EN 17 GABLES BLVD E. SETA U K ET, NY 11733 O BERLIN U.<br />

LEVY TA M AR 137-13 72 RD FLUSHING, NY 11367 Q U E EN S COLL. NY<br />

LEW ALAN B A Y BERY R DR PLEANTVI, NY 10570 J.T.S.<br />

LEY N O R JE F F E R Y 24 H UTTO N AVE APT 19 W. O RA N G E, NJ 07052 J.T.S<br />

LIEBERM AN M ICHAEL P.B.609 CH A PEL VIEW F L E M IN G T O N ,N J 08822 R U TG ERS-D O U G L A SS U.<br />

LIGHT PETER 4924 K ESTER AVE. SH ERM OAKS, CA 91304 J.T.S<br />

LITCHEN SUSAN 11 CH RISTINE CRES WILLOW, ON M 2R1A 4 Y O R K U.<br />

LOOSLEY PAUL 11250 57TH S T R E E T EDM ONTON, AB T5W 3T9 U. OF A LB ER T A<br />

LOSEKAM CLAUDIA LIN D EN STR 3 N EU STAD T, WG 3577<br />

LO W ENTH A L PAULA 7607 SPRING AVE M ELRO SE P K ,P A 19126 EM O RY U.<br />

LUPOVITCH STEVEN 6707 ED IN B O R O U G H DR W. BLO O M FLD , Ml 48033 U. OF MICHIGAN<br />

M ACHT JEA N E TTE 108 M EADOW ST G A R D E N CITY, NY 11530 W A SHIN G TO N U. ST.LOUIS<br />

M ALAN K A BRENDA 16 O TTEN DR VEPEAN, ON U. OF O TTAW A<br />

M ALLIN KELLY 9504 M OODY PARK CIRC O V E R L N D PK, KS 66212 U. OF KANSAS<br />

M A N D E L JO E L 20647 O R M A R ST CH ATSW ORTH, CA 91311 U. OF CA LIFORN IA , LA<br />

MANN IAN 2758 LA R A D O S AV JACK SON V L, FL 32217 COLUM BIA U.<br />

MANN TA R A 7 A RLIN G T O N RD R ED W O O D CT, CA 94062 U. OF CA LIFO R N IA<br />

M ARCUS A N D REW 12 SALEM PL W HITE PLAI, NY 10605 G E O R G E W A SHIN G TO N U.<br />

M ARK S M ICHAEL 73-62 189 ST FLU SH IN G, N Y 11366 SUN Y U.<br />

M A RRIN O PATRIZIA 21 CRA COV IA BOLO GN A , IT 051<br />

M A RTEN S KAREN 3311 SY A LL A N D SG A D E COPENHGN, DK 2200N<br />

MAY FRAN CIN E 3073 G LA D STO N E 3 POMONA, CA 91767 CAL. POLY TECH<br />

M A Y ER CH ARLES 1053 LEA DR SAN R A FA EL, CA 94903 U. OF CALIF.<br />

M CGHEE A N G ELA 5625 W YALUSING AVE PH I LA, PA 19131 G RU TA<br />

M EG ALOM M ATIS COSMAS 23 CO RYTSA S ST ATHENS, ZZ 16231<br />

M ELINE DAVID 4800 MADISON ST HOLLY W O OD , FL 33021 U. OF INDIANA<br />

M ESUGUICH JEA N YVES 1 DEIZE MOULIN PAIRS, FR 03000<br />

M EY ERS BRIAN 1154 D IPLOM AT DR WINNIPEG, MB R2V 3K7 U. OF M ANITOBA<br />

M EY ERS M ARCY 2417 M O R B U R Y RD PITTSBURGH, PA 15221 EM O RY U.<br />

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FA M ILY & FIRST A D D R ESS CITY, S T A T E /C N T R Y ZIP U NIV ERSITY<br />

M ILLER D O U G LA S 144 A L B E R T A DR A M H ERST, NY 14226<br />

M ILLER G A Y L E 161 W EST BRIA R LN G R EEN B A Y , Wl 54301 U. O F WISCONSIN<br />

M ILLER K A R Y N 7JA R D IN S MERICI 120 QUEBEC, QB G 1 S 4 N 8 CA RLTO N<br />

M ILLER PHILIP 841 C ED A R ST. SA N TA M ON IC, CA 90405 U. O F CA LIFO R N IA<br />

M ILLER R E N A N A 3206 BENJAM IN RD O CEA NSID E, NY 11572 BRA ND EIS<br />

M ILLM A N JU D ITH 61 M AX W ELL LANE ENGLISHTW N, NJ 07726 AM ERICA N U.<br />

M ILM AN KEN 10401 JELL IC O ST 64 CA 91344 STA TE COLL. O F CALIF.<br />

M INK R O N N IE 128 EIGHTH RD JO H A N N ESBU ,SF 2090<br />

M INTZ C A R L A A V IV A 914 E. U N IV ERSITY BLO O M IN G TN , IN 47401 U. OF INDIANA<br />

M O G EN D O V IC H JU LIA 41 B U N K ER RD E. H A N O V E R , NJ 07936 DREW U.<br />

M O R R IS N A N CY 6165 N.D.G. AVE. M O N TR E A L , QB H4B1K9 CO N CO RD IA U.<br />

M UN ZIN G F R IE D E R E IC K 55 R EIN H O LD -SCH N EID R FR EIB U R G , WG<br />

M U R O F F L E O N A R D 755 STEE LES A VE W W ILLOW DA LE, ON M 2R 256 J.T.S.<br />

M U R R A Y M ICHELE SITE 8 COMP. 15 RR 8 V E R N O N , BC V 1T 8L 6<br />

N A K A M U R A K EIKO 5-11-31, NISHIJIN FU K U O K A , JP<br />

N E IB E R G ELYSSA 5230 PR A T T SKO K IE, IL 60077 U. O F WISCONSIN<br />

N E IB E R G M A U R IN E 1615 R O SE LA N D E. LANSING, Ml 48823 W E LLESLEY CO LLEGE<br />

NESSM A N MALI 143 G R E E N R A L E A V E W A Y NE, NJ 07470 CLA R K U.<br />

N EU M A N N DAN IE LA 15 LU K M A M ER G A SSE CHLR, SU 7000<br />

NEW M AN D EB O RA H 38 LYNN RD BRO CK TO N , MA 02402 V A SSA R CO LLEG E<br />

NEW M AN M ICH A EL 5215 SW H EW L ETT P O R T LA N D , OR 97221 PO R T LA N D STATE<br />

N O T T E R FELIX 159 LE TZIG R A B EN ZU RICH , SU 8047<br />

NUSSBAU M D ALIA 1818 R IV ER SID E DR BU RBA N K , CA 91506 STA TE COLL. OF CALIF.<br />

NUSSBAU M JU D Y 142 W. 8 8 TH ST NY, NY 10024 GOU CH ER<br />

O 'C O N N O R K A T H L EEN 1121 SO U TH 48TH PHI LA, PA 19143 U. OF PEN N SY LV A N IA<br />

O LSHIN JO S H U A 24 BA YV IEW VE G R E A TN EC K , NY 1 1 0 2 1 JOH N HOPKINS<br />

O R E N T L E O R A 25 M A V O E H ARA RI JE R U SA L E M 48776 SUN Y U.<br />

O R K IN JE F F R E Y 6 6 BISHOP RD SH A R O N , MA 02067 BRA ND EIS<br />

O SE R O W SK Y JILL 217 H A R T ST. ESSEX VILLE, Ml 48732 U. OF MICHIGAN<br />

O ST ER W E IL Y A E L 11201 O LD CLUB RD RO C K V ILL E. MD 20852 U. OF M A R Y LA N D<br />

PAPILE D IANA 212 V ILLA N O V A COSTA MESA, CA 92626 U. O F CA LIFO RN IA , I.<br />

PELZM A N M A R IA N N E 12091 T O U R M A L IN E TR S. SPRING, MD 20904 U. OF M A R Y LA N D<br />

P EN ZN ER B A R B A R A 4110 B A LTIM O RE AVE PHI L A ,P A 19104 RECO N STR. RABB. COLL.<br />

PETTIT PETER 182 W. SAN JOSE AVE. CLA R EM O N T , CA 91711<br />

PINCHASI D A N N Y 519 N. ELM DR B EV ER L Y HL, CA 90210 U. OF CALIF., LA<br />

PITTE R Y M A R G A R E T A 23 PRINS LEO PO LD STR BRU GG ES, BG 8310<br />

POPK Y C H A R L ES 57 W RIV ER ST W LKES BAR, PA 18702 J.T.S.<br />

PR O U SER JOSEPH 537 W 181TH ST NEW Y O RK , NY 10027 J.T.S.<br />

PR O U SER O R A 4 0 ED G A R ST SUMMIT, NY 07901 J.T.S.<br />

PR O W E L L E R A M IRA 511 M CKIN LEY AVE D U N K IR K , NY 14048 V ASSAR CO LLEGE<br />

PRY STO W SK Y ELAN 4112 B A R B E R R Y DR L A F A Y E T T H, PA 19444 BRA ND EIS<br />

PU L V E R LA U REN 111 BEACH RD KINGS PT, NY 11024 SARA H LAW RENCE<br />

RA BEN ELISA 1311 LATHAM RD G R E E N S B O R O , NC 27408 G O U CH ER<br />

R A K E R STEPH AN IE 7908 ROBISON RD BETHESDA, MD 20817 G EO R G E TO W N U.<br />

R EE R SH EM IU S G E R T R U D AM P FIN G ST A N G ER 54 G O T TIN G E N , WG 34<br />

REICH C Y N TH IA 1079 H U N TIN G TO N RD A BIN G TO N , PA 19001 H EBREW U. CO LLEGE<br />

R E IC H E R T TH O M A S 300 PELHAM RD N. RO C H E LLE , NY 10805 G EO RG ETO W N U.<br />

R EIN ITZ NAOMI 18 CUSHM AN RD SCA R SD A LE, NY 10583 STA TE COLL. OF CALIF.<br />

RESN ICK M ALCA 5 H A Z E L LN BALACYNW D, PA 19004 BOSTON U.<br />

RICH BRIAN 3111 G R E E N L E A F W ILM ETTE, IL 60091 U. O F ILLINOIS<br />

R ITT B ER G B E V ER L Y 316 EN N ISK ILLEN AVE. W INNIPEG, MB R 1V 0H 9 U. O F M ANITOBA<br />

R O B E R T S A N N E 113 R A IL R O A D A V E. N ORW OO D , NJ 07648<br />

R O B ER TSO N D R U SILLA 46-59 158 ST FLU SH IN G, NY 11358 STA TE COLL O F CALIF.<br />

R O C K L A N D TH O M A S 158 BRITE AVE. SCARSD A LE, NY 10583 G R IN N E L U.<br />

RO SE FELICIA 576 A V E N U E Z BRO O K LY N , NY 11223 BRA ND EIS<br />

R O SE SUSAN T*HREE A CRES H O LY W ELL BIRM INGHAM , GB B459AA CAM BRID G E ENG.<br />

RO SEN C A RL 9480 SW 53 ST MIAMI, FL 33165<br />

RO SEN DAVID 2215 W O O D B U R Y G LEN D A L E, Wl 533209 U. O F WISCONSIN<br />

RO SEN DENA 143 E. W IN TER DR. PHOENIX, AZ 95020 U. O F CA LIFO RN IA<br />

RO SEN M ARILYN 576 58ST BKLYN NY, NY 11215<br />

RO SEN MELISSA 4434 BEA CO N SFILED CT W LAK E VILL, CA 91361 U. O F CALIF., SB<br />

RO SEN BA CH M ARC 7100 BALBOA BLVD VAN NUYS, CA 91406 U. O F CA LIFORN IA , SD<br />

R O SEN BA U M M ELANIE 2180 E 38TH AV V A N C O U V ER , BC V5P 1H7<br />

R O SE N B L A T T MAIDIE C/0 A N T H R O DEPT ST.U S T A N F O R D , CA 94305 S T A N F O R D U.<br />

RO SE N B L U M TAM IR 11125 D EBO RA H DR POTOM AX, MD 20854 TUFTS-JACKSON<br />

RO SEN BLU M V A R D A 620 WASH SQ. SOUTH PHI LA, PA 19106 NY U.<br />

RO SO FSK Y WENDI 261 NICHOLS FA L L RIV ER, MA 02720 CASE W ESTERN RES.<br />

RO SS JO N A TH A N 2724 YOSEM ITE A V E S ST LOUISPK, MN 55316 M ACALESTER<br />

ROSS SAN D Y 3522 FA IRM A N ST LAKEW EOOD, CA 90712 U. O F CA LIFORN IA<br />

RO TH SC H ILD C H ER Y L 18920 O LN EY MILL RD OLN EY , MD 20832 BRANDEIS<br />

RUBIN ALISA 11507 D A N V ILLE DR RO CKV ILLE, MD 20852 Y A LE U.<br />

126


FAMILY & FIRST ADDRESS CITY, STATE/CNTRY ZIP UNIVERSITY<br />

RUBIN RICH ARD<br />

RUBIN R O B ER T<br />

RU DN ICK U RSU LA<br />

R U D O F SK Y STEVEN<br />

RU SO N IK ALAN<br />

SA FER ST EIN C H ER Y L<br />

S A K S JA Y M E<br />

SALZM AN M ITCHELL<br />

SA M ERS A U D R E Y<br />

SAM U ELS G R E G O R Y<br />

SAN F E R R A R E C H A RLES<br />

SAN FT BA RRIE<br />

SA R K O N SA N D R A<br />

SA TH ER SHERI<br />

SC H A E F E R SILKE<br />

SCH A FER M ICHAEL<br />

SCHA FM AN LEEM ORE<br />

SCH E R LE G ABRIELE<br />

SCHLAR LISA<br />

SCHN EE S TU A R T<br />

SCHON DIANE<br />

SCH W A RTZ GAIL<br />

SCHW ARTZ K EN N ETH<br />

SCHW A RTZ LISA<br />

SCHW ARTZ R O N A<br />

SCHW ARTZ T E R E N C E<br />

SEIDEL ETHAN<br />

S EL T Z E R S T U A R T<br />

S EV ELO W STACEY<br />

SHA PIRO CO RY<br />

SHA PIRO JO N A TH A N<br />

SHA PIRO NAOMI<br />

SHA PIRO R A C H E L<br />

SH A R K E Y VIVIAN<br />

SHAW BA RRY<br />

SHAW JO N A TH A N<br />

SHAW LEO N O RA<br />

SHERM A N LA U RA<br />

SH O R E HOW ARD<br />

SHPINER R U T H A N N E<br />

SHU M AN JO SH U A<br />

SIED LER M ARK<br />

SILVER LEORA<br />

SILV ER LESLEY<br />

SIMINS RO B ER T<br />

SING ER BEN<br />

SINGER DAVID<br />

SING ER KIM<br />

SK IN D ZIEL PAM ELA<br />

SLEPP K ERRY<br />

SLOTNICK RANDI<br />

SM A LL DAVID<br />

SOLEYM ANI LISA<br />

SOLOM O N ARI<br />

SONE LIANNE<br />

SONIK DANA<br />

SPACK BETH<br />

S PA N D O R F E R K AREN<br />

SPIEWAK JILL<br />

SPITZ LA RRY<br />

STERN JAMIE<br />

STRA U SS A N D R EA<br />

STRAUSSM AN SAUL<br />

STRU NIN ROY<br />

SUTTO N M ARLEN E<br />

S Z U K D A R E K B A R B A R A<br />

TA N N EN BA U M WILLIAM<br />

TEPLITZ FRA N CES<br />

T O C H N E R STEVEN<br />

TR A C E Y JOSH UA<br />

30 RA N D O LPH DR<br />

2524 E. 64 ST.<br />

19 TH A ER STR .<br />

23 W IN TER LANE<br />

8 D EN M A R K CRES.<br />

13851 S.W. 109ST<br />

11 BLAKE RD<br />

229 V A L LEY RD<br />

180 BIG O AK RD<br />

4 4 4 FAIRW A Y D R<br />

1000 S. 84TH<br />

6120 52N D SO<br />

2841 R IV E R A DR.<br />

1853 TA L L TIM BERS DR<br />

70 B R EN TA N O STR<br />

4 R ICH A RD W A G N E R ST.<br />

60 EAST END AVE.<br />

16 S C H IL LER PR O M E N A D E<br />

1605 W O RCH ID LANE<br />

4 S T R A T F O R D WAY<br />

400 CLA Y TO N RD<br />

5340 S.W. M EN EFEE DR<br />

1121 D U N D EE DR.<br />

1342 E 83 ST<br />

3 W O O D T H R U SH CT<br />

10 RO CH A M BEA N RD.<br />

515 W 110TH ST<br />

55 D ADIO RD<br />

1311 BIRCH RD.<br />

30 M O N TCA LM CRESCEN T<br />

POB 3070<br />

390 C H A R L TO N ST<br />

11 PLY M O U TH PL<br />

691 S. PA N TA N O PKWY<br />

2 A LA N G D A LE GDNS<br />

442 PA R T R ID G E<br />

442 PA R T R ID G E<br />

3360 21 ST<br />

1085 STEELES W.PH3<br />

816 D EDHAM ST<br />

3701 BENT BRANCH RD<br />

2 SILV ER SAD D LE<br />

28 R O B IN G R O V E RD<br />

983 D ALEN CON<br />

741 E. A V E R Y ST.<br />

5 5 0 N EW DALE RD<br />

8 W A LD EN ST<br />

5632 A RBO RV IEW CT<br />

401 9 3R D ST<br />

1974 A N D ER SO N LANE<br />

47 REIN ER RD<br />

5 CIRCLE WAY<br />

22825 PO N TC H EN TR A IN<br />

4837 CAMBLE ST<br />

3 PEA RW O OD CRES.<br />

7906 DUFF1ELD LANE<br />

24 TIM BER R D<br />

3342 HILTON W OODS DR<br />

16 OLD FARM RD<br />

301 W K ALER DR<br />

3909 SHENTON RD<br />

1688 LO N G V A LLE Y DR.<br />

333 O GD EN AVE<br />

306 PEPPER RD GE RD<br />

6520 LIN D EN H U RST AVE<br />

JO SEN G RA SSE 9<br />

83354 ETTW A ND A AV E<br />

25 JEW ETT AVE<br />

6042 G RA N D V IEW<br />

3 DIAM OND<br />

DIX HILLS, NY<br />

BKLYN, NY<br />

H A N N O V ER , WG<br />

DIX HILLS, NY<br />

W ILLOW DALE, ON<br />

MIAMI, FL<br />

LEXINGTON, NA<br />

M ERION, PA<br />

STA M FO R D , CT<br />

N. O RLEA N S, LA<br />

LINCOLN, NE<br />

SEA TTLE, WA<br />

BU RLIN G A M E, CA<br />

BIRM INGHAM , AL<br />

BERLIN 41, WG<br />

W ERM ELSKIV , WG<br />

N.Y., NY<br />

BERLIN, WG<br />

PHOENIX, AZ<br />

M O RRIS PLN, NJ<br />

SCARSD A LE, NY<br />

PO RTLA N D , OR<br />

D R ESH E R , PA<br />

BRO O K LY N , NY<br />

W ILLOW DALE, ON<br />

SCARSD A LE, NY<br />

NY, NY<br />

HAM DEN, CT<br />

HOM EW OOD, IL<br />

WINNIPEG, MB<br />

HOLLY W O OD , CA<br />

S. O R A N G E, NJ<br />

W HTEPLNS, NY<br />

TU ESO N, AZ<br />

ESSEX, GB<br />

D EER FIEL D , IL<br />

D EER FIEL D , IL<br />

L.l. CITY, NY<br />

W ILLOW DALE, ON<br />

NEWTON, MA<br />

FA LLS CH., VA<br />

RO LLIN G H, CA<br />

W ILLOW DALE, ON<br />

LAVAL, QB<br />

SAN BERN A R, CA<br />

W. V AN CO UV E, BC<br />

B EV ERLY, MA<br />

W. BLO O M FLD , Ml<br />

EV ERETT, WA<br />

W. PALM BEA, FL<br />

DOWNSVIEW, ON<br />

SH A RO N, MA<br />

SO U TH FIELD , Ml<br />

V A N C O U V ER , BC<br />

DON MILLS, ON<br />

HOUSTON, TX<br />

EDISON, NJ<br />

COLUMBUS, GA<br />

G R EA TN ECK , NY<br />

PHOENIZ, AZ<br />

RA ND LSTO W N , MD<br />

N. BROOK, IL<br />

TEAN ECK , NJ<br />

STA M FO RD, CT<br />

LOS ANG ELE, CA<br />

BA RLA DIN G N, WG<br />

N O R T H R ID G E, CA<br />

T E N A FLY , NJ<br />

Y O R B A LIN D A , CA<br />

LEXINGTON, MA<br />

11746<br />

11234<br />

11746<br />

M 2R1J4<br />

33186<br />

02173<br />

19066<br />

06903<br />

80124<br />

68510<br />

98118<br />

94010<br />

35226<br />

1000<br />

5632<br />

10028<br />

1006<br />

85021<br />

07095<br />

10583<br />

97201<br />

19025<br />

11236<br />

M 2K2A9<br />

10583<br />

10025<br />

06517<br />

60430<br />

R 2V 2N 4<br />

90078<br />

07079<br />

10605<br />

95710<br />

R M 125LA<br />

60015<br />

60015<br />

11106<br />

M2R2T1<br />

02159<br />

22041<br />

90274<br />

M 2R2Z7<br />

H1W3W3<br />

92404<br />

V 7T1W 6<br />

01915<br />

48033<br />

98290<br />

33406<br />

M 3H2L3<br />

02067<br />

48034<br />

V 5Z2Z3<br />

M 3B2C1<br />

77071<br />

08820<br />

3106<br />

11020<br />

85021<br />

21133<br />

60062<br />

07666<br />

06905<br />

90048<br />

7453<br />

91325<br />

07670<br />

92686<br />

02173<br />

CO LUM BIA U.<br />

BROWN U.<br />

CLA R K U.<br />

Y O R K U.<br />

U. OF FLO R ID A<br />

U. O F PEN N SY LV A N IA<br />

TEM PLE U.<br />

U. OF PEN N SY LV A N IA<br />

T L A N E UC (NEWCOMB)<br />

D A LLA S TH EO L. SEM.<br />

U. OF W A SHIN G TO N<br />

U. OF C A LIFO RN IA , SC<br />

U. OF ALA BAM A<br />

U. O F PEN N SY LV A N IA<br />

U. OF CA LIFO RN IA , LA.<br />

R U TG ER S-D O U G L A SS U.<br />

COLUM BIA U.<br />

U. OF W A SHIN G TO N<br />

U. OF PEN N SY LV A N IA<br />

J.T.S.<br />

J.T.S.<br />

U. OF M ANITOBA<br />

STA TE COLL. OF CALIF.<br />

B A R N A R D U.<br />

U. OF PEN N SY LV A N IA<br />

U. OF A R IZO N A<br />

M IDDLESEX POLY<br />

W A SHIN G TO N U. ST. LOUIS<br />

U. OF ILLINOIS<br />

V ASSAR CO LLEGE<br />

Y O R K U.<br />

T R IN ITY<br />

O BER LIN U.<br />

J.T.S.<br />

U.OF TO R O N T O<br />

C O N C O R D IA U.<br />

U. O F CALIF.<br />

U. O F BRITISH COLUMBIA<br />

U. O F MASS.<br />

M ICHIGAN ST. UNIV.<br />

EM ORY U.<br />

U. OF TO R O N T O<br />

BRA ND EIS<br />

C O R N E L L U.<br />

U. OF BRITISH COLUMBIA<br />

CEGEP<br />

U. OF TEXAS<br />

R U TG ER S-D O U G LA SS U.<br />

U. OF G EO R G IA<br />

TU FTS-JACKSON<br />

J.T.S.<br />

U. OF W A TERLO O , CANA D A<br />

U. OF ILLINOIS<br />

R U TG ERS-D O U G L A SS U.<br />

BRANDEIS<br />

U. OF CALIFORNIA, LA.<br />

S T A N F O R D U.<br />

W ASHIN G TO N U. ST. LOUIS<br />

U. OF CALIF,I.<br />

BOSTON U.<br />

127


FA M ILY & FIRST A D D R ESS CITY, STA TE/C N T R Y ZIP U NIV ERSITY<br />

TR IM B LE JA M ES 911 JO H N JA CK SO N V IL, TX 75766<br />

TU C K E R H A D A R 23681 M ARIO N O A K PARK, Ml 118237 U. O F MICHIGAN<br />

U R 8 ACH DEBBIE 16 M O N T R E SS O R DR W ILLOW DA LE, ON M 2P1Z 1 CEGEP<br />

VAN SCHAIK C A R O L Y N 35216 RD 140 VISALIA, CA STATE COLL. OF CALIF.<br />

V IE Z E L J E F F R E Y 41 3 G R A C E PL NW M ILFO RD , NJ 07646 SUN Y U.<br />

V O G E L STE W A R T 4713 M O N A R C A DR TA R Z A N A , CA 91356 J.T.S.<br />

V O L K M A N N EV EL IN A 40 K IR C H G A R T E N S T R S E M O EG LIN G EN , WG 7141<br />

V ON BERG S H E L L E Y 35 P A L ER M O DR O R O V IL L E , CA 95965 STA TE COLL. OF CALIF.<br />

W ACHS A V IV A 107 M APLE AVE. BALA, PA 19004 NY U.<br />

W A LD M A N BEN JUA M IN 4 0 5 R O SE M A R Y RD TO R O N T O , ON M 5P3E6 MC GILL U.<br />

W A LD M A N -Y A A R I A Y E L E T 148 LINCOLN A VE RID G EW O O D , NJ 07450 W ESLEY AN U.<br />

W A LZ A N E T T E 14 AM R A T H A U S A LTH EU G ST E, WG<br />

W A N D R E Y IRINA 24 G U N T E R SB L U M E R W E G BERLIN, WG 38<br />

W A R R E N CHRIS 27 B E V E R L Y ST T O R O N T O , ON M 541X 8 Y O R K U.<br />

W E IK ER LISA 31035 LA N GLOIS RA NCH P A L O SV ER D E, CA 90274 STA TE COLL. OF CALIF.<br />

WEI LA N D T O LIV ER 13 O B ER N ST R STA D T H G N , WG 3060<br />

W E IN B E R G SH El LA 6909 G R E E N E ST. PH I LA, PA 19119 R ECO N STRUCT. RABBIN COLL.<br />

W E IN E R A LISA 370 EUCLID AVE O A K LA N D , CA 94610 U. OF CA LIFORN IA , D.<br />

W E IN ER A R T H U R 10 M YSTIC W AY STO N Y B R O O K , NY 11790 J.T.S.<br />

WEISS S A N D R A 6242 N. A V E R S CHICAGO, IL 60659 U. O F ILLINOIS<br />

WEISS S A R A 278 U N D E R H IL L RD S. O R A N G E , NJ 07079 BRYN M ARW U.<br />

W EITSM A N PA TRICIA 462 VINE W. L A FA Y ET T, IN 47906 U. O F INDIANA<br />

W E R T H E IM E R REBECCA 14 CHEM IN DE B O TTE R L VESEN A Z, SU 1 2 2 2 Y ALE<br />

W E X L E R NAOMI 738 H ILL ST H IG H LA N D P,IL 60035 U. O F ILLINOIS<br />

W H E E L E R S A N D R A 121 M A RPO SA A V E LOWELL, MA 01851 C O R N E L L U.<br />

W H ITE EM A N U EL 6752 W E STBU RY M O N TR E A L , QB H3W 2X6 MC G ILL U.<br />

W H Y TE LA U R EEN 4504-16A ST C A LG A R Y , AB T 2 T 4 L 7<br />

W ILKE C A RSTEN 22 AN D ER BA UM SCHU LE E R FTSTA D T, WG 5042<br />

W ILLIS A A R O N 3530 S T O N E R AV LA, CA 90066 U. OF CA LIFORN IA , SC<br />

W ILSON REB E C C A 395 SOU TH CT PALO ALTO, CA 94306 ST. COLL. OF CALIF.<br />

W IN ESTO CK ESTH ER 13907 80TH AVE. ED M ON TO N , AB T 5R 3J6 U. O F T O R O N T O<br />

W INNICK KEITH 14705 A LB E R S D ST VAN NUYS, CA 91411 J.T.S.<br />

W IN N IG PA U LA 2616 N. LAKE DR. M ILW AUKEE, Wl 53211 HEBREW U. CO LLEGE<br />

W O LC H O C K S E R E N A 10 G R A N D C R E S T ST WINNIPEG, MB R2V 2X2 U. O F M ANITOBA<br />

W O LD E D AVID 1609 H A G Y S FO R D RD N A R B E R TH , PA 19042 J.T.S.<br />

W Y M AN 1LYSSA 3522 C O L O N IA L AVE ERIE, PA 16506 ADELPHI U.<br />

Y A K A R Y A E L 667 E FO X H IL L DR BLM FIELD H, Ml 48013 U. O F KANSAS<br />

Y A LO N D O N N A 424 C O O K ID G E RD C H E R R Y H IL L , NJ 08002 CO LUM BIA U.<br />

Y A R O N Y A R R A 367 K EN T E R AVE L.A., CA 90049 U. O F CA LIFO RN IA<br />

Y E O M A N S H E N R Y 29 F O R B U R G RD LONDON, GB N 166H P<br />

Y O U N G JO S H U A 4 0 3 3 B A Y A R D RD S. EUCLID, OH 44121 CASE W ESTERN RES.<br />

Z A C K E R H E A T H E R 4 03 C E D A R B R O O K LN.W. LINW OOD, NJ 08221 BROWN U.<br />

ZA L K O W V IVIAN 1101-4620 W 10TH AV V A N C O U V E R , BC V 6 R 2J5 U. O F BRITISH COLUMBIA<br />

Z E T T E R W A L L SIV 341 A LA M O DR. VACA V ILLE, CA 95688 STA TE COLL. O F CA<br />

Z U C K E R S A R A 11 LOCUST DR KING STO N, Rl 02881 BROWN U.<br />

ZW EIG N ETT A 611 BRIA R HILL AVE. TO R O N T O , ON H 5N 1N 4 J.T.S.


FAMILY & FIRST A D D RESS CITY, STA TE/C N T R Y ZIP<br />

U NIV ERSITY<br />

CHAPM AN ELIZABETH<br />

CO HEN LIMOR<br />

CO HEN TO V A<br />

COPLON D EA N A<br />

D AV ID OW D AN IELLE<br />

E Z R A T T Y JA IM E<br />

F R IE D E R JULIE<br />

F U TO N JULIE<br />

G E R S T E L JO N A T H A N<br />

G IL B E R T JE F F R E Y<br />

G O L D ESTH ER<br />

G O L D B E R G K ATHY<br />

G OLDIN DINA<br />

G OLD STEIN BETH<br />

G R E E N SH A RO N<br />

G R E E N B E R G LIZA<br />

G R U B E R M ICHAEL<br />

G U G M A N SUSAN<br />

H A L PE R N DINA<br />

H ERM A N A VIV A<br />

H ERM A N SHIRA<br />

H ER SH B E R G JAM ES<br />

H U C H ITA L JO R D A N A<br />

ISRAEL DAVID<br />

JAM ISON SA RA<br />

K A H N CHAVIE<br />

K LASKIN B A RBA RA<br />

K OM ETANI M ICHA EL<br />

K U T N E R LA U REN<br />

LEIBOW ITZ LISA<br />

LEVIN ROSS<br />

LINZER E MILY<br />

M A L H E R B E JO H A N N E S<br />

M A RCU S PAULA<br />

M C G A R R Y M ICHAEL<br />

M ILLER ABIGAIL<br />

M ILLER RIVA<br />

M ILSZTEIN M A RTA<br />

M ILSZTEIN SILVIO<br />

N EIPRIS LOUIS<br />

N EU M A N MIRIAM<br />

OLIVERI FR A N CESCA<br />

PER LA D AN IEL<br />

PESKOW ITZ M IRIAM<br />

P O STELN EK D EBO RA H<br />

P R O R O K LISA<br />

REICIN GLEN N<br />

RICHM AN ROBIN<br />

RO BINSON BREN LE E<br />

R O SE N B E R G JO N A TH A N<br />

RO TH MIRIAM<br />

SCHLOSS D EBO RAH<br />

SCHW A RTZ D O N N A<br />

SHAW LISA<br />

SHW EK Y<br />

EVAN<br />

SILV ERM A N FRA N C ES<br />

SMITH ESTELLE<br />

STERN DANA<br />

STER N B E R G C H E R Y L<br />

SY M O N D S G R EG G<br />

TA N NIN BENJAM IN<br />

T A TT ELB A U M KATE<br />

TISHM AN ELLEN<br />

TO LPIN I LANA<br />

W EIN ER SH A RO N<br />

W EISBRO T MIRIAM<br />

W ISER TOBY<br />

W ISOTSKY BU RTON<br />

W ITTAL M ICHELLE<br />

W U G M EISTER MIRIAM<br />

713 A R LIN G T O N RD N A R B E R TH , PA 19072<br />

1354 SOUNDVIEW DR PT WASH, NY 11050<br />

4374 B ED FO R D AVE BRO O K LY N , NY 11229<br />

241 ERICA W AY M ENLO PK, CA 94025<br />

54 PATTO N BLVD NEW HYD E P, NY 11070<br />

11 H A R V A R D RD W O O DM ERE, NY 11598<br />

101 LINDEN DR CINCINATTI, OH 45215<br />

C/O TO R Y 48 UNIV. PL PRINCETON, NJ 08540<br />

2323 SW A R TH M O R E DR SA CRA M EN TO , CA 95825<br />

4421 W ESTES LINCOLN WD, IL 60646<br />

99-32 66R D F O R E ST HLS, NY 11374<br />

2420 W O O D BRID G E LN H IG H LA N D P, IL 60035<br />

25 D AYST A LB U R N D A LE, MA 02166<br />

3007N E T H E R L A N D AVE BRO NX , NY 10463<br />

5753 D ESER T DR LA JOLLA , CA 92037<br />

3736 K A N A H A ST N.W. W A SHIN G TO N, D.C. 20015<br />

80-54 266 ST F L O R A L PK, NY 11064<br />

8 TH ISTLEW O O D LANE FA Y ETTV ILL, NY 13066<br />

3935 BLA CK STON E AVE BRO NX , NY 10471<br />

5729 M ER R IM A C RD M O N TREA L, AB H4W 155<br />

19 NEW OCEAN ST LYNN, MA 01902<br />

15 W A TER VIEW DR PT JE F FE R S , NY 11777<br />

21 W A R R E N RD M APLEW OOD, NJ<br />

38 B A LLA R D ST NEW TON, MA 02159<br />

2119 D ELA N CEY PL PHI LA, PA 19103<br />

6026 N CH RISTIAN A CHICAGO, IL 60659<br />

6901 STA H L COVE AUSTIN, TX 78731<br />

4 JESSICA LANE W A R R E N NJ 07060<br />

346 E LA N CA STER AVE W Y N N E C O R D , PA 119096<br />

2145 77 ST B RO O K LY N , NY 11214<br />

2951 W FA R W ELL CHICAGO, IL 60645<br />

2550 IN D EPEN D EN CE AV BRONX, NY 10463<br />

4 G A IN SB O R O ST BELLVILLE, SF 7530<br />

105 M ITCH EL AVE LONG BCH, NY 11561<br />

5 PARK ST BOSTON, MA 02108<br />

19 SU Z A N N E LANE CH APPAQ U A, NY 10514<br />

2306 PA RK W O O D S RD ST LOUIS PK, MN 55416<br />

2539 A R EN A L ES BU EN OS AIRES, SA 1425<br />

2539 A R E N A L E S BU EN OS AIRES, SA 1425<br />

17 BLAKE RD BRO OK LIN E, MA 02146<br />

70 KINGS C O U R T APT 18 SA N TU R O E, PR 00911<br />

33 VIA MARCH SA L A PA R U T A , IT 91020<br />

6 9 BIRCH HILL SEA R IN G TO N , NY 11507<br />

195 COLD SPRIN G S RD DSYOSSET, NY 11791<br />

727 SEA B U R Y A VE F R N K LIN SQ, NY 11010<br />

8901 O D E L L M O RT O N GR, IL 60053<br />

9102 POTTAW ATTAM I SKOKIE, IL 60076<br />

3 9 3 6 W. EN FIELD SKOKIE, IL 60076<br />

2070-360 MAIN ST WINNIPEG, MB R 3 C 3 Z 3<br />

6055 SW EETBRIA R MAMPHIS, TN 38139<br />

6840 S EUCLID AV CHICAGO, IL 60649<br />

102 PEPPERIDG E CRCL FA IRFIELD , CT 06430<br />

520 E 90TH ST NEW Y ORK , NY 10128<br />

2118 H O L L A N D WAY M ERRICK, NY 11566<br />

1746 T U TT LE AVE W A LL IN G FO R , CT 06492<br />

8836 SOPHIA AV SEPULVEDA, CA 91343<br />

4 CO UNCIL ST BONDI JUNC, AU 2022<br />

4595 M ILBRO O K DR A TLA N TA , GA 30327<br />

31 H AM ILTON RD PEABODY, MA 01960<br />

25 B O RO N IA RD SYD N EY , AU<br />

80 B R E V O O R T RD CHAPPAQUA, NY 10514<br />

4 30 E 86 ST NEW Y ORK, NY 10028<br />

216 T U D O R RD N EEDHAM , MA 02192<br />

239-20 65TH AV DOG LA STO N, NY 11362<br />

103 OLD FA RM LANE FA IRFIELD , CT 06430<br />

1103 SUSSEX RD TEAN ECK , NJ 07666<br />

62 KOSTER DR FR EEH O LD , NJ 07728<br />

812 K ERSEY RD SILVER SPR, MD 20902<br />

67 K A R IL LA AVE SYDNEY, AU 2066<br />

19 STEEPH ILL W ESTON, CT 06883<br />

U. OF PEN N SY LV A N IA<br />

SUNY U.<br />

B A R N A R D U.<br />

U. OF PEN N SY LV A N IA<br />

SUNY U.<br />

BRA ND EIS<br />

U. OF RO C H E ST ER<br />

PRINCETO N U.<br />

U. OF MICHIGAN<br />

U. O F ILLINOIS<br />

COLUM BIA U.<br />

C O R N E L L U.<br />

Y A LE U.<br />

Q U E EN S COLL. N.Y.<br />

U. OF CALIF.<br />

U. OF PEN N SY LV A N IA<br />

BRA ND EIS<br />

BRA ND EIS<br />

Y ALE U.<br />

CO N CO RD IA U.<br />

BRA ND EIS<br />

COLUM BIA U.<br />

BRA ND EIS<br />

U. O F WISCONSIN<br />

W ESLEY AN U.<br />

W A SHIN G TO N U. ST. LOUIS<br />

U. O F TEXA S<br />

RU TG ERS-D O U G LA SS U.<br />

C O R N E L L U.<br />

Y A LE U.<br />

U. O F ILLINOIS<br />

U. OF PEN NSY LV AN IA<br />

BRANDEIS<br />

BOSTON U.<br />

COLUM BIA U.<br />

U. O F PEN NSY LV AN IA<br />

NY U.<br />

O BERLIN U.<br />

BRA ND EIS U.<br />

U. OF PEN NSY LV AN IA<br />

BRA ND EIS U.<br />

B RA ND EIS U.<br />

U. O F M ANITOBA<br />

D REW U.<br />

U. OF MICHIGAN<br />

BRANDEIS U.<br />

BRA ND EIS U.<br />

SUNY U.<br />

TUFTS-JACKSON<br />

BRANDEIS U.<br />

TU LA N E UC<br />

U. O F PEN NSY LV AN IA<br />

U. O F VIRGINIA<br />

U. OF PEN NSY LV AN IA<br />

U. OF PEN NSY LV AN IA<br />

SUNY U.<br />

BRA ND EIS U.<br />

BA R N A R D U.<br />

U. OF PENNSYLVANIA<br />

Y ALE U.<br />

BRANDEIS U.<br />

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OSA STAFF ADDRESSES<br />

Jonathan Bar-Sade<br />

20 Flarav Herzog St.<br />

Shikun Bavli<br />

Tel-Aviv 62915 Israel<br />

Telephone: (03) 442651<br />

Rina Buberoglu<br />

Rehov Anatot 3219<br />

Ganei Tsahala<br />

Tel-Aviv 69353 Israel<br />

Telephone: (03) 483468<br />

Sylvia Kamowitz Cohen<br />

Moshav Mishmar Ayalon<br />

D.N. Ramie<br />

Telephone: (08) 220035<br />

Yehudit llani<br />

PO Box 24176<br />

Mt. Scopus, Jerusalem<br />

96267 Israel<br />

Telephone: (02) 531847<br />

Yardena Nahum<br />

8 King David St.<br />

Naharia 22203 Israel<br />

Telephone: (04) 926623<br />

Micha Wartski<br />

Li Avi — Zohar St.<br />

Bet Hakerem, Jerusalem<br />

96267 Israel<br />

Telephone: (02) 531847<br />

130

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