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2 week<br />

plan<br />

Money-saving meals<br />

Dinner for just 80p per day!<br />

Britain’s No.1 fortnightly<br />

yours.co.uk<br />

FREE<br />

Day cream<br />

worth £8.20<br />

WIN<br />

£6,015<br />

prizes!<br />

ISSUE <strong>296</strong><br />

Beat<br />

joint pain<br />

7 fast pill-free solutions<br />

23 pages of<br />

expert advice<br />

n Clever cleaning tips<br />

n 3 ways to<br />

healthy teeth<br />

n Stop the<br />

scammers<br />

naturally<br />

Touching new film<br />

Helen Mirren<br />

‘Why I’d<br />

love to buy<br />

a camper van’<br />

april 24-<br />

may 7, 2018<br />

£1.55<br />

Holidays for garden<br />

lovers… Best trips<br />

home & abroad<br />

This Morning’s<br />

Alison<br />

Hammond<br />

‘A day without<br />

laughter is<br />

such a waste!’<br />

stylish<br />

weekend<br />

budget<br />

buys<br />

Try our sugar-free chocolate mousse recipe


Inside<br />

this fortnight...<br />

cover pic: SGP/Vantagenews.com<br />

Real life<br />

9 Animal Magic<br />

12 Polio survivor Sandra Hulme<br />

16 Dolls we loved…<br />

18 Research family history<br />

20 ‘I can’t recognise<br />

people’s faces’<br />

22 Meet the street vet<br />

24 ‘Painting gave me my<br />

life back’<br />

26 We did it first: pinafores!<br />

Star chat<br />

10 Cover Helen Mirren<br />

14 Home and Away’s Ray<br />

Meagher chats to Yours<br />

138 Cover Alison Hammond<br />

Your best life now!<br />

32 Cover Do it all eye creams<br />

34 Cover Fashion: The great escape!<br />

36 Colour-match bags and shoes<br />

38 Cover 15 minutes to happy joints<br />

44 Cover Cut that sugar!<br />

47 Healthy recipe revamps<br />

49 Cover Achieve a healthier smile<br />

Good to know<br />

65 Cover Clever cleaning tips<br />

66 A guide to co-housing<br />

69 Boost your savings today<br />

71 Yours answers your questions<br />

73 Find the right apps for you<br />

75 Cover Stop the scammers<br />

Nostalgia<br />

56 More tales from the bathtub<br />

58 Dancing queen!<br />

Leisure time<br />

85 Cover Money-saving meals<br />

91 James Martin recipe<br />

92 Floral craft projects to try<br />

95 Knit a tea cosy<br />

97 Roses to grow in containers<br />

98 Yours Travel Club<br />

99 48 hours in… Whitby<br />

100 Cover Breaks for plant lovers<br />

Your favourites<br />

51 Meeting Place<br />

60 Roy Hudd<br />

79 Friends of Yours<br />

105 Carers in touch<br />

115 Cover Puzzles<br />

to test you<br />

& prizes to win<br />

113 Cover Free moisturiser<br />

129 The shop with a secret: part 1<br />

137 Horoscopes<br />

£6,015<br />

of prizes<br />

to win<br />

32<br />

Favourite<br />

eye creams<br />

47<br />

Hide those<br />

veg…<br />

26<br />

Pinafores<br />

are back in<br />

fashion!<br />

44<br />

The great<br />

sugar debate<br />

I was very surprised to discover that I have something<br />

in common with Hollywood superstar Helen Mirren<br />

(p10). I’d also love to own a camper van. The lure of<br />

the freedom of the open road combined with home<br />

comforts has always appealed to me… maybe we’ll<br />

both get our wish one day. I also found myself agreeing<br />

with This Morning presenter Alison Hammond’s<br />

assertion that a day without laughter is a day<br />

wasted (p138). She certainly knows how to make<br />

people smile!<br />

With household bills continuing to rise we bring<br />

you part two of our Live Well For Less feature (p85).<br />

A complete two-week recipe plan with 14 dinners for<br />

two people for the bargain price of £22.53. That’s just<br />

80p each per day! We also have budget<br />

fashion buys (p34), clever cleaning tips<br />

(p65) and a brand-new serialised<br />

short story (p129).<br />

See you next issue<br />

Keep in touch...<br />

We want to hear your news and views<br />

Write to<br />

Yours magazine,<br />

Media House,<br />

Peterborough Business Park,<br />

Peterborough<br />

PE2 6EA<br />

Email<br />

yours@bauermedia.co.uk<br />

website<br />

Find us at<br />

yours.co.uk<br />

Welcome ...<br />

Facebook<br />

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Yoursmagazine<br />

Sharon Reid,<br />

Editor<br />

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Sign up now at<br />

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92<br />

Floral-themed<br />

crafts to try<br />

Subscription query?<br />

Call 01858 43 8884<br />

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Advertising query?<br />

Angela Whenman is here to help if you<br />

have a query with an advert or offer in<br />

Yours. Call 01733 468444 (Mon, Wed, Fri,<br />

9-1pm, or leave a message at other times).<br />

For other queries call 01733 468000.<br />

Must-have<br />

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bags<br />

The vital<br />

work of<br />

street vets<br />

Knit this ‘berry<br />

cute’ tea cosy<br />

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Squirrel…<br />

For how to join<br />

the search<br />

see page 115<br />

Get Yours<br />

for just £1<br />

…only when<br />

you subscribe<br />

See page 50


schoolgirl fashion<br />

Fashion has headed back to school<br />

for a look we’ve long loved<br />

26<br />

We did it first:<br />

Pinafore<br />

dresses<br />

By Katharine Wootton<br />

What do Judy Garland,<br />

Alice in Wonderland,<br />

Audrey Hepburn and<br />

millions of schoolgirls<br />

have in common?<br />

They’re all fans of the pinafore dress!<br />

While you might have packed<br />

yours away with your satchel at the<br />

end of your schooldays, the pinafore<br />

is currently enjoying a revival, thanks<br />

to fashion designers and high-street<br />

retailers. The new-found popularity of<br />

corduroy – a popular fabric for pinafores<br />

– and a revival of the pinafore’s more<br />

masculine cousin, the dungaree, have<br />

helped the comeback. Pinafore dresses<br />

are now coveted by stars such as<br />

Mollie King, Holly Willoughby, Joanna<br />

Froggatt and Claire Foy.<br />

As far back as the 16th Century,<br />

people of all classes have worn a<br />

garment over other clothes as a<br />

protective cover. Over time, pinafores<br />

became the preserve of maids and<br />

YOURS n EVERY FORTNIGHT<br />

housewives. The word pinafore is still<br />

used to mean an apron or pinny.<br />

The pinafore went on to become the<br />

the standard uniform for generations<br />

of young girls. It’s no surprise that<br />

illustrator John Tenniel chose to depict<br />

Lewis Carroll’s Alice wearing a white<br />

pinafore over her sky–blue dress.<br />

In 1939 another wide-eyed young<br />

lady put pinafores on the fashion map<br />

when Judy Garland donned a gingham<br />

version intended to make her look<br />

younger than her 17 years. Actress<br />

Loretta Young gave the pinafore dress<br />

Perfect with a<br />

turtleneck, the<br />

pinafore can<br />

also be teamed<br />

with a shirt or a<br />

frilly blouse<br />

a more sophisticated spin<br />

when she wore a red, white<br />

and blue version for a film<br />

promo of the 1941 movie<br />

The Lady of Cheyenne.<br />

Loretta Young and Twiggy put their<br />

own spin on the popular pinafore dress<br />

In 1954 Audrey Hepburn brought<br />

her own brand of chic to a classic polkadot<br />

pinafore worn over a long-sleeved<br />

t-shirt in the film, Sabrina.<br />

Sixties’ designers Vivienne<br />

Westwood and Mary Quant adapted<br />

the look for their contemporary styles.<br />

Soon the hottest bods in town from<br />

Twiggy to Lulu were wearing the<br />

pinafore dress – and we followed<br />

their example.<br />

One of the most endearing<br />

attractions of the pinafore is its<br />

versatility. The hem length could be<br />

suitably sensible for school or short<br />

enough to be cool when the mini-skirt<br />

craze was at its height. Teamed with a<br />

turtleneck top or ruffle-neck blouse,<br />

a pinafore can be severely practical<br />

or sweetly girly.<br />

No wonder it has bounded back into<br />

our shops once more in every fabric<br />

from corduroy to leather and tweed.<br />

pics: alamy stock photo, capital pictures, getty images, rex/shutterstock


The<br />

sweetest<br />

thing<br />

We should all be<br />

eating less sugar,<br />

but just how much is<br />

too much and are all<br />

sweet things bad for<br />

our health?<br />

By Charlotte Haigh<br />

PICs: Getty images, shutterstock<br />

The average British adult eats<br />

around 60g of added sugar<br />

a day – that’s the equivalent<br />

of 15 teaspoons and twice<br />

the recommended daily amount of<br />

30g of sugar a day. “It’s a big problem<br />

for our health,” says dietitian Helen<br />

Bond. “Too much sugar increases<br />

your calorie intake which could cause<br />

weight gain and harm your teeth.”<br />

Plus research has linked diets high<br />

in sugar to heart disease, type 2<br />

diabetes, mental health problems<br />

and even cancer.<br />

Cutting down on the sweet stuff<br />

could make a huge difference to<br />

your health (and your waistline)<br />

over time – but the problem is that<br />

sugar makes our food taste so good,<br />

which makes it hard to resist. If you<br />

struggle to get the better of your<br />

sweet tooth you’ll be pleased to<br />

know that you don’t have to avoid<br />

sugar completely – in fact you can<br />

have a pretty sweet diet without<br />

blowing your daily sugar quota.<br />

What’s in<br />

a name?<br />

Not all sugar is bad and this is<br />

where it can get confusing. “There<br />

are natural sugars found in healthy<br />

foods such as the glucose and<br />

fructose in fruit and vegetables<br />

and the lactose in dairy<br />

products,” says Helen. “These<br />

naturally occurring sugars<br />

in fruit, vegetables and milk<br />

products come hand-inhand<br />

with lots of nutrients,<br />

including fibre, vitamins and<br />

minerals which are important<br />

for your health so there’s no<br />

need to restrict how much of<br />

these foods you eat.”<br />

What we all need to do<br />

though, is keep ‘free sugars’<br />

to a minimum. “Free sugars<br />

are those added to food either by you,<br />

or by a manufacturer in foods<br />

such as jam, fizzy drinks, cakes<br />

and biscuits,” says Helen. “Public<br />

Health England recommends<br />

free sugars make up no more<br />

than five per cent of our daily<br />

calories – that’s around 30g<br />

of sugar, or 7 teaspoons.”<br />

This allowance means<br />

you don’t have to cut out<br />

the sweet stuff entirely, says<br />

Helen. “In fact, sugar can<br />

play an important role in<br />

a healthy diet by making<br />

some nutritious foods<br />

more palatable – such as<br />

porridge and plain yogurt,<br />

rhubarb and other<br />

sour fruits.”<br />

44<br />

YOURS n EVERY FORTNIGHT


Hidden sugar<br />

You might not think you eat a lot of<br />

sugar, especially if you don’t snack<br />

on cakes and biscuits or add sugar<br />

to your tea or coffee. But a quick<br />

glance at the labels of some of your<br />

favourite foods might shock you.<br />

Breakfast cereals, pasta sauces and<br />

condiments such as tomato ketchup<br />

are often high in sugar even though<br />

they don’t taste that sweet.<br />

A product is considered to be high<br />

in sugar if it has more than 22.5g of<br />

total sugars per 100g. A low-sugar<br />

product has to have 5g or less<br />

of total sugars per 100g.<br />

But you can’t just rely on<br />

that figure. The ‘of which<br />

sugars’ figure on food<br />

labels describes the total amount<br />

of sugars from all sources – free<br />

sugars, plus those naturally present<br />

in foods. For example, plain yogurt<br />

may contain as much as 8g of sugar<br />

per serving, but none of these are<br />

free sugars because they all come<br />

from milk so they don’t count<br />

strapline xxxx<br />

towards your daily 30g of sugar.<br />

Have a look at the ingredients list<br />

on the label too – if there is added<br />

sugar in a product it will be listed<br />

as sugar, sucrose, glucose, fructose<br />

or glucose-fructose syrup. The<br />

higher up the list the more sugar<br />

a product contains.<br />

3<br />

1 Wean yourself off<br />

sweet drinks<br />

ways to<br />

save on sugar<br />

“Alcohol provides nearly 10 per cent of our free<br />

sugars so cutting down will reduce your intake,”<br />

says Helen. “Drink water or milk instead of fizzy<br />

drinks and squash and try low-calorie sweeteners<br />

in tea and coffee.”<br />

3 Cheat your<br />

snack cravings<br />

When you want something<br />

sweet between meals, try a<br />

couple of medjool dates, a<br />

banana with peanut<br />

butter and a sprinkling<br />

of coconut or a pot of<br />

plain yogurt dusted<br />

with cinnamon.<br />

2 Get dessert-savvy<br />

Save sugary puddings for occasional<br />

treats and on a daily basis go for<br />

chopped fruit with plain yogurt.<br />

Or make this added sugar-free<br />

chocolate mousse by whizzing<br />

up an avocado, a banana,<br />

2 dessertspoons of cocoa<br />

powder and enough<br />

milk to give a smooth<br />

consistency.<br />

10%<br />

of the more harmful<br />

‘free’ sugars in our diet<br />

comes from alcohol, so<br />

cut down on the tipples<br />

to boost your health<br />

What’s the<br />

alternative?<br />

“Be wary of the so-called ‘natural’<br />

alternatives to sugar, such as maple syrup,<br />

coconut sugar, agave and honey,” says Helen.<br />

“They’re fine to use if you enjoy the flavour but<br />

they do count as free sugars in just the same way<br />

as table sugar. Remember ordinary sugar is natural<br />

too – it comes from a plant.”<br />

If you really want to cut back try sweetening your<br />

foods with xylitol or stevia. Xylitol has the same sweetness<br />

as sugar, but with 40 per cent fewer calories. And it may<br />

actually protect your teeth by preventing bacteria<br />

from sticking to them. Stevia is made from a<br />

South American plant and is up to 400 times<br />

sweeter than sugar. It’s the only<br />

calorie-free natural sweetener.<br />

YOURS n EVERY FORTNIGHT<br />

45


good know<br />

to<br />

Simple advice on money + home + family + shopping + trends<br />

Gleaming<br />

gadgets!<br />

Use these quick-and-easy cleaning<br />

tips to get your kitchen gadgets<br />

sparkling like new<br />

Cleanse<br />

your<br />

kettle<br />

Makeover<br />

your<br />

microwave<br />

Fill a dish with water, add a few slices of lemon and microwave on<br />

high for 3 mins. Once finished, leave the microwave closed for 5<br />

mins to allow the steam to loosen up any stubborn stains for easy<br />

wiping. For dried-on food you might need to repeat the process.<br />

Sanitise<br />

your<br />

blender<br />

Make your own natural<br />

limescale remover! Prepare<br />

a solution of equal parts<br />

water and white vinegar,<br />

then pour into the kettle<br />

(until it’s three-quarters<br />

full) and leave for one hour.<br />

Bring to the boil, allow<br />

to cool, then drain. Rinse<br />

several times to remove<br />

any traces of vinegar.<br />

Don’t forget to unplug before cleaning<br />

Once you’ve removed<br />

the crumb tray and<br />

shook it into the bin, use<br />

an old toothbrush to<br />

gently dislodge any large<br />

chunks stuck inside the<br />

toaster itself. If you’ve<br />

washed the tray, make<br />

sure it’s completely dry<br />

before re-inserting.<br />

Tackle<br />

your<br />

toaster<br />

After each use, pour hot<br />

soapy water into the jug of<br />

your blender, replace the<br />

lid then give it a 1 min blitz<br />

on the highest setting and<br />

rinse. For a deeper clean,<br />

swap the soapy water for<br />

2 tbsp of lemon juice and<br />

baking soda. Works just as<br />

well on smoothie makers.<br />

PICS: shutterstock<br />

YOURS n EVERY FORTNIGHT<br />

65


Meet the<br />

street vet<br />

With reports that homelessness<br />

is at epidemic proportions, we<br />

speak to a vet who pioneered a<br />

project helping pets and their<br />

owners who sleep on the streets<br />

By Katharine Wootton<br />

At the end of a long day<br />

treating pampered<br />

pooches and de-fleaing<br />

cats who enjoy many<br />

creature comforts, Jade<br />

Statt doesn’t just head home for a welldeserved<br />

rest. Instead, vet and lifelong<br />

animal lover Jade packs her vet bag and<br />

heads out onto the streets of London<br />

looking out for the pets of some of the<br />

poorest people in the country.<br />

Since last April Jade, along with<br />

her co-founder Sam Joseph, has been<br />

leading the charity StreetVet, which<br />

sees qualified veterinary practitioners<br />

and vet nurses volunteer their time<br />

to treat the animals of the homeless,<br />

currently in London, Bristol, Brighton,<br />

Cambridge and Plymouth.<br />

The idea for the charity first<br />

came about when Jade struck up a<br />

conversation with a homeless man<br />

while on a night out with friends. “I got<br />

talking to this guy whose dog had really<br />

itchy skin and it annoyed me that this<br />

dog was suffering as it was something<br />

I knew I could easily fix as a vet,” says<br />

Jade. “Coincidentally around the<br />

same time, someone told me about a<br />

hairdresser called Joshua Coombs who<br />

Vet Jade receives a<br />

lick of thanks from<br />

street dog Heidi<br />

22<br />

YOURS n EVERY FORTNIGHT


Jade in action and right Anna Minoli,<br />

one of the senior street vets who has<br />

been involved since the early days,<br />

with street dog Sky and their owner<br />

real life<br />

was going round cutting the hair of the<br />

homeless in his free time for a project<br />

called Do Something for Nothing. That<br />

gave me the idea that perhaps I could<br />

do the same thing, but instead treating<br />

homeless people’s pets for free.”<br />

From there, Jade enlisted the help<br />

of other vets who wanted to make<br />

a difference, as well as teaming up<br />

with a charity called Streets Kitchen<br />

who already reached out to homeless<br />

people, and began heading onto the<br />

city streets to find dogs and owners<br />

in need.<br />

“While there are other charities<br />

out there providing a vet’s centre<br />

for homeless animals, many of the<br />

people we work with have mental<br />

health problems that mean they find<br />

sitting in a waiting<br />

room of people very<br />

intimidating. As the<br />

treatment is meanstested,<br />

they also<br />

sometimes struggle<br />

with the idea of<br />

having to prove<br />

they are homeless,<br />

which is why we<br />

go to them on the<br />

streets instead.<br />

“I usually say<br />

anything we would<br />

do in a normal vet’s<br />

consultation we can<br />

do on the streets<br />

such as health<br />

checks, vaccinations,<br />

worming, antibiotics<br />

pain relief, taking<br />

bloods and testing<br />

urine. Then if we see<br />

‘Some people say<br />

that the homeless<br />

only have dogs so<br />

they can get more<br />

money, but in my<br />

experience that<br />

couldn’t be further<br />

from the truth’<br />

The vets make a difference to<br />

the lives of pets and owners<br />

an animal that<br />

needs surgery,<br />

we have a list of vet practices who<br />

support us, in particular Goddards Vet<br />

Group, that we can take them to.”<br />

Although some of the homeless<br />

people Jade meets acquired their pets<br />

on the streets – sometimes having saved<br />

a stray or abandoned animal – Jade<br />

says many have had their pets since<br />

before they became homeless. But<br />

whatever the situation, she says the<br />

bond between these animals and their<br />

owners is incredibly special.<br />

“Some people say that the homeless<br />

only have dogs so they can get more<br />

money, but in my experience that<br />

couldn’t be further from the truth.<br />

Often homeless people<br />

won’t go to the doctor or go<br />

in from the cold because<br />

they won’t leave their dog.<br />

Many say my dog eats first.”<br />

Because of this, Jade<br />

says that by helping the<br />

animals, she inevitably<br />

makes a difference to the<br />

lives of their owners, too.<br />

“If you consider all the<br />

things homeless people<br />

have to think about on<br />

a daily basis like staying<br />

safe, getting food and<br />

keeping warm, for us to<br />

say to them your dog is<br />

OK, that takes that bit of<br />

stress away from them.”<br />

One of the most<br />

moving moments Jade<br />

has experienced since<br />

starting out was with a<br />

man suffering from extreme anxiety<br />

who was terrified he was going to<br />

lose his dog, having been refused at<br />

countless hostels because they won’t<br />

take animals.<br />

“He was about the same age as me<br />

and had been a British Gas engineer<br />

for ten years when his anxiety meant<br />

he lost his job. From there he lost his<br />

flat and ended up on the streets. I<br />

found out about him through a hostel<br />

who contacted me and began meeting<br />

with him, but not long after he tried<br />

to commit suicide. I found him in the<br />

hospital and from there continued to<br />

help him. He recently got a flat with his<br />

dog and is back on the road to recovery.<br />

“When I started this project I never<br />

anticipated the layers you get involved<br />

with; by helping the dogs, you’re almost<br />

always helping the person.”<br />

With StreetVet having treated over<br />

200 animals to date, Jade now wants<br />

to grow the network of vets like her<br />

giving their time to help the homeless<br />

to new cities around the UK, as well<br />

as campaigning to get more hostels to<br />

accept dogs.<br />

“If we didn’t do this work, some<br />

of the animals may have developed<br />

serious problems had we not<br />

intervened. The depth of the human/<br />

animal bond between the homeless<br />

and their dogs warms my heart and it<br />

makes me feel better when I can help<br />

both the animals and their owners.”<br />

n To find out more about StreetVet,<br />

or to make a donation, visit<br />

www.streetvet.co.uk/get-involved<br />

YOURS n EVERY FORTNIGHT<br />

23<br />

PICs: robin trow


KEY<br />

PIECE<br />

Get away in style this weekend, whether you’re<br />

escaping to the country, catching a quick city break<br />

or heading to a leisurely lunch with loved ones<br />

The<br />

Great Escape<br />

Ladies<br />

who lunch<br />

If you’re heading out for a posh<br />

meal, this frock is perfect. The<br />

flattering wrap style will hide your<br />

tummy – even after a big lunch! If<br />

you’re not confident about your<br />

arms, pair with a tailored jacket<br />

in a neutral shade.<br />

KEY<br />

PIECE<br />

By Fashion Editor, Michelle Nightingale<br />

KEY<br />

PIECE<br />

Fun at the<br />

seaside<br />

Give a nod to the nautical<br />

trend with seasideinspired<br />

shades and prints<br />

and pack lots of layers for<br />

those breezy promenade<br />

walks. We love these<br />

colourful chinos, the<br />

perfect alternative to blue<br />

or black.<br />

£65<br />

£42<br />

8-22,<br />

M&Co<br />

Country M<br />

Don’t let our<br />

changeable weather<br />

catch you out! Be<br />

prepared with this<br />

pretty lightweight<br />

and water-repellent<br />

mac, teamed with fun<br />

wellies.<br />

xs-l,<br />

Phase Eight<br />

£29<br />

Kerry wears: Stripe top,<br />

£14, 8-22, Peacocks<br />

| white jumper (worn<br />

around shoulders, see<br />

above) | trousers, £22, 6-22,<br />

Next | bag, £42, Cath Kidston<br />

8-22,<br />

M&Co


KEY<br />

PIECE<br />

holiday wardrobe<br />

City slicker<br />

A smart jacket is a must-have<br />

staple for any city break. Team<br />

with a practical, easy-to-wear<br />

dress or trousers and most<br />

importantly – comfy flats.<br />

An across-the-body bag<br />

is essential too, leaving<br />

your hands free for<br />

sightseeing and<br />

shopping!<br />

Selina wears:<br />

Dress (see left)<br />

| jacket, £150, 8-20,<br />

Phase Eight | heels,<br />

£38, 3-9, Next |<br />

necklace, £18, Next<br />

| bag, £45, Hotter<br />

❤<br />

fashion editor<br />

lo ves<br />

y Mouse<br />

Selina wears:<br />

Dress (see<br />

below left)<br />

| jacket, £69,<br />

6-22, Per Una<br />

at M&S | flats,<br />

£12.50, 3-8,<br />

George at Asda<br />

| bag, £90,<br />

Cath Kidston<br />

£59<br />

Kerry wears:<br />

Parka coat, £69,<br />

10-28, Damart<br />

| shirt, £24.99,<br />

8-26, Lindex<br />

| knit (see left)<br />

| jeans, £59,<br />

8-22, Monsoon<br />

| wellies, £15, 3-9,<br />

George at Asda<br />

8-22,<br />

Monsoon<br />

Stockists: Cath Kidston 0333 320 2663;<br />

Damart 0871 200 9000; George at Asda 0800 952 0101;<br />

Hotter 0800 083 8490; Lindex 0203 005 0009;<br />

M&Co 0333 202 0720; M&S 0333 014 8555;<br />

Monsoon 0203 372 3052; Next 0333 777 8739;<br />

Peacocks 0292 010 1560; Phase Eight 0208 877 4001.<br />

Unfortunately, we cannot guarantee availability and prices<br />

of items featured on this page<br />

PHOTOGRAPHY RUTH JENKINSON; STYLIST DANIELLE ELMES-HUGHES;<br />

HAIR AND MAKE-UP CARL STANLEY<br />

YOURS n EVERY FORTNIGHT<br />

35

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