January 2019

thomasloebig

THE

JANUARY 2019 $6.95

AMERICAN PHILATELIST

MONTHLY JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN PHILATELIC SOCIETY

Looking for the Grand View

COLD WAR PHILATELY

PLUS

POSTAL REALITIES BASUTOLAND AMERISTAMP EXPO

AMERICA’S STAMP CLUB


Stamps for Sale? Why Wait...

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hen the time comes to sell your stamps, your

W primary concern is getting top dollar for

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leading stamp dealer. We have a track record of

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Than Anyone in America

Each year we need millions of stamps to satisfy

the collectors we serve. That means we must pay

competitive prices to purchase stamps – over $70

million in the past five years. It would be difficult

to buy all those stamps paying anything but high

market prices.

That’s great news for you if you’re serious about

selling your collection.

Our Expert Stamp Buyers Pay Top Dollar

With Mystic you get both high prices and

fair treatment. We pay you what your stamps

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We need all types of stamps and stamp

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Call 1-800-835-3609

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Name _________________________________________________

Street _________________________________________________

City/State/Zip __________________________________________

Phone Number (include area code) _________________________

o United States o Worldwide o Collection o Accumulation

Approximate value ______________________________________

Value based on _________________________________________

Brief description of stamps ________________________________

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Mystic Stamp Company

Attention: Buying Department

9700 Mill Street, Camden, NY 13316-9111

MysticBuysStamps.com • Fax: 1-315-245-9838

BA2059

BA2059 7.31x10 why wait AP.indd 1

11/20/18 7:28 AM


Alfred H. Caspary

Alfred F. Lichtenstein

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Great collectors put their trust in H.R. Harmer…

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Named sales have been a prominent part of H.R. Harmer's success since our inception. Some of the greatest

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It is a proven fact that stamps sell

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an attractive manner, which is why

we are so proud to offer individual

catalogues for extraordinary collections.

After all, H.R. Harmer was the first firm

to print auction catalogues in color

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right, in addition to our regular biannual

auction.

Do you have a collection that you

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Contact us today if you are interested in consigning to future auctions.

H.R. Harmer · Global Philatelic Network · USA

2680 Walnut Ave, Suite AB · Tustin · CA 92780-7052

www.hrharmer.com

Phone 714.389.9178


THE

CONTENTS • JANUARY 2019

AMERICAN PHILATELIST

JANUARY 2019

TABLE OF CONTENTS

VOLUME 133 • NO. 1 • WHOLE NO. 1,416

Since 1887 — The Premier

Philatelic Magazine in the Nation

CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER

Martin Kent Miller, ext. 221

martin@stamps.org • aparticle@stamps.org

EDITORIAL CONTENT SPECIALIST

Fred Baumann, ext. 222 • fbaumann@stamps.org

GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION SPECIALIST

Doris Wilson, ext. 223 • doris@stamps.org

DIGITAL MEDIA STRATEGIST Mara Hartzell,

ext. 207 • mhartzell@stamps.org

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT MANAGER

Helen Bruno, ext. 224

hlbruno@stamps.org • adsales@stamps.org

PAGE 44

LOOKING FOR THE GRAND VIEW

BY JOE R. CODY

Perched near the rim of the Grand

Canyon, the Grand View Hotel

hosted not only early sightseers, but

the Grandview Post Office. Both are

gone, but the author returns them

to Arizona’s postal history map.

PAGE 26

WHEN THE COLD WAR WENT

POLAR

BY STEVE PENDLETON

Organized by Admiral Richard E.

Byrd, Jr., “Operation Highjump”

mustered 4,700 men, 13 ships and

33 aircraft in 1946-47 to establish a

polar presence for America.

DEPARTMENTS

87 APS & APRL Elections

62 Books and Catalogs

52 British Empire: Basutoland

60 Buy and Sell

88 Classifieds

70 Digital Discoveries

56 Expertizing

40 Postal Realities

91 Index of Advertisers

8 Letters to the Editor

92 Membership Report

94 New Stamps

PAGE 18

POSTCARD FROM A PEACE

ACTIVIST TO A FUTURE

PRESIDENT

BY VINCENT CENTONZE

One of 2 million Yanks who went

to Europe in World War II, Joe

Polowsky brought home a determination

that war never start again.

PAGE 74

YOUR QUICK GUIDE TO

AMERISTAMP EXPO / ARIPEX

Mesa, Arizona, welcomes collectors

to three days of mid-winter warmth

and philatelic fellowship in “the Valley

of the Sun,” with lots to see and

do at the show, and nearby as well!

12 Our Story

72 Philatelic Happenings

4 President’s Column

84 Showtime

6 The Philatelic Experience

96 Worldwide in a Nutshell

American Philatelic Society

American Philatelic Research Library

100 Match Factory Place • Bellefonte, PA 16823

814-933-3803 • 814-933-6128 (Fax)

STAMPS.ORG • STAMPLIBRARY.ORG

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Scott English, ext. 219

scott@stamps.org

CHIEF MEMBERSHIP OFFICER

Ken Martin, ext. 218 • kpmartin@stamps.org

CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER

Rick Banks, ext. 216 • rbanks@stamps.org

GENERAL INFORMATION apsinfo@stamps.org

ADDRESS CHANGES requests@stamps.org, ext. 201

EDUCATION/YOUTH Cathy Brachbill, ext. 239

cbrachbill@stamps.org

EXPERTIZING/QUICK ID Thomas W. Horn,

ext. 205 • twhorn@stamps.org

LIBRARY/INFO. SERVICES Scott Tiffney, ext. 246

stiffney@stamps.org

MEMBERSHIP Judy Johnson, ext. 210

judy@stamps.org

SALES UNIT Wendy Masorti, ext. 270

stampstore@stamps.org

SHOWS/EXHIBITIONS Kathleen Edwards, ext. 217

stampshow@stamps.org

SHOW TIME LISTINGS

showtime@stamps.org

The American Philatelist (ISSN 0003-0473) is published

monthly by the American Philatelic Society, Inc., 100 Match

Factory Place, Bellefonte, PA 16823.

Periodicals postage paid at Bellefonte, PA 16823 and at additional

mailing office. Price per copy $6.95. Canadian

Distribution Agreement Number 40030959.

Opinions expressed in articles in this magazine are those of

the writers and are not necessarily endorsed by the society

and/or the magazine. The American Philatelist cannot be responsible

for the accuracy of any information printed herein.

Postmaster: Send address changes to:

The American Philatelist

100 Match Factory Place, Bellefonte, PA 16823.

©2018, The American Philatelic Society, Inc.

2 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


PRESIDENT’S COLUMN

BY ROBERT ZEIGLER

president | RZeigler@zcklaw.com

Even in January, It’s Time for Thanksgiving

First and foremost, I hope that 2019 will be a happy and

healthy New Year for all our members!

I recently returned from an all-too-brief cruise

vacation. My activities were somewhat curtailed by the need

to care for my wife, who has a serious illness but was game

enough to accompany me. The cruise went to several ports

in the western Caribbean, and I like to try to get a glimpse of

what life is like for the local people in these places.

The weather was idyllic, and the sea was calm or close to it

throughout. The cruise line took good care of us, and we enjoyed

it, while I added a new country to my “life list” of 46 or

so that I’ve been lucky to have had the chance to visit. (While

I’m fortunate in that regard, I feel like a travel novice when I

talk to certain people, like our former Executive Director Bob

Lamb. Bob was a career Foreign Service Officer who reached

the rank of Ambassador and still actively travels. He has been

to nearly 200 countries, depending on how you choose to

count them.)

When I go to different places in the world, I am struck by

how fortunate we are as hobbyists to be able to concentrate

on stamps and their infinite variety and uses.

On the island of Roatan, which belongs to Honduras but

is about 35 miles off the northern coast of that country, there

is a cruise terminal. It amounts to a shopping mall adjacent

to the pier, where cruise passengers may shop for souvenirs,

but I saw no stamps or covers available. The vendors were

local and Honduran for the most part, as was most of the

merchandise. But the whole facility was literally walled off

from the rest of the island, and only cruise passengers and

approved locals were allowed inside.

So, wanting to see more, I walked outside the wall.

I found myself instantly in the Third World. I acquired a

local guide, who had good English and answered my questions.

The main street of the town was pitted and the concrete

was in sad shape, with puddles in the potholes, and mud

alleys leading off to either side. Stray dogs inhabited every

block. Plenty of local people could be seen on the street, including

many young men without work.

Local merchandise of all sorts could be found, with prices

declining the farther we got from the cruise terminal. The

language was predominantly a Creole, a pastiche of Spanish,

French and English. There were three local beers available,

not bad and at reasonable cost. Seafood also was reasonable,

but beef and other imported foods were much harder for the

local people to afford. I was told by my guide that Roatan was

better off than the Honduran mainland, especially as far as

crime was concerned.

But stamps? Covers? Forget it!! When you are in this sort

of economy, there is a post office, but collectors are the real

rarities.

So enjoy your collecting in 2019. But when you see

stamps and covers from less prosperous places around the

world, think about how fortunate we are to be able to afford

our great pastime.

Port on Roatan, Honduras.

4 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


Merry Christmas

AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR

43 rd AUCTION

February 5 - 6, 2019 / banknotes & coins

February 18, 2019 / Special Auction CHINA

February 18 - 22, 2019 / philately

Closing date for consignments: January 3, 2019

44 th AUCTION

June 4 - 5, 2019 / banknotes & coins

June 11 - 15, 2019 / philately

Closing date for consignments: April 30, 2019

Take the chance to present your consignment in an

excellent auction.

We would like to thank all our customers,

consignors, bidders and interested parties for

a successful year 2018 and wish you health,

joy and success in the New Year.

We are always looking for ...

Philately & Numismatics worldwide

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/ specialized collections / thematic collections – all topics

/ complete estates / all types of coins / banknotes /

large accumulations and dealer stocks

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rea sonable consignment fees with no hidden costs /

huge international customer base (over 179,000 collectors

and dealers)

Consign or sell now!

Consignment & outright purchase at any time!

Contact us today for an individual appointment with one

of our international experts.

WORLDWIDE OFFER OF PHILATELY & NUMISMATICS – www.auktionen-gaertner.de

Am_Philatelist 2018-12

Auktionshaus Christoph Gärtner GmbH & Co. KG

Steinbeisstr. 6+8 │ 74321 Bietigheim-Bissingen, Germany │ Tel. +49-(0)7142-789400

Fax. +49-(0)7142-789410 │ info@auktionen-gaertner.de │ www.auktionen-gaertner.de


PHILATELIC EXPERIENCE

BY MARTIN KENT MILLER

editor & chief content officer | martin@stamps,org

Adventures in the Desert

As an experienced hiker, I know about the challenges and the risks of adventuring

out into various locales and conditions. The importance of terrain, weather,

wildlife and resources shift depending on both your point of origin and your destination.

Possibly one of the most challenging settings for hiking and camping is a desert.

The extremes of climate, landscape and the availability of water make desert adventures a

formidable proposition.

Sometimes collecting can feel like wandering in the desert. While we enjoy the hobby,

the learning, and the thrill of the hunt, on occasion we find ourselves challenged beyond

expectation. We start a new specialty with great enthusiasm but suddenly find ourselves

isolated or without the necessary resources to continue — or we abruptly reach a point

that saps our determination. I’ve spoken with numerous collectors who relay similar frustrations

arising from projects that originally were a source of great excitement.

The solution, at least this year, is to go wander in the desert. No, I am not suggesting

that you head out into the wilderness; I recommend a trip to Mesa, Arizona. While I have

enjoyed some remarkable adventures in the deserts surrounding this city, my suggestion is

for you to attend AmeriStamp Expo/ARIPEX next month. Arizona in winter is an enticing

venue for any explorer. Combine the destination with some of the best features that the

hobby has to offer and you have a near perfect philatelic peregrination.

In this issue you’ll find a guide to AmeriStamp Expo/ARIPEX on page 74. As you work

your way toward that section, make sure you take in all of the scenery we have prepared

for you — from the philately of Cold War politics to the Arctic Circle and even a stop at

the Grand Canyon, this month’s American Philatelist offers a globetrotting exploration.

One of the best prescriptions for the maladies of collector’s block (similar to the

dreaded “writer’s block”) is to spend time with other philatelists. The variations in terrain

(bourse, exhibits and seminars), abundant resources (dealers in stamps, postal history and

more), and the assorted wildlife (other collectors) is absolutely energizing. The desert, like

our hobby, is indeed a wonder to behold. The diversity offered expands a visitor’s appreciation

of its features, both bold and subtle. As now we consider roaming toward the desert,

let us be reminded that “…not all who wander are lost…” – J.R.R. Tolkien.

6 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019

aps_stamps

Editor,

The American Philatelist

@american.philatelic.society

@APS_stamps

blog.stamps.org

wsradio.com/aps-stamp-talk

APS Official Family

2016–2019

PRESIDENT

Robert Zeigler

ziggy_travesty@yahoo.com

BOARD OF VICE PRESIDENTS

Jeff Shapiro

dirtyoldcovers@aol.com

Patricia (Trish) Kaufmann

trishkauf@comcast.net

Cheryl Ganz

cherylganz@yahoo.com

SECRETARY

Stephen Schumann

stephen.schumann@att.net

TREASURER

Bruce Marsden

mail@brucemarsden.com

DIRECTORS-AT-LARGE

Michael Bloom

mbloom@sinotech.com

Rich Drews

richbear427@hotmail.com

Peter P. McCann

ppm103226706@aol.com

Mark Schwartz

mark.schwartz1@verizon.net

IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT

Stephen Reinhard

sreinhard1@optonline.net

STAMP THEFT COMMITTEE

Nicholas A. Lombardi

P.O. Box 1005, Mountainside, NJ 07092

stamptheft@stamps.org

APS INSURANCE PLAN

Hugh Wood Inc.,

220 Match Factory Place

Bellefonte, PA 16823

Toll Free: 888-APS-6494

Phone: 212-509-3777

Fax: 212-509-4906

aps@hughwood.com

ADDRESS CHANGES

To change your address online

visit stamps.org and log into your My APS

account. Or mail your new address information

to APS, 100 Match Factory Place,

Bellefonte, PA 16823 (Fax: 814-933-6128).

Please try to give us four weeks’ notice.

You can also add an e-mail address or

website to your APS record.

CONNECT ONLINE

aps_stamps

@american.philatelic.society

@APS_stamps

blog.stamps.org

wsradio.com/aps-stamp-talk

@Stamplibrary

blog.stamplibrary.org


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

lettertotheeditor@stamps.org

Missing the APEX

I've been an APS member for many years. I read The

American Philatelist from cover to cover monthly and I’m inspired

by it.

Wendy Masorti had some nice thoughts to share with her

recent Buy and Sell column in the November issue (“APS Advice:

Self Grading is not recommended”). I agree with most

of it.

But why on earth would Wendy recommend that you send

your item off “to Professional Stamp Experts (PSE) and have it

officially graded” when she works for the American Philatelic

Society? APEX − the American Philatelic Expertizing Service

− has been our society’s expertizing service since 1903. It has

served our community, this nation’s philatelists, with unquestionable

authority and integrity for nearly 116 years.

I believe in APEX. So should every stamp collector that

reads my letter. So should Wendy.

Play for our team, Wendy.

David Saks

Memphis, Tennessee

From the Director of APS Sales Unit: While I appreciate

Mr. Saks' comments and concern, I want to assure everyone

that APEX is our first choice for expertizing of stamps. If my

article was in reference to the authentication of stamps, of

course APEX would have been the main focus. However, the

article referenced grading and APEX does not offer this service.

Professional Stamp Experts (PSE), the Philatelic Foundation,

and Professional Stamp Authentication and Grading

(PSAG) offer grading of stamps and I made reference to only

one of those – in hindsight, I should have mentioned all three.

Perhaps I should have clarified in my article that APEX does

not grade and that is why I recommended an outside service.

Deaf vs. Hearing Impaired

Honored on this

1983 stamp (Scott

1861), Thomas

H. Gallaudet

co-founded

the Hartford,

Connecticut,

School for the Deaf.

Catching up on my reading, I just read

the October 2018 issue of The American

Philatelist and I cringed when I saw my

Letter to the Editor on page 924 (“Gallaudets

Honored in Aviation as Well as

Education”).

I did not write “hearing impaired” as

I quoted “Deaf ” and please respect that I

did choose the correct terminology. I did

provide you with a link about the proper

reference to the “Deaf ” terminology and

this could have been an asset to you, especially

when it comes from experts in

their respective fields.

To reinforce my point, please see the following link:

hearinglosshelp.com/blog/hard-of-hearing-hearing-impaired-or-deaf-which-is/

Please make a retraction in the next issue of the magazine.

Kenneth S. Rothschild

Burbank, California

Editor’s Note: We apologize for the errant edits in this

letter. Mr. Rothschild did, in fact, provide a valuable link and

the information coincides with information available from

Gallaudet University (www.gallaudet.edu).

A self-adhesive 2015 $15 Common Goldeneye Federal duck

stamp still on its backing paper, Scott RW80A.

Self-Adhesive Scourge

I read with interest the letter by Bill Wilson in the November

issue of The American Philatelist (“Collecting Modern

Plate Blocks,” pages 1016-18).

I began collecting U.S. plate blocks in the mid-1960s, primarily

as the result of my father working at the local post

office and getting me interested in stamp collecting. My collection,

which I thoroughly enjoyed, continued to grow into

the late 1990s.

However, my interest in plate blocks was dealt a serious

blow when the U.S. Postal Service began the transition from

the traditional “lick-and-stick” stamps to self-adhesives.

While the latter may indeed be more convenient for the

Postal Service, as well as for the common customer using the

stamps on mail, I felt then as I do now, that this change was

a serious blunder with respect to traditional stamp collectors

like me.

Now I only collect Nevada duck stamps, Federal duck

stamps and also Federal Junior duck stamps. After 20 years of

producing Federal duck stamps both with moisture-activated

gum and in self-adhesive formats, it has now been decided

that Federal duck stamps will be released in self-adhesive formats

only. Now even the future of that part of my collection

is in doubt.

Ron Ballard

Elko, Nevada

8 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


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Broken Heart Carved Coral Castle

I found the Josef Pilsudski article in the November 2018

issue of The American Philatelist quite interesting, and reflected

on how life can take strange twists and turns. Specifically,

I thought of Edward Leedskalnin (1887-1951), a contemporary

of Pilsudski’s whose life followed a dramatically different

trajectory.

Leedskalnin was Estonian. Under the influence of his

older brother, he took part in “terrorist activities” against the

Russian Empire in the very early 1900s to achieve independence.

His brother, as I recall, was arrested as was Edward,

and eventually his brother died due to these activities.

Fearing for the life of Edward, whose heart was broken

at the age of 26 the day before he was to wed, the family sent

Edward to the United States.

After years of working throughout the United States and

Canada, and apparently serving in World War I, Edward built

the Coral Castle in South Florida for the young lady who

broke his heart. He hoped to win her back, but she never returned.

The Coral Castle

has been referred to as

Florida’s Stonehenge.

It has appeared in

movies such as Wild

Women of Wongo

(1958), the children’s

musical Jimmy, The

Boy Wonder (1966),

in programs on The

History Channel and as “The Castle of Secrets” in Leonard

Nimoy’s “In Search of ” series. The castle also inspired Billy

Idol and his 1986 song “Sweet Sixteen.”

Though no stamps picture his coral creations, Edward

Leedskalnin and his castle have left their mark on deltiology,

having appeared on numerous picture postcards. Not bad for

someone with a mysterious past whose life began like that of

Josef Pilsudski, then took a sharp turn.

Juan L. Riera

Miami, Florida

Too Many Firemen

I wish to point out an error

in the descriptions of the

U.S. First Responders Forever

stamps shown and described

on pages 1092-93 in the November

American Philatelist. The third responder shown is not

a fireman with axe; rather it is a policeman with flashlight.

Lawrence R. Mead

Rochester Hills, Michigan

Editor’s Note: Mr. Mead is of course correct; captions for

the stamp images on both pages failed to identify the policeman.

We regret the error.

10 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019

Overestimating North Ingermanland

The map accompanying my “Worldwide in a Nutshell”

column on North Ingermanland in the November American

Philatelist (page 1104) was misleading. While it was a good

notional representation of the entire area of historic Ingermanland

north of St Petersburg, Russia, it went far beyond

the tiny area of the Republic of Ingermanland in 1919. The

dozen or so villages which Colonel Elfengren conquered for a

couple of months in the summer of 1919 were confined to an

area I estimate at about 25 square miles in the far northwestern

corner of the red area on the November AP map. By the

time North Ingermanland began issuing stamps, it had been

reduced to the small Finnish village of Kirjasalo.

If you look carefully at the red area of the November map,

you will see a small point in the far north. That point jutting

into Finland represents the entire area of the stamp-issuing

Republic of North Ingermanland in 1919. After the Russo-

Finnish Winter War of 1939-40, the Russian border was

shifted northward. As a result, whatever remains of Kirjasalo

today is about 120 miles inside Russia.

The small village of Kirjasalo offered the Ingrians a good

defensive position for their “Republic.” As a salient in the

Finnish border, only the southern edge faced Bolshevik Russia.

A glacial ridge offered the defenders natural protection

against Russian attackers. It also helped that the Bolshevik

forces had to deal with some higher priority opponents elsewhere.

Gazetteers tell us little about the republic. Pre-war Kirjasalo

had a couple of hundred inhabitants. I don’t know how

many of Col. Elfengren’s 580 volunteers remained to defend

the enclave, but I suspect the total population never reached

1,000 and was probably much less.

Robert E. Lamb

State College, Pennsylvania

Editor’s Note: North Ingermanland is shown as a much,

much smaller dot of red on this revised map of it during

1919-20. We regret the error.

ESTONIA

LATVIA

FINLAND

RUSSIA


“Even though I did have mixed emotions, in retrospect, I am glad my lifelong stamp collection

was sold and frankly, I am quite glad it was you who bought it. “You were totally

professional in your appraisal. There was no bargaining or dickering. I told you what I

thought it should bring and you agreed and wrote out a check for $75,000.”

Lawrence Gray

Delray Beach, Florida


OUR STORY

BY SCOTT ENGLISH

executive director | scott@stamps.org

Future Shows:

You Have Questions, We Have Answers

Spring Meeting 2020

In 2018, the APS announced the last AmeriStamp Expo

would be held in Mesa, Arizona, next month. The APS will

return to its tradition of annual Spring Meetings held at

World Series of Philately shows. In November, the APS Board

of Directors approved the first Spring Meeting location to be

held at WESTPEX 2020 in Burlingame, California.

What Happens at a Spring Meeting?

At a Spring Meeting, the APS Board of Directors and

selected staff travel to an annual WSP show. The Board will

hold a meeting and, on Saturday morning, the APS will convene

a General Membership meeting. The bourse, events and

competitive exhibiting all are managed by the show committee.

We will promote our presence and activities at the show

and make efforts to help bring in more traffic to support the

show, much as we have for AmeriStamp Expo.

What Happens to the Single-Frame Competitions?

The Single-Frame Champion of Champions and Team

Competitions were held at the Winter Meeting. These events,

sponsored by the American Association of Philatelic Exhibitors,

will find a new home at another WSP show. AAPE solicited

proposals for the Single-Frame competitions and will

announce a new location soon.

Looking Ahead, how is APS Planning for Coming Shows

and Meetings?

Once AmeriStamp Expo ends next month, we will begin

working on Spring Meeting locations for 2021 and 2022

through the WSP network. In the meantime, please make

your plans to join us for AmeriStamp Expo/ARIPEX from

February 15-17, 2019, and the APS Spring Meeting at WEST-

PEX on April 24-26, 2020. There’s more to come as well.

Chicago 2021 StampShow and an International

Initiative

In 2021, we will be hosting an international StampShow

at the Donald E. Stephens Center in Rosemont, Illinois. Present

planning is to host a four-day show during August 12-15,

2021, that will be jointly-sponsored by the

APS, American Topical Association and the

American First Day Cover Society.

Aside from the traditional top-caliber

competitive exhibiting collectors have come

to expect from StampShow, we are putting

together an international invitational to

highlight Latin American exhibiting.

Traditionally, the U.S. has hosted an international exhibition

every ten years with the next such show set to be

Boston 2026. The United Kingdom has successfully experimented

with a mid-term show to keep the collecting community

sharp and active between these decennial international

shows. Given that success in the U.K., we will be working

closely with the Boston 2026 organizers on the Chicago show

so we’re better prepared to put philately’s best foot forward,

both here at home and abroad.

We will be rolling out information in Mesa for the 2021

show, promoting that show internationally May 30-31 at

STOCKHOLMIA 2019, and advancing our organizational

work and scheduling for StampShow/National Topical Stamp

Show 2019 which will take place August 1-4 in Omaha, Nebraska.

In November, I met with the Chicago collecting community

to outline activities and workload over the next three

years. We have a large and experienced community to work

with in the Chicagoland area and we’re collectively confident

this 2021 StampShow will be a successful show for all who

take part.

2019 APS Elections

This month, APS chapters will receive informational

mailings from the candidates running for the 2019 APS and

APRL Elections.

For the APS Board, 10 of the 11 Board seats are elected: a

President, three Vice Presidents, a Secretary, a Treasurer, and

four Directors-at-Large.

On the APRL Board, there will be two Trustee positions

elected by the membership and one selected from the APRL

Founders, Patrons and Vooys Fellows.

Nominations and seconds can be received through March

31, 2019. Ballots will be mailed with the May issue of The

American Philatelist and will be due back to the APS no later

than noon on Saturday, June 8, 2019.

On Saturday, February 16, 2019, the APS will host a Candidates’

Forum following our General Membership

meeting during AmeriStamp Expo/

ARIPEX in Mesa, Arizona. For members who

cannot attend the show, we will be recording

the session and posting it to the APS website.

Election information will be updated regularly

on the APS website at www.stamps.org/

Elections.

12 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


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Figure 1. This postcard was

mailed from Moscow by U.S.

World War II veteran and

peace activist Joe Polowsky

to U.S. Senate Majority Leader

Lyndon Johnson in 1955.

Postcard from a Peace Activist

to a Future President

BY VINCENT CENTONZE

During World War II, the United States and the Soviet Union were allied in

the struggle against Nazi Germany. But no sooner had the war ended when

the two superpowers became embroiled in a dangerous competition.

The 1950s were the height of the Cold War, a perilous time when the two nations

clashed in a conflict of ideas and principles, each competing to increase its

sphere of influence in the world. Two different philosophies, capitalism and communism,

vied to win over emerging nations, and we faced an omnipresent threat

that hostilities could escalate to a nuclear conflagration. This cast a grim shadow

over the world for half a century.

Fortunately, while there were some close calls during the Cold War, such as

the Cuban Missile Crisis, for the most part there were no overt military confrontations

between the U.S. and U.S.S.R. Instead, there were wars by proxy where one

side aided a third party against its superpower rival, such as during the U.S. participation

in Vietnam or the Soviet incursion into Afghanistan. The Cold War was

largely fought surreptitiously, behind the scenes, with international political and

economic machinations and espionage. Still, there were some individuals during

the Cold War who, often to the detriment of their reputations, advocated for peace

and de-escalation of tensions between the superpowers. One reminder of that time

when individuals were pawns in an international chess game is the postcard shown

in Figure 1.

The picture postcard is from Joseph Polowsky in Moscow, addressed to “Senator

Lyndon B. Johnson, United States Senate, Washington, DC.” Polowsky was a

World War II veteran who served in the U.S. 69th Infantry Division. He was in

the vanguard of American soldiers who met up with Soviet soldiers on the Elbe

18 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


Figure 2. A famous photograph of U.S. and Soviet soldiers meeting on the Elbe River in

Germany on April 25, 1945, 13 days before the end of Hitler’s “Thousand-Year Reich.”

River in the German town of Torgau as the Allies pushed the Nazi war machine

back from the eastern and western fronts. Figure 2 shows a photograph of that

event which occurred in the waning days of World War II on April 25, 1945. Joe

Polowsky was one of the troops who met the Soviets, shaking hands and sharing

smiles.

Figure 3. Photograph of U.S. and Soviet soldiers socializing in Torgau. Polowsky is shown

standing up in the back of the jeep in the center of the photo.

Figure 3 shows a second snapshot in which helmeted GIs in a jeep and their

Soviet counterparts in pilotka sidecaps meet and greet in the nearby German town

of Torgau. Polowsky is standing on the back of the jeep at the center of the photo.

News of the meeting on the Elbe was enthusiastically received by all Allied

forces at the time, amidst the euphoria of imminent victory. Figure 4 shows a phila-

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 19


Figure 4. This cover with a cachet

memorializing the meeting on the Elbe

is canceled and dated the day after the

meeting between Soviet and American

troops actually occurred.

telically contrived cover canceled April 26, and later embellished with a cachet

commemorating the event and franked with a U.S. 3-cent Win the War stamp,

Scott 905. The cover and commemoration on the cachet are dated April 26, 1945,

one day after the event actually took place.

Nevertheless, the event gradually faded from memory as postwar relations

worsened and smiles faded between the two former Allies. The Soviets and their

East German client state frequently commemorated the event for propaganda purposes,

especially with philatelically inspired items such as the 1947 souvenir card

shown in Figure 5.

Figure 5. This 1947

3-mark Soviet Zone

semipostal souvenir

card marks the second

anniversary of the

meeting of Soviet and

Western Allies on the

Elbe River. Most money

from sales of these cards

went to fund postwar

construction and

resettlement aid.

20 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


The card contains three 1946 Numeral definitives from the first Allied joint

issue; the 10-pfennig chocolate, 15pf light yellow green, and 45pfennig bright red,

Scott 537, 541 and 550, respectively. Until 1948, these stamps were valid in the

American, British, French and Soviet Occupation Zones. Torgau was in the Soviet

Occupation Zone in Saxony, which was to become the German Democratic

Republic. The 25 April 1947 commemorative cancel reads “TAG DER VEREINI-

GUNG DER ALLIERTEN ARMEE” (Day of the Meeting of the Allied Armies).

The card was sold for 3 marks, with 2mk30pf from each card going toward reconstruction

and refugee assistance.

Ten years after the historic meeting, Polowsky, along with nine other veterans

of the 69th Infantry Division, went to Moscow for a reunion between American

and Soviet soldiers who met up on the Elbe. The Figure 1 postcard was mailed by

Polowsky during the reunion, which was held on May 9, 1955, in conjunction with

a Soviet celebration of victory over Germany.

The card was sent by airmail and is franked with a Soviet 1-ruble Spasski Tower

definitive of 1948, Scott 1260, and a 25-kopek Aviator regular issue of 1949 from

the Workers and Arms series, Scott 1345. The stamps pay the proper 1.25-ruble airmail

postcard rate to the U.S. in effect from July 1953 to September 1, 1957. There

is a magenta Moscow cancel dated 13/5/55 and a black Cyrillic auxiliary marking

for foreign mail that translates as “International.” The card is also stamped with a

private May 18 receipt marking. The message reads:

Moscow May 12 th

Dear Senator Johnson:

Reunion with Soviet Elbe veterans was great success.

Kindest Regards

Joseph Polowsky

Joe Polowsky was an idealist; he believed in the lasting nature of the good will

expressed by both sides as they exchanged hugs and souvenirs on the banks of the

Elbe on that clear spring day in 1945. Disgusted with the carnage they witnessed

during the war, American and Soviet soldiers pledged an oath to do all they could

to prevent a future war.

Following his discharge from the army in 1946, Polowsky became a peace activist

and worked diligently to uphold the promises made by the bright-eyed Allied

troops who met up on the Elbe. Polowsky took the oath to heart. Every year he

faithfully commemorated the anniversary of the Elbe meeting by holding a vigil on

the Michigan Avenue Bridge in Chicago, much to the chagrin and embarrassment

of some of his family members.

He also traveled to the United Nations, and made several trips to the Soviet

Union. He even met Soviet Prime Minister during Nikita Khrushchev’s 1959

visit to the United States. Polowsky later

made another visit to the Soviet Union

where he met Khrushchev yet a second

time. Later he made trips to East Germany

and met with that country’s leader,

Walter Ulbricht.

This was the height of the Cold War,

so regardless of good intentions, threats

of “the Red Menace” abounded and anti-Soviet

feelings prevailed. Any peace

activist who travelled to Russia was

branded as a pawn of the Soviet Union.

Traveling behind the Iron Curtain was

not only difficult, but also dangerous;

for an average American like Polowsky

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Figure 6. Veterans of the 69th Infantry

Division show off their visas to travel

to Moscow for a 10-year reunion. Joe

Polowsky is in the center of the back row

wearing the dark suit.

to meet with high-level communist officials raised eyebrows. According to a 1991

Los Angeles Times interview with Polowsky’s daughter, he was accused of being a

communist sympathizer. Polowsky and those who cared for him paid dearly for his

committment; the family was in desperate financial straits because Polowsky spent

all his money on his travels and anti-war activities.

It is curious that

Polowsky mailed a postcard

to Lyndon Johnson,

who was then an

influential Senator from

Texas, his party’s Majority

leader at the time he

received the card. It may

have been an attempt to

contact American politicians

to agitate for his

agenda of peace and better

relations with the Soviet

Union. Alternatively,

Johnson may have been

instrumental to Polowsky

and the other veterans in

procuring the necessary

documentation to enter

the Soviet Union.

Figure 6 shows an Associated

Press (AP) photo

of several of the veterans,

including Polowsky,

proudly displaying their

newly obtained visas outside

the Soviet Embassy,

so it must not have been a very easy bureaucratic feat. It must also have been quite

newsworthy if the AP covered it.

While the Russians may have gleaned every bit of propaganda value from his

anti-war activities and friendly stance toward them, it is doubtful that Joe Polowsky,

a taxi cab driver from Chicago, knowingly collaborated with the Russians to bring

about the demise of Western society. Nevertheless, Lyndon Johnson’s office probably

forwarded the card to the FBI. After all, this was the era of McCarthyism and

“the Red Scare,” and Johnson was an ardent anti-communist. Indeed, the House

Un-American Activities Committee and the Senate Subcommittee on Investigations

questioned individuals for much less than Polowsky’s activities.

After his death from cancer in 1983, Polowsky was buried in Torgau, which

was then still in East Germany. There have been several tributes to him, including

a school named after him in Torgau, a song, and even Torgau’s own floral variety,

the Polowsky Peace Rose.

As with most philatelic items, there was a fascinating back story behind this

simple postcard. It was rewarding to dig a little deeper and peer through an interesting

window into this period in history.

References:

Billiter, W. (1991 April 25). A Man Who Sought U.S., Soviet Peace. Los Angeles Times, Accessed August 20,

2018http://articles.latimes.com/1991-04-25/local/me-1063_1_soviet-peace

“Burial Set to Recall Meeting at the Elbe, 69th Infantry Division website, Accessed August 20, 2018 http://

www.69th-infantry-division.com/joe-polowsky.html

“Joseph Polowsky.” Wikipedia. Accessed August 20, 2018https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Polowsky

22 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


About the Author

Vince Centonze grew up on Long Island, New York, where he started collecting stamps

more than 50 years ago. He and his brother would scour the pages of dad’s American Legion

magazines looking for ads offering 100 stamps for a quarter. While his brother eventually

lost interest, his fascination with stamps deepened through college and his first career in the

Air Force. Centonze belongs to over a dozen philatelic organizations, including the American

Philatelic Society, United States Stamp Society, Egypt Study Circle, China Stamp Society,

International Society for Japanese Philately, Mexico-Elmhurst Philatelic Society, Haiti

Philatelic Society, Yugoslavia Study Group, Perfins Club, Precancel Stamp Society, the Florida

Precancel Club, United Postal Stationery Society, the Carriers and Locals Society, the American

Association of Philatelic Exhibitors and two local stamp clubs, and Vince has written for

several of their publications.

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#N4, N11-13, #NE1 mint and #NJ6 used. Catalog

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#9481 BELGIUM (2 VOLUMES) - 2 Davo albums with mostly

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Catalog value is over $10,000.................... NET $3,250.00

#9516 BRITISH QUEEN VICTORIA - Lindner stockbook filled

with a magnificent, mint collection of approximately 550

Queen Victoria stamps(1851-1901) in mounts meticulously

arranged by Stanley Gibbons numbers. Includes some multiples

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countries. Some of the countries represented are Antigua,

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the following highlights with Stanley Gibbons numbers

Ceylon #3a, #156, #159a.o.; Cyprus #36 (2 copies, one with

margin); Falkland Is. #8x, #11, #11x, #12, #27-28, #33-34;

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#9483 BRITISH AFRICA (N-Z) - Scott Specialty album with

mint and used stamps thru 1973. Fine collection that includes

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#9482 BRITISH AMERICA (2 VOLUMES) -2 Scott Specialty

albums thru 1973. Beautiful collection with mostly mint

stamps from Anguilla to the Virgin Is. Includes mint 1935

Silver Jubilee from 20 colonies as well as mint Canada #C2,

#C4, #E3; Cayman Is. #100-111; Falkland Is. #122-127,

#166-179, #197-209, #210-222, #227-230, #2l1-5l8;

Newfoundland #233-243; So. Georgia #17-30; Trinidad #2-

4; Turks & Caicos #87-88, #105-117. Also includes used

Canada large queens 6 different plus #34-3, #41-47, #54-

56, #74-84, #149-159, #162-177. Mixed condition on some

19th century. Also, some sets are lacking the top value (definitives).

Catalog value is over $4,000........ NET $1,395.00

#9484 BRITISH ASIA (ABU DHABI-IRAQ) - Scott Specialty

album with mint and used stamps thru 1975. Fine collection

which includes mint Aden #66-75; Aden-Kathiri #20-27;

Aden-Shihr #20-27; Bahrain #96-98; Bangladesh #42-55;

Ceylon #319-328; Hong Kong #168-173, #218-254, #275-

288, #J13-17; India #237-242, #302-319, #C1-6, #M44-

55. Used stamps included are Bahrain #9, #13, #78-80;

Hong Kong #154-166A; India #50-52, #75, #O64; India Jind

#137-140, #142-145. Most countries represented. Also includes

mint 1935 Silver Jubilee from Ceylon and Hong Kong.

Catalog value is over $2,750.................... NET $1,095.00

#9523 GB & IRELAND - Scott Specialty album thru 1974.

Starts with GB #1 used, this collection also includes used

#2, #4, #5 & #7 (not cut to shape), #57, #96, #108, #139-

141, #222-224 plus 58 additional Queen Victoria stamps.

GB Mint #203-204; Guernsey , Jersey, Isle of Man first dues

sets from each. Also there is a good selection of Offices in

Turkey. Ireland is well represented from the 1950’s on with

earlier stamps somewhat sparse. A selection of 1970 Postal

Strike issues included. Catalog Value is over $7,500.

.................................................................NET $1,995.00

#9527 POLAND (7 VOLUMES) - 7 Lighthouse and Kabe

album with mostly mint stamps in mounts from 1918 thru

2000. One of the finest, extremely comprehensive collections

we have offered. Vast majority of the mint stamps and

souvenir sheets are never hinged. Some highlights are used

#B14, #B49-49B and mint #12a, #13a, #28a, #29a, #251,

#341-343, #347-356, #362-363, #412a, #830, #B15-25,

#B29-29C, #B31, #B49Bc, #B107, #C26A-C, #C26A-C with

labels, #C26Cd, #C34 imperf. Also included are many

quadrilled pages with varieties, etc. There are numerous imperfs,

errors and more. Over 150 GROSZY overprints from

1950 are included . Fabulous opportunity not to be

missed....................................................... NET $3,250.00

#9500 RUSSIA - Mint, NH stamps housed in a Mystic album

from 1944 thru 1956. This collection includes #992A-1001,

#1029-1031, #1059-1066, #1094-1097, #1104-1120,

#1162-1171, #1183-1188, #1227-1229, #1230-1233,

#1277-1279, #1310-1317, #1352-1354, #1355-1356,

#1359-1363, #1388-1389, #1411-1414, #1443-1444,

#1449-1457, #1462-1463, #1491-1496, #1497-1499,

#1500-1503, #1508-1509, #1541, #1542-1544, #1584-

1585, #1590-1593 and #1624-1627. While not a complete

run, this collection includes numerous sets that are $20 and

up, some of which are noted above. Few partial sets included.

Catalog value is over $5,000............ NET $2,950.00

#9519 RUSSIA (6 VOLUMES) - 3 Stockbooks and 3 binders

filled with stock pages with stamps from 1960 thru 2015. Extensive

collection, mostly used prior to 1950 and almost all

mint there after. From 1960 on is almost complete (notable

omission is the green 1964 Tokyo Olympic S/S - note after

Scott #2926). Includes from 1958 on over 400 souvenir

sheets or mini sheets, only a few used. Few earlier include

mint #1081a, #1082a, #1083a. These souvenir sheets and

mini sheets are housed in a separate book and some S/S

have one corner stuck. Some of the many highlights includes

mint #265-268, #294-301, #411-412, #559-568, #569-

572, #666-677, #678-686, #687-692, #698-705, #775-

779, #909-910, #992A-1001, #1004-1020, #1132-1136,

#1162-1171, #1261-1264, #1326-1327, #1394-1399,

#1512-1514, #1555-1558, #1559-1562, #1568-1583,

#1596-1597, #1624-1627, #2533-2534, #C83-90 and

used #484-486, #487-488, #524-528, #536-539, #546-

550, #551-554, #555-558, #1284-1288, #1289-1294,

#C37-39, #C58-67 and #C76-76D. NET 2,995.00

#9503 SOUTH AMERICA (2 VOLUMES) - 2 Scott Specialty

albums from the 1850’s thru the early 1960’s. Includes mint

and used stamps from 10 South American (no British) countries

from Argentina to Venezuela. Includes Argentina mint

#67 (no gum), #452 and used #8 and #33; Bolivia mint #39,

Brazil used #8-10, #38, #39, #61, #62 and mint #80 (no

gum), #210, #213; Chile used #3, #11-13; Peru used #3,

#9-11, #12-13, #14-15; Uruguay mint #282-284, #O125-

131; Venezuela used #21, #C508. This is just a sampling.

Many other goodies throughout. Catalog is well over

$3,000.................................................... NET $995.00

#9504 SWEDEN (3 VOLUMES) - 3 Lighthouse albums with

mint and used stamps in mounts from 1858 thru 1980. Collections

used up to 1939 with only a few mint exceptions and

then mint from 1940 on with only a few used exceptions. Singles,

pairs from booklets and booklets are included within.

Highlights are used #213-220, #B1-10 (one with a fault),

#C2-3, #O12-25 and mint #322a, #479-483 sheets of 9,

#592 pair. Intact booklets #516a, #517a, #520a, #582a

and #596a. Reasonably complete from 1940 on, including

numerous booklets. Pages from 1981-1985 are included

...................................................................... NET $995.00

#9506 UNITED STATES - Minkus album pages from 1851

thru 1975. Excellent mint and used collection including many

19th century stamps such as used #7 or #9 (2), #73 (3), #68,

#69, #76, #77, #115, #116, #117, #311, overall condition

is mixed generally average/ fine to fine. Some faulty or space

fillers. There is duplication but not extensive. Mint highlights

are #230-234, #236-237, #285-290, #294-299, #300-

306, #323-327, #328-330, #369, #397-400 plus a beautiful

F/FV, NH #630 White Plains S/S. Also includes #437,

#571, #572, #578-579, #581-591, #658-668, #669-679,

#692-701, #803-834 and #1053. Only includes regular issues

and commemoratives, no B.O.B. Catalog value is over

$6,000......................................................... NET $995.00

#9510 WORLDWIDE (4 VOLUMES) - Minkus albums with

quadrilled and blank pages with mostly used stamps from

1880 thru 1990. Over 35 countries including Australia, GB,

Ireland, New Zealand, Canada, India, Brazil, Egypt, Memel,

Thailand and Vietnam. Some countries well represented.

Many thousands of stamps throughout. Some duplication,

multiples, covers within. Extensive variety of singles and

sets............................................................. NET $695.00

#9511 WORLDWIDE - BOX - Assortment includes Ireland

(1900’s-1930’s), Sweden (early w/ varieties), United States

(1850’s -1940), Austria, Syria, Egypt, San Marino, Iran, Portuguese

Colonies, Ireland, British, Germany, France, Colombia,

GB. Lots of stamps and lots of value in one chock filled

box............................................................. NET $750.00

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US ON


The support ship USS Merrick (AKA-97) alongside

the USS Mount Olympus (AGC-8) during Operation

Highjump. U.S. Marine Corps photograph.

ON THE ICE: THE U.S. NAVY IN OPERATION HIGHJUMP

BY STEVE PENDLETON

By the end of World War II, the United States found itself in a far different condition

regarding the rest of the world. From the isolationism of the 1930s, we found

ourselves with commitments in every ocean and most land masses. We also found

ourselves with a new rival — Soviet Russia.

Fresh from the total destruction of the Axis war machine, our military became

cognizant of the global importance of heretofore neglected regions. This was especially

true of the Arctic and Antarctic. In the Arctic, the Soviet Union lay only a

short distance from Alaska and Canada. The Antarctic provided a landmass which

helped block the passage of ships through the Southern Ocean.

There were in early 1946 still many vessels and crews left over from the hostilities.

There was an obvious need to test men and equipment in the dangerous polar

conditions. There was also the challenge of Soviet interest in Antarctica. While

the U.S. did not have (and still does not have) land claims in the Antarctic, it was

interested in maintaining those of its allies Great Britain (and through it Australia

and New Zealand) and France.

Finally, even after many expeditions, much of the Antarctic coast was still unknown.

The classic Antarctic expeditions had mainly been focused on getting to

the Pole. These could often take on the characteristics of a race. The U.S. Navy

26 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


USS Brownson, a destroyer in the

Eastern Group of Operation Highjump.

U.S. Navy photograph.

could utilize its aviation arm to fly over vast territory not before seen by man.

On Aug. 26, 1946, Adm. Chester Nimitz ordered the formation of Operation

Highjump. This was the largest such endeavor ever attempted on the southern continent.

Over 4700 seamen and eleven ships were to sail south.

A Daunting Task

The Navy had to overcome some very serious problems. First was the simple

issue of time. Tasked at the end of August, most ships were to set sail in November.

Simple preparations of suitable clothing, equipment and exploring supplies had to

be undertaken speedily.

Second, there was a real lack of knowledge of the polar regions, something really

desirable if you are sailing into the Southern Ocean. Even though Adm. Byrd

had led several earlier expeditions, many of his officers and men had never been

in the ice.

Third was the suitability of the vessels tasked with the expedition. They were

indeed a motley crew. There was an aircraft carrier, oilers, transports, command

ship — even a submarine. Icebreakers were tasked to provide sea lanes, but these

were much less powerful than today’s monsters.

Philately - The Beginning

Ever since the saga of Operation Highjump began, some philatelists have tended

to downgrade it because they think there is little variety of material to collect.

This may be due to the fact that a large majority of covers were cancelled aboard

one ship (USS Mount Olympus), with a distinct ship cancel (a double ring device

which has a small imperfection on the outer ring, dated Jan. 10, 1947). They also

have a common cachet, a marking which has the operation name and an anchor

on an ice flow.

This is actually a much more rewarding expedition to collect than it might

seem. First, of course, is the effort to complete a set of ship cancels. Some of these

vessels serviced very little mail. Second, while the official cachet is ubiquitous,

A U.S. Coast Guard Antarctic

Expedition Helicopter shown landing

on the icebreaker USCGC Northwind.

U.S. Coast Guard photograph from the

National Archive.

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 27


A typical philatelic cover from USS Mount Olympus (above), but this one is signed by Rear

Adm. Cruzen and a cover (below) dug up from the Snow Cruiser abandoned during the

1940-41 expedition. It was canceled in 1947; the Kearney Expedition stamp was issued in

October 1946.

there are a number of other markings to find. Finally, you can try to collect mail

— especially sailor and official covers — that was cancelled while the ships were

in polar waters. Many covers exist having been cancelled on the way home or even

after reaching the U.S.

Finally, there were the flight covers, including a South Pole overflight. However,

these were not well documented, being some of the scarcest such mail. There was

also the tragic fatal 1946 PBM-5 Mariner air crash, and the rare pieces associated

with it. Perhaps the strangest mail of all is that which was dug up from the remains

of the infamous Snow Cruiser of the Third Byrd Expedition.

Planning the Operation

Because of the ridiculous time constraints, many things had to be done way too

quickly. One important task was to select the leadership of the expedition. Admiral

Byrd was of course in overall command. However, his second, Rear Adm. Richard

Cruzen, was also experienced. Other leaders were Capt. George Dufek and Captain

Charles Ward.

28 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


Items from survivors of the Martin PBM-5 Mariner George 1 air crash: a commercial letter from Owen

McCarty about a week before the crash; and a 2008 card to the author signed by survivor James H.

“Robbie” Robbins.

The wreckage and survivors of the

December 30, 1946 crash of a US Navy

Martin PBM-5 Mariner George 1 on

Thurston Island, Antarctica. US Navy

photograph.

The plan was to divide the ships into three groups. The Western Group would

sail towards the coastline from the Ross Sea around to Queen Maud Land. Much

of this had never been seen by men, as the icepack was often impenetrable. Using a

seaplane tender, flights would be made to aerially photograph the terrain.

The Central Group was to head into the Ross Sea, to the site on the ice shelf

where the original Little America camps had been built. (This one was at a slightly

different spot, and being temporary, was mostly built of tents). It did not have a

postal cancel. Flights would be made, including another one over the South Pole.

Finally, there was the Eastern Group. These vessels penetrated into the seas at

the bottom of the Palmer Peninsula and into the Amundsen Sea. As with the other

groups, flights would be made from a seaplane tender. Their goal was to fix the

coastline in the areas of Thurston Island and Mt. Siple.

By December 17, 1946 some of the units had crossed into the icepack. Some

ships crossed later. At least one, the submarine USS Sennet, suffered damage to its

bow and was forced to retreat from the ice.

30 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


Two covers with differing cachets used on the carrier USS Philppine Sea.

As each group was occupied at different times in the ice, I will discuss each

ship’s activity and philately within that context. One of the hardest tasks to complete

for any Operation Highjump collector is to find covers cancelled while the

ship was in the ice. I give the approximate dates the ship is known to have been in

the ice. However, a few days on either side would place it in the Southern Ocean —

or in a few cases, on the beach in Rio.

West Group

This group consisted of the seaplane tender USS Currituck, the destroyer USS

Henderson and the tanker USS Cacapon. It was responsible for the recording of

perhaps the largest unknown area in the world. Among its discoveries were the

coasts of Wilkes Land, Bunger’s Oasis, and many of the mountains of Queen Maud

Land.

USS Cacapon reached the ice on December 24, and did not leave it until March

3. The vessel used the standard expedition cachet. It had two cancels on mail — a

single ring and double ring types with the ship’s name.

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 31


An unusual cancel and cachet on two covers used aboard the seaplane

tender USS Currituck.

USS Henderson: As with the Cacapon, this vessel reached the ice December 24

and went north March 3. Unlike most of the other vessels, it did not have a shipnamed

cancel. However, it did have a circular hand cancel with the wording U.S.

Navy 15182 Br.

USS Currituck: This was one of the most philatelically-interesting vessels because

of its cachets and special cancels.

As with the other two ships in its group, it got into and left the ice on the same

dates. Instead of the normal naval cancel it used a pictorial device (of which there

are several subcategories). This shows an iceberg in the middle, USS Currituck/

Antarctic/Expedition, and the years 1946/1947 to the left of the killer bars. In addition

to the regular cachet there are several penguin-featured ones unique to this

ship.

Eastern Group

There were also three ships in this group. They were the seaplane tender USS

Pine Island, the destroyer USS Brownson and the tanker USS Canisteo. This group

visited the area around Charcot Island and Alexander I Island. They also visited

32 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


A double ring cancel used on the USS Cacapon. The USS Sennet, a submarine, had a cancel

that was unreadable so a straight line marking at the bottom of the cover with the FDR

stamp.

the area around Peter I Island. Mostly they laid off the icepack, and sent patrols to

photograph a largely unknown coast.

USS Pine Island: This tender was at the edge of the ice from December 25 to

March 3. It had several cancels. One is the standard Navy cancel with the ship’s

name. It also used one reading ‘US Navy 15763 Br.’ The standard cachet is used;

they also had a return-address rubber stamp.

USS Brownson: The destroyer reached the pack on December 17, and stayed

until March 3. It had a standard ship’s name cancel, as well as a single line cachet

with the ship name. And, of course, the usual Operation Highjump cachet.

USS Canisteo: As with USS Brownson this ship got to the ice December 17, and

lingered till March 3. Seen is a single ring ship name datestamp. On its return voyage

it celebrated the rounding of Cape Horn with a crude rubber stamp.

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 33


USCGC Northwind and USCGC Burton Island were US Coast Guard icebreakers. These Crosby

photo cachet covers note their presence during the operation.

Central Group

Of the three groups, this was by far the largest and in some ways the one facing

the most danger. There were no less than six ships in this ‘fleet’, with a seventh

called the ‘carrier group’ which consisted of one vessel — naturally, an aircraft carrier.

Their task was to cut their way through the ice pack, into the Ross Sea. Reaching

the ice shelf at the site of the Bay of Whales, they would create a temporary

camp. Hopefully, from there they could make flights to the edges of the shelf and

to the South Pole itself.

The group first rendezvoused off Scott Island. Then, accompanied by two icebreakers,

the ships sailed one after another through the pack. This was no picnic

cruise. Finally they were able to anchor at the Bay of Whales. When supplies were

landed it then became possible to make many flights fanning west, south and east,

which discovered a lot of unexplored territories.

34 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


A seaman on USS Yancey

sent a Christmas card

canceled on the USS

Mount Olympus.

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A U.S. Coast Guard photo

showing the USS Yancey

(left center) and the USS

Merrick (right center)

following the Coast

Guard icebreaker USCGC

Northwind (center).

National Archive photo.

Commander T.R. Vogeley had some

unusual covers canceled on the USS

Mount Olympus.

USS Mount Olympus was the flagship, and center of philatelic activities. It

reached Scott Island on December 30, and got underway for New Zealand February

27. As mentioned, most philatelic mail originated here. The basic cover is

probably one of the most common U.S. Antarctic items other than the 1956 South

Pole machine cancel. However, there are a number of other Mount Olympus items.

A hand cancel with several varieties is known. There are also scarce varieties of the

double ring datestamp, for example one with an unbroken outer ring. There is also

a cachet type with a group of penguins.

USS Yancey: A cargo vessel, which rendezvoused at Scott Island December 30,

and departed the island on February 13. This vessel did not have its own cancel,

and I have seen no cachets other than the standard. It did have a rubber stamp

with the ship’s name and address. I have also seen sailors’ mail cancelled aboard

the Mount Olympus.

USS Merrick: Another cargo ship, rendezvoused at Scott December 30. In the

ice it suffered damage, and was towed out to Scott Island on February 13. It had a

regular ship’s name cancel, and the standard cachet. Seldom seen are two special

cachets each featuring a bear in the middle.

36 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


Even in the Antarctic it was business as usual – cover from mail clerk on the USS Canisteo (above)

and one from a clerk on the USS Brownson (below).

USS Sennet: A most unusual addition was this submarine. It crossed the Antarctic

Circle on December 28, but soon ran afoul of the ice. A collision put a large

hole in the bow. The rest of the time was spent as a weather station near Scott

Island.

There are problems with its philately. It had a US Navy cancel but it was so worn

it is usually indecipherable. A one-line ship’s cachet was made up. Beware of forged

markings. Luckily these are easily spotted, since the forger misspelled the name

“U.S.S. Semnett”.

USCGC Burton Island: An icebreaker which was at the northern edge of the

shelf February 6 and at Scott Island February 26 after assisting in the evacuation

of Little America. There is a regular ship’s name cancel and standard cachet. I have

also seen some very nice pictorial Crosby cachets.

USCGC Northwind, an icebreaker, met the other ships at Scott Island on December

30, departed February 13. It also had a ship’s name cachet, standard cachet

and some Crosby covers.

USS Philippine Sea; an aircraft carrier. Certainly Adm. Byrd was not stupid

enough to risk a carrier in the ice. It arrived off Scott Island on January 25, and

set course for Panama on January 30. It carried nine converted DC-3 type aircraft,

which were to be flown down to Little America. This was a unique situation for the

Navy, since the planes were to be flown one-way. They were almost too large to fly

off a carrier (they could only do so with assistance), and far too large to land. After

their flights from Little America, they were left at the camp.

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 37


Rear Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd Jr.

There was a ship’s name cancel, and the standard cachet. In addition there was

a nice square penguin cachet, as well as a circular one which had longitude/latitude

that could be changed according to position.

Highjump in the Air

Given that dozens of helicopter and aircraft flights — ship to shore, overland,

etc. — were made in this endeavor, it should be no surprise that covers were carried

by pilots to document them. What may be a surprise is their scarcity. Many of these

were documented with less than ten covers.

From December 25 to January 25, helicopters flew from the USS Mount Olympus

and the USCGC Northwind. This was sometimes a dangerous occurrence. Two

helicopters crashed, one each on January 19 and 22.

Those large planes also got in a lot of use. On January 29-30, the flight of the six

aircraft to Little America from the Philippine Sea was documented by a very few

covers. One of the rarest Antarctic flight covers are those documenting the second

Byrd overflight of the South Pole. These were carried on February 16 by two aircraft.

They were cancelled aboard USS Mount Olympus.

Even larger aircraft could not avoid danger. On December 30, a Martin PBM-5

Mariner flying boat took off from the Pine Island on a mission to photograph unknown

land around the Thurston Island coast. After several hours of no contact,

the George 1 was presumed lost. Immediately a search was begun. Survivors of the

crew were found after over a week, but had to walk out several miles from their

downed aircraft. They had to leave three dead crewmates in the wreckage.

Of course, no mail survives from the crash. However, I have found two remembrances

of the event. One is a letter from Mr. Owen McCarty, a survivor, dated

December 16 from Pine Island. Many years later, I had the opportunity of speaking

directly to another survivor, James Robbins, who obligingly sent me a card with his

signature. Even then, his concern was with recovering the bodies of his comrades.

(Note that there are probably covers with letters from people who were there, mentioning

the tragedy).

Finally, there’s a real oddball, if you can find one. You may remember that during

the Third Byrd expedition a large contraption called the ‘Snow Cruiser’ was

landed at Little America. It proved to be unusable in the ice, so it was abandoned

APS Specialty Society:

Universal Ship Cancellation Society

Now in its 86th year, the USCS was founded in 1932,

and has grown into an international philatelic organization

of over 1,100 members with an interest in postmarks

and covers from all maritime services. This includes

Navy ships of all countries, Marine Corps, Coast

Guard, Navy bases, merchant ships with seapost and

paquebot markings, related cachets and other naval

ephemera and memorabilia. It is the only organization

in the United States devoted to Navy and maritime covers,

and is one of the oldest specialized postal history

societies in the world. The Universal Ship Cancellation

Society, APS Affiliate 98, has a number of local chapters,

and publishes a well-illustrated monthly journal,

The U.S.C.S. Log. You can visit its website to find out

more at www.uscs.org.

APS Specialty Society:

American Society of Polar Philatelists

APS Affiliate 31, the American Society of Polar Philatelists

was founded in 1956 and has approximately 300

members worldwide. Society members enjoy a common

interest in the stamps, covers and postal history

of the north and south Polar Regions. Members also

enjoy Ice Cap News, the society’s award-winning quarterly

magazine. Members are encouraged to contribute

articles and columns in order to share their specialized

knowledge with others. The ASPP provides mail

auctions so that members can buy and sell duplicate

material, and an Estate Advisory Service to assist members

and their heirs in the disposal of collections. Visit

the ASPP online at www.polarphilatelists.org for more

information and for a sample issue of their journal.

38 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


when that expedition left. The 1947 men dug down into the now snow-covered

machine, and rescued a number of the covers which (it was planned) were to roll

to the Pole in comfort. These were cancelled on USS Mount Olympus and given a

typewritten explanation. There must have been a lot of these leftover covers, since

they were used at the South Pole even in the late 1950s.

Highjump’s Upshot

Much of the remaining unknown coastline was photographed, and many mistakes

in positioning corrected. There were some remaining problems in mapping.

The next season two icebreakers went south in Operation Windmill. They were

able to solve many of those concerns. While there were mishaps, considering the

number of ships involved and the flights made, the aims of the U.S. Navy were basically

reached. Many of the participants went on to serve in Operation Deepfreeze.

This article is dedicated to the memory of the three fliers who didn’t make it

home: Maxwell A. Lopez; Wendell K. Hendersin; and Frederick W. Williams.

The Author

Steve Pendleton has been writing articles for AP since 1985. He has made

three voyages to the Antarctic. He is a member of the Universal Ship Cancellation

Society, the American Society of Polar Philatelists and the President of the Pitcairn

Island Study Group.

An artist’s rendering of the Snow Cruiser.

RESOURCES

America on the Ice (1990), by Frank Klotz, NDU Press, Ft. McNair Washington D.C.

National Imagery and Mapping Agency: Sailing Directions Antarctica (2002), NIMA Bethesda, Maryland.

Quest for a Continent (1963), by Walter Sullivan, McGraw-Hill, New York.

American Air Mail Catalog, Part 2, 7th edition (2015), by Hal Vogel, AAPS Minerva, New York.

Operation Highjump http//en.Wikipedia.org.

Operation Highjump: a Philatelic Introduction www.South-Pole Com./Highjump.htm.

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JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 39


POSTAL REALITIES

BY STEVE BAHNSEN

contributor

Ducks Carry

PRIORITY MAIL

Across Connecticut

Wayward Waterfowl Paid High Price for Delivery

Those who designed federal duck stamps – a type of revenue stamp – in the

late 1960s never dreamed this would happen: The stamps would be used in

2018 to pay postage on something called “Priority Mail.” Yet this truly took

place in northern Connecticut, and seemingly without a hitch.

The father of a woman in Plainville, Connecticut was a stamp collector and

mint U.S. stamps were one of his specialties. He also had a nice assortment of the

Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation stamps − the official term for what

many of us call “duck stamps.”

Issued by the Interior Department’s Fish and Wildlife Service since 1934, the

proceeds from their sale go toward acquiring wetlands for waterfowl and other

wildlife. These stamps generally feature waterfowl, such as ducks or swans. Older

engraved duck stamps offer incredibly beautiful outdoor scenes in color. Many

post offices and sporting goods stores sell these stamps, which are required for use

by hunters. They are all considerably larger than U.S. postage stamps, too.

The aforementioned woman’s stamp-collecting father died, leaving her thousands

of mint U.S. stamps. Rather than sell them to dealers, she opted to use many

of them for postage.

Apparently, she did not know the difference between a postage stamp and a

duck stamp, which cannot be used for postage.

Apparently, neither did her post office.

When the need arose last winter to send something to Bloomfield, Connecticut,

she chose to use a Priority Mail Flat Rate envelope. This was a good choice

40 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


U.S Postal History, Ephemera,

Documents, Diaries, Advertising,

Photograph Albums, Scrapbooks, etc.

Americana, History, Military, Ethnic, Women,

Crime, Education, Transportation, and more

Catalogs, Want Lists, Shows, Online

since her material would be delivered overnight. She knew this would cost more

than an ordinary letter, but did not know how much more. As there was a bountiful

supply of stamps to use, she picked two $3 duck stamps, affixing both onto the

Priority Mail envelope right where postage should be placed. The stamp on the

right is Scott RW33 and was valid until June 30, 1967, for hunting purposes. The

other stamp is Scott RW36. It was valid for hunting up to June 30, 1970.

We can only assume the sender did not notice or care about these expiration

dates as she licked and affixed both stamps on the envelope. (Remember when we

did this with all mail?)

Her next move was to visit the Plainville, Connecticut, Post Office, a handsome

building that dates from 1936.

The window clerk dutifully canceled each stamp with a black double-ring device.

Since tracking is a part of the Flat Rate service, a label was placed on the

envelope. Finally, a postage meter strip with no value was added to indicate that

this package had been accepted by a postal employee on the date shown.

Like the customer, the postal clerk must have assumed a $3 stamp is a $3

stamp. He or she did not know or care that duck stamps are not postage stamps.

Also, the Priority Mail Flat Rate envelope fee in 2018 was $6.70, not $6. What

about the other 70 cents?

You may think the lady was lucky

or cunning to save nearly six bits on

postage. In fact, if she had consulted

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dealer currently offers RW33 and

RW36 in fine-to-very-fine mint condition

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Somewhere between the sender and receiver, an anonymous postal employee,

ignoring the black cancels, used a red marker on both stamps. Had this person

been a pro, he would have marked the envelope “Return to Sender – Invalid Postage

Used.”

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Looking for the Grand View

The Search for Grand Canyon’s Vanished Post Office

BY JOE R. CODY

Figure 1. The front of Grand View Hotel,

circa 1900: Tourists loiter while a wagon

delivers supplies. Image courtesy of

Northern Arizona University, Cline Library,

Colorado Plateau Archives.

I

have never enjoyed the Grand Canyon. This malaise hasn’t prevented me from

visiting it many times with friends and family. I put on a happy face and pose

for pictures, yet my secret desire is a swift return to the parking lot and a timely

departure. For me, the incredible view of the Grand Canyon is not enough to offset

a general fear of heights, and my dislike of both sunburn and large crowds of tourists.

It was during another routine family vacation to the Grand Canyon in the fall of

2016 that I found my Grand Canyon, the one I could love. Here was a hidden place

cooled in the shade of tall ponderosas, untrammeled by tourists, and rich with the

obscure history of pioneers and their letters.

My study of Arizona Territorial post offices had revealed a Grand Canyon mystery

to me. Of the five post offices established at the Grand Canyon during Arizona’s

territorial period, the location of one of them − Grandview − was unknown.

The Grandview Post Office was a busy place housed within the Grand View

Hotel at the south rim of the Grand Canyon, approximately 11 miles east of Grand

Canyon village. Figure 1 shows a picture of the hotel around 1900, which I have

colorized.

44 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


Figure 2 shows the Grandview

Post Office Doane cancel on the

only Canyon Copper Co. cover I

know of. It was mailed September

14, 1904, sent by stagecoach to the Grand Canyon Post Office, then on the next

morning’s Grand Canyon Railway mail coach to Williams, Arizona, and finally to

Rutland, Vermont. It is one of several fine covers shared with me by Larry McBride.

I had applied my research techniques and resources to locate the site of the

Grandview Post Office, but each attempt failed. I renewed my efforts and expanded

my techniques, expecting the satisfaction that comes when history finally reveals

itself. This was not to be.

I resolved that during that 2016 family vacation I would not again waste time

staring blankly into the Grand Canyon, posing for pictures and burning my nose.

Instead, I would search for the remains of the Grand

View Hotel and Post Office. I just needed to take that

first step.

After waving goodbye to my wife and daughter as

they headed down Bright Angel Trail into the Grand

Canyon, my son Ryan and I began our search for the

Grand View Hotel. I was familiar with the general

location we would be searching but some guidance

would surely help.

Our first stop was the information booth at the

Grand Canyon Visitor’s Center. Here they welcome

questions as simple as the location of the closest restroom

or as arcane as the whereabouts of the lost

Grand View Hotel.

We were given verbal directions to a wide spot

along Rim View Drive, told if we parked there and

entered the forest half a mile along the way, we

should find the remains of the Grand View Hotel.

When it is disturbed, the ground surrounding the Grand Canyon restores itself

slowly. This enabled us to quickly discover a wagon road, buried in branches and

forest litter but still clearly traceable as seen in Figure 3.

Figure 2. The only Canyon Copper Co.

cover known to the author, mailed

September 14, 1904. Backstamps

establish that it was received the

same day at the Grand Canyon Post

Office upon arrival of the daily Grand

View Stage. Placed aboard the next

morning’s Grand Canyon Railway mail

coach southbound, it transited Williams,

Arizona the next day, and reached

Rutland, Vermont five days later. Cover

image courtesy of Mr. Larry McBride.

Figure 3. A section of the original wagon

road between the Grand View Hotel

and Grand Canyon Village. It was here

that Joe R. Cody’s search for the 1903-

08 postal route for the Grandview Post

Office began.

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 45


Figure 4. After a long train ride and a

night in Flagstaff, Arizona, early tourists

faced a bumpy and crowded 70-mile

stagecoach ride to reach the Grand

Canyon. A dozen including the driver are

seated atop this tourist stagecoach, with

six more or so inside.

Figure 5. “Starting down Grand View

Trail, Grand Canyon of Arizona” reads the

printed caption on this postcard mailed

Nov 11, 1906, from the Grandview Post

Office. The sender’s brief postscript –

“Tomorrow this is our trip.” – seems a tad

ominous.

The road’s age was obvious, and in earlier times it was clearly used by wheeled

vehicles as two narrow ruts creased the gravel of the roadbed.

It was Ryan who made the first discovery: a cement slab. Additional evidence

for recent habitation included a collapsed water cistern, cemented stones, and a

possible foundation, with wire and pipe. We took

pictures, and the following day returned to share the

location with the rest of the family and capture GPS

coordinates.

Expounding to all who would listen on the value

of perseverance proved a cruel joke, as my new friend

Dick Brown of the Grand Canyon Historical Society

would soon reveal. What we had found in the forest

was not the site of the Grand View Hotel, but that of

a later facility, The Summit Hotel. Dick provided historical

photos that confirmed it.

Dick had visited the site of the Grand View Hotel

in 1978, and kindly agreed to assist with the renewed

search effort. Historical photos of The Grand

View Hotel clearly show four tall ponderosa pines in a

straight line along the back porch of the hotel. These trees were still present during

Dick’s 1978 visit. They were noteworthy because the lower limbs had been sawn off

to a great height to allow hotel guests an unobstructed view of the Grand Canyon

from their second-floor rooms. Those ponderosa pines would prove helpful.

0

Built in the winter of 1896, the Grand View Hotel was a log structure 85 feet

long with 12 guest rooms upstairs. A cozy lobby and office were on the main

floor. When the hotel opened in June 1897, the Grand View was the only hotel

at the Grand Canyon. Other lodging choices at the time included Hance

Camp or Bright Angel, but these were primitive camps with canvas tents.

The Grand View Hotel was immediately successful, with full occupancy

during peak season and notable activity even in the winter. An indication

of the hotel’s early clientele was made relatable to readers of the Coconino

Sun newspaper, which in a February 1898 article reported 200 meals were

served there the previous month. Hotel guests typically arrived in Northern

Arizona aboard an Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe train with service between

Los Angeles and Albuquerque. Disembarking in Flagstaff, guests spent the

night followed the next morning by a rough 70-mile ride to the Grand View

Hotel aboard a Grand Canyon Stage Line stagecoach like the overloaded

one in Figure 4. First-person accounts consistently describe this stage ride

as miserable and physically tiring.

Hotel guests participated in the same activities familiar to tourists today:

resting, exploring, hiking, horseback riding and guided tours into the canyon.

What Grand View guests also experienced was an active mining operation.

The Last Chance Mine, founded in 1891, supplied high-grade copper

ore from Horseshoe Mesa 1,200 feet below the canyon’s rim. The narrow,

steep trail to the mine descended from the rim near the Grand View Hotel.

The sights, smells and sounds of daily ore-bearing mule trains utilizing the

trail were just part of the rustic scenery, little removed from what many

tourists experienced as shown on the picture postcard in Figure 5.

The Last Chance Mine was partially owned by Grand View Hotel founder

and proprietor Pete D. Berry. Mining revenues funded construction of

the hotel, which generated revenue to support mining expansion. The two enterprises

rose and fell together.

In 1901, the AT&SF railroad completed construction of a 64-mile branch line

from Williams, Arizona, to the Grand Canyon. Shown in Figure 6, the Grand Can-

46 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


yon railroad depot only 11 miles west of the Grand View Hotel

profoundly changed both hotel and mining operations. Increased

tourist traffic, lured by easy, comfortable transportation, led to

hotel expansion. The decreased cost and increased scale of copper

ore transportation could make mining more profitable, too.

Berry never applied for a post office at the Grand View Hotel.

Mail matters were conducted through a Post Office Box, 65

miles distant, in Williams, Arizona. Why mail was not conveyed

privately and conveniently by daily stage to Flagstaff defies easy

explanation. The only known example of Grand View Hotel mail

postmarked prior to establishment of the Grandview Post Office

is shown, front and back, in Figure 7.

0

During the spring of 2017, Dick and I corresponded regularly

about possible locations for the Grand View Hotel. With few new leads our consensus

was a rim-side search north of the Summit Hotel location showed promise.

I followed a geological lead comparing the layers of Grand Canyon strata from a

historical photo of the Grand View Hotel to current satellite images. A small butte

1,200 feet north of the Summit Hotel seemed to match geologically. Ponderosa

trees were present and the outline of a rectangular structure was visible on satellite

images.

Meeting Dick and his wife at Grandview

Point Overlook, we headed as a group

to the remains of the Summit Hotel − the

only known location in the forest. We set

coordinates and headed toward the rectangular

structure on the rim edge, which

seemed further than expected because

we were blazing a new trail over uneven

ground. I was not encouraged, as any facility

the size of a hotel would require a road

that should still be evident in some form.

Heading further from the old wagon

road, hope faded as we approached the

rectangular form. The views of the Grand

Canyon were spectacular − a perfect location

for a hotel, we all agreed − but alas,

this was where the Grand View Hotel had

stood.

0

In late 1902, the Last Chance Mine,

200 acres of surrounding properties

and the Grand View Hotel were sold to

eastern investors. Renamed the Canyon

Copper Company, the business would

be managed locally by two Vermonters,

John Page and Harry (H.H.) Smith. Both

arrived by train in Flagstaff on May 9,

1903. H.H. Smith would assume Grand

View Hotel management responsibilities,

Mr. Page the mining operations.

One of Smith’s tasks was submission

of Post Office Form 5-939, dated October

7, 1903 − an application to establish

the Grandview Post Office. Smith noted

Figure 6. The arrival in 1901 of a branch

line and this Grand Canyon depot just

11 miles from the Grand View Hotel

brought increased tourism and made

nearby mining more profitable.

Figure 7. This printed envelope advertising the Grand View Hotel was both submitted to the

post office at the other end of the branch rail line in Williams, Arizona, and delivered locally,

thus qualifying for the 1-cent drop mail rate.

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 47


Figure 8. The Grandview, Arizona

M.O.B. (Money Order Business)

postmark dated May 18, 1908, traced

from the 2014 12th edition of the

Arizona Territorial Postmark Catalog.

Figure 9. The only known Grand View

Hotel third-class rate cover, mailed

March 19, 1905, possibly contained a

hotel brochure. Cover image courtesy of

Marjory J. Sente.

the population at Grandview as “about 50 people,” and mails to be supplied from

the Grand Canyon Post Office. This postal arrangement also benefited the Canyon

Copper Company. Operations of the daily Grand View Stage to the Grand Canyon

would thereafter receive a postal route subsidy. The Grandview Post Office application

was approved by the U.S. Post Office Department effective November 27,

1903, with H.H. Smith named as Postmaster.

The earliest known “Grandview, Ariz” postmark is dated June 10, 1904. Surviving

Grandview covers and postcards often have “Grand Canyon, Ariz Rec’d” transit

postmarks. The Grandview Post Office utilized a single Doane type 2/1 postmark.

On July 7, 1907, Postmaster Smith applied to the USPOD for money order services

at Grandview. This request was approved and a double-ring canceler was furnished

as shown in Figure 8, reading “M.O.B.” (for “Money Order Business.”) I know of

just one Grandview Ariz M.O.B. postmark from 1908 that documents this service.

A census of known Grandview postmarks was compiled by pioneer Arizona

collector and catalog editor Owen Kriege in the late 1980s, and it illustrates how

Grandview mail volume changed seasonally. No postmarks are known with January

or February dates, and only one example each from December and March. The

most common postmark months are July and August (with eight and five known,

respectively). Clearly, summer tourists were the largest group utilizing the Grandview

Post Office. In fact, 65 percent of the known postmarks were applied to picture

postcards beloved by tourists. No mail to international destinations is known,

and a single inbound cover from 1904 is recorded. Kriege’s census also shows a

preponderance of the mail addressed to midwest and eastern states. Then as now,

the lure of the Grand Canyon drew

tourists from across the nation.

Figure 9 shows a rarity among

Grandview Post Office covers: the

only known Grand View Hotel

third-class rate cover I’ve ever seen.

Mailed on March 19, 1905, it may

have carried a hotel brochure to

the resident of downtown Chicago

to whom it is addressed. But such

promotions were not enough.

The Grandview Post Office was

closed November 30, 1908, its mail

redirected to the Grand Canyon

Post Office. A 35 percent drop in

copper prices in 1907 compounded

by fewer tourists at the hotel proved unsustainable. Mining operations paused,

then ceased forever, the Grand View Hotel closed, and Postmaster H.H. Smith relocated

to Phoenix and pursued real estate.

0

Following the unsuccessful July 2017 search, the original 1903 USPOD location

report for the Grandview Post Office was located in the files of the Postal History

Foundation in Tucson, Arizona. Township boundary coordinates provided us with

a perimeter for our search, within which a likely location was confirmed on geology,

proximity and by line-of-site photography.

By coincidence, a small period photo showing the front of the Grand View

Hotel also shows in deep background the shape of a ridge line within the cavity of

the Grand Canyon. This unnamed but distinctive ridge was apparent to us during

our previous field searches. We speculated that the Grand View Hotel site could be

found along the line-of-site between the photographer and this background ridge.

Using 3D satellite images it was possible to relocate this original line of site, a location

east of the Summit Hotel.

48 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


0

In 1909, hotel founder Pete Berry and his wife Martha reopened the Grand

View Hotel. Its glory days now past, the Grand View evolved into a rustic, quiet

alternative to the tourist circus at Grand Canyon Village. Berry sought a buyer

for the abandoned mine and sleepy hotel, and found one in California publishing

magnate William Randolph Hearst, who paid $45,000 for the property in 1913.

Although Hearst had grandiose plans for the site, these faded away, and the Grand

View Hotel continued serving tourists much as it always had.

Pete and Martha returned and managed the hotel for eight more seasons before

the Grand View Hotel closed forever in October 1916. Abandoned in 1919,

a decade later it was razed for tax purposes. Giant logs used to support its roof

were removed and reused in construction of the

Desert View Watchtower, where they can still be

seen today. In 1941, the U.S. Park Service acquired

Hearst’s Grand Canyon properties, preserving the

area which remains open and accessible to all.

0

In the spring of 2018, I contacted a National

Park Service archeologist and filed a request for assistance.

I soon learned the NPS had an archeological

file on the Grand View Hotel, but the file was

classified “need to know only.” I requested access,

and in May I received the complete NPS Grand

View Hotel file, and discovered that NPS archeologists

had consistently misidentified the ruins of the

Summit Hotel as those of the Grand View − the

same mistake I’d made in 2016.

However, NPS surveys around the Summit

Hotel had discovered ruins from the Last Chance

Mine mill site upon the rim of the Grand Canyon,

not below it. Further, an 1892 mill site survey map

included boundary markers which would align

with current topographical maps.

Orienting the historic map with a modern satellite

image of the search area revealed a nearly

perfect alignment. If a 1903 survey benchmark recorded

on an unrelated document could be located,

the site of the Grand View Hotel would be found

100 yards away.

On a hot, dry summer day, our first stop was

a location 100 yards from the estimated location

of the 1903 survey benchmark, where the terrain

was hilly and forested, with no indication of a hotel.

We then began walking south in an arc keeping the

1903 benchmark location to our left. After 150 feet,

we entered a small clearing with two tall ponderosa

pine trees, both evenly pruned to a height of about

40 feet.

The trees were 280 feet from the 1903 benchmark. Beyond the trees perhaps

30 feet was a wide stone walking path ending in a straight line: the front entrance

path to the Grand View Hotel. We’d found it. The two trees, the stone path, even

the distant ridge from the historic photograph aligned perfectly.

Figure 10 shows how the camera was used to document our discovery. Using

the two surviving ponderosa pines to align the images, I superimposed a 90-yearold

image of the abandoned Grand View Hotel with a photo of Judy Cody standing

Figure 10. Using the two surviving trees

to guide him, the author superimposed

a 90-year-old image of the abandoned

Grand View Hotel with a photo he took

of Judy Cody standing at the empty

lot last year. The result is this eerie

simulated “double exposure” in which

Judy appears to be hiding behind a post

at the long-vanished lodge.

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 49


Figure 11. The view in June 2018 of the

Grand Canyon from the former site of

the back porch of the Grand View Hotel.

GUERNSEY STAMPS

AND COLLECTABLES

New Issues: 22nd January 2019

at the empty lot last year. The result is

an eerie simulated “double exposure”

in which Judy appears to be hiding behind

a post at the lodge.

Here was the former site of the

Grandview Post Office and the end of

the journey of discovery − but not the

end of a personal journey that included

new friends, family sharing, postal

history, and a strong sense of accomplishment.

I’ve also found my favorite spot at

the Grand Canyon − the “grand view:

that Grandview guests enjoyed over a

century ago, shown in Figure 11. It’s

not among the sunburned tourists teetering

on the canyon rim, but back in the forest with stories of past adventure and

memories forever.

America in 2019 celebrates the centennial of Grand Canyon National Park. Plan

a visit and find your favorite spot.

About the Author

Joe Cody’s interest in stamps began in 1975 while cataloging an accumulation

of U.S. 3-cent sheets with his grandmother. An APS member since 1987, his current

interest is Arizona Territorial-era postal history. His research articles appear regularly

in The Roadrunner, the journal of the Arizona & New Mexico Postal History

Society. Mr. Cody will give a presentation titled “Searching for Lost Arizona Post

Offices” during AmeriStamp Expo/ARIPEX next month in Mesa, Arizona.

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along with the five stamp sets issued in this series.

www.guernseystamps.com

50 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


THE BRITISH EMPIRE

BY NOEL DAVENHILL

AP Columnist | chambon@xtra.co.nz

Basutoland

Home to 2.23 Million − and Maybe a Crocodile

Figure 1. Identical except for

color and value, this ten-stamp

set of King George V pictorial

definitives pictures a crocodile

on the banks of the Orange River,

with the Drakensberg Mountains

where the river begins in the

background. These 1933 stamps

were the first inscribed for use in

Basutoland. Image courtesy APS

StampStore.

52 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019

A small, mountainous landlocked country surrounded by the Republic of South

Africa, Basutoland – “the Switzerland of Southern Africa” − was proclaimed a British

Crown colony in 1872. However, beginning in 1914 the colony was partially

administered from South Africa as a British High Commission Territory along

with Bechuanaland and Swaziland.

From the early 19th century, the Basotho people were led by the charismatic

young Chief Moshoeshoe (or Moshesh) to help thwart the marauding Zulu tribesmen

who invaded from the north to plunder property and destroy crops. The

raiders were followed by land-hungry Boers whose demands erupted into open

warfare in the Basotho Wars of 1858-68, prompting a request by Moshoeshoe for

British protection in 1868. The death of their great leader in 1870 preceded the annexation

of Basutoland by Cape Colony. This failed to alleviate the ongoing unrest

which eventually led to the year-long “Gun War,” partially resolved in 1881 by a

shaky peace treaty.

Reassurance of Crown colony status in 1884 did little to halt continuing outbreaks

of sporadic violence. From 1910 efforts by the newly established Union of

South Africa to administer Basutoland were rejected in favor of retaining British

control, which continued until October 1, 1966, when the Kingdom of Lesotho

became independent.

Basutoland’s mail service commenced in 1876 when Cape of Good Hope

stamps were made available from its few post offices. South African stamps were

introduced in 1910. The first

stamps inscribed “Basutoland,”

issued in 1933, were recess

printed by Waterlow & Sons on

paper with Multiple Script “CA”

watermarks. The ten-stamp set

is shown in Figure 1.

Although ten denominations

from ½-penny to 10-shilling

were inscribed “Postage

and Revenue,” an £1 black stamp

identical in design was added

for fiscal use only. The single

design features the crowned

profile of King George V above

a crocodile on the Orange River

with a backdrop of the Drakensberg Mountains.

Though they are no longer known in the region, the reason a crocodile continues

to be a major symbol is explained in a 1903 book by Minnie Martin, Basutoland:

Its Legends and Customs:

“The Basuto are the people of the crocodile (Kuena), … the crocodile being

their sacred animal. They believe that one crocodile still exists …, but I have never

met any one who had seen it. Still they cling to this belief, for what would Basutoland

be without its Kuena? There is no need to see it, it is there. It will not desert its

people, so why should they disturb it?”


And isn’t leaving crocodiles alone always a wise policy?

A small quantity of ½p, 1p, 2p and 6p denominations of this set were overprinted

“OFFICIAL” in 1934 for use by government agencies, Scott O1-O4. There

is conflicting information as to numbers issued before they were withdrawn after a

few months because of limited usage. An authenticated mint example of the halfpenny

green is shown in Figure 2.

Twice expertized, the four-stamp set from which Figure 2 was taken sold for

$37,500 in Shreves Galleries Sale of the Sovereign Collection in May 13-14, 2008.

The stamps were not made available to the public and are consequently very scarce.

Many dangerous and deceptive forgeries exist.

Omnibus stamps for all Britain’s colonies and protectorates in 1935 and 1937,

marked the Silver Jubilee of King George V and the Coronation of his successor

King George VI, respectively. Examples from both reigns, Scott 11 and 16, appear

in Figure 3.

The crocodile design was retained for

definitives portraying the new monarch King

George VI in 1938. Changes involved an additional

1½p denomination and discontinuation

of the £1 revenue stamp. In a later printing

shown in Figure 4, the 1p value acquired a distinctive

“tower” plate flaw at position 4 in row 2,

resembling a prominent tower on the top of the

hill on the right.

Bilingual se-tenant pairs of South African

1p, 2p and 3p Victory stamps – one stamp with text in English, the other in Afrikaans

− were overprinted for use in Basutoland, Bechuanaland and Swaziland and

issued in December 1945, Scott 29-31. The 1p pair, Scott 29, is pictured in Figure 5.

The Royal Family’s visit to Southern Africa in 1947 was marked with

four values portraying King George VI uniformed as Admiral of the Fleet

and Royal Family members, Scott 35-38. Again, identical designs were issued

by Bechuanaland and Swaziland. Omnibus 1½p and 10sh stamps,

Scott 39-40, also were issued belatedly in December 1948 to celebrate the

Royal Silver Wedding in April, and in October 1949 the 75th anniversary

of the Universal Postal Union was marked with four more, Scott 40-44. A

2p Omnibus stamp, Scott 45, celebrated the coronation of Queen Elizabeth

II on June 3, 1953 and is shown in Figure 6.

In 1954, a series of QEII pictorial definitives was printed by De La Rue,

Scott 46-56. Displacing the crocodile that had rested by the river for more

than two decades, 11 different new bicolored images from ½p to 10sh revealed a

lively kaleidoscope of Basutoland.

On the ½p value we see the distinctive pinnacle of Qiloane, crowned by a 100-

foot pillar of sandstone that is believed to have inspired the iconic Basuto Hat, and

a popular landmark to explore for active tourists. The 1p stamp shows

the Orange River – the longest in southern Africa − as it flows from its

headwaters in the Drakensberg Mountains.

A Mosutu horseman wearing the traditional blanket, essential during

the frequent cold nights in all seasons, featured on the 2p stamp,

while typical mud-brick dwellings of a Basuto household are seen on the

3p. Showcased on the 4½p are the scenic Maletsunyane Falls, the second

highest in Southern Africa. The 6p stamp depicts a herd boy playing the

lesiba, a traditional musical instrument in the region. The 1sh shows a

shepherd caring for his flock in a mountain pasture.

Lancers Gap, seen on the 1sh3p design, was the site of the 1852 conflict between

the British Lancer Regiment and Basotho forces, but the modern passenger

aircraft indicates its proximity to what has now become Moshoeshoe International

Figure 2. No one knows how few stamps

including this ½p were overprinted

“OFFICIAL” in 1934 for use by government

agencies, but they have become

Basutoland’s greatest rarities. Image

courtesy Shreves Galleries Sale of the

Sovereign Collection, May 13-14, 2008.

Figure 3. Basutoland Omnibus stamps in

1935 and 1937 marked the Silver Jubilee

of King George V (left, Scott 11) and the

Coronation of King George VI (right, Scott

16). Image courtesy APS StampStore.

Figure 4. Kings changed but the crocodile

stayed in 1938 with a new set portraying

King George VI, including this 1p stamp

(left, Scott 19). In a later printing (right),

one stamp in each sheet acquired a plate

flaw resembling a tower on the top of the

hill on the right.

Figure 5. Scott 29, a bilingual pair of

South African 1p Victory stamps – one

with text in English, the other Afrikaans

− was overprinted for use in Basutoland

in December 1945. Image courtesy APS

StampStore.

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 53


Figure 6. The 1954 Queen Elizabeth II

definitives included (from top) stamps

commemorating the corontation

(Scott 45) and featuring Qiloane

(Scott 46), Mosuto Horseman (Scott

48), Maletsunyane Falls (Scott 50) and

Lancers Gap (Scott 53). Image courtesy

APS Reference Collection.

Airport in Maseru, the capital.

The 2sh6p stamp depicts Old Fort Leribe, a stronghold for Basotho forces built

during the 1880-81 “Gun War.” The historic Cave House illustrated on the 5sh and

the original home of French missionaries in 1883, is now a museum. Finally, the

10sh high value in deep claret and black features the shearing of an Angora goat for

mohair, a valuable export. We’ll see these stamps shortly.

A temporary shortage of ½p stamps in 1959 required surplus stocks of the

2p denomination to be surcharged by the Government Printer in Pretoria. Some

72,000 of these stamps were overprinted, creating Scott 57.

Basutoland’s 1959 National Council set, Scott 58-60, was issued on the occasion

of the meeting of the National Council, with images reminding proud citizens

of its tradition of self-rule. Pictured in Figure 7, the 3p carries a classic engraving

of Chief Moshoeshoe in his prime, on his throne, knobkerrie in hand, and commemorates

his laws of 1854. The 1sh shows the council building as it was in 1903.

“Lesotho” and “Basutoland” appear on these stamps together for the first time,

aimed at preparing the country for its approaching independence.

On February 14, 1961, Basutoland, along with Bechuanaland Protectorate and

Swaziland joined South Africa in switching from sterling currency to the Rand

(equivalent to 10 shillings Sterling). South Africa’s withdrawal from the British

Commonwealth a month later was met with widespread opposition, from Basutoland

and the other High Commission territories, to the new currency. It was

evident that there was insufficient time to print new stamps before the currency

change on “Decimal Day,” which left no alternative other than to surcharge current

definitives.

The South African Government Printer was contracted to overprint existing

stocks of stamps held by the Post Office Store in Pretoria, and intact sheets were

reclaimed from local post offices and from the Crown Agents in London to receive

the new values. However, a lack of adequate stocks of type in a single font that

could be used on all stamps means diverse fonts had to be used, listed by Scott as

Types I, II and III.

Whereas ½-cent on ½-penny, 1c on 1p and 2c on 2p surcharges were all Type

I, a minimum of three trial sheets of 2c on 2p were accidentally released printed

in a larger font. Six sheets of 2c on 2p are known with the “2c” inverted, listed as

Scott 63a.

Smaller, narrower typeface fonts (Type II) surcharged all subsequent denominations

from 2½c on 3p to 1-rand on 10sh. Only about 3,500 each of the 10c on 1sh

and 25c on 2sh6p stamps (Scott 67a & 69a) were printed, ensuring their relative

scarcity and absence from all but the most advanced collections.

Although De La Rue succeeded in printing 2½c stamps (Scott 75) in time for

Decimal Day, it was logical to concurrently place on sale redundant stocks of 2½c

on 3d surcharges (Scott 64 & 64a). Other surcharged values were issued from time

to time during 1962-63.

In late 1962, a few inverted 2½c Type II surcharges with Mohotlong postmarks

were found amongst a bulk lot of mixed stamps in South Africa. This remarkable

find was clearly from a single sheet from which the stamps had been posted locally

and most had been thrown out with the envelopes. The rarest of Basutoland’s 1961-

63 decimal surcharges and errors, both mint and used copies of this stamp, Scott

64b, today catalog $8,000.

The surcharges ended in February 1963 with the placing on sale of a final 1r

stamp, Scott 82.

Reportedly due to dwindling stocks of 1c, 2½c, 5c, 12½c and 50c stamps in

1964, new printings, now with Block CA watermarks, were provided by De La

Rue (Scott 87-91). Crown Agents Omnibus stamps for Freedom from Hunger. Red

Cross and ITU centenaries, ICY, and Winston Churchill also were issued from

1963 to 1966, Scott 83/108.

54 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


In May 1965, commemorative stamps printed in photogravure by Harrison

were issued to introduce self- government followed by a new constitution in preparation

for the declaration of the independent kingdom of Lesotho. Again inscribed

jointly “Basutoland” and “Lesotho,” the four stamps, Scott 97-100, feature a Mosotho

mother and child, mountain scenery, a legislative building in the capital,

Maseru, and a border-crossing post.

Although Independence Day was October 4, 1966, it wasn’t until November 1

that Basutoland stamps with provisional “LESOTHO” overprints were placed on

sale, listed under “Lesotho” in the catalog as Scott 5-20. In a curious error on both

watermarks of the 1r stamp, the overprint was misspelled as “LSEOTHO” at position

2 in row 4 (Scott 14a & 20a). In a bizarre coincidence (or was it?) an identical

error occurred on 1c and 5c postage dues at position 7 in row 4 (Scott J1a-J2a).

Figure 8 shows a procession of the high values in the QEII Pictorial definitive

series, beginning on the left with the 10sh Mohair stamp printed in 1954, Scott 56.

Next came the “R1” currency change surcharge issued in 1961, which was printed

in all three fonts;

the one shown is the

common Type III surcharge,

Scott 71. In

1963, these surcharges

were followed by a new

design in which “R1”

replaced “10/,” Basutoland

Scott 82, followed

by the same stamp

overprinted “LESOTHO” for the arrival of Independence in 1966, Lesotho Scott

20.

After only five months these overprints were replaced with new pictorial designs

portraying King Moshoeshoe II in place of Queen Elizabeth.

And can you guess what returned on the next high-value Lesotho postage stamp

in 1967, Lesotho Scott 36? Next to the portrait of the king on the 1R stamp, it’s Lesotho’s

coat of arms. Those feature

Qiloane’s sandstone peak, rearing

horses, antique weapons, the

national motto, and − at the very

center of the design, basking in

the middle of a traditional Basuto

shield − a contented crocodile

Figure 9. Lesotho issue of 1967 (Scott 36) with detail seemingly snoozing on the sand.

of crocodile on the coat of arms.

Figure 7. The low value from the 1959

National Council set, this 3p stamp,

Scott 58, shows Chief Moshoeshoe in his

prime on the throne and commemorates

his laws of 1854. Image courtesy APS

Reference Collection.

Figure 8. Four high values in a dozen

years (left to right): the 1954 QEII 10sh

Mohair Pictorial definitive (Basutoland

Scott 56); the 1961 Type III 1-rand on

10sh currency surcharge (Scott 71); the

1963 QEII R1 Mohair definitive (Scott 82);

and the “LESOTHO” overprint on the QEII

R1 stamp when independence arrived in

1966, Lesotho Scott 20. Image courtesy

APS Reference Collection.

LATIN AMERICA

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JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 55


EXPERTIZING

BY TOM HORN

authentication department director | twhorn@stamps.org

Even Sherlock Holmes Had to Start Somewhere

Here in Pennsylvania, as cold December

gives way to colder January, you’ve been

working on your stamp collection. The chill

wind, snow and darkness outside have

kept you in that nice, warm stamp room

you claimed in a cozy corner of

your home. You found,

or rediscovered,

more than 3,000 entries from “A” (used on Australian Official

stamps) to “Zululand.” The ISWSC also has separate lists at

the same site for stamps with Cyrillic and Greek inscriptions,

and their entire Identifier is downloadable.

Knowing where a stamp is from will get you to the right

place in a worldwide catalog. If it has an odd overprint, surcharge

or other text you still don’t recognize, or you just can’t

find it in the listings, it may be a “back-of the-book issue.”

When you’re really stumped at identifying a stamp, it may not be a postage stamp at

all. These three are all revenue stamps, avidly collected by many and documented in

many books and in journals by the American Revenue Association. But they pay tax, not

postage, which is why you won’t find them in most postage stamp catalogs.

some stamps

that you have

wanted to learn

more about for

years. They look like

they might be valuable. Can

you determine their identities

yourself?

The first thing you need

to know is where the stamp is

from, and what kind of stamp it is.

For single-country specialists this

may sound like child’s play, but those

who collect a wider world know it can be

tougher than you might imagine – especially

for stamps from lands that do not use a familiar

alphabet. Many are shown in color in an

“Illustrated Identifier” section in the back of

each Scott Standard Postage Stamp Catalogue.

Online, there is a very helpful Worldwide

Illustrated Stamp Identifier that identifies

stamps by alphabet and character type, and

even stamps with no characters at all.

Mystic Stamp Co. has an online Foreign

Stamp Identifier, and the International Society

of World Wide Stamp Collectors (ISWSC)

has a World Wide Stamp Identifier with

These special-purpose stamps are called that because many

catalogs list them after the definitive and commemorative

stamps. Semi-postal, airmail, postage due, official and special

delivery stamps are just a few of the many back-of-the-book

categories, which in the Scott catalog earns the stamp a special

prefix; “C” for all airmail stamps, for example.

Finally, if you know what country a stamp is from but

still can’t find it in the book, it may be beyond that catalog

Cinderellas are stamp-like

adhesives that are not actually

stamps at all. This 234-page

catalog of Cinderellas from

Canada alone gives you some

idea of what a broad field they

occupy.

56 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


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altogether. It may belong to one of two colossal catch-all categories

of very collectible but non-postal adhesives: revenue

stamps (also called “fiscal” or “tax” stamps); and Cinderellas

(which can be anything that looks like a postage stamp but is

not one, like Christmas seals or supermarket reward stamps).

The easiest way to identify these is sometimes by what is

not printed on them: any text indicating use on mail, such as

“post,” “postage,” “postage & revenue” (on stamps intended

to be used for both), or a foreign equivalent, such as “poste,”

“postes,” “posta,” or “correos.” Of course, many countries –

increasingly including our own, since the 1960s – don’t show

these words anymore. Revenue stamps almost always have

text identifying their function, such as “Internal Revenue

Service” or “Stock Transfer.”

Once you know where your postage stamp is from, check

the following details, listed in no particular order: design;

color; dated cancel; overprints; surcharges; watermark; and

gauge of the perforations.

If it does come down to color as the deciding factor, try

looking at the stamp objectively. For example, if your catalog

values a stamp in carmine rose at 25 cents, in carmine at $5,

and in lake it lists at $300, that will certainly sway many optimists

(perhaps including you) to believe that your stamp

can’t possibly be the 25-cent or $5 stamp. Having someone

else − especially another experienced

collector − view the stamp can be a

good idea, especially when you cannot

decide. Another fresh pair of eyes

may see what you did not.

Forming your own opinion about

the stamp helps you learn more about

the stamp and the process needed

get the answer. If you do not have

the factual information to support

your opinion, it usually only means

there is more to study about it. All of

the gathered information helps you

when deciding to submit the stamp for certification, for making

purchases in the future and especially selling the stamp.

Remember: even Sherlock Holmes had to start somewhere.

And you already have a magnifying glass!

Color is one of the many characteristics that matters in defining

a stamp, as seen on these 2-cent Washington definitives of

two different designs. Printed left to right in rose, carmine and

carmine rose, respectively. Note, color reproduction here may

not be accurate enough to properly display the differences in hue,

saturation and brightness. Images courtesy APS Reference Collection.

The design might indicate several catalog numbers, while

narrowing your catalog search. Color will make a difference

in most cases. Take age and condition into account when trying

to determine the color. Fading happens.

A dated cancel on the stamp forces you to look at a certain

range of catalog numbers for the design, eliminating those

that were issued at a later date.

Overprints (new text printed on an existing stamp) and

surcharges (overprints that state the value of the stamp) can

eliminate some of the possibilities for

the stamp’s identity. A watermark, or the

lack thereof, continues to narrow the

field, and careful perforation measurements

can finish the process for you.

If you cannot decide on an answer

for any one of these details, come back

to it. Having trouble choosing between

carmine rose, carmine and lake as the

color for your stamp? Settle on the other

details first and you might land on the

identity, because the other details (a dated

cancel, for example) might eliminate

two of those color shades for you.

APS Specialty Society:

American Revenue Association

The American Revenue Association (APS Affiliate #51)

serves the needs and interests of all collectors of revenues,

tax stamps, stamped paper, telegraph and railroad

stamps, and general non-postal Back-of-the-Book

material — U.S. and foreign, federal, state, provincial,

local, municipal and private. ARA holds an annual convention

in conjunction with national stamps shows

and offers a quarterly journal, The American Revenuer.

Annual dues are $25. Website: www.revenuer.org.

Fusco Auctions

Home of the best philatelic auctions in the mid-west between Chicago and

Philadelphia for over 40 years. The focus of our philatelic auctions is to serve the

beginner to well advance collector. With the average lot price in the $50-500 range,

collectors are sure to find stamps, covers and large lots to their liking. We average

4–6 philatelic auctions each year. We also are always looking for collections to either

purchase outright or to take on consignment for these auctions. We broadcast the

auctions live on five websites and can also be found on Stamp Auction Network.

Please contact us at 440-975-8938 to sign up for free catalogs and/or email

notifications. You can also visit our website at www.fuscoauctions.com.

Fusco Auctions

4740 Beidler Rd. Rear • Willoughby, Ohio 44094

(20 miles east of Cleveland)

58 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


Would you like to be offered

quality stamp collections

at Wholesale Prices?

If so, please contact us to request our list

of country collections at wholesale prices.

Dr. Robert Friedman and Sons

(800) 588-8100

email: stampcollections@drbobstamps.com

www.drbobstamps.com

Good reasons to request our wholesale list:

• For forty years we have been the nation’s largest buyer and seller of country stamp collections.

• Our collections are generally sold between 15 and 35 percent of catalog value- far lower than retail prices!

• Every eight weeks we send our list of newly acquired collections to our customers by U.S. Mail and/or email.

• Each list offers some $300,000 of country collections composed of some 375 different country collections

each wholesale priced between $100 and $5000.

• If there is duplication, it is never counted and is included free as a gift!

• Collections are accurately described and cataloged with highlights mentioned.

• We are determined to keep each customer 100% happy and guarantee customer satisfaction with every

collection purchased.

• Any collection may be returned for any reason within a reasonable period of time.

• Our return rate is far less than one percent.

• First time purchasers reorder with us well over 90 percent of the time.

• The majority of our collections are sold on Scott, Minkus or Hingeless album pages- often in expensive

albums, which are at no additional cost.

• We pay shipping charges within the United States and all collections are shipped within three business

days of purchase.

• Payment may be made by credit card or check and customers who are known to us may pay for orders that

are immediately sent over a three month period without interest.

The Friedman family hopes you will join our family of happy collectors many of which have been purchasing

from us for over 25 years. Allow us to help you build your wonderful stamp collection at wholesale prices.


BUY AND SELL

BY WENDY MASORTI

sales director | wendy@stamps.org

‘Can StampStore sell my Entire Album

or Collection?’ No, but Yes.

At APS StampStore, we get asked this question so often

that we decided to feature it in this column. The

answer is NO, we do not sell entire collections or albums

as a single lot. However, a partly filled album or small

collection could be broken up and sold in individual pages.

Each page would be an individual StampStore lot, priced for

all items shown.

It is important to note that stamps sold through the APS

StampStore are sold on an individual basis or for small sets

within a single country. Each item or set is mounted to or

attached to a submission sheet with one scan permitted for

each submission.

We do not have the resources to scan an entire collection

as a single lot. Without images of everything being sold, we

could not take responsibility for the contents if it was sold

and then returned later. Disagreements between buyer and

seller over quality, contents, even the number of stamps in

the transaction would become a matter of “he said” vs. “she

said.” That is why StampStore must insist on scans of everything

that is being offered. Also, StampStore is simply not

set up to handle the additional shipping expense of mailing

heavy albums, oversize stock books and the like.

We do have some sellers who describe and sell an individual

page of stamps as a single item, at a set price. This allows

for a scan of the entire album page so that the buyer clearly

sees what is being sold. Of course, to sell your stamps this way

you must complete a submission sheet for each page, complete

with catalog numbers, an accurate description with one

price for all items on the page. A good example of this sort of

sale is this offering of a Scott album page of modern U.S. Official

stamps, Scott O127-O141, StampID: 501088608.

How would a buyer know that you are selling five individual

pages from a particular collection?

In the description area you could note something like

“5 individual album pages from this collection being sold –

search by my seller ID to see more”.

Breaking up a collection and pricing it can be time-consuming

and requires access to recent stamp catalogs for proper

descriptions and pricing. Collectors who meticulously

price a large collection this way frequently feel that the monetary

return may not be worth the time it takes. Therefore, you

may want to first contact a local stamp dealer, or members of

your local stamp club, to see if perhaps they would make an

acceptable offer for the collection in its entirety.

Your collection could be sold to a dealer as one unit or –

again, if you have the time – you may sell parts to different

dealers. For example, a dealer specializing in Latin America

would likely pay more for your Mexican stamps than someone

who deals mostly in U.S. stamps; a postal history specialist

may pay more for covers, and so on. Remember to visit the

APS website to find dealers or stamp clubs near you.

It all comes down to how much time and effort you want

to put into selling the collection. What’s important is that you

make the choice that’s right for your collection, your circumstances

and you.

Circuit Book Sales Categories Needed

We continually monitor categories that are in particular

short supply for the Circuit books (not StampStore). To see

our full list of stamps needed for circuits (as well as those not

currently in need) visit www.stamps.org/Stamps-Needed. If

you have material in these areas that you are interested in

selling, consider using circuit sales. For those new to selling,

seller information is available online or can be requested by

contacting our staff at 814-933-3803 ext. 231.

TOP SELLER

This imperforate 1920 United

States 2-cent carmine rose type

IV Washington stamp (Scott 532)

was a top-selling U.S. item in September

on StampStore.

Overall monthly sales reports

are posted each month online at

stamps.org/Stampstore-Sales-Report.

You can view sales and see

what is hot for the month, and

compare that with what you’d like

to add to your collection.

60 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


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BOOKS & CATALOGS

BY FRED BAUMANN

editorial content specialist | fbaumann@stamps.org

Fancy Cancels on Canadian Stamps

1855 to 1950 (third edition) by David

Lacelle.

Published in August 2018, the British

North America Philatelic Society

blurb to celebrate the 244-page third

edition of Fancy Cancels on Canadian

Stamps relates the story of how the

book came to be in lieu of a summary

of its contents because it is, in microcosm,

everything that is wonderful

about our hobby:

“At about age 10 … Dave received a

small tobacco tin of Scott No. 41s, the

Three Cent ‘Small Queen’ issue, from a

kindly aunt in Montreal… There were

about 30 Small Queens,…with all but

one having either circular date stamp

or machine cancels. He asked his local

stamp dealer about the oddity, and was

told that it was a ‘cork’ cancel, probably

from an old whiskey bottle cork. The

seed was planted from this single cork

cancel, a much later collection grew, as

well as a BNAPS study group, and both

the first and second editions of this

book.

“Dave still has this first cork, and

has enjoyed the 60-year hobby which

came from it. He would like to ask collectors

to please practice ‘random acts

of kindness,’ as his aunt did. You never

know when such an act can have a long

term positive effect upon a young person.”

Lacelle confides that his third edition’s

“many updates and revisions …

are mostly due to the invaluable input

from the 80+ members of the … Fancy

Cancels & Miscellaneous Markings

[Study Group] over a ten-year period.”

Noting that 78 of the group’s newsletters

“all the way back to January 1989”

have now been scanned and are available

on the BNAPS website,” he invites

all those with an interest to read the

journals at their convenience free of

charge at www.bnaps.org/hhl/n-fcm.

htm

Spiral-bound for easy use, the book

begins with a 10-page introduction covering

the origins and persistence of fancy

cancels since the mid-19th century,

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how they are categorized and collected

and more. Following is the meat of the

manual, 147 pages of postmark images

with detailed information about each,

sorted into Numeral, Letter, Name,

Star, Cross and Geometric designs, including

10 categories of Fancy Cancel

designs. The cover illustration gives

some idea of the vast range of designs.

Concluding the work are 10 appendices:

Simple Town Name Cancels;

Utilitarian Items Used as Cancels;

Foreign Cancels on Canada (from the

days when any uncanceled stamp of

any nation was fair game for postal

employees with canceling devices

around the world); Crown Cancels;

“Toronto Twos” (Numbers 18 to 54);

Fancy Cancel Numbers by Post Office;

a table cross-referencing Lacelle’s

catalog numbers with those in the 1973

62 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


Canadian Fancy Cancellations of the

Nineteenth Century by Day & Smythies;

Littlefield Bogus Cancels; Unconfirmed

Cancels; and Fantasy or Joke Cancels.

The book is a labor of love, a meticulously

detailed and thoughtful guide

to a fascinating postmark specialty and

a powerful testament to the role a single

stamp can sometimes play.

Published August 2018 by the British

North America Philatelic Society, Ottawa,

Canada. Spiral bound with laminated

covers, 8½ inches by 11 inches, 244

pages. $56.00 CDN plus postage from

www.sparks-auctions.com/bnapsbooks

First Day Covers of 1918 Air Post

Stamps — or Are They? by Ken Lawrence.

This slender but essential compendium

brings together an interdependent

series of important articles by Ken

Lawrence originally published in the

February, March, April and May 2015

issues of The United States Specialist,

journal of the United States Stamp

Society. In these, Lawrence lays out in

considerable detail all that is known

of the relative handful of first-day-ofsale

covers of the 24-cent, 16-cent and

6-cent Jenny airmail stamps issued in

1918.

The 66 pages of text painstakingly

lays out the history of these covers,

what is known of their origin, their

progress through the marketplace, the

regard and the suspicion they have received

in the century since they were

created and how and by whom opinions

regarding their authenticity came to be.

Lawrence examines them in order of

issue and by denomination, comparing

and contrasting them with one another

as the clearest way of examining the

ways in which they confirm or challenge

credibility. Element by element,

the covers are reviewed, and many are

found wanting.

As Lawrence notes at the outset,

“For this review I have conducted

fresh investigations, greatly facilitated

by Internet resources that did not exist

when I compiled my original census

[in 2003], the most valuable being

the Philatelic Foundation’s certificate

search and Robert A. Siegel Auction

Galleries’ power search. Despite significant

differences in approach and

some lapses or leaps of faith by Kirker,

I found his booklet to be a useful reference.”

His modus operandi was to regard

all covers as genuine until proven

otherwise. Most ultimately failed that

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JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 63


test convincingly, nor does Lawrence

shy away from naming the probable

author of most of the bogus material.

Andrew McFarlane is a seasoned

U.S. first-day cover specialist and

aerophilatelic exhibitor. I am neither,

but what McFarlane says about this

book in his introduction echoes my regard

not only for Lawrence personally,

but for the impeccable quality of his

many years of research:

“What sets Lawrence’s work apart

from most is his willingness to explain

in detail how he arrived at his position.

You may or may not agree with that position,

but there is no debate as to how

the conclusion was reached… I urge

you to not only look at the evidence

presented, but also appreciate the manner

in which he forms his conclusions.”

When it comes to authentication, of

course, what the best-informed buyers

in the market will and won’t spend their

money on speaks with another kind of

authority. That is why, instead of picturing

Ken’s book, I picture one of the

first-day covers Lawrence selected to

show on its cover.

In the book itself, it is described

as a cover that 1918 American Philatelist

editor Joseph B. Leavy mailed “to

himself” on the first day of sale. The

pair of 6¢ stamps paid 2¢ postage for

a local letter at an office with carrier

service plus a 10¢ special delivery fee.

Joe Kirker [author in 2014 of United

States Airmail Stamps 1918: History

and Analysis of First Day of Sale

Postal Use, who reported this cover in

2009] considers this the only recorded

genuine first day cover of the Scott C1

stamp. Ken Lawrence agrees.”

At Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries

October 3, 2018, sale of “United States

Stamp Treasures: The William H. Gross

Collection” this cover was Lot 105:

“The only recorded genuine cover with

the 6¢ 1918 Air Post stamp mailed on

the First Day of Issue − an important

20th century postal history rarity.” The

full description included both Kirker’s

and Lawrence’s evaluations as to its

genuineness.

According to a note in pencil on it,

the cover first sold in September 1943

for $125. Seventy-five years later, having

been authenticated by the Philatelic

Foundation in 2008, it was hammered

down in the October 3 auction within

the auctioneer’s estimate at $32,500.

Published in September 2018 by the

American First Day Cover Society;

order from them at www.afdcs.org/

publications.html Non-member prices

for a pdf (Adobe portable document

format) download only are $12, or $20

for a complete set of unbound printed

pages. The printed version also may

be ordered by mail from AFDCS Sales,

P.O. Box 44, Annapolis Junction, MD

20701-0044.

Independent State Mail and Confederate

Use of U.S. Postage — How

Secession Occurred: Correcting the Record

(expanded 2018 edition) by Patricia

A. Kaufmann.

One of our favorite writers and exponents

of American postal history,

Trish Kaufmann is an important voice

in our hobby, not least for endeavoring

to introduce more beginners to the

joys of hand-held history and for her

emphasis on keeping historical facts

straight. That latter objective is the

whole point behind her latest undertaking,

which began as a chapter with

the same title by Kaufmann in the 2017

“La Posta” anthology, Aspects of Postal

History.

As “La Posta” publisher Peter Martin

notes in his Foreword to the current

work, “A short-run offprint of that book

article was produced and quickly sold

out. The offprint won the Literature

Reserve Grand Award at Chicagopex

2017.” (The Grand Award, incidentally,

went to the amazing catalogs of Robert

A. Siegel Auction Galleries, which says

something about the significance of

Kaufmann’s modest 23 pages.)

Martin encouraged Kaufmann to

revise and expand her work as the first

installment in a new second monograph

series by “La Posta,” and new material

in the marketplace added fresh

detail to the chapters on Missouri and

Arizona Territory, not least with the

addition of a good number of Siegel’s

outstanding covers among the 76 maps,

political cartoons, flags and stamps in

this colorful presentation.

The research itself is skillfully summarized

on a single page inside the

front cover in charts listing 16 states or

territories, their dates of secession and

their dates of admission into the CSA.

For those who want the full story for

each of these entities, Kaufmann skillfully

provides a single chapter for each,

presented as they contemplated secession

and based on the outcome of their

deliberations. Well-chosen Endnotes

enable you to verify the facts for yourself.

As with many of the best books in

philately, this one is not beyond the

reach of any interested high school

student, yet contains material of which

even advanced specialists are probably

unaware. If you have an interest in Civil

War history, this is a book you will want

to have. Even better, it’s a book we can

readily afford.

The book is available in the United

States for $19.50 postpaid using the order

form available through https://www.

trishkaufmann.com/isu-2

Seebeck: Hero or Villain? (second

edition) by Danilo Mueses, edited,

revised and enlarged by Michael Schreiber

This book is a first-rate study of

Seebeck’s works and the contracts under

which he made them, but it is a

book with a thesis. Nicholas F. Seebeck

(1857-99) was a philatelic pariah in his

64 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


SEEBECK:

Hero

or

Villain?

DANILO A.MUESES

Second Edition

Edited, revised and enlarged by Michael Schreiber

late 19th-century heyday, due to the

abundant remainders he peddled and

the reprints he cheerfully created for

the philatelic marketplace. The thesis of

the book, succinctly stated in the introduction

by Roberto Rosende, is this:

“Much has been written about philately’s

misfortunes as a result of commercial

contracts that Seebeck realized

with some Central American and South

American countries for the supplying

of postage stamps.

But is this in fact true, or did the

popularity of our hobby increase because

of the ease of acquiring stamps at

low cost that the contracts and Seebeck

created?”

I have always thought that many

of the mid- to late-19th-century Latin

American issues that earned Seebeck so

much of his notoriety were the engraved

equivalents of those ornate chocolates

in the huge red heart for Valentine’s

Day, with far too many acanthus leaves,

scrolls, Corinthian capitals and assorted

frou-frous of the engraver’s art – in

other words, just what I like.

But it also strikes me that it is precisely

because of Seebeck’s outlandish

reprinting of so many of these stamps

that so many North American dealers

to this day won’t poke them with tenfoot

tongs. That may be why I never

made a serious effort to collect them, as

Michael Schreiber has.

Whatever the case – and however

you feel about the stamps, the reprints

or Seebeck – this is a masterful study

guide that unravels a philatelic domain

that Seebeck remainders and reprints

rendered unfortunately complicated.

You may want those reprints to follow

the Seebeck story yourself, or you may

wish to exclude them from your collection

at any cost. Either way, this book

offers great value.

What elevates the value of this copiously

illustrated and painstakingly

indexed 180-page title to unique is that

it is being made available to whoever

wants it gratis, as a digital publication.

As the copyright page plainly states,

“The digital version of this book is free

and is not for sale or rent. Any person

who has the digital version of this book

may send a free copy of the digital version

to any other person.”

The book is amazing in the sheer

volume of detail as to Seebeck’s operations

that it supplies; amazing, too, in

the job it does of supplying a strong

sense of the philatelic world he inhabited,

including what his detractors had to

say about him. The precise chronology,

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1881 is given as the date of issue of these

cards which also was the date of the first

envelopes with the printed stamps

[ postal stationery – the early Scott catalogs

listed postal stationery ]. On these

latter, the stamps which were printed

M U E S E S – S E E B E C K

Figure 3–1. Advertising card circa 1881 of the Hamilton Bank Note Company, founded in 1881.

Figure 3–2. Dominican Republic postal card of 1881. The imprint reads

“THE MANHATTAN BANK NOTE CO. NEW YORK.”

abundant use of art and detailed bibliography

are other signs that Michael

Schreiber has been hard at work, and in

a good cause. Even if you’d just like to

know more, give this digital book a try.

But fair warning: you may get bitten by

the Seebeck bug, too.

Request your free Seebeck ebook by

sending an email to momotombo@woh.

rr.com

WANTED TO BUY

Japan Buy Price for mint, NH, XF

Scott # We Pay Scott # We Pay

1-4 $800 198-201 $125

5-8 900 222a 500

9-18 1,200 Used 350

28-31 7,500 239-252 200

32-39 2,100 271a 250

40-44 180 306a 180

45-50 900 311a 180

55-67 1,300 422a 130

68-71 200 425-436 500

75-84 490 456 150

91-108 400 479a 170

113-114 1,400 498a 120

115-125 1,000 509-521B 600

127-147 1,100 C1-2 550

152-154 500 C3-7 100

Used 200 C8 900

163-166 200 Used 600

171a-176a 350 C9-13 130

188-189 400 C14-24 300

C25-38 225

have the same design as the adhesive

stamps; on the postcards [ postal cards ]

the stamp is oval with the value at each

side. One of the series of cards evidently

was intended for home [ domestic ] use.

The other series had inscriptions in

Offices in China

1-18 125

22-32 900

33-49 3,000

Offices in Korea

1-14 1,200

We pay top price for covers & FDCs Before 1955.

Postage: Paying 55¢ per 100 Yen face

value in sheet of 20 Yen & up

We will travel for large holdings.

Rising Sun Stamps

3272 Holley Terrace, The Villages, FL 32163-0068

Phone: (Cell) 570-350-4393

E-mail: haruyo_baker@msn.com

Figure 3–3. Engr

the Hamilton Ba

Co. On April 1

Charles E. Gray

ager. For six mon

pany general ma

Spanish and

these were in

UPU [ Univer

below the low

UPU stamps

‘The Manhat

[ Figure 3–2

for domestic

white stock, a

In the Co

January 194

mentions a M

uated at 71 B

which in 188

al cards ] for

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 65


Stanley Gibbons Commonwealth

Stamp Catalogue – Hong Kong (6th edition

- 2018)

Published in fall

2018, this new edition

of the Hong Kong catalogue

– the fourth in nine

years – lists all stamps of

the former British colony

since 1862 and stamps

issued under the Special

Administration Region

of the People’s Republic

of China introduced on

July 1, 1997, including

new issues up to January

2018. Prices have been carefully revised

to reflect the consistently strong market

for this area, which appeals to both colonial

specialists and new collectors in the

surging and highly active domestic PRC

market.

The outstanding new feature of this

2018 edition is the inclusion for the first

time of newly listed watermark varieties

in 1912-37 King George V issues (Gibbons

100-131), and in the 1917-27 “CHI-

NA” overprints added to deter currency

speculators in the Treaty Ports (Gibbons

British Offices in China 1-29). Many of

these watermark varieties are extremely

scarce, often known in used condition or

in unused condition only.

The “Short THI” in “THIRTY” variety

on the first Queen Elizabeth $1.30

bicolored definitive of 1954-62 is now illustrated

and priced, while other collectible

varieties also are helpfully illustrated

in color for the first time.

Following priced listings for three

crowned circle handstamps of the 1840s

and 1850s, the color catalogue covers

definitive, commemorative and Omnibus

postage stamps as well as postage

dues, postcard stamps, postal fiscal issues,

stamp booklets, Premium booklets,

plus related stamps issued for use in the

Japanese Occupation of Hong Kong, and

Hong Kong stamps used at British Post

Offices in China and in Japan.

Values for issues up to 1970 were taken

from Gibbons British Commonwealth

& Empire Stamps Catalogue 2016. Values

for more recent Hong Kong stamps “have

been extensively revised and updated

specially for this edition…” Gibbons adds

that “Prices have been extensively revised,”

and that “There is

a helpful guide to prices

of stamps on cover up to

1945…”

The 115-page softbound

catalog with laminated

light card covers has

a listed U.K. retail price of

£17.95 (about $23 U.S.),

not including postage.

Stanley Gibbons

Stamp Catalogue −

Middle East (including

Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon,

Palestinian Authority and Syria),

First Edition 2018.

As its too-brief introduction states,

“It is over 35 years since the [Gibbons

catalogs]… split into

‘Parts 2 to 22’ was announced,

dividing up

what had up to then been

an alphabetical listing of

European and Overseas

countries over seven

large volumes into fairly

handy-sized catalogues,

bringing together countries

or groups of countries,

generally united

by geography or political

affiliation… Over time

these volumes [‘Parts 2 to 22’] … have

grown in size, with the ever-increasing

numbers of new issues.”

These same pressures are why Scott

subdivided its six massive, alphabetically

ordered volumes down the middle, into

a dozen easier-to-handle books that split

up the weight. It turns out that for Gibbons

this is a much more difficult task

when it comes subdividing the most contentious

region on Earth.

For the record (but nowhere available

in the 2018 Gibbons Middle East catalog),

you’ll find stamps of Djbouti, Egypt (including

British Forces in Egypt and Suez

Canal Company), Eritrea, Somalia and

Sudan off in the second edition of Gibbons

North-East Africa Catalogue. You’ll

only find Iran and Turkey in Volume 1 of

the less-specialized Gibbons Asia Simplified

Stamp Catalogue, and the a search

for the company’s most up-to-date listing

of Saudi Arabia is shown at the Gibbons

website as being the 2017 six-volume set

of Stamps of the World.

Just to confuse matters further, the

Gibbons Middle East catalog introduction

states [bold face mine], “This is the

second part of our Middle East catalogue.”

Then why does the back cover promise

[bold face theirs] “A comprehensive

catalogue listing the stamps of the Middle

East?” Immediately followed by, “The

Stanley Gibbons Middle East Catalogue

brings together all the countries of the

region in one comprehensive guide.” (I

do not think they know what this word

“comprehensive” means.)

When Middle East was last seen from

Gibbons, in 2009, it was Part 19 of the old

order of regional and national

catalogs. It didn’t

include Iran back then,

either, but it did include

the now-absent nations

of Abu Dhabi, Aden,

Ajman, Bahrain, British

Postal Agencies in

Eastern Arabia, Dubai,

Egypt, Fujiera, Gaza, Qatar,

Ras al Khaima, Saudi

Arabia, Sharjah, South

Arabia, Trucial States,

Umm al Qiuwain, United

Arab Emirates and Yemen.

Why is this new book not called “Part

2” on its front cover? Where is the missing

first part? Is that where all the rest will

eventually end up? What will the prequel/

sequel be titled — “The First Half of Gibbons

Middle East Catalogue”?

In all fairness to Gibbons, they have

about perfected the 6½- by 9½-inch format.

That size is ideal for ease of use and

portability, and the images are comparable

to those you find in Scott.

The new book is a nice catalog as far

as it goes — and as far as it goes is listings

for Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestinian

Authority and Syria (This presumably

will make Iran the last nation to be listed

someday in Part 1, which should have

room for Egypt, too − but what about all

the others?) The philatelic world wonders.

66 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


The 414-page softbound catalog with

laminated light card covers has a listed

U.K. retail price of £34.95 (about $46

U.S.), not including postage.

2019 Scott Classic Specialized Catalogue

of Stamps and Covers 1840-1940

The Scott Classic Specialized catalog

has grown in size more than 50 percent

since the first volume was introduced in

1994 (the 1995 edition) — from 857 pages

of listings in the 1995 edition to 1,308

pages in the new 25th edition for 2019.

As departing Amos Press executive

Donna Houseman recently observed,

“The first edition consolidated

the basic listings from the Scott Standard

Postage Stamp Catalogue for stamps

issued from 1840 to 1940. In the 1996

edition, editors began to add values for

covers. In the 1998 edition, listings of

British Commonwealth countries were

extended to 1952 to include all British

Commonwealth stamps issued under

King George VI.

“Since the first edition was published,

special editorial consultant Sergio Sismondo

has worked tirelessly each year to

help the editors expand the editorial content

and listed values in the Scott Classic

Specialized catalog, and this year was no

exception. Sismondo was instrumental

in the creation of the Scott Classic Specialized

catalog. James E. Kloetzel, editor

emeritus, and Bill Jones, a former Scott

associate editor, also provided substantial

input by updating values and making significant

editorial enhancements throughout

the catalog.

“We extend special thanks to our

many advisors who offer improvements

each year to make this catalog an invaluable

reference work for worldwide classic

stamps.”

In the 25th anniversary edition, classic

Germany received a complete review,

resulting in more than 1,900 value changes,

with a mix of increases and decreases.

Increases are especially notable among

never-hinged and on-cover values.

Mozambique Company Scott 1-104

have been completely reorganized according

to the paper on which the stamps

were printed and by perforation gauge.

Collectors are encouraged to refer to the

Classic Specialized Additions, Deletions

& Number Changes for important changes

to the listings. In addition, more than

160 value changes were made.

Almost 1,200 value changes were

made to the listings of the Colombian

states of Antioquia, Bolivar, Boyaca, Cundinamarca,

Santander and Tolima.

Malaya and the Malayan states of

Sungei Ujong and Trengganu weigh in

with more than 400 value changes. Values

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 67


for Malayan stamps reflect an overall softening

of the market, but a few increases

are sprinkled throughout Sungei Ujong.

The 1878 2¢ brown (Scott 2) jumps from

$3,600 unused to $4,400, and from $3,900

used to $4,600.

Significant value increases are found

among the listings of Transvaal, known

as the South African Republic until 1877

when it was occupied and annexed by the

British.

A complete examination of Australia

resulted in more than 700 value changes,

with more decreases than increases.

The 1915 2-penny gray type I (Scott 45)

moves upward slightly, from $37.50 unused

to $42.50, but drops from $10.50

used to $7.50.

Among the listings for Fiji’s classic

stamps, 150 value changes are the result

of a line-by-line review. A similar review

occurred for Scott Standard catalog Vol.

2B listings for stamps issued from 1938

to early 2006. Although decreases in

value predominate among the listings for

stamps issued from 1938 to 2006, values

for early classic issues reflect a mix of increases

and decreases. The 1874 6¢-on-

3-penny green surcharged issue (Scott

24) climbs upward, from $2,500 unused

to $2,750. The value for used examples

remains at $750.

Thrace also was closely examined this

year, resulting in more than 180 value

changes, most of them increases. New varieties

have been added for this country

as well.

New never-hinged listings have been

added to Jordan, Kuwait and Lebanon,

and almost 770 value changes were recorded

for Italian Offices Abroad in Aegean

Islands.

Editorial enhancements are found

throughout the catalog. Various notes

and footnotes have been clarified or expanded

to further explain complicated

listings, and other notes have been carefully

reviewed to ensure accuracy.

What sets the Scott Classic Specialized

catalog apart from the Scott Standard

catalog are the thousands of neverhinged

listings, pre-stamp postal markings

and forerunner listings, among other

features. New to this edition of the Scott

Classic catalog are listings for numeral

cancellations of the Canadian province

of New Brunswick. The cancellations can

be found on New Brunswick 3-penny and

5p stamps, and on Canada’s 1868 3¢ red

Large Queen (Scott 25), and 1873 3¢ orange

red (37) and 1888 3¢ bright vermilion

(41) Small Queen stamps.

On-cover values have been added

for the first time to Malaya and Malayan

States. Users of the Scott Classic Specialized

catalog will find a list of countries

with listings for stamps on covers on

page 23A of the introduction to this catalog.

Five new major numbers have been

added to Reunion’s parcel post stamps. As

a result, the 1906 10-centime red parcel

post stamp previously listed as Q1 has

been renumbered to Q4.

To purchase the 2019 Scott catalogs,

contact your favorite dealer, or call Amos

Media at 1-800-572-6885. Also visit Amos

Advantage. For Scott eCatalogues, visit

Scott Online.

Review our recently updated

Cut Square listings for

1920-25 Revalued Issues

www.postalstationery.com

PO Box 1006, Alton, NH 03809

603.875.5550 email: const@tds.net

SCANDINAVIA YEAR SETS

In original post office packaging

CLEARANCE SALE – 30% OFF prices below

ALAND

2009 .......... $45

2007 .............35

2006 .............36

2005 .............32

1998 .............20

1995 .............26

1994 .............28

1993 .............21

1991 .............18

1989 .............18

1988 .............21

1987 .............25

1986 .............17

1985 .............13

1984 .............15

DENMARK

2017 ........$115

1989 .............59

1986 .............56

1985 .............60

1984 .............49

1983 .............33

1982 .............24

1981 .............28

1980 .............20

1979 .............16

1978 .............14

1977 .............18

1976 .............16

1975 .............24

1974 .............12

1973 .............14

1972 .............30

1971 .............20

1970 .............20

1969 .............65

FAROES

2000 .......... $37

1998 .............25

1997 .............25

1995 .............30

1994 .............23

1993 .............22

1992 .............21

1991 .............21 1978 ............... 9

1990 .............21 1977 ............... 8

1989 .............25 ICELAND

1988 .............20 2003 .......... $56

1987 .............24 2002 .............59

1986 .............23 1998 .............45

1985 .............25 1996 .............39

1984 .............25 1994 .............32

1983 .............18 1993 .............30

1982 ............... 8 1992 .............45

1981 ............... 9 1991 .............47

1980 ............... 7 1988 .............22

1979 ............... 9 1987 .............26

1978 .............11 1986 .............35

1977 .............20 1985 .............23

1975-6 ...... 150 1984 .............29

FINLAND 1982 .............20

2013 ........$130 1979 .............13

2012 .......... 138 NORWAY

2011 .......... 135 2017 .......... $95

2008 .............93 2016 .............92

1997 .............54 1996 .............54

1994 .............39 1995 .............64

1992 .............39 1994 .............49

1991 .............32 1993 .............49

1989 .............49 1992 .............49

1988 .............32 1991 .............49

1985 .............35 1989 .............52

1983 .............19 1988 .............52

1980 .............15 1987 .............52

1976 .............59 1986 .............43

1974 .............60 1985 .............33

GREENLAND 1984 .............36

2011 ........$139 1983 .............45

1992 .............59 1982 .............29

1991 .............59 1981 .............20

1990 .............39 1980 .............12

1988 .............28 1979 .............18

1987 .............22 1978 .............22

1986 .............12 1977 .............20

1985 .............15 1976 .............24

1982 ............... 9 SWEDEN

1981 .............13 2003 ........$130

1980 ............... 9 2002 .......... 145

1979 ............... 8 2001 .......... 143

P&H $4 + $1 ea. Additional set

NORTHLAND

1998 .......... 145

1996 .......... 120

1995 .......... 119

1994 .......... 116

1993 .......... 107

1992 .......... 105

1991 .............90

1990 .......... 114

1989 .......... 160

1988 .............86

1987 .............86

1986 .............72

1985 .............65

1984 .............59

1983 .............56

1982 .............47

1981 .............68

1980 .............42

1979 .............42

1978 .............42

1977 .............32

1976 .............38

1975 .............34

1974 .............57

1973 .............70

1972 .............70

1971 .............95

1970 .......... 110

1969 .......... 100

SWEDEN

BOOKLETS

1994 ........$140

1993 .......... 140

1992 .......... 150

1991 .......... 115

1990 .......... 120

1989 .......... 135

1988 .......... 115

1987 .......... 115

1986 .............90

1985 .............80

1984 .............85

1983 .............65

1982 .............65

1981 .............55

Since 1975

International Trading, LLC, Box 34, Verona, NJ 07044

800-950-0058 • www.northstamp.com

68 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


DIGITAL DISCOVERIES

BY MARA HARTZELL

digital media strategist | mhartzell@stamps.org

An Insider’s View to Exploring Stamps

Over the course of 2018, we had the opportunity to work

with and promote the YouTube channel, Exploring Stamps.

The producer, Graham Beck, supports the hobby with a variety

of well-produced videos and with an infectious enthusiasm

for philately. Graham recently gave us a few minutes of

his time to discuss the plans for a new year of videos.

How are you taking the exploration of stamps and topics

to new heights in Season 3?

My interest in philately is only getting stronger, and it is

showing in my videos. Season 3 is going to have the same

formula as the first two but will continue to improve upon

my own video and presentation skills. Each season I try to

learn new techniques and experiment with different styles to

best present the hobby to my growing YouTube audience, and

I have some really exciting ideas that I know are going to be

entertaining.

Can you provide any topic or location previews?

Yes, well… the teaser trailer leaves you with a clue to the

first episode that is on location. I have identified most of the

stamps that I will be exploring, so I have some ideas for a few

other locations that I could travel to for the 2019 season. As

for topics, some will involve philatelic firsts, scandal, propaganda

and of course the interesting histories and geographies

that I would not have otherwise looked up had it not been

for the stamps in my collection. You will have to watch the

season.

Will there be any continued topics back by popular

demand from Season 1 or Season 2, like your Stockbook

Countdowns?

I typically pull a stamp out of my messy box at random

and learn about it, however I do make a disclaimer that most

of the stamps are at random but there will be some topics

that I must cover due to popular demand, and those will not

be random. For example, there was one topic that I brought

up during a video on philatelic covers that generated a lot

of interest amongst my viewers; the same is true for a stamp

70 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019

that I showed during a Stockbook Countdown… I heard several

viewers wanting to learn more and I am eager to explore

them during the 20 episodes.

In past seasons of Exploring Stamps you highlighted

Stampex in England and StampShow/NTSS in the U.S., do

you have plans to attend any large stamp shows/meetings

this season?

At this time I don’t have any plans. Partly because I am in

the planning and early filming phase, and also partly because

I am exploring other avenues of philately. The filming done

at both Stampex and StampShow/NTSS have provided tremendous

value to both myself and my viewers who have not

attended shows at the past. If my schedule and budget permit,

then it is possible that I may attend a show this year.

Are your social media followers getting sneak peeks

into Season 3 locations and topics through your stories

and posts?

Yes, definitely. Before the upcoming video I will give a

couple clues as to what is coming next. And while on location

or working with props, I may give subtle clues as to where I

am or what stamp I am researching. I enjoy teasing my followers

with hints as to where the season will take us.

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What is the best way to ensure fans can stay up-to-date

with Season 3 developments?

Firstly, subscribe to the Exploring Stamps YouTube channel

(https://aps.buzz/Explore), it’s completely free and notifies

you when new episodes and other channel videos are

launched. The best way to follow my progress and challenges

with the season 3 filming is through social media, I post regularly

on Instagram, Twitter and Snupps. The philatelic communities

on those platforms have influenced several of my

videos in the past as I often post questions and polls. I have

been challenged with different ideas that have changed my

perception and approach to various stamp topics.

What are you most excited about for Season 3 (aside

from playing with super fun-looking parachutes)?

The parachute video just proves that I am having way too

much fun with this hobby; I get excited about trying new

things and techniques such as the parachute teaser trailer.

Video provides an endless set of tools to engage an audience,

and one of the bigger challenges is using those tools to create

a balanced video. The goal is to get the viewer interested and

leave them eager to learn more. For each of the first 2 seasons

I experimented and found some techniques that really work

well with philately and storytelling, and I plan to continue

experimenting. I am in the process of building an actual set

for one of the videos, something that I have not yet done. I

am also looking to blend green-screen effects with an on-site

location and I am looking forward to seeing how those episodes

turn out.

Anything you’d like to mention that we haven’t already?

For each video since the very first, I have been learning

about philately and the stamps that I have shown and spoken

about. If you are an experienced and knowledgeable philatelist,

you can see my understanding and respect for philately

grow through the first 40 episodes as well as the off-season

videos. If you are new to the hobby and have watched the videos,

you would have grown and learned about philately with

me. I would love for more collectors to bring their knowledge

and insights to my channel and other social media platforms,

helping to encourage the newcomers to the hobby, and continue

to grow the philatelic presence online.

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JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 71


PHILATELIC HAPPENINGS

BY KEN MARTIN

chief membership officer | kpmartin@stamps.org

Acronym cavalcade at CSAC, NPM and APRL

Ivan Cash

Spencer R.

Crew

Mike Harrity

The U.S. Postal Service announced the appointment of

three new members to the Citizens Stamp Advisory Committee

(CSAC). Established in 1957, CSAC members consider

and then recommend stamp subjects to

the Postmaster General, who makes the final

decisions.

The newest members are Ivan Cash, Spencer

R. Crew and Mike Harrity. Cash is an

award-winning interactive artist and film director,

and the founder of Cash Studios of

Oakland, California. Crew is the Clarence J.

Robinson Professor of History at George Mason

University in Fairfax County, Virginia.

Harrity is the senior associate athletics director,

Student-Athlete Services, at the University

of Notre Dame near South Bend, Indiana.

They join continuing members Gail Anderson,

Peter Argentine, B. J. Bueno, Cheryl R.

Ganz, Janet Klug, Carolyn Lewis, Harry Rinker,

Maruchi Santana and Katherine C. Tobin.

Many members may recognize Klug as a past

president of the APS and Ganz as a current

vice president. Learn more on the APS blog

at https://aps.buzz/CSAC2018.

Bay Stamp Club of Oakland, California

held its 73rd Annual Stamp Show on October

27-28, 2018. The show attracted 190 collectors who examined

material from 13 dealers with something for every collector.

The competitive exhibits consisted of four multiframe exhibits

and nine single-frame exhibits ranging in themes from

Owney the Postal Dog and His First Day Covers to Finland-

Russian Area Rebellions 1919-1922.

The Olean Stamp Club hosted a program on Migratory Bird Hunting

and Conservation Stamps with local artist Jennifer Miller, who

designed the 2015 Federal Duck Stamp.

Following a successful Oleplex Stamp Show the Olean

Stamp Club of New York state featured a program on the

Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp with local

artist Jennifer Miller who designed the 2015 Federal Duck

Stamp.

On November 1 and 2, 2018, the Tenth Blount Postal History

Symposium was held at the Smithsonian National Postal

Museum. With 2018 marking the centennial of the end of the

First World War, this year’s symposium topic was “WWI and

its Immediate Aftermath,”

Much of the world was covered in the wide range of papers

presented and in philatelic exhibits at the NPM. Topics

considered varied widely from the postal workplace and logistics,

to propaganda and censorship, and from funding the

war to adapting to the shortages it caused.

The American Philatelic Research Library 50th anniversary

celebration began with an informal meet-and-greet at Big Spring

Spirits on Friday, November 2.

Among the panels and presentations of interest were Diane

DeBlois and Robert Dalton Harris’ “U.S. Army Signal

Corps Telephone & Telegraph in the Great War;” Ravi Vora’s

“The Versailles Peace Treaty: The Role of Diplomatic and

Military Mail;” Nancy Pope’s “Postal Censorship of the Press

during World War I;” Alexander Kolchinsky’s “The Mail of

Prisoners of the Great War: Picture Postcards and Aid-Related

Cards;” and Jim Miller’s “Write that Letter Home: Senders,

Recipients, and the Content of World War I Correspondence.”

A public lecture on World War I letters was held on the

night of October 31. Curator-led visits to the NPM exhibition

“My Fellow Soldiers” were offered during the symposium. An

online version of that exhibit is available at https://aps.

buzz/NPMSoldiers.

72 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


Former Librarians Tara Murray (left), Ellen Peachy and Gini Horn

were honored at the Golden Anniversary of the APRL.

The American Philatelic Research Library Golden Anniversary

celebration to honor its 50th anniversary was

held November 2 and 3 at the American Philatelic Center in

Bellefonte. While members began arriving the Monday prior

to do research in the library, the event itself began with an informal

meet-and-greet on Friday evening, followed by a full

day of activities on Saturday, including author talks, displays

of rarely seen items from the APRL archives, a ceremony

in recognition of past APRL librarians, special behind-thescenes

library tours, all concluding with a celebration dinner

with a very special guest speaker.

May Day Taylor (shown above on a honorary cover) received the

annual 2017 Kehr Award for her enduring contributions that help

guarantee the future of the stamp hobby.

APS Executive Director Scott English presents a Carter Volunteer

Award to Rod Juell at Chicagopex 2018.

A visitor from Germany, auctioneer Christoph Gärtner (center)

stands between Ken Martin (left) and Germany specialist Keith

Stupell at the American Philatelic Center.

Later in November, distinguished German stamp auctioneer

Christoph Gärtner visited the American Philatelic

Center on his way to Chicagopex. Executive Director Scott

English presented a couple of APS awards at Chicagopex

including a Carter Volunteer Award to Rod Juell. The 2017

United States Stamp Society Barbara R. Mueller Award for

the best article published in the The American Philatelist in

2017 was presented at Chicagopex to co-winner Al Kugel for

World War I: 100, which he wrote with Ed Dubin, published

in the April 2017 issue. Also in November, the 2017 Kehr

Award for enduring contributions that help guarantee the

future of the stamp hobby was presented to May Day Taylor.

Also at Chicagopex, English delivered the USSS Barbara R. Mueller

Award to co-author Al Kugel for the article he wrote with Ed

Dubin, “World War I: 100,” selected as the finest 2017 article in The

American Philatelist.

Congratulations to the major award winners at Chicagopex,

the single World Series of Philately show held since the

writing of last month’s column.

Bernard Hennig Multiframe Grand: Outbound Foreign

Mail Cancels of New York; Their Progression 1845-1877, Nicholas

M. Kirke;

Felix Ganz Multiframe Reserve Grand: Washington and

Franklin Coils Third Bureau Perforated Issues 1908-1922,

Greg Shoults;

Single Frame Grand: Coil Stamps: The Plates, Coil Stamps

and Coil Waste Issues of 1912 & 1914, Greg Shoults;

John Kevin Doyle Literature Grand: United States Stamp

Treasures: The William H. Gross Collection, Scott Trepel;

Literature Reserve Grand: Florida Postal History During

the Civil War, Deane R. Briggs.

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 73


Meet Us in Mesa…

…for Arizona Sun & Philatelic Fun

Make plans now to join old friends and meet new ones

with your APS family at the society’s annual winter meeting

February 15-17 in Mesa, Arizona. It’s the final AmeriStamp

Expo as the APS transitions back to its traditional and timetested

rotating annual meetings in conjunction with World Series

of Philately stamp shows around the country. This year,

AmeriStamp Expo joins talents with ARIPEX 2019 to cook up

a sun-soaked escape full of stamps, covers, hobby fellowship

and more … far from the woes of wintry weather, with plenty

for everyone to see and do!

The three-day show will be held at the Mesa Convention

Center at 263 N. Center St. in Mesa, Arizona, where 240 exhibit

frames – up to 3,840 pages – will showcase the annual

nationwide single-frame Champion of Champions competition

and Most Popular Exhibit competition, and an Open

Competition. Chaired by Chief Judge Peter McCann, the distinguished

jury for the show will include Allison Cusick, Michael

Dixon, Bill Fort, Colin Fraser, Matt Kewriga, Frederick

Lawrence, Steve Schumann and Steve Reinhard.

In addition, a bourse of as many as 50 dealers will offer

a remarkable array of stamps, postal history and collecting

accessories for every interest and budget. Representatives of

up to 15 or more local and national societies and clubs, chapters

and affiliates, and the APS Education Department, will

host an estimated 50 presentations, seminars and meetings

to keep collectors cheerfully occupied during the 22 hours of

AmeriStamp Expo/ARIPEX.

A special youth area known as Discovery Cove will provide

hands-on activities for beginners ages 6 to 12. All children

who visit Discovery Cove and complete a stamp passport

activity will receive a free packet of stamps, an activity

booklet and information about the Young Stamp Collectors of

America (YSCA).

Mesa follows Phoenix as the second-largest urban component

of Arizona’s “Valley of the Sun.” Known for 300 days of

sun per year and toasty temperatures, the valley also encompasses

Scottsdale, Glendale, Tempe, Gilbert, Chandler and

Peoria in a sprawling community of 4.73 million renowned

for its superb spa resorts, outstanding golf courses and vibrant

nightclubs.

74 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


Get a headstart on AmeriStamp Expo with an

updated set of Arizona album pages. Download the

pages FREE at https://aps.buzz/Albums.

The Superstition Mountains outside of Mesa, Arizona.

Travel Information

Delta Hotels Phoenix Mesa is the headquarters hotel for AmeriStamp

Expo/Aripex.

Fly in to the Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport

(PHX), 3400 E. Sky Harbor Road, just 12 miles from the show

hotel and convention center. www.skyharbor.com

From the airport take the complimentary Sky Rail at the

airport to the Valley Metro Rail. Valley Metro Rail charges $2

to ride one-way to its Center Street at Main Street stop, about

one-third of a mile south of the hotel and show venue. You also

can reserve a ride on the Super Shuttle, which charges $17 for

the trip (book online at https://aps.buzz/AzShuttle), or take a

taxicab from the airport (estimated fare $36).

The show headquarters hotel is the Delta Hotels by

Marriott Phoenix Mesa at 200 N. Centennial Way, Mesa, AZ

85201, just a few steps away from the show. Until January

21, the hotel is offering a single/double room rate of $159 per

night, plus tax, at (480) 898-8300, or book a reservation online

at https://aps.buzz/AzHotel.

Dining Tips for the hotel, convention center and environs.

There are a few dining options in the hotel: the Azul Café

(casual American and southwest dining); and AZ Brew (coffee

and cocktails). Other popular nearby dining choices less than

half a mile away include Diamond’s Sports Grill just across

from the hotel (casual American and bar cuisine); Oak Room

Kitchen (Italian, American and pub food); Mango’s Mexican

Café (well reviewed and moderately priced); and Rosa’s Mexican

Grill (southwestern).

Dining Tips for Mesa, Phoenix and region. According to

the Trip Advisor website for Mesa (which includes some restaurants

from other parts of the Phoenix metro area), the most

popular eateries are Italian & pizza (276), Mexican (216), Chinese

(105), seafood (42), barbeque (37), Thai (34) and steakhouse

(33). Find out more about them or choose by other listed

categories to suit you at https://aps.buzz/AzFood.

Attractions

At the show’s venue, the Mesa Convention Center, you

are:

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 75


Half a mile from the Arizona Museum of Natural History,

introducing you to the natural and cultural history of

the American Southwest, including “Dinosaur Mountain” −

the largest dinosaur exhibit west of the Mississippi River.

Half a mile from the Mesa Arts Center, venue for Arizona’s

own Carnival of Illusion’s Valentine’s Day Weekend

performance of “Magic, Mystery and OOOH La La,” with

tickets now available for performances Friday, February 15

at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday February 16 at 4:30 p.m. and 7:30

p.m. Reserve tickets now at: https://www.carnivalofillusion.

com/tickets/

Eight miles away from the Arizona Commemorative

Air Force Museum, with 55,000 square feet of historic military

aircraft, exhibits, videos, WWII artifacts, and memorabilia.

11 miles away from the Phoenix Zoo, at 455 North Galvin

Parkway. The 56-year-old zoo on 125 acres in the Papago

Park area of Phoenix is home to more than 3,000 animals, including

30 endangered or threatened species. While there, be

sure to visit the Desert Botanical Garden, a 140-acre garden

founded by the Arizona Cactus and Native Flora Society in

1937. It now has more than 21,000 plants, one-third of which

are native to the area, including 139 species which are rare,

threatened or endangered.

Farther afield

Fresh Foodie Trail – for a free nine-page color-illustrated

gide to Agritourism in and near Mesa, visit https://aps.buzz/

AzFoodie.

Native American & Western Attractions – The first settlement

in the Mesa area was about 2,000 years ago. A Native

American civilization called the Hohokam (meaning “those

who are gone”), built an empire that lasted 1,500 years. Today,

Arizona is home to 22 Native American tribes, each with

its own unique cultural heritage that offer a rich experience

to visitors. To explore these offerings, visit https://aps.buzz/

AzCulture.

Usery Mountain Regional Park (18 miles west by northwest)

– A 3,648-acre park offering camping, archery & 29

miles of multi-use trails plus scenic wind caves.

Saguaro Lake (28 miles northwest) – Saguaro Lake is

the fourth reservoir on the Salt River formed by the Stewart

Mountain Dam in the U.S. state of Arizona. The lake is off

State Route 87, about halfway between Phoenix and the ghost

town of Sunflower.

Superstition Mountains (35 miles west) – this range

of mountains east of the “Valley of the Sun” is anchored by

Superstition Mountain, a popular recreation destination for

residents. Check some of the options among “the Superstitions”

at https://aps.buzz/AzMountains.

Apache Trail (55 miles west by northwest) – this stagecoach

trail (still mostly unpaved) named after the Indians

who originally used the route, it links Apache Junction at the

edge of the Greater Phoenix area with Theodore Roosevelt

Lake through the Superstition Mountains and the Tonto National

Forest.

Tonto National Forest (85 miles northwest) – the fifthlargest

forest in the United States embraces almost 3 million

acres of rugged and spectacularly beautiful country, ranging

from Saguaro cactus-studded desert to pine-forested mountains

beneath the Mogollon Rim. This variety in vegetation

and range in altitude (from 1,300 to 7,900 feet) offers outstanding

recreational opportunities throughout the year,

from lake beaches to cool pine forest.

Grand Canyon National Park (240 miles north) – marking

its centennial in 2019, this fabled landmark needs no introduction

to U.S. stamp collectors, having been featured on

eight United States stamps in the last 85 years. A nearly fourhour

drive from Mesa, in the opinion of many visitors it may

well be America’s most memorable national park.

76 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


AmeriStamp Expo / ARIPEX 2019 AT-A-Glance

When: February 15 to 17

Hours: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday & Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday

Where: Mesa Convention Center

263 N. Center Street

Mesa, Arizona 85201

Hotel: Delta Hotels by Marriott Phoenix Mesa

200 N. Centennial Way

Mesa, AZ 85201

(480) 898-8300

Admission: Free, but all who attend must register. You can save your

self some time by registering in advance at:

https://aps.buzz/ASE19

Parking: Free, see map on page 81

More info:

https://stamps.org/AmeriStamp-Expo

or call Kathleen Edwards, APS Shows & Exhibitions

Assistant at (814) 933-3803, extension 217

Weather: Mesa Temperature Averages for February 15-17

Feb 15: 69⁰ / 47⁰ | Feb 16: 69⁰ / 47⁰ | Feb 17: 69⁰ / 48⁰

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 77


AmeriStamp Expo 2019 Schedule

This schedule is subject to change. Please check the website for the most current schedule.

The AmeriStamp Expo/ARIPEX is being held in the Mesa Convention Center. The Dealer Bourse will be in the Main Hall, Society

booths and the Youth Area will be in the Mesa Room. Exhibits will be in the Paolo Verde Room. Meetings will be held in

the Convention Center and the Delta Hotels Phoenix Mesa.

Thursday, February 14, 2019

9:00 AM American Philatelic Society -

Executive Session

AZ Ballroom C

On The Road Course - Pressing

Issues: Stamp Printing Simplified -

Wayne Youngblood

AZ Ballroom G

10:00 AM American Philatelic Society - Board

Meeting

AZ Ballroom C

1:00 PM Society for Czechoslovak Philately

Board of Directors Meeting

AZ Ballroom E

5:30 PM American Philatelic Society -

Campaign for Philately Reception

(Invitation Only) - Starlight Room

Friday, February 15, 2019

10:00 AM SHOW OPENS

YOUTH AREA OPEN

Exhibiting Seminar on Treatment and

Importance

AZ Ballroom F

11:00 AM USPS First Day Ceremony

Conference Theater

12:00 PM Exhibiting Seminar on Title Page and

Synopsis

AZ Ballroom F

1:00 PM Auxiliary Markings Show and Tell -

Ralph Nafziger

Cholla II

The 1933 Byrd Antartic Issue:

Production, FDC and Other Uses -

Alan Warren

AZ Ballroom B

1:30 PM Writing for the APS - Martin Miller

AZ Ballroom A

2:00 PM American First Day Cover Society

Regional Meeting - Foster Miller

AZ Ballroom D

Gay and Lesbian History on Stamps

General Meeting

Cholla II

Guided Exhibit Tour - Ken Martin

Palo Verde Rooms

3:00 PM ATA Roundtable: Update on Topical

Collecting and ATA News

AZ Ballroom F

United Postal Stationery Society

Board of Directors Meeting

AZ Ballroom C

4:00 PM American Association of Philatelic

Exhibitors Board of Directors Meeting

AZ Ballroom E

Buying and Selling through the APS -

Ken Martin

AZ Ballroom F

6:00 PM SHOW CLOSES

YOUTH AREA CLOSES

Authentic Hungarian Dinner (Ticket

Required)

Off Site, contact society for

information

Saturday, February 16, 2019

8:00 AM Royal Philatelic Society of London

Breakfast

Starlight Room

9:00 AM American Philatelic Society - General

and Town Hall Meeting

Conference Theater

CANEJ Board Meeting - Elizabeth

Hisey (Closed)

AZ Ballroom C

9:30 AM Stamp Collecting Merit Badge

Workshop - Lee Shedroff (Advance

Registration Required)

AZ Ballroom G

78 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


10:00 AM SHOW OPENS

YOUTH AREA OPEN

10:00 AM Canal Zone Study Group Meeting and

Presentation

AZ Ballroom D

Great Britain Collectors Club Annual

General Meeting - Doug McGill

AZ Ballroom A

Society for Hungarian Philately

Annual Meeting - Alan Bauer

Cholla II

Viewing the Grand Canyon with a

Philatelic Eye - Marjory Sente

AZ Ballroom F

10:30 AM Candidates Forum

Conference Theater

11:00 AM Exhibiting Seminar on Treatment and

Importance

AZ Ballroom D

Meet and Greet- Penguins on Stamps

Study Unit - Jean Stout

Cholla II

NORDJAMB ‘75 - World Jamboree in

Norway - Lawrence Clay

AZ Ballroom F

United Nations Philatelists General

Meeting

AZ Ballroom B

12:00 PM Navigating the APS Website

Martin Miller

Cholla II

1:00 PM “got guatemala?” The Joys and

Adventure of Collecting Guatemala -

Michael Bloom

AZ Ballroom B

American Association of Philatelic

Exhibitors General Meeting and Open

Forum

AZ Ballroom A

Plate Number Coil Regional Meeting

AZ Ballroom F

Scouts on Stamps Society International

Annual Meeting - William Shea

AZ Ballroom C

United Postal Stationery Society

General Membership Meeting

AZ Ballroom D

2:00 PM Scenes of the West- The history of

the 1898 Omaha Exhibition Issue-

Casey Jo White

AZ Ballroom A

Searching for Lost Arizona Post

Offices - Joe Cody

Z Ballroom B

The Joys and Excitement of

Collecting Ryukyu - Gary B. Weiss

AZ Ballroom F

3:00 PM Judges Feedback Forum

Conference Theater

USPPS and IPPS Joint Meeting with

Speaker

AZ Ballroom F

4:00 PM Society for Czechoslovak Philately

General Meeting

AZ Ballroom B

6:00 PM SHOW CLOSES - YOUTH AREA

CLOSES

6:15 PM Awards Reception - (Ticket Required

Superstition Ballroom South

7:00 PM Awards Banquet - (Ticket Required

Superstition Ballroom North

Sunday, February 17, 2019

8:00 AM Dealer Breakfast - (Ticket Required)

Starlight Room

9:30 AM Stamp Collecting Merit Badge

Workshop - Lee Shedroff (Advance

Registration Required)

AZ Ballroom G

10:00 AM SHOW OPENS

YOUTH AREA OPEN

11:00 AM Estate Planning for Philatelists - Ken

Martin

AZ Ballroom D

1:00 PM Women Exhibitors General Meeting

- Cholla II

4:00 PM SHOW CLOSES - YOUTH AREA

CLOSES

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 79


Convention Center MAP

NORTH

SUPERSTITION

BALLROOM

SOUTH

LEGEND

g Banquet - Superstition Ballroom

g Exhibits - Palo Verde Rooms

g Bourse - Buiding C - Main Hall

g Meetings - Arizona Ballrooms

g First Day Ceremony - Conference Theatre

g APS General Meeting - Conference Theatre

g Societies - Building C - Crimson & Robson

g Youth Area - Building C - Sirrine

CONFERENCE

THEATRE

EXHIBITS

PALO VERDE I-III

YOUTH

SOCIETIES

BOURSE

MAIN HALL

The show hotel is the Delta Hotels by Marriott

Phoenix Mesa at 200 N. Centennial Way,

Mesa, AZ 85201. Until January 21, the hotel is

offering a single/double room rate of $159 per

night, plus tax, at (480) 898-8300, or book a

reservation online at https://aps.buzz/AzHotel.

80 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


PL.

E. 3RD PL.

ST.

N. MACDONALD

ST.

EPPER PL.

REET

Active Adult

Resource

Center

Bank of

America

Visit

Mesa

Downtown

Mesa Assoc.

Az Museum

of Natural History

US Bank

DREW

N. CENTER ST.

Post

Office

Mesa

Convention

Center

Library

Council

Chambers

Mesa

City Hall

Mesa

Amphitheatre

N. CENTENNIAL WAY

Marriott

Mesa

E. 1ST ST.

E. PEPPER PL.

Longest Running WSP Show in Sunrise Florida — Striving to be the Best Show in the U.S.

Benedictine

Wells Fargo

Mesa Arts Bank

University

Center

2018 Sarasota National

Stamp Exhibition

Mesa Justice

E. 1ST AVE.

Center

N. PASADENA

N. HIBBERT

N. POMEROY

AREA Parking

Mesa, Arizona offers a generous

supply of FREE parking

options. This map shows the

free E. lots 2ND that ST. are closest to the

AmeriStamp Expo venue. The

full Mesa parking map can be

downloaded from https://aps.

buzz/AzParking.

Fire Station 201

N. MESA DR.

W

a

D

w

e

m

p

in

so

Pl

m

p

D

5

D

S. MACDONALD

Hosted by the Sarasota Philatelic Club

February 1–3, 2019

Sarasota Municipal Auditorium • 801 N. Tamiami Trail • U.S. Hwy. 41 • Sarasota, FL

S. CENTER ST.

S. SIRRINE

Show Hours: Fri. & Sat. 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–3 p.m.

Free Admission • Free Parking • Free Stamp Appraisals

S. HIBBERT

AVE.

AVE.

Dealers from Across the Nation • 200 Frames of Informative Exhibits • United States Postal Service

United Nations Postal Agency • Learning Center for the E. 2ND Young AVE. and Not-so-Young • Free Stamps

Participating dealers: Roy Smith/Robert Feldman, The Classic Philatelist, Bardo Stamps, Jacksonville Stamp &

Coin, New England Stamp, Stephen Taylor, Robert M. Sazama, Stanley M. Piller, A to Z Stamps, The Browse

House, Collectors Exchange, The Stamp Professor, AAA Stamp & Coin, Labron Harris, Suncoast Stamp Co.,

Weisz Stamps & Covers, John Kimbrough, Richard Friedberg, Mountainside Stamps, Frank Bachenheimer,

Mark Reasoner, Rasdale Stamp Company, Fairwinds, Fred Boatwright, Earl T. Reeder, Roy’s Stamps, Eric Jackson,

Castlerock, Stamps, Inc., Patricia A. Kaufmann, Miller’s Stamp Co., BEJJCO of Florida, Inc.,

Quality Stamps/Dick Murphy, Wayne Gehret, and Double J Stamps.

S. MESA DR.

*P

5

For more information, visit www.sarasotastampclub.com

2019 Sarasota National Stamp Exhibition AP ad with dealers.indd 1 JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN 10/23/2018 PHILATELIST 10:14:57 AM 81


BOURSE DEALERS

The show bourse will be located in Building C - Main Hall

A & D Stamps and Coins

A to Z Stamps

A. Keith Kaufman

M/NH Philatelics

AKM Stamps

BJ’s Stamps & Coins LLC

Classic Asia

Pacific Stamps & Covers

Classic Philatelist

Warren Manning

Coast Philatelics (Dollar)

Compustamp

D & P Stamps

David Grossblat

DK Enterprise

Ed Dimmick

Gary Posner, Inc.

Global Philatelic Associates

Greenbridge Philatelics

HB Philatelics

Hugh Wood, Inc.

Labron Harris

Martin Shupe Stamps

Mesa Stamps

Michael E. Aldrich, Inc.

Miller’s Stamp Company

Newport Harbor Stamp Co.

Oceanview Stamp Company

Quality WW Stamps

R.G. Stamps & Covers

Rail Philatelist

RASLAD Enterprises

Richard Thomas Philatelics

Robertson Tracy Enterprises

San Pedro Stamp & Coin

Schau-Stickney

Postal History

Spink USA

Stamp Art

Stamp Center of Texas

Stamp Smith

Stamps ‘n’ Stuff

Stanley M. Piller & Assoc.

Stephen Pattillo

Rare Stamps

Steve Sims

Walter Kasell

Weisz Stamps and Covers

Worldwide Philatelics

Wulff’s Stamps, Inc.

SocietY Booths

Society booths will be located in Building C - Mesa Rooms

American Association of

Philatelic Exhibitors

American First Day

Cover Society

American Topical Association

Arizona-New Mexico

Postal History Society

Canal Zone Study Group

International Philippine

Philatelic Society

International Society of

Guatemala Collectors

Plate Number Coil

Collectors Club

Scouts on Stamps Society

International

Society for Hungarian

Philately

United Nations

Philatelists, Inc

United Postal Stationery

Society

United States Possessions

Philatelic Society

82 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


• AMERISTAMP EXPO/ARIPEX DEALER SHOWCASE •

Specializing in

WORLD AIR MAIL STAMPS

Come by to see our extensive stock. Also

stamps of the world and ask about our show specials.


SEE US AT BOOTH #312




COLLECT AIR MAILS?

Contact us for our latest price list.


San

San Pedro Stamp & Coin, & LLC Coin



6350 N. Oracle Road • Tucson, AZ 85704



(520) 393-9887 • Email: sanpedrosc@gmail.com


Established 1950



WORLDWIDE

PHILATELICS

STAMPS & COVERS

Bring this ad to booth #326 and

receive a 20% discount on any purchase.

www.worldwidephilatelics.com



Specializing in dead countries and hard-to-find pre-1940 stamps

TSDA

BUYING — SELLING

RASLAD Enterprises

U.S., France, Offices & Colonies

• FRENCH PRE-INDEPENDENT COLONIES

• EARLY TO MODERN U.S., FRANCE

• FR. POLYNESIA, FR. ANDORRA, FSAT, MONACO

• NEW CALEDONIA, SPM, WALLIS & FUTUNA

• NEW ISSUE SERVICE

ALWAYS

BUYING!

Lynn Davidson-Stroh

PRESIDENT

www.deadcountrystamps.com

deadcountrystamps@gmail.com

(505) 879-2395 or (785) 639-2317

P.O. Box 3675 • Gallup, NM 87305

Send Your Want List!

WULFF’S STAMPS, INC.

P.O. Box 1563, Rohnert Park, CA 94927

Phone 1-707-890-5000 • 1-800-884-0656

Web: www.wulffstamps.com

Email: service@wulffstamps.com

ATA MSDA

See us at AmeriStamp Expo/Aripex Booth #325

See us

at Booth

226

IFSDA

Buy and Sell U.S. Classics, FREE Appraisals

For One of the World's Most

Complete U.S. Inventories

See us at Booth 205

or visit our website:

www.millerstamps.com

DARN! I should have bought my stamps from

MILLER'S STAMP CO.

— A name you can trust since 1969 —

12 Douglas Lane, Suite 11 • Waterford, CT 06385

Phone: 860-908-6200 • E-mail: stamps@millerstamps.com

Many Graded Stamps from 80–100

QUALITY U.S. STAMPS

2018 miller eighth of a page ad for December AP.indd 1 10/26/2018 12:23:31 PM

HB Philatelics

Proofs & Essays • Federal & State Hunting Permits

Guy Gasser

P.O. Box 2320 • Florissant, MO 63032

Phone 314-330-8684

E-mail: guy@hbphilatelics.com

AmeriStamp Expo/

Aripex • Booth 310

www.hbphilatelics.com

Official APS Web Sponsor

STAMPSHOW/NTSS 2019

Omaha, NE — August 1-4, 2019

It isn’t easy, but...

WE CARRY

THE WORLD!

“We carry more stamps

at shows than any

dealer in the country.”

See Our

HUGE

StOck Of

UNITED

STATES

and

FOREIGN

U.S. — The Works! #1 right up to date, mint,

used, plates, BOB, etc.

FOREIGN — Millions of stamps, 20¢ to $5,000, A to Z!

See us at APS AmeriStAmp expo

Booths 304, 306, 308

~ Jim and Sue Dempsey ~

A&D StAmpS AnD CoinS

2541 Venado Camino • Walnut Creek, CA 94598

Ph: 925-935-8212 • Fax: 925-935-9277

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 83


SHOWTIME

stampshow@stamps.org

The “Show Time” Calendar features a list of

upcoming shows and APS events (shown in

green). To obtain a listing, please submit a “Show

Time” form, available online at www.stamps.org/

Show-Calendar or by mail from APS headquarters.

Information must be received 60 days before

desired publication time.

The listings are free to World Series of Philately

and other shows that are sponsored by an APS

chapter or affiliate. Other shows/bourses may

purchase listings for the month of the show/

bourse and the month prior only. The listing fee

is $25 per show per issue. Shows designated *B*

are bourse only.

Grand award winners from *WSP* shows are

eligible for the annual APS World Series of Philately

Champion of Champions competition. Visit www.

stamps.org/Show-Calendar for a complete listing

of shows and APS events.

New Jersey January 3-5

Garden State Stamp and Cover Show New

Jersey Stamp Dealers Association, The

Bethwood, 38 Lackawanna Ave., Totowa. *B*

Contact: Tom Jacks, 908-419-9751

Email: tjacks@verizon.net

Website: www.mountainsidestamps.com

Michigan January 5-6

BIRPEX 2019 Birmingham Stamp Club /

Ferndale Stamp Club, Birmingham Masonic

Temple, 37357 Woodward Ave., Bloomfield Hills.

*B*

Contact: Fred Como, 586-863-7934

Email: karate1dad@netscape.net

Indiana January 12-13

MSDA Winter Indianapolis Show Midwest

Stamp Dealers Association, Lawrence

Community Center, 5301 N. Franklin Rd.,

Lawrence. *B*

Contact: Jim Bardo, 847-922-5574

Email: jfb7437@aol.com

Website: www.msdastamp.com

Louisiana January 18-19

NOLAPEX Stamp & Postcard Show Crescent City

Stamp Club, Doubletree New Orleans Airport,

2150 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Kenner.

Contact: Doug Weisz, 773-914-4332

Email: weiszcovers@yahoo.com

Website: www.ccscno.org

South Carolina January 19-20

2019 Winter Stamp and Postcard

Show Columbia Philatelic Society, Spring

Valley High School, 120 Sparkleberry Lane,

Columbia. *B*

Contact: Mark Postmus, 803-309-2534

Email: mapostmus@yahoo.com

Website: stamps.org/cps

Wisconsin January 19-20

MSDA Winter Milwaukee Show Midwest Stamp

Dealers Association, Crown Plaza Milwaukee

Airport, 6401 South 13th Street, Milwaukee. *B*

Contact: Jim Bardo, 847-922-5574

Email: jfb7437@aol.com

Website: www.msdastamp.com

New York January 20

Bayside Stamp Show The Adria Hotel, 220-33

Northern Blvd., Bayside, Queens. *B*

Contact: Marilyn Nowak, 718-645-7659

Email: marilynjnowak@verizon.net

Pennsylvania January 25-26

York County Stamp Show White Rose Philatelic

Society of York, York Expo Center, 334 Carlisle

Ave., York.

Contact: Gordon A Miller, 717-252-1191

Email: gmscales@comcast.net

Georgia January 25-27

Southeastern Stamp Expo Southeastern

Federation of Stamp Clubs, Hilton Hotel Atlanta

Northeast, 5993 Peachtree Industrial Blvd.,

Norcross. *WSP*

Contact: Scott Mark

Email: sestampexpo@gmail.com

Website: www.sefsc.org

Washington January 26-27

GESSPEX Greater Eastside Stamp Society,

Redmond VFW Hall, 4330 148th Ave. NE,

Redmond. *B*

Contact: Dana Nielsen, 206-819-8534

Email: dananielsen@comcast.net

Website: www.facebook.com/GESS

Connecticut January 27

Fourth Sunday Stamp and Coin Show New

Haven Philatelic Society, Annex YMA, 554

Woodward Ave., New Haven. *B*

Contact: Brian McGrath, 203-627-6874

Email: soggy3@aol.com

Website: www.nhps1914.org

Florida February 1-3

Sarasota National Stamp Exhibition Sarasota

Philatelic Club, Sarasota Municipal Auditorium,

801 N. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota. *WSP*

Contact: Liz Hisey, 941-444-0777

Email: lizhisey@comcast.net

Website: www.sarasotastampclub.com/show.html

New Jersey February 2

MSC Monthly Bourse Merchantville Stamp

Club, Martin Luther Chapel School gym, 4100

Terrace Ave., Pennsauken. *B*

Contact: Carol Anne Visalli, 856-562-1389

Email: cavisalli@gmail.com

Website: www.merchantvillestampclub.org

South Carolina February 9-10

Myrtle Beach Stamp & Postcard Show Myrtle

Beach Stamp Club, Waccamaw Shoppes At

Fantasy Harbor, 2999 Waccamaw Blvd., Myrtle

Beach. *B*

Contact: Donn M. Ebert, 843-347-0087

Email: lilfort@sccoast.net

Website: sites.google.com/site/

myrtlebeachstampclub/

Kansas February 15-16

The Cessna Show The Cessna Stamp & Coin

Club, Cessna Activity Center, 2744 George

Washington Blvd., Wichita.

Contact: Ralph E. Lott, 316-683-6593

Arizona February 15-17

AmeriStamp Expo/ARIPEX American Philatelic

Society and Arizona Fed. of Stamp Clubs, Mesa

Convention Center, 263 N. Center St., Building

“C”, Mesa. *WSP*

Contact: Kathleen Edwards, 480-240-0388

Email: stampshow@stamps.org

Website: www.stamps.org www.aripex.org

Florida February 16

Annual Stamp Show West Volusia Stamp Club,

Sons of Italy, 1270 Doyle Rd., Deltona. *B*

Contact: Mike Daley, 407-417-7818

Email: miked129e@gmail.com

Website: floridacsp.com/wvstamp/

Ohio February 16-17

MSDA Winter Cincinnati Show Midwest Stamp

Dealers Association, Four Points by Sheraton

Cincinnati North, 7500 Tylers Place Boulevard,

West Chester. *B*

Contact: Jim Bardo, 847-922-5574

Email: jfb7437@aol.com

Website: www.msdastamp.com

New York February 17

Bayside Stamp Show The Adria Hotel, 220-33

䄀 䌀 吀 一 伀 圀 ጠ 䔀 匀 吀 䤀 䴀 䄀 吀 䔀 䐀 吀 唀 刀 一 䄀 刀 伀 唀 一 䐀 㘀 ⴀ 㠀 圀 䬀 匀 ℀

倀 ⸀ 伀 ⸀ 䈀 漀 砀 アパート 㔀 Ⰰ 匀 礀 爀 愀 挀 甀 猀 攀 Ⰰ 一 攀 眀 夀 漀 爀 欀 アパート㈀ 㤀 ⴀアパートアパート

倀 吀 匀 ∠ 䄀 匀 䐀 䄀

84 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


Northern Blvd., Bayside, Queens. *B*

Contact: Marilyn Nowak, 718-645-7659

Email: marilynjnowak@verizon.net

Ohio February 17

Montrose Stamp Show Lincolnway Stamps,

Holiday Inn Akron, West 4073 Medina Road,

Akron. *B*

Contact: David G. Pool, 330-832-5992

Email: lincolnway@sssnet.com

Website: www.stamps.org www.aripex.org

Ohio February 22-23

Toledo Stamp Expo 2019 Stamp Collectors Club

of Toledo, Holland Gardens, 6530 Angola Rd.,

Holland.

Contact: Charles Habilitzel, 419-297-7604

Email: president@toledostampclub.org

Website: www.toledostampclub.org

Nebraska February 23-24

LINPEX 2019 Lincoln Stamp Club, Country Inn &

Suites, 5353 N. 27th St., Lincoln.

Contact: Dale Niebuhr, 402-423-7108

Email: dale.niebuhr@gmail.com

Website: www.lincolnstampclub.org

Connecticut February 24

Fourth Sunday Stamp and Coin Show New

Haven Philatelic Society, Annex YMA, 554

Woodward Ave., New Haven. *B*

Contact: Brian McGrath, 203-627-6874

Email: soggy3@aol.com

Website: www.nhps1914.org

Alaska March 1-3

Alaska Philatelic Exhibition (APEX) Anchorage

Philatelic Society, Anchorage Senior Activity

Center, 1300 East 19th Avenue, Anchorage. *B*

Contact: Patrick Hoffmann, 907-346-2717

Email: phoffmann@alaska.net

Website: anchoragephilatelic.org/

Florida March 2

15th Annual Stamp and Coin Show Flagler

County Stamp and Coin Club, Elk’s Lodge, 47

Old Kings Road North, Palm Coast. *B*

Contact: David Rosenthal, 386-437-0368

Email: stampandcoin@hotmail.com

Website: www.stampandcoinclub.com

New Jersey March 2

Westfield StampShow Westfield Stamp Club,

Westfield Municipal Building, 425 East Broad

Street, Westfield.

Contact: Ed Grabowski, 908-233-9318

Email: info@westfieldstampclub.org

Website: www.westfieldstampclub.org

New Jersey March 2

MSC Monthly Bourse Merchantville Stamp

Club, Martin Luther Chapel School gym, 4100

Terrace Ave., Pennsauken. *B*

Contact: Carol Anne Visalli, 856-562-1389

Email: cavisalli@gmail.com

Website: www.merchantvillestampclub.org

Tennessee March 2

KnoxPEx 2019- Moon Landing 50th

Anniversary Knoxville Philatelic Society,

Holiday Inn Knoxville-Cedar Bluff, 9134

Executive Park Dr., Knoxville.

Contact: Tom Broadhead, 865-974-1151

Email: broadhea@utk.edu

Website: www.knoxstamps.com

Michigan March 2-3

Michipex 2019 Michigan Stamp Club, Sokol

Cultural Center, 23600 West Warren, Dearborn

Heights. *B*

Contact: John Bendzick, 313-277-2298

Ohio March 2-3

McKinley Stamp Club Show McKinley Stamp

Club, St. George Serbian Orthodox Social Hall,

4667 Applegrove St., NW, North Canton.

Contact: Dave Pool, 330-832-5992

Email: lincolnway@sssnet.com

Website: mksc.webs.com

Connecticut March 9

NORPEX 2019 Norwalk Stamp Club, Norwalk

Senior Center, 11 Allen Road, Norwalk.

Contact: John Leskovsky, 203-846-2490

Email: johnleskovsky@sbcglobal.net

Website: www.thenorwalkstampclubinc.org

California March 9-10

Frespex 2019 Fresno Philatelic Society, Veterans

Memorial Building, 435 Hughes Ave., Clovis. *B*

Contact: Dick Richardson, 559-472-8445

Email: starstamps@thegrid.net

Illinois March 9-10

Rockford 2-3-4 Stamp Expo Rockford Stamp

Club, Forest Hills Lodge, 1601 West Lane Rd.,

Loves Park.

Contact: Tim Wait, 815-670-5869

Email: t.wait@comcast.net

Website: www.rockfordstampclub.org

New Mexico March 9-10

Mesilla Valley Stamp Show Mesilla Valley Stamp

Club, Las Cruces Convention Center, 680 East

University Ave., Las Cruces.

Contact: Richard Hiss, 575-202-1937

Email: RHHiss@comcast.net

Website: www.meetinlascruces.com

New York March 9-10

BUFPEX 2019 The Buffalo Stamp Club, VFW Hall,

2450 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga.

Contact: George Gates, 716-633-8358

Email: gghg53@aol.com

Massachusetts March 10

SOPEX 2019 (Massachusetts) Samuel Osgood

Stamp Club, Elks Lodge, 652 Andover Street,

Lawrence. *B*

Contact: Robert A. Dominque, 978-470-0583

Email: radpm67@gmail.com

Mississippi March 15-16

GULFPEX 2019 Gulf Coast Stamp Club, St.

Martin Community Center, 15004 LeMoyne

Blvd., Biloxi.

Contact: John F. Barrett, Ph.D., 214-240-5256

Email: jstrubelboy@aol.com

Website: www.gulfcoaststampclub.org

Ohio March 15-17

Garfield-Perry March Party Garfield-Perry

Stamp Club, Holiday Inn Strongsville, 15471

Royalton Road, Strongsville. *WSP*

Contact: Roger Rhoads

Email: rrrhoads@aol.com

Website: www.garfieldperry.org

Oregon March 16

STAMPFEST Greater Eugene Stamp Society,

Willamette Valley Stamp Exhibition, a twoday

show in cooperation with Salem Stamp

Society on March 17, 2019; see website for more

information; contact George Struble, 503-364-

3929 or gstruble@willamette.edu, St. Jude›s

Catholic Church, 43rd and Willamette, Eugene.

Contact: Clarin Lewis/ George Struble, 541-461-

3574/503-364-3929

Email: clarin44@comcast.net / gstruble@

willamette.edu

Website: www.greatereugenestampclub.weebly.

com

New York March 17

Bayside Stamp Show The Adria Hotel, 220-33

Northern Blvd., Bayside, Queens. *B*

Contact: Marilyn Nowak, 718-645-7659

Email: marilynjnowak@verizon.net

Oregon March 17

STAMPEX Salem Stamp Society, Willamette

Valley Stamp Exhibition, a two-day show

in cooperation with Greater Eugene Stamp

Society on March 16, 2019; see website for more

information., Red Lion Hotel, 3301 Market St.

NE, Salem.

Contact: George Struble, 503-364-3929

Email: gstruble@willamette.edu

Website: www.salemstampsociety.org

Illinois March 22-24

ASDA Stamp Show American Stamp Dealers

Association, Holiday Inn Chicago Oakbrook, 17

W 350 22nd Street, Oakbrook Terrace. *B*

Contact: Dana Guyer, 800-369-8207

Email: dana@americanstampdealer.com

Website: www.americanstampdealer.com

Wisconsin March 23

BAYPEX ‘19 Green Bay Philatelic Society, St.

Matthew’s Church Multi-Purpose Room, 2575

South Webster Ave., Green Bay. *B*

Contact: Mark Schroeder, 920-337-9616

If you collect stamps,

you owe it to yourself to check us out at

WWW.MOZIANSTAMPS.COM

Or contact us at

Lawrence J Mozian

PO Box 5774

Williamsburg, VA 23188

E-mail lmozian@cox.net Phone (757) 220-2007

Serving philatelists since 1901

215moz website.indd 1

2/23/2015 3:59:23 PM

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 85


Email: markthetuba@gmail.com

Alberta March 23-24

Edmonton Stamp Club Spring National Stamp

Show Edmonton Stamp Club, Central Lions

Centre, 111 Ave & 113 Street, Edmonton. *WSP*

Contact: Kelly Liusz Moser, 780-569-0044

Website: www.edmontonstampclub.com

Virginia March 23-24

SPRINGPEX 2019 Springfield Stamp Club,

Robert E. Lee High School (Cafeteria), 6540

Franconia Rd. (VA Rte. 644E), Springfield.

Contact: Gerry Frazier

Email: frazierg@cox.net

Website: www.springfieldstampclub.org

Connecticut March 24

Fourth Sunday Stamp and Coin Show New

Haven Philatelic Society, Annex YMA, 554

Woodward Ave., New Haven. *B*

Contact: Brian McGrath, 203-627-6874

Email: soggy3@aol.com

Website: www.nhps1914.org

Florida March 30-31

TALPEX 2019 Tallahassee Stamp and Cover

Club, Tallahassee Senior Center, 1400 North

Monroe Street, Tallahassee. *B*

Contact: Gerard York, 850-284-4712

Email: gerard_york@msn.com

Website: www.tsandcc.info

New Jersey April 6

MSC Monthly Bourse Merchantville Stamp

Club, Martin Luther Chapel School gym, 4100

Terrace Ave., Pennsauken. *B*

Contact: Carol Anne Visalli, 856-562-1389

Email: cavisalli@gmail.com

Website: www.merchantvillestampclub.org

Illinois April 6-7

MSDA Spring Show North Midwest Stamp

Dealers Association, Ramada Inn- Chicagoland

Executive Airport, 1090 S. Milwaukee Ave.,

Wheeling. *B*

Contact: Jim Bardo, 847-922-5574

Email: jfb7437@aol.com

Website: www.msdastamp.com

Delaware April 13

DELPEX 2019 Brandywine Valley Stamp Club,

Nur Shrine CenterTemple, 198 S. Du Pont Hwy

(US Routes 13 & 40), New Castle.

Contact: John Howker, 302-635-7016

Email: johnhowker@aol.com

Website: www.brandywinevalleystampclub.com

California April 13-14

NOVAPEX 2019 Redding Stamp Club, Redding

Senior Citizens Center, 2290 Benton Drive,

Redding.

Contact: Mark Woodward, 530-722-2248

Email: markwoodward@charter.net

Website: www.reddingstampclub.org

Michigan April 13-14

Plymouth Show West Suburban Stamp Club,

Hellenic Cultural Center, 36375 Joy Road,

Westland. *WSP*

Contact: Tim Strzalkowski, 313-533-7737

Missouri March 29-31 Email: showchair@plymouthshow.com

St. Louis Stamp Expo Area Clubs, St. Louis

Website: www.plymouthshow.com

Renaissance Airport

AP-PLACEHOLDER-2018.qxp_USspecialist_FP

Hotel, 9801 Natural Bridge

Road, St. Louis. *WSP*

Washington

3/15/18 5:51 AM Page

April

1

20-21

Contact: Mike Peter

Evergreen Stamp Club Spring Stamps

Website: www.stlstampexpo.org

Show Evergreen Stamp Club, Kent Commons

Recreation Center, 525 4th Ave., N., Kent.

Contact: William Geijsbeek, 425-883-9390

Email: billgphil@gmail.com

Website: www.stamps.org/Evergreen-Stamp-

Club

California April 25

Competitive Thematic Exhibiting in North

America APS On the Road Course, San

Francisco Airport Marriott Waterfront Hotel,

1800 Old Bayshore Highway, Burlingame. *APS*

Contact: Ross Jones, 814-933-3803 ext. 238

Email: education@stamps.org

Website: stamps.org/Learn/Courses

California April 26-28

WESTPEX WESTPEX, Inc., San Francisco Airport

Marriott Waterfront Hotel, 1800 Old Bayshore

Highway, Burlingame. *WSP*

Contact: Clyde Homen, (831) 637-7847

Email: cjh1491@sbcglobal.net

Website: www.westpex.com

Visit a FREE Stampshow

in Southern California go to:

Stampshowsteve.com

for Dates, Times & Locations

FREE Parking Too!

Maryland April 27

Tidewater Stamp Club Annual Show Tidewater

Stamp Show, Easton Fire Department, Aurora

Park Dr, Easton. *B*

Contact: Carol Armstrong, 410-310-1224

Email: cwarmstrong01@atlanticbb.net

Ohio April 27

TUSCOPEX 2019 Tuscora Stamp Club,

Tuscora Park, 161 Tuscora Avenue, NW, New

Philadelphia. *B*

Contact: Jim Shamel, 740-922-4610

Email: jimhelenshamel@hotmail.com

Connecticut April 28

Fourth Sunday Collectibles Show New Haven

Philatelic Society, Annex YMA, 554 Woodward

Ave., New Haven. *B*

Contact: Brian McGrath, 203-627-6874

Email: soggy3@aol.com

Website: www.nhps1914.org

New York April 28

Bayside Stamp Show The Adria Hotel, 220-33

Northern Blvd., Bayside, Queens. *B*

Contact: Marilyn Nowak, 718-645-7659

Email: marilynjnowak@verizon.net

South Carolina April 28

2019 Winter Stamp and Postcard

Show Columbia Philatelic Society, Spring

Valley High School, 120 Sparkleberry Lane,

Columbia. *B*

Contact: Mark Postmus, 803-309-2534

Email: mapostmus@yahoo.com

Website: stamps.org/cps

Massachusetts May 3-5

Philatelic Show Northeastern Fed. Of Stamp

Clubs, Boxboro Regency Hotel & Conference

Center, 242 Adams Place, Boxborough. *WSP*

Contact: Jeff Shapiro

Email: coverlover@gmail.com

Website: www.nefed.org

New Jersey May 4

MSC Monthly Bourse Merchantville Stamp

Club, Martin Luther Chapel School gym, 4100

Terrace Ave., Pennsauken. *B*

Contact: Carol Anne Visalli, 856-562-1389

Email: cavisalli@gmail.com

Website: www.merchantvillestampclub.org

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When in Naples (Florida)

stop in and examine our large stock of U.S. and

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86 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019

215rubber01.indd 1

11/25/2014 9:10:16 AM


APS ELECTION

stamps.org/elections

American Philatelic Society (2019-2022)

As of December 4, 2018, 10 nominees are seeking

election to the APS Board of Directors for the

2019–2022 term. Two American Philatelic Research

Library board positions are to be filled by the vote of

APS members for the 2019–2025 term. One APRL

board position is to be filled by a vote of the founders,

patrons, fellows, and Vooys Fellows for the 2016–

2022 term.

All nominations and seconding endorsements

must be sent to Election Monitor, APS, 100 Match

Factory Place, Bellefonte, PA 16823 to be received

by March 31.

Personal photographs, candidate statements, and

a ballot listing all qualified candidates will appear in

the May issue of The American Philatelist.

An asterisk has been placed after the names of

those candidates who have secured the seconding

nominations required to be placed on the ballot. Ten

seconds are required for the APS Board positions and

one second is required for candidates for the APRL

Board of Trustees position. Nominees for the founder,

patron, fellows, and Vooys Fellows positions must be

made by a Committee appointed by the APRL President

or five (5) founders, patrons, fellows, or Vooys

Fellows within 60 days prior to any election.

Rules and other election information are available

from the APS website at stamps.org/elections or by

contacting the society at 814-933-3803.

President

Robert Zeigler, Indianapolis, IN*

Board of Vice Presidents (run as a team of

three)

Cheryl Ganz, Winfield, IL*

Patricia (Trish) Kaufmann, Lincoln, DE*

Jeff Shapiro, Fayville, MA*

Secretary

Stephen Schumann, Hayward, CA

Treasurer

Bruce Marsden, Short Hills, NJ

Director-at-Large (four to be elected)

Michael Bloom, Portland, OR

Rich Drews, Palatine, IL

Peter McCann, University Park, FL

Mark Schwartz, Philadelphia, PA

American Philatelic Research Library

(2019-2025)

Trustee (Two APS Member-elected)

Melanie Rogers, Chicago, IL*

Trustee

(elected by founders, patrons,

fellows, and Vooys Fellows)

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JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 87


CLASSIFIED ADS

www.stamps.org/Classified-Ads

UNITED STATES

U.S. CLASSIC PRICE LIST FREE.

Seconds to superb, 4,500 lots,

60 pages, colored photos. No. 1

through B.O.B., Illustrated grading,

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USED and MINT PNCs. Google

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FREE 35-page U.S. U.N. Pricelist or

view online at www.fortpittstamps.

com Fort Pitt Philatelics PO Box

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UNITED STATES Classic + www.

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FREE Buy It Now MAILBID

catalog. US, Foreign stamps;

coins & currency Reeves Box 407

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USED PNC COLLECTORS our FREE

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Stratham, NH 03885 (1417)

www.wiltonstamp.com (1416)

US MINT/USED 1840-1940 singles

and plate blocks send on approval.

See it before you buy it. Philatelic

Friends, Box 802, Bear, DE 19701

(1424)

EARLY TO THE LATEST PLATE

BLOCKS on approval. Positions

filled. Send me your want list today

John Robie, PO Box 2-A, Linden, CA

95236 (1421)

Mexico

New and Lower Prices

www.greggnelsonstamps.com

707-894-5273

Classified advertising in

The American Philatelist

is a cost-effective way to

get the attention of nearly

30,000 American Philatelic

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U.S. BOOKLET PANES www.

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stampsforcollectors.net (1416)

US APPROVALS Beginners welcome.

Lowest prices. Lists welcome. John

Barkdoll POB 751024 Petaluma CA

94975 (1422)

FREE LIST OF MNH US plate blocks.

10% discount on first order. Allys, 5

Cliff Pond Rd, Brewster, MA 02631

or email allysstamps@gmail.com

(1419)

50% Of FACE U.S. MNH POSTAGE

$25 face for $12.50, free shipping.

Barry Rickert, 26 Schoolhouse Rd,

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AUTOGRAPHED US PLATE BLOCKS

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U.S. POSSESSIONS

www.stampstore.org Seller ID

738268 (1420)

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CANADA

CLASSIC CANADA ON APPROVAL.

See it before you buy it. Philatelic

Friends, Box 802, Bear, DE 19701

(1424)

www.nfldstamps.com

Walsh Specialized eCatalogues

2018 Newfoundland and

2018 BNA Canada (1421)

DEVENEY STAMPS Canadian Stamp

Dealers Specializing in: Canadian

GET NOTICED WITH CLASSIFIED ADS

1 month 6 months 12 months

1 line $ 3.94 $ 21.28 $ 37.82

2 lines $ 7.88 $ 42.55 $ 75.65

3 lines $ 11.82 $ 63.83 $ 113.47

4 lines $ 15.76 $ 85.10 $ 151.30

5 lines $ 19.70 $ 106.38 $ 189.12

6 lines $ 23.64 $ 127.66 $ 226.94

7 lines $ 27.58 $ 148.93 $ 264.77

8 lines $ 31.52 $ 170.21 $ 302.59

9 lines $ 35.46 $ 191.48 $ 340.42

10 lines $ 39.40 $ 212.76 $ 378.24

11 lines $ 43.34 $ 234.04 $ 416.06

Revenues, Precancels, Varieties

& Provinces Most Pricing 50% of

Catalog WWW.DEVENEYSTAMPS.

COM (1417)

CANADA singles & year sets. Free:

30 pg cat. Lehigh Valley Stamps,

P.O. Box C, Coplay, PA, 18037.

Phone 610-231-1855. Email:

LehighVlystamps@aol.com (1420)

stampsforcollectors.net (1423)

BRITISH COMMONWEALTH

BRITISH EMPIRE – Extensive stock

with emphasis on pre-1960.

Advise us of your wants. TOGA

ASSOCIATES, Box 396, Fairfield,

CT 06824 203-255-8885 e-mail:

tbansak@aol.com (1419)

www.mozianstamps.com (1420)

www.commonwealth-stamps.com

(1423)

BRITISH COLONIES & WW

stampstore.org Seller ID 502981

(1417)

FREE PRICE LISTS for British

Commonwealth. Mint and Used.

Good prices. Quick, friendly service.

Holbrook, Box 3184, Henrico, VA

23228, Jimjih@verizon.net, web:

www.Jimjih.com (1425)

ASIA

Visit - www.dharaastamps.co.in

(1417)

AUSTRALIA

www.stampstore.org Seller ID

738268 (1419)

stampsforcollectors.net (1423)

2017 Canadian Revenue

Stamp Catalogue

E.S.J. van Dam Ltd

P.O. Box 300-P, Bridgenorth, ON, Canada K0L 1H0

toll free phone 1-866-382-6326

Postpaid U.S. $32 for Air Mail to USA or order online at

www.canadarevenuestamps.com

To calculate the number of lines for

your ad, count all letters, numerals,

punctuation and blank spaces

between words. Divide the total

by 34 and round up to the next

whole number. Advertising is

restricted to current APS members;

please include your APS number.

All classified ads must be prepaid.

Send your ad text and payment to

AP Advertising, 100 Match Factory

Place, Bellefonte, PA 16823.

AUSTRIA

AUSTRIA AND RELATED AREAS

— Ask for our free price lists.

RSchneiderStamps@gmail.com.

1000s of stamps online at www.

RSchneiderStamps.com (1427)

BALKANS

WANT LISTS FILLED, Year

Sets, Extensive stock www.

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BELGIUM

www.StampsBelgium.com (1416)

BRAZIL

www.castlerockstamps.com (1424)

CANAL ZONE

www.canalzonestamps.com (1427)

JOIN: www.CanalZoneStudyGroup.

com (1420)

CHINA

BUY STAMPS at www.

ChinaStampSociety.org (1417)

stampsforcollectors.net (1423)

CHINA BUYER PAYS TOP $

Email images to:

jon@chinesestampbuyer.com

www.chinesestampbuyer.com

(1418)

Classified ads may be submitted

online, by fax or via email if

charged to your VISA, MasterCard

or Discover. When submitting

your ad, please include your card

number and expiration date.

Renewals only are accepted by

telephone.

Renewal Notice: If (1416) appears

after your ad, it expires after this

issue. Deadline for the March issue

is January 21, 2019.

88 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


www.Stamps-China.com (1416)

www.castlerockstamps.com (1424)

COLOMBIA

www.castlerockstamps.com (1424)

CUBA

www.CubaPostal.com (1423)

www.ilastamps.com (1416)

www.stampstore.org Seller ID

738268 (1421)

www.castlerockstamps.com (1424)

CZECHOSLOVAKIA

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02568, 888/868-8293 (1426)

EASTERN EUROPE

stampsforcollectors.net (1423)

FRANCE

10% OFF YOUR 1st ONLINE

PURCHASE. Singles, year sets,

special offers. Want list service. Free

shipping. Prices in $CAD. www.

anicetrethier.com (1420)

www.StampsFrance.com (1416)

stampsforcollectors.net (1423)

FRENCH COLONIES

www.disler.com (1417)

www.stampstore.org Seller ID

738268 (1419)

GERMANY

GERMANY AND RELATED AREAS

- Ask for our free price lists.

RSchneiderStamps@att.net.

1000s of stamps online at www.

RSchneiderStamps.com (1420)

GERMAN AREA ON APPROVAL.

See it before you buy it. Philatelic

Friends, Box 802, Bear, DE 19701

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stampsforcollectors.net (1423)

GREAT BRITAIN

www.british-stamps.com (1423)

HUNGARY

Want lists filled, New Issues,

Extensive stock of all Eastern

European countries. www.

hungarianstamps.com, POB

4028, Vineyard Haven, MA

02568, 888/868-8293 (1421)

stampsforcollectors.net (1423)

ICELAND

stampsforcollectors.net (1423)

INDIAN STATES

BUYING & SELLING 888-262-5355

info@stampsinc.com (1420)

ITALY

www.StampsItaly.com (1416)

ITALY AND COLONIES

stampstore.org Seller ID 502981

(1417)

LATIN AMERICA

www.castlerockstamps.com (1424)

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MEXICO

www.castlerockstamps.com (1424)

NEW ZEALAND

www.stampsale.com (1423)

PANAMA

JOIN: www.COPAPHIL.org (1420)

PERU

www.castlerockstamps.com (1424)

PHILIPPINES

www.stampstore.org Seller ID

738268 (1416)

POLAND

POLAND SPECIALIZED: Classics

to New Issues, Year Sets, Back of

Book. Lubelski Philatelic LLC 111

Helen Drive, Rossford, Ohio 43460

Ph: 419-410-9115, Web: www.

Lubelskistamps.com Email: Dan@

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buyhungarianstamps.com, HSE,

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02568, 888/868-8293 (1426)

PORTUGAL

www.StampsPortugal.com (1416)

ROMANIA

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buyhungarianstamps.com, HSE,

POB 4028, Vineyard Haven, MA

02568, 888/868-8293 (1426)

UNITED NATIONS

U.N. PRICE LIST, Wm. Henry Stamps,

POB 150010, Kew Gardens, NY

11415 www.allunstamps.com

(1421)

WORLDWIDE

www.philbansner.com (1432)

www.dickkeiser.com (1427

www.wiltonstamp.com (1416)

www.stampconnections.com

(1417)

SELLER ID 534232: US, Polynesia

(1416)

www.mozianstamps.com (1420)

stampsforcollectors.net (1417)

-- AFFORDABLE QUALITY STAMPS

-- www.sunsetstamps.com (1421)

www.stampsale.com (1423)

ALBUMS

EDITABLE STAMP ALBUMS

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SPECIALISTS From Delta-Q

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QStampAlbms.com (1427)

APPROVALS

WORLDWIDE APPROVALS

DISCOUNT 66 2/3% from Current

Scott. Send APS# to Robert

Ducharme, C.P. 592, St. Jerome, QC

J7Z 5V3, Canada (1423)

www.wiltonstamp.com (1416)

US AND WORLDWIDE. See it before

you buy it. Philatelic Friends, Box

802, Bear, DE 19701 (1424)

INTERNATIONAL APPROVALS

servicing new and intermediate

collectors, if interested, send

inquiries to Doyen Trading Co. PO

Box 432 Basking Ridge NJ 07920

(1418)

CUSTOMIZED WW APPROVALS

Strong collections, Pick @ 50%

All countries & levels to advanced

AKM PO Box 30010, Mesa, AZ

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www.akmstamps.com (1417)

GREAT STAMPS FAIR PRICES

Personal Service, Worldwide sets &

singles. Emporium, 10 Wilmington

Ave., Apt. 109W, Dayton, Oh 45420

(1417)

50 YEARS+ APPROVAL DEALER!

Many customers with me 20+

years. Try me. Great discounts. First

$10 purchase on me Jerry Bourque,

Box 1688, Garden City, SC 29576.

bbjerrybb@peoplepc.com (1418)

WORLDWIDE BOOKS OF MOUNTED

SINGLES by country. Pre 1941 to

2000’s. Some sets available. Many

books with issues of last 10 years.

State interests. Howard Mundt, 415

N Lenfesty, Marion IN 46952 (1424)

U.S. Possessions

CZ, Cuba, Guam, Hawaii, PR, Philippines, Spanish Era

Whether you want that elusive issue to complete

FSDA

ASDA

a set or sell your collections. Free price list.

FRANK BACHENHEIMER

6547 Midnight Pass Rd., #89, Sarasota, FL 34242 • Ph: 941-349-0222

www.astampdealer4u.com • frankb@astampdealer4u.com

U.S. Revenues

R1 to RZ18, Telegraphs, Savings

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FSDA

ASDA

a set or sell your collections. Free price list.

FRANK BACHENHEIMER

6547 Midnight Pass Rd., #89, Sarasota, FL 34242 • Ph: 941-349-0222

www.astampdealer4u.com • frankb@astampdealer4u.com

VATICAN CITY YEAR SETS

Year Mint

2017 $91.00

2016 $97.00

2015 $87.60

2014 $100.00

2013 $115.00

Year Mint

2012 $82.52

2011 $95.00

2010 $81.35

2009 $92.72

2008 $81.19

Entire Vatican catalog is stock; 1929 to today

Please add 3% postage & shipping,

minimum $0.75 maximum $7.40. FREE price list.

PENNY BLACK STAMP COMPANY

P.O. Box 78, Dexter MI 48130-0078

Phone: (734) 424-3043

www.pennyblackstamp.com

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 89


AUCTIONS

www.sterlingkingbrookauctions.

com (1420)

CENSORED

www.dickkeiser.com (1427)

COVERS

www.philbansner.com (1432)

http://www.postalhistory.com/

(1425)

www.dickkeiser.com (1427)

DONATIONS

BOYS TOWN invites donations of U.S.

and foreign stamp collections, coins,

currency, and mint U.S. postage.

Help us help kids! Leon Myers

Stamp Center, 13628 Flanagan

Blvd., Boys Town, NE 68010. Email

stampcenter@boystown.org Phone

402-498-1143 (1417)

INTERNET

BLUE MOON PHILATELIC

bmastamps2.com – 10K WW Stamps

+ No File Photos. Ship to US only

(1418)

DAVID SEMSROTT STAMPS Stamps

– Internet StoreStamps - Covers –

Collections – Back of Book www.

DavidSemsrott.com APS Dealer

Member 106062 (1417)

LITERATURE

www.philbansner.com (1432)

www.pbbooks.com Leonard H.

Hartmann (1424)

www.wgkremper@msn.com for

pricelist (1427)

MAIL BIDS SALES

FREE CATALOG. Ashford Stamps, Box

9845, Newmarket, Auckland, New

Zealand. www.stampsale.com (1423)

100 COLLECTORS sell discounted

packets, country collections

on pages/sets in 36 page free

newsletter. Great description. Alfins,

168 EagleCrest Drive, Buffton SC

29909 (1420)

MILITARY

www.dickkeiser.com (1427)

PACKETS

200 DIFF. STAMPS 70% large WW

only $4.00 per PK +98¢ SASE.

Towlson, 60 Ivanhoe Rd., Buffalo, NY

14215 (1421)

POSTAL HISTORY

www.philbansner.com (1432)

http://www.postalhistory.com/

(1425)

www.dickkeiser.com (1427)

www.mgjpostalhistory.com

+ephemera (1422)

www.vintagepaperandpostcards.

com (1416)

www.castlerockstamps.com (1424)

POSTCARDS

www.oldfloridapostcards.com

(1416)

REVENUES

www.dickkeiser.com (1427)

WORLD REVENUES LIQUIDATION:

collections, sets, singles of

everywhere from A-Z. Also

documents and Cinderellas. Gordon

Brooks, Box 100, Station N.D.G.,

Montreal, QC, Canada H4A 3P4

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STAMP SHOPS

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Covers, and More. 8919 W. Sahara

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702-222-0355 (1417)

SUPPLIES

COMPLETE PHILATELIC SUPPLIES

$30+ order gets free U.S. shipping. B

and G Sales ebay: http://stores.ebay.

com/bandgsales or call 317-627-

5242 (1424)

TOPICALS

EJstamps@gmail.com (1418)

www.CollectibleStampsGallery.com

(1425)

WANTED

FOREIGN POSTAL STATIONERY. I

can use almost anything in foreign

postal stationery. Steve Schumann,

2417 Cabrillo Drive, Hayward, CA

94545 stephen.schumann@att.net

(1427)

WISCONSIN BUYER - EVERYTHING

www.stampbuyer-wisconsin.com

(1424)

INDIA & STATES POSTAL

STATIONERY. Record-setting prices

paid. Sandeep 401-688-9473 sj722@

aol.com (1420)

CHINA STAMPS COVERS S/S Pay

Higher! GU Box 4485 Santa Clara CA

95056 (1427)

WORLD AIR MAILS WANTED

Contact us with what you have to

offer SPSC 520-393-9887 fax 520-

900-7426 sanpedrosc@gmail.com

(1420)

Sheets, Errors and Collections

WANTED! Forever stamps especially

needed! Call Stuart at 603-929-0057

with what you have to offer. (1423)

EL SALVADOR AIRMAILS: APS

member seeking Salvador Scott

#C8d, C10b, C15a, C17b, C20a, C22a

& C131a. Will pay top prices. Finn

Ahlberg, finnahlberg@bellsouth.

net (1424)

buyers and

builders of great

stamp collections

visit

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ALL

HAWAII

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650-344-3401

Full website www.vogtstamps.com

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Send a note of your interests and we’ll

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If in London, please visit our

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Have you visited our e-bay store?

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We Sell &

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Suburban Stamp Inc.

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413-785-5348

E-mail: suburbanstamp@verizon.net

BERLIN

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1970–1979 $175.00

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1990 $32.00

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1990 $42.50

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90 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


Index of Advertisers

A & D Stamps and Coins

aanddstampsandcoins.com 83

Amos Media www.linns.com

www.amosadvantage.com 61

Antonio M. Torres www.antoniotorres.com 89

APS AmeriStamp Expo / Aripex

classic.stamps.org/ASE-Preregister

APS Membership

C3

APS Estate Advice

www.stamps.org/Estate-Advice 90

Argyll Etkin Limited www.argyll-etkin.com 90

C.G.Auktionshaus Christoph Gärtner GmbH

& Co. KG www.auktionen-gaertner.de 5

Century Stamps www.century-stamps.com 23

Champion Stamp Co., Inc.

www.championstamp.com 24-25

CK Stamps c/o Kang Chen

www.ckstamps.com 90

Colonial Stamp Company

www.colonialstampcompany.com 91

Columbian Stamp Co.

www.columbianstamp.com 90

Daniel F. Kelleher Auctions, LLC

www.kelleherauctions.com 43

Davidson’s Stamp Service

www.newstampissues.com 88

Delta-Q Desktop Publishing

www.delta-qstampalbums.com 87

Denali Stamp Co. www.denalistamps.com 90

Deveney Stamps www.deveneystamps.com 91

Don S. Cal www.DonSCal.com 90

Downeast Stamps www.destamps.com 62

Dr. Robert Friedman and Sons www.

drbobfriedmanstamps.com 11

Dr. Robert Friedman and Sons

www.drbobfriedmanstamps.com 59

Dutch Country Auctions

www.thestampcenter.com 63

E.S.J. van Dam, Ltd.

www.canadarevenuestamps.com 88

Eastern Auctions, Ltd.

www.easternauctions.com 35

Edward D. Younger Co.

www.edwardyounger.com 14-17

Eric Jackson www.ericjackson.com 41

Frank Bachenheimer

www.astampdealer4u.com 89

Frank Bachenheimer

www.astampdealer4u.com 89

Fusco Auctions www.fuscoauctions.com 58

Gregg Nelson Stamps

www.greggnelsonstamps.com 88

Guernsey Post Ltd www.guernseystamps.com

www.guernseypost.com 50

H.R. Harmer GPN, Inc. www.hrharmer.com

www.hrharmer.com/en/

GlobalPhilatelicNetwork/# 1

HB Philatelics www.hbphilatelics.com 83

Hip eCommerce www.hipstamps.com 3

Hugh Wood Insurance www.hughwood.com 57

Hungaria Stamp Exchange

www.hungarianstamps.com 85

interasia auctions ltd

www.interasia-auctions.com 89

Intl. Society of Guatemala Collectors

www.guatemalastamps.com 62

J.R. Mowbray, Ltd. www.mowbrays.co.nz 86

James E. Lee www.jameslee.com 39

Kay & Co. www.kaystamps.com 55

Kelleher and Rogers, Ltd.

www.kelleherauctions.com 42

Lawrence Mozian www.mozianstamps.com 85

Markest Stamp Co. www.markest.com 29

Martin Winter 70

Michael Eastick and Associates Pty Ltd

www.michaeleastick.com 86

Miller’s Stamp Co. www.millerstamps.com 83

Mountainside Stamps, Coins & Currency

www.mountainsidestamps.com 87

Mystic Stamp Company

www.mysticstamp.com C2, 13

New England Stamp

www.NewEnglandStamp.com 86

Nieser Stamps & Coins www.kennieser.com 55

Northland International Trading, LCC

www.northstamp.com 68

Palo Albums Inc. www.paloalbums.com 69

Paradise Valley Stamp Co.

www.stamp-one.com 51

Patricia A. Kaufmann

www.trishkaufmann.com 21

Penny Black Stamp Co.

www.pennyblackstamp.com 89

Phil Bansner www.philbansner.com 39

Philasearch.com www.Philasearch.com 13

PostalStationery.com

www.postalstationery.com 68

Randy Scholl Stamp Co.

www.randyschollstampcompany.com/

have-tongs-will-travel.asp

C4

Rasdale Stamp Company

www.rasdalestamps.com 68

Raslad Enterprises

www.deadcountrystamps.com 83

Read’Em Again Books

www.read-em-again.com 41

Richard A. Friedberg

www.friedbergstamps.com 65

Rising Sun Stamps 65

Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc.

www.siegelauctions.com 86

RUBBER STAMPS shop.wcp-nm.com 86

San Pedro Stamp & Coin, LLC

www.sanpedrosc.com 83

Sarasota National Stamp Exhibition

www.sarasotastampclub.com 81

Scott A. Shaulis www.shaulisstamps.com 86

Southeastern Stamp Expo 2019

www.sefsc.org 67

Space Cover Store www.spacecoverstore.com 86

Stamp Smith 77

stampsinc www.stampsinc.com 84

Stephen Pattillo - Quality Stampshows

www.stampshowsteve.com 86

Stephen T. Taylor www.stephentaylor.co.uk 71

Sterling Kingbrook Auctions

www.sterlingkingbrookauctions.com

www.stampauctionnetwork.com 86

Steve Malack Stamps www.malack.com 71

Suburban Stamp, Inc. 90

Subway Stamp Shop, Inc.

www.subwaystamp.com 9

The Classic Collector

www.sismondostamps.com 84

Tropical Stamps, Inc.

www.tropicalstamps.com 89

United States Postal Service www.USPS.com 7

Universal Philatelic Auctions

www.UPAstampauctions.co.uk 90

Vance Auctions Ltd. www.vanceauctions.com 67

Vogt Stamps www.vogtstamps.com 90

Worldwide Philatelics

www.worldwidephilatelics.com 83

Wulff’s Stamps www.wulffstamps.com 83

Renew online at

https://aps.buzz/Renew

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 91


MEMBERSHIP REPORT

No. 11, November 30, 2018

NEW APPLICANTS

The following applications were

received during November

2018. If no objections are

received by the Executive

Director (814-933-3803) prior

to January 31, 2019 these

applicants will be admitted

to membership and notice to

this effect will appear in the

February 2019 issue.

Alwani, Ali Imran (229654) Sugar

Land, TX

Ardon, Nishan S. (229671)

Oakland, CA ASIA-US ERRORS/

FREAKS/ODDITIES, JOINT ISSUES

(US & FOREIGN), CA POSTAL

HISTORY-SOUTH AMERICA-

AFRICA; Communications

Director

Astin, Benjamin (229673)

Wilmington, NC US AIRMAILS,

BLOCKS/GUIDELINE BLOCKS,

SPECIAL DELIVERIES, BOOKLETS/

PANES, SPECIMENS; Retired

Atwater, Charles (229685)

Birmingham, AL US

COMMEMORATIVES, PLATE

BLOCKS; 81; Retired

Barron, Ken (229595) Weston, MA

US; 78; Executive

Barta, Bradley (229686) Venice, FL

Bedrick, Jon H. (229687) Staten

Island, NY US; 70; Retired

Berger, Sheldon N. (229678)

Hillsboro, OR US 20TH

CENTURY, COMMEMORATIVES,

USED-ISRAEL-MUSIC/

MUSICIANS/INSTRUMENTS-

SPACE/JET/ROCKET COVERS; 68

Bering, Joseph P. (229633)

Lebanon, PA US CIVIL WAR

COVERS, CONFEDERATE STATES-

BRITISH COLONIES-EASTERN

EUROPE-MADONNAS-GERMAN

3RD REICH/OCCUPATIONS; 89

Bloch, Eric (229620) Voorhees, NJ

US & GERMANY PRE-1950; 90;

Retired

Bobo, David P. (229682) Benton,

TN US CLASSICS, ERRORS/

FREAKS/ODDITIES; 41; Manager

Buckley, Jack (229626) Omaha,

NE; 54; Brick Layer

Bunch, Michael (229606) Pelham,

TN US, NAVAL COVERS-SHIPS/

BOATS-RAILROADS-SPACE-

NAVAL COVERS FOREIGN; 58

Caban, Francis (229612) Tampa,

FL US, 19TH CENTURY,

PRECANCELS (BUREAU); 31

Cady, Christina (229688) Eagle

River, AK STAMPS ON STAMPS;

50; Budget Analyst

Cetrone, Ron (229646) Saint Clair

Shores, MI US CLASSICS-FANCY

CANCELS; 50; Millworker/

Business Owner

Clancy, William (229669)

Midlothian, VA LOTS &

COLLECTIONS-US 19TH & 20TH

CENTURY, CLASSICS, BOOKLETS/

PANES, CIVIL WAR COVERS; 81;

Retired

Clark, Elisabeth (229618) Clemson,

SC AIR MAIL (FOREIGN); 56

Collins, James F. (229691) Nutley,

NJ GERMANY; 63; Consultant

Curtis, Kenneth (229661)

Circleville, OH; 75; Retired

Czarnomski, John E. (229604)

Hummelstown, PA

US-ALAND-ANTARCTIC

TERRITORIES-BRITISH COLONIES-

SCANDINAVIA-LUXEMBOURG-

BELGIUM-FRANCE; 66;

Pharmacist

Desautels, Philip (229647)

Woonsocket, RI US-

WORLDWIDE; 80; Retired

Dickerson, Scott (229638) Grand

Island, NY; 43; Truck Driver

Dirk, Carl (229628) El Paso, TX

PICTURE POSTCARDS-COVERS-

POSTAL HISTORY-WORLDWIDE-

DEAD COUNTRIES

Doyle, Jim T. (229635) Phoenix, AZ

US, 19TH CENTURY, AIRMAILS,

DUCK/HUNTING/FISHING,

ERRORS/FREAKS/ODDITIES-

IRELAND; Engineer

Ephrem, Victor L. (229698)

Jacksonville, FL US 19TH &

20TH CENTURY, CONFEDERATE

STATES, POSTAGE DUES,

OFFICIALS/OFFICIAL MAIL,

REVENUES/TAX PAIDS (FEDERAL)

Estrella, Guillermo J. (229611)

Quito, Ecuador ECUADOR-

CHINA-PERU-ZEPPELIN COVERS/

STAMPS-COLOMBIA-LATIN

AMERICA; Physicist

Fauver, Lowell (229697)

Columbus, OH UN; 80; Retired

Favre, Earl J. (229621) Picayune,

MS US-WORLDWIDE; 81; Retired

Freedlun, Dean (229670)

Vacaville, CA US 19TH

CENTURY, AIRMAILS-NUDES-

ZEPPELIN COVERS/STAMPS; 57

Fukac, Matthias (229693)

Vienna, Austria NEWSPAPER

STAMPS-1851 AUSTRIA-

PRE-1900 WORLDWIDE; 42;

Auctioneer

Gates, Beverly (229674) Spokane,

WA; 80; Realtor

Geissler, Frederick M. (229681)

Manassas, VA US USED; 58

Gessler, Gina (229609) Mount

Horeb, WI; 61

Gilbert, Lesley (229668) DeKalb,

IL STAMP DESIGN/DESIGNERS-

US, AIRMAILS, CLASSICS,

COMMEMORATIVES, WV

POSTAL HISTORY

Girard, Andrew J. (229662) Oak

Ridge, TN GREAT BRITAIN,

COMMONWEALTH; 74;

Insurance Broker

Glendon, Thomas J. (229666)

Philadelphia, PA US 19TH

& 20TH CENTURY, AIRMAILS,

COMMEMORATIVES, CIVIL WAR

COVERS, CONFEDERATE STATES;

Retired

Glowatz, Mark (229648) Duryea,

PA US-CANADA; 65; Retired

Goldstein, Michael (229622)

Potomac, MD; 73; Retired

Gresse, John S. (229623)

Springfield, OH US, SINGLES,

BLOCKS, BOOKS, PANES-

WORLDWIDE; 78; Retired

Grimone, Frank W. (229663)

Pinehurst, NC; 83; Retired

Groesbeck, Alan W. (229624) Estes

Park, CO US; 69; Retired

Guro, Thomas (229653) Citrus

Heights, CA 19TH CENTURY-

US USED, FANCEY CANCELS-

OLYMPICS-SCOUTS

Haeberle, James (229649) South

Dayton, NY; 73; Retired

Halkovic, Stephen (229610)

Titusville, FL US-ASIA-AFRICA-

BRITISH COMMONWEALTH-

EUROPE-SOUTH AMERICA

Harrison-Iserhien, Mary Takiisha

(229692) Chicago, IL; Educator

Harvey, Barbara J. (229643)

Newport News, VA; 57

Harvey, David S. (229627)

Standish, ME WORLDWIDE-US-

FDC; 59

Hill, Edwin (229607) Spokane, WA

US COMMEMORATIVES, 19TH &

20TH CENTURY-SWITZERLAND-

GREAT BRITAIN-FRANCE; 61

Hillert, Edward P. (229689)

Georgetown, TX US PLATE

BLOCKS, BACK OF BOOK-

FOREIGN AIRMAILS; Retired

Janes, Doug (229613)

Sacramento, CA US AIRMAILS;

71; Retired

Kaplan, Robert S. (229631)

Marlboro, NJ SHIPS-MAPS-

SPORTS-ART-BUILDINGS-

ANIMALS-HISTORY; 73; Retired

Kelly, John (229617)

Valley Stream, NY US

COMMEMORATIVES,

DEFINITIVES, AIRMAILS, JOINT

ISSUES (US & FOREIGN)-UN; 63

Keneally, Patrick D. (229651) East

Setauket, NY US, POSTAL

HISTORY, 19TH & 20TH

CENTURY, DUCK/HUNTING/

FISHING, AIRMAILS; 76; Retired

NEW MEMBERS

Applications 229355 through

229445 and 229446 through

229453 as previously published

have been accepted for

membership by the Board of

Vice Presidents.

SUMMARY

Total Membership,

October 31, 2018.............28,663

New Members 96

Reinstated 141.......237

Chapters Disbanded 2

Deceased 60

Resignations 88.......150

Total Membership,

November 30, 2018........28,750

(Total Membership, November 30,

2017 was 29,523 a difference

of -773)

Kiphart, Kelly (229629) Goodyear,

AZ US 19TH CENTURY, AIRMAILS

Lafayette Stamp Club (1607-

229660) West Lafayette, IN

Laneve, Janice (229630) Brooklyn,

NY US 19TH & 20TH CENTURY,

FDC, SOUVENIR SHEETS,

SOUVENIR PAGES; Magazine

Editor

Lohaviriyasiri, Pradit (229596)

Bangkok, Thailand THAILAND-

US-UK; 76; Retired

Lohwater, Susan W. (229636)

Huron, OH US AIRMAILS,

FLIGHT COVERS-RUSSIA/USSR/

INDEPENDENT REPUBLICS-

RELIGION-LIGHTHOUSES-UN-

CANAL ZONE; 67

Lopez, Marc-Antoine D. (229637)

Lewes, DE US USED-FRANCE-

EUROPA/CEPT-CANADA; 55;

Accountant

Madderra, James (229672)

Poulsbo, WA

Matheny, Kenneth (229625)

Fraser, MI US, COVERS,

AIRMAILS; 60

McCarthy, Constance M. (229675)

Machesney Park, IL US; Editor

McConnell, James P. (229699)

Enfield, NH US, USED; 53;

General Contractor/Tree Service

Owner

McLaughlin, James (229602) New

Market, TN US 19TH & 20TH

CENTURY, AIRMAILS, BOOKLETS/

PANES, COMMEMORATIVES-

WORLDWIDE USED; 58

Mills, John F. (229634) Aiken, SC

US, 19TH & 20TH CENTURY,

COMMEMORATIVES,

OFFICIAL POST OFFICE SEALS,

DEFINITIVES; 79

92 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


Mohnkern, Steven (229594)

Livonia, NY US BLOCKS/

GUIDELINE BLOCKS, COIL LINE

PAIRS, BOOKLETS/PANES; 50

Montgomery, Steven (229683)

Munith, MI; 52

Moore, Marvin E. (229639)

Daleville, VA US; 80; Retired

Nicoloff, Jerry (229598) Saint

Louis, MO GERMAN-BALKAN

STATES-US AIRMAILS; 57;

Machine Operator

Nielsen, Robert J. (229664)

Anchorage, AK FDI-ALASKA

POSTAL COVERS; 81; Retired

Parsons, Denis (229603) Tigard,

OR US, 19TH & 20TH CENTURY,

CONFEDERATE STATES,

CLASSICS, PLATE BLOCKS; 54;

Teacher

Patterson, John L. (229676)

Hagerstown, MD PHILLIPINES-

RHODESIA-ROMANIA-SPAIN-US;

78; Retired

Peterson, Mitchell J. (229605)

Maple Grove, MN US

19TH & 20TH CENTURY,

COMMEMORATIVES/PANELS,

COVERS, CLASSICS

Pomeroy, Marc (229656)

University Place, WA US 19TH

& 20TH CENTURY

Protko, Jose (229593) Weston,

FL US CLASSICS, AIRMAILS,

ERRORS/FREAKS/ODDITIES,

FLIGHT COVERS, PARCEL POST-

LATIN AMERICAN; 57

Quackenbush, Fred (229614)

Hixson, TN WORLDWIDE; 89;

Retired

Randall, Jeff (229659) Spokane,

WA US, 19TH & 20TH CENTURY,

AIRMAILS-JAPAN; 56

Reeve, Ruth (229694) Pain Court,

ON

Robison, Paul A. (229644) Grand

Prairie, TX US 19TH & 20TH

CENTURY, COMMEMORATIVES,

CANCELS, CUT SQUARES,

CLASSICS; 53

Rodgers, Greg (229652) Salinas,

CA BELGIUM-US REVENUES/TAX

PAIDS (FEDERAL)-MONACO-SAN

MARINO

Rumi, Hasan Khurshid (229597)

Dhaka, Bangladesh; 58;

Business

Sanders, Nathan E. (229600) North

Andover, MA

Seefeldt, Michael (229665)

Janesville, WI US CLASSICS; 72;

Retired

Siryj, Roman (229684) Downey,

CA; 60

Smith, David J. (229632) Castle

Valley, UT WESTERN EUROPE;

78; Retired

Smith, Timothy J. (229690)

Twentynine Palms, CA; 68

Snyder, Ron (229657) Weaverville,

CA US 19TH & 20TH CENTURY,

WASHINGTON FRANKLINS; 78

Sproat, William G. (229640)

Sarasota, FL MIGRATORY BIRD

HUNTING; 87; Retired

Starnes, Elizabeth (229645)

Tucson, AZ US BOOKLETS/

PANES, BLOCKS/GUIDELINE

BLOCKS, PLATE BLOCKS-CANAL

ZONE; Retired

Taylor, Robert H. (229655)

Chesterfield, MO US

DUCK/HUNTING/FISHING,

COMMEMORATIVES,

NEWSPAPERS & PERIODICALS,

19TH & 20TH CENTURY, PLATE

BLOCKS; 68; Retired

Tompkins, Robert L. (229601)

Canyon, TX US AIRMAILS,

COMMEMORATIVE PANELS,

DUCK/HUNTING/FISHING; 97;

Retired

Turner, Harold (229680)

New Albany, IN US,

COMMEMORATIVES,

DEFINITIVES, AIRMAILS, FIRST

DAY COVERS, SOUVENIR SHEETS;

Retired

Vazquez, Frances (229695)

Pittsburgh, PA US 20TH

CENTURY

Vischniac, Presley A. (229615)

Missoula, MT UK-RUSSIA; 72;

Retired

Vrhnyanski, John (229696)

Astoria, NY US MINT; 48

Walzak, Robert J. (229650) Detroit,

MI US-WORLDWIDE; 72; Retired

Wang, Mouer (229658) Portland,

OR; 71

Warbasse, Lawrence H. (229616)

Traverse City, MI US 19TH

& 20TH CENTURY, AIRMAILS,

BLOCKS/GUIDELINE BLOCKS,

CANCELS, COVERS

Welch, John G. (229641)

Champlin, MN WORLDWIDE-

SOUTH KOREA-PORTUGAL-

MACAU; 70; Retired

Wells, Robert (229677)

Temperance, MI SAN MARINO-

VATICAN-CANADA; 81; Retired

Westphal, Robert E. (229642)

Dallas, TX US, POSSESSIONS-

PRE-WWII WORLDWIDE; 76;

Retired

Winder, Shirley (229599) Hollister,

CA SANTAS-JAPANESE; 76;

Retired

Withers, Carlene F. (229619)

Springfield, MO US 19TH &

20TH CENTURY, CHRISTMAS

SEALS, COMMEMORATIVE

PANELS, AIRMAILS,

COMMEMORATIVES; 70; Retired

Wright, Douglas E. (229679)

Davenport, IA US CLASSICS,

SPECIAL DELIVERIES, OFFICIALS/

OFFICIAL MAIL, PRECANCELS

(BUREAU)-19TH CENTURY-

GREAT BRITAIN; 56

Young, Michael (229700) Roanoke,

VA SPACE/JET/ROCKET COVERS-

US 19TH & 20TH CENTURY,

CLASSICS, COVERS-SPORTS

Youngblood, Thomas (229608)

Gaithersburg, MD US

19TH & 20TH CENTURY,

COMMEMORATIVES

Yusuf, Nadia (229667) Jamaica,

NY; 32

NEW CHAPTER

Stamp Show Here Today, The

Podcast (1606-229430), Las

Vegas, NV Contact: Mr. E. Caj

Brejtfus, 5965 Harrison Dr., #6,

Las Vegas, NV 89120

RESIGNED CHAPTERS

The Franklin Stamp Club (217246)

Rogue Valley Stamp Club (178924)

REACTIVATED

AFFILIATE

Gay/Lesbian History on Stamps

(AF0205)

DECEASED

Albrecht, Robert D. (9678-060382)

Madison, WI

Baker, Howard W. (7405-051919)

Ann Arbor, MI

Beck, Henry C. (056412) Walpole,

NH

Bekker, Charles F. (7116-43305)

Mountain Home, ID

Benjamin, J.H. (0845-016590)

Westmont, QC, Canada

Berman, David M. (115971), Coral

Gables, FL

Bleiberg, David J. (9519-066137)

Los Angeles, CA

Cameron, Bruce P. (11655-073442)

Minneapolis, MN

Carter, Donald E. (7175-042789)

Coburg, OR

Colby, Robert P. (9124-049893)

Richmond, VA

Clark, Thomas S. (8353-058744),

Rochester, NY

Dibble, Richard (228013),

Westbury, NY

Ellerbock, Robert (186161),

Wyckoff, NJ

Evermon, Donald W. (11076-

066190) Columbus, GA

Everett, William J. (072459) Milford,

CT

Fell, William J. (1596-058780) Flin

Flon, MB, Canada

Foot, Russell B. (107187)

Chesapeake, VA

Forbes, James M. (126325), North

Ridgeville, OH

Freeman, David M. (190184)

Orange, CA

Gallagher, Jack (203764), Whiting,

NY

Gavenda, S. (7618-051242) Des

Plaines, Il

Ghiradelli, Robert, G. (9961-

070131) Hilton Head Island, SC

Gordan, Monika B. (12511-222294)

Kimball NE

Griffin, Charles N., Dr. (163687)

Mount Pleasant, S.C.

Haas, Conrad E. (224827) Suffolk,

VA

Hastings, Walter W. (135480) Fair

Oaks, CA

Hays, Alvin L. (5163-146255) San

Antonio, TX

Helms, Jack E. (5635-037987)

Hopewell, NJ

Hentz, John (194570) San

Francisco, CA

Jacks, Jerry C. (188172) Hixson, TX

Kanter, Stephen A. (106549)

Pasadena, CA

Knecht, David F. (168914) Fargo,

ND

Latzko, William, P. (7368-051099)

Winter Garden, FL

Maier, Lucille, F. (8121-070648)

Tonawanda, NY

Math, Irwin (086545) Princeton

Junction, NJ

Moellering, Nancy K. (153538) St.

Charles, MO

Morin, Robb M. (226012)

Bloomington, MN

Nachman, Milton W. (6883-049377)

Newtown, PA

O’Toole, Steven T. (160575),

Liberty, IN

Robertson, Jan (188104) Deland,

FL

Rogal, Richard (154958)

Springfield, IL

Rylie, Guthrie (222587),

Sheboygan, WI

Schilling, Wayne M. (203139)

Brentwood, CA

Sivak, Michael J. (120726) Kapaa,

HI

Stillman, James R. (211329)

Kentfield, CA

Straley, Jane C. (Sherry) (4535-

128992) Sacramento, CA

Strem, C. Clifford (5644-034409),

San Leandro, CA

Sundfor-Fulscher, Sandra (05821-

162368) Westchester, IL

Szymanski, Lawrence S. (115279)

Chicago, IL

Taisne, Jean Claude E. M. (054307)

Mission Viejo, CA

Turner, Lee T. (057154) Lubbock, TX

Ure, Donald A. (082735) Troy MI

Walton, Mary Anne (1778874)

Belleville, IL

Waterman, David H.(105258)

Bellingham, WA

Wareing, James H. (8236-56708)

Sussex, WI

White, Owen (155940) Toronto,

ON, Canada

Wilburn, Donald Sr. (160751)

Virginia Beach, VA

Wreight, Gene (201910),

Bloomington, IL

Wynn, F. Houston (8372-059021),

Springfield, VA

Yurko, Raymond J. (144753), Yale,

MI

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 93


NEW WORLD ISSUES

BY FRED BAUMANN

editorial content specialist | fbaumann@stamps.org

CZECH REPUBLIC

THE STRUGGLE FOR CZECH STATEHOOD

As this Oct. 10 Czech Republic souvenir sheet

reminds us, the end of World War I was in fact the

beginning for many smaller European states that

had been incorporated into the autocratic Austro-

Hungarian Empire, Czechoslovakia (now the

Czech Republic and Slovakia) being among them.

The two 33-koruna stamps on this sheet – the last

in a series begun with Scott 3609 in 2014 − echoes

that theme. The upper stamp pictures Prague’s St.

Wenceslaus Monument honoring both the nation’s

patron saint and the statue itself as a mute witness

to the birth of national independence on October

28, 1918. It was on that day that the nascent First

Republic of Czechoslovakia came into being when

agents of its National Committee refused to send

more grain to Austro-Hungarian troops at the front

– the first decisive move of what was to become an

independent state. The second stamp depicts Tomas

G. Masaryk, founder and first president of that

republic until 1935. The periphery of the 40-millimeter

by 50mm sheet contains a litany of the key

events and individuals of that turbulent era, some

of whom appear in the design.

GUERNSEY

SEASON’S GREETINGS AT THE KIOSK

Just off the coast of France, the Channel Island

of Guernsey offered an innovative service to enable

its 63,000 citizens to print their own Post &

Go holiday stamps this year. On November 22,

Guernsey Post announced that from December

3 to 21 it would “vend Bailiwick Flower

stamp strips with the overprint message ‘Merry

Christmas & a Happy New Year 2018.’ ‘Our Post

& Go kiosks continue to be really popular and,

following the great response to the Guernsey

Information Centre location this year, we’ve

decided to add a festive message…’ explained

Bridget Yabsley, head of philatelic at Guernsey

Post.” No details were given as to how long these

stamps would remain available, but Guernsey

Post noted that “Strips can be ordered directly

online… or email philatelic@guernseypost.com.”

UNITED KINGDOM

PRINCE OF WALES GETS 70TH BIRTHDAY STAMPS

Royal Mail delivered a very special 70th birthday present to Prince

Charles Philip Arthur George on November 14 – a set of six stamps

showing His Royal Highness undertaking official duties and with family

members. As the first-born child of Princess Elizabeth and the Duke

of Edinburgh, Prince Charles became the Prince of Wales and the Heir

to the Thrones of the United Kingdom and 15 other Commonwealth

realms, and the future Head of the British Commonwealth of Nations.

Two of the six stamps depict Prince Charles with his sons: Prince William,

the Duke of Cambridge; and Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex. In

the stamp shown, all three men appear in Royal Air Force uniform in a

previously unpublished photo taken at the recent RAF centenary commemorations

in 2018. The stamps, sheet, press sheets and picture postal

cards are available from www.royalmail.com/princeofwales

94 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


ROSS DEPENDENCY

KEEP ’EM FROSTY, BUT KEEP ’EM FLYING

Named for British naval officer and explorer Sir James Clark Ross, the Ross Dependency is one of

11 wedge-shaped sectors of Antarctica claimed by a nation, its claimant being New Zealand. Like

all of Antarctica, working and living there are only possible thanks to rugged and reliable aircraft

to staff and supply the polar outposts. On November 7, New Zealand Post issued a set of six stamps

and a miniature sheet depicting six of its aircraft, four operated by the Royal New Zealand Air

Force (RNZAF) and two by private carriers. Shown is the low value, a $1.20 stamp picturing a variant

of the RNZAF Auster T7C monoplane being offloaded from a cargo ship. Five other stamps in

the set and sheet feature a $1.20 DHC2 Beaver ski monoplane, $1.20 C-130 Hercules, $2.40 Boeing

757 strategic air lift aircraft, $3.00 AS350-B3 Squirrel helicopter, and a $3.60 DCH-6 Twin Otter.

CANADA

REMEMBRANCE DAY

On October 24, Canada issued a single stamp to mark the 100th

anniversary of the day the guns fell silent at the end of the

First World War. The “P”-rate stamp, paying Canada’s basic

domestic letter rate (currently 85 cents), depicts the white dove

of Peace above a strand of barbed wire, against the grim, gray

vista of a forest shattered by shellfire. The stamp is inscribed

“ARMISTICE” to commemorate 1918, but the dates marking

the centennial are punctuated by a single decorative poppy of

the type worn by Canadians of every age, gender and walk of

life each autumn. In 1931, after the relief of peace subsided, the

Canadian Legion representing hundreds of thousands of WWI

veterans, had November 11 renamed as “Remembrance Day,”

and the blood-red poppy with its black eye became its symbol.

Recalling their losses − 66,000 dead, 172,000 wounded − those

veterans realized that a day would come when no one would

have any direct memory of “the Great War,” but that it was important

that the suffering, the sacrifice and the loss be recalled,

if only to prevent its repetition. The stamps are available in

perforated panes of five with moisture-activated gum and selfadhesive

die-cut booklets of 10 from Canada Post.

CROATIA

A LOCOMOTIVE LESSON

Croatian Post (Hrvatska posta) issued two 7.60-kuna stamps October 5 to commemorate railway engines that ran between the

capital at Zagreb and a western suburb at Samobor, near the Slovenian frontier. The narrow-gauge steam locomotive No. 7 was

a 10-ton engine built in Germany capable of pulling light passenger and mixed trains up mild grades at a top permitted speed

of 15.5 miles per hour (25 kilometers per hour). It ran from 1901 until December 31, 1979. Its diesel-electric counterpart, the

Motor Train DEV I, was intended to be faster and more efficient than the aged pufferbelly that preceded it, but insistence on

building it in Croatia ultimately involved 18 factories, a number of prototypes, and took four to ten years. The first DEV I took

to the tracks in 1959, followed by three other versions in 1961, 1962 and 1965. Three years after the railroad closed for good in

1983, all four were scrapped. The newer trains had been able to travel as fast as 37 miles per hour, but the four of them together

gave 85 years of service, whereas old No. 7 alone had given 79 and is still around in a museum. Slow and steady won the race.

New worldwide stamps are presented for information and are not necessarily shown at the correct scale. The quality of images

available at the time of release varies widely and we resize to achieve the best possible reproduction.

JANUARY 2019 / AMERICAN PHILATELIST 95


WORLDWIDE IN A NUTSHELL

BY BOB LAMB

AP Columnist

EAST TIMOR (TIMOR-LESTE)

Status: Democratic Republic based on Portuguese model

Population: 1,321,929 (2018 est.)

Area: 5,743 square miles

Currency: 100 centavos = $1 U.S. (U.S. dollars are used but East

Timor has its own coins)

Timor is a rugged island in the eastern part of what is today Indonesia, off the north coast of Australia.

When the lucrative sandalwood trade brought the Portuguese to Timor in the early 16th century, they

found a mountainous island with an ethnically mixed population divided into numerous warring kingdoms.

Later Dominican missionaries arrived on the island, but for over a century the official Portuguese

presence in Timor was limited to seasonal trading expeditions from Macau. The principal Portuguese

base of operations in the region was not on Timor but on Solor, an island about 100 miles north.

In the early 1600s the Dutch East Indies Company aggressively challenged Portugal’s

maritime supremacy and by 1613 the Portuguese held only their foothold in

eastern Timor. An agreement with the Dutch led to a division of the island, though

warfare continued for another 200 years fueled by undefined boundaries and local

rivalries. It is a wonder that Portugal retained its position given the meager

resources it committed to Timor. It is estimated that in 1750 there were fewer than

10 Portuguese on the island plus a handful of Dominican Friars whose labors for

God were allegedly tempered by frequent licentious lapses. East

Scott RAJ3 is a 1925

4a lake postal tax

stamp overprinted

for use in Timor.

This 4a bright green

Portuguese Vasco

da Gama common

design stamp, Scott

226, was released in

Timor in 1938.

This 25-cent Crocodile stamp,

Scott 352, is one of four 2002

first issues of the Independent

State of Timor-Leste.

Timor’s borders were not agreed upon until 1914.

Life changed significantly for most citizens of Timor since

the 18th century. Economically backward, East Timor was the last

Portuguese colony to get its own stamps, when in 1885 ten Macau

stamps were overprinted for use on the island. Timor remained a

colonial backwater where Portugal sent its malcontents and criminals.

Despite Portuguese neutrality in World War II, the Japanese

invaded Timor in 1942. There appears to have been no local mail

service during Japanese occupation, and no Timor stamps were

issued from 1938 until 1946.

The colony continued to use special stamps until 1974 when

Portugal’s Carnation Revolution brought decolonization – and

civil war – which lasted until 1976 when East Timor was annexed by Indonesia, which brought Indonesian

stamps. Violence continued and in 1999 Indonesia agreed to a referendum. When the people voted

strongly in favor of Independence, the United Nations assumed authority over the country and the Australians

assisted with security. Two values were issued in 2000 by the U.N. Transitional Authority in East

Timor. The stamps were not widely used. Still, despite political unrest, elections were held.

On May 20, 2002, the U.N. recognized the Independent

State of Timor-Leste. On that day the new

country issued its first postage stamps. In the 16 years

since, it has issued about a dozen stamps. There is a

modern post office constructed with South Korean

aid in Dili, the capital and commercial hub of Timor-

Leste. On my three visits on three consecutive days in

late 2018, the sales area was staffed by three helpful

employees. Each time, I was the only customer.

All these stamps are listed under Timor in Volume

6B of the Scott catalogue.

Timor marked the

75th anniversary of

the Universal Postal

Union in 1949 with

this 16a stamp,

Scott 255.

Left: Overprinted “Timor” in 1885, this

Macau colonial issue was one of the

first postage stamps used on the island,

Timor Scott 1.

Right: A 9-avo King Carlos Portuguese

colonial stamp issued in 1903, Scott 63.

Scott 350 is one of two stamps issued in

2000 by the U.N. Transitional Authority in

East Timor. Both are scarce, especially in

used condition.

96 AMERICAN PHILATELIST / JANUARY 2019


AMERISTAMP EXPO

PRE-REGISTRATION

Name ____________________________________________________________ APS No. _____________________

Guests (adults or youth) __________________________________________________________________________

Address _______________________________________________________________________________________

City ________________________________________________________________ State _____ Zip ____________

Email _______________________________________________ Phone (_____)______________________________

QTY

Volunteer to help at the show on this day(s):

q Wed., Feb. 13 q Thu., Feb. 14 q Fri., Feb. 15 q Sat., Feb. 16 q Sun., Feb. 17

Volunteers who work 8 hrs. or more receive a free awards banquet ticket. We’ll send details.

Thursday – On-the-Road Course: Pressing Issues: Stamp Printing Simplified APS Members $45

10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. (Lunch on your own). Presented by Wayne Youngblood Non-Members $95

Saturday & Sunday – Boy Scout Merit Badge Workshops

9:30 a.m.– 3:30 p.m. (Lunch on your own). Presented by Lee Shedroff

Free - sponsored by Scouts on Stamps Society International

Email lshedroff@aol.com to Register- Space is Limited!

Saturday – Awards Banquet $60

6:15 p.m. Cash Bar; 7:00 p.m. Dinner. Choice of Entrée: $65 after Jan. 15

$ Amount

q Pan Seared Garlic Herb Airline Chicken Breast with garlic mashed potatoes and a seasonal vegetable medley

q Pan Seared Salmon topped with white wine butter sauce and served with rice pilaf and a seasonal vegetable medley

q Grilled Flat Iron Steak topped with wild cherry bordelaise and served with roasted garlic mashed potatoes and a seasonal

vegetable medley.

Includes: Signature Salad, Dinner Rolls, and Lemon Tart

NOTE: Advances prices available until January 15, 2019.

Tickets and name badges are prepared in advance and should be picked up at the show.

February 15-17, 2019 • Mesa Convention Center

263 N. Center Street, Mesa, Arizona 85201

Return this form by January 15, or register at the door.

Online registration available at www.stamps.org/ASE-Preregister

NOTE: ALL attendees should complete a pre-registration form, even if not ordering tickets. Name badges and tickets

are prepared in advance, and should be picked-up at the Pre-Registration desk.

TOTAL: $

Use of Show Photography and Video - American Philatelic Society (APS) reserves the right to use any photograph/video taken at any

event sponsored by APS, without the expressed written permission of those included in the photograph/video. APS may use the photograph/

video in publications or other media material produced, used or contracted by APS including but not limited to: advertising, brochures,

invitations, books, newspapers, magazines, social media, television and websites.

To ensure the privacy of individuals and children, images will not be identified using full names or personal identifying information without

approval from the photographed subject, parent or legal guardi

Submit form and payment by

January 15, 2019.

Payment Method

q Check (Payable to “APS”) -or- q Visa q MC q Discover

Card number: # ∙ _ _ _ _ ∙ _ _ _ _ ∙ _ _ _ _ ∙ _ _ _ _ Exp. Date _ _ ∙ _ _

V-Code _ _ _ (3 digits on back of card) Daytime Ph: (____) _____-_______

Signature ______________________________________________________

StampShow

100 Match Factory Place

Bellefonte, PA 16823

Phone: (814) 933-3803 ext. 217

Fax: (814) 933-6128

stampshow@stamps.org


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UNFORTUNATELY many collections in the $2,000

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IF YOU LIVE IN:

IF YOU LIVE IN:

WRITE OR CALL:

WRITE OR CALL:

Ohio, Michigan,

Randy Scholl Stamp Co.

Ohio, Kentucky, Michigan, Indiana, Randy Scholl 7460 Jager Stamp Court Co.

Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, West Virginia, Cincinnati, 7460 Jager OH 45230 Court

Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West New Virginia, Jersey, Phone: Cincinnati, 513-624-6800

OH 45230

New Pennsylvania, York, or Ontario New Jersey, randyscholl@fuse.net

Phone: 513-624-6800

New York, or Ontario randyschollstampcompany.com

randyscholl@fuse.net

randyschollstampcompany.com

Wisconsin,

Dr. Robert Friedman & Sons

Northern Wisconsin, Florida, Dr. Robert Phone: Friedman 800-588-8100 & Sons

Southern Northern Florida, Phone: Fax: 800-588-8100

630-985-1588

or Southern Texas: Florida, drbobstamps@comcast.net

Fax: 630-985-1588

or Texas: www.drbobfriedmanstamps.com

drbobstamps@comcast.net

www.drbobfriedmanstamps.com

Coins also wanted.

Coins also wanted.

California, Nevada, Newport Harbor Stamp Co.

Arizona, California, Oregon, Nevada, Newport Harbor P.O. Stamp Box 3364 Co.

Arizona, or Washington: Oregon, Newport Beach, P.O. CA Box 92659 3364

or Washington: Phone: Newport 800-722-1022 Beach, CA (Dave) 92659

newportharborstamps@gmail.com

Phone: 800-722-1022 (Dave)

newportharborstamps@gmail.com

IF YOU LIVE IN:

IF YOU LIVE IN:

WRITE OR CALL:

WRITE OR CALL:

North Carolina,

PRM Enterprises, Inc.

South North Carolina,

PRM Randall Enterprises, T. Scribner Inc.

Georgia, South Carolina, or Virginia: 4110 Randall French T. Fields Scribner Ln.

Georgia, or Virginia: 4110 Harrisburg, French NC Fields 28075 Ln.

Phone: Harrisburg, (704) NC 575-2795 28075

Phone: (704) scrib1@ctc.net 575-2795

Coins scrib1@ctc.net

also wanted

Coins also wanted

Illinois, Iowa,

Coins, Stamps ’N Stuff LLC

Minnesota, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Coins, Stamps Jerry & ’N Barb Stuff Koepp LLC

Nebraska, Minnesota, South/ Kansas,

8190 Jerry Hickman & Barb Koepp Road

North Nebraska, Dakota, South/ Des Moines, 8190 IA Hickman 50325-4405 Road

Missouri, North Dakota, New Mexico, Des Moines, Phone: IA 515-331-4307

50325-4405

Arkansas, Missouri, New or Colorado: Mexico, Orders: Phone: 847-778-5519

515-331-4307

Arkansas, or Colorado: Orders: Fax: 515-331-2527

847-778-5519

Fax: 515-331-2527

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