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UJ#22 - Peru, local flavor

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PERU

LOCAL FLAVOUR

HUARIQUES

THE SOUL OF THE

KITCHEN

CRAFT BEER

PERU IN EVERY GLASS

FOOD CARTS

A STREET FULL OF

FLAVOUR

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2


Giving renewed value to the world and cultural heritage of our country. Stretch of the Qhapaq Ñan or Great Inca Trail, Huanuco, Peru.

3


INDEX

10

COOKING

FROM THE

HEART

18

INFOGRAPHICS:

BASIC LESSONS IN

PERUVIAN COOKING

20

INTERVIEW

WITH COQUE

OSSIO, CULINARY DIRECTOR

OF CUSCO RESTAURANTS

30

THE

GOOD

FOOD

ROUTE

40

INFOGRAPHICS:

PERUVIAN STREET

FLAVOURS


This edition of Ultimate

Journeys - Travel in Peru was

produced by LimaTours’

marketing team.

UJ GENERAL DIRECTOR

Gerardo Sugay

CONTENT DIRECTOR

Gerardo Sugay

Ana Paula Albin

Ximena Arrieta

GENERAL EDITOR

Ximena Arrieta

PRODUCT DESIGN

Dafne Vargas

42

A

PERUVIAN

PINT

50

SCENTS

AND

FLAVOURS

OF PERU

COORDINATION

Karla Huertas

ART DIRECTOR

LimaTours

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Sergio Salazar

Naomi Tamamoto

INFOGRAPHICS

Juan Diego León

Sergio Salazar

Naomi Tamamoto

EDITORIAL STAFF

Ximena Arrieta

PHOTOGRAPHS

Archivo LimaTours

@MatthewSchueller

Sergio Salazar

PromPerú

Apega

Pirata Studio Film

54

PROGRAMME:

PERU ON

A PLATE

Intu

COVER PAGE PHOTO

CREDIT

Apega


EDITORIAL

The majesty of the Peruvian Andes protected by practicing sustainable tourism.

DEAR READER:

Eating is a great pleasure for many. It is not just something that human beings need to survive; it has become an experience which

stimulates the senses. It is so important that it has given rise to gastrophysics, the study of the physics and chemistry that are

involved in gastronomy and all that it implies.

However, for Peruvians, eating is more than science, or recipes, or pleasures. In Peru, gastronomy, according to chef Ferran Adria, is

“a religion”. This religion can be experienced in different ways: inside temples of high cuisine which are considered some of the best

in the world, or in the simple neighbourhood chapels where the love of food is simple and pure.

In this edition of Ultimate Journeys - Travel in Peru magazine, we invite you to join us on a journey through what we like to call

“alternative gastronomy”. Let yourself be guided by a 100% Peruvian palate through the story of our food and its evolution, from its

indigenous roots through the colonial period to today’s huariques, small restaurants with authentic, homely flavours.

Experience our colourful street carts and their tasty traditional dishes. Explore the world of culinary fusion where our historic

ingredients are put back in the spotlight in Cusco, and finish off with a toast as you discover what makes Peruvian craft breweries

so unique.

The Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw once said, “there is no love so true as the love of good food!”. So, if Peru is synonymous

with gastronomy, there can be no doubt that it will be love at first bite.

Happy reading and enjoy!

Your friends at LimaTours

Design and management of tour programmes, in all areas of the company

(quotation, product design, suppliers management, Lima operations, billing

and collection)

6


7


CURRENT ISSUES

Sergio Salazar

TRAVEL AND LEISURE: PERUVIAN

HOTELS ARE HIGHLIGHTED

After a reader survey, the magazine Travel and Leisure has

published its list of the best destinations and hotels of the

year, which features several Peruvian nominations. Cusco

was chosen as the best city to visit in South America, while

Lima was in ninth place. In the category of the World’s Best

Hotels, Palacio del Inka, Luxury Collection Hotel and Sol y

Luna came in at 83 and 41 respectively. In Best Resorts

in South America, Inkaterra Hacienda Urubamba placed

ninth, whilst Tambo del Inka, Luxury Collection Resort &

Spa was seventh, and Sol y Luna won third place. In Best

Hotels of South America, Hotel B placed ninth, Belmond

Hotel Monasterio was eighth, Belmond Palacio Nazarenas

was fourth, and Palacio del Inka, Luxury Collection Hotel

was first.

ACCESS CONTROLS FOR THE

SALT PONDS OF MARAS

To avoid any contamination of the salt produced in the

salt ponds of Maras, restrictions on public access to

the tourist attraction have been introduced since June.

Visitors will be able to follow the pathways only as far as

the lookout point above the ponds, so that they will not

enter the pond area. The administrators of the Salt Ponds

will prepare a demonstration area to explain all about the

salt extraction process, as well as a viewing route which

will pass above the pools.

Libertador

Sergio Salazar

PERUVIAN RESTAURANTS FEATURE

IN THE TOP TEN WORLDWIDE

Once again Peruvian gastronomy has received

international recognition. Central and Maido have been

placed in the Top Ten of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants,

as they were last year, positioning at 6 and 10 respectively.

In the previous ranking, Central had been again at 6 and

Maido at 7. At the prize-giving held in Singapore, chefs

Virgilio Martinez and Pia Leon received the Awards, which

also crowned Central as the best restaurant in South

America.


LimaTours

@MatthewSchueller

LIMATOURS – ONE OF THE BEST

DMCS OF THE YEAR IN LATA

PERU TRIUMPHS IN WORLD TRAVEL

AWARDS SOUTH AMERICA

LimaTours was recognised as the second-best DMC (Destination

Management Company) of the Year, at the presentation of the LATA

Achievement Awards 2019 during the ELA Fair organised by the

Latin American Travel Association, LATA. The award was given after

evaluating the company’s achievements in quality of service, product

innovation, partner support, and positive impacts on the community

and the environment. At the same event, PromPeru won the award

for the best destination of the year, in recognition of its efforts to

promote the country Peru in the United Kingdom.

Four awards went to Peru in the South American edition of the

World Travel Awards, one of the tourism industry’s most prestigious

events worldwide. Our country was recognised as the Best Cultural

and Culinary Destination, while Machu Picchu was chosen as the best

tourist attraction in the region. Also, PromPeru was selected as the

best Tourism Office in South America. As the winner of the regional

Awards, Peru will now go forward as a representative in the same

categories for the WTA Worldwide Ceremony which will take place in

Oman on November 28.


10

COOKING FROM THE HEART


Km Cero

COOKING

FROM THE

HEART

THERE IS NO DOUBTING

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF

GASTRONOMY TO PERU.

HOWEVER, BEYOND

ALL THE AWARDS

AND THE SUCCESSES,

THERE IS A SPIRIT TO

COOKING THAT BRINGS

BACK MEMORIES

AND EXPERIENCES,

THAT REFLECTS OUR

RICH HISTORY OF

HUNDREDS OF YEARS

AND MAKES US PROUD

TODAY. WELCOME TO

THE ALTERNATIVE

PERUVIAN

GASTRONOMY.

In the smallest

restaurants,

many owners

serve their

customers

themselves.

11


COOKING FROM THE HEART

When we were young, we were taught that we use our

senses to appreciate the world around. We know where

to walk by our sight, we listen to music with our hearing,

we feel the kisses of our loved ones with the sense of

touch, we appreciate the scents of flowers with the smell,

and we differentiate salt from sugar with our taste. The

world is what we perceive it to be, thanks to our senses.

Beyond the variety of our ingredients and talented chefs,

there is something more that makes Peruvian food so

special. Behind the flavour, there are feelings embodied

in each dish and shared with those who have it in front.

Anticuchos, the

superstars of

street food.

Of the five senses, studies have shown that the two most

powerful are scent and taste. Smells and flavours can

instantly bring back feelings and memories that were

locked away in our brains. You don’t remember what

you saw in a shop, but you remember the smells? You

have forgotten the name of the restaurant, but not the

flavour of the dishes that you enjoyed? Your memory is

doing all that.

Interestingly, the senses of smell and taste are strongly

linked to gastronomy. However, we cannot talk about

cooking without highlighting Peru, considered of the

world centres of great food, for its incredible selection

of fruits and spices, its many recipes and its world-class

restaurants. It is so famous that master chef Ferrán

Adriá called cooking “a religion” in this country.

Apega

LimaTours

In Peru,

you will

find family

flavours

reinvented

in high-class

cuisine.

Km Cero

12

Restaurants with modern ideas are beginning

to spread across the country.


Traditions remain strong,

especially outside Lima.

PERU, A RICH MIXTURE

Km Cero

With the coming of the Spanish, the diet changed

dramatically: beef came to replace camelid meat, rice

was used instead of quinoa, and there are so many more

examples. After the Spanish came Africans, Japanese,

Chinese and Italians, all of whom added their own magic

touches to make today’s Peruvian gastronomy.

In Mirko Lauer’s book The Peruvian Gastronomic Revolution,

journalist Raul Vargas says that “Peruvian cuisine has

an absorbency, an ability to be open and accepting to

outside influences.” These influences are not just foreign,

but also local. The migration to the capital - particularly

from the 1980s when we suffered from terrible armed

conflict - meant that Lima took over as the nerve centre

of Peruvian food. All those who came from the provinces

brought their cultural heritage, including their traditional

cuisines. The result? Regional food outlets that can take

you on a culinary journey the length and breadth of Peru,

without leaving the capital.

These local food traditions bring with them their own

ingredients and a thorough transformation. Foodstuffs

that were neglected or despised for years are now

empowered in the hands of young chefs, who seek to

value the fruits of Mother Earth, the Pachamama. They

have given birth, for example, to Novo-Andean cuisine,

which has brought historic grains like quinoa and

kiwicha to the most exclusive dining tables; alpaca steaks

and joints become a rare delicacy, and so on. We were

always blessed, without any doubt, but we finally have

been able to find a way to communicate it to the world -

and listen to us talking!

Sergio Salazar

Lomo saltado,

one of Peru’s

most iconic

dishes, was

born from

the marriage

of eastern

and Peruvian

cookery.

Km Cero

Peruvian restaurants are a meeting

place for cultures and flavours.

13


3000

OF THE

4000

VARIETIES OF POTATO

THAT ARE IN THE

ANDES

ARE FOUND IN

PERU

OF THE

50 TYPES

OF MAIZE

THAT ARE GROWN IN

PERU

THE MOST POPULAR

ARE CUSCO'S

GIANT MAIZE

AND

PURPLE CORN

Two Peruvian restaurants are placed in the world's top fifty

CENTRAL&MAIDO

CENTRAL

MAIDO

WE HAVE SEVERAL GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS

RELATED TO GASTRONOMY:

THE BIGGEST SERVING

PAPA

RELLENA

(846 kilos)

QUINOA

MAZAMORRA

(1,680 kilos)

THE BIGGETS

PACHAMANCA

EVER

THE BIGGETS

CAUSA

EVER


Km Cero

Young chefs experiment

with local ingredients in

exotic new recipes.

lomo saltado or rice with the mother’s touch. This return

to our origins is what forms the base of what we like

to call the Peruvian alternative gastronomy, something

that we experience outside of the luxury restaurants, by

taking a ride towards the real heart of Peruvian food, the

flavour of the home.

Here we can find the huariques, restaurants where they

serve food in a homely fashion following recipes which

have passed from generation to generation. This is what

Km Cero

FROM THE HEART TO THE TABLE

Cookery represents a type of voyage. A journey for the

chef who leaves his safety zone to keep on learning; a

journey for the immigrant mother who comes to a new

city and has to cook for her family; a mental trip for each

one of us as flavours take us back to the past. Good food

strengthens the sense of belonging, of identifying with

one’s roots.

Taking the culinary journey in Peru, we must remember

an extraordinary ingredient: the family. A Peruvian’s first

meal is prepared in the family kitchen, with grandmother’s

inspires the street carts or carretillas with a total Peruvian

flavour where you can enjoy tasty marinated anticuchos

or nutritious breakfasts on the go. Lunch stalls within the

markets are also growing in popularity, even becoming

a magnet for tourists. All these emphasise customer

satisfaction, to see the smile on the face of the diner

when they take their first mouthful.

Food is a way to reach into the heart of Peru - to the

family dining table, and the happiness created there,

the scents that take you back to your childhood, the

tastes which make your mouth water. To eat is not just a

necessity; now it is an experience that overwhelms your

senses.

Street markets

offer an

interesting

eating

alternative.

Andean grains are now

considered superfoods.

Apega

15


COOKING FROM THE HEART

A NEW LOOK

You can

try ceviche

in smart

restaurants or

more down-toearth

outlets.

Gastronomic tourism continues to grow throughout the

world, and Peru is no exception. It is more and more

common to see visitors that have come here to learn

about our food and seek out culinary experiences

beyond the established tours.

Peru is an

important

destination for

gastronomic

tourism.

Whatever the time of day, you will find a place to satisfy

your hunger in Peru. Breakfasts are served from the very

early hours on the street; at night, there are sandwich

shops and restaurants serving soups and broths for

night owls, many of them open all night long.

Km Cero

For those who want something more elegant, there are

restaurants which serve up the same street food recipes

on their menus. “From the market to the table” refers

not just to the ingredients, but also to these traditional

dishes with local flavours, brought to another level

without losing their essence.

It is remarkable how famous Peruvian food has become,

and this boom can change the face of the city. Streets

and neighbourhoods that were not well known before

have become the centre of an amazing gastronomic

movement that has put them in plain sight, as with

Surquiyork, a new dining route in the quiet district of

Surquillo, with a tempting variety of flavours.

It does not matter whether you are from the coast or

the highlands, from north or south; when we talk about

food in Peru we are all one. The papa a la huancaina is

from Huancayo, but belongs to all of us, as do Arequipa’s

rocoto relleno, the juane from the Amazon, and Lima’s

own suspiro a la limeña. You are welcome to join us in

exploring the flavours of our great revolution of the pots

and pans.

Rocoto relleno,

stuffed hot

pepper, is a

flagship dish

for Arequipa.

Apega

THE STUDY “KEY TRENDS IN CULINARY

TOURISM” FROM THE CONSULTANTS

GLOBAL DATA, PUBLISHED BY PROMPERU,

POINTS OUT THAT IN 2017, TOURISTS SPENT

186 THOUSAND MILLION DOLLARS ON

FOOD AND DRINK DURING THEIR TRAVELS.

Apega

16


17


Basic lessons in

PERUVIAN COOKING

PERUVIAN COOKERY AS WE KNOW IT TODAY IS A BLEND OF CUSTOMS AND TRADITIONS

THAT HAVE COME TOGETHER TO FORM A RICH AND SPICY SAUCE. LOOK UNDER THE TABLE

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT OUR GASTRONOMY.

Throughout our history, more than 4500 native species have been adapted for humans to eat. The coastal cultures

based their diet on seafood and became expert fishermen. In the highlands, meats such as alpaca and guinea pig were

combined with grains and tubers of which quinua, potato and maize were predominant. During the times of the

Tahuantinsuyo, the Inca empire, the expansion allowed an exchange of ingredients between the different regions.

INFLUENCES

From the nineteenth century, migration began to create

some of the gastronomy of which we are now so proud.

The sailors came to

Peru in search of

opportunity, bringing

with them skills in cake

and bread-making.

They arrived as

labourers. When they

settled, they took the

local dishes and added

their techniques and

ingredients, thus creating

what we now call Nikkei

(Peruvian-Japanese

fusion).

JAPAN

AFRICA

ITALY

SPAIN

Coming as slaves to work

on the haciendas, many

opened up restaurants

when they were freed.

There, they combined

Peruvian ingredients with

Chinese recipes, giving

birth to the famous "chifa".

CHINA

Brought over as slaves

or domestic workers,

the people have

retained till the

present day their

culinary traditions,

including the

preparation of viscera.

The new ingredients

from Europe mixed

with those which

already existed in

Peru form the basis

of our Creole food.

With them also

came an Arab

influence which

can be seen in

many names and

foodstuffs.

CHAUFA


COFFEE

PRODUCTOS ESTRELLA

If our food is recognised all over the

world, it is in part because of our highest

quality ingredients.

POTATO

COCOA

PISCO

Peru is the seventh-largest exporter of coffee and

the second most important supplier of organic

coffee. The national coffee bean is known for its

aroma and flavour, and Tunki coffee won the award

as the best organic coffee in the world in 2010.

Growing in the Amazon, cocoa passes through

several processes before being made into

chocolate, drinks, paste or butter. It is used as

the main ingredient by the most prestigious

chocolate-makers.

This ancient tuber, besides its

versatility in the kitchen, is full

of vitamins, minerals,

antioxidants and fibre.

Made from different grape varieties,

its unmistakable flavour is always a

pleasure to taste, whether in the pure

spirit or in a chilcano or a pisco sour.

LOS SUPER ALIMENTOS

Natural and healthy, superfoods are a

powerful source of proteins, vitamins and

minerals necessary for a positive lifestyle.

AJI (CHILLI)

CAMU CAMU

LUCUMA

ASPARAGUS

A pillar of our cuisine, giving flavour

and warmth to so many of our dishes.

It stimulates the nervous system and

produces endorphins.

This fruit from the Amazon has high

levels of vitamin C. It encourages

the growth of collagen, leading to

healthy bones, skin and cartilage.

This fruit carries carbohydrates,

vitamins, minerals and

beta-carotene, preventing

anaemia and ageing.

A tasty source of potassium,

vitamins and fibre. It also helps

to clean the urinary tract and

slows brain deterioration.

QUINOA

MACA

KIWICHA

CHIA

Highly nutritious, this indigenous

grain is now in demand worldwide for

its high levels of proteins,

unsaturated fatty acids and minerals.

Another indigenous grain that has become part

of the NASA space programme, it lowers

cholesterol and is a natural anti-inflammatory. It

contains phosphorus, calcium, vitamins and iron.

For the Incas, this knobbly root was

considered a gift from the gods. Today it is

prized worldwide for its vitamins and

minerals, amino acids, protein and fibre.

This tiny seed is one of the best

sources of omega 3, as well as

calcium, iron, phosphorus, vitamins,

magnesium, zinc and antioxidants.

TIRADITO

PANETON

AJI DE GALLINA

ANTICUCHO


INTERVIEW

CUSCO RESTAURANTS,

WITH EIGHT OUTLETS,

EACH WITH THEIR

OWN STYLE AND MORE

THAN TWENTY YEARS

IN THE BUSINESS, HAS

BECOME ONE OF THE

BENCHMARKS FOR

GASTRONOMY IN THE

IMPERIAL CITY. WE

TALK WITH COQUE

OSSIO ABOUT THE

CHALLENGES AND

TRANSFORMATIONS

THROUGH WHICH

OUR NATIONAL

CUISINE HAS EVOLVED

AND HOW CUSCO

IS BEGINNING TO

ATTRACT ATTENTION

AS A DESTINATION

FOR LOVERS OF

GOOD FOOD.

COQUE

OSSIO

CULINARY

DIRECTOR

OF CUSCO

RESTAURANTS

While studying

business

administration,

Coque decided to

change direction

and focus on

gastronomy.

20


Sergio Salazar

21


INTERVIEW

Cusco Restaurants

Dining out can be the centrepiece of an unforgettable

evening. A beautifully prepared dish, richly flavoured,

perfectly presented, becomes the highlight of the day and

leaves marvellous memories. In the city of Cusco, where

every corner brings fresh surprises, an exceptional culinary

experience is a perfect complement to an extraordinary tour.

Cusco offers

fantastic views, a

perfect background

to unforgettable

meals.

With more than twenty years in the business, Cusco

Restaurants aims to offer different alternatives to the public

for enjoying good food in the city. From classic pizzas to

adventurous signature dishes, the range of options in their

eight establishments can satisfy even the most demanding

palate. Coque Ossio, the Head Chef, tells us more about the

project.

Classic

dishes are

transformed

using native

ingredients

What is the concept behind Cusco Restaurants?

Coque: Today, we are talking about a range of concepts

behind one business proposition. When we began

more than twenty years ago, we recognised that the

typical tourist stays in Cusco from five to six days. So we

decided to create a variety of dining experiences which

would allow the visitors to try different cuisines during

their visit with a range of typical costs.

CUSCO RESTAURANTS HAVE EIGHT

ESTABLISHMENTS: INKAGRILL, MAP CAFE,

PACHAPAPA, INCANTO, GREENS ORGANIC,

LIMO, KION AND CALLE DEL MEDIO.

Cusco Restaurants

22

Cusco Restaurants

From haute cuisine to regional

staples, Cusco Restaurants

encompasses it all.


Cusco Restaurants

The first restaurant we opened was the Inkagrill, which

highlighted international cuisine but allowed us to

include Peruvian dishes. At that time, the tourist was

often still not adventurous enough to try local food, so

we had to adapt classic dishes by adding a local twist.

We wanted the tourists to find something they could

recognise and feel comfortable with when they sat down

to eat.

Cusco Restaurants

As time passed, we took advantage of various

opportunities and were able to choose the route we

wanted to follow.

In the past twenty years, what changes have you

seen in how tourists appreciate our traditional

gastronomy?

Coque: In general, travellers today are much more willing

to try new things. The access to information means they

can discover beforehand what they are going to find

here: the tourist is no longer scared to see a whole fried

guinea pig on the table, because he has already seen

the photographs on the internet. Before, as chefs, we

wanted to be sure that we were offering something they

would be willing to eat; nowadays, we have the chance

to put more of ourselves into the work and show the full

potential of our local cuisine.

Every detail is looked

after to give a unique

service.

So your customers have also changed?

Coque: As we have so many different concepts, we see

all kinds. The two largest groups are those who have preplanned

their visit, and those who walk in off the street.

The former know what they want to eat and have sought

out a restaurant that matches their standards of quality

and service; the latter are more adventurous.

What about the local public?

Coque: More of them are visiting all the time. When we

Healthy alternatives

are also available

on the Cusco

Restaurant menus.

With so many different concepts, how can we

recognise the identity of Cusco Restaurants in

each establishment?

Coque: I believe it is the character behind it that identifies

us. The constant search for excellence, the quality of the

product and the integrity of the proposition. As a team,

we have frequent exchange meetings between the staff

of all the restaurants so that we can get to know one

another. We recognise that our customers like to talk to

us, to get to know us, to ask questions. There is where

we try to establish a connection with the visitor so that

they go away not only satisfied but also with a suggestion

of where they can eat the following day.

began to set up our restaurants in Cusco, they were

seen as places “for the tourists”. Now people feel proud

of the city’s cuisine; they want to share in it and enjoy it

for themselves.

Sweet flavours

also stand out in

visually interesting

proposals.

Cusco Restaurants

23


ENTREVISTA

Annual selection of the best restaurants

and coffee shops in 35 cities

Could we be talking of Cusco as a new centre of

gastronomy for Peru?

Coque: The thing with Cusco is that its other qualities

are so magical that it is natural that high-quality dining

has developed to accompany them. The city has not

lost the character and homeliness of its picanterias and

traditional chicherias, but these alone have not been

given visitors everything they want. It is important to

treasure these traditional diners, and I know that the

cusqueño loves his regional food, but we also need to

offer something more than what has already been an

accepted part of the city.

2018

It appears to be a form of evolution.

Coque: What has been happening with our gastronomy

is that previously it was looking for a cuisine that was

very controlled and formal, with structured dishes.

Now there is a desire to return to the basics, to the

earthenware pot with a stew that tastes like your

grandmothers’ recipe – something that Peruvian

cuisine has never lost. It is excellent that we have a

trend to revalue the rusticity, but without losing the

stylistic touch that adds an extra twist to create a dish

of the highest quality without losing its traditional heart.

The guide for all who

love fine dining

“WE TRY TO KEEP UP WITH

GASTRONOMIC TRENDS: IT IS THE

PERUVIAN INGREDIENTS THAT ARE

THE PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS IN OUR

PRESENTATIONS, BUILT INTO THE UNIQUE

CONCEPT OF EACH RESTAURANT”

COQUE OSSIO, CULINARY DIRECTOR OF

CUSCO RESTAURANTS

Cusco Restaurants

Aji de gallina, chilli chicken,

a classic tasty creole dish.

CONTACT US: ventas@creandoidea.com

C. 981419945 - 981299956

24


Cusco Restaurants

Kion, Cusco Restaurants

Peruvian-Chinese concept.

were back home. This was not a choice of the managers

of the restaurants; it has been a natural development

driven by migration. Lima is the gastronomic capital and

is going to remain so, without a doubt.

Finally, what can we expect from Cusco

Restaurants in the future?

Coque: Apart from continuing to open new restaurants,

we want to become more efficient in our service, in

perfecting our outlets, in the quality of food and

particularly in making our customers happy. I don’t

mean to say that we have reached our peak, we still

have a market full of possibilities to explore, and we

will continue growing if the right opportunities present

themselves.

In addition to his

work as a chef, Ossio

provides specialist

gastronomic

consultancy.

In Pachapapa,

the environment

is traditional and

down to earth.

Cusco Restaurants

So then, what is the difference between the

market in Cusco and in Lima?

Coque: In Lima, you have to be always thinking

about how to get the customer to come back. Lima is

complicated because there are a lot of good restaurants;

besides, new restaurants are always opening, and there

are so many groups of customers to concentrate on. In

Cusco, we are focused on a customer that may visit our

outlet just once, but we have to ensure the same high

quality each time.

What Lima has is unmatched, in that it has become a

meeting point for people coming from every region of

Peru, where they can eat food as authentic as if they

Sergio Salazar

25


INTERVIEW

WHAT IS IT ABOUT PERUVIAN

FOOD THAT HAS MADE IT SO

POPULAR?

The wide variety of ingredients

available in Peru means that

there are many different dishes.

@MatthewSchueller

Coque: One thing Peruvian food has is its flavour. It is

full of colour, which makes it stand out when you put

it on the table. We like to mix things up, add rice to the

lomo saltado, put a little pepper in it... we love to enjoy

food. Some of the dishes may seem similar to those of

Indian or Thai food, but our flavours are unique.

Cusco Restaurants

The bars

in Cusco

attract

locals and

visitors

alike.

THEY SAY THAT EVERY DISH

TELLS A STORY, WHAT DOES OUR

PERUVIAN FOOD SAY ABOUT US?

Cusco Restaurants

Coque: Peruvian gastronomy shows the great richness

we have within ourselves. The many varieties of cuisine in

Peru tell us that the country is great. We have the coast,

the highlands and the jungle – Peru is diverse and fruitful.

You can recognise the fusions that have taken place over

the years, while still maintaining the traditional roots.

The food here is an art form which allows us to express

the cultural diversity we have in our country.

Culture and flavour all in one

dish - that’s Peruvian fusion!

26


From the kitchenware

to the lighting, every

detail is part of the

gastronomic experience

you can enjoy in Cusco.

Calle del Medio,

Cusco Restaurants

27


SEE THE CONCEPT BEHIND EACH OF THESE

CUSCO RESTAURANTS AND PLAN

YOUR NEXT CULINARY VISIT TO THE

IMPERIAL CITY!

INKAGRILL

The first restaurant in the Cusco Restaurants

chain opened its doors in the Plaza de Armas

more than twenty years ago. The menu is

international but combines Peruvian flavours

with classics such as pizzas, pasta, sandwiches

and pastries.

DON’T MISS:

Alpaca Teodoro Ponte.

LIMO

Enjoy a magnificent view over the city in Limo,

whose cuisine is inspired by the Peruvian-

Japanese fusion known as Nikkei. Dishes such

as tiraditos and ceviche stand out, and there

is also a sushi bar and a bar specialising in

piscos where you can try some delicious exotic

cocktails.

DON’T MISS:

Tempura Limo.

PACHAPAPA

CALLE DEL MEDIO

Taste the creole spirit that infuses Calle del

Medio. The most traditional of Peruvian dishes

are brought into the twenty-first century with a

modern twist on the ingredients, but without

losing their essence. Relax in the bar with its

balcony looking out over the Plaza de Armas.

Located in the centre of the San Blas district,

Pachapapa brings you closer to the spirit of

Cusco cooking. Here you will enjoy a regional

menu including cuy (guinea pig), trout and

native potato, on a country-style terrace in the

heart of the city.

DON’T MISS:

Roast guinea pig.

DON’T MISS:

Sublime pie.


MAP CAFÉ

Have an extravagant dining experience

within a crystal cube inside the Museum of

Pre-Columbian Art (MAP), in stark contrast

to the colonial colonnades that surround

it. The elegant menu features classic dishes

reinvented with style and culinary refinement.

DON’T MISS:

Trout tartare.

INCANTO

Imagine yourself in the kitchen with your

nonna, your Italian grandmother, at Incanto.

This live demonstration of Italo-Peruvian fusion

features hand-made pasta and gnocchis, and

pizzas cooked in a clay oven, all presented with

style and imagination.

DON’T MISS:

Spicy prawns.

GREENS ORGANICS

Perfect for those seeking a healthier option.

The dishes at Greens are prepared using

organic and natural ingredients and include

salads, pasta and other delights, perfect for the

vegetarian customer who wants to discover

Peruvian flavours.

DON’T MISS:

Veggie hamburger.

KION

A great example of Peruvian-Chinese fusion.

Kion is the best place to try eastern flavours,

as its tasty dishes have made it one of the

most popular restaurants in the city. From

delicate entrees to meaty stir-fries, Kion is an

adventure for the palate.

DON’T MISS:

Dim sum selection.


30

THE GOOD FOOD ROUTE


Sergio Salazar

TO EAT WELL IN

PERU, YOU DON’T

HAVE TO SPEND

A FORTUNE. JUST

PUT ON YOUR

WALKING SHOES,

WANDER AROUND

THE STREETS,

AND YOU WILL

QUICKLY DISCOVER

CHARACTERFUL

NEIGHBOURHOOD

RESTAURANTS

WHERE YOU CAN

EAT LIKE A LIMEÑO.

JOIN US ON THIS

HUARIQUE TRAIL BY

BICYCLE, A TOUR

WHICH BLENDS

LOCAL HISTORY

WITH FANTASTIC

FLAVOURS.

THE GOOD

FOOD ROUTE

Hundreds of

tourists choose

Peru as a place

to learn about

our fabulous

gastronomy.

31


THE GOOD FOOD ROUTE

Isolina

Huarique – The Spanish Royal Language Academy defines

this as a hideaway or hiding place. In the strict sense of

the word, it is “a place where you can hide yourself, or in

which you hide and protect something.” But, what is a

huarique for a Peruvian?

In Peru, to talk of a huarique is to talk about food. In

his book “Great Huariques of Peru”, the world-famous

chef Gaston Acurio defines it as “the Peruvian bistró” -

a high-quality diner without the ostentation of a fancy

restaurant. The dishes and their preparation are

traditional, enjoyed by loyal local customers, partners in

the culinary adventure - people who are not just faces

that occasionally appear in the diner, but regulars who

are greeted by name when they walk in the door.

The charm of the huarique is that you get to perceive

authentic local cuisine, the complete experience of tastes

and flavours, without it hurting your wallet. Moreover, if

you are in Peru, you can discover huariques where you

least expect to find them; you just need to meet a local

guide with a feel for the community who can take you on

a gastronomic tour.

Going in search of Lima’s huariques is a job best

undertaken on foot, wandering down small alleys and

finding intimate little back street bars. But this time, we

will replace two feet with two wheels and, mounted on

bicycles, we will set out a tour to make your mouth water.

It will be an opportunity not just to enjoy good food, but to

change your routine and see the city from another angle.

Sergio Salazar

LimaTours

Small tables

and cosy

surroundings

are part of the

spirit of the

huarique.

Lima is a great

city to get to know

by bike.

32

Huariques have become

hugely popular for the

tasty home cooking.


The Lima coastline

offers a unique

urban view.

MIRAFLORES AND THE OCEAN

Willian Justen de Vasconcellos on Unsplash

Our tour begins in the heart of Miraflores. Oscar, the

guide who will accompany us today, helps to check over

the bicycles which we will be riding for the four-hourlong

outing. Together with Eli, Randi and Ingri – three

Norwegian sisters who are visiting Peru – we head off

towards the Malecon, or Sea View, of Miraflores.

Miraflores is a district which combines some of the best

features of Lima. It has modern high-rises looking down

on pre-hispanic huacas and colonial mansions, all in the

urban heart of the city, whilst its parks attract hundreds

of people, particularly at the weekends, and above all

it has a clifftop chain of green spaces with impressive

views of the Pacific through which thread the paths and

cycleways of the five-kilometres Malecon.

That is exactly where we are going. In a little more than

fifteen minutes, we reach our first stop, the Parque del

Amor (or the Love Park), one of Miraflores’ most iconic

spots.

We are met by the loving couple whose embrace forms

the central sculpture of the park, “The Kiss”, by Peruvian

sculptor Victor Delfin. I must confess that although I have

stood so many times in front of it, I have never really

seen it. “Examine the faces of these people,” Oscar tells

us. “See their mixed-race features, prominent eyebrows,

wide noses.” It was a detail I had never noticed before,

though it was entirely in keeping with the social themes

that run throughout Delfin’s work.

The Love Park and

its famous sculpture

“The Kiss”.

DO YOU KNOW THAT LIMA IS THE

ONLY SOUTH AMERICAN CAPITAL

WITH DIRECT ACCESS TO THE SEA?

Sergio Salazar

Bicycle tours are

carried out with full

regard to safety.

Sergio Salazar

33


EL RUMBO DEL BUEN COMER

Willian Justen de Vasconcellos on Unsplash

Enjoy the

view as you

pass along

the Malecon.

Willian Justen de Vasconcellos on Unsplash

A small heart-shaped park of gardens and flowers

extends around the sculpture. The clifftop wall which

rounds the park is decorated with picturesque mosaics

in bright patterns and colours. However, if a twelvemetre

kiss in the centre is not enough, you will surely be

moved to romance as you read the lines written around

the walls, quoting verses from Peruvian poets, all on the

theme of love. It is not unusual to see recently married

couples coming here to be photographed, particularly

when the sun is setting.

Back to the bicycles, and the next stop is just a few

blocks away. Since its opening in 1998, Larcomar has

become an iconic tourist attraction, a commercial centre

with dozens of shops and restaurants with a unique view

over the sea. Each stop we make is an opportunity for

Oscar, who loves to tell us a little about Lima and Peru,

to point out features which are new and interesting even

for local visitors.

Unlike other tours where the car or bus takes you from

one place to another, today we have a chance to enjoy

the streets as we pass through them. Wandering along

the Malecon is a great way to experience day to day Lima

life, from the sporty joggers to the dog walkers, groups of

friends relaxing on the grass, a musician playing her guitar

and singing on a bench, the fruit seller pushing his cart

piled with fresh products. How many times do limeños

complain about the weather, forgetting how refreshing it

can be to feel the cold wind in our faces?

of the people you meet is always a special memory that

you can keep in your heart.

LET ME TELL YOU, BARRANCO

The sea and Peruvians have been tightly linked for

thousands of years. For the ancient coastal dwellers, the

Pacific Ocean was their principal source of food and an

essential part of their beliefs. Cultures such as the Chimu,

the Mochica and the Nasca recreated in their ceramics

sea creatures such as crabs and whales, illustrated

scenes of daily life with fishers at work, or told of mythical

encounters with their gods from the sea deeps.

When the Incas began to expand their empire along the

coast, the sea was given another name: Mama Cocha,

the goddess of water, daughter of the Sun and sister of

the Inca. The coming of the Spanish brought significant

social transformations, but the sea did not lose its

importance, becoming the connection between Spain

LimaTours

The Navy

Lighthouse

is a popular

hang-out,

surrounded by

lawns where

you can relax.

Before leaving Miraflores in our way to Barranco, a man

with his children stands aside to let us pass. “Welcome to

Peru!” he says, cheerily as we cycle by. These unexpected

moments are priceless and moving, especially if you are a

tourist visiting the country for the first time. The kindness

Larcomar, a nerve centre

for Miraflores tourists.

34


LimaTours

and its Viceroyalty. As time passed, the coast became

a public space especially in the Republican era, when

The streets of

Barranco hold

a little of the

history of Lima.

districts such as Barranco and Chorrillos became the

beach resorts of the wealthy, with beautiful little houses

and small estates belonging to the ruling classes.

Today the link between Lima and the sea is still vital: to

live with a view over the water, to exercise along the

sea cliffs, to relax while listening to the waves, to head

to the beaches and enjoy their freshness every summer.

As we pedal along the Malecon towards Barranco, the

urban landscape changes, but it is always looking out

to sea, whether from modern tower blocks or historic

mansions. Eli, Randi and Ingri notice this and I can see

in their faces, that feeling of being entering into another

era and rediscovering the historical past of Lima.

While in Miraflores we heard about Lima as it is today, in

Barranco we learn how it became the cosmopolitan city

in which we now live. Surrounded by the European style

colonial mansions in Saenz Peña Walk, with the obelisk

of the liberator San Martin standing witness, Oscar tells

us about independence, about the War of the Pacific, the

blow this dealt to the country and how we were able to

rebuild it.

Time moves on, and so do our bicycles. On the way, we

leave behind the main roads and immerse ourselves in

the narrow streets of Barranco, with colourful buildings

that house art galleries, craft workshops, designer

boutiques, bars and restaurants. It is not for nothing that

Barranco is known as the bohemian quarter of Lima, the

centre of the city’s nightlife and culture.

The artistic spirit of Barranco hangs in the air on the

Puente de los Suspiros, or Bridge of Sighs, which we

have now reached. It was constructed in 1876 to link the

two sides of the narrow gully that it crosses, but it has

become a must-see for every Barranco visitor. According

to tradition, anyone that can hold their breath while

they cross the bridge will see their wish come true. One

hundred forty-three years later, and with a few nips

and tucks, the bridge still stands as a testimony to the

changing city and has not lost its soul.

A few paces further on, at the foot of a statue of the

renowned composer Chabuca Granda, we discover the

more traditional side of this district and its relationship

with music and art. Below the bridge, colourful murals

decorate the walls, a display of the urban art which is

seen throughout the district, complementing its historic

beauty.

Returning to the bicycles, we head up to the main square.

It is now midday, and hunger is beginning to bite. The

moment we have been waiting for so long has come: it is

time to pamper the palate.

MATE, Mario

Testino’s museum

of photography,

is housed in

a beautifully

restored colonial

mansion in

Barranco.

La ermita, the

hermit, one of

the most famous

of Barranco’s

chapels.

LimaTours

Sergio Salazar

35


Km Cero

THE GOOD FOOD ROUTE

AN ECSTASY OF THE SENSES

After leaving the bicycles in good hands, we begin the

search for huariques on foot – which is fortunate, when

we consider all the delicious calories that we will have to

burn off. To whet the appetite, we begin with a tasting in

the Barranco Beer Company, a bar dedicated to homebrewed

beers.

Four types of beer are brought to the table: an ipa, a

stout, a lager and a weiss. In Norway, as throughout the

world, this drink is well known – especially for the three

sisters, one of whom is lucky enough to work in beer

sales. One of the joys of this craft brewery is the different

ingredients that impart a distinctive flavour to each brew.

Luis Gamero / PromPeru

The main square

of Barranco, a

meeting point for

the local night life.

The Bridge of

Sighs, a must-see

for any Barranco

visitor.

A thank you and goodbye, and we are on our way. We

walk to Isolina, where a queue has already begun to form

at the entrance despite the early hour. The atmosphere

recalls a cosy past where the taverns were filled with

friends who love to eat and drink well, while delicious

aromas fill the air and a waltz plays in the background.

The statue

dedicated

to Chabuca

Granda, a much

loved Peruvian

composer.

In these wood-panelled rooms from the previous

century, it is an experience just to sit and watch the

dishes passing by.

Sergio Salazar

(LYRICS OF CHABUCA GRANDA’S ICONIC SONG “PUENTE

DE LOS SUSPIROS”)

It is time to eat at last. A tasty presentation of stir-fried

beef is brought from the kitchen and placed on our table.

The size of this lomo saltado - the name of the plate - is

extravagant, and the flavour leaves me speechless. And

not just me: the whole table eats in silence until the

platter is completely clean. “The essence of our lomo

saltado is not only the recipe, but also the smokiness that

the meat has. I think it is this characteristic that gives

personality to the dish”, Jose del Castillo, the main chef

of Isolina, tells me. What a personality it has!

36


Sergio Salazar

Causa, a simple

and tasty dish that

you will love.

ISOLINA WAS PLACED AT 13 IN THE

LATIN AMERICAN EDITION OF THE 50

BEST RESTAURANTS AWARDS 2018.

Sergio Salazar

Craft beer tasting

is beginning to

earn its place in

our gastronomy.

We leave Isolina to head back to the main square of

Barranco. Crossing it, we walk a few blocks further to find

Piqueos, a colourful and comfy bistró. We are here to

sample another Peruvian kitchen classic, the causa. Every

dish has its own story, true or not, and what they say here

is very romantic: the causa was born during the campaign

for Peru’s Independence when, to pay the soldiers, the

street vendors sold the dish on the corner of the block to

raise money “for the cause”.

above and the noise of the motorcars streaming along

them.

A delicious ceviche is waiting for us on the table, and its

preparation is simple and direct: fish, fresh seafood, corn

cob and sweet potato. The three sisters hesitate at first

but are soon charmed by the combination of textures and

flavours that it brings to the palate. They finish off with

Sergio Salazar

This may not be historically accurate, but what is

undoubtedly true is that the causa is famous throughout

the world. Sometimes the simplest of recipes can charm

us as much as the presentations of the most exclusive

restaurants. Nothing is missing in this combination of

mashed potato seasoned with pepper and lime, whose

particular flavour still leaves room for the filling, whether

it is chicken, tuna, crab or vegetables. Simple. Easy, Tasty.

Unique!

No Peruvian food tour would be complete without

including our flagship dish, the ceviche, the grand

showpiece. We are going down the Bajada de Baños, the

Bather’s Descent, a sloping alley which connects the

district of Barranco with the beach, historically used by

fishermen, which passes below the Bridge of Sighs. Here

is the restaurant Javier, far from the chaos of the roads

Lomo saltado as done at

Isolina’s. A fantastic dish.

37


THE GOOD FOOD ROUTE

picarones, and we teach them how to eat in true Peruvian

style: picking the doughnuts up with their fingers and

dipping them in honey.

“We chose this tour because it is a change from how

we would normally explore a new city. It has been a

great experience - much more personal than a large

group going round in a bus” explains Eli. Yes. Sitting on

the terrace of the restaurant, listening to birdsong and

feeling the sea breeze, I feel it too. All our senses were

stimulated today: we saw the history of the city passing

by in its buildings old and new, we tasted some excellent

dishes, we heard the waves of the sea in the distance, we

enjoyed aromas that sometimes we miss, like the meat

frying in the pan and the freshly cut grass by the roadside,

and we have experienced the city more intensely, from its

climate to its people.

enjoy every day, available to rich and poor alike. Maybe,

in a tip to the Spanish Royal Language Academy, Peru is

one great huarique that preserves something special: the

wealth of its fantastic flavoursome food in which we all

share. So, let’s enjoy each mouthful and proudly offer it

to the world!

The love for

Peruvian food is not

only experienced

with the palate.

Enjoy its colour and

aroma, too.

While we were walking back to our bicycles, Randi asks, “are

all these dishes normal food or only for special occasions?”

The question made me realise how lucky we Peruvians are,

with such a treasure house of gastronomy that we can

SCAN AND LEARN MORE

ABOUT THIS EXPERIENCE

OFFERED BY LIMA BICI.

Sergio Salazar

38

Picarones are one of classic sweets,

made with pumpkin and honey.

Bicycle tours are a healthy transport

option in the city.

Sergio Salazar


Ceviche mixto, mixed

seafood ceviche, a

celebration of the

coastal harvest.

Sergio Salazar

39


Peruvian

STREET FLAVOURS

IN PERU WE HAVE OUR OWN DISTINCTIVE STYLE OF STREET CATERING WHICH DELIVERS ON THE THREE

BS – “BUENO, BONITO Y BARATO”, THAT IS, “TASTY, ATTRACTIVE AND CHEAP!”. FOOD CARTS OFFER A

SELECTION OF THE COUNTRY'S TEMPTING TRADITIONAL DISHES, AND THIS IS WHERE YOU CAN SAMPLE

THE MOST AUTHENTIC LOCAL FLAVOURS, AS ENJOYED BY THE MAN IN THE STREET.

CEVICHE

The iconic Peruvian dish

also has its wheelbarrow

version. The best places to

eat ceviche in its most

authentic form are street

markets and fishing

harbours. The recipe is

fresh ingredients, a lot of

flavours and the yapa - an

extra serving after you

have finished off the first

portion.

CALDO DE GALLINA - CHICKEN BROTH

Bajona is the name here in Peru for the food you feel

a craving for when you are leaving an all-night party.

Here, people search out for caldo de gallina, tasty

soup with noodles and egg. It is perfect for warming

you up on a winter night.

SALCHIPAPA

The name says it all – a

dish which brings together

fried potatoes and

salchicha or hot dog. It is a

simple but delicious

combination, even more so

with a dash of the chilli

pepper which we like so

much. It's a classic

Peruvian “fast food”

combination.

PAPA RELLENA –

STUFFED POTATO

On the outside, it looks like a

ball of mashed potato fried all

over. But when you take a bite,

you discover within a fantastic

flavour of minced beef and

onion, egg and olives. The

finishing touch is provided by

sarsa criolla, sweet onion

seasoned with lime juice, salt,

chilli and black pepper.

CLASICO

A special combination of two desserts – arroz

con leche, a rice pudding made with sweetened

rice and milk, and mazamorra morada - purple

porridge, a type of jelly made from purple

maize or corn. The name refers to football,

since the contrasting colours of white and

purple belong to two of the most successful

Peruvian teams: Alianza Lima in the blue or

purple shirts and Universitario in the white.


PICARONES

These are Peruvian doughnuts, but

so much better. Deep-fried rings of

sweet potato and pumpkin dough

flavoured with anise, with a

characteristic golden colour,

drenched in honey. “Finger-licking

good” describes them perfectly, as

you have to pick up the rings by

hand and dip them in the honey, like

a good Peruvian.

EMOLIENTE

No time for breakfast? In Peru, you

can begin your day with a healthy glass

of quinoa, maca or emoliente – a hot

drink made with an infusion of herbs.

And if you are hungry, accompany it

with one of a variety of sandwiches

which will cost you just about a

sol more.

CHOCLO CON QUESO -

SWEETCORN AND CHEESE -

OR PAPA CON HUEVO -

EGG AND POTATO

The best two options when you

want something cheap. These

simple ingredients go with

anything, including the

homemade sauces offered as a

garnish which you should not

miss — a healthy and light choice.

FOOD TRUCKS

In the last few years, the Peruvian street

food scene has been transformed. In

addition to the hand pushed street carts

and similar local vendors, another option

has appeared for people seeking these

familiar flavours with a traditional touch:

food trucks.

These restaurants on wheels offer typical

fast food such as hamburgers, wings,

pizzas, sandwiches and the like, but

adding a local twist, whether in seasoning

or ingredients. There are now food trucks

with entirely Peruvian concepts, such as

salchipaperos, nikkei – a Peruvian-

Japanese fusion – and even cevicheros.

Today, there are festivals and dedicated

spaces for food trucks. You can go to

these places and organise a gastronomic

tour at your leisure, where the traditional

Peruvian flavours are kept alive in a fun

and creative environment.

AEROPUERTO - AIRPORT

There are foreign

influences galore in

Peruvian cuisine and one is

the chifa, a national

institution that draws its

ideas from Chinese

recipes. Aeropuerto is the

combination of the most

popular plates: arroz

chaufa – fried rice with egg

and chicken – and tallarin

saltado, sauteed or

stir-fried noodles.

ANTICUCHOS

Another Peruvian street classic. There

is nothing better than watching the

flames of the grill searing the juicy

pieces of marinated beef heart, while

the smoky aroma fills the air. The dish

is always served with seared potato

slices and a cob of corn.


42

A PERUVIAN PINT


Sergio Salazar

CRAFT BEER SEEKS

THE PERFECT

BALANCE OF

FLAVOURS TO

PLEASE THE

PALATE; IT’S

MORE THAN JUST

HAVING A BEER.

HERE IN PERU, IT

IS AN EXPERIENCE

THAT COMBINES

A LOVE FOR THE

DRINK WITH AN

ENTHUSIASM

FOR OUR SPECIAL

INGREDIENTS, THE

FERTILE FIELDS

AND COMMUNITIES

OF THE COUNTRY.

A

PERUVIAN

PINT

Pairing a craft

beer with good

food is changing

the way the drink

is enjoyed.

43


A PERUVIAN PINT

For many years, a stylish drink has been considered to

be wine, a whisky or a cocktail. Beer drinking was seen as

something less refined, a readily available product you

can buy any day, nothing special. Nevertheless, the view

has changed, and this daughter of hops and barley has

made room for itself on the tables of the most refined

restaurants.

Sacred Valley Brewing

The making of

a craft beer is

managed over

by a team of

brewers in each

establishment.

The history of beer dates from the sixteenth century

in Europe, coming to the Americas with the colonial

English when they reached the north of the continent.

Although there were prohibitions on the consumption of

alcohol for many years, the art of brewing beer at home

continued in secret. We call it an art because, behind

every barrel, there are skills that have been perfected

over time, through a process of trial and error.

Sierra Andina

At one stage, industrially brewed beers threatened to

take over the market with their low cost and standardised

flavours. However, lovers of the traditional ale, seeking

for a taste than mass-production could not provide,

began to develop their own craft beers in the 1960s and

started a boom which has taken over the world. This

trend began in Peru in 2010 and had been hotting up

ever since in bars throughout the country.

Sacred Valley Brewing

44

Beer in a barrel, known as draught, helps

protect and improve the quality of the beer,

but special skill is needed to serve it.

Sacred Valley Brewing has five types

of beer in continuous production. In

addition, it produces Specials.


Care in the selection of

ingredients and the team help to

ensure you obtain an excellent

product.

are fermented at a higher temperature for short periods,

lagers at a lower temperature, but for longer, and lambic

beers are self-fermenting.

Sacred Valley Brewing

CRAFT BEER

VS. INDUSTRIAL BEER

Within this variety of standard types, each brewery

develops their own recipes to find a way to shine. Beyond

the skills of the master brewer, there is something more

to add. “What we have in Peru is a wide variety of highquality

ingredients which can add complexity and flavour,

such as coffee, cocoa and fruits. Other countries are not

so lucky, or have to pay a high price for them,” explains

Juan Mayorga, founder of the Sacred Valley Brewing in

Cusco. Here is where the magic lies, in the process of

experimentation that takes place in every brewery to

develop a high-quality product, full of taste and aroma,

To understand the difference between artisan

brew and mass production, we have to look at

the manufacturing process. Industrial beer is

made in significant quantities by a standardised

process in a giant factory.

In contrast, craft beer is made a few litres

at a time to maintain quality by controlling

the fermentation process. These beers have

no additives or preservatives, nor are they

pasteurised, keeping the purity of their primary

ingredients.

Sacred Valley Brewing

Sergio Salazar

Despite the

difference in

price, the quality

of a craft beer

is preferred by a

growing number

of drinkers.

Another way in which they differ is the bottling.

Industrial beers are usually sold in more

transparent bottles, while artisan beers can be

found in dark bottles to protect them from the

effect of light.

A MASTER’S TOUCH

All beers in the world have the same four ingredients:

water, hops - which give it the bitterness and aroma;

malt or a malted grain - which could be barley, wheat

or rye; and yeast - which aids the fermentation process.

With these, the master brewer works his magic, creating

a beautifully balanced end product. The exact process

differs according to the type of beer. For example, ales

The combination of essential

ingredients with local additions offers

a wide range of flavours which can be

given to the beers

45


A PERUVIAN PINT

The science behind

brewing is very

precise.

which stands out from the rest. These efforts are

reflected in the prizes that Peruvian breweries have won

in competitions abroad.

It is the science behind micro-breweries that have

brought them greater prestige than the industrial

giants, so that drinking a craft beer is an experience

similar to tasting a fine wine. Nowadays we can talk

about the pairing of food and beers, or specialised

tastings, and a complete artisan beer movement that

has built a strong following over the last few years. “A

good beer is not just something to sell. It should have

a good flavour, colour, aroma and head or froth, but it

also needs a memorable name, an image and a story

behind it. For us, it is a complete experience: a quality

product which complements the food that the drinker

can enjoy”, says Ted Alexander, founder of the Sierra

Andina brewery in Huaraz.

Packaging process

in the Sierra Andina

brewery in Huaraz.

Sacred Valley Brewing

Sierra Andina

46

Saenz Peña Ave. 208, Barranco. Lima


Sierra Andina

Craft beers can create

exciting new flavour

combinations.

Robert Mathews en Unsplash

Although the

consumption of craft

beer in Peru is still

low, it is set to grow.

PERUVIAN BREWING

In Peru, beer is the most popular alcoholic drink and

is available in almost all bars and restaurants. Since

2010, when craft beer production began to establish

itself, a new public has learned to appreciate it. They

are knowledgeable and demanding customers, who

can recognise the various styles and enjoy the different

flavours of each type. It is these people, inevitably, who

are leading the call for improved quality to which the

artisan brewers must respond.

“When we began, there were fifteen or twenty national

brewers. Now there are almost fifteen in the Cusco

region alone”, comments Mayorga. “It continues to grow,

with a more knowledgeable public and greater quality

products, which means we have to continue improving.”

Nevertheless, Alexander concludes that passion is not

enough in this business. “You have to understand the

process from the inside, the science and chemistry of

the product. The customer used to drink whatever was

on sale, but they are growing more demanding. Without

skill and knowledge, a new producer is not going to last

long”, he insisted. .

THE ARTISAN BEER MARKET IS WORTH

MORE THAN 38 MILLION DOLLARS

WORLDWIDE, ACCORDING TO THE

REPORT GLOBAL CRAFT BEER MARKET

- GROWTH, TRENDS AND FORECASTS

(2018 -2023). THE USA IS THE PRINCIPAL

PRODUCER.

Sacred Valley Brewing’s bar in Cusco. They will

soon be opening in Lima.

Sacred Valley Brewing

47


A PERUVIAN PINT

More and more bars are adding craft

beers to their list.

Craft beer has not only taken beer drinking to new levels,

but it has also opened up new business possibilities.

Its decentralising tendencies are undeniable, with the

appearance of well-known breweries outside Lima. “Part

of our mission with Sierra Andina is to open up the

market to people in small towns such as Huaraz. We

want to create economic and gastronomic opportunities

in the provinces. We aim to be a business with social

values, that looks after its workforce and helps them to

be better professionals”, comments Alexander.

Sierra Andina

Trivio in Huaraz,

Sierra Andina’s

Restobar. They also

have a taproom in

Llanganuco and

in Lima.

The same story is happening in Cusco, where Sacred

Valley Brewing works sustainably to support communities

and protect the environment. “We have designed a water

treatment plant for our factory so that we can use water

resources better. We avoid bottling our beers to reduce

waste, too”, explains Mayorga. As well as buying their

ingredients from the local suppliers to help improve their

economy, the brewery holds an event once a month to

support various Cusco organisations dedicated to social

welfare.

The craft beer industry is growing strongly in Peru. So,

don’t miss the chance to enjoy a tasty product, made

with local ingredients and a unique touch of freshness

and flavour, perfect for lunch with friends or dinner with

your partner. Close your eyes and feel on your tongue

the spirit of Peru sealed in every bottle.

100% PERUVIAN

Barbarian

Nuevo Mundo

Cumbres

Barranco Beer

Siete vidas

Hops

Invictus

Magdalena

Candelaria

Curaka

Lemaire

Abrilia

Costumbres

Maddok

Ragnarok

Cerveceria del

Valle (Cusco)

Zenith (Cusco)

Yucay (Cusco)

Sierra Andina

(Huaraz)

Dorcher (Pozuzo)

Sierra Andina

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49


EXPERIENCES

SCENTS AND

FLAVOURS

OF PERU

On foot or by bike. In Lima or Cusco. Enjoying restaurants or street food.

Peru can offer experiences to take your taste buds to another level. Take

the chance to immerse yourself in our history through food and see how

meaningful is the relationship between Peruvians and gastronomy.

50


Sergio Salazar

51


EXPERIENCES

A little bite of Barranco

Walk through the streets of Barranco, known as the bohemian

district of Lima and famous as the home of great restaurants and

bars. Enjoy fifteen different tasty experiences, including drinks and

dishes such as ceviche, lomo saltado and pisco sour. The sweet

touch comes with chocolatiers and ice cream shops that you will

meet on the way, finishing up with a cup of freshly roasted coffee.

Complete the experience with a visit to a local market to see the

freshest fruit and vegetables.

Pirata Studio Film

LimaTours

Fall in love with Lima

Discover the charms of Lima’s historic centre, declared a World

Heritage Site by Unesco. Admire its squares, marvelling at the

legacy of imposing colonial architecture and churches hundreds

of years old. While you explore the streets, enjoy some of the

street food such as picarones, anticuchos and mazamorra. You

can also visit traditional restaurants and bars to try their classic

dishes, such as pan con chicharron, papa a la huancaina and

chilcano.

LimaTours

Gourmet Peru

Get into the world of gourmet cooking with this unmissable tour.

Begin with a chocolate workshop to learn all about Peruvian cacao,

known throughout the world for its high quality. Then you will visit

three great restaurants: Amaz, from chef Pedro Miguel Schiaffino,

with a menu built around ingredients from the Amazon; Statera,

from chef Andre Patsias, whose concept mixes the flavours of the

coast, the highlands and the forests; and Barra Lima, whose chef

John Evans is focused on seafood. End the exploration at Carnaval,

one of the fashionable bars of the moment with a menu of innovative

and audacious cocktails.

Homegrown

Appreciate the roots of Peruvian gastronomy with a journey

through a local market, where you can see close up the raw

ingredients of our cuisine before they get into the cooks’ hands.

Later, visit the innovative new dining centre Mercado 28 and its

multiplicity of outlets for a special tasting. There are eighteen

different restaurants with traditional cooking, pastries and drinks,

all in Miraflores.

Barra Lima

52


A flavourful journey

Tease your palate with a culinary tour around three Cusco

restaurants. Limo will introduce you to the world of nikkei, a magical

fusion of Japanese and Peruvian flavours and techniques. Inkagrill

puts a Peruvian twist on international cuisine, using ingredients

unique to the country such as alpaca. Finish up with a touch of

sweetness in Calle del Medio, with a tasting of creole desserts with

modern variations based on such traditional ingredients as purple

maize or lucuma.

Cusco Restaurants

Manuel Choqqe Bravo

An Andean toast

Here is a different experience for wine lovers! In the heights of

Chinchero above the Sacred Valley, you can try a remarkable

drink: oca wine. The oca is a highly nutritious Andean root

vegetable, which - after a special fermentation process - can be

made into a flavoursome wine. At this tasting, you will try four

different varieties, produced on a small scale by oca farmer

Manuel Choqque.

Venturia

Sacred Valley on two wheels

Get to know the Sacred Valley from another perspective on electric

bicycles. On a journey of a little more than thirty kilometres, you will

pass through beautiful scenery, surrounded by snowy mountains

and fields full of colourful crops. Learn about chicha, the ancient

Andean drink made of maize, in its historic traditional breweries

known as chicherias, which have been declared a National Heritage

Treasure. Finish the journey with a refreshing taste of homebrewed

beer to the cheerful sound of the running waters of the

Urubamba River.

From the garden to the table

Join in the preparation of a Peruvian dish: watch, smell, touch, feel

and taste. With the help of an experienced chef, you will collect

the ingredients from an organic garden before taking them to the

kitchen and beginning your culinary adventure. Everybody has a

job to do - washing, peeling and chopping as needed. Finally, you

will create a dish full of taste and aroma, which you will enjoy under

the blue immensity of the Andean sky.

Sacred Valley Brewing

53


PERU ON A

PLATE

8 DAYS

7 NIGHTS

Hotel B

DAY 1

You have time to rest in your hotel when you

arrive in Lima. At night, enjoy a pisco experience

where you learn how the drink is made and of

course, taste some delicious cocktails.

DAY 2

Discover the history of our gastronomy on the

Peruvian Experience tour, a walk which mixes

tradition and technology. At night you will

visit the centre of Lima to admire its colonial

architectural inheritance.

Peruvian Experience

DAY 3

Walk through the lanes of the bohemian

neighbourhood of Barranco to enjoy the great

flavours of its huariques, or local restaurants. You

will have the afternoon free to enjoy Lima at your

leisure.

DAY 4

LimaTours

Arrive in Cusco. Relax on a pleasant journey

to your hotel in the Sacred Valley through

spectacular scenery.

54


Intu

Sacred Valley Brewing

DAY 5

LimaTours

Visit the archaeological site of Moray, considered

by many to be an Inca agricultural research station

because of the formation of its terraces. Try a unique

oca wine before eating a traditional lunch, and then you

can enjoy some home-brewed beers from the Sacred

Valley Brewing.

DAY 6

Spend the day in Machu Picchu and learn why it has

been named one of the Seven Wonders of the World.

DAY 7

Discover the city of Cusco and the impressive

archaeological sites all around. At night, you will explore

the gastronomy of the city in three very different

restaurants.

DAY 8

Transfer to the airport.

Cusco Restaurants

55


LIMATOURS PRESENTS

MACA

THE ALPACA

Follow her adventures on our social media:

/limatoursperu

@limatours

56

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