02.10.2019 Views

Jeweller - October 2019

Create successful ePaper yourself

Turn your PDF publications into a flip-book with our unique Google optimized e-Paper software.

VOICE OF THE AUSTRALIAN JEWELLERY INDUSTRY

OCTOBER 2019

All’s Fair

THE FULL INTERNATIONAL

JEWELLERY & WATCH FAIR REPORT

High colour

+ +

THE GEMSTONE CATEGORY OFFERS

A RAINBOW OF POSSIBILITIES

True blue

WHY DEMAND IS SPIKING FOR

AUSTRALIAN SAPPHIRES


ottom.pdf 1 15/10/2018 12:25 PM

Tanzanite - In Stock & Online Now

Visit our website or call our Melbourne office for details:

Room 405, 4th Floor, Wales Building, 227 Collins Street, Melbourne VIC 3000

Ph: +61 (0) 3 9654 5200 / Interstate Orders 1300 843 141 E: sales@oagems.com www.oagems.com


Y O U R L E A D I N G S U P P L I E R O F P I N K A R G Y L E & W H I T E D I A M O N D S

W O R L D S H I N E R

I N S P I R E D P E R F O R M A N C E

Y E A R A F T E R Y E A R

W W W . W O R L D S H I N E R . C O M

NEW SOUTH WALES Suite 301, Level 3, 70 Castlereagh Street, Sydney 2000, P: 02 9232 3557, E: sydney@worldshiner.com

VICTORIA Suite 502, Wales Corner, 227 Collins Street, Melbourne 3000, P: 03 9654 6369, E: melbourne@worldshiner.com

QUEENSLAND Unit 17, Level 11, 138 Albert Street, Brisbane 4000, P: 07 3210 1237 E: brisbane@worldshiner.com

NEW ZEALAND Suite 4K, 47 High Street, Auckland P: 09 358 3443 E: nz@worldshiner.com

A U S T R A L I A • G E R M A N Y • I N D I A • I T A L Y • J A P A N • N Z • U K • U S A


Gold is our business,

Chains are our speciality

Proud to be an Australian manufacturer

producing and serving the jewellery industry

from our Sydney premises.

New catalogue out now

Please enquire with our office

T (02) 9262 5454 E sales@isaacjewellery.com.au

W www.isaacjewellery.com.au


CONTENTS

OCTOBER 2019

21/

25/

31/

FEATURES REGULARS BUSINESS

17/ FAIR GO

Jeweller explores this year’s

International Jewellery & Watch Fair.

21/ DESIGN TRIUMPH

Discover which pieces took home

the top prizes at the 2019 Jewellery

Design Awards.

25/ BROAD SPECTRUM

Why the coloured gemstone category

is going from strength to strength –

and how retailers can take advantage.

31/ TEAL THE SHOW

Consumers are falling for the charms

of Australian sapphires.

35/ INDIAN SUMMER

Preparation and positivity prevailed at

the IIJS Premier event in Mumbai.

9/ Editorial

10/ Upfront

12/ News

15/ ARA

16/ New Products

37/ Gems

Garnet: Gem of Many Colours – Part I

45/ My Store

46/ 10 Years Ago

47/ My Bench

Gary Thyregod

48/ My Bench

Gary Mouradjallian

50/ Soapbox

Benn Harvey-Walker says it’s past

time for jewellers to embrace

ethical practices.

39/ Business feature

Bernadette McClelland shares what

she’s learnt as an entrepreneur.

41/ Selling

Focus on solving customers’

problems to win business, advises

Michael Hinshaw.

42/ Management

Good help is hard to find, writes

Barry Urquhart.

43/ Marketing

Forget the 4P’s and embrace a new

paradigm, says Chris Petersen.

44/ Logged On

Alisa Meredith reveals why Pinterest

is the key to your website’s success.

Front cover description:

World Shiner is a leading diamond

and jewellery wholesale company

with international prestige and

three decades of experience.

October 2019 Jeweller 5


lesgeorgettes.com

contactaus@lesgeorgettes.com


• Genuine Argyle Authenticity cards

• Argyle Origin Certificates

• ADV Authenticity Cards

• 9ct Gold Australian diamond jewellery

• Lifetime Guarantee

• Rare Argyle loose diamonds

• Argyle Whites, Pinks, Cognac Colours

• Complete Packaging and Stands


EDITORIAL

MELEE MALAISE: IS MARKETING THE SOLUTION?

Does anyone have the answer to rectify the

current malaise in the diamond industry?

Before you can fix something you need to

know the exact cause of the problem. I only

state the bleeding obvious because there are

calls for a new, $US1 billion global marketing

campaign promoting natural diamonds, and

especially engagement rings.

Martin Rapaport is on the record as saying

that current generic marketing efforts need

to improve and miners, supported by brands,

must step up to the plate to reach consumers.

Few would disagree with such a concept –

but where do the funds come from?

De Beers supported the industry for decades

with its worldwide generic advertising

campaigns. Indeed, it could be argued

De Beers created the diamond industry, as

we know it today, when it began using the

slogan, ‘A diamond is forever’.

It was so powerful and successful that in 1999

the iconic US magazine AdAge awarded it

the title of best marketing slogan of the 20th

Century. So, 20 years later, and in a radically

different market, who and where would

the money come from to create an equally

successful worldwide marketing campaign?

One suggestion is from small contributions

from all diamond exports, including: a 0.05

per cent levy on all diamond exports (rough

and polished) from non-mining countries;

0.5 per cent fee on all polished exports and

1 per cent on rough exports from mining

countries; and a 2 per cent levy on all exports

by the diamond-mining companies. It has

been estimated that this would garner around

$US500,000 annually.

The Diamond Producers Association (DPA)

has the mission to ‘protect and promote

the integrity and reputation of diamonds’.

Its marketing budget increased from $US40

million in 2017 to $US70 million last year.

Meanwhile, according to De Beers, the

international diamond jewellery market was

valued at more than $US80 billion in 2017.

If all of these figures are reasonably accurate,

it means that currently, around 1 per cent of

consumer sales revenue is being spent on

marketing to consumers by the DPA.

A 1 per cent marketing budget is clearly not

enough, especially in the digital age where

the internet has created a world of small

tribes, rather than one large, more easily

reached ‘homogeneous’ market.

But back to the problem – or problems –

which need to be tackled. What are they?

It’s all too easy to blame the natural diamond

malaise on the rise of synthetic stones. Yes, the

man-made diamond suppliers have a loud

voice in the consumer media, but I wonder

whether the ‘noise’ equates to sales.

I think the narrative of synthetic stones

hampering and harming the natural market

is simply a convenient excuse.

There are other factors in play; people have

A 1 PER CENT

MARKETING

BUDGET IS

CLEARLY ACIETURIS NOT

ENOUGH, AUT EXERITAS

ESPECIALLY AUTATIS ADIO IN

THE CULLABO. DIGITAL

AGE ITASSIM WHERE

THE INULLECERUM

INTERNET

HAS ET, ADI CREATED ALIQUI

A VELIAM WORLD ERUM OF

SMALL NEST UNTUR TRIBES,

RATHER ARIBUS THAN QUI

ONE CONSEQUE LARGE,

‘HOMOGENOUS’

LABORRO VITIO.

MARKET

ACIASPIET

been getting married later in life. The ‘arrival’

of man-made stones has also coincided with

a new generation, Millennials, reaching the

age of marriage. It is often said they are more

focused on sustainability and see mining as

unappealing and even morally outrageous.

Other theories suggest younger people

don’t view diamonds as a display of love, as

their parents once did. Some also suggest

that Millennials have more difficulty meeting

everyday needs, when compared to their

parents, because of the higher cost of living;

they prefer to save money for other life goals.

Another change is an increasing trend

for colour diamonds and gemstones in

engagement rings.

On the industry side, the malaise has also

been caused, or at least not helped, by the

US-China trade war. That’s inarguable – but

the sales decline has in fact been in progress

for some time. There has also been an oversupply

of rough, while some suggest that

poor quality melees and cheap stones have

contributed to consumes’ loss of confidence.

There’s no doubt a concerted marketing

effort can address some of these problems.

But another catchy slogan won’t fix the

underlying structural issues. For that, everyone

in the supply chain will have to do more than

throw money at the different problem(s); they

will need to show vision and leadership.

Coleby Nicholson

Editor

October 2019 Jeweller 9


UPFRONT

BULLETIN BOARD

■ TOUCH POINT

A British jeweller has found a unique

way to encode a secret message in a

diamond ring: by setting the stones

point-up to spell out a message in

Braille. The inverted diamond design

has been named ‘Feel the Love’, and

caters to both the blind community

and those wanting a discreetly

personalised jewellery piece.

■ GOLD LEAF

An Australian company is using tree

leaves to detect gold deposits. Mining

business Marmota analysed foliage

from plants in South Australia to

successfully identify a gold vein 44m

underground. The method works

because tree roots bring up mineralrich

water from deep below the

surface. The basis for the technique was

first developed by the CSIRO.

■ GIN WITH ICE

A UK-based liquor company has

commissioned a jeweller to set a

1-carat diamond inside a bottle of gin.

The stone features petal-like facets and

is designed to highlight the purity of

the gin. The 1-litre bottle is valued at

£10,000 ($AU18,000) and will be given

as the prize in a competition.

OPAL

OCTOBER BIRTHSTONE:

DID YOU KNOW?

Opals are Australia’s national gemstone and

the country produces 95 per cent of the

world’s supply, but Europeans only discovered

them here in 1849. Before then, only one opal

mine was known – in Slovakia. The ancient

Romans considered the gem a good luck

charm that could make its wearer invisible.

Its name comes from the Latin word opalus,

meaning ‘precious stone’.

DIGITAL

BRAINWAVE

WHO SAID?

“Unlike diamonds, coloured gemstones

have not been commoditised. Retailers

can provide an almost infinite gem

colour palette and a bespoke jewellery

purchasing experience, all of which

translates to much better margins.”

Turn to page 25 to find out >

PINTEREST CALLS AUSTRALIA HOME

Pinterest has opened its first Australian office in Sydney, NSW, amid strong results from

the Asia-Pacific region. According to the company, Australian and New Zealand Pinners

save almost 4 million Pins each day. The number of Pinterest users in the region has

more than doubled over the past year. In a statement on the company’s Newsroom

blog, Carin Lee-Skelton, Australia and New Zealand country manager Pinterest, said,

“I’m excited to work closely with businesses of all sizes in Australia and New Zealand to

help them reach their audiences on Pinterest.” Pinners are one of the most shoppingengaged

audiences on social media, with 90 per cent of weekly users using the app to

make purchase decisions.

TOP PRODUCT

O’Neils Affiliated has a new range of blue zircons just in

time for summer. Available in shades of cerulean, reminiscent

of the Mediterranean Sea, blue zircon will mesmerise with its

brilliance and intensity. In stock and online now.

VOICE OF THE AUSTRALIAN

JEWELLERY INDUSTRY

jewellermagazine.com

Publisher & Editor

Coleby Nicholson

Associate Publisher

Angela Han

angela.han@gunnamattamedia.com

Assistant Editor

Arabella Roden

arabella.roden@jewellermagazine.com

Production Manager

& Graphic Design

Jo De Bono

art@gunnamattamedia.com

Accounts

Paul Blewitt

finance@gunnamattamedia.com

Subscriptions

info@jewellermagazine.com

Jeweller is published by:

Gunnamatta Media Pty Ltd

Locked Bag 26, South Melbourne,

VIC 3205 AUSTRALIA

ABN 64 930 790 434

Phone: +61 3 9696 7200

Fax: +61 3 9696 8313

info@gunnamattamedia.com

Copyright: All material appearing

in Jeweller is subject to copyright.

Reproduction in whole or in part is

strictly forbidden without prior written

consent of the publisher.

Gunnamatta Media Pty Ltd strives to

report accurately and fairly and it is

our policy to correct significant errors

of fact and misleading statements in

the next available issue. All statements

made, although based on information

believed to be reliable and accurate at

the time, cannot be guaranteed and

no fault or liability can be accepted

for error or omission. Any comment

relating to subjective opinions should

be addressed to the editor.

Advertising: The publisher reserves

the right to omit or alter any

advertisement to comply with

Australian law and the advertiser

agrees to indemnify the publisher for

all damages or liabilities arising from

the published material.

10 Jeweller October 2019


NEWS

Fresh Nomination campaign goes live

Italian jewellery brand Nomination has

unveiled a new marketing campaign called

“One for me, one for you”. The full video

and artwork were uploaded to the official

Nomination social media channels after

being revealed at the Vicenzaoro trade show

in Italy.

The Nomination Australia and New Zealand

Instagram and Facebook channels were

updated on Monday 9 September, in line

with the global campaign launch date.

Nomination stockists have been invited to

share the video to their own Facebook and

Instagram accounts.

“One for me, one for you” promotes

Nomination’s signature links in a fresh way,

emphasising the shareable, personalised feel

of the jewellery. Friends, love, animals, travel

and family are explored in the campaign.

The collection includes more than 2,000 links

featuring engraving, gemstones, enamel,

cubic zirconia and natural diamonds. The

stainless steel base comes with 18-carat gold,

9-carat rose gold or sterling silver plating.

New York-based production designer

Giovanni Bianco – former creative director of

Vogue Italia – was behind the energetic and

diverse campaign, and directed the video

clip. Bianco’s agency, GB65, has created video

content for Rihanna’s Fenty brand as well as

Italian fashion houses Marni and Missoni.

As the campaign went live, Ken Abbott,

managing director of Nomination distributor

Timesupply, said: “Nomination Composable

is unisex, multigenerational, and original. It

celebrates the gift of sharing and connecting

with people – the people we love. What a

campaign, what an opportunity.”

Olivia Burton gets new distributor

GDL Accessories has acquired the Australian

and New Zealand distribution rights for Olivia

Burton watches. The UK-based brand joins

several other high-profile fashion watches in

the GDL portfolio.

ABC Bullion brings

ancient treasures

to Australia

Independent bullion dealer ABC Bullion,

part of the Pallion group of companies,

has been appointed Presenting

Partner for the Australian leg of the

exhibition ‘Tutankhamun: Treasures

of the Golden Pharaoh’.

The six-month exhibition is part of a

10-city world tour to mark the centenary

of the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb

by British archaeologist Howard Carter.

‘Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh’ includes

150 objects from the New Kingdom

ruler’s gravesite, of which 60 have never

before left Egypt.

The recently renovated Australian

Museum, in Sydney, will host the

event in partnership with ABC Bullion,

entertainment company IMG, Destination

NSW and the Egyptian Ministry of

Antiquities. It is scheduled for 2021.

Andrew Cochineas, CEO Pallion, said, “We

are thrilled to be Presenting Partner of the

’Tutankhamun: Treasures of the Golden

Pharaoh’ exhibition and to provide

Australians with access to the golden

wonders of ancient Egypt. Only nine

other cities in the world will have this

once in a lifetime honour.”

The exhibition will include a brand new

detailed display dedicated to gold,

presented by ABC Bullion.

“Australia is the second-largest gold

producer in the world. This exhibition

shows that gold has always been an

important part of world civilisation... With

gold prices and demand at record highs,

it seems that the lustre of gold shows no

signs of decline,” Cochineas said.

The Sydney leg of the exhibition

follows record-breaking runs in Paris

and Los Angeles.

In a statement, GDL management said:

“Designed in London, Olivia Burton takes

inspiration from fashion, vintage and nature

to create unique and feminine accessories

that can’t be found anywhere else.”

West End Collection previously distributed

Olivia Burton and had done so since 2016.

Publicly listed watch conglomerate Movado

Group acquired Olivia Burton in 2017.

GDL ACCESSORIES IS NOW SUPPLING THE BRAND

Movado is also the parent company of

Tommy Hilfiger, Hugo Boss, Lacoste and

MVMT watches, all of which are distributed

by GDL.

+ MORE BREAKING NEWS

JEWELLERMAGAZINE.COM

EGYPTIAN TREASURES ARE HEADED TO OZ

12 Jeweller October 2019


Stella to distribute EPOS watches

Stella Timepieces has been appointed

exclusive distributor of EPOS Swiss watches,

effective from 27 August 2019.

EPOS is a heritage watch brand designed

and manufactured in Switzerland’s Jura

Mountains and Vallée de Joux. Each watch is

hand-assembled to ensure quality and live up

to the legacy of Swiss watchmaking.

“We have been in talks with EPOS for a while

now, and feel extremely fortunate to be able

to partner with a company of such prestige

and innovation in watchmaking,” Krzysztof

Jakubaszek, founder Stella Timepieces, said.

“The roots of the company date back to

1925. Building upon the long heritage and

knowledge embedded in the company,

EPOS has always focused on creating highly

sophisticated mechanical masterpieces at

affordable prices, staying true to the company

slogan: ‘Artistry in Watchmaking.’”

Stella Timepieces also distributes Swiss watch

brands Alfex, Tacs, Atlantic and Grovanna

among others.

Repairs and servicing will be conducted

through Stella Timepiece’s purpose-built

service centre, run by A.J Watch Repairs.

Michael Hill introduces lab-grown stones

As it celebrates its 40th anniversary,

Michael Hill International has released its

financial results for FY19 – revealing the

success of its turnaround efforts – as well

as its intention to enter the synthetic

diamond category.

The company’s net profits increased to $16.5

million in FY19 – up $14.9 million from FY18.

Meanwhile, same-store sales increased 0.7

per cent for the quarter, indicating that

momentum is picking up despite a 3.3 per

cent decline for the year. The biggest driver

of sales came from e-commerce, with online

purchases increasing by 43.6 per cent.

While 10 new stores were opened, 11 were

closed, leaving a total of 306 spread across

Australia, New Zealand and Canada.

After announcing the financial results, CEO

Daniel Bracken revealed that Michael Hill

has started selling synthetic diamonds

at a Queensland location in order to test

consumer demand.

“It’s a new product category and growth

opportunity,” the Australian Financial Review

quoted Bracken as saying. “It’s the newest

thing in the jewellery world and being the

first to market is another demonstration of us

making sure we’re completely relevant to the

modern consumer.”

Jeweller contacted Michael Hill International

for more information on its synthetic

diamond product line. However, a

representative for the company was unable

to comment at the time.

DANIEL

BRACKEN, CEO

MICHAEL HILL

INTERNATIONAL

Boulder Opal Awards reward jewellers

The Queen of Gems International Jewellery

Design Awards have recognised leading

jewellers specialising in boulder opal. Hosted

by the Queensland Boulder Opal Association,

the awards took place in July at the annual

Opal Festival in Winton, Queensland.

Angela Hampton of Hampton Fine Jewellery

& Design in Queensland’s Redland Bay was

the night’s big winner. She took home the

Professional Category – Jewellery Design

trophy, as well as the People’s Choice Award

for her armband ‘Paradise Blue’ featuring

boulder opal, sapphire and tsavorite garnet.

Lilo Stadler, committee member of the

annual awards, said, “Congratulations to all of

‘PARADISE BLUE’ BY ANGELA HAMPTON

our entrants for their passion to the Boulder

Opal industry, and for once again showcasing

and sharing their design ideas with us all.”

First place winners in the Professional

Jewellers category received $2,000 in cash,

while other categories had a $1,000 prize.

Introducing a stylish collection of lockets

and petite charms, finely handcrafted from

solid gold, rose gold, sterling silver and

gemstones.

Exclusive to fine jewellery stores in

Australia and New Zealand.

sales@stowlockets.co.nz

+64 7 281 1509

stowlockets

#preciousstories

stowlockets.com


NEWS

IN BRIEF

Argyle’s new pink diamond collection

*

JEWELLERY COMPETITION OPEN

India’s Gem & Jewellery Export Promotion

Council (GJEPC) has announced that

entries are open for the Artisan Jewellery

Design Awards 2020. The competition’s

theme is ‘Architectural Gems’, with

categories of Art Deco, Islamic Arabesque

and Neo-Futurism. The deadline for

submissions is 31 October 2019. For

details, visit: www.theartisanawards.com.

*

PINK DIAMOND DETECTOR

The Gemological Institute of America

(GIA) has announced that its iD100

Diamond Detector can now distinguish

natural pinks from synthetics

manufactured using both HPHT and

CVD methods. Jewellers can access

the new capability by downloading

a software update, priced $US249

($AU362.52), for the machine.

*

ALROSA’S NEW APPROACH

Russian mining giant Alrosa has set

November as the sale date for the

largest-ever Russian pink diamond. The

14.83-carat stone, named ‘Spirit of the

Rose’ is expected to fetch $US60 million.

The mining company also put up 200

natural fancy colour diamonds for sale

at its True Colors auction in Hong Kong

last month and has announced plans

to market high-fluorescence diamonds

under the brand ‘Luminous Diamonds’.

*

RECORD-BREAKING RING

The Guinness World Record for the

most diamonds set in one ring has

been broken. A team of 14 people from

Lakshikaa Jewels in Mumbai created the

Lotus Temple Ring, an 18-carat gold ring

encrusted with 7,777 white diamonds,

inspired by Delhi’s Lotus Temple. It is

valued at $US4.9 million ($AU7.1 million).

*

CORRECTION TO MY BENCH

The September edition of Jeweller

featured a My Bench profile of Gary

Thyregod. Due to a production error,

the profile ran next to a photo of Gary

Mouradjallian. Both jewellers are profiled

in this issue with the correct photos.

Turn to page 47.

+ MORE BREAKING NEWS

JEWELLERMAGAZINE.COM

With the world’s

premier source of

natural pink diamonds,

the Argyle Mine in

Western Australia, set

to close next year,

parent company Rio

Tinto has announced a

new auction of smaller

material to complement

the annual Argyle

Tender.

While the Tender –

which is this year named ‘The Quest for the

Absolute’ – brings together the largest and

most intensely coloured pink diamonds

extracted from the mine, the new ‘Argyle Pink

Everlastings Collection’ features diamonds

of 0.14 carats or less, with colours across the

pink spectrum.

The stones are divided into 64 lots, totalling

211.21 carats. Each lot carries a Certificate of

Authenticity from Rio Tinto.

The Everlastings Collection will tour Perth,

Singapore, London and New York alongside

the 2019 Argyle Tender, with bids closing on

9 October.

THE ARGYLE PINK EVERLASTINGS COLLECTION.

IMAGE CREDIT: RIO TINTO

Alan Chirgwin, vice-president of sales and

marketing, Rio Tinto Copper & Diamonds, said

in a statement, “We are delighted to offer for

the first time ever this unique collection of

rare Argyle pink diamonds, destined to be in

strong demand by the world’s finest jewellers.

“The accumulation of these diamonds from

a certifiable source in various shapes, sizes

and colours is the result of a painstaking

endeavour, unlikely to be ever repeated.”

Less than 100 carats of equivalent pink

diamonds are expected to be produced by

the Argyle site before its 2020 closure.

New direction for Pandora Jewellery

Pandora Jewellery’s fresh global marketing

campaign, initiated by new CEO Alexander

Lacik, commenced on 28 August with a

celebrity- and media-focused outdoor party

in Los Angeles.

The DowntownLA event space was painted

pink – the company’s new ‘signature colour’

– for the celebration and included sculptures

by female street artist C.Finley. The new, softer

Pandora logo also debuted at the event,

alongside the autumn 2019 collection.

The company has since launched pinkthemed

experiential marketing initiatives in

Sydney’s Pitt Street shopping district and in

London’s Piccadilly Circus.

Emphasising the brand’s efforts to recapture

the attention of younger consumers,

six celebrity spokeswomen have been

announced, joining Stranger Things star Millie

Bobby Brown who has signed on to promote

Pandora for the next two years.

The women – dubbed the ‘Pandora Muses’

– are: Game Of Thrones actress Nathalie

Emmanuel, model Halima Aden, dancer

Larsen Thompson, artist Tasya van Ree,

writer and photographer Margaret Zhang

and model Georgia May Jagger, who was

previously the celebrity face of Thomas Sabo.

They boast a combined social media reach

of more than 9 million followers and have

already begun promoting the brand online.

In the lead up to Christmas, Pandora is also

targeting the youth market with Harry Potter

and Disney collections.

On 5 September, Pandora also confirmed

a three-year partnership with UNICEF, the

United Nations’ Children’s Fund, to support

child survival, education and protection

initiatives. A special edition collection of

jewellery will launch on 20 November –

World Children’s Day – with all profits going

to UNICEF.

14 Jeweller October 2019


RETAIL

ARA

DISAPPOINTING RESULTS DO NOT A RECESSION MAKE

Despite the Morrison Government’s tax

cuts beginning to take effect, retailspending

figures for July published

by the Australian Bureau of Statistics

have fallen well short of expectations.

However, while the data confirm that

retailers are facing tough trading

conditions, the Australian Retailers

Association (ARA) notes that news of a

‘retail recession’ has been exaggerated.

Passed by Parliament in June, the tax

package put up to $1,080 in the pocket

of working Australians.

Not all taxpayers received the refund in July,

but predictions were widely made that

a boost in spending would flow through

to retailers as the first wave of payments

arrived in bank accounts.

Coupled with the Reserve Bank of Australia’s

two successive cuts to interest rates in June

and July, and the increase to the minimum

wage that took effect on July 1, a modest

recovery was expected in the sector as more

money was flowing into the economy.

Yet the month-on-month retail spending

figures for July showed a surprising and

disappointing result – a contraction of

0.13 per cent, following the 0.4 per cent

rise in June.

The figures are sobering, given that the

‘election effect’ – the depressive impact of

the May Federal election on retail spending

– is well and truly over.

Throughout the year, retail trade has been

patchy and certain sectors are facing

structural change and diminishing returns

– particularly department stores. That may

be dragging down the overall figures.

THE ARA IS

CALLING FOR

CONSUMERS

TO IGNORE

SENSATIONALIST

AND ALARMIST

HEADLINES,

AND NOT TO BE

DISCOURAGED

FROM MAKING

BIG PURCHASES

DUE TO

UNFOUNDED

RECESSION FEARS

Notably, the clothing, footwear and

personal accessory category – of which

jewellery is part – declined by 1.36 per cent

in July after June’s 1.95 per cent increase.

Those gains were likely buoyed by endof-financial-year

sales. Indeed, the end of

the financial year could also have played

a part in the July figures, as consumers

reviewed their spending and planned their

household budgets for the next 12 months.

The continuing impact of the drought

and the shift to online shopping should

also be stated as significant factors

impacting retail performance.

The lack of willingness to spend

discretionary income was reflected in a 0.73

per cent fall in the cafés, restaurants and

takeaway food category, while household

goods and food retailing – which includes

household groceries – saw a slight uptick.

But while the figures are dispiriting for the

hard-hit retail trade, the ARA rejects talk of

a ‘retail recession’.

The definition of a recession is two quarters

of negative growth, rather than one month

of anaemic trade. With the bulk of tax

refunds arriving in August, the next round

of figures are likely to show improvement.

Meanwhile, annual retail sector growth is at

2.36 per cent, with improving conditions in

Western Australia and Tasmania as well as

steady results in Victoria and Queensland,

the two states that together make up

44 per cent of Australia’s population.

In order to stave off recession, the

ARA is calling for consumers to ignore

sensationalist and alarmist headlines,

and not to be discouraged from making

big purchases due to unfounded

recession fears.

Consumers should feel confident enough

to spend their tax cuts on products and

services at local retail businesses – for

example, a piece of jewellery they

have been window shopping for months.

This will provide a welcome boost to

the economy.

With retail being Australia’s largest

private-sector employer and the bedrock

of the Australian economy, it is vital that

consumer confidence is allowed to flourish.

To that end, the ARA also calls on

policymakers on both sides of Parliament

to explore all stimulatory measures possible

in order to get growth going again. i

RUSSELL ZIMMERMAN is

is the executive director

of the Australian Retailers

Association (ARA).

Email: info@retail.org.au

The Australian Retailers Association (ARA) is the largest association representing the country’s

$310 billion retail sector, which employs more than 1.2 million people. Providing expert advice

across multiple disciplines including leasing and wage rates, the ARA’s mission is to ensure

retail success by informing, protecting, advocating, educating and saving money for members.

October 2019 Jeweller 15


NEW PRODUCTS

HERE, JEWELLER HAS COMPILED A SNAPSHOT OF THE LATEST PRODUCTS TO HIT THE MARKET.

IKECHO AUSTRALIA

Ikecho Australia introduces the sterling silver,

white button 5.5-6mm freshwater pearl and

14-carat, 3-micron plated cubic zirconia hook

earrings with matching 7-7.5mm freshwater

pearl pendant. Visit: ikecho.com.au

MAURICE LACROIX

Renowned for its high-quality designs and innovation, watch brand Maurice Lacroix has worked the Swissmade

AIKON model to give it finishings of unparalleled perceived value. Visit: westendcollection.com.

LES GEORGETTES

BY ALTESSE

STONES

& SILVER

The new addition to the Les Georgettes by

Altesse collection is the Garden cuff 25mm in rose

gold, with coral/taupe reversible leather insert.

Visit: lesgeorgettes.com

BRONZALLURE

This Oval Adjustable Ring from Bronzallure features

a certified natural amazonite stone and the brand’s

signature Golden Rosé metal alloy. 100 per cent

made in Italy. Visit: dgau.com.au

This 925 sterling silver

spin ring pendant

measures 35x20mm

and comes with a

65cm chain with

4cm extension. Visit:

stonesandsilver.com.au

CLUSE

Cluse introduces new special edition

gift sets for men and women: the Rose

Gold Triomphe & Bracelet Gift Set and

the Aravis Mens Silver/Grey/Black

Watch & Silver Mesh Strap Gift Set.

Visit: heartandgrace.com.au

FABULEUX

VOUS

Leading on from the trends

in the US and Europe,

the Maria collection is

a celebration of colour!

Precious stones – including

peridot, citrine, amethyst,

apatite and sapphire – are

hand-wired with sterling

silver to create feminine

pieces of art. Visit:

fabuleuxvous.com

16 Jeweller October 2019


INTERNATIONAL JEWELLERY & WATCH FAIR

DARREN, JENNY AND LARRY SHER

LEANNE HOLME, PETER BECK, JENNIFER VAN DEN BROEK

AND OLIVIA BAIRD

JOHN ROSE AND GINA SCHAEFER

Sydney Fair

unifies jewellery industry

THIS YEAR’S INTERNATIONAL JEWELLERY & WATCH FAIR HAS BEEN PRAISED FOR

BRINGING TOGETHER RETAILERS, BUYING GROUPS AND SUPPLIERS

t’s appropriate that the theme of the 2019 International Jewellery & Watch

Fair (IJWF) was ‘Unity’ as the event brought together Nationwide Jewellers,

Showcase Jewellers and Leading Edge Jewellers’ buying days under one

roof for the first time.

Amid tough trading conditions, exhibitors and visitors welcomed the decision

to create a single buying event for the industry, which relieved some of the

pressure on suppliers and boosted foot traffic.

Expertise Events general manager Joshua Zarb described the overall

atmosphere throughout the event as “overwhelmingly positive”. “It was so nice

to see everyone really pull together; it made for a relaxed but still exciting show,”

Zarb added.

Duraflex Group Australia managing director Phil Edwards agreed, saying, “My

impression of the fair was very positive. It had a good vide and, as always, was

well organised by Expertise Events.”

Edwards praised the decision to have all three groups buying at the fair as

“excellent and about time”, adding, “It is essential for the trade that this type of

unity remains.”

Chris Worth, business development manager at Worth & Douglas, said the fair

seemed “more positive on the floor and the numbers seemed good as well”,

adding that he preferred this year to the 2018 event.

Steve der Bedrossian, CEO of SAMS Group Australia, echoed the sentiments of

unity, saying, “It’s nice to see everyone in the same place; it was a lot easier, that’s

for sure. More efficient and the numbers seem to be good as well.”

The presence of all three buying groups unequivocally helped visitor numbers,

according to Ken Abbott, managing director of Timesupply.

“It’s been a great fair, as usual. We are seeing more people coming through who

probably would have gone to buying days,” he said. “It’s good having all three

[buying groups] under one roof.”

At the West End Collection booth, business was bustling.

“We were very successful this year; we had a lot of new brands to offer and

exclusive new releases to show,” managing director John Rose said. “When you’re

giving the retailers something exciting and meaningful, it makes it better for

them and better for us as well.”

While Rose said numbers were about the same as the 2018 show, he did notice

that the consolidated show “drew a lot more of the buying-group members

along, which was definitely a good thing”.

“We showed 15 different brands at the fair and it’s much nicer for us to show our

products in a big beautiful display,” Rose added. “At buying days, we don’t have

enough room and time to show them all so it’s hard to tell the full story of the

brand you’re representing.”

At the Peter W Beck booth, the sentiment was equally upbeat. “It feels livelier

and there’s a better vibe in general, more positive,” marketing co-ordinator Olivia

Baird said. “There are more people around and I think having all three buying

groups is a massive reason why. It was a great move.”

Some exhibitors did find it more challenging. “I think it’s brilliant [to have all three

buying groups at the fair] but we did expect, having normally done three buying

days in advance, there would be a greater spend [at the fair],” Helen Thompson-

Carter, managing director of New Zealand-based Fabuleux Vous, said.

Fabuleux Vous had a bumper event in 2018 but Thompson-Carter said this year

was quieter, adding that Australian retailers seemed more apprehensive due to

depressed retail conditions, especially in the drought-affected regional areas.

Der Bedrossian also noted the impact of the drought: “A lot of the people here

are from regional areas; a lot of our business comes from mum-and-pop stores

there and the drought really affects them. I think the industry has turned a

corner and there’s more of a positive attitude – as long as we get some rain in

the country areas, where the strength is.”

Edwards said of DGA’s results, “I felt overall numbers were down from previous

years but for those that did attend, I felt they were positive and willing to be

pro-active for their business in the current difficult retail environment.”

October 2019 Jeweller 17


Stay where you are & survive or,

make the change &

THRIVE!

Here at Showcase Jewellers, we are ALL about members; we’re a member

owned organisation, and it’s been that way for over 38 years now!

We have a long established, comprehensive management structure in place

with some of the most experienced heads in the industry, all working together

as a support office for members. We are proud to provide our members support

and the tools to navigate their way through retail, sales, product knowledge,

policies, operations, marketing and of course the wide digital arena.

Contact us today

We’re ready when you are. So if you think it’s time to get serious about where

you’re going, email us today. Our team will be happy to show you how we can

grow your business together.

enquiries@showcasejewellers.com.au

www.showcasejewellers.com.au

MAKE THE CHOICE TO THRIVE AND BECOME A SHOWCASE MEMBER TODAY

Experienced Head Office Staff Members

No Joining Fee or Ongoing Monthly Management fees

Establishment Loan, charged over 6 months.

100% refundable should you ever choose to leave

We will move or create your website on your behalf,

at no charge. You will have complete ownership rights.

Different membership options available to suit

your business model

We have negotiated the best supplier discounts

for members, we know this is critical for you!

Industry leading, quality and comprehensive

digital resources

DURAFLEX GROUP AUSTRALIA

Meanwhile Darren Roberts, managing director Cudworth Enterprises,

said this year’s event “was not too bad – about the same as

last year”. “While it’s pleasing that we’re all together, we [suppliers]

need support from the retailers now that we’re all under one roof,”

he added.

Results were also steady for Moda Group. “The fair was different

to last year; this year we picked up on the second day,” managing

director Trent McKean told Jeweller. “I’d say sales are quite similar and

we did bring a different mix of our brands to last year.

“Having all three buying groups here was much better for us,”

he added. ”For us as wholesalers, not doing all the other buying

meetings beforehand lets us be more organised for the Fair.”

Hampar Erdogan, CEO Golden Mile Jewellery, noticed a similar

pattern of traffic: “It started off quite slowly on the Saturday then

picked up quite quickly. It was better than last year – last year was

quite sparse.”

The buzz on the floor on the opening day was excellent as visitors

streamed in early in the morning and a steady flow continued

throughout the day. Most exhibitors said the show was more upbeat

than expected and they’d seen improved business from last year.

One of them was David Paterson, managing director Paterson Fine

Jewellery: “I’ve been very impressed – last year we were okay, and

this year has definitely exceeded last year,” he said.

Nick Hoogwerf, representing New Zealand supplier Kagi Jewellery,

told Jeweller the IJWF made a great first impression: “It’s been really

good. We’ve been able to connect with new customers and other

suppliers, which is fantastic,” he said, adding that the next 12 months

should see the industry become “more aligned so everybody can

work together and grow together”.

The buying groups also reported positive results. Colin Pocklington,

managing director Nationwide Jewellers, said 90 per cent of the

suppliers he spoke to were very happy with the results, which

were aided by having all of the group members present: “One large

supplier said his only problem was not enough staff to handle all of

the orders!”

Erdogan also believes suppliers may have struggled to see everyone,

especially clients they would’ve previously met with at the traditional

buying days.

‘We cannot thank Carson and the rest of the Showcase Family enough for making us feel so

special. We are so excited to be on this journey with Showcase. Thank you for welcoming us

with open arms!’ - The most recent member to join our Showcase Jewellers family


INTERNATIONAL JEWELLERY & WATCH FAIR

TIMESUPPLY

“There are a lot more people as a result; however, we used to get

quite a few orders on the buying days. Only having four sales reps

here means we have seen clients walk past and not be able to

place their orders. They leave messages for the reps to come and

see them in store but normally we’d be getting those orders here,”

he explained.

Pocklington added that numbers were good: “We had 182 stores

here, up on last year’s 160 stores, and our comprehensive program

had something for everyone, which no doubt contributed to the

strong attendance.

“We also had more major initiatives to launch this year – in particular

our new digital platform, which has been embraced by members.

There has also been strong interest in our new shop-insurance

scheme, which will deliver significant savings to members.”

Carson Webb, managing director Showcase Jewellers, had an equally

positive outlook on merging the buying days into the fair.

“We really had to all come together and give it a real go for success

this year. It is tough out there and this certainly made things easier

for our suppliers to see everyone in one location,” he told Jeweller.

“We had a great event – each of our training days, member and

supplier dinners sold out! It was one of our best conferences to date

and we were about 25 per cent up in member attendance.”

For Webb, there was “no comparison” between 2018 and 2019: “This

year was much better. It’s tough retailing at present for all of us and

it’s not down to suppliers or event organisers; it’s just really difficult.

“We are all feeling the domino effect of what retailers are going

through at store level. This fair was a fabulous event and I commend

the hard work put in by Expertise Events to create a great

atmosphere for us,” Webb added.

“I’m sure there’ll still be some tweaks as we trade through uncertain

times; however, everything seems to be pointing towards a more

positive 2020 ahead for retail.”

Looking ahead to the challenges of the next 12 months, it is

clear that the IJWF in Sydney provided a much-needed sense of

community and purpose in the jewellery industry.

Looking ahead, retailers, suppliers and buying groups must

continue to embrace new strategies, positive thinking and forward

momentum in order to overcome tough conditions. i

Swiss made chronograph

Proudly distributed by

02 9417 0177 | www.dgau.com.au


INTERNATIONAL JEWELLERY & WATCH FAIR

WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS

Fair organisers Expertise Events ensured

education was a priority at this year’s Fair,

offering workshops and seminars under

the IJWF Create and IJWF Talks banners.

Retailers looking to boost both online

and in-store traffic were well served by

an in-depth presentation from Podium’s

Taylor Cutler. The session focused on

managing reviews and boosting your

business’ Google presence when potential

customers search ‘best’ and ‘near me’.

Ian Cunningham from retail designers

ID Solutions brought fresh insights to

bricks-and-mortar retailing. Cunningham

stressed the importance of creating a

“unique, branded experience” in store

as well as online.

He described the retail jewellery store of

the future as a “sanctuary” that seeks to

foster customer connection through tactile

elements, emotional imagery and a design

that funnels people through the store.

One of the most popular of the IJWF Talks

series was a special question-and-answer

session on promoting manufacturing

and custom design. Panellists included

Vince Bonfa from Janai Jewels, Pallion’s

Chris Botha, Lester Brand, Georgina Staley

of Georgies Fine Jewellery, Bolton Gems

founder Brett Bolton, Podium Australia’s

Steven Garcia, Greg Lilly from Diamond &

Co in New Zealand and Romel Santos of

Santos Customs.

Attendees were given insights into

challenges like the sales spiral, internet

price-matching, creating enriched

experiences, margin erosion and turning

customers into ‘super endorsers’.

Finally, the topic of lab-grown diamonds

sparked lively debate. “I particularly liked

that education was offered in various

forms, aimed at people improving their

business,” Staley told Jeweller.

“Lab-grown diamonds will be a

controversial topic for a while to come

until they find their place in our market.

The best thing a jeweller can do is educate

yourself about them, then decide if they

are right for your business.”

Several members of the panel

recommended buying a diamond detector.

THE PANEL TAKES QUESTIONS AT THE ‘MARKETING STRATEGIES FOR MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS’

QUESTION-AND-ANSWER SESSION.

Meanwhile, the IJWF Create workshops

were a popular addition to the fair.

Samantha Kelly, who taught the sketching

sessions, told Jeweller, “Every attendee did

a really amazing job and I was beyond

impressed. It was incredible to see the

different ways people visualise designs.”

Meanwhile George Palos, who presented

the coloured gemstones workshop, said

they were “very well attended, with the

Saturday session full and the Monday

session oversold.”

The watch-repair workshop hosted by

Grant Menzies was also a success.

TROPHIES GALORE

The 2019 Lexus Melbourne Cup was a hit

at the Pallion stand. Crowds gathered for a

photo opportunity with what is arguably

the nation’s most iconic trophy. The

‘Loving Cup’ design is celebrating its 100th

anniversary this year and is produced by

Pallion subsidiary ABC Bullion.

Finally, the second edition of the Jewellery

Design Awards were also held during the

fair, giving recognition to the most creative

designs from the nation’s professional

jewellers and apprentices.

For a full list of the winners turn to page 22.

Christian Paul

SYDNEY


AND THE

WINNER IS…

THE JEWELLERY DESIGN AWARDS WAS

ONE OF THE MOST HIGHLY ANTICIPATED

EVENTS AT THIS YEAR’S INTERNATIONAL

JEWELLERY & WATCH FAIR. READ ON TO

DISCOVER THE SUCCESSFUL COMPETITORS,

INCLUDING SOME FAMILIAR FACES AND

PROMISING YOUNG TALENTS

ith its second edition, the Jewellery Design Awards (JDA)

cemented its reputation as a highlight of the International

Jewellery & Watch Fair in 2019. The ceremony took place on

Sunday 25 August on the show floor at the ICC Exhibition

Centre in Darling Harbour, with a full crowd gathering for the

prize giving and canapé reception.

Gary Fitz-Roy, managing director Expertise Events, hosted the awards,

introducing the 44 finalists across the 10 categories. Meanwhile jewellery

industry veteran Lester Brand – one of the three judges, alongside David Ole and

Brett Low – was on hand to welcome everyone to the event.

Brand told Jeweller he found it hardest to select a winner for the Diamond

Award, which eventually went to the night’s only double success: Matthew Ely,

of Matthew Ely Jewellers in Sydney’s Woollahra.

He won with ‘Ballare’, a pink and white diamond dress ring inspired by the tutu

of a ballerina, which was aimed at “challenging the traditional cluster with pear

shape diamonds making the outer skirt”. “The underside of this cluster is directly

inspired by a Gothic cathedral in the hand-carved basket,” Ely added.

He also took home the Pearl Award for his ‘Chinese Fan South Sea Pearl Ring’

featuring a magnificent Autore South Sea pearl from a million-dollar strand, set

in 18-carat white gold. The piece was “inspired by the folding arms of a Chinese

fan while cupping the pearl like a shell. Clean and simple lines were designed to

showcase the pearl at its best.”

Ely told Jeweller: “It is always an honour to be a finalist for any award, let alone

win. I was absolutely thrilled to have two pieces win.”

Meanwhile, judge Ole praised the quality of all this year’s entrants, saying, “The

standard of creativity and workmanship was very high.” For him, the Coloured

Gemstone category was the hardest to choose a winner from, due to the

innovative designs presented.

Low agreed, telling Jeweller, “The colour gemstone categories [at jewellery

competitions] are always my favourite and also the hardest to judge. It is great to

see more coloured gems being used in the Australian market.”

He added that this year’s competition entries showed “some clear standout

pieces using both handmade and CAD methods of manufacturing.”

The Coloured Gemstone Award eventually went to Mindika Haddagoda for ‘Tulips’,

a pendant featuring Ceylon blue, yellow and pink sapphire, ruby and diamond.

“I am humbled, grateful and very happy about it,” Haddagoda said of his win,

adding that the main challenge of creating a winning coloured gemstone piece

was “to get the colours to contrast stylishly. I also wanted to create a pendant that

can be worn in many different ways to give maximum benefit to the consumer.”

Haddagoda previously took out the CAD/CAM/Cast Award in the 2017 edition

of the competition. Looking ahead to the next JDA, the jeweller revealed, “I will

try to win [again]. I think the Jewellery Design Awards are a wonderful event

for the jewellery industry in Australia and New Zealand. I would like to take this

opportunity say thank you in every possible way to all the staff of Expertise

Events and Jeweller magazine for all their hard work.”

Jason Ree was also a repeat winner. After triumphing in the Precious Metal

and Fair Visitor Choice sections two years ago, he took out the Men’s Jewellery

& Accessories category with ‘Kikkou’ – a ring featuring an Australian bi-colour

sapphire and the mokume gane metalworking technique.

When it came to selecting the winners across the categories, Ole revealed the

judges agreed on “95 per cent” of the top choices, with Low adding that they

“generally had a similar top two or three pieces. We then would discuss our

opinions until a clear winner was chosen.”

This year’s awards boasted a $20,000 prize pool including cash, equipment and

gemstones. Representatives from the sponsors of each category were invited

to announce the winners and present them with their prizes. The next JDA is

scheduled to take place in 2021. i

Turn the page to see the winning pieces and their creators.

October 2019 Jeweller 21


1ST & 2ND YEAR

APPRENTICE/STUDENT AWARD

3RD & 4TH YEAR

APPRENTICE/STUDENT AWARD

Presented by: Basky Narayanan

Winner: Bradley Pike, ‘Griffin’

Materials used: Sterling silver,

petrified wood, citrine

Sponsored by:

Presented by: Basky Narayanan

Winner:

Eileen Leahy, ‘Transformation of a Moth’

Materials used:

9-carat yellow gold, sterling silver,

titanium, onyx

Sponsored by:

AUSTRALIAN OPAL AWARD

BRIDAL AWARD

Presented by: Clayton Peer

Winner: Cindy Xu, ‘Icy Conversation’

Materials used: 18-carat gold, boulder opal,

mother of pearl, diamond

Sponsored by:

Presented by: Craig Miller

Winner: Ben Tracy, ‘Diamond Fantasie’

Materials used: Platinum, diamond

Sponsored by:

22 Jeweller October 2019


CAD/CAM/CAST AWARD

COLOURED GEMSTONE AWARD

Presented by: Jenny Sher

Winner: Matt Sime, ‘The Cathedral of Vasily

the Blessed’; accepted by Natalie Corke

Materials used: 9-carat yellow gold

Sponsored by:

Presented by: Mark McAskill

Winner: Mindika Haddagoda, ‘Tulips’

Materials used: 18-carat white and yellow gold,

Ceylon blue, pink and yellow sapphire, ruby, diamond

Sponsored by:


DIAMOND AWARD

PEARL AWARD

FEATURING THE

DELICATE PINK TONE OF

ARGYLE PINK DIAMONDS

Presented by:

Steve der Bedrossian

Winner: Matthew Ely, ‘Ballare’

Materials used: 18-carat white and rose gold, pink

and white diamond

Sponsored by:

Presented by:

Erica Miller

Winner: Matthew Ely, ‘Chinese Fan South Sea Pearl Ring’

Materials used: 18-carat white gold, South Sea pearl,

diamond

Sponsored by:

MEN’S JEWELLERY & ACCESSORIES AWARD

Presented by: Grant Menzies

Winner: Jason Ree, ‘Kikkou’

Materials used: 18-carat green

and yellow gold, 14-carat red gold,

platinum, Australian bi-colour

sapphire

Sponsored by:

PRECIOUS METAL AWARD

Presented by: Lester Brand

Winner: Paul Amey, ‘Pink Mist’’

Materials used: 18-carat yellow gold, platinum,

pink and white diamond, Keshi pearl

Sponsored by:

SAMS GROUP

AUSTRALIA

E pink@samsgroup.com.au

W samsgroup.com.au

P 02 9290 2199


COLOURED GEMSTONES

GEMFIELDS

CRACKING THE COLOUR CODE

COLOURED GEMSTONES ARE FIRING UP THE JEWELLERY INDUSTRY.

ARABELLA RODEN EXPLORES THE RAINBOW OF OPPORTUNITIES PRESENTED

BY THIS INCREASINGLY POPULAR CATEGORY

ith the diamond category facing tumultuous times, some in

the jewellery industry are looking to coloured gemstones

where product can provide better margins, reduced

competition, creative design and, crucially, enthusiastic

consumers at every price point.

Terry Coldham, patron of the Gemmological Association of Australia, believes

coloured gemstones are “more popular than ever”.

“There is more material available in an ever-increasing variety of types, qualities

and cuts,” he says. “Retailers are increasing sales and meeting those demands for

something special by stocking an interesting range of coloured gemstones.”

The most recent edition of the Knight Frank Luxury Investments Index, compiled

by the London-based consultancy, found that coloured gemstones had

significantly outperformed the rest of the jewellery industry over the past 10 years.

“A decade ago, diamonds were widely perceived by consumers to be the most

prestigious of gems. Today, the swing toward precious coloured gemstones is

overwhelming,” Sean Gilbertson, CEO Gemfields, says. “The last decade has seen

the world record prices for an emerald and a ruby surpass that of a colourless

diamond on a per carat basis.”

He adds, “People often forget that the well-known laws of supply and demand

apply to ‘efficient markets’ – a term that cannot yet be used for the coloured

gemstone sector. Gemfields’ Kagem emerald mine in Zambia is a case in point:

over the last decade its gemstone production has tripled, while the prices received

have increased more than six-fold.”

O’Neils Affiliated director Brendan McCreesh explains: “A 2-carat ruby, for example,

has the ability to increase in value exponentially over the years – far greater than

the increase in value of diamond. This can be utilised as a selling tactic to increase

high-value sales.”

O’NEILS AFFILIATED

McCreesh notes that the trend is currently for

teal and pink sapphire and tourmaline,

morganite, and yellow gemstones. “The

demand for custom-designed jewellery

requiring larger coloured stones is also

at an all-time high,” he adds.

“We are seeing a global trend of vibrancy and colour, using semi-precious

and precious stones, with a combination of metals – anything goes,” agrees

Helen Thompson-Carter, director Fabuleux Vous. As a result, the New Zealandbased

supplier’s latest collection, Maria, features sapphire, ruby, citrine, peridot,

tourmaline and apatite combined with baroque and freshwater pearls.

George Palos, managing director Facets Australia and the presenter of the

Appreciating Coloured Gemstones workshop at this year’s International Jewellery

& Watch Fair, says coloured gems also create a point of difference.

“JEWELLERS KEENLY UNDERSTAND THAT

DIAMONDS ARE THEIR BREAD AND BUTTER,

HOWEVER COLOURED GEMSTONES NOT ONLY

MAKE DISPLAYS MORE VISUALLY EXCITING BUT

ALSO OFFER HIGHER MARGINS.”

“The reason coloured stones are very much in fashion with retailers at the

moment is that it is next to impossible to draw comparisons with stones offered

by competitors,” he explains, adding that retailers are looking to coloured gems to

supplement shrinking diamond margins.

Moving into the coloured gemstones category has paid off for Ikecho Australia,

which added an opal collection to its pearl-focused jewellery line in early 2018.

“It started a bit slow in the beginning but once we got feedback from our

customers and incorporated that feedback for future designs, the response has

been great and customers want more,” founder Erica Miller says.

Indeed, coloured gemstones represent a world of potential that’s waiting to be

fully embraced.

COMPARE AND CONTRAST

Unlike diamonds, coloured gemstones cannot be easily valued by a Rapaport-style

price list. Instead, diverse factors determine their value such as colour and intensity,

size, country of origin and rarity.

BRENDAN MCCREESH, O’NEILS AFFILIATED

October 2019 Jeweller 25


COLOURED GEMSTONES

20 th

ANNIVERSARY

SINCE 1999

Jewellers keenly understand that diamonds are their bread and butter,

however coloured stones not only make displays more visually exciting

but also offer higher margins,” McCreesh explains. “Stocking a good

range of coloured stones is always going to provide a stimulating point

of difference for a business.”

Damien Cody, co-director of Cody Opal and vice-president of the

International Coloured Gemstone Association (ICA), adds, “Unlike

diamonds, coloured gemstones have not been commoditised.

Retailers can provide an almost infinite gem colour palette and a

bespoke jewellery purchasing experience, all of which translates to

much better margins.”

Smaller rough stones have become a significant niche for some

manufacturing jewellers as they create a unique finished effect.

Charles Lawson, director of Lawson Gems in Brisbane, says there is a

“steady flow of customers seeking out small rough gems, usually in

sapphire or ruby, for use as rough in jewellery – often more specifically

for ‘casting in place’.”

Spring/Summer

Classic and Elegance that will last a lifetime.

He adds that the market demand for ‘smalls’ that would otherwise be

considered excess is a positive outcome.

That’s the case at Fabuleux Vous, with Thompson-Carter telling Jeweller,

“One of the greatest appeals of coloured gemstones is the ability to

create something unique, to be bold, without having to use larger

stones. I love the way gemstones come in so many different shapes,

sizes and cuts, and they are affordable.”

Indeed, in an increasingly polarised market, coloured gemstones offer

retail jewellers the opportunity to sell at both ends of the market. The

combination of stagnant wage growth and internet price-matching

has driven some consumers to seek out cheaper jewellery. In general,

these customers are less concerned with quality but are still seeking

aesthetically-pleasing and interesting pieces.

To satisfy this market, more abundant natural gems like quartz, agate,

onyx and turquoise are an attractive option for jewellers.

Doron Berger, director Blue Turtles, tells Jeweller, “Semi-precious gems

are a huge category that knows no bounds. There are a large variety of

gems that are always in high demand, regardless of fashion or seasonal

trends: rainbow moonstone, amethyst, moldavite and Herkimer

diamond [a type of double-terminated quartz], for example.

“There are myriad gems that aren’t diamonds, emeralds, sapphires or

rubies but their beauty is astounding,” he adds.

CHOOSING COLOUR

Creatively, coloured gemstones offer great potential for manufacturing

jewellers to show their skills; rainbow rings, gradient designs, clusters

and pendants have all become fashionable in recent years. These gems

also have a compelling emotional connection. “For many people, the

process of purchasing a fine coloured gemstone is filled with a sense

of discovery – one that is truly thrilling,” McCreesh explains.

+61 2 9266 0636 +61 2 9266 0969

Gemfields gemmologist Elena Basaglia agrees, saying, “No other gems

quite channel the mystery and magic of centuries of kings, maharajas,

pashas, queens and tsars in the same way as ‘the big three’.”

enquiries@ikecho.com.au

www.ikecho.com.au


BATTLING MISCONCEPTIONS

As the coloured gemstone category has

matured, jewellers have increased their

knowledge of coloured gemstones. However,

with the rise of the internet, consumers are

also more informed – and misinformed – than

ever, meaning continuing education for retail

jewellers is crucial.

“Our experienced team of gemmologists

at O’Neils Affiliated is always here to assist

with the more complex queries; however,

experienced sales staff with a gemmological

understanding within a retail environment

are also essential to assist the discerning

customer,” director Brendan McCreesh advises.

When it comes to the public, he points to two

key areas of confusion: scarcity and hardness.

“The concept of rarity is often misunderstood,

largely due to the term being so subjective.

Are diamonds rare? It depends on your point

of view,” he explains. “In comparison, it would

be fair to say that rubies are certainly far rarer

– ruby mines are dwindling due to material

depletion; many have shut down in the past

20 years yet many new diamond deposits

have been discovered.”

Additionally, McCreesh says it’s important to

understand that hardness and durability are

not the same. “A misconception regarding

hardness and durability has caused many

a retail sale for fall through,” he says. ”

There is a vast world of jaw-droppingly

beautiful gemstones out there that people

unnecessarily dismiss due to some misguided

and unfounded concept of hardness. There

are many jewellery purchases where there is

no need for hardness to be front-of-mind.”

Indeed, Charles Lawson, director of Lawson

Gems in Brisbane, has also faced the challenge

of correcting misconceptions about hardness.

“Some stones get a bad rap for being soft or

brittle, for example, apatite, kyanite, zircon

and opal,” he says. “When compared to

corundum or diamond they are exponentially

softer; however, when compared to pearl

– one of the most popular gems – they are

exponentially harder, yet they are overlooked.”

Another misperception is that all treatments

are undesirable. “Heat-treating has been

around for the last 500 years or so and is a

completely stable treatment when done

properly,” Lawson explains. “The problem

occurs when disclosure is not given.”

Finally, the misguided

idea that coloured

gemstones represent an

investment opportunity

similar to natural

fancy-colour diamonds

continues to persist.

CLOCKWISE

FROM TOP: FACETS

AUSTRALIA, CODY

OPAL, FACETS

AUSTRALIA

“It would be akin to

investing in art with no idea of what you are

doing,” Lawson says. He recommends studying

with gemmological associations in Australia

(GAA), the UK (Gem-A) or the USA (GIA).

GAA patron Terry Coldham also advises

retailers to consider undertaking a

gemmology course: “A course of study

will provide retailers with the background

information on a very wide variety of

gemstones: where they come from, their

properties and most importantly their stories.

In the customer’s eyes, you are not then just a

sales assistant but an expert advisor.”

Meanwhile, Damien Cody, co-director of Cody

Opal and vice-president of the International

Coloured Gemstone Association (ICA)

emphasises the role of the ICA in promoting

the coloured-gemstone industry through

awareness and education. Its biannual

Congress is scheduled to take place this

month in Bangkok, Thailand.

The event, which runs from 12–15 October, is

themed ‘Ruby: Eternal Love’ and will include

presentations from “a broad spectrum of

industry experts from around the globe,

covering topics including mining, cutting,

marketing, distribution, ethics, design and

gemmology. There will be a strong focus on

artisanal mining,” Cody reveals.

Closer to home, the new Australian Opal

Centre (AOC) project at Lightning Ridge is

already taking shape, having secured

$17 million in state and federal funding

earlier this year.

“The AOC is the most important development

the Australian gemstone industry has

ever undertaken,” says Coldham, who is a

foundation member of the centre.

“The AOC will certainly create more interest

in opal with local consumers and significantly

increase visitor numbers to the opal fields.

More importantly the AOC will become a

symbol for the Australian opal industry and a

tool for promotion of our opals internationally.”

SAMS GROUP

AUSTRALIA

Precious Gemstone & Diamond Set Jewellery

A delicious range of natural precious gemstone

jewellery set with sparkling white diamonds,

available in every colour of the rainbow!

Beautifully crafted in 18ct gold.

E pink@samsgroup.com.au

W samsgroup.com.au

P 02 9290 2199


By FV Jewellery

IKECHO AUSTRALIA

TEMELLI JEWELLERY

However, she hastens to add, “Perhaps the biggest misconception is

that rubies, emeralds and sapphires have to be expensive gemstones.

There are countless shades and colour variations, meaning there are

myriad options for each of us. The trade traditionally values certain

colours of ruby, sapphire, or emerald, yet the phrase ‘beauty is in the

eye of the beholder’ is never more applicable than when selecting

coloured gemstones.”

Coldham notes that “beauty, rarity and durability” are often attributed

as the main purchasing drivers of coloured gemstones; however, he

believes the consumer’s “perception of the story behind the stone and

what it means to them personally” is far more important.

“Some will choose a garnet because it is their birthstone, some an

amethyst because it reminds them of a favourite grandma, some

wanted to possess a large, heart-shaped blue stone after seeing the

movie Titanic,” Coldham explains. “The wonderful thing about coloured

gems is each usually symbolises something important to the wearer.”

For Samantha Kelly of Adelaide’s Samantha Kelly Jewellery there’s

another unique quality. “Besides the price difference, individuality seems

to be key; people want something that no-one else has,” she says.

This makes coloured gemstones particularly appealing for Millennial

and Gen Z shoppers, known to covet unique jewellery. Lilo Stadler, of

opal supplier Bolda, notes that Queensland boulder opal plays directly

to that desire.

“There is a trend toward larger stones that make a statement – boulder

opals admirably fit that bill and do not carry exorbitant price tags.

The statement made by wearing a big opal is one of character, not

a demonstration of worth. Boulder opals are for trendsetters, not

followers,” she says.

PERFECT FOR CHRISTMAS STOCK!

With Millennials now aged between 23 and 38, they make up the

largest segment of current and future engagement-ring customers.

Notably, coloured gemstones are popular in this category. “Not every

engagement ring stone must be a diamond,” McCreesh says. “Having a

coloured gemstone alternative at hand is very important.”

At Melbourne’s Temelli Jewellery, aquamarine, morganite and

tanzanite have had “significant increases in popularity”, according to

marketing manager James Temelli.

sales@fabuleuxvous.com

Helen +64 274 203 137

FVJEWELLERY.COM

FOLLOW US #WEARYOURFABULOUS

“We’ve been commissioned to create a lot of custom rings and

engagement rings using these gemstones. As of late, we have also

noticed clients interested in emerald-cut coloured gemstones,

whether it be ruby, aquamarine or sapphire.”

Temelli adds that coloured gemstones increase a jewellers’ ability to

cater to different clientele, who aren’t interested in a diamond ring.

SUSTAINABLE SOURCING

The movement toward ethical consumption has been gaining traction

across all retail sectors, and many in the jewellery industry are already


THE

HOT

LIST

THE TEN MOST IN-DEMAND

COLOURED GEMSTONES

OF THE LAST 12 MONTHS,

ACCORDING TO JEWELLERS

AND SUPPLIERS

SAPPHIRE

Teal tops the list,

alongside particolour

and blue

sapphire, closely

followed by pink

and, significantly,

yellow.

TOURMALINE

All colours of this

versatile gem

are popular, but

particularly in

demand are soft

and pretty pink

and blue-green

‘teal’ shades.

MORGANITE

The pink trend

continues, with

consumers

embracing peach

pink morganite.

OPAL

Demand for

Australian opal

and boulder opal

remains strong.

AQUAMARINE

The watery blue

of aquamarine has

captured hearts.

Indeed, ocean hues

across all gemstones

are enchanting

consumers.

SPINEL

Grey, grey-blue and

lavender purple

have been noted

as popular spinel

colours.

GARNET

Tsavorite and

demantoid garnet

have been winning

over consumers

with their vibrant

green hues.

TANZANITE

The deep, vibrant

blue shade of

tanzanite is

becoming more

popular for

engagement rings.

EMERALD

An enduring classic,

consumers still love

the deep green

of emerald.

RUBY

The final gem of the ‘big three’, ruby

rounds out the top 10 list.

NEW COLLECTION

Proudly distributed by

02 9417 0177 | www.dgau.com.au


COLOURED GEMSTONES

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: A COLLECTION OF FINE BLACK OPALS FROM LIGHTNING RIDGE, COURTESY CODY OPAL; TEMELLI JEWELLERY; BLUE TURTLES; ADRIAN CROSBIE HANDMADE

JEWELLERY, COURTESY LAWSON GEMS; LAWSON GEMS; BLUE TURTLES.

taking steps toward responsible practices. “More of today’s jewellery consumers

are asking whether the gemstone and precious metal they are buying has been

ethically sourced,” Cody explains. “The ICA has been working very closely with

CIBJO, AGTA [American Gem Trade Association] and the OECD over a number of

years to better understand the supply chains for the various coloured gems.”

Many developing nations mine coloured gemstones, including Zambia,

Mozambique, Myanmar, Colombia and Madagascar. Other gemstone-producing

areas have experienced unrest in recent times, as in Sri Lanka, Mexico and Brazil.

Cody says the “vast majority” of coloured gemstones are supplied by artisanal and

small enterprises, and the ICA is committed to developing procedures to help

them become more responsible and sustainable. The organisation has endorsed

the new CIBJO Responsible Sourcing Guidelines and “is encouraging all players

in the supply chain to be more aware of the potential issues” he says, adding, “ICA

members already agree to adhere to a strict code of ethics.”

At O’Neils Affiliated, responsible sourcing is taken seriously. “For us as a company,

whilst price is important, it does not outweigh our priority to source gemstones as

ethically as possible,” McCreesh says. “I personally endeavour to do business with

people we know to have high professional and ethical standards.”

He adds that O’Neils Affiliated has been able to build strong links in its 70-year

history with reputable miners and cutters to ensure high standards are met.

At Gemfields’ mines in Mozambique and Zambia, responsible practices encompass

environmental management, safety and community engagement. “We typically

invest more than $US1 million each year into local education, agriculture, health

and conservation projects,” Jack Cunningham, sustainability, policy and risk

director, Gemfields, says, adding that the company also sells gemstones via its own

auction platform to ensure transparency.

Meanwhile, Lawson acknowledges the complexity of responsible sourcing, telling

Jeweller that “there is no simple way to source an ethical gemstone”. He points to

the difficulty of exporting gems legally out of developing nations and forming

sustainable business relationships in unstable countries.

“The term is now a buzz phrase often used by unethical gem and jewellery traders

to sell goods – how do you trust those claims?” he asks, adding that one advantage

of opal and sapphire is that they can be sourced locally in Australia.

Stadler confirms that buyers of boulder opal frequently express the desire for

ethically-mined and produced gemstones. Indeed, Ikecho’s Miller sources boulder

opal from her own father’s mines in Lightning Ridge and Queensland. “He has

the largest range of opals in Australia so I have a lot of variety to choose from,” she

explains.

On an international level, Palos points out that there is no equivalent to the

diamond industry’s Kimberley Process in the coloured gemstone market. As a

result, the responsibility falls to suppliers. “I firmly believe most wholesalers in

Australia, or indeed around the world, do their utmost to guarantee their product

is ethically sourced,” he says.

Ensuring complete trust and transparency with suppliers is key for Kelly. “It can

be difficult, but I have built up relationships with my suppliers so I trust they will

disclose further information if required. It’s extremely rare that I will purchase any

gemstones from new suppliers,” she explains.

Temelli Jewellery takes a similar approach. “We align with gemstone suppliers

who have the same ethical sourcing procedure as we do,” Temelli says. “As well

as lab-certified coloured gems, we also assess the origin and, if possible, the

mine of origin when sourcing specific gems so that we can understand how the

gemstones are mined, cut and polished.”

As with many aspects of the jewellery industry, trust is crucial when it comes to

coloured gemstones. Equally critical are creative flair, an ability to capitalise on the

emotional connection to colour and an understanding of consumers who desire a

true point of difference. i

30 Jeweller October 2019


AUSTRALIAN SAPPHIRE

COOLAMON SAPPHIRES

THE BEAUTY OF

Australian sapphires

ARABELLA RODEN DISCOVERS WHY THESE LOCAL GEMS ARE CAPTURING THE

IMAGINATIONS – AND HEARTS – OF CONSUMERS IN EVER-INCREASING NUMBERS

cross the world, sapphire has enjoyed a storied position as one of the

most coveted gemstones for centuries. The ancient rulers of Greece

and Rome adorned themselves in sapphire jewellery and, as the

September birthstone, they have enjoyed ongoing popularity with

modern consumers.

Many still associate sapphire with Kashmir – renowned for its vivid blue gems

with silk – and Sri Lanka (Ceylon). The latter’s orangey-pink Padparadscha gems

have long been admired by collectors. Madagascar has also become an important

source of sapphire since deposits were first found there in the late 1990s.

Yet one of the rising trends in the local market is for the gems in our own backyard:

Australian sapphire. Sapphire has been mined here for more than a century and

the country was the world’s leading producer by volume from 1965 to 1985. Major

deposits are concentrated around the east coast, particularly in northern NSW and

Queensland where colours range from deep midnight blue to green, teal, particolour

and yellow, with rare instances of purple, orange, peach and colour-change.

Before the year 2000, much of the Australian supply was sold to foreign buyers

who then marketed it as being of Thai, Burmese and even Sri Lankan origin. Today,

consumer awareness of the high-quality local material has grown exponentially.

“Sapphire has always been a popular

gemstone within the jewellery industry

due to its durability and interesting array

of colours but, for the past year, we have

certainly noticed an increase in requests for

Australian sapphire,” Amelia Chafer, marketing

manager Coolamon Sapphires, says.

Katherine Kovacs, director of K&K Export Import, agrees, saying, “There has

been an increased demand over the last 12 months for bright, well-cut Australian

sapphire in blue and teal – and we’re expecting further growth.”

The wide variety of colours, coupled with sustainable sourcing and competitive

pricing, makes Australian sapphire a compelling category for jewellers – especially

those looking to appeal to Millennial and Gen Z customers.

BENEFITS AND CHALLENGES

VICTORIA

BUCKLEY

As one of the most durable gemstones with a hardness of nine on Mohs’ scale,

sapphires are ideal for everyday wear and can be set in any material, from platinum

to 18-carat gold. As a result, they are a popular choice for engagement rings, often

accented with white diamonds.

October 2019 Jeweller 31


AUSTRALIAN SAPPHIRE

“We have seen a strong demand for Australian

sapphires coming back into the market, mainly for

engagement rings for our younger clientele under 35.

“They are a little more adventurous and want to include

colour into their engagement rings,” says Simon West,

of Simon West Jewellery in Melbourne, who sources sapphire from

Gemfields in Queensland as well as Inverell and Reddestone Creek

in NSW.

K&K EXPORT IMPORT

top grades very different to when I started,” she says, adding,

“Many people still think of sapphire as only blue and are quite

surprised to discover the range of colours it can occur in.”

Chafer agrees: “The most common misconception about

sapphire is that it is only blue but it actually exists in all colours of

the rainbow. In our Central Queensland mines, the dominant colours

are blue, blue/yellow parti-colour, all shades of yellow, and green. The

pinks, oranges and purples are very rare but they bob up now and then.”

West’s customers have embraced unusual colours. “Blue sapphires are still going

strong with 40 per cent of all sapphire sales, but that’s opposed to 10 years ago

when 80 per cent of sapphire sales were blue,” West reveals.

The same trend has been evident at Coolamon, with Chafer telling Jeweller,

“There is always a strong demand for a ‘good blue’, although there is no doubt

that ‘teal’ has been the colour in fashion for some time, while parti-colour – yellow

and blue in the same stone – is just as desirable for its uniqueness.”

Sydney jeweller Victoria Buckley has also noticed an increase in demand for

sapphires for engagement and dress rings but notes there’s still a widespread

misconception about the colours available.

“I have certainly noticed much more interest for Australian sapphires and I’m

glad to see appreciation for our beautiful gems, even if it makes the prices for the

This offers both a challenge and an opportunity for jewellers. Overcoming

preconceptions and educating consumers on the wide variety of local sapphires

can be tricky. Yet they have a strong selling point, particularly for engagement

shoppers: these versatile gems offer an affordable, natural and durable alternative

to more expensive stones, like yellow or pink diamond, and can give the ring a

similar look until the customer is ready to upgrade.

However, retail jewellers are quick to point out that their customers fall in love with

sapphires on their own unique merits, not because they can pass for other gems.

“Australian parti-colour sapphires have always been something I’ve loved working

with; they have such interesting and unique colours and effects,” Buckley says. West

points to their “lustre and colour variation” as the main appeal.

The gems are a perfect fit for creative designs. Indeed, their vibrant hues mean

FIND US ON INSTAGRAM

MILLENNIUM_CHAIN

Australian leading wholesaler, specialising in manufacturing

9ct and 18ct yellow gold, rose gold and white gold.

Machine made and hand made, any kind, chains and bracelets,

bangles and findings. Suppliers to retailers and wholesalers.

MILLENNIUM CHAIN

P: 03 9650 5955 | E: sales@millenniumchain.com.au

www.millenniumchain.com.au


these gems stand out at any size. “Using smaller stones gives the jeweller the

choice of a vast colour range, greater ease of matching, and options for intricate

designs using calibrated shapes,” Chafer says. “Smaller stones are ideal for cluster

settings, shoulder stones, colour runs, encircling fine-solitaire settings and

complete jewellery sets. The possibilities are limitless.”

One drawback of sapphire’s popularity for engagement rings is the limitations

on the shapes available. “Cushion shapes are still popular and difficult-to-source

shapes such as round and octagonal tend to get snapped up pretty fast,” Kovacs

says. Meanwhile, Chafer reveals the trends for shapes change as often as for colour,

noting hexagons and emerald cuts are currently popular.

AN ETHICAL PERSPECTIVE

Three in four Millennial and Gen Z consumers are willing to pay more for a product

that has been sustainably and ethically produced, according to research from

Nielsen. When it comes to jewellery, the concerns of consumers tend to coalesce

around country of origin and the environmental impacts of mining. On both

counts, Australian sapphires have a marketable edge as the local industry is tightly

regulated with strict environmental and labour controls.

Jewellers that we have been working with have been doing a brilliant job at

promoting Australian sapphire as an ethically sourced, ‘home-grown’ product,”

Kovacs says. Chafer adds: “There’s an assurance our sapphires are ethically mined

and are authentic natural gemstones.”

When it comes to treatments, disclosure is standard practice among

Australian suppliers, while gems sourced overseas have fewer guarantees

of accurate labelling.

At Coolamon Sapphires, the process of mining is also low impact. “The sapphires

are recovered from the alluvial deposits by a washing process which uses no

chemicals and produces no noxious products,” Chafer explains.

This operation is dependent on having sufficient water and has been heavily

restricted in recent months due to the ongoing drought. Those looking to acquire

existing stock not only support the local industry, but also businesses stricken by

lack of rain.

Perhaps reflecting the rising demand for this responsibly-sourced gems, Canadian

mining company Fura Gems recently entered an options agreement with Richland

Resources for its Queensland sapphire mining permits and licenses.

Fura, which bills itself as “a progressive and imaginative company” aiming to set “a

new precedent for best practices in the gemstone industry”, already mines ruby in

Mozambique and emerald in Colombia and the Australian acquisition rounds out

the group’s ‘big three’.

Sapphire is an enduring favourite of the jewellery industry and Australian sapphires

in particular are winning over jewellers and consumers with not only their beauty,

but also their ethical and sustainable credentials. i

A RAINBOW OF COLOUR

Guaranteed Natural

Sapphires & Zircons

From our Central Queensland mines to the market

COMPREHENSIVE CALIBRATED INVENTORY

EXCELLENT COLOUR MATCHING

MIXED COLOUR SETS

DISCOUNTS FOR BULK ORDERS

SMALL ORDERS WELCOME

07 4933 0151 • gems@coolamonsapphires.com


INDIA SHOW REPORT

GAUGING THE MOOD IN MUMBAI

DISRUPTIONS IN THE DIAMOND AND GOLD MARKETS HAVE BEEN KEENLY FELT

IN INDIA – YET THE RECENT INDIA INTERNATIONAL JEWELLERY SHOW WAS

FIRMLY FOCUSED ON SOLUTIONS, COLEBY NICHOLSON REPORTS

y the time the India International Jewellery Show (IIJS) closed on

12 August in Mumbai, the organisers reported that visitor attendance

had been better than expected, given it was held during what they

called a “depressed market”.

More than 32,000 local buyers and 1,100 international visitors attended the 36th

edition of IIJS, which would have been pleasing to the organisers given that the

Indian show regularly sees 35,000–40,000 buyers attend.

This year, 1,300 exhibitors displayed their wares in the expanded Bombay

Exhibition Centre. The booths comprised 10 clearly defined sections: Couture,

Mass Produced, Plain Gold, Loose Stones, International Pavilions, Synthetics &

Simulants, Laboratories & Education, Allied, Hall of Innovation and Special Clusters

(Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises sector).

The Indian jewellery industry is facing many challenges including the high

gold price – largely a result of the US-China trade war – and an oversupply of

diamond. The latter has caused many diamond suppliers to reduce prices as they

grapple with cashflow to accommodate local banks, which have been pressuring

manufacturers over lending facilities.

Some of the issues are self-inflicted, given the recent high-profile fraud and

corruption charges on Indian diamond and jewellery businesses.

According to one diamond manufacturer at IIJS, a decline in Chinese demand

has also affected India’s diamond exports in the past year, particularly for 0.20- to

0.60-carat goods, which are popular in that market.

The past year had seen an 18 per cent decline in cut and polished diamond

exports to $US1.5 billion; while gold jewellery exports fell by more than by 5 per

cent to $US963 million.

These pressures are among the reasons the Indian jewellery sector experienced a

10 per cent year-over-year decline in overall exports in July 2019 to $US2.22 billion,

according to India’s Gem & Jewellery Export Promotion Council (GJEPC).

Faced with these local problems, the industry, led by the GJEPC, is not standing

still and has predicted that global exports will reach $US70 billion per year, up from

$US41 billion per year in 2018.

The industry is trying to boost diamond demand among Indian consumers

to complement the strong gold jewellery tradition in the country. Pramod

October 2019 Jeweller 35


INDIA SHOW REPORT

Kumar Agrawal, chairman GJEPC, recently told a news conference that the

Indian jewellery industry needs to adapt to the changing world economic and

trading conditions.

“India is well placed in this changing world order. With the US putting a 10 per cent

duty on Chinese exports of gems and jewellery, India has a potential opportunity

to grab market share – a $US6 billion opportunity,” he explained, adding, “On

one side, India is engaged in trade negotiations with the Eastern world and we

are on the way to sign bilateral and multilateral trade deals with [the] Regional

Comprehensive Economic Partnership, which controls one-third of the world

trade, and includes China, the Indo-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership

Agreement (EPA) and the Indo-Korea EPA.”

The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership consists of ten ASEAN

member countries as well as its free trade agreement partners: India, China,

Australia, New Zealand, South Korea and Japan.

“Our vision is to increase gem and jewellery exports to $US75 billion and create an

additional 2 million jobs by 2025,” Agrawal said.

He explained that the sector is facing challenges globally and sustaining demand

for the product is most important; meanwhile, the GJEPC will focus on promoting

small jewellery exporters.

“We are happy that, post our meetings and representation, De Beers is investing

around $US175 million globally and Alrosa is also adding funds through the

Diamond Producers’ Association and their individual offices too,” Agrawal added.

Additionally, Indian authorities are taking steps to differentiate synthetic and

natural diamonds – a key concern of diamond producers and retailers.

“The Indian government has introduced a separate 8-Digit HS [Harmonized

System] Code for lab-grown/synthetic diamonds, making India one of the early

adopters of distinct HS Codes for both rough and polished synthetic diamonds,

which is a consumer-friendly and trade-friendly initiative that enhances the ease of

doing business,” Agrawal explained.

The Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System, also known as the

HS, is an internationally standardised system of names and numbers to classify

traded products. It came into effect in 1988 and has since been developed and

maintained by the World Customs Organisation.

Paul Rowley, executive vice president diamond trading and distribution, De Beers

Group, also addressed the media at the IIJS. He said, “India is the pulse and the

heartbeat of the global gem and jewellery trade. Within a few years, two-thirds

of the Millennial population of the world will be in India. IIJS Premiere 2019 will

jumpstart the shift to a new order in the global gem and jewellery trade.”

De Beers was also a sponsor of the GJEPC’s corporate social responsibility

initiative Jewellers For Hope. At a charity dinner during the IIJS, Rowley said,

“Diamonds are the ultimate symbol of love and these miracles of nature have

given hope to so many people across world. The diamond industry in India

has been doing tremendous work in education, health and uplifting the

marginalised sections of the society. De Beers has always been committed to

the welfare of its stakeholders and society.

“We are happy to partner with GJEPC for the charity event that gives hope

to the underprivileged and empowers children, women and people in

a great manner.”

Another initiative promoted by GJEPC at the show is the creation of a Gem Bourse

at Jaipur. It’s envisioned that the Gem Bourse will house more than 2,000 coloured

gemstone manufacturers and traders along with the offices of customs, banks, and

other service providers at one place.

With the Indian gem and jewellery industry facing significant difficulties as well as

opportunities, and so many artisanal producers relying on it for their livelihood, it’s

critical that the GJEPC takes action. Through the IIJS show and its other initiatives,

the organisation is taking a pro-active approach to ensuring the sector’s future

remains secure. i

COLEBY NICHOLSON attended the India International Jewellery Show as a guest of the

GJEPC as an accredited media representative.

36 Jeweller October 2019


GEMS

GARNET – GEM OF MANY COLOURS: PART I

greens. There is also a colour change garnet,

which shows blue-green in daylight, shifting

to purple-red under incandescent light.

Why does garnet have so many colours?

The answer relates to chemical processes as

the garnet crystal is forming. Simply put –

because the chemistry of the garnet family is

complex – in some garnets, oxides of metals

such as iron, chromium and magnesium are

inherent to the crystal, thus creating specific

colours.

In other garnets, trace elements are included

as the gem form, thus creating a different

range of colours.

FIGURE 1. CORROSION TUBES

FIGURE 2. LAMELLAR TWINNING

The garnet family is an extensive one,

with 20 members. In the jewellery world,

five members are of importance, namely:

pyrope, almandine, spessartine, grossular and

andradite. Each of these will be considered

next month in Part II of the Garnet – Gem Of

Many Colours series.

Long an indicator of wealth and status,

deep red garnet was coveted by monarchs

and nobles across many ancient cultures.

The Romans used carved garnets in seals

to mark their official documents, the

ancient Britons decorated their weapons

with the gems, and Egyptian pharaohs

were buried with strings of garnets.

The name garnet comes from the Latin word

granatus or granum meaning “seed”, as red

garnet in its rough state is similar in colour

and shape to the seed of the pomegranate.

Garnet has a long history of use as a

decorative as well as a practical item. Its

hardness of 6.5 to 7.5 on the Mohs scale,

durability and vibrant colour palette make it

ideal for use in jewellery as well as a range of

ceremonial regalia such as crowns, chalices

and sceptres.

Hardness and durability, key properties

valued by jewellers and artisans for

millennia, also make garnet an ideal modern

industrial resource. Originating in volcanic

and metamorphic environments and thus

subjected to extreme heat and pressure,

garnet can withstand similar extremes in an

industrial setting.

Today, industrial grade garnet is widely

used as an abrasive, in high-pressure water

jet cutting tools, as a component of wear

resistant road paints and in rechargeable

batteries. Australia is a leading supplier

of industrial grade garnet, with mines in

Western Australia and the Northern Territory.

Gem quality garnet is typically viewed as

a red gemstone, with colour variations of

brownish red to reddish pink. However, this is

only one part of the gem’s colour story.

Many customers are surprised to learn that

this affordable gemstone comes in a rainbow

of hues, including colourless, blue, black,

orange and yellow, purple and a range of

WHY DOES

GARNET HAVE

SO MANY

COLOURS? THE

ANSWER RELATES

TO CHEMICAL

PROCESSES AS THE

GARNET CRYSTAL

IS FORMING.

SIMPLY PUT –

BECAUSE THE

CHEMISTRY OF THE

GARNET FAMILY

IS COMPLEX

Colour aside, garnet can also display the rare

optical effects of chatoyancy (cat’s-eye effect)

and asterism (star effect). Such garnets are

highly sought after. Some garnets may also

contain iron, giving these gems magnetic

properties. In addition to its colour range,

garnet has a bright vitreous lustre.

One garnet type, the vibrant green

demantoid, has a dispersion value greater

than diamond, adding to this garnet’s

gemmological and jewellery value.

Gem quality garnets are found across the

world, including in Brazil, Australia, Myanmar,

Madagascar, India, Sri Lanka and Namibia.

SUSAN HARTWIG FGAA came late to the world

of gemmology after a long career in corporate

training and project management. She

combines her love for writing with a passion

for gems and jewellery. Susan writes regularly

for her gemmology blog ellysiagems.com. For

more information on gemmology courses and

gemstones, visit: gem.org.au

October 2019 Jeweller 37


Completing my Diploma in

Gemmology has benefited

me as a jeweller in more

ways than I ever expected.

I have always had an interest

in gemstones and found

the course was not only

informative and challenging

but immensely rewarding.

Studying with the GAA has also

allowed me to meet like-minded

people from many facets of the

jewellery industry and grants me access

to resources that I will continue to use

throughout my professional career.

Emma Meakes FGAA

Jeweller, John Miller Design - WA

Diploma in

Gemmology

Enrolments now open

For more information

1300 436 338

learn@gem.org.au

www.gem.org.au

Be

Brilliant

Gem-Ed Australia

ADELAIDE BRISBANE HOBART MELBOURNE PERTH SYDNEY

Passionately educating the industry, gem enthusiasts

and consumers about gemstones


BUSINESS

LESSONS FROM LEAVING THE CORPORATE WORLD

One of the hardest decisions is to

leave the safety of a nine-to-five job.

BERNADETTE MCCLELLAND shares her

insights into striking out alone and

succeeding on one’s own terms.

Nearly two decades ago, as everyone

was preparing for the Y2K bug to close

down the world, I was closing up my

files, picking up my bag and saying my

goodbyes to a company I had called

home for some 20 years.

I’d joined the business at a time that

pre-dated mobile phones and when

messages were delivered via wooden

pigeonholes.

The first plain-paper fax machine I sold

was for $20,000 and the sales floor was a

boys’ club with few women.

It was an environment and an era that

taught me a million lessons.

It was also a time where my company

was the leader in its field until temporarily

losing pole position when moving the

goal posts from analogue to digital.

We bounced back with strategies that

included leadership through quality,

customer delight and world-class

solution selling.

I was truly fortunate to be part of a tribe,

albeit one that frustrated the living

daylights out of me. Whilst it gave me

a sense of family however, something

was missing.

Something that said, “There is more to

work and even more to you.”

A NEW PARADIGM OF WORK

Today, with the gig economy hitting

its straps, an increasing number of people

are escaping their corporate cubicles.

They are going in search of roles that

align with their lifestyle, purpose and

growth, and they are leveraging powerful

new technology to do so.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)

says approximately 2.5 million people in

Australia have swapped their offices for

corner cafés and it’s a cultural shift that’s

expected to continue.

WHILST YOU WILL

BE EXCITED ABOUT

THE PROSPECT

OF GROWTH AND

TRYING NEW

THINGS WHEN

YOU LEAVE YOUR

OFFICE JOB,

YOU WILL LOSE

COMMONALITY

WITH THOSE

WHO ARE NO

LONGER IN

YOUR WORLD

And as I reflect on nearly two decades of

freelancing and entrepreneurial ventures

in the gig economy, these are the biggest

lessons I have taken away:

Don’t expect people to understand – Whilst

you will be excited about the prospect

of growth and trying new things when

you leave your office job, you will lose

commonality with those who are no

longer in your world.

Some will be supportive but some might be

sceptical, even laughing and mocking you

for being a ‘dreamer’.

There is a natural human reaction for

others to want you to stay where they

are, especially if they see you are on a

growth trajectory. At a biological level, our

brain distrusts difference and when you

branch out on your own, you are set apart

from the pack.

Find a group of people who ‘get it’ –

Acclaimed businessman and author Seth

Godin got it right when he said, “A group

needs only two things to be a tribe: a

shared interest and a way to communicate.”

October 2019 Jeweller 39


BUSINESS

Finding groups along your path that

understand you is critical. This is not just

for support but also for sharing ideas – and

the latter will always lead to growth.

Get used to moments of self-doubt – Enjoy

the highs that come with your new venture

but don’t walk away from the lows.

The biggest mistake I made was walking

away from a venture after only two years

and taking an eight-year detour because

I didn’t think I had what it took.

Be mindful of those winters as spring

and summer will always follow.

Recognise the important people – This

means your family. Why? Because stepping

out on your own crosses both personal and

professional boundaries, not necessarily in

equal amounts.

Having great kids and a supportive

husband has been my biggest blessing

in life. My partner truly believes that his

wife has commercial value as well as

personal value and he is not be threatened

by that at all.

Customers won’t come just because you

have a dream – I remember someone

asking me early on, “So how are you going

to market yourself?“ It didn’t take me

long to realise that marketing is the

number-one priority over and above

what you actually do.

With that came my first book then my

second, a website when the Internet was

fairly new and a newsletter at a time when

personalisation was novel.

It also meant doing free speaking gigs to

get testimonials and brought a feeling

of uncertainty of what to charge when

nobody would give me a straight answer.

I look at freelancers, entrepreneurs and

even small businesses now focusing so

much on their product and not enough on

marketing and I think, ‘Flip it, flip it!’

Qualify those coffee meetings – Everybody

wants to have a quick meeting or a coffee

chat to ‘pick your brains’. A brilliant learning

for me was to ask why.

If their answer didn’t align with my

own goal for the meeting then I would

postpone it. Minding your time is critical

and qualification is not just about

prospecting; it’s about protecting your

time as well.

Always invest in yourself – I have been

fortunate to work as the Asia-Pacific lead

coach for Tony Robbins, one of the world’s

best-known life and business coaches,

all because I was ‘coachable’ and open

to being brave.

I am grateful for the learning and leverage I

attained from that experience.

I have also invested in one-on-one

mentoring with leadership expert Matt

Church, who introduced me to models

and commercial thinking that I can now

incorporate into my training, keynotes

and writing.

I have been fortunate enough to invest

in travelling to different parts of the world

to hang out with like-minded people and

I have now shared my message across

five continents.

I’m not suggesting everyone needs to

do what I do but picking up a book,

listening to a podcast, asking for feedback

and having a conversation with a mentor

or person you admire and want to

emulate are all ways of investing in

yourself and your growth.

Trust your gut – I always wondered

if the answer I was seeking was outside

of me.

Ultimately, we often know the right

course of action and we need to own

that knowledge.

For example, the right course of action

could mean saying no to clients that aren’t

a good fit; refusing to discount your price

because you know your value; distancing

yourself from people who do not align with

your values.

It’s about doing what you love and

listening to those internal messages you

hear but may not always trust.

Winners, high-achievers and go-getters

have more than belief – they have faith.

They know that everything will be okay,

and that taking both leaps and baby

steps, forwards and backwards, in the

pursuit of change is always about growth

and innovation.

CHANGING YOUR

ENVIRONMENT

ALWAYS HAS

ITS BENEFITS

– SHIFTING UP

YOUR CIRCLE OF

INFLUENCE WILL

ALSO PRODUCE

POSITIVE

OUTCOMES, AS

WILL LIVING BY

THE MANTRA

THAT THERE IS

NO RIGHT OR

WRONG

The opposite of faith is disbelief and fear.

When you live by rules that confine you

to the way you’ve always done things, you

are operating out of fear – you are simply

trying to stay safe, or protect your ego with

bubble wrap.

With this mentality, you stop yourself from

pushing boundaries, colouring outside

the lines, challenging the status quo and

busting expectations.

Know that you are where you are supposed

to be – What you are doing today may not

be the right thing for the future but it is the

right thing right now.

There will always be a reason why you

are doing what you are doing, so don’t

beat yourself up if it is not all it is cracked

up to be.

If it’s not a fit then make a decision – do it

for a reason or don’t do it at all. If it is exactly

where you want it to be then be grateful

and pay something forward.

Do not play the comparison game – ever!

You have way too much value to offer and

it’s a game you will always lose.

None of us know what tomorrow will bring;

however, changing your environment

always has its benefits.

Shifting up your circle of influence will also

produce positive outcomes, as will living by

the mantra that there is no right or wrong.

FINAL REFLECTION

I hope these nine personal truths

can help you get your head around a

change of direction and motivate you to

stay the course.

In the words of the rapper Eminem, “If

people take anything from my music, it

should be motivation to know that anything

is possible as long as you keep working at it

and don’t back down.”

Keep working at it. i

BERNADETTE

MCCLELLAND is a keynote

speaker, executive sales

coach, and published author.

3redfolders.com

40 Jeweller October 2019


SELLING

FALL IN LOVE WITH CUSTOMERS’ PAIN POINTS

A SURE-FIRE WAY TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS IS TO CREATE A SOLUTION TO AN EXISTING PROBLEM. TO DO THIS, BUSINESSES

MUST HAVE A THOROUGH UNDERSTAND THE PAIN POINTS OF THEIR CUSTOMERS. MICHAEL HINSHAW REPORTS.

It’s human nature to fall in love with your

own solutions but it’s also one of the most

common pitfalls for business leaders,

entrepreneurs and those responsible for

improving customer experiences, so don’t

do it.

Why? Because the implications of this mindset

are significant.

Remember New Coke? It’s probably the

most famous example of well-intentioned

company leaders betting on a solution to a

problem they didn’t fully understand.

Other examples include the Amazon Fire

phone, the Google+ social network and

3D TV.

These are perfect examples of falling in love

with a solution and it’s possible none of

these failures would’ve happened at all if the

companies had spent even a small portion of

energy and resources on understanding their

customers’ pain points.

Consumers want products and services that

improve their lives, so it follows that few

consumers will care about a solution when it

misses the mark, even if you’re trying to solve

the right problem.

Furthermore, even fewer consumers will care

if you’re solving a problem that doesn’t exist!

DON’T JUMP TO SOLUTIONS

When it comes to addressing the issues

at hand, jumping to solutions is never a

good idea.

How many times have you seen companies

– maybe even yours – make ill-advised

investments in technology, systems,

products or services that actually make

problems worse because they lack a deep

understanding of the problem being solved?

Rarely does a solution fail because it wasn’t

built as designed or intended.

Rather, it fails because it doesn’t solve the

right customer pain point. Once a company

follows a hypothesis instead of a fact-based

DEEPLY EMPATHISE

WITH YOUR

CUSTOMERS

AND WHAT THEY

ARE TRYING TO

ACCOMPLISH. THIS

EMPATHY CAN

– AND SHOULD –

LEAD TO A LOVE

FOR THE PROBLEM

THEY NEED YOU

TO SOLVE

SOLVING A CUSTOMERS’ PROBLEM IS KEY

solution, the ramifications amplify across

the product lifecycle, often altering the

customer experience.

Resources are then needed to fix the

solution, which all could have been avoided

by understanding the original problem.

In the world of design, this is akin to running

experiments that validate what you expect

to happen rather than revealing what is

actually happening.

Consider what happens when you show

a website or user-interface prototype to a

customer and ask how they like it.

Normally, they’ll give you honest and direct

feedback – “I don’t like the colour”, “The menu

is confusing”, “Can you make the font bigger?”

What they can’t tell you is how well this

solves their problem.

If you use your time with customers to

discover the problem then come back and

test multiple solutions, you’ll learn firstly

if you’re solving the right problem and,

secondly, which are the best solutions.

In a corporate environment, the pressure to

come to the table quickly with fully-formed

solutions is high.

Initial solutions are arrived at without much

customer feedback and, by the time they

reach an executive audience, those solutions

are under far more scrutiny than the

problems they’re trying to solve.

In other words, start with the problem.

HELP CUSTOMERS TO DO THEIR JOBS

Your customers have specific tasks they’re

trying to accomplish when they interact

with your products. They desire dependable,

predictable outcomes that make it easier to

achieve these tasks. Any solution that doesn’t

make it easier to do this is no solution at all.

By observing and chatting with customers,

you can establish what job they’re trying to

complete and how your business is making it

hard for them to do so. Understanding your

customer’s goals and pain points is what

leads to building better solutions.

Understanding problems comes from

understanding customers and right solutions

only result from solving the right problems.

Don’t seek solutions until you truly

understand what you’re solving and

remember that it will be necessary to test

multiple solutions in order to succeed. Don’t

be afraid to fail fast and often, and don’t fall

in love with your solution.

Deeply empathise with your customers and

what they are trying to accomplish. This

empathy can – and should – lead to a love

for the problem they need you to solve.

When that occurs, you’ll develop solutions

that your customers will love.

When you’re improving your customers’ lives,

that’s when the magic happens. By using

your solution, your customers will begin to

succeed and when this happens, you’ll also

begin to succeed. i

MICHAEL HINSHAW

is president of McorpCX,

which focuses on customer

experience management.

mcorpcx.com

October 2019 Jeweller 41


MANAGEMENT

THE CHALLENGE OF RETAINING GREAT STAFF

AN ENTERPRISE IS ONLY AS GOOD AS ITS PEOPLE. SEEKING EXCEPTIONAL WORKERS WILL NOT ONLY IMPROVE

OUTCOMES BUT ALSO INFLUENCE OTHER STAFF TO ELEVATE THE COMPANY CULTURE, WRITES BARRY URQUHART.

Great people are attractive, appealing and

valuable assets to any business. They are also

like magnets in that they attract other great

workers and great customers as well; however,

great people can be hard to find and even

harder to retain.

The adjective ‘great’ is an emotional term;

it’s difficult to quantify. There are plenty of

questions about how to measure greatness

and much subjectivity in the assessment. How

accurate was the title of Alexander the Great

really, for example?

When recruiting, greatness can only be

properly understood and applied in a context

that is relevant to the culture of the enterprise

as a whole.

Consequently, the search for great people

is typically random and inefficient. Any

attempt to identify them through networking

can be compromised by mateship and the

questionable values and motives applied by

mutual associates. Only occasionally does

networking lead to a “meeting of the minds”.

SEARCHING FOR GREATNESS

It takes considerable time, money and

resources to sift through job applications

and business leaders need to assess whether

they are getting value from this distribution

of resources, especially when new employees

prove to be unsuccessful.

The presence of greatness is not conspicuous

in a CV. There is no university course that

teaches students how to be great and what

referee – or applicant, for that matter – would

be so bold as to use the term as a descriptor?!

Far too often, those identified as possessing

the potential for greatness fail to live up to

expectations because greatness is not an

aptitude with pre-determined dimensions.

Rather, greatness is an attitude, a self-belief

which is articulated in so many ways, often

non-verbal and subtle.

People can often sense when they have

been or are in the presence of greatness.

GREAT PEOPLE

OFTEN DON’T

NEED RULES AND

POLICING TO ENSURE

COMPLIANCE OR

CONFORMITY

– FOR THEM,

THOSE FACTORS

SIMPLY LIMIT

THEIR MAXIMUM

POTENTIAL

GREAT PEOPLE ATTRACT OTHER HIGH ACHIEVERS

It is a good feeling and promotes a desire to

remain in their company.

Yet no-one knows better the presence and

quality of greatness than the individual; selfimage

is a key and fundamental component

of self-determination.

In employment advertisements, one strategy

is to refocus from the position to the person.

The bold and challenging declaration that an

entity is seeking a special person triggers an

intriguing process: in the first instance, there

is a fall in the number of applications and, at

the same time, there is a rise in the overall

quality of those applicants.

Typically, the resulting interviews and

interactions are interesting and challenging.

After all, great people want to work for, and

with, great businesses, bosses and peers.

Individually and collectively, great people

have a presence. They also generate a sense

of energy and urgency. The resultant culture

and ambience are, well, great!

KEEPING GREAT PEOPLE

Expectations of and by great people

are high, generally dynamic and very

personal. Recognition of, and respect for,

the individual is imperative. Elitism

is not desirable nor typically functional

and therefore great should be the norm, not

the exception.

Moreover, great people are inclined to

attract other great people, so highachievement

becomes a benchmark in

the company culture.

Great people often don’t need rules

and policing to ensure compliance or

conformity. For them, those factors simply

limit their maximum potential.

The positive alternative is to provide

parameters within which people strive

for and achieve their consistent optimal

performance. Explanations of ‘why we do

the things we do’ promote and facilitate

understanding and commitment.

Ongoing, prompt and genuine recognition

and reinforcement are valued by all and

contribute to cohesion and malleability.

These elements ensure dynamism, growth,

and development.

Like many things in life, the essential

component is the context rather than the

content. Managers seek to control processes

and they can find it difficult to exercise

control over great people.

Meanwhile, leaders focus more on

influencing and enhancing values – but they

also must facilitate individual and collective

growth. Each is an integral component of the

art of retaining great people.

Above all, whether they accept or embrace

the tag of ‘great’, high achievers have much to

contribute. Ensuring their involvement in key

elements of the business is fundamental for

retaining a culture of greatness and attracting

even more great people. i

BARRY URQUHART

is managing director of

Marketing Focus and an

international keynote speaker.

marketinginfocus.net.au

42 Jeweller October 2019


MARKETING & PR

FORGET THE 4P’S OF MARKETING – MEET THE 4E’S

EXTRAORDINARY TIMES CALL FOR ADAPTIVE RETAILING SOLUTIONS. CHRIS PETERSEN REVEALS THE NEW PARADIGM FOR SELLING

IN THE OMNICHANNEL AGE – AND HOW YOU CAN MAXIMISE YOUR RESULTS BY SHIFTING TO A DIFFERENT SERVICE FRAMEWORK.

There has been much discussion about the

changing face of retail. Omnichannel has

become the new normal. It is no longer a

question of online versus bricks-and-mortar

stores; today, consumers can shop anytime

and everywhere, and no longer need to

separate physical retail from digital.

Shopping has become a seamless experience

of which time, location and method are no

longer barriers. In this new era of retail,

traditional marketing is dead.

Retailing has transformed from a product/

place business to a people-based business

where today’s customers are focused on the

shopping experience.

The traditional 4P’s of marketing – product,

price, promotion and place – are dead.

Successful retailers are now differentiating

through the 4E’s – experience, everywhere,

exchange and evangelism.

So, what’s changed?

DAWN OF A NEW ERA

In the age before online shopping, retail

was about location: customers had to visit

stores in order to purchase. Retailers could

differentiate by carrying a different selection

of products, and pricing and promotion were

instrumental in attracting customers and

driving store traffic.

Today, it would be considered almost

impossible for an individual retailer to

differentiate successfully on product or

price alone.

The real reason the 4P’s are dead, however,

is changes in consumer behaviour

and expectation. Today’s omnichannel

consumers shop anytime and everywhere.

They expect unlimited product selection

and the ability to price-compare, all from

the convenience of their smartphones.

This isn’t the first time the industry has

suggested replacing the 4P’s. In 1990,

advertising academic Bob Lauterborn

suggested 4C’s, which he identified as:

WHAT IS EMERGING

IS A VERY CLEAR

PICTURE THAT

RETAILERS MUST

DO FAR MORE

THAN SELL ITEMS

AT A PRICE. RETAIL

SUCCESS REQUIRES

TRANSFORMATION

TO A TRULY

CUSTOMER-CENTRIC,

EXPERIENTIAL

BUSINESS

THE NEW PRODUCT IS CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE

consumer wants and needs, cost to satisfy,

convenience to buy and communication.

While these 4C’s do shift the focus from

product to customer, they don’t adequately

capture the expectations of today’s

omnichannel consumers.

Shoppers are now voting with their wallets

for retailers that fulfil their own 4C’s:

• Connections – Consumers expect to

connect with brands at any time, especially

on their smartphones.

• Choice – Today’s consumers are not limited

by what they can find in a store or even the

goods they find in their own country.

• Convenience – Consumers are increasingly

looking for the convenience of how they

purchase and also how they choose to

receive their goods, such as via overnight

delivery, nominated-day delivery or clickand-collect.

• Conversation – Consumers are more likely

to begin their buying journeys on social

media where they seek conversations

about products and, most importantly,

recommendations.

What’s wrong with these 4C’s? Nothing;

however, they are primarily focused

on consumer expectations and do not

adequately address what retailers must

do to pro-actively change their strategies.

EVOLVING TO THE 4E’S

Despite unprecedented store closures, the

retail apocalypse isn’t here yet. What we are

witnessing is traditional retailers struggling

to transform in an age of disruption.

Marketing expert Pamela Danziger says a

pivotal issue for retailers today is that they

may not be selling what customers want.

While business owners cling to the 4P’s

because they can control them, Danziger says

retailers must align with today’s experiencedriven

customers by focusing on the 4E’s:

• Experience – The sum of the customer’s

experience is the new ‘product’.

• Exchange – The customer doesn’t just want

a catalogue of products at a price; they

want an exchange of ideas, information and

value, beyond price.

• Evangelism – Promotion is not enough and

customers are tired of being bombarded

with deals. Evangelism means engagement

that is personalised on the customer’s

terms, lifestyle and values.

• Everyplace – Stores have been replaced by

‘everywhere’ and communication must now

be everywhere as well.

Some marketers have argued for even more

E’s: emotions, execution and engagement.

What is emerging is a very clear picture

that retailers must do far more than sell

items at a price. Retail success requires

transformation to a truly customer-centric,

experiential business.

The very best retailers have transformed from

selling products using the 4P’s to engaging

customers via the 4E’s, and they’ve done so

in ways that build lasting relationships that

create lifetime value. i

CHRIS PETERSEN is

founder and CEO of retail

consultancy Integrated

Marketing Solutions (IMS).

imsresultscount.com

MONTH 2019 Jeweller 43


LOGGED ON

INCREASE WEBSITE TRAFFIC WITH PINTEREST

OF ALL THE SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS, PINTEREST IS ONE OF THE BEST FOR DRIVING POTENTIAL CUSTOMERS TO YOUR

WEBSITE. ALISA MEREDITH EXPLAINS WHY RETAILERS SHOULDN’T OVERLOOK THIS CRUCIAL DIGITAL TOOL.

In the quest for more website traffic,

you’ve likely investigated SEO, advertising,

Instagram, Facebook, blogging, link building

and more – but this may be the first

time you’ve considered the traffic-driving

potential of Pinterest.

If so, you’re not alone.

According to a study conducted by Social

Media Examiner in 2018, only 27 per cent of

marketers are using Pinterest. What?!

Is it true when they say Pinterest only works

for wedding planners and cupcake recipes

– or have 27 per cent of marketers realised

something the others haven’t, namely that

Pinterest wants to send traffic to your site?

Pinterest exists to inspire people to get out

and do, and it works. Research has shown

that 90 per cent of ‘Pinners’ get ideas on

what to buy from the platform and with

265 million monthly users, that’s a lot of

people looking to buy.

For a long time, Pinterest was the

number-two driver of social referral traffic

after Facebook; however, in the past

year, Pinterest traffic has overtaken

Facebook traffic. It can take some time

Pinning consistently to see substantial results

but the time you spend on Pinterest pays off

for months years to come.

Did you know that a Facebook post starts

losing effectiveness after about 24 minutes

and will disappear from newsfeeds forever in

under 12 hours? By comparison, a Pin can stay

relevant for up to 3.5 months. Given that you

can re-share content at sensible intervals, it’s

possible to make a Pin last forever.

To drive traffic from Pinterest to your site,

you must figure out how your products or

services can improve the lives of potential

consumers in a meaningful way.

Here are some key strategies:

Use keywords wisely – The words you use

on Pinterest can be as powerful as the

images you share. Pinterest uses language

to determine how to distribute your Pin.

Keywords are particularly relevant but

planning keywords for Pinterest is different

to Google.

On Google, people are more likely to be ready

to act right away so “wicker patio dining set”

makes perfect sense. For Pinterest, they may

be seeking ideas so “patio inspiration” might

be a good angle to try.

Hashtags can also help your content surface

more quickly so in this example, you would

include #patioinspiration in the description.

Save content to relevant boards – Save your

content to all relevant boards but tell Pinterest

what is most representative of the content

with that very first Pin.

Choose quality over quantity – Scheduling

a few quality Pins each day with a focus on

compelling images, keyword-rich descriptions

and a strong call to action is always better

than 100 hastily-Pinned images.

Pinterest looks for signals from followers to

decide how much distribution a Pin will get,

so share only content that is relevant to your

audience and always focus on your own

content first. It’s nice to support others but

that won’t help your traffic!

Tweak and plan your content for Pinterest

– Use in built Pinterest tools to tweak your

content so that it is encouraging and

empowering to your followers.

Visit Analytics > Profile in the main menu then

click on “Link clicks” to see the Pins that get

the most clicks.

If you’re Pinning other people’s content, you’ll

get a great idea of what’s popular. Is there a

topic that you haven’t covered that appears

over and over?

Make it easy for others to Pin – Every blog post

and product page on your site should have

a great image and Pinterest’s ‘Save’ widget to

make it easy for people to share your content

with just one click.

A STRONG PINTEREST STRATEGY WILL PAY OFF IN THE LONG TERM

FOR A LONG TIME,

PINTEREST WAS

THE NUMBER-

TWO DRIVER OF

SOCIAL REFERRAL

TRAFFIC AFTER

FACEBOOK;

HOWEVER, IN

THE PAST YEAR,

PINTEREST

TRAFFIC HAS

OVERTAKEN

FACEBOOK

TRAFFIC

Design Pins specifically for more traffic –

Pinterest looked at 25 elements of 21,000

Pins to learn what goes into Pins that drive

discovery/awareness, email sign-ups, online

sales and offline sales. The most traffic-driving

Pins included tasteful logo placement, clear

use of text overlay and striking visuals. They

also called out unique features where relevant,

like ‘new’, focused directly on the product or

service and clearly showed how to use the

product or service. Finally, images used a

vertical format (2:3 ratio or 600×900 pixels).

These specific features can improve your Pin

results; however, there’s always going to be an

element of art to creating great Pins.

A Pin that resonates emotionally with Pinners

and feels relevant to the brand is the one that

will succeed.

In conclusion, if Pinterest isn’t yet part of your

traffic-building plan, you’re missing out.

By tapping into the desire of Pinners to be

inspired, you can massively increase your

website traffic – so get started today. i

ALISA MEREDITH is a

self-described ‘Pinterest

nerd’ and content marketing

manager at Tailwind.

tailwindapp.com

44 Jeweller October 2019


MY STORE

ARBOR

BRUNSWICK

LOCATION: Melbourne, Australia

NAME: Ellinor Mazza

POSITION: Owner

When was the space completed? Our

space is constantly evolving! The most

recent configuration was completed

between late 2018 and early 2019 with the

addition of some custom-built furniture

by a local maker, Nick Leong, and includes

the addition of my studio to the front

window. I previously had a separate space

in the Melbourne CBD, but decided to

consolidate and move into the store.

Something that is really important to me

is that the space can change as we need

it to. There is nothing fixed to the ground

– except my roller stand – and there is

always the option to rotate furniture.

Who is the target market and how

did they influence the store design?

Our target market is very broad, but

the common factor is that they value

handmade, quality pieces, along with our

strong approach to customer care. We aim

to create a warm, inviting and comfortable

space; the use of lots of wood in our

cabinets and also in our displays definitely

helps with this. The addition of a working

studio space to the store has been part of

the customers feeling a connection – they

don’t see the space as purely “sales” but

also a place where pieces are produced.

With the relationship between store

ambience and consumer purchasing

in mind, which features in the store

encourage sales? Visual merchandising

and our curation of the pieces in store.

Each collection is a real standalone and fills

a style within the greater picture. Recently

we have been working closely with

individual jewellers who are stocked in

the store to make a cohesive and visually

pleasing display, sometimes removing

one piece that throws off the look of the

collection. The results have been worth

that extra effort.

What is the store design’s ‘wow factor’?

Our large pegboard is the most striking

thing in the store as it allows us to display

our leather goods, but also add some

details like vintage tools to help tell the

story of what we are about. i

October 2019 Jeweller 45


10 YEARS AGO

WHAT WAS MAKING NEWS 10 YEARS AGO?

A SNAPSHOT OF THE INDUSTRY EVENTS THAT MADE NEWS HEADLINES IN THE OCTOBER 2009 ISSUE OF JEWELLER.

Buying groups

celebrate

The story: Two major buying groups – Nationwide

Jewellers and Showcase Jewellers – held their

annual members’ events and awards during the

International Jewellery Fair last month.

The Nationwide event saw 320 members and

suppliers attend The Ivy function venue.

The Australian members of the year were Georgina

Staley and David O’Brien from Georgies Fine

Jewellers in Narooma, NSW. The 2009 Supplier

of the Year was The Jewellery Centre, a previous

multi-award winner.

Big success for IJF

The story: Last month’s JAA International

Jewellery Fair has received resoundingly

positive reviews. Improved booths, an

extensive seminar program, and better

economic sentiment all contributed to the

event’s success. “There was a bit of uncertainty

as to how the market would react this

year but the feedback we’ve had has been

exceptionally positive,” said Gary Fitz-Roy,

managing director Expertise Events.

Approximately 6,500 buyers – an 11 per cent

increase from 2008 – walked through the

Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre

from August 30 to September 1.

Meanwhile the Showcase

awards dinner was held

at the Star City Casino

and attracted just under 300 guests, including

members, suppliers and staff.

The Showcase Jewellers Member of the Year

award was won by Stephen McCosker of Mystique

Jewellers who operates seven stores in Queensland,

while Supplier of the Year was won by Pandora.

The Member Recognition Award was received by

Robert and Helen Ely of York Jewellers.

JEWELLERY MAGAZINE IN

CONFLICT CONTROVERSY

The story: Questions have been

raised about the relationship between

a leading industry supplier and

the fledgling industry magazine

Jewellers Trade, including rumours

one of its co-owners, Jeremy Keight,

is associated with an advertiser, Euro

Mounts Australia.

The August issue of Jewellers Trade

featured an article on Euro Mounts

Australia titled, “The Best of British

Hallmark Available in Australia”,

which appeared under the banner

“Manufacturing”. The glowing

endorsement of the company

was written in the first person but,

curiously, the article does not identify

an author.

Jeweller contacted the magazine’s

editor Noel Lowry and Euro Mounts

managing director Andrew Pitcairn for

clarification over whether the piece

was a story or an advertisement, and

if it would be considered in breach

of the Australian Press Council’s

advertorial guidelines.

Keight was also contacted directly

for comment on his involvement

with both magazine and supplier.

No responses were received.

Skagen celebrates 20 years with cocktail party

The story: A celebration to mark the 20th

anniversary of Skagen watches in Australia took

place on 31 August at the Consulate General of

Denmark in Sydney.

It was attended by more than 70 guests,

including Skagen retailers and staff, along

with representatives of the media and Skagen

founder Charlotte Jorst, who had flown in from

the US.

The limited-edition Skagen Swiss Movement

collection was unveiled on the evening, with each

guest receiving one as a gift.

Jorst delivered an entertaining speech, praising

Australians’ “zest for life”: “I have never met

so many positive lovely people in one place, ever,”

she said.

Guests sipped champagne with elderflower cordial

– a traditional Danish summer drink – and nibble

Danish canapés including dill cured salmon, pink

roast beef with caramelised onions and chocolate

dipped almond and marzipan short bread.

46 Jeweller October 2019


MY BENCH

Gary Thyregod

WORKS AT: Gary

Thyregod Jewellery

AGE: 57

YEARS IN TRADE: 40

TRAINING: Sydney

Technical College, four-year

apprenticeship

FIRST JOB: Henning

Molgaard, 1979

OTHER QUALIFICATIONS:

Certificate IV Training &

Assessment; I have been a parttime

teacher at TAFE for the last

10 years

Favourite gemstone:

Diamond. It’s intriguing and the

more you work with diamonds,

the more you appreciate them

– especially when they have a

colour.

Favourite metal: Platinum,

because it’s so malleable with

a beautiful whiteness, and

doesn’t oxidise!

Favourite tool: Hammer,

because it feels good to use.

Best new tool discovery:

A laser welder! It makes the

impossible repairs possible.

Best part of job: Most of

the work I do is for private

clientele, which includes

one-off designs, remodelling

of old jewellery and repairs, so

it would be when you finally

finish a piece of jewellery, and

you are satisfied, and the client

is extremely satisfied with

the piece. Also, sharing your

knowledge with others.

Best tip to a jeweller:

Experiment as much as you can

with different techniques to

develop your own design.

What frustrates me most

about the industry is… There

is not enough appreciation

for jewellery in this country.

A lot of jewellery retailed here is

imported. We have some of the

world’s most talented jewellers,

who are not recognised

because of lack of exposure

and public awareness. There

needs to be a lot more

promotion done. i


MY BENCH

Gary

Mouradjallian

WORKS AT: King Street

Design, owner

AGE: 54

YEARS IN TRADE: 39

TRAINING: Six months

at TAFE, then dropped

out. The rest self-taught

and experience.

FIRST JOB: Started King Street

Design with my brother Alan.

OTHER QUALIFICATIONS:

None

Favourite gemstone: Opal –

every piece is interesting and

unique. Especially boulder

opals, because they’re often

delicate and naturally colourful.

Favourite metal: Platinum.

It’s hard to work with but

long lasting.

Favourite tool: My file as it

does the job for lots of things.

Best new tool discovery:

Laser machine; it makes my

job easier for small things and

gives me time to work on more

labour-intensive jobs.

Best part of job: Finishing

challenging and different

pieces every week, dealing with

clients, and receiving ongoing

referrals from clients.

Worst part of job: When a job

is not working out correctly.

Best tip from a jeweller: Sit

down and watch and learn.

Most of all, practise as much as

you can outside of work hours.

Best tip to a jeweller: Be

patient and give yourself time

to finish the piece.

Biggest benefit to being

mostly self-taught? Learning

everything the hard way,

which can be frustrating but

very rewarding.

Is your work mostly custom

makes or repairs?

Custom makes, however in this

trade it pays to look after your

customers with repairs.

Love jewellery because:

It’s challenging and creative

and I make something new

every day. i


SOAPBOX

THE RACE TOWARDS AN ETHICAL FUTURE

To put it bluntly, the Australian jewellery

industry isn’t playing catch-up when it

comes to ethics. The truth is, we’ve barely

left the starting line – and we really need

to pick up the pace.

As an advocate for improving the ethical

performance of the jewellery industry, I spend

a lot of time researching what’s going on in

jewellery-related supply chains.

This means I keep an eye on what’s

happening in the precious metals sector –

small- and large-scale mining and recycling –

and the evolution of the lab-created diamond

industry and its impacts on the jewellery

industry. I also watch what’s going on in

gemstone mining, diamond and gem cutting

and biogenic materials.

Undeniably, there’s a steady shift towards

greater transparency and responsibility in the

jewellery trade. Not only in wealthy countries

in Asia, Europe and the Americas, but also in

many developing nations such as Tanzania,

Colombia, Nigeria and Ghana.

In my experience, Australian industry

professionals remain conspicuously absent

when it comes to participating in that

dialogue at an international level. It feels like

we’re in some quiet little backwater and the

rest of the world is passing us by.

And nowhere is this more apparent than

when you examine our local retail jewellery

and bespoke manufacturing sectors. Apart

from a very small number of jewellery

business operators – such as Megan Webb,

Zoë Pook, Utopian Creations and a handful of

others, including the company I co-founded,

Ethical Jewellery Australia, the subjects of

responsible sourcing and ethics rarely get a

mention in mainstream media.

In the words of the late physics professor

Julius Sumner Miller, you might ask, “Why

is it so?” In my opinion it’s simply because

our customers aren’t penalising us for not

being more socially and environmentally

responsible – not yet, anyway.

Of course, it’s reasonable to ask, if jewellery

customers don’t care, why should we?

But there’s a simple answer – and this is where

I get up on my soapbox – because, people, it’s

the right thing to do. No more. No less.

The harsh reality is the demand for jewellerymaking

materials around the world fuels a lot

of issues we see in the news: conflict funding,

mercury pollution, habitat destruction,

exploitation, child labour, greenhouse gas

emissions, money laundering and all the rest.

We, as an industry, need to take responsibility

for the harm we cause. Because when the tide

turns here in Australia, and it will, do you really

want to have to explain to your customers

why you don’t care about these things? That’s

assuming you even get opportunity to justify

your position – more likely, they’ll just go and

spend their money elsewhere.

It’s not as difficult as you may think. You can

buy recycled precious metals, gemstones

and diamonds. You can get Fair Trade

gemstones and gold easily enough. You can

source traceable diamonds, and you can buy

lab-created whatever if you choose to take a

position against mining.

It’s all doable. You just have to care enough to

want to do it.

OF COURSE, IT’S

REASONABLE TO

ASK, IF JEWELLERY

CUSTOMERS

DON’T CARE, WHY

SHOULD WE? BUT

THERE’S A SIMPLE

ANSWER – AND THIS

IS WHERE I GET UP

ON MY SOAPBOX –

BECAUSE, PEOPLE,

IT’S THE RIGHT

THING TO DO

Not convinced? Don’t take my word for it. Just

open your eyes and look around.

Look at Chopard’s commitment to ethical

gold and Tiffany & Co.’s commitment to

traceable sourcing and sustainability. Consider

De Beers’ efforts to develop traceability

technologies and the rapid evolution of

blockchain in the jewellery space.

Look at the initiatives undertaken by Diamond

Foundry, Lark & Berry, Spencer Diamonds,

MiaDonna, Swarovski and others in the ethical

jewellery space internationally. All these

companies and many more have jumped on

the ethical bandwagon because, at the very

least, they’ve recognised the shifting mood of

the market.

These are astute people – industry leaders.

They’re not doing it for giggles.

The future of your business lies in the hands

of Millennials and Gen Z. These generations

are smack-bang in the middle of the marrying

age. They’re educated, they’re open-minded

and they’re buying engagement rings,

wedding rings, commitment rings. They’re

buying anniversary gifts, push presents and

more – and they’re taking strong cues from

the sustainable fashion movement.

My point is, if you haven’t been paying

attention to any of this jewellery ethics ‘stuff’,

you need to get on board now. Otherwise,

you’ll get left behind.

Name: Benn Harvey-Walker

Company: Ethical Jewellery Australia

Position: Director

Location: Sherwood, Brisbane

Years in Industry: 12

50 Jeweller October 2019


INTERNATIONAL

J E W ELLERY & WATCH FAIR

It’s time to act for 2020.

The International Jewellery & Watch Fair is the perfect

face-to-face platform to launch new products and strengthen

your brand presence.

Strongly supported by Australia’s leading industry groups,

meet thousands of qualified buyers, gather leads and grow

your customer base.

Book now to secure your premium location at the International

Jewellery & Watch Fair and be seen, be remembered and be

ahead of the game in 2020.

September 12 – 14, 2020

ICC Sydney > Exhibition Centre > Darling Harbour

WWW.JEWELLERYFAIR.COM.AU

Contact Mary-Anne Brown

phone: +61 2 9452 7513

email: Maryanne.brown@expertiseevents.com.au

Organised by


ARGYLE PINK DIAMONDS

Ruby, Sapphire,Emerald & Opal with Argyle Pink Diamonds

Australian Argyle Pink Diamonds are beyond rare and amongst the most precious diamonds in the world.

Pink Kimberley jewellery is crafted from an exquisite blend of white diamonds and natural Australian

pink diamonds from the Argyle Diamond Mine, located in the East Kimberley region of Western

Australia. A coveted Argyle Pink Diamond Certificate accompanies all Pink Kimberley pieces

containing pink diamonds greater than 0.08ct.

PinkKimberley.com.au

E pink@samsgroup.com.au W samsgroup.com.au P 02 9290 2199

Hooray! Your file is uploaded and ready to be published.

Saved successfully!

Ooh no, something went wrong!