KACHEN #21 (Winter 2019) English edition

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L Ë T Z E B U E R G E S C H

ENGLISH

EDITION

KACHEN

LUXEMBOURG’S FOOD & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

WINTER

LET’S CELEBRATE!

Happy Birthday Kachen

TYPESCH

No. 21

MORE THAN 50 RECIPES

SEASONAL: QUINCE, LEEK

CHRISTMAS COOKIES

WITH THE KACHEN TEAM

CELEBRATE & ENJOY

DIY: DELICIOUS GIFTS

FESTIVE MENU

WITH THOMAS MURER

MINDFUL LIVING

NEW: LOCAL PRODUCERS

THE ABC OF CBD

CONSUME DIFFERENTLY

9,95 €

LUXEMBOURG • GRAN CANARIA • LIEGE • CHAMPAGNE


Pavlova

with Mascarpone

Galbani is coming to your table for the

Holidays!


EDITORIAL

Our vision for 2020

We live in a digital age in which real emotional connections

can only be sustained through community and

shared values. What we have achieved in the blogging

and influencer community through the BLOG AWARD;

that is, a constant, fruitful exchange that helps everyone

develop, we will now continue consequently with the

KACHEN-CLUB. Over the coming months and years we

will approach you more directly than before, we will invite

you to interchange thoughts and opinion with us, so that,

over the next few years, KACHEN will continue to meet

your expectations.

Dear readers,

Dear friends of KACHEN!

Five years of KACHEN!

That number elicits a sigh of satisfaction from me. It was

an inspiring, exciting, sometimes exhausting and eventful

half-decade. Now, it is time for a moment of reflexion.

Those of you, who have been there, supporting and

accompanying us, from the beginning, know how much

heart and soul went into the magazine. Success was never

guaranteed when, five years ago, from an idea and a large

amount of enthusiasm, a new medium was brought into

the world, which is still, today, unique in Luxembourg.

Thus, with the support of our partners, Luxembourg’s own

food and lifestyle magazine was born. A platform for all

good and beautiful things in our small country and the

greater region, which has been able to establish itself as a

real point of reference for all things culinary and lifestyle.

Even if the contemplation of past achievements feels

good, let’s not indulge too much in nostalgia, but look forward

to what the future holds and how we can contribute

to it.

A new decade

A new decade, a time to reflect… as we have already indicated.

The KACHEN editorial staff summarizes their

“mission” in a few words: to encourage others to live a

healthy, pleasurable and inspiring life.

In other words: KACHEN exists in order to foster and celebrate

all of our potential; to do the best we can together.

We want to question ideas and deep-rooted patterns of

thought. We want to offer suggestions and information for

a better life, in tune with nature and society.

This issue offers a revitalised magazine with a new

design, within which you will still find familiar and recognizable

articles and topics. In addition, there will be a few

new categories, as already announced and implemented

in the last edition. “Living consciously” will, in future, be

a strong component – and we hope to have landed on a

topic which is also dear to your hearts.

You will have already noticed a fundamental change in

the last issue – the paper. Most of you liked it. For those of

you who did not quite warm to it, rest assured, the change

is for a good reason. It is a consequent decision based on

the values that we stand for. KACHEN is 100 % “made in

Luxembourg”, “printed in Luxembourg”, recyclable and

the production is climate neutral!

During our planning phase for the coming years, let us

know who and what inspires you, and what topics you

would like to see in KACHEN 2020! We handle your suggestions

personally, whether by email or via social media.

Last but not least…

It is greatly satisfying to concentrate our energy on the

essential instead of losing ourselves in the muddle of the

daily jungle of information. “The more you know, the less

you need” – we have taken this saying to heart. I look forward

to spending the next years with you, dear KACHEN

friends. Let us change ourselves together – and then the

rest of the world.

With gratitude

Bibi Wintersdorf

CHIEF EDITOR & PUBLISHER

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


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16

82

52

24

40

6

57

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


SUMMARY

SECTIONS

THE TEAM — 5

RESTAURANT & SHOP NEWS — 6

NEWS — 8

PRODUCTS THAT WE LOVE — 10

BOOKS — 13

5 YEARS KACHEN - THANKS! — 32

KACHEN WORKSHOPS — 114

BLOG AWARD — 116

CULINARY THRILLER — 120

RECIPE DIRECTORY & IMPRINT — 154

NEU À LA CARTE — 12

The city's signature delights

MADE IN LUXEMBOURG — 14

The fragrance of Virginie

PORTRAIT OF A CHEF — 80

Jean-Charles Hospital - Dare to have more fun

CHEF'S MASTER CLASS — 82

Venison

RESTAURANT PORTRAIT — 86

Winds of change with Restaurant Chiggeri

FEATURE — 96

Punch - A Christmas Classic

WINE NEWS — 100

VINTNER FAMILIES — 102

Domaine Laurent & Rita Kox in Remich

NOBLE DROPS — 104

SEASONAL RECIPES — 16

Christmas menu with Thomas Murer

SEASONAL RECIPES — 24

The favourite cookies of the KACHEN-Team

SEASONAL RECIPES — 34

Cover cakes

BAKING BASICS — 38

Gingerbread cake with Cathy Goedert

STEP BY STEP — 40

Airy Brioche plait

DO IT YOURSELF — 42

A season of giving

VEGETARIAN RECIPE — 50

Vegetable Stock

FEATURE — 52

Pre-Christmas spice science and

recipes of Bertrand Duchamps

SEASONAL FRUIT — 60

Quinces

SEASONAL VEGETABLE — 66

Leeks

RENÉ MATHIEU & HIS TEAM — 72

A strong unit - René Mathieu and his team

LUXEMBOURGISH BEEF — 88

Fondue vigneronne

FARMERS RECIPE — 90

Christmas Stollen

GRANNY'S RECIPE — 92

Miss Eme's waffles

TYPICALLY LUXEMBOURGISH — 94

Kachkéis (cooked cheese)

3

MAGAZINE

HAPPY HOUR

NEW RECIPES

DID YOU NOTICE?!

From now on, our recipes are

marked with icons that show

at a glance whether they are

vegan, vegetarian, dairy-free,

sugar-free, gluten-free or

nut-free. Explanation >>

vegan

vegetarian

dairy-free

sugar-free

gluten-free

nut-free

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


SUMMARY

MINDFUL LIVING

CONSUME DIFFERENTLY — 106

Maintaining optimism in the modern world

PASSIONATE — 108

Local produce

INFO INTOX — 110

Sustainability! A few tips

CONSUME DIFFERENTLY — 112

Amazing food storage solutions, that aren't plastic

106

WELLBEING

MOOD — 122

Reset your mood and beat the winter

blues with fermented food

HEALTH & NUTRITION — 124

The ABC of CBD

GREEN KITCHEN — 126

Cooking with CBD oil

LIVING BETTER — 130

Sleeping in winter

BEAUTY — 131

Natural beauty

COLUMN — 132

Winter blues?

126

INSPIRATION

MUST HAVES — 134

A decoration full of magic

DESIGN IN LUXEMBOURG — 138

Léa Schroeder - A passion for pattern

140

4

KACHEN ON TOUR

LUXEMBOURG — 140

The Valentiny Foundation

ON TOUR WITH LUXAIRTOURS — 144

Gran Canaria, a miniature continent

ON TOUR WITH CFL — 149

Liège - Ardent Energy

GREATER REGION — 152

Les Grains d’Argent - A sparkling weekend in the champagne

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


THE TEAM

CHEFS

CATHY

GOEDERT

RENÉ

MATHIEU

FRÉDÉRIC

VUILLEMIN

BERTR AND

DUCHAMPS

© AGC PHOTOGRAPHY

JEAN-CHARLES

HOSPITAL

THOMAS

MURER

THE TEAM

YANNICK BURROWS — PHILIPPE SALIBA — MAURIZIO MAFFEI — TANJA HAMMES — PATRICIA SCIOTTI — LIZ MIKOS

JILL STERBA — BIBI WINTERSDORF — ENIA HAECK — RAMUNAS ASTRAUSKAS — VESELA SAVOVA DREWS

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


NEW DISCOVERIES

BESTIAL

1, rue Charles Kieffer — Grass

Tel. +352 / 26 37 62

bestial.lu

BRASSERIE O’

2A, rue de Munsbach — Niederanven

Tel. +352 / 28 11 84

brasserieo.lu

COME À LA

RÔTISSERIE

70, route d’Esch — Luxembourg

Tel. +352 / 23 64 11 21

comealarotisserie.lu

The unusual Bestial restaurant has

just opened its doors in Grass. After

Aal Schoul, the butcher school

in Hobscheid, Bestial is the second

restaurant of Guy Kirsch, the enfant

terrible of the butcher industry in

Luxembourg. Bestial is tailored to

every moment of the day. Those

who start the day very early will

undoubtedly enjoy breakfast from

6 a.m. onwards. Around midday,

Bestial offers an original formula:

simply select a tray and enjoy the

dishes of the day, including salads,

soups, seasonal dishes and grilled

meats. The restaurant welcomes

you all day long, whether for dinner,

after work or for an aperitif. Of

course, the meat and delicatessen

products of Metzger Kirsch have a

permanent place on the menu.

Brasserie O' is the latest creation of

the Aura Group, which specialises in

Italian gastronomy and already has

four companies. In the Brasserie O',

located at the same address as the

group's other restaurant, the ″Osteria

di Niederanven″, customers can meet

in a modern atmosphere for a cosy

glass; happy hour, after work drinks

and themed events are also offered.

In terms of cuisine, the group is varied,

with Luxembourgish specialities such

as Wäinzoossiss or traditional

brasserie dishes, burgers, fried chicken

and much more on the menu.

Severin Laface is unstoppable. In the

former car repair shop, converted

into the trendy ″Come à la Maison″,

with its various areas and extensions,

he now presents his latest

concept, which will be particularly

popular with meat fans. The new

restaurant "Come à la Rôtisserie -

SteakHouse & Grill" in the chalet

area of the Robin du Lac concept

store invites you to enjoy the finest

grilled meat dishes. The delicious

meat grilled on charcoal tastes both

spicy and juicy. Come à la Rôtisserie

prefers to work with small producers

from Ireland, Scotland and even

Japan who adhere to strict ethical

and social standards.

6

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


RESTAURANT & SHOP NEWS

BISTRO LËNSTER

6, Iernzwee — Junglinster

Tel. +352 / 27 40 58 58

CHICHE!

20, Avenue Pasteur — Luxembourg

Tel. +352 / 26 48 09 81

Laangwiss 2,

7, rue Nicolas Glesener — Junglinster

Tel. +352 / 26 78 00 91

bistrolenster.lu

chiche.lu

The Bistro Lënster in the heart of

Junglinster, called JongMëtt, is the

newest restaurant from Concept

+ Partners. Newly opened, it offers

a traditional menu for all occasions,

with a wide selection of wines, beers

and cocktails, in a warm ambience

with relaxed service. The menu ranges

from tarte flambée to the perfect

egg, without forgetting Kniddelen

or Paschtéit, but also surprises with

risotto with prawns, Asian burger

and gourmet planchets. Vegetarian

and vegan dishes are also available

to meet all requirements. Chef Marc

Gaye, Manager Nicolas Richard

and their team are particularly concerned

with delighting the taste

buds of their customers and ensuring

that they spend a pleasant time.

The first address was only provisional,

but the project continues on

its way thanks to its success so far.

In less than two years, the Chiche

Gastronomy and Solidarity Project

under the direction of Marianne

Donven, Pitt Pirrotte and Chadi

Bekdach has established itself as

an important address in the capital.

Chiche has now settled permanently

in the heart of Limpertsberg. Of

course, we also find the same tasty

cuisine here, with the flavours and

spices of the Middle East, which have

already seduced our gourmet guests

at the first address. The much larger

room now offers space for up to 230

people, the decoration, once again

entrusted to Isabelle Dickes, takes

up the elements of the old address

and is still inspired by the theme of

migration.

A new dynamic management team,

a highly motivated team and a new

look for the two ALaViTA shops

in Junglinster and Bonnevoie will

ensure shopping pleasure for fans of

fresh organic products. The ALaViTA

team is convinced that anyone who

has ever tried organic products can

no longer do without them. Carefully

selected food, fruit and vegetables,

preferably from local producers,

are offered fresh every day in accordance

with the seasons. In the near

future, fresh organic food will also be

available on site and to take away.

This philosophy, combined with firstclass

personal service and a warm

atmosphere, makes the difference. In

the newly designed shops in Junglinster

and Bonnevoie you can convince

yourself of this with a cosy coffee!

7

© MARC LAZZARINI

ALaViTA

alavita.lu

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


ON THE WAY TO A

GREEN ENERGY FUTURE WITH

ENOVOS FOR CACTUS

While the future national energy and climate scheme

plans to use 25 % renewable energy by 2030, Cactus is

working with Enovos to strengthen its engagement for

solar energy by implementing two further photovoltaic

units on the roofs of its supermarkets in Bettembourg

and its logistic centre in Windhof. With these two new

installations, the number of photovoltaic units, that produce

eco energy under instruction from Cactus, rises

to five. At total of 10,842 panels, installed on the roofs

of the supermarkets in Bascharage, Ingeldorf, Redange

and Bettembourg, and on the centre in Windhof, produce

2,488 MWh per year. That corresponds to the yearly

energy usage of around 630 single-family homes. Well

done, Cactus!

cactus.lu

A SPOTLIGHT ON LE 18

22 Journalists came together in the majestic Château de

Ferrières in Paris for the 2019 Villégiature award. The

top-class jury, made up out of journalists from the international

press, such as Forbes, Paris-Match or Vogue and

other renowned references, honours the most beautiful

hotel in Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Asia.

The winner in the category Best Hotel Bar in Europe,

Hotel Le Place d’Armes, was up against splendid institutions,

such as Hotel Lutetia with its Bar Le Joséphine,

an icon of the golden age in the heart of Paris, or with

the luxurious bar in the boutique Hôtel TwentySeven, a

pearl in the Amsterdam industry, with its extraordinary

architecture. To the honour of our country, the hotel Le

Place d’Armes, represented

by Jean Michel

Desnos and Hubert

Bonnier, was crowned

with the award for

Best Hotel Bar in

Europe. The refined

and relaxing Le 18,

situated at the heart

of the seven buildings

on Le Place d’Armes,

is a lively place with

contemporary finesse.

The prestigious

award is richly

deserved!

hotel-leplacedarmes.com

LUXEMBOURGISH AMATEUR CHEF

AT THE FOREFRONT!

I’m sure you remember our summer edition with a feature

on the barbecue and the amazing recipes by Luc Hoffmann!

The first ever Luxembourger to make it into the famous

cooking show Masterchef. Out of over 1000 applicants,

the barbecue king triumphed over 99 other candidates

at the casting in Cologne. As one of 30 finalists he was

successful in participating in the show. After several

rounds, in which the Luxembourger held his own and

fashioned extremely creative dishes, he had to admit

defeat in the 3rd round. He achieved the respectable

15th place and was therefore the fifteenth best hobby

chef in Germany.

Masterchef is the most popular cooking casting show of

all times, with more than 300 million viewers in over 50

countries.

8

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


NEWS

FIRST EVENT OF FOOD-A-MENTAL

On December 8th the first Food-a-Mental event will take

place. The association was founded at beginning of the

year by a number of chefs and experts from the food industry

with the common goal to promote togetherness,

exchange and respect. This first event offers a dinner

in Ma Langue Sourit, whereby the guest is invited to experience

a different kind of restaurant visit. The menu

will consist of five courses, which respect the seasons

and nature. Accompanying that is a recipe book, in which,

to the delight of the customers, the chefs introduce their

techniques and food associations. The high point is surely

that the chefs will stand by to answer all your questions

and fulfil your gourmet dreams.

The menu with drinks (aperitif, wine, water and coffee)

costs 150 euros per person. Places are limited, so do not

hesitate!

Registration via email only to m.williquet@horecamedia.be

A VERY OWN GAULT

MILLAU GUIDE FOR

LUXEMBOURG

With the newest edition for 2020

Gault Millau has published, for the

first time, a guide solely intended for

Luxembourg. It is published in two

languages, French and English

and under the name A Taste of

Luxembourg. For this edition,

Gault Millau decided to

concentrate not only on

restaurants, brasseries,

and gastropubs, but also

present important

addresses that bring joy!

PRIZE DRAW

Win one of four copies of

A Taste of Luxembourg!

Send an email with your name and

address and the reference

GAULT MILLAU to gewinnen@kachen.lu

The winner will be chosen at random

and notified under the email address provided.

Appeals are not permitted.

Closing date: 31.01.2020

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE

WINNER OF GAULT MILLAU 2020

In front of an audience of journalists and excited restaurateurs,

the management of the restaurant guide

presented their winners and results of the 2020 special

edition A Taste of Luxembourg. As the testers of the

leading institutions were sworn to secrecy, nobody knew

whether they were even being observed or chosen until

they received the invitation for the evening. Restaurateurs

from the entire country were present. As is fitting

for the beginning of a new decade Gault Millau came

up with a few surprises. Cyril Molard, head chef at the

restaurant Ma Langue Sourit in Moutfort was the first

chef to be crowned The Chef of the Year.

FURTHER WINNERS IN LUXEMBOURG:

› Lady Jane – Bar of the Year

› Pas Sage – POP of the Year

› Pierre Zehner – Patissier of the Year

(La Distillerie et Côté Cour)

› Claude Rameau – Sommelier of the Year

(Pefferkär)

› Sébastien Périé – Host of the Year

(L'Atelier Windsor)

› Thomas & Emeline Murer – New restaurant of the Year

(An der Villa)

› Giuseppe Molinaro – Mediterranean of the Year

(Tailor's Concept)

› Baptiste Heugens – Young Chef of the Year

(Two6Two)

› Stéphanie Jauquet – Personality of the Year

(Cocottes, Plateau, Tempo)

9

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


PRODUCTS THAT WE LOVE

THE MAGIC OF CHRISTMAS AT

OBERWEIS

The holidays are just around the corner and the Christmas

decorations already in all the windows, scents of gingerbread

and chocolate awaken our senses. The wait is over

because Oberweis has created an Advent calendar full

of magic for you to enjoy extraordinary moments from

December 1st onwards. Designed as a mysterious box

set, inspired by elegant and childlike story books, it is

illustrated all around with symbolic Christmas motifs.

Gourmets will discover 24 small compartments in which

chocolates, biscuits, fruit jellies, sweets and other delicacies

are hidden.

oberweis.lu

A NEW FLAVOR FOR

LUXLAIT KEFIR

Kefir is a milk drink from the Caucasus. It has a light,

yoghurt-like taste and is particularly delicious for

breakfast, pure or in muesli. Kefir is one of the wellness

drinks because it is beneficial for digestion. Kefir Luxlait

is available in natural, vanilla and now also in a new

blackberry flavour!

luxlait.lu

THE DASH THAT MAKES

THE DIFFERENCE

Afidi (meaning "hope" in the Eton language, the dialect

of a people from the equatorial forest of Central Africa)

offers you the Authentic Penja Pepper. It is the first

product with a protected geographical indication (PGI)

in Africa, south of the Sahara. The pepper draws its

aromatic richness and unique taste from the equatorial

climate and volcanic soil of the Penja region in the heart

of Cameroon. Completely free of additives, it is powerful

without being aggressive, fresh and slightly spicy. Use it

to refine your meat, season your fish, salads, ice cream

and cocktails. The freshly picked pepper from Afidi will

soon be on sale in Luxembourg and is already available

through an official BENELUX distribution partner.

NEW CHAPTER FOR

DOMAINES VINSMOSELLE!

Domaines Vinsmoselle launches a new brand, Les

Vignerons de la Moselle, characterized by respect,

authenticity and passion. The new range includes seven

grape varieties. From the sparkling Elbling, through the

Rivaner, the Luxembourg Pinot, the fresh Auxerrois, the

fine Pinot Blanc and the Pinot Gris to the typical Riesling.

All wines also carry the Luxembourg PDO label and are

therefore synonymous with high quality. Let yourself be

convinced and taste the incomparable quality wines of

Les Vignerons de la Moselle.

lesvignerons.lu

africadeli.lu

10

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


Best Hotel Bar

in Europe

Prix Villégiature Awards 2019

Both noble and relaxed, “Le 18”, the bar of the Place d’Armes hotel is a lively place with contemporary elegance.

whiskies. Since this summer, the discreet terrace, nestled at the back of the hotel, allows you to enjoy a drink

in a timeless space...

18, Place d’Armes - L 1136 Luxembourg

For reservations: le18bar@hotel-leplacedarmes.com

+352 27 47 37 211

11


NEU À LA CARTE

THE CITY’S

SIGNATURE DELIGHTS

TEXT Claude Neu

12

Like the Schueberfouer kings of sweet and savoury,

Joslet and Jean la Gaufre, there are people who

produce such great food and drink that it has become

the stuff of legends. With signature dishes that, over the

years, have become the go-to for a great shindig or simply

the perfect meal.

Thus, the city centre's ladies who lunch and who head to

the weekly market are bound to order a glass of "Alice"

without saying the full name. It’s understood that they're

talking about the fizz by Alice Hartmann that's part of

their exciting lives, maybe even

their everyday routines. They're

not the only ones who’ve

jumped onto the bandwagon as

the quality of the Wormeldange

nectars, served with smart

bespoke marketing, gives them

an almost legendary feel.

Let's tackle breakfast time and

turn our attention to Gasperich,

which is so successful that

clients post photos on Facebook

of the huge queues outside

Au Pain de Mary – even on

pouring Saturday and Sunday

mornings. In a very short space

of time, Maryline Roux and her

master baker husband have become the capital's sweethearts

– whether it is for their baguette, special bread or

lip-smacking pastries. Their signature "Nantais" is a fluffy

pound cake whose hint of ground almonds blended with

orange or rum could easily cause addiction.

As for the selection of sweets in long-standing establishments,

you have Namur of course. An enterprise that may

not have changed much over time but whose unrivalled

Mont-Blanc is still the best in the country by a mile. We'd

even go so far as to say that we prefer the finesse and small

size of its mix of meringue, whipped cream and chestnut

vermicelli to the one by the legendary Angelina in Paris,

whose in-house pastry chef created this exquisite dessert at

the start of the last century and whose filling could be said

to verge on the excessive. At the other famous pâtissier,

Oberweis, we would pick chocolate truffles if we could only

stop eating the sublime “Schuedi”, a delight smothered in

butter and sugar that's only available in its original format.

Last but not least, at Les Cocottes we'd go for succulent

speculoos and raisin bread, which is no surprise seeing as

the boss and most of the kitchen staff are Belgian.

The savoury selection is even more impressive as shops

and restaurants battle it out for best place. Let's start with

Kaiffer, the most famous butcher on the Grand-Rue. Practically

all the products may be said to be perfect but there's

nothing quite like its brawn salad on the market. The

meat is cut super-thin and has

secret seasoning but what really

brings your tastebuds to life is

the drop of vinaigrette.

Kaempff-Kohler has made its

mark with amazing mature

cheese but, in winter, we hanker

for the pickled herring bathed

in a deliciously seasoned cream.

When it comes to homemade

cheese, their “cancoillotte” (Kachkéis)

is wonderfully creamy and

stands its ground when pitted

against the one slightly yolky

version at Oberweis.

Lunch or dinner at Yves Radelet

in Drauffelt is of course always a pleasure but their saucissons

(e.g. with nuts), cheese spreads and yoghurts are

getting more and more popular too and are now available

in certain supermarkets.

We'd need another page or two to list all the restaurants

that are famous for their signature dishes. So let's stick to

eateries that excel in unusual recipes such as ox tongue at

Brideler Stuff, pommes dauphines at Bonifas in Nospelt

and, when in season, truffle pasta at Roma on Rue Louvigny.

To end on a high, let's keep things sweet

at Bargello ice cream parlour where the

mojito sorbet is already a classic.

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


Aal Schoul - Hobscheid

Dahm - Erpeldange

La Pomme Cannelle

OroArgento

Opéra

Mu Luxembourg

L’Avenue

Cantine du Châtelet

La Cristallerie

Ristorante Essenza

Le Fin Gourmand

Hostellerie du Grünewald

Les Jardins d’Anaïs

Skybar - Bertrange

Le Presbytère - Lasauvage

La Maison Lefèvre - Esch-sur-Alzette

Au Vieux Moulin - Echternach

Léa Linster - Frisange

- Findel

Fani Ristorante - Roeser

ISBN 978-99959-925-8-3

BOOKS

Luxembourg

GASTRONOMIE & PATRIMOINE - GASTRONOMY & HERITAGE

VEG

Easy & delicious meals for everyone

— Jamie Oliver —

Jamie Oliver is back with over 100

brilliantly easy, flavour-packed and

accessible veg recipes

320 pages — Michael Joseph

ISBN 978-0-7181-8776-7

SUPER SIMPLE

— Tieghan Gerard —

More than 125 recipes for instant,

overnight, meal-prepped, and

easy comfort foods

288 pages — Clarkson Potter

ISBN 978-0-5255-7707-2

SMOOTHIE PROJECT

The 28-Day Plan to Feel Happy and Healthy No Matter Your Age

— Catherine McCord —

Weelicious founder serves up more than 100 transformative recipes

for nourishing and delicious smoothies.

Catherine McCord, the founder of Weelicious and family food brand

One Potato, offers a way to change your life using only your blender.

Whether you are looking to improve your overall health, to combat

a chronic condition or to help your children eat better, this triedand-tested

collection of more than 100 delectable recipes help you

and your family achieve your goals, in a way that is practical and

affordable.

Complete with shopping lists, illustrated charts, testimonials and

advice from top nutritionists, the book simply outlines the benefits

of particular ingredients and how they work in the body.

256 pages — Abrams Books — ISBN 978-1-4197-4042-8 — Publication date 17 th December 2019

13

Volume 2

Luxembourg

Luxembourg

les éditions europe luxembourg Volume 2

LUXEMBOURG

Gastronomy & Heritage (vol.2)

— Benoît Andries —

20 new chefs present their

restaurants, their stories and reveal

the secret of a recipe of their choice.

The particularity of this book lies

in the link with the environment of

these 20 restaurants.

176 pages — Bilingual EN/FR. Europe

Luxembourg s.a.

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


MADE IN LUXEMBOURG

THE FRAGRANCE

OF VIRGINIE

© VITO LABALESTRA

© VIRGINIE DEPOORTER

MORE INFOS

ateliervirginie-luxembourg.com

Atelier Virginie

... and for a visit in the workshop, contact:

contact@atelier-virginie.lu

In German there is a saying, in which being able to "smell"

someone ("sich-riechen-können") means being able to get

along. Stepping into a shop, hotel, or restaurant we make

instant decisions whether or not we like a place based not

only on what we see but what we can smell. All this means

that if you have an educated nose, besides talent of course,

as Virginie Depoorter possesses, you can aim to pamper

and delight people’s olfactory senses.

The Frenchwoman, from Châteauroux in the Indre

department, has dedicated one of her series to her

chosen home and its scents: "Bambësch" for example

smells of a walk in the woods, "Schueberfouer" of fun

fair sweetmeats, and "An de Wéngerten" envelops every

room with the vibe of Mosel vineyards. In her workshop

Atelier Virginie Luxembourg in Helmsange, which

belongs to the commune of Walferdange, Virginie creates

her products by hand according to the motto: "quality not

quantity". Once the candles have burnt down, the artisan

offers a refill. This means that the beautifully scented

treasures for your home are even more sustainable than

their composition of glass and natural ingredients already

makes them.

Her passion for scents and the business idea based on

this developed a few years ago from a not so positive

experience. An operation on her hand when she was fifty

meant she could not continue the work in her workshop,

which she had established in 2002. At that time she

specialised in making hand lanterns, which she decorated

with a creative kind of tissue decoupage on glass, and

later focussed on the designing of jewellery, which she

made from precious metals and decorated not only with

jewels but also with fabrics. But after her operation she

had to take a break and was forced to rethink her work…

14

TEXT Jessika Maria Rauch

Without further ado, her friends gifted her a perfume

course in Grasse. It soon became clear that this change

boded well and Virginie’s hand-poured candles, refined

with natural scents, quickly found fans. The new line of

business developed fast and so she now sells her special

gift and decorative items "made in Luxembourg" in many

places in the country, such as the Luxembourg House,

Atelier Veraille in Esch, Pall Center Oberpallen, Lucien

Schweizer, and Couturier Ezri Kahn. The latter has

created his own line with Virginie.

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19

15


CHRISTMAS MENU

WITH THOMAS MURER

Emeline & Thomas Murer

Our Christmas menu was created in collaboration with chef

Thomas Murer from the restaurant AN DER VILLA in Steinfort

and RAK, manufacturer of fine tableware with European

headquarters in Luxembourg.

We wish you much joy in cooking and enjoying and good luck

in our competition (page 22), where you can win a set of the

shown RAK tableware!

RECIPES Thomas Murer

PHOTOS Ramunas Astrauskas

In collaboration with

16

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


SEASONAL RECIPES

ROASTED SCALLOPS, PARSNIPS,

VOATSIPERIFERY CRUMBLE

AND TRUFFLE CREAM

Serves 4

1 hour

43 minutes

› 12 large scallops without the

coral

For the parsnip purée

› 500 g parsnips

› ½ l milk

› ½ l chicken stock

› 50 g butter

For the crumble

› 100 g flour

› 100 g butter

› 100 g ground almonds

› 50 g grated parmesan

› 10 g ground Voatsiperifery pepper

(wild Madagascan pepper)

› Truffle shavings or a little herring

caviar

For the truffle cream

› 200 ml chicken stock

› 200 ml cream

› 5 g truffle oil

› 10 g tartufata (truffle sauce)

› salt and pepper

The parsnip purée

1 Peel and finely slice parsnips. Add milk and chicken stock and cook on a low

heat for 30 minutes.

2 Strain (keep the cooking stock) and blend with a little chicken stock (add

slowly until you achieve the right consistency).

3 Stir in butter then season with salt and pepper.

The truffle cream

Reduce the cooking stock by half, add cream, reduce by half again and add

tartufata, truffle oil, salt and pepper then blend with a hand blender.

The scallops

Colour the scallops on one side in a little oil (sunflower, olive etc.) Remove

from the heat, add a knob of butter and put to the side.

The crumble

Whisk all the ingredients with a flat

beater then bake for 12 minutes at

180°C on a sheet of baking paper.

Place the parsnip purée on the

bottom of the plate, coat with

crumble, place 3 scallops on top and

garnish with a few truffle shavings

and a little herring caviar (avruga).

Serve the sauce on the side. Feel free

to coat the entire plate in the sauce.

17

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


LUXEMBOURGISH VENISON FILLETS

WITH KÄSKNEPFLE, RED CABBAGE

AND HUNTSMAN'S SAUCE

Serves 4

3 hours + 1 hour the day before

2 hours

› 4 venison fillets (150 g each)

For the red cabbage and fig chutney

› ½ grated red cabbage

› 4 brunoise-cut soft figs (small

dice)

› 2 diced Golden Delicious apples

› 100 ml Melfor vinegar

› 100 ml port

› 250 ml full-bodied red wine

› 1 chopped onion

› salt and pepper

For the Käsknepfle

› 250 g flour

› 250 g fromage blanc

› 4 eggs

› salt, pepper and nutmeg

For the huntsman's sauce

› ½ l game stock

› 50 g redcurrant jelly

› ½ l red wine

› 1 shallot

› 1 onion

› 2 celery sticks

› 1 carrot

› 10 g white peppercorns

› 2 juniper berries

› 10 cl cognac

› 1 tbsp tomato purée

› cornflour

The red cabbage

1 Marinate cabbage in vinegar, port

and red wine the day before.

2 The next day, sweat the onion in

oil (ideally duck fat), add cabbage,

apples, figs and any remaining

marinade. Cover and cook on a low

heat for 1-1.5 hours stirring from

time to time so it doesn't stick to the

bottom.

The Käsknepfle

1 Whisk all the ingredients with a

flat beater.

2 Put the mixture into a largeholed

sieve over a pan full of salted

water so portions of dough drop

from the sieve into the water and

cook. When the Knepfle come to the

surface, remove them and put them

into a bowl of iced water. Drain.

Alternatively you can put the dough

on a board and drop small portions

into water using a knife.

3 Pan-fry in butter the next day.

The sauce

1 Sweat the onion, shallot, celery

and carrot in a little oil.

2 Add the pepper, juniper berries

and tomato purée. Add cognac and

flambé it. Add red wine and reduce

by ¾.

3 Add game stock and reduce by

half. Depending on the consistency,

thicken with a little cornflour to

achieve the right consistency.

Venison fillet

Sear all over in the pan (quickly,

very hot) then roast in the oven for 3

minutes at 200°C. Season with salt

and pepper.

CHEF'S TIPS

Add the Terre Exotique

"trapper mix" spice blend.

Can be served with a wild

mushroom medley.

Ceps, girolles, black chanterelles...

cooked in the pan with

a little butter. Salt and pepper.

Arrange the mushrooms in the

middle of the plate. Place the

venison fillet on top or next

to the mushrooms. Sprinkle

with the "trapper mix". Serve

the knepfle, red cabbage and

sauce separately.

18

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


SEASONAL RECIPES

19

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


SEASONAL RECIPES

RASPBERRY MERINGUE CUPS

WITH LYCHEE ROSE ESPUMA

Serves 4

2 hours + 12 hours resting time

80 minutes

› 200 g raspberry sorbet

For the meringue

› 100 g egg white

› 110 g superfine caster sugar

› 35 g icing sugar

› 12.5 g cornflour

› some frozen raspberries or

raspberry jam

For the Chantilly

› 100 g double cream

› 11 g icing sugar

For the lychee rose espuma

› 32 g sugar

› 300 g lychee purée

› 30 g rose water

› 250 g plain yoghurt

› 28 g lemon juice (approx. 1 lemon)

› 2.5 leaves of gelatine or 4.5 g

gelatine powder

For the strawberry coulis

› 150 g strawberries (frozen)

› 20 g sugar

› 20 g water

For the garnish

› Small herbs of choice

The meringue

1 Whisk egg whites and sugar to

form stiff peaks.

2 Mix icing sugar and cornflour then

stir in the stiff egg whites with a

spatula.

3 Poach 6 cm discs on baking paper.

Dry out for 60 minutes at 85°C in a

fan oven. Remove from the oven and

scoop the bottom out with a small

spoon.

The cream

Beat the cream until whipped and

firm with icing sugar.

The lychee rose espuma

1 Stir all the ingredients together then bring to the boil. Leave to cool slowly

and add gelatine.

2 Pour into a siphon whilst still warm, put 2 cartridges in and leave to rest in

the fridge for 12 hours.

The strawberry coulis

Bring sugar and water to the boil. Pour the sugar water onto clean strawberries

and blend. Strain in a sieve or through a cloth.

Put a raspberry or raspberry jam into the meringues then use a piping bag to

fill the meringues with Chantilly.

Put a cloud of foam (espuma) on the plates then place a half-sphere of

raspberry ice cream on top. Top with a meringue and garnish with strawberry

coulis and a few baby leaves.

20

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19

21


SEASONAL RECIPES

Dear readers,

For the holidays we have a very special competition for

you! Win a complete set of the beautiful porcelain from

the series PLATINUM by RAK, on which Thomas Murer

has arranged our Christmas menu!

The Platinum series is a fabulous combination of elegance,

brilliance and minimalism. Thanks to their silver

border these unique items radiate a festive atmosphere

and promote the culinary inspiration of the chefs.

We are giving away a total of 3 sets of 48 pieces each,

worth 3 x € 1.000, composed as follows:

PRIZE DRAW

› 3 X 12 assiette creuse gourmet (dessert or starter

plate) - this plate was used by Thomas for the dessert.

› 3 X 12 assiette plate 33 cm (main course) - this plate

was used for the main course

› 3 X 12 assiette plat gourmet (main course) - this plate

was used by Thomas for the starter

› 3 X 1 assiette plate 22 cm (cake plate) - not pictured

To take part simply answer the following question:

Why is the porcelain brand called RAK?

Send the correct answer with your name and address

and with RAK in the subject line to gewinnen@kachen.lu

The closing date for entries 31.01.2020.

rakporcelain.eu

22

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


ADVERTORIAL

RAISIN BREAD

2 small loaves or 1 large loaf (500 g)

10 minutes + 1 hour

25 minutes

› 170 ml lukewarm milk

› 14 g dried yeast

› 500 g plain flour

› 45 g sugar

› 80 g butter, cubed

› 10 g salt

› 2 eggs

› 250 g raisins

1 Mix the flour, yeast, sugar, butter, eggs and

salt in the stand mixer bowl with the flat beater

on speed 2.

2 Lower to speed 1 and slowly add the lukewarm

milk until well mixed through. Change

the attachment to the dough hook and kneed

on speed 2 for 3 minutes. Add the raisins and

quickly knead on speed 2. Do not over-knead.

Cover with a damp tea towel and leave for 1

hour, or until doubled in volume.

3 When risen, cut the dough into 2 equal pieces.

Place these in 2 baking tins.

4 Bake in a preheated oven at 200°C for

approximately 25 minutes. When the bread is

baked, you will be able to hear a hollow sound

when you tap the bottom of the baking tin.

23

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


24


SEASONAL RECIPES

THE FAVOURITE COOKIES

OF THE KACHEN-TEAM

It should be clear that the

KACHEN team delights in

cooking, experimenting and

enjoying. However, we had a

lot of fun during this shooting,

as these are the favourite

Christmas biscuit recipes of

our editorial staff members.

Especially welcome was the

support of Raya and Louis. The

two of them obviously had fun

pilfering the biscuits and the

cookies were certainly

delicious!

25

RECIPES The Team

PHOTOS Ramunas Astrauskas


SEASONAL RECIPES

OAT BISCUITS WITH

CINNAMON & WALNUTS

VESELA SAVOVA DREWS,

EVENT MANAGER &

BLOG AWARD PLANNER

16 biscuits

5 minutes

7 minutes

› 140 g oat flour (gluten-free)

› ¼ tsp salt

› ½ tsp baking soda

› 7-8 tbsp coconut sugar

or brown sugar

› 60 g raisins

› 50 g chopped walnuts

› 1 tsp cinnamon

› 2 tbsp melted coconut oil

› 7-8 tbsp milk of choice,

as needed

Preheat oven to 195°C.

1 Combine dry ingredients and mix

very well. Add wet ingredients and

form into a big ball.

2 Now make little balls from the

big one. For soft biscuits, refrigerate

until cold (otherwise, just bake right

away).

3 Bake for 7 minutes.

4 Remove from oven when they’re

still a little undercooked, then it’s

important to let cool for 10 minutes

before removing from the tray,

as they’ll continue to bake while

cooling.

They should have spread out, but

every now and then they might not

(climate plays a huge role in

baking), so just smush down with

a spoon if needed. Add a raisin on

top to decorate them.

5 You can also choose to make

extra biscuit dough balls and freeze

them to bake at a later date.

TIP

For softer biscuits, store in a

lidded container.

26

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


ANISE BISCUITS WITH

BLOOD ORANGE JAM

TANJA HAMMES, GRAPHIC DESIGNER

RECETTES XX CATEGORIE DE SAISON XX

50 biscuits

40 minutes

12 - 15 minutes + resting time overnight

› 3 eggs size M

› 250 g fine sugar

› 250 g flour type 405

› 2 tsp ground anise

1 Place the eggs and sugar in a mixing bowl

and beat until frothy with a food processor

until the sugar has completely dissolved.

2 Fry the anise seeds in a pan at medium heat

for 5 minutes, stirring constantly. Allow to cool

and crush coarsely with a mortar.

3 Sieve the flour and gently fold into the sugar

mixture together with the ground anise and

crushed anise seeds.

4 Heat a large baking tray briefly in the oven,

grease with butter and dust with flour.

› 1 tsp anise seeds

› approx. 50 g blood orange jam

› butter & flour for the baking tray

5 Fill the dough into a piping bag with a starshaped

spout and spray on 2-3 cm dots. Leave

a little space, because they run a little apart.

6 Leave uncovered overnight in a dry room.

7 The next day, preheat the oven to 150°C

and bake the biscuits for 12-15 minutes. Don’t

overbake, they should remain bright.

8 As soon as the biscuits have cooled down,

assemble the biscuits by placing a small

dollop of jam on one of the biscuits and placing

a second biscuit on top.

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


VANILLA CRESCENT

BISCUITS

JILL STERBA, ACCOUNT MANAGER

BACI DI DAMA

ENIA HAECK, GRAPHIC DESIGNER

40 biscuits 20 minutes ~ 20 minutes 40 biscuits 75 minutes 20 minutes

› 280 g flour

› 100 g almond powder

› 90 g sugar

› 200 g soft butter

› 2 egg yolks size M

› 1 pinch of salt

› 1 vanilla bean or vanilla extract

› 160 g flour type 00

› 120 g icing sugar

› 170 g almonds or hazelnuts (according to taste)

› 120 g butter

› 1 pinch salt

› 100 g dark chocolate

For the topping

› 150 g icing sugar › 1 sachet of vanilla sugar

Preheat oven to 190° C top and bottom heat.

1 Halve the vanilla pod lengthwise and scrape out the

pulp with a knife.

2 Knead all ingredients into a smooth dough. Cut the

dough in half and form it into 2 balls. Wrap them in cling

film and place in the fridge for 2 hours (up to 24 hours) to

allow the flavour to unfold.

3 Remove one half of the dough from the fridge and knead

briefly. Form the dough into a roll about 3 cm in diameter.

Using a dough scraper, cut the roll into 1.5 cm pieces. Roll

the dough pieces one after the other into a ball, then form

each into a roll that is a little thicker in the middle and

pointed at each end. Then bend each piece into the typical

crescent shape. Place the biscuits onto a baking tray lined

with baking paper and bake for 8-12 minutes until golden.

4 In the meantime, mix the icing sugar with the vanilla

sugar. After baking, let the biscuits cool for 5 minutes and

then carefully roll one after the other in the icing sugar

and let cool on a cake rack.

Proceed in the same way with the second dough portion

(the dough can be kept in the fridge for up to 24 hours).

1 Preheat the oven to 180°C and place the hazelnuts or

almonds on a baking tray. Grill for 10 minutes.

2 Put the hazelnuts or almonds into a blender and mix to

a very fine powder.

3 Mix flour, hazelnuts/almonds, butter and sugar in a

bowl and knead to a homogeneous dough.

4 Wrap the dough in foil and let it rest in the fridge for a

few hours.

5 Take the dough out of the fridge and form it into a roll.

Cut into 2 cm thick slices. Results in about 80 pieces for

40 biscuits.

6 Form the dough pieces into balls and place them on the

baking tray covered with baking paper, pressing lightly on

the balls to flatten the lower part slightly.

7 Bake the biscuits for 20 minutes, remove from the oven

and allow to cool.

8 Cut the chocolate into small pieces and melt with a

little butter in a water bath.

9 Coat the flat side of the cookies with chocolate and

glue together with the flat side of another cookie.

TIP

Ideally served with Moscato or Irish coffee.

28

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


SEASONAL RECIPES

BRUTTI MA BUONI

PATRICIA SCIOTTI, EDITORIAL MANAGER

15 biscuits 30 minutes 20 minutes

› 230 g sugar

› 200 whole hazelnuts

› 50 g hazelnut powder

Preheat the oven to 180°C.

1 Roast the whole hazelnuts in the oven for 15-

20 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes. Remove the

skins by rubbing them between hands or with a

cloth. Let them cool.

2 Set the oven to a temperature of 150°C.

Roughly shred the hazelnuts with 50 g of sugar to

obtain a coarse powder. Add the hazelnut powder,

50 g sugar and vanilla. Whisk the egg whites until

stiff, adding the rest of the sugar and then gently

stir into the nut mixture.

› 125 g egg white

› 1½ tsp vanilla extract

3 Pour the dough into a thick-bottomed saucepan

and heat over low heat while mixing to dry. You

have to mix it carefully so that it does not stick to

the bottom. After 15-20 minutes it is ready and

must detach from the sides of the pan.

4 Using a spoon, form small piles of dough on a

baking sheet covered with baking paper. Bake for

about 20 minutes, the surface should be shiny,

cracked and dry but not over-coloured. Let cool

and enjoy.

29


SEASONAL RECIPES

FORTUNE COOKIES

BIBI WINTERSDORF, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

20 cookies

60 minutes

5 minutes

› 2 egg whites size M

› 60 g icing sugar

› 60 g flour

› 1 pinch salt

› 35 g melted butter

› 1 ½ tbsp heavy cream

› ½ tsp vanilla extract

› ½ tsp almond extract

› baking paper or a silicone mat

› homemade notes with

messages of happiness

Preheat the oven to 180°C circulating air.

1 Melt the butter in a small pot over a low heat.

2 Beat the egg whites with the sugar until fluffy, add

the flour and salt until the dough is smooth, then stir in

the melted butter, cream, vanilla and almond extract.

3 Spread a teaspoon of the mixed dough in a circle

(approx. 6 cm diameter) on the baking paper or silicone

mat and repeat 3 to 4 times. Bake for 5 minutes until the

edges turn slightly brownish.

4 Take the tray out of the oven and remove the dough

circles from the tray as quickly as possible. Place a piece

of paper with a message of happiness in the middle and

fold the dough sheet into a semicircle. For the perfect

fortune cookie shape, bend the half circles over a blunt

object (e.g. a bowl rim) and place them in the recess of

a muffin tin to cool so that they retain the shape. This

process should take a maximum of 10 seconds, as the

biscuits cool down quickly.

30

TIP Do not bake the whole dough

at once. A maximum of three to

four biscuits per tray is sufficient,

otherwise the biscuits will cool

down too quickly and break when

folded!


ADVERTORIAL

SACRED BREAD!

For our parents, grand-parents and actually all our ancestors, bread

was at the centre of every meal. From breakfast to dinner, at any time

of day (and night!), bread was always on the table. And for good reason,

it goes with almost everything.

Breaking bread

Do you remember those sumptuous

slices of bread with a thick crust and

a heavy layer of salted butter that

your grandmother prepared for you

after school? Or was it your uncle

who gave you a richly filled roll? Or

those delicious crispy bread snacks

that you stole from the kitchen

while the food was being prepared?

We all associate many beautiful

memories with this simple yet tasty

pleasure: bread. Memories that put

a smile on our face. One thing is for

sure: bread is part of our culture and

our history.

Fischer yesterday and today

Looking back at the history of

Fischer, we see, above all, a family

with a deep passion for good bread

– a passion that has been passed

down from generation to generation.

It all began with Mr Fischer, a

master baker from Diekirch. His

entrepreneurial spirit in combination

with a lucky meeting with Mr.

Muller, the owner of several mills

in Luxembourg, set the ball rolling.

Mr Fischer's bakeries expanded and

developed into the well-known brand

Fischer and became the leading

bakery in Luxembourg. By using

an artisanal production process

and traditional recipes, Fischer has

managed to preserve the taste of

bread from former days - the delicate

crispness of its crust, the softness of

its crumb and a wealth of flavours.

There is no way around it: to make

great bread you need to know the

right gestures, and above all give it

time, time, time!

An even tastier range

of products

Preserving the taste of good

bread is essential, but it is just as

important to consider current market

trends and customer expectations.

Eager to offer only the best to its

customers, Fischer has recently

revised its entire range of breads,

offering a delicious blend of old

recipes and new flavours: from

"Cereal Baguettes" to "Müsli" bread

to "Baurebrout" and an extended

organic range... A new chapter in

our history begins!

31

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


5 YEARS KACHEN-THANK YOU!


COVER

CAKES

To properly celebrate our fifth anniversary and

because holidays also rhyme with sweets and

pastries at KACHEN, we asked Anne-Claire

Decker, a psychologist at work and a pastry chef

at heart, who is passionate about this hobby, to

share with us the secret of these delicacies that

she makes with brio and that have made it onto

our very special cover this month.

RECIPES Anne-Claire Decker

PHOTOS Ramunas Astrauskas

For more cakes,

visit her Instagram

Cakes.By.Ace

34

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


SEASONAL RECIPES

SPECULOOS CAKE WITH BLUEBERRY

AND VANILLA BUTTERCREAM

Serves 10-12

3 hours

30-40 minutes

For the speculoos cake

› 1/2 cup butter (room

temperature)

› 1/2 cup oil

› 1 1/2 cup sugar

› 4 eggs

› 2 tbsp speculoos spices

› 3 cups flour

› 1 tbsp baking powder

› 1 1/4 cup buttermilk

For the blueberry and

vanilla buttercream

› 1/2 cup butter (room

temperature)

› 2 cups powdered sugar

› 1 tsp vanilla extract

› 2 tbsp heavy cream

› 1 cup blueberries

› 1/4 cup water

The cake

1 Preheat oven to 175°C and prepare two round cake tins

(12 cm) by lightly greasing the sides and bottom.

2 In a large bowl, mix together the butter, oil and sugar

until creamy. Add eggs, one at a time while mixing.

3 In a different bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder

and speculoos spices. Alternate adding flour mixture

and buttermilk to the butter and sugar mixture until well

combined.

4 Evenly divide batter into your prepared cake tins and

bake on 175°C for approx. 30 minutes or until a toothpick

inserted in the middle comes out clean.

The buttercream

1 Place blueberries and 1/4 cup water in a small pot over

medium heat. Simmer until blueberries are broken down

and most of the water has evaporated.

2 Strain the blueberries, pressing through with a spatula.

Place the blueberry sauce in the fridge or even freezer to

cool completely.

3 Beat the butter until soft and creamy. Gradually add

the powdered sugar. Once butter and sugar have come

together, add the vanilla.

4 Beat in the heavy cream and the blueberry sauce until

desired consistency is reached.

5 Place one layer of cake on a cake board or a plate. Top

with buttercream and spread evenly.

6 Place the second layer on top and spread frosting evenly

to the top and the sides of the cake. Place in the fridge to

chill for 20 minutes, then add decoration.

35

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


CHOCOLATE CAKE

WITH CHOCOLATE

BUTTERCREAM FROSTING

CHAI CAKE

WITH MASCARPONE

BUTTERCREAM

Serves 10-12

3 hours

30-40 minutes Serves 10-12

3 hours

30-40 minutes

For the chocolate cake

› 2 cups flour › 2 cups sugar

› 3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder

› 2 tsp baking powder

› 1 1/2 tsp baking soda

› 1 cup milk › 2 eggs

› 1/2 cup oil (canola or coconut oil)

› 1 cup boiling water

For the chocolate frosting

› 1/2 cup butter (room temperature)

› 1 3/4 cups powdered sugar

› 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder

› 1 1/2 tbsp heavy cream

The cake

1 Preheat oven to 175°C and prepare two round cake

tins (Ø 12 cm) by lightly greasing the sides and bottom.

2 Add flour, sugar, cocoa, baking powder and baking

soda to a large bowl. Then add milk, oil and eggs to the

flour mixture and mix together.

3 Add boiling water to the cake batter until well combined.

4 Evenly divide batter into your prepared cake tins, and

bake on 175 °C for approx. 30 minutes or until a toothpick

inserted in the middle comes out clean.

The buttercream frosting

1 Beat the butter until creamy.

2 Then add powdered sugar, cocoa powder and heavy

cream.

3 Place one layer of cake onto a cake board or a plate.

Top with buttercream and spread evenly.

4 Place the second layer on top and spread frosting

evenly to the top and the sides of the cake. Place in the

fridge to chill for 20 minutes, then add decoration.

For the chai cake

› 1/2 cup butter (room temperature)

› 1/2 cup oil › 1 1/2 cup sugar

› 4 eggs › 2 tbsp chai tea powder

› 3 cups flour › 1 tbsp baking powder

› 1 1/4 cup buttermilk

For the mascarpone buttercream

› 1 1/4 cup heavy cream

› 1 cup powdered sugar

› 8oz (a bit less then 250 g) mascarpone cheese

The cake

1 Preheat oven to 175°C and prepare two round cake

tins (Ø 12 cm) by lightly greasing and flouring the sides

and bottom.

2 In a large bowl, mix together the butter, oil and sugar

until creamy. Add eggs, one at a time while stirring.

3 In a different bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder

and chai powder. Alternate adding flour mixture

and buttermilk to the butter and sugar mixture until

well combined.

4 Evenly divide batter into your prepared cake tins and

bake on 175°C for approx. 30 minutes or until a toothpick

inserted in the middle comes out clean.

The buttercream

1 Add the heavy whipping cream and powdered sugar

to a large bowl and mix.

2 Add the mascarpone cheese to the whipped cream

and whip until stiff peaks form.

3 Place one layer of cake onto a cake board or a plate.

Top with buttercream and spread evenly.

4 Place the second layer on top and spread frosting

evenly to the top and the sides of the cake. Place in the

fridge to chill for 20 minutes, then add decoration.

36

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


So small.

So Good!

Mini cheese rolls,

4 pack.

Choose from cheese rolls and

cheese and ham rolls

4 x 80 g

3.99

(12.47/kg)

Mini ham and cheese

toasties, 20 pack

20 x 12 g

2.99

(12.46/kg)

Mini pigs in

a blanket, 12 pack

300 g

2.99

(9.97/kg)

ALDI, EVERYDAY AMAZING!

37

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


GINGERBREAD CAKE

Passionate about her job as a

pastry chef, Cathy Goedert, a

young Luxembourger, now offers

pastry courses. She trained at

the École Hôtelière Provinciale

de Namur, then at the Bellouet

Conseil pastry school in Paris, and now Cathy

wants to share her knowledge and expertise. In

this edition of KACHEN, she shows how to make

a gingerbread, very light in flavours and texture,

that can be prepared in no time at all.

2 gingerbreads

15 minutes

40 minutes

› 200 g rye flour

› 100 g white flour

› 20 g baking powder

› 200 g whole eggs (3 eggs size L)

› 60 g sugar

› 150 g milk

› 300 g honey

› 5 g vanilla extract or in powder form

› 2 untreated lemons

› 2 untreated oranges

› 10 g cinnamon powder

› 2 g nutmeg

› 4 g anise powder

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


BAKING BASICS

Grate the lemon and orange peel

1 finely, making sure that only the

top layer is rubbed off and not the

white one, which otherwise tastes

bitter.

Sieve flour and baking powder

2 together.

3

Mix the sugar with the eggs,

stirring constantly (approx. 2-3

minutes).

4Stir in the cold milk, then add the

warm liquid honey.

Gradually add flour and baking

5 powder, vanilla, citrus peel and

spices and mix well.

Brush the moulds with butter. Fill

6 only three quarters of the cake

forms with dough and bake in the oven

(hot air) at 160°C for 40-50 minutes.

7

If desired, decorate with icing

sugar and spices (star anise,

cinnamon stick and vanilla stick).

39

RECIPE Cathy Goedert

PHOTOS Ramunas Astrauskas

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


STEP BY STEP

AIRY BRIOCHE PLAIT

This juicy, delicate brioche plait stands out with

its especially airy dough. This is achieved, in part,

through the use of tangzhong, a starter dough

originally from Asian baking culture. By heating a part

of the flour with water, the flour can take up liquid more

easily and this makes the pastry softer and juicier. If you

do not own a suitable cake tin you can also bake on a

baking tray. This means, however, that the plait will

have more width than height. The plait is a perfect small

present to take to a brunch or breakfast.

Makes 1 large brioche (23 x 13 x 7 cm)

or 3 small ones (14 x 7 x 5 cm)

› 100 ml water

› 420 g & 20 g flour (type 550)

› 125 ml warm milk

› ½ cube fresh yeast (21 g)

or 1 pkt dry yeast (7 g)

› 75 g soft butter at room temperature

› 50 g smooth refined sugar

› 1 heaped tbsp vanilla sugar

› 1 egg & 1 egg yolk (size M) at room temperature

› 40 g sour cream (alternatively Greek yoghurt)

› 2 tbsp fine grain salt (8 g)

› 150 g golden raisins

› 1 egg yolk & 2 tbsp milk to spread

› almond flakes to sprinkle

RECIPE & PHOTOS Ursula Schersch

40

Variations without the starter dough/ without raisins

To make the brioche without a starter dough, simply skip

step 1 and combine water and milk and dissolve yeast in

the mixture. Use 450 g flour. Raisins can be left out.

For a longer, cold rising process

If you don’t shy away from work, after kneading, let the

dough rise overnight in the fridge, covered with cling film

or in a container with a lid. Let adjust to room temperature

the next day by taking out of fridge ¾ to 1 hour

before braiding.

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


XX CATEGORIE XX

1

Prepare dough first: add 20 g flour into a small pot or small pan and

add half the water, stirring continuously so that a relatively thick

paste is produced. Stir with a whisk until all clumps have disappeared.

Stir in rest of water. Heat pot on the hob until mixture is hot but not boiling.

Let Tangzhong thicken briefly, stirring continuously – it should be gel- or

pudding-like. Remove from hob, cover, and let cool.

2

Dissolve yeast in warm milk in a small bowl. Beat soft butter, sugar and

vanilla sugar in a large bowl with a (hand) mixer until light and creamy –

takes about 5 minutes. Combine yeast-milk, sour cream, salt and cooled

dough (should not be more than lukewarm) and mix until all parts are well

combined. Carefully add about 1/3 of flour (about 150 g) with the mixer. Change

to a solid wooden spoon, or, if using a food processor change to a dough hook.

Add raisins, distributing evenly.

TIP If fat and liquid separate, add 1-2 tablespoons flour into mix.

3Slowly add rest of flour with wooden spoon. As soon as the flour is

combined with the dough, continue kneading by hand (e.g. directly in

the pot) for around 5 minutes. The dough will be relatively sticky but do

not add any flour otherwise the raisin plait will become too firm. If the dough

is too sticky, cover and set aside for 5-10 minutes. After that the dough will

be easier to work with. In the food processor the soft dough is not a problem.

As stated, knead the dough for around 5 minutes and then let rise at

room temperature until double in volume (about 1-1 ½ hours) or over night in

the fridge (see below for a tip). Divide the dough into differently sized parts,

independent of making one large plait or three small plaits or how many

strands will be used.

4

Roll out each bit on a largely

flour-free surface. For a large

plait make the strands around

35 cm long, for three small brioches

make them each 25 cm long. Roll the

finished strands in flour so that they

don’t stick when braiding. Place the

ends of the strands over each other

and pinch together, then braid them

to a plait. Tuck in the ends.

5

Let

each plait rise considerably

in a covered tin at room temperature

– for about 1 hour.

Make sure the baking paper is cut

a few centimetres above the tin so

it can support the dough when rising.

Combine egg yolk and milk and

coat the plait twice, then decorate

with the almond flakes. Bake plait

in preheated oven at 175°C top and

bottom heat until golden brown;

takes around 25 minutes. Let cool for

10-15 minutes in the tin, then take

out using the backing paper to help.

Let cool completely on a grid.

REZEPT Firstname Lastname

FOTOS Firstname Lastname

41

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


A SE ASON

OF GIVING

The

greatest gift is to give

a little bit of yourself...

and when you take the time

to make your own presents

this is exactly what you will

be doing. With our easy-to-do

ideas, you will be able

to spoil your friends and

family with delicious goodies

with a festive flair.

HARISSA

› 125 g dried red chillies, chopped

› 1 tbsp dried mint

› 1 tbsp ground coriander

› 1 tbsp ground cumin

› 1 tsp ground caraway seeds

› 1 tsp ground black cumin seeds

› 10 garlic cloves, chopped

› 1 tbsp tomato purée

› 1 tsp smoked paprika

› 3 garlic cloves

› ½ tsp salt

› 250 ml olive oil

1 Cover the chillies with boiling

water and leave for 1 hour.

2 Drain and process with all the

other ingredients and 2 tbsp of the

oil. Slowly add the rest of the oil and

process until thick.

3 Spoon into a sterilised jar and

cover with olive oil. Seal. It will keep

in the fridge for up to 6 months.

Use to flavour couscous, grilled

squid and roast chicken.

Mix with yoghurt for a dip or

use as marinade for meat.

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


DO IT YOURSELF

SELECTION OF PRESERVES

MUSTARD

FRUITS

RED PEPPER

RELISH

HOMEMADE

KETCHUP

› 3 plums halved & stoned

› 2 apricots halved & stoned

› 2 figs, halved

› 2 small pears, peeled & quartered

› 400 g sugar

› juice of 1 lemon

› 150 ml dry white wine

› 400 g honey

› 50 g mustard powder

1 Place all the fruit into a stainless-steel

pan and add just enough

water to cover. Add the sugar and

lemon juice and stir over low heat to

dissolve the sugar.

2 Simmer for 10 minutes so the

fruit cooks but stays intact. Remove

fruit with a slotted spoon, drain and

place on a baking tray.

3 Cook at 120°C in the oven for

about 45 minutes until dry.

4 In the meantime, add the wine

and honey to the remaining syrup

and simmer for about 15 minutes

to reduce. Add the mustard powder

and mix (stir).

5 Put the dry fruit into sterilised

containers and pour the syrup over

to cover them completely. Leave

until cold, then seal.

Use chopped over fish, pork or

with cheese. Drizzle remaining

syrup over salads.

› 1 kg red peppers, seeded,

quartered & sliced

› 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper

› 2 tsp black mustard seeds

› 2 red onions, sliced

› 6 garlic cloves, chopped

› 375 ml red wine vinegar

› 2 apples, peeled, cored & grated

› 1 tsp grated fresh ginger

› 200 g brown sugar

1 Simmer the peppers, pepper,

mustard seeds, onion, garlic,

vinegar, apple and ginger together

for 30 minutes until the peppers are

soft.

2 Add the sugar and stir over low

heat until dissolved. Simmer, stirring

occasionally, for 1 ¼ hours until

thick.

3 Spoon into sterilised jars. Allow

the flavours to develop for a few

weeks before using. Will keep in a

cool dark place for 1 year.

SHORTCUT VERSION Grill 8 red

peppers over a gas flame or in the

oven until the skins are blistered.

Put in a plastic bag until cold.

Remove the skins and seeds and

quarter. Pack into a sterilised

container dotted with 3 bay leaves

and 6 garlic cloves. Cover with

olive oil. Keep in the fridge.

Use in salads, as a burger, pizza

or sandwich topping, or with

grilled meats.

› 2 tbsp olive oil

› 2 onions, finely chopped

› 1 celery stick, chopped

› 1 tsp chopped fresh ginger

› 4 garlic cloves, chopped

› ½ red chilli without seeds, chopped

› 2 tsp dried basil

› 2 cloves garlic

› 1 tsp coriander seeds

› salt & pepper, to taste

› 5-7 fresh tomatoes

› 2 x 340 g tinned whole tomatoes

› 1 handful fresh basil (opt.)

› 250 ml red wine vinegar

› 80 g sugar

1 Heat the oil and fry all the vegetables,

spices and herbs for 15 minutes

over low heat, then add the tomatoes

and a cup of water.

2 Boil to reduce the sauce by half.

Add the fresh basil, if using, and

blend until smooth.

3 Put back on the heat, add the

vinegar and sugar and reduce to

tomato sauce consistency.

4 Spoon into sterilised container,

seal and keep in a dark, cool place.

Will keep for up to six months.

Use as you would commercial

ketchup.

43

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


DO IT YOURSELF

SELECTION OF FLAVOURINGS

MOROCCAN

TAGINE SPICE MIX

› 4 tbsp ground ginger

› 8 tbsp ground cinnamon

› 2 tbsp dried garlic flakes

› 2 tsp sea salt

› 2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

› 1 tsp saffron

› 2 tsp dried lemon peel (opt.)

Combine all the ingredients and

place in a suitable container. (The

saffron can be left out, but it does

add hugely to the flavour of the

final dish for which it is used.)

Use to flavour meat, poultry

and fish or to make tagines.

BOUQUET

GARNI

› 18 bay leaves

› 5 tbsp dried parsley

› 5 tbsp dried thyme

› 2 tbsp dried tarragon

or rosemary

Mix all the ingredients together

and place 2 tsp of mixture into the

centre of a small piece of muslin

cloth (make sure each contains

1 bay leaf ). Tie with kitchen string.

Use like a store-bought

bouquet garni.

CRACKED

PEPPER & SALT

MIX

› 1 part pink peppercorns

› 1 part black peppercorns

› 1 part white peppercorns

› 3 parts sea salt

GAR AM

MASAL A

› 1 tbsp cumin seeds

› 10 tbsp coriander seeds

› 3 tbsp fennel seeds

› ½ tbsp whole cloves

› 2 star anise

› 10 cardamom pods

› 2 tbsp black pepper

› 2 tbsp ground cinnamon

› ½ tsp ground nutmeg

1 Roast the cumin, coriander,

fennel and cloves in a dry pan

until they just start to release

their aromatic flavours.

2 Combine with the star anise,

cardamom and black pepper in

a pestle and mortar. Pound and

grind until fine.

3 Add the cinnamon and nutmeg,

mix well and transfer to a

suitable container.

Use as a rub for chicken, lamb,

and beef or to flavour curries.

Combine the peppercorns and crush

with a pestle and mortar. Add the

salt and transfer to a container.

Use to flavour dishes. It also

makes an excellent crust for

fillet steak.

44


DO IT YOURSELF

GARLIC OIL

› 8 garlic cloves, chopped

› 500 ml olive oil

Combine and allow to infuse for

3 days. Strain and use.

Use in salad dressings, to make

homemade aioli, drizzled over

soups, in marinades and pastas,

or when making popcorn.

PARMESAN OIL

› 500 ml olive oil

› 100 g parmesan, finely grated

› 20 g parmesan, shaved

1 Stir the olive oil and 100 g

parmesan over low heat for 10-15

minutes until the parmesan cheese

starts to melt and clump together.

Allow to cool.

2 Strain into a sterilised container

and add the 20 g parmesan cheese

shavings. Seal and store in a cool,

dark place for up to 6 months.

Use drizzled over pastas, soups,

and salads or in homemade

bread.

INDIAN OIL

› 1 tsp garam masala

› 1 tsp coriander seeds

› 1 tsp cardamom pods

› 1 tsp fennel seeds

› 3 allspice berries

› 3 curry leaves

› 1 small dried chilli

› 750 ml peanut or canola oil

1 Lightly grind the spices with a

pestle and mortar and add to the

oil in a sterilised container. Seal

and leave for 3 days.

2 Strain into another sterilised

container and store in a cool, dark

place for up to 3 months. (You can

add fresh curry leaves and a whole

chilli to the oil before sealing.)

SELECTION OF OILS

Use in marinades for chicken,

lamb or fish. Drizzle over

potatoes, butternut or pumpkin

before roasting.

CHILLI OIL

› 8 fresh chillies

› 14 small dried chillies

› 8 garlic cloves

› 4 tbsp whisky

› 1 tsp finely grated lemon zest

› 2 tbsp lemon juice

› 2 cups olive oil

› 2 tbsp red wine vinegar

› 1 bay leaf

› 2 tsp salt

1 Pulse the chillies and garlic in a

food processor or grind to a paste

with a pestle and mortar.

2 Transfer to a pan and add the

whisky, lemon zest and juice, vinegar,

bay leaf, salt and about 3 tbsp of

the oil. Simmer until it releases its

flavours.

3 Remove from the heat and whisk

in the rest of the oil. Pour into a

sterilised jar and leave for a few

days before using.

Use to add flavour to soups,

burgers, flavouring beef, chicken

or tuna, or as a cooking base.


ADVERTORIAL

CHESTNUT & BLACK CURRANT VANILLA CREAM

... LIKE A MONT BLANC

Serves 4-5 60 minutes 12-15 minutes

For the chestnut cream

› 180 g chestnut cream

› 50 g mascarpone

› 1 sheet gelatine

› 2 tbsp cream (to melt the gelatine)

For the jelly with black currants

› 100 g black currant juice

› 1 sheet gelatine

› ¼ vanilla pod

› 1 star anise

› 10 g brown sugar or a black

currant jelly, but not too sweet.

For the whipped cream

› 200 g whipped cream

› 60 g mascarpone

› ¼ vanilla pod

› 8/10 g icing sugar

For the syrup for the brick pastry

› 30 g brown sugar

› 60 g water

› 20 g butter

For the crispy leaves & decoration

› 60 g candied chestnuts

› 4 puff brick pastry

(use the rest for small crispy

biscuits to accompany foie

gras according to your taste

and desires)

› 1 lime

› 1 orange

Chestnut cream

1 Mix chestnut cream and mascarpone

carefully.

2 Heat the cream slightly and add

the squeezed gelatine leaf (previously

soaked in cold water for five

minutes) and melt while stirring.

3 Add this cream to the mascarpone

mixture, beat well and keep cool.

Black currant jelly

1 Heat the black currant juice with

vanilla, star anise and sugar.

2 Cook for 1 minute, add gelatine

(soaked and squeezed), pass through

a sieve, mix well and keep cool.

Whipped cream

1 Mix the whipped cream with the

mascarpone, sugar and vanilla.

2 Place in a poached bag and keep in

a cool place.

Syrup

1 Heat the water slightly to melt the

sugar and add the butter.

2 Coat the four brick pastry plates

one after the other with butter and

place them on top of each other.

3 Cut into rectangular strips of 4 x

13 cm (5/6 strips).

4 Place one on top of the other

between two sheets of baking paper,

place a cake plate on top to weigh

down and bake in the oven at 155°C

for approx. 12/15 minutes until they

are amber.

Arrange

1 Whip the chestnut mascarpone

cream lightly again and pour into a

piping bag.

2 Stir the currant jelly.

3 Sprinkle with some crumbled

chestnuts and add some lime and

orange peel. Enjoy!

Open Monday, Thursday and Sunday

from 6:30 p. m. to 10:30 p. m,

from Friday to Saturday from 6.30 p.m.

to midnight and on Sunday from

12 .p.m. to 2:30 p.m. (single menu)

Information and reservations:

+352 / 23 611-410

+352 / 23 611 -1 — info@casino2000.lu

casino2000.lu

Adults only

RECIPE Alain Pierron

PHOTO Ramunas Astrauskas

47

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


MORE SWEET OFFERINGS

BUTTERSCOTCH

SWEETS

CRANBERRY & PISTACHIO

WHITE CHOCOLATE ROUNDS

› 335 g caster sugar

› 2 tbsp white vinegar

› 2 tbsp golden syrup

› 120 g unsalted butter

› ½ tsp vanilla extract

› 80 ml cream

› 250 g dark or white chocolate,

melted

Place all the ingredients except the

chocolate over low heat and stir to

dissolve the sugar. Increase the heat

and bring to the boil. Simmer for 10

minutes or until it reaches 115°C

on a sugar thermometer. Remove

from the heat and pour into a lightly

greased mini muffiin tin, filling the

cavities only about ¼ of the way.

Allow to cool at room temperature

until set. Dip each sweet in melted

chocolate and allow to set on a

baking tray lined with baking paper.

› 800 g white chocolate, chopped

› 500 g desiccated coconut

› 250 g pistachio nuts, roughly chopped

› 250 g dried cranberries

Melt the white chocolate over simmering water. Add the

rest of the ingredients and stir to combine. Spoon into round

chocolate moulds and allow to set. (You could also spread it

in a baking tin and cut into squares when set.)

CHRISTMAS

BON BONS

› 350 g cake leftovers, crumbled

› 1-2 tbsp sweet sherry or brandy

› 2-3 tbsp golden syrup

› 125 g dark chocolate, melted

› 100 g white chocolate, melted

› silver balls for decoration

Mix the cake leftovers, sherry and

syrup and add the melted dark

chocolate. Form into 30 small balls,

place on a lined baking tray, cover

with cling film and leave in the

fridge for about 30 minutes to firm

up. To decorate, use a teaspoon

to drip a little of the melted white

chocolate on each bonbon and

decorate with the silver balls.

48

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


DO IT YOURSELF

CHOCOLATE

CHILLI SAUCE

› 200 g dark chocolate

› 500 g cream

› 30 g butter

› ½ tsp chilli powder

Melt all the ingredients together

and pour into a container. Will keep

in the fridge for up to one week.

(Adjust the amount of chilli powder

according to your taste.)

Use hot or cold drizzled over

of fresh berries, ice cream

and waffles or to add flavour

to coffee.

SELECTION OF DESSERT SAUCES

BUTTERSCOTCH

SAUCE

MOCHA SAUCE

› 100 g dark chocolate, chopped

› 125 g double cream

› 2 tsp instant espresso dissolved

in 2 tbsp water

› 1 tbsp golden syrup

Melt the chocolate over low heat,

add the remaining ingredients

and stir until melted. Pour into a

container and keep in the fridge for

up to one week.

Use hot or cold to drizzle

over ice cream, brownies

and poached pears.

BERRY SAUCE

› 1 part sugar › 1 part water

› 1 tbsp lemon juice

› 1 part fresh berries or almost

any fruit (frozen, dried or fresh)

1 Dissolve the sugar in the water

over heat. Add the berries and boil

until dissolved and reduced.

2 Add the lemon juice, mix and

strain to remove seeds. Pour into a

container and keep in the fridge for

up to one week.

Use to drizzle over desserts, ice

cream or meringue.

› 250 g soft brown sugar

› 125 g butter

› 2 tbsp golden syrup

› 125 ml cream

› 1 vanilla pod, sliced lengthways

& seeds removed

1 First melt the sugar in the butter

over low heat, then bring to the

boil and add the syrup, cream and

vanilla pod and seeds. Simmer for 10

minutes to thicken.

2 Remove the vanilla pod and pour

into a container. Will keep in the

fridge for up to 1 week.

Use drizzled over ice cream,

baked desserts and pancakes.

Can be reheated if you prefer

the sauce hot.

49

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


VEGETABLE STOCK

The secret to a good meal is

in the base. Make your own

vegetable stock and use it for

your vegetarian Christmas

dishes and to prepare

delicious sauces! So much

better than store bought!

Our little secret:

To achieve an extra savory

″umami″ taste, we add

roasted mushrooms!

2 litres

1 hour

2 ½ hours

› 2 large onions, quartered

› 4 garlic cloves, peeled

› 3 leeks, roughly chopped

› 3 stalks of celery, roughly

chopped

› 2 large carrots, roughly chopped

› 1 small bunch parsley

› 1 small handful of thyme

› 2 tbsp olive oil

› 1 tsp black peppercorns

› 250g Portobello mushrooms,

halved

50

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


VEGETARIAN RECIPE

Preheat oven to 200°C. Place

1 onions, garlic, leeks, celery,

carrots, parsley and thyme in a

roasting tray. Drizzle with 1 tbsp of

olive oil and roast for 1 hour or until

golden.

Heat 1 tbsp of oil in a heavybased

pot and sauté mushrooms 2

until golden brown.

3

Add vegetables to the pot and

fill with 3l of water. Simmer for 1

hour. Remove impurities with a ladle.

4Pour stock through a strainer lined with muslin

cloth and squeeze out all liquid from the vegetables.

To store, pour into glass jars and refrigerate for up to a

week, or freeze. If you freeze in glass jars, leave at least

an inch and a half of headroom so the stock can expand

without breaking the glass of the jar.

NO-WASTE TIP

You can also use (clean) vegetable scraps for making

stock! Instead of throwing away your vegetable

scraps, collect them in a storage container and keep

them in the freezer to make great tasting stock from

scratch.

51

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


52

TEXT Susanne Jaspers

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


FEATURE

PRE-CHRISTMAS

SPICE SCIENCE

The season of Advent has its own very special fragrance. Responsible

for this are a few well-travelled exotic spices, which by now belong

firmly into the inventory of the western kitchen.

Christmas is perhaps not the most important date

in the Christian calendar – that is probably Easter

– but surely the most popular. No other festivity

is prepared as extensively or celebrated as intensely. In

that, the culinary aspect plays a major role. Evidence,

if needed, comes in the form of TV spots given over to

heartburn medication and feelings of fullness in the days

before the event, while women’s and lifestyle magazines

offer the newest dieting tips right after the festive days.

No other time in the year sees that kind of excessiveness.

It begins with biscuits via alcoholic sins, such as mulled

wine or punch, to the infamous Christmas goose. Most

of these traditional and typical Christmas drinks and dishes

have one thing is common: they are nothing without

the equally traditional and typical Christmas spices. And

in reality, these are originally just as non-Christian and

non-western as Christmas itself.

CLOVES

The clove has nothing to do with the well-known carnation

flower, sometimes known as clove-pink on account

of its similar scent. The spice is actually the dried buds

of the clove tree, which grows on the Indonesian Maluku

Islands, once known as the Spice Islands. In Europe the

clove has been known since the Middle Ages. The German

name for the spice “Nelke” derives from the Low

German word “Negelkin”, which means small nails.

Makes sense. In English, the word is also related, via the

Latin “clavus”, to the word for nail. The spice, indispensible

in Indian curries, belongs to every punch and mulled

wine. Equally, no self-respecting gingerbread can be

without. Yet, the spice is not only good for the refinement

of sweet specialities. Besides many more healing properties,

cloves can also help against feelings of fullness and

wind. Which is why the spice makes sense for the heavy

Christmas roast – besides being delicious. If, by the way,

the cloves have not been removed from the dish after

cooking, do not be tempted to eat the stems for they are

extremely bitter. Moreover, if you do not have the time to

bake biscuits but you would still like your house to smell

Christmassy, here’s a classic and quick two-minute fix: an

orange peppered with cloves.

The taste? Very spicy to slightly fiery with a peppery note

and accompanying sweet aroma.

53

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


CARDAMOM

Cardamom is part of the ginger family and is one of

the most precious spices worldwide. The seeds of the

predominantly Indian and Sri Lankan plant are harvested

by hand. This is a very labour intensive job and the price

of the product is therefore high. Naturally, cardamom

belongs to the basic ingredients found in Indian spice

mixes. The famous yogi tea, for example, is made with

cardamom, while in the Arabian kitchen it is used to

refine coffee. Among Christmas baked goods one will

find the spice predominantly in ginger bread, stollen, and

spekulatius. In fact, cardamom is also excellent in the

preparation of marinades and sweet sauces. However, you

will need to keep the distinction between the green and

the roasted, black cardamom in mind. The rule is: green

for sweet, black for hearty dishes. Ahem: by the by, the

spice is said to strengthen the libido.

The taste? Green: spicy-sweet-sharp with a flowery, fruity

note. Black: smoky-herbal, earthy.

STAR ANISE

While its name and shape fits perfectly with Christmas

decorations, the star anise derives originally from

China. From the blossom of the tree of the same name

in the family of the magnolia trees, fruit develops

with each containing eight seeds – exactly, the “stars”.

In Europe, star anise has been known since the 15th

century. It should not be confused, however, with the

Japanese star anise, which is similar in appearance.

The latter can be used wonderfully as incense but

consumed it is about as poisonous as the infamous

puffer fish Fugu. Star anise belongs to the most popular

ingredients in punch and ginger bread. On account of

its digestive properties it can also be confidently added

to the fat roast duck.

The taste? Like anise but way more intensive with a

note similar to liquorice.

SWEET “PRINTE” & TART ROAST:

A PERFECT CHRISTMAS MIX!

Save yourself the cumbersome searching and

mixing of spices and simply throw a couple of

“printen” into your roast sauce. This type of spicy

ginger bread, first made in 1820 in Aaachen,

a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, combines

basically all of the typical Christmas spices in its

recipe. It has also become the staple ingredient

in an especially wintery Sauerbraten recipe.

54

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


FEATURE

CINNAMON

Last but not least the perhaps most

famous and most typical of all the

Christmas spices: cinnamon is said to

be one of the oldest spices in the world.

As far back as 4000 years ago, the

dried bark of the tree belonging to the

laurel family was used in the Chinese

kitchen. Egyptians are said to have

used the spice for embalming their

mummies, alongside the refinement

of dishes. In Europe cinnamon was

counted as the most expensive

spice of all at the beginning of the

modern age. These days it is said

that the thinner the bark, the finer the

aroma. You can use cinnamon in the

form of a stick, ground, or in slices

for cooking. It works with basically

everything and definitely belongs

into your Christmas baking recipe:

the cinnamon stars.

VANILLA

Vanilla is the exception among the

spices as it derives from America

rather than Asia. The “queen of the

spices” is a dried seed vessel origi-

nally from the Mexican climbing orchid,

which is, these days, cultivated

predominantly on the islands in the

Indian Ocean. Beside cardamom and

saffron, vanilla counts itself among

the most expensive spices in the

world. No wonder, already the Aztecs

used the spice as currency to pay

back tax debts. According to legend,

their ruler, Montezuma, indulged

in 50 to 60 cups of cocoa sweetened

with vanilla daily. The spice made its

way to Europe through the Spanish

conqueror Hernán Cortés. Take care

when inhaling the scent: apparently

vanilla contains stimulating pheromones

– as is well known, these sexual

signals encourage “lust”. These

days, a cake or other sweet treat without

vanilla is almost unthinkable.

And what would Christmas be without

Vanillekipferln?

The taste? Sweet like vanilla ice

cream. Just without the ice cream.

CHRISTMAS: JUST AS

EXOTIC AS THE SPICES?

Well, yes. The Romans paid

homage to their god Saturn

on the 25th, the ancient

Egyptians celebrated the

god of light, Horus; for the

Germanic peoples Christmas

Day was midwinter and in the

Near East it was the birthday

of the Indian god of light. It

was in the year 217 that a

pope called Hippolyt tried to

tidy up the various beliefs

and declared the 25th of

December as the birthday

of Christ – which is how

Christmas Day came into

being. With such a multicultural

history, it is not a surprise that

the western Christmas bakery

encompasses so many

international ingredients.

55

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


EAT HEALTHY FOOD WITH

BERTRAND’S COOKING STUDIO

To complete our special on spices, chef Bertrand Duchamps, founder of the

Atelier de cuisine Bertrand, offers us two vegetarian recipes, concocted

with a salt specially created for the occasion. Of Breton origin,

Bertrand likes to remember his French roots that have shaped

his cuisine and his search for authentic, tasty and natural

products.

atelier-de-cuisine.com

56

RECIPES Bertrand Duchamps

PHOTOS Ramunas Astrauskas

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


FEATURE

CHRISTMAS SALT

› 1 tbsp cardamom

› 1 tbsp star anise

› 1 tbsp cloves

› 1 tbsp cinnamon

› 1 tbsp vanilla extract (powder)

› 5 tbsp of fine grey Guérande salt

1 Mix the spices in equal parts.

2 Roast dry in a frying pan without

adding anything. Take care not to

burn.

3 Pour into the blender.

4 Add the salt.

THAI BLACK RICE AND

FRIED EGG

Serves 4 15 minutes 45 minutes

› 240 g Thai black rice

› 360 g water

› 4 free-range eggs from the farm

› 2 tbsp olive oil

› Christmas salt

› pepper & salt

1 Cook the rice the day before. Start

cooking rice like risotto. Put the olive

oil in a small pot and brown the rice

until it cracks, then pour water over

it and add some normal salt. Cover

as soon as it boils and leave to cook

at the lowest temperature (level 1)

for 40 minutes. Save for the next

day.

2 Gently reheat the rice.

3 Just fry the eggs in some olive oil

and sprinkle with Christmas salt.

Add to the rice and serve.

57

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


XX CATEGORIE XX

WILD PRAWNS WITH

CHRISTMAS SALT & RUM

Serves 4 15 minutes

› 12 wild prawns from Argentina, whole

› 40 cl coconut milk

› ½ garlic clove

› 320 g peas, Edamame beans, white precooked

beans (mixture to equal parts)

› 1 tbsp clementine juice

› 2-3 kale leaves

1 Peel and devein the raw shrimps.

2 Grill the dry coconut strips in the oven at 180°C

for 5 minutes, constantly monitoring them.

3 Blanch the kale in salted water for 5/6 minutes.

Rinse with cold water and drain.

4 Place the white beans and coconut milk in a

small pot, add a pinch of Christmas salt and cook

for 3 minutes. Add the prawns for 3 minutes just

to poach them. Then take the shrimps out of the

pot and put them aside.

› coconut chips

› 1 tsp dark rum with vanilla

› about ten pink peppercorns from

Madagascar.

› Christmas salt

› pepper

5 Add edamame-peas-beans mixture and cook

for 4 minutes.

6 Shortly before serving, add a few drops of the

rum and the clementine juice. Season to taste

with pepper.

7 Arrange in a flat dish: place the beans in the

middle, the kale on the sides and the shrimps on

top. Finally, decorate with strips of coconut and

the pink peppercorns from Madagascar and

serve.

58

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


ADVERTORIAL

MACARON FANS,

READY, SET, BAKE!

For the first time, Oberweis is offering you the possibility to represent Luxembourg

in the international Amateur Macaron Competition. This event, which was

established in 2010, brings a host of great French pastry chefs together, most

of whom are a member of Relais Desserts. Since 2015 international pastry chefs are

also welcome, which gives the competition a multicultural dimension. After teams

from Canada and Italy took part in 2017, and one year later, even from Japan

and Belgium, Luxembourg has now also accepted the challenge, in partnership

with the house of Oberweis!

Kick-off for registrations is December 10 th at 7 pm!

Find the link to participate in this extraordinary event on our website and on our social media.

The first 20 registered candidates will be able to take

part in the international Amateur Macaron Competition.

No particular knowledge is required. You need only be

one of the fastest to register in order to take part. You can

be an absolute amateur, without any patisserie training at

all. As soon as you are registered, the organising body

will check your details and contact you to inform you

about participation.

From then on you will have time until February 1st to hone

your recipe and – who knows – make it into a winning formula…

On February 1st, you must hand in the prescribed

number of macarons and your recipe to Oberweis.

A jury made up out of industry experts will then decide

who of the twenty candidates will represent Luxembourg

in the contest. Of course, all twenty registered participants

will receive a present!

Only the winner is invited (various costs included) to

take part in the big final in the South of France. They will

be able to dive into the world of gastronomy and will have

the luck to meet renowned pastry chefs and bloggers. In

order to win, the candidate must prepare a second macaron,

different to the one created in the first instance. This

second macaron will be introduced to a sympathetic and

curious jury, made up out of chefs and important personalities

of the confectionary industry.

In order to provide our candidate with the greatest

chance of winning, they will be accompanied by the

Oberweis team in the months leading up to the big

day. They will receive coaching and practice lessons

in order to perfect their macaron. The following year,

the candidate will be a juror in the pre-selection panel.

oberweis.lu

59

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


SEASONAL FRUIT

5 FACTS ABOUT

QUINCES

APPLE OR PEAR?

OR BOTH?

Neither! While they may look

similar and are also pome

fruit of the rose family, only

a few quince varieties are

edible when raw (e.g. the

honey quince). Quince are a

real delicacy in the form of

compote, jelly, juice, bread, or

in cake – even if, these days,

they are a mostly forgotten

treat.

QUINCE SYRUP

TO COUNTER REFLUX

Simply prepared and taken

daily for several weeks,

a syrup made up of 50%

diluted fruit extract, 12%

sugar, and 12% water, can

help, without side effects,

against the uncomfortable

reflux (daily 0.6 ml per kg

body weight).

STORING AND

FREEZING

The best quince has an intensive

scent and little fuzz. Small spots

on the skin do not matter but if

they have dents they need to be

used quickly. Quince can easily

transfer their strong aroma onto

other fruit, therefore are best

stored separately. Store at room

temperature and they continue to

ripen; keep cool, dry, dark, and airy

and they keep for up to two months.

Ripe fruit keeps two weeks in the

fridge (0-2 degrees). If you want to

freeze them they must be peeled

and blanched.

IT’S NOT ONLY

IN THE PULP!

Steep a teaspoon of the kernels

in one cup of warm water for a

few hours. The resulting quince

nectar helps against a cough,

is anti-inflammatory, laxative,

and helps to heal wounds (as an

external poultice; taken orally for

stomach and gut). A tea made

with two teaspoons of the kernels

boiled in 1/8 l water, and let steep

for 5 minutes, helps to counter

bad breath and restlessness.

Careful: kernels must be prepared

whole and remove them by

straining before consuming!

TEXT Martina Schmitt-Jamek

SUPER DELICIOUS –

SUPER HEALTHY

Not only because you need to use less sugar when

preserving on account of the fruit’s high pectin content

(the riper, the lower the content), quince are also a strong

antioxidant and are anti-inflammatory, detoxing, and a

digestive. The fruit are high in tanning agents, the flavonoid

quercetin and the vitamins A and C, which counteracts gout,

helicobacter pylori and atherosclerosis; while folic acid is

important in pregnancy.

60

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


QUINCE TARTE TATIN

Serves 6-8 25 minutes 25-30 minutes

› 100 g butter

› 250 g castor sugar

› 1.5 kg quince preserve, cut into quarters

› 400 g puff pastry

› 100 g mascarpone

1 Preheat the oven. Place the butter and sugar in a deep

frying pan (25 cm) with an ovenproof handle. Heat the

butter and sugar until the sugar has melted.

2 Arrange the quince quarters close together in the

frying pan and try to close up all the gaps. Remember, you

are going to invert the tart, so the quinces must be neatly

packed.

3 Roll out the puff pastry on a floured surface and cut it

into a round slightly larger than the frying pan. Place the

pastry on top of the quinces and tuck it in lightly around

the edges.

4 Place in the oven and bake for about 25–30 minutes at

180°C or until the pastry is golden brown. Remove from

the oven and leave to rest for 5 minutes before turning

the tart out onto a plate. If any of the quinces stick to the

frying pan, you can just loosen them and press them into

the top of the tart. Serve with mascarpone.

REZEPT Firstname Lastname

FOTOS Firstname Lastname

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


QUINCE

STRUDEL

BAKED FRUIT

SALAD WITH

CREAM

Serves 6- 8

30 Minutes

1 1/2 hour

Serves 6-8

30 minutes

1 hour

For the filling

› 2 kg quinces, wiped

clean and cut into slices

› 300 g sugar

› 4 g ground cinnamon

› 4 g ground cloves

› 3 g vanilla essence

› 10 ml Grand Marnier

› 10 g butter

› water

For the crumb mixture

› 160 g sugar

› 210 g fresh

breadcrumbs

› 6 sheets phyllo pastry

1 Preheat the oven. Arrange the quince slices in a baking

dish. Mix the remaining filling ingredients and sprinkle

them over the top. Add about a cup of water and cover

with aluminium foil. Bake for about 45–60 minutes until

soft, depending on how thick the quince slices are. Test

to see if the quinces are ready by pressing the point of a

knife into them. Allow them to cool.

2 Mix all the ingredients for the crumb mixture. Brush

each phyllo pastry sheet with melted butter and sprinkle

some of the crumb mixture over it. Stack the sheets on

top of one another. Spoon the cooled filling on top of the

phyllo pastry and roll up like a Swiss roll, with the sides

folded inwards so that the filling cannot fall out. Place

on a baking sheet and brush the top with melted butter.

Bake for about 20 minutes at 180°C until golden brown.

Cut into thick slices and serve warm.

› 2 large quinces, peeled

› 6 pears, halved

› 100 g soft brown sugar

› 750 ml apple juice

› 1 lemon peel, grated

› 3 cinnamon sticks

› 3 cloves

› 30 ml pear or orange liqueur

› 1 small punnet gooseberries

› 1 banana, cut into thick slices

› 150 ml thick cream

1 Peel the quinces and cut them into

thick slices. Place in a baking dish with

the pears (cut sides down). Sprinkle

with sugar, add the apple juice, lemon

peel, cinnamon sticks and cloves. Add

liqueur and cover with aluminium foil.

Bake 180°C for about an hour in the

preheated oven or until the fruit is soft.

2 Add the gooseberries and bananas

and spoon the syrup over the fruit.

Place under a preheated grill until the

tips of the fruit begin to change colour.

Remove and leave to cool. Serve the

fruit salad with whipped cream.

62

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


SEASONAL FRUIT

QUINCES BAKED

IN ORANGE JUICE

Serves 4

30 minutes

1 1/2 hours

› 3 large quinces

› 100 g sugar

› 3 cinnamon sticks

› 1 vanilla pod, cut open

lengthways, seeds scraped out

› 4 large oranges, juice squeezed out

› 1 finger-sized piece of fresh ginger,

thinly sliced

› 375 ml water

› 15 g butter, cubed

› 2 oranges

1 Preheat the oven at 180°C. Peel

the quinces and cut them into

quarters, but reserve about 15

quince pips and 5 pieces of skin. Pack

the quinces into a shallow baking

dish and sprinkle the sugar over the

top. Arrange the cinnamon sticks,

quince pips and skin in between the

quince quarters.

2 Mix the vanilla seeds with the

orange juice and pour the mixture

into the baking dish. Insert the ginger

slices in between and pour the water

over; dot with butter and cover with

aluminium foil. Bake for about 1 ½

hours or until the quinces are just

pink. Remove the quince skin and

pips. Allow to cool.

3 To serve, segment the orange

slices and add to the quinces. Serve

with yoghurt or cream.

63

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


QUINCE PRESERVE

WITH VANILLA

2 large jars

45 minutes

3 hours

› 12 quinces, peeled, halved

› 2 vanilla pods, cut open lengthways,

seeds scraped out and retained

› juice of 2 lemons

› 750 ml water

› 750 ml verjuice

› 600 g sugar

1 Place all the ingredients together in a

large saucepan. Place a layer of baking

paper over the saucepan and simmer

for about 3 hours or until the quinces

are soft.

2 Spoon out the quinces using a

slotted spoon and pack them into the

hot, sterilised jars. Increase the stove

temperature and reduce the cooking

liquor until syrupy. Pour the syrup over

the fruit in the jars and seal the jars.

STEWED QUINCES

WITH HONEY

& LEMON

Serves 4

30 minutes

2 hours

› 125 ml honey

› 60 ml lemon juice

› 500 ml water

› 4 quinces, peeled, halved

› creamed honey and natural yoghurt

to serve

1 Place all the ingredients in a large

saucepan and add some of the quince

skin. Bring to the boil then simmer for

about 2 hours or until the quinces are

soft and the liquid is ruby red in colour

and starting to thicken.

2 To serve, mix creamed honey with

natural yoghurt and serve with the

stewed quinces.

64

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


MASTER YOUR FAVOURITE CHRISTMAS DISH

with AEG appliances

www.aeg.lu

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


SEASONAL VEGETABLE

5 FACTS ABOUT

LEEKS

THE POOR WO/MAN’S

ASPARAGUS

Leeks work best with fish and

meat. One way to cook leek is

to halve the vegetable, season

with salt and pepper, coat with

oil, and grill at 175°C for 5-6

minutes on each side until firm

to the bite. But the delicate wild

leek is also delicious uncooked

in a salad, especially when

combined with apples and a

tangy dressing. To tone down

the sharpness briefly blanch the

leek in water or apple juice.

EASY FRIENDSHIPS

Leek gets on well with

chervil, caraway, tarragon,

lovage, parsley, thyme,

nutmeg, and chilli. Refine

your potato purée with leek;

you will be impressed with

its zest!

TEXT Martina Schmitt-Jamek

66

THIS VEGETABLE HAS

MANY SKILLS!

It can strengthen the body’s

defences, cleanses, strengthens

nerves; it can help to store

calcium in the bones, and improve

the intake of plant-based iron,

guard against kidney stones, and

ensure better functioning of the

gall bladder. The sulphurous allicin

is a natural antibiotic, as well as

being antimicrobial and a fungicide,

and it lowers cholesterol and blood

pressure. Manganese can help

against depression, and flavonoids

protect the internal walls of blood

vessels and guard against cancer.

BUYING AND

STORING

The milder, more delicate wild

leek is available from June until

September, while the autumn and

winter leek is somewhat spicier.

When buying look out for firm,

green leaves; if they are already

tired, the root hairs brown, or the

white lower part yellowish, the

leek will have seen better days.

Wrapped up, leek keeps in the

vegetable compartment of the

fridge for up to one week. Leek

that has been cut into rings and

possibly blanched can easily

be frozen, but should not be

defrosted before use.

MANY THROW AWAY

THE GREEN PARTS…

…but that is a shame. All parts of the leek can be used and the

green parts in particular hold 300 times more beta-carotene

than the white. Beta-carotene protects against free radicals

and guards against heart disease. If the somewhat stringy

and woody consistency of the green parts bothers you, use

them for soups and stews.

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


XX CATEGORIE XX

CREAMY POTATO AND LEEK SOUP

WITH CRISPY LEEK RIBBONS

Serves 4 20 minutes 25 minutes

› 500 g floury potatoes

› 2 leeks

› 1 garlic clove

› 4 tbsp olive oil

› approx. 800 ml vegetable stock

› 200 ml cream

› salt

› milled pepper

› a pinch of ground nutmeg

› 1 stalk fresh thyme


1 Peel the potatoes, wash and chop into cubes. Clean

the leek, divide halfway, wash thoroughly and let dry.

Keep some of the leek for the garnish and cut into fine

strips. Chop the rest into rings. Peel the garlic and chop

finely.

2 In a pot, heat 2 tbsp oil, add garlic and leek and sweat

without letting them colour. Add the cream to the broth;

add potatoes and season with salt, pepper and a pinch of

nutmeg and cook for approx. 15 minutes until soft.

3 Purée the soup until it has a fine consistency. If necessary,

cook further or add broth. Season with salt.

4 Wash the thyme, shake dry and remove leaves.

5 In a pan, fry the leek strips in rest of hot oil until crispy.

Add thyme, season lightly with salt and pepper.

6 Serve soup in bowls and garnish with leek ribbons.

67

REZEPT Firstname Lastname

FOTOS Firstname Lastname

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


IRISH POTATO PATTIES

WITH KALE & LEEK

Serves 4

20 minutes

50 minutes

› 500 g floury potatoes

› 2 leeks

› 200 g kale

› 2 eggs

› approx. 100 g flour

› 1 ½ - 2 tbsp baking powder

› 2 tbsp freshly chopped dill

› approx. 120 ml buttermilk

› salt

› milled pepper

› 2 tbsp butter

› 2 tbsp vegetable oil


1 Wash 2/3 of the potatoes and cook in boiling

water for approx. 30 minutes. Drain, run cold

water over potatoes, peel and press through a

potato ricer.

2 Peel rest of potatoes, wash, grate finely,

and press out onto piece of kitchen paper.

3 Wash leek, clean and cut finely. Break kale

leaves from stalk, cut away thick stalks and

cut central leaf veins flat. Wash leaves well

and blanch for 2 minutes in boiling salt water.

Drain, run over with cold water, let dry and

chop up small.

4 Combine eggs with flour, baking powder, potato

gratings, leeks, kale, dill and buttermilk.

Add milk or flour if needed. Season with salt

and pepper.

5 In a hot, coated pan heat butter with oil; add

dollops of dough with wooden spoon. Fry for

approx. 5 minutes at medium heat, flip and fry

for a further 5 minutes on other side until golden

brown. Fry all patties in this way. Let dry on

kitchen towel and serve, for example, with a

herb dip.

68

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


SEASONAL VEGETABLE

OVEN-ROASTED LEEKS WITH

SMOKED HAM, MUSHROOMS,

WALNUTS & THYME

Serves 4

20 minutes

approx. 25 minutes

› 4 leeks

› 4 slices of Parma ham, or a different smoked ham

› 4 stalks fresh thyme

› 60 g walnuts

› 2 tbsp olive oil

› 350 g mixed mushrooms, e.g. shiitake,

oyster mushrooms, champignons

› salt

› milled pepper

Pre-heat oven to 220°C top and bottom heat.

1 Wash and clean leek. Take 1 leek and cut into approx.

5 mm thick strips. Halve the rest of leek lengthwise. Cut

ham into thirds crosswise. Wash thyme, shake dry and

remove leaves. Roughly chop walnuts.

2 Coat baking dish or small baking tray with 1 tbsp oil.

Place the halved leeks with the cut showing onto dish/

tray and distribute the leek rings among them. Season

with salt, pepper and thyme and bake in oven for approx.

20 minutes.

3 Meanwhile, wash mushrooms, dry and shorten stems.

According to size, leave whole, halve or cut into pieces.

Heat rest of oil in pan and fry mushrooms until golden

brown and season with salt and pepper.

4 Take leek out of oven and distribute ham on top, put

back into oven for around 5-6 minutes.

5 When done, take out of oven, distribute the mushrooms

on top and garnish with chopped walnuts to serve.

69

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


SEASONAL VEGETABLE

LEEK QUICHE WITH FETA,

DRIED TOMATOES

& PINE NUTS

1 quiche (form 12 x 30 cm)

40 minutes

30 + 45 minutes

For the dough

› 230 g flour

› 1 tsp salt

› 1 egg

› 150 g butter

› flour, to work with

› butter, to grease form

For the topping

› 2 leeks

› 1 garlic clove

› 2 tbsp butter

› 80 g dried tomatoes, steeped in oil

› 200 g feta cheese

› 4 eggs

› 100 g crème fraîche

› 80 g parmesan cheese

› 200 ml cream

› salt

› milled pepper

› 1 tbsp dried thyme

› 50 g pine nuts

Preheat oven to 180°C (fan). Butter the quiche form.

1 For the dough, combine flour with salt, heap onto a

work surface, make a depression in the middle, crack egg

into depression and distribute butter in flakes around the

dip. With your hands, knead quickly to a smooth dough,

form into a ball, wrap in cling film and place in fridge for

30 minutes.

2 For the topping, halve leeks, clean, wash and cut into

strips. Peel garlic and chop finely. Sweat garlic and leek

in hot butter for 1-2 minutes without letting them colour.

Let any liquid evaporate and put pan aside.

3 Roughly chop tomatoes. Cube feta.

4 For the broth, whisk eggs with crème fraîche, parmesan

and cream and season with salt, pepper and thyme.

5 Roll out dough on floury work surface until slightly larger

than form and place into form making sure to create

a border. Distribute vegetables and feta onto dough,

pour broth over top and add pine nuts.

Bake in oven for approx. 45 minutes until golden brown.

70

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


NATURALLY DIFFERENT

A L A R G E S E L E C T I O N O F R E G I O N A L P R O D U C T S

Oberpallen | Steinsel | Strassen

71

pallcenter.lu

facebook.com/pallcenter

instagram.com/pallcenter


A STRONG UNIT

René Mathieu and his team

For René Mathieu's latest recipes, the chef wanted

to honour the young team that supports him

on a daily basis. Jim Meyers, Archibald de Prince,

Pierre Zehner and Louise Burton work every day in

the kitchens alongside the chef, and this time they

have prepared the dishes that you will be able to

discover in these pages.

72

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


RENÉ MATHIEU & HIS TEAM

› 6 red endives

› ½ red cabbage

› 2 apples Granny Smith

› 1 bunch of flat-leaf parsley

› a handful of apple blossom flowers

› 100 g parmesan cheese in chunks

› 100 g pumpkin seeds

› fine salt & pepper

› olive oil

RED ENDIVE CURLS WITH CABBAGE,

PARSLEY AND APPLE

By Louise Burton

Serves 10 20 minutes 2 hours

For the pickles

› 100 g sugar

› 200 g of vinegar

› 300 g water

› 4 cardamom seeds

› 1 bay leaf

For the candied cabbage

› 1 l apple juice

› 1 pinch of cinnamon

For the sauce

› 1 lemon

› 1 tbsp tamari sauce

› 1 tbsp honey

› 1 cm of ginger

› olive oil

1 Mince the red cabbage and prepare it in three ways:

one left natural, the second pickled, and the third candied

(see below).

To make the pickles, bring the ingredients together to a

boil, then pour hot over the cabbage and allow to macerate.

To candy the cabbage, cook it with apple juice, cinnamon

and let it crystalize.

2 Separate the endive leaves and set aside.

3 Prepare the tamari sauce. Mix a tablespoon of honey,

tamari sauce, lemon juice, and grated fresh ginger. Emulsify

with olive oil. Season with salt and pepper.

4 Dry roast the pumpkin seeds in a frying pan.

5 Mix the three cabbages, add the julienned green apples

and flat parsley and season with tamari sauce. Fill

the endive leaves with the mixed cabbage, apple blossom

flowers, pumpkin seeds and some parmesan cheese

grating.

73

RECIPES René Mathieu & Team

PHOTOS Ramunas Astrauskas

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


RENÉ MATHIEU & HIS TEAM

WINTER ROOTS ROLL UP WITH LEMON

KOHLRABI CREAM

By Jim Meyers

Serves 10

30 minutes

For the vegetable rolls

› 1 radish

› 2 yellow beets

› 2 red radishes

› 2 golden ball turnips

› 2 large carrots

› 2 green radishes

› 1 bunch of flat-leaf parsley

› 1 bunch of basil

› 1 celery root

› 1 piece parmesan cheese

› fleur de sel

› olive oil

› olive oil with lemon

For the kohlrabi cream

› 1 kohlrabi

› truffle oil

› 1 tbsp honey

› 1 lemon, juice

› 4 cashews

› Matcha green tea powder

VEGETABLE ROLLS

1 Using a mandolin, slice all the vegetables

into thin petals.

2 Soak your various vegetable petals

lightly in olive oil before placing them

on a sheet of baking paper. Cover the

sheet by making lines of vegetables,

the petals overlapping slightly by

alternating colours.

Tip: While making your collage,

remoisten each vegetable slice with

olive oil. Sprinkle with a few grains of

salt and parmesan cheese shavings.

3 Roll the vegetables up, gently

peeling off the first petals resting

on your baking sheet (as if you were

making a maki). Gently peel off the

sheet at the same time as you are

making your vegetable roll. With a

knife, cut off the final edge of your

sheet of baking paper that extends

beyond the vegetables. Wrap the

baking paper back around the whole

vegetable roll to hold it securely.

Set aside for 15 minutes in a cool

place so that the parmesan infuses

each vegetable petal.

KOHLRABI CREAM

Centrifuge the kohlrabi and mix the

juice with truffle oil, honey, lemon

juice and add the lemon olive oil as

if you were making a mayonnaise.

Season with salt and pepper.

TO SERVE

Unroll your sheet of baking paper

again to release your vegetable roll.

Cut 4 cm wide sections with a knife.

Divide into a large plate. Sprinkle

with a few turns of the pepper mill

and Matcha green tea powder. Add

some grated cashew nut and kohlrabi

cream and decorate with some

herbs and flowers.

74

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19

75


THE SALSIFY IS FLIRTING WITH THE PEAR

NUT, TRUFFLE, CHESTNUT PURÉE

By Archibald de Prince

76

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


RENÉ MATHIEU & HIS TEAM

Serves 6

20 minutes

60 minutes

› 12 salsifies

› 6 pears

› olive oil

› fleur de sel

› 100 g butter

› 1 tbsp honey

› 1 lemon juice

› 2 dl tamari

For the purée

› 1 dl vegetable cream

› 100 g walnuts

› salt & pepper

To serve

› 1 beautiful chestnut

› 1 beautiful truffle

› walnut oil

1 Peel two pears and cut them into 12 wedges. Keep the

peelings to cook with the salsifies.

2 Clean the salsifies by rubbing them with a brush, then

wash them thoroughly and rinse them. Place them in a

vacuum bag with a little olive oil, a pinch of fleur de sel

and 20 g of butter, add the peelings of the two pears

and steam cook in the oven for 16 minutes at 120°C or in

water. Put aside.

3 Collect the peelings and cooking juices and add them

to the cream. Heat everything, add the nuts and mix to a

purée. Season with salt and pepper. Put aside.

4 Cut the remaining pears into thin strips and roll them

up on their own, counting 5 rolls per person. Put aside.

5 In a skillet, add the rest of the butter, add the cooked

salsifies and brown with the pear quarters (they must

remain crisp). Then mix the honey, lemon juice and tamari

together and deglaze with this mixture. Let everything

caramelize.

On a large plate, arrange the salsify and pear wedges

harmoniously. Finish with the pear rolls, a few splashes

of walnut purée, grated truffle and chestnut and finish

with a dash of walnut oil and the caramelized juice of the

salsify.

77

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


ICE CREAM

1 Cut the vanilla pod in half and

scrape the inside with the blade of

your knife to extract the seeds.

2 Peel the Jerusalem artichokes

(keep the peelings, wash them and

let dry in the oven for 4 hours). Cook

the Jerusalem artichokes with the

vanilla seeds, butter and lemon juice

in a vacuum bag for 20 minutes in a

steam oven.

3 Bring 320 g of water to a boil.

Add the honey and the sugar. Place

everything in a blender, add the

cooking juice from the Jerusalem artichokes

and the vanilla and mix to

obtain a fine purée. Pour into an ice

cream maker.

THE JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE MELTS

WITH PLEASURE FOR THE PRALINE

HAZELNUT STREUSEL, LEMON OIL, ALMOND MILK

By Pierre Zehner

Serves 10

For the sponge cakes (10)

› 120 g liquid praline

› 6 eggs

› 120 g powdered sugar

› 30 g gluten-free flour

For the streusel

› 90 g powdered sugar

› 130 g gluten-free flour

› 120 g butter

› 90 g crushed hazelnuts

› 170 g hazelnut powder

1 hour + 10 minutes

1 hour

For the ice cream

› 950 g Jerusalem artichoke

› 40 g butter

› 2 vanilla pods

› 80 g sugar

› 40 g lemon juice

› 50 g honey

› 500 ml almond milk

› 1 dl cream

› 1 tbsp of orgeat syrup

› olive oil with lemon

THE SPONGE CAKES

Beat the praline, eggs, add 30 g flour

and 120 g powdered sugar and whisk

well. Pour the mixture into a siphon,

add 3 cartridges and shake vigorously

for several minutes.

Fill a plastic cup with a perforated

bottom with this foam at one third

of its height, immediately turn it over

onto a plate covered with a sheet

of baking paper and place it in the

microwave for 1 minute.

Unmould the sponge after cooling

and place it in a container in the

fridge, covered with cling film.

THE STREUSEL

Beat together butter, flour, sugar,

hazelnut powder and crushed hazelnuts.

Spread between two baking sheets

and bake at 150°C for 10 minutes.

Let cool, add the dry Jerusalem artichoke

peels and reduce to pieces.

TO SERVE

Mix the cream with the orgeat syrup.

Then, place a praline sponge and the

Jerusalem artichoke ice cream on a

plate. Sprinkle with hazelnut streusel,

add a few drops of almond milk,

a few drops of orgeat syrup and a

little lemon oil.

78

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


ADVERTORIAL

CASINO 2OOOO:

AN ERA OF CHANGE

To attract an even wider range of customers and to be in perfect harmony with the expectations of

its audience, CASINO 2OOO has entered into an era of change. Thus, the Purple Lounge restaurant

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a new menu... The warm and cosy atmosphere will seduce most people, while brasserie dishes will

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an establishment with a chic urban feel

Completely redesigned by the interior designer

and decorator, Isabelle Armand, the Purple

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in a contemporary and elegant setting. The

new decoration, enhanced by natural and raw

materials, and bathed in a gentle light, plunges

you into a warm and cosy atmosphere. Of course,

everything has been designed for the well-being

and comfort of customers. For their part, the

chefs at the Purple Lounge bend over backwards

to establish a brasserie cuisine based on quality

products.

EVENTS

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Fabrice ÉBOUÉ starting

from € 35

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from € 50 to € 250

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BÉNABAR from € 38

WIN 2x2 PLACES

Answer the following question:

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Send an e-mail with your name and

address and the keyword BÉNABAR

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Closing date is the 15.01.2020

Le SNACK BAR: a central

meeting point and a great

place to enjoy life

Élodie Lenoir, interior designer and

her team who make up EL'LE Interior

Stories have been selected to create

the brand-new SNACK BAR space. She

likes the idea of telling a story, finding a

common thread and building relationships

with her clients.

Its mission: to create a snack bar shop

with "ready-to-eat" dishes, coffees,

drinks and various dishes to enjoy at

any time of the day. A tasting area has

been added, a stopover to take the time,

taste and exchange before moving on to

another activity.

05.02.2020

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starting from € 38

Open daily from 10 am, Monday to Thursday until 3 am, Friday to

Sunday until 4 am. Information: +352 / 23 611 -1 - info@casino2000.lu

casino2000.lu

For adults only

79

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


80

PHOTO Ramunas Astrauskas

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


PORTRAIT OF A CHEF

JEAN-CHARLES HOSPITAL

DARE TO HAVE MORE FUN

"I completely freed myself from this

pressure," says Jean-Charles Hospital

(50). He smiles. "One day I simply told

myself: stop it, Jean-Charles. Now it’s

time to have some fun. Only fun." The

pressure is this: everything in connection

with a Michelin star and other

prizes. The fun: the oven in Le Bistronome

in the Route d’Arlon. Hospital

has worked here, in

his own kitchen, since

July 14th 2010. "I can

cook whatever I feel

like without having

to think about certain

criteria, which I might

have to fulfil to get a

star." The stars are not

strangers to him, nor

is their attraction. The man from the

Champagne region learnt the trade

of pâtissier, chocolatier, and glacier

at the school of hotel management in

Saint-Didier, and won a gold medal

for being the best trainee in France.

For his military service he spent two

years in Washington DC as the personal

cook to the French military

attaché. "I was twenty years old and

did not have a lot of experience. But

I got to meet the French Minister of

Defence and the American President."

After that he worked with the starred

chef Didier Delu in Paris for a year

and then for two years with Roger

Souvereyns, the chef of the legendary

Scholteshof in the Belgian city

of Hasselt. He was chef-patissier in a

two star establishment. "I was given

free reign in creating the menu," he

remembers, "and Souvereyns impressed

me with his savoir-faire in

the kitchen and through his innovative

taste. Aesthetic taste, too." Then

he made the change to starred chef

Rik Vandersanden not far away at

"You can do a lot

of wonderful things

with those if the

preparation is

good and the

ingredient fresh."

De Barrier in Houthalen. Here, in Flanders, far away from French cuisine, he

learnt to perfect his English surrounded by cooks from all over the world. He

stayed for seven years: "That’s a long time in this profession."

The Luxembourgish leg of his journey started about 20 years ago when he

joined Pascal Brasseur in the restaurant Wengé as chef. "For nine years he

put his faith in me. That was so important to me," says Hospital, "I could do

what I wanted in the kitchen. That was a good opportunity to put myself out

there in Luxembourg." Then, he and Philippe L’Hôpital opened Le Bistronome

together, with the energetic support of gastronomic advisor Tony Tintinger

("he helped us a lot"). The distribution of tasks is clear: the

kitchen is Hospital’s responsibility; L’Hôpital takes care of the

service.

"It’s not an easy kitchen but a kitchen with several techniques

and in which one respects the simple products of the

season," Hospital defines his work thus. "Everything depends

on the chef," he says. He has to constantly "question himself".

Everything is always changing. For example, for three years

now business meals have been happening less often, are

becoming shorter and faster. And the clients are getting

younger. "You have to move with the times." For Le Bistronome that means

that Hospital has reduced the offer of first courses and main dishes somewhat,

and reduced the price of the three-course Menu du Marché from 41 to 39 euros.

"I also use fewer noble ingredients, which are already so expensive when

buying and some clients find those prices exorbitant." That means less turbot,

John Dory, and crayfish, more gilthead or monkfish. "You can do a lot of

wonderful things with those if the preparation is good and the ingredient

fresh."

He feels at home in Luxembourg, which is also where his son was born. "The

Luxembourgish people have given me a lot of their trust. The country is

beautiful and green and has a great location in Europe." Le Bistronome is

closed on Sundays and Mondays, as well as at Christmas and in the summer

holidays. "You have to protect family life." That, he says, is important: "I really

did not want my wife to work with me in the business." He is determined

to protect his emotional and family life. "I’ve seen too many bad examples."

Naturally, he still cooks at Christmas and on holidays, "but only with family

and friends. Completely relaxed. And with an open bottle of wine in the

kitchen. That’s real pleasure."

LE BISTRONOME

373, Route dʼArlon — L-8011 Strassen

Tel. +352 / 26 31 31 90

bistronome.lu

81

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


VENISON

with small onions & bacon in pepper sauce,

celery mousseline

4 persons

1 hour

45 minutes

For the meat

› venison 600 g net

› 1 sprig rosemary

› peanut oil

For the pepper sauce

› 200 g deer bones & some slices

of meat (ask your butcher)

› ½ l red wine

› 1 tbsp Sirop de Liège

› 1 tbsp cognac

› 1 tbsp strong mustard

› 2 tbsp sherry vinegar

› 1 tbsp flour

› 1 beautiful shallot

› 1 carrot

› 2 garlic cloves,

crushed with the skin

› 10 black peppercorns

› 1 bay leaf

› 5 juniper berries

› 1 carnation

› 3 tbsp peanut oil

› salt & pepper

RECIPE Jean-Charles Hospital

PHOTOS Ramunas Astrauskas

For the french style sides

› 240 g smoked pork belly

› 200 g baby onions

› 200 g brown mushrooms

or chanterelles

› 50 g butter

› peanut oil

› sugar, salt & white pepper

For the creamed celery

› 600 g celery

› 1 l raw milk

› salt

82

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


CHEF' S MASTER CLASS

THE MEAT

Fry for 2 minutes on each side in

1 a pan with peanut oil. The meat

must remain pink inside.

Remove the pan from the heat,

2 add a piece of butter, a small

clove of garlic crushed with the skin

and a sprig of rosemary.

3When the butter has melted,

generously baste the venison

with it for 1 minute. Place meat on

a grill and keep warm in the oven at

40°C covered with a piece of foil.

THE SAUCE

Fry the bones in peanut oil over

4 a high heat.

Add the shallots and the carrots.

Brown everything together 5

with the crushed garlic. Flambé with

cognac, deglaze with vinegar and

reduce. Reduce the heat, add the

flour and fry lightly while stirring.

Add the Sirop de Liège and the

6 mustard, immediately deglaze/

cover with red wine.

Add bay leaf, pepper, juniper and

7 cloves. When boiling for the first

time, skim off the foam. Continue

cooking on a low heat for 30 minutes.

Pour through a sieve and season

8 to taste with salt and pepper.

9

Reduce for another 10 to 15 minutes

and stir occasionally with a

whisk.

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


CHEF' S MASTER CLASS

THE SIDES

Peel the onions (put them in

10 warm water for 1 hour beforehand,

then they are easier to peel).

Put the onions in a pot and cover with

cold water, add the butter, one pinch

salt and one pinch sugar. Cook and

reduce until the onions are soft.

Clean the mushrooms without

11 water and cut into 4 or 6 pieces,

depending on size.

Dice the bacon. Fry the mushrooms

in hot peanut oil in a pan, season

with salt and pepper, drain, add the

bacon and fry.

As soon as everything is well

12 coloured, stir in a piece of butter

and add the onions.

THE CELERY

Chop celery coarsely, add the

13 cold milk so that the celery

pieces are well covered (about 1.5

times the volume of the celery). Season

with a pinch of salt. Bring to the

boil while stirring, then cook at low

heat for approx. 75 minutes.

Drain and keep the cooking

14 juices. Mix the celery while

slowly adding the cooking soup until

the desired consistency is achieved.


FOODIES

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85

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


RESTAURANT PORTRAIT

WINDS OF CHANGE

WITH RESTAURANT CHIGGERI

Young, creative and engaged – and yet willing preserve

the good qualities of the old – that’s what Joao and Sandra

Ramos stand for. In March 2017 they took over the traditional

restaurant Chiggeri in the Rue du Nord. What has

not changed is the decor of the historic city palace. Time

seems to have stood still in the labyrinthine former private

home of the Feltes family. There are original wood

floors, unsymmetrical and occasionally small rooms, and

a steep and narrow wooden staircase. Exhausting for the

service but certainly charming. Every room, from the conservatory

to the private salon to the romantic bay with a

view on Kirchberg, has its own special atmosphere. “We

have not changed the existing décor,” says Sandra Ramos,

“instead, we changed the philosophy and the menu.” Previously,

the brasserie downstairs and

the gastronomic restaurant on the

first floor were separate but that’s not

the case anymore. “All our guests get

the same food and wine menu and

can then decide if they would rather try our bistro menu or

the gastronomic choice. They are free to eat a hamburger

at our most beautiful table.”

“The dishes on our menu

are ones which have withstood

the rigorous family testing.”

The menu is small but select. The creative side of chef

Joao Ramos is obvious. Listed are classics of the bistro

kitchen as well as more eccentric creations of the haute

cuisine. The classics are nevertheless not run of the mill.

The Chiggeri hamburger on homemade bread delivers

with the best beef and Italian ingredients such as burrata

and mortadella. The lasagne is an old family recipe handed

down by Sandra’s grandmother and made completely

without béchamel. “We don’t do your typical Italian, Portuguese,

or similar country kitchen. Instead, we incorporate

ideas and stimulations from our travels across the

world. The dishes on our menu are ones, which we loved

the taste of and which we have redefined in our own way,

and which have withstood the rigorous family testing.”

Products used are, as far as possible,

local and seasonal, and everything

is cooked fresh each day. “This fresh

kitchen also allows us to adapt the

menu to the season every three

months,” says Joao. The joy in experimentation shows in

creations such as sashimi of red tuna with foie gras – now

a staple on Chiggeri’s menu.

Sandra’s father Dino Totaro is also part of the team. He

is responsible for the wine menu of the restaurant. As the

treasurer of the ALS (Association Luxembourgeoise des

Sommeliers) the role fits him like a glove. In 2017 Chiggeri

was awarded restaurant with the best wine menu in

Luxembourg. For guests, it’s useful to see the labelling of

the wines according to categories of price. “That helps to

discretely advise guests when choosing wines; making

sure they fit the food and the budget.”

In summer, Chiggeri’s terrace – one of the most beautiful

in the city – offers the perfect place for a relaxing dining

experience with a breath-taking view across the valley of

the city to Kirchberg. “We have no tourists marching past,

which means that guests can enjoy a calm and beautiful

summer’s day without feeling disturbed by traffic noise.”

Much loved by guests are also the “Dinner in the dark”

events. Every Thursday, they offer a meal for up to twelve

people in complete darkness. A bite-size four-course

menu is served with appropriate wines. “It’s astonishing

to see the dynamics in a mixed group of guests when one

of their senses is removed.” On account of its popularity,

reservation is necessary.

RESTAURANT CHIGGERI

15, Rue du Nord — L-2229 Luxembourg

Tel. +352 / 22 99 36

chiggeri.lu

86

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


87

TEXT Barbara Fischer-Fürwentsches

PHOTOS Ramunas Astrauskas

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


LËTZEBUERGER RËNDFLEESCH

PRODUIT DU TERROIR (LUXEMBOURGISH BEEF)

A recipe by Frédéric Vuillemin, owner and chef

of the restaurant Becher-Gare in Bech.

88

RECIPE Frédéric Vuillemin

PHOTOS Ramunas Astrauskas

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


LUXEMBOURGISH BEEF

Produit du terroir

Lëtzebuerger

Rëndfleesch

Eng Passioun,

e Genoss!

FONDUE

VIGNERONNE

Serves 4

15 minutes

1 hour

For the cooking marinade

› 2 bottles of strong red wine

› 1 glass port wine

› 1 carrot

› 1 garlic clove

› 1 bouquet of flowers garni

› peppercorns

For the fondue

› 300 g beef (rump steak or fillet)

› 2 chicken breasts

› 1 duck breast

› Espelette chilli pepper

La viande d’origine

de qualité 100%

luxembourgeoise

garantie de la fourche

à la fourchette !

1 Put all the ingredients with the wine and the port wine into a

saucepan and simmer at low heat for an hour.

2 Remove the skin from the duck to degrease it. Cut the meat

into thin slices, season with Espelette pepper and put aside in

a cool place.

3 When you are ready to eat, pour the red wine reduction into

a fondue pot and enjoy it like a Fondue Bourguignonne.

Serve with French fries or fried potatoes.

RECOMMENDED WINES

Blaufränkisch Alexander Laible

Cuvée Les Darons Corbières Jeff Carrel

Pinot noir Domaine Pundel Hoffeld

www.produitduterroir.lu

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


CHRISTMAS

STOLLEN

EASY RECIPE WITHOUT SPICES

90

RECIPE Berthe Elsen-Melkert

PHOTOS Ramunas Astrauskas

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


FARMER'S RECIPE

After the fantastic coffee yule

log recipe that Berthe let us

share with our readers in last

year's Christmas issue, she's back

with a classic and delicious Stollen

as part of our cooperation with the

Luxembourg Chamber of Agriculture!

As a mother of three and grandmother

of seven, family matters to

Berthe and she spends her days as a young retiree concocting tasty little

dishes. The follow-up to her first cookbook, "Kache wéi fréier - Meng 105

beschte", is called "Cuisine d’antan – International" (available in French and

German). The book is published on request of EMB, European Milkboard,

grouping 7 countries, with the Luxembourg Dairy Association “D’Fair Mëllech”

representing Luxembourg. Her family is a member of this group of fair

milk producers.

2 Stollen (600 g) 30 minutes + 1 1/2 hours 45 minutes

For the marzipan filling

› 100 g semolina

› 120 g melted butter

› 300 g icing sugar

› 4 tbsp ground almonds

› 10 drops almond extract

› 6 tbsp milk

For the dough

› 1 kg flour

› 60 g fresh yeast

› 250 g butter

› 500 ml whole milk

› 150 g fine sugar

› 1 ½ tsp fine salt

› 350 g currants

› 30 g candied lemon peel and

orange pieces

› 50 g mix of chopped nuts and

almonds

› 200 ml rum or honey schnapps

› icing sugar for decoration

1 For the marzipan filling: mix the ingredients together

and let sit overnight in a covered bowl.

2 Steep the currents, candied lemon peel and nuts in

rum or honey schnapps for 1 hour.

3 Sift the flour into a large bowl. Form a depression

in the centre and crumble the yeast into it, sprinkle 1

tablespoon sugar over the yeast and sprinkle salt over

the top of the flour.

4 Pour 2 tablespoons of the lukewarm milk over the

yeast. Let the mixture rise in a warm place for about 30

minutes.

5 Melt the butter in the rest of the lukewarm milk, add

to the yeast.

6 With dough hooks, knead the dough from the inside

out to make a nice-looking yeast dough, let rise again

until doubled in volume.

7 On a floured surface, knead the dough with your

hands, working in the currants and nuts at the same time.

8 Divide the dough into two portions, roll out flat, and

spread the marzipan mixture over them. Form into

stollen shapes and let rise in the oven at 30°C.

Bake for 45-50 minutes at 180°C.

9 Remove from the oven and brush on melted butter

with a pastry brush.

Let cool, then sprinkle with icing sugar.

Will keep for about a month.

PRIZE DR AW

2 CUISINE D’ANTAN – INTERNATIONAL books in French.

Email us your full name and address with the word STOLLEN to gewinnen@kachen.lu

The winner will be chosen at random and will be notified by email. No legal action is permitted.

Submission deadline: 31.01.2020

91

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


MISS EME'S

WAFFLES

92

RECIPE Mademoiselle Eme / Jacques Schneider

PHOTOS Ramunas Astrauskas

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


GRANNY'S RECIPE

Jacques Schneider, a young Luxembourg artist who brilliantly combines

photographic and pictorial art, attaches particular importance

to sharing, especially when it comes to eating and enjoying. For us, he

has created a recipe in homage to his grandmother's best friend, Mademoiselle

Eme, who died at the age of 95 and for whom he had great admiration.

She was a remarkable woman who dedicated her life to serving others

and prepared these simple and tasty waffles regularly for the Luxembourg

scouts for more than 80 years. We had the pleasure of discovering the recipe

for you during a shared moment of joy in Jacques Schneider's studio.

3xvive.lu

20 waffles 5 minutes 40 minutes

› 2 eggs

› 125 g butter or margarine

› 1 1/2 tbsp oil

› 1 tbsp fine sugar

1 Whisk the eggs in a bowl.

2 Melt the butter slowly in the microwave and

add to the dough.

3 Stir in a tablespoon of fine sugar.

4 Stir in lemonade and flour at the same time

and continue to mix. The consistency should be

slightly liquid.

› 1 sachet vanilla sugar

› 500 g flour

› 1 pinch of fine salt

› 1 bottle of lemonade (75 cl)

5 Bake the dough in a waffle machine,

preferably in the presence of your guests, to

enjoy it as quickly as possible!

6 Serve with fresh whipped cream and jam.

93

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


TYPICALLY LUXEMBOURGISH

KACHKÉIS (COOKED CHEESE)

If there is one speciality that is associated with Luxembourgish cuisine, it

is cooked cheese or "Kachkéis". Hardly any other dish polarises as much as

Kachkéis: you love it, or you hate it!

You can find this lean sour milk cheese, which is a processed cheese, especially

in Luxembourg, the north of France and in some regions of Austria. In the past,

Kachkéis could not be bought ready made and you had to prepare it yourself.

Today you can buy the finished product in different variations, so that only a

few people still prepare it themselves. The raw cooked cheese is dissolved with

water, milk or cream and refined with all kinds of spices.

If you now feel like making your own Kachkéis, we have a recipe for you here.

350 ml

10 minutes

› 1 roll of Kachkéis 250 g

› 150 ml water › butter › 1 egg yolk

› salt & ground pepper

› some cumin if you like

› Alternatively, replace water,

butter and egg with:

› 2/3 cream and 1/3 white wine

RECIPE Bibi Wintersdorf

PHOTO Ramunas Astrauskas

1 Cut the cheese into small pieces

and place in a pot. Add water (about

2/3 of the weight of the cheese). The

cheese pieces must not be completely

covered, otherwise the cheese becomes

too liquid (alternatively, you

can also use cream and white wine

instead of water for cooking, but

then omit the butter and egg yolk).

2 Melt the cheese while stirring

constantly on a low flame (do not

boil!). Stir in the piece of butter and,

if you like, an egg yolk. Season with

salt and pepper and other spices like

cumin.

3 Leave to cool and store in the refrigerator.

Take out of the fridge

about 30 minutes before serving to

allow the cheese to reach room temperature

and become spreadable.

94

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19

95


A CHRISTMAS CLASSIC

Dickens’ famous story about the miser Ebenezer Scrooge made punch one of

the favourite drinks in the season of Advent. Yet, originally, the drink did not

even come from England.

96

TEXT Susanne Japsers

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


FEATURE

“Four elements, join'd in an emulous strife,

fashion the world, and constitute life. From the

sharp citron the starry juice pour; acid to life is

the innermost core. Now, let the sugar the bitter

one meet; still be life’s bitter tamed down with

the sweet! Let the bright water flow into the bowl;

water, the calm one, embraces the whole. Drops

from the spirit pour quick'ning within; life but

its life from the spirit can win. Haste, while it

gloweth, your vessels to bring: The wave has but

virtue drunk hot from the spring!””

FRIEDRICH SCHILLER

(translation: Edward Bulwer-Lytton)

These instructions for making punch are over 200

years old and belong to Friedrich Schiller. His

“Punch Song” possesses, however, a big caveat: the

German poet only mentions four ingredients and that is,

strictly speaking, wrong.

Many think, when hearing the word “punch”, foremost

of a traditional British drink. After all, at the latest since

Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, punch is associated

with English homeliness, a crackling open fire and red

cheeks. Indeed, the alcoholic drink is especially popular

on the island.

British? As if!

Punch was not invented by the Brits. In reality, it comes

from somewhere a bit further away, from India to be exact.

In India, for many centuries, the drink has been brewed

from arrak, a spirit distilled from palm wine and containing

up to 60 or 70 per cent, as well as sugar, lemon, spices

and water or tea. Were you counting? That’s right, there

are five ingredients, dear Friedrich Schiller, not only four.

The Hindi word for five is pāñč (pronounced “pantsh”).

And now the English do play a role after all. In the 17th

century, English sailors learnt to appreciate the Indian

speciality and brought the recipe back home, as well as the

name, albeit somewhat anglicised. From thereon, “Punch”

spread across England , and not long after, throughout the

whole of Europe.

97

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


XX CATEGORIE XX

DICKENS’ PUNCH

RECIPE

Since we have mentioned the

esteemed writer, we would like

to offer our readers – in time for

Christmas – Dickens’ very own

recipe. However, caution is advised

twofold. First, rum alone was

not enough for Dickens; second,

the preparation is somewhat

combustible.

› ¾ cups sugar

› 3 lemons

› 2 cups rum

› 1 ¼ cups cognac

› 5 cups black tea (or water,

if preferable)

› lemon and orange slices

› freshly ground nutmeg

A composer’s favourite drink

Partly responsible for the popularity of the drink was Wolfgang Amadeus

Mozart who first encountered it on his travels to England in 1764. Up until

then, it had been unknown in Vienna. “Punch, pronounced ‘punsch’, is a drink

made of water, rum, sugar and boiled lime. Drunk warm or cold as desired…”

wrote Mozart’s father Leopold to a friend. This letter about the drink foreshadowed

the fact that it later became his son’s favourite brew. Mozart’s father

also only mentions four ingredients in his description. Astonishingly, and

surely unimaginable today, he writes that one might partake of the drink when

cold, something that was not unusual back then. These days, one might question

the wisdom of that particular enjoyment.

In a pot, add sugar and lemon peel,

stir and let steep for 30 minutes.

Add rum and cognac. Take a

spoonful of the mixture and ignite.

With the spoonful, set fire to the

mixture in the pot and let burn for

three minutes. Smoother flames

with the lid. Remove lemon peel,

add juice of three lemons and hot

water or tea. Garnish with lemon or

orange slices and nutmeg and serve

hot in a glass.

Valued by actor Heinz Rühmann

These days there are many different ways of making the classic brew. Mark

you, the legendary Feuerzangenbowle, from the film of the same name starring

Heinz Rühmann, is also a variant of the punch. Basically, whatever tastes good

is allowed in respect to the recipe – with or without alcohol. However, care is

always advocated when partaking in warm alcoholic beverages – they are quick

to have an effect and, if taken liberally, are guaranteed to create hangovers.

98

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


ADVERTORIAL

AWARD WINNING, REGIONAL

AND A TREAT!

Wines and Crémants of the Domaines Vinsmoselle

deliver in the international sphere

In addition, the Domaines Vinsmoselle

convinces with their vintage wines.

The winegrowers association received

the nomination of best producer of still

wine in Luxembourg at the winter 2019

edition of the Berliner Wein Trophy –

Germany’s biggest international wine

tasting event. Out of 1426 presenters

from 41 countries, the Domaines Vinsmoselle

received five gold and one silver

medals. At the summer 2019 Trophy

they achieved a dream medal count with

nine gold and five silver medals. The

Gewürztraminer GPC 2018 Vin de Paille

even received a grand gold medal.

Luxembourgish Crémants and wines do not have to hide at international

competitions. They regularly clear the floor of prizes in the neighbouring

countries. Especially the Crémants and wines of the Domaines Vinsmoselle

garner attention. They can be most certainly described as “hidden champions” that

deserve a far higher degree of popularity. “In 2019 we received a veritable rain of

medals,” Josy Gloden, president of the winegrowers association, says delighted.

“The consequent efforts over several years of our wine-growers in the vineyards and

the continuing optimisation of quality have finally born fruits.”

At the Concours International des Crémants de France et de Luxembourg 621

Crémants were savoured overall, from all the well-known Crémant-producing

regions: Alsace, Burgundy, Loire, Jura, Savoie, Bordeaux, and the Luxembourgish

Moselle. Eight Crémants POLL-FABAIRE were awarded gold medal with a total of

29 medals for Luxembourg. “Proof of the fact that the consumer in Luxembourg can

fall back onto first class regional and especially unusual products.” The secret of

success is, besides the terroir, the choice of grapes for a Crémant. “In Luxembourg

we predominantly use Auxerrois, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Riesling.

In the Bordeaux region Sauvignon, Sémillon and Muscadelle dominate. Not to be

overlooked is the first-rate work and adventurous spirit of our cellarer. With 28 years

of experience our Cuvées just get better and better,” says Josy Gloden with pride.

So why not serve some award-winning

Luxembourgish wines and Crémants

during the upcoming holidays? One can

easily find a suitable wine or Crémant

for every occasion and dinner, and

they make wonderful gifts. Fittingly,

the Vignum Magnum will be reissued

in the festive season. If you want an

advance tasting, don’t miss the Festival

des Crus at the winery Wellenstein

between November 22nd-24th. “The

many awards are not reflected in the

prices, by the way,” says Josy Gloden.

“We take part in competitions in order

to stay in the know and so that we can

try the newest international trends. The

professional opinion of our international

colleagues is just as important as the

feedback from our customers.”

Go to vinsmoselle.lu for information on

the wines, Crémants, awards, and gift

ideas of the Domaines Vinsmoselle.

99

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


WINE NEWS

BRUT, ROSÉ, MILLÉSIMÉ

A toast to Crémant!

TEXT Claude François

For a long time now, Luxembourgish Crémant has not

only been a popular sparkling wine but has become a

Luxembourgish national treasure. Crémant is part of

the everyday just like “Kachkéis” and “Bouneschlupp”!

Introduced in November 1991, the sparkling wine, which

must undergo strict quality and production regulations,

quickly became a huge success. Indeed, the product

secured commercial success for many wine growers.

The Luxembourgish wine-growing scene is not imaginable

without Crémant anymore. According to the

Luxembourgish wine growing institute,

every year between 2.5 and 3

million bottles of Crémant are

produced.

Over the years, the quality of the

product has risen and there are

ever more special Cuvées that can

compete with the big Champagnes.

This is well attested by awards from

international competitions.

The classic Cuvées contain especially

large amounts of Auxerrois

and Pinot blanc, but also Riesling,

Chardonnay and Pinot Gris are very

often used in Cuvées. Some producers

bank on pure brand Crémants,

whereby Riesling holds special place.

Those who can afford to, produce

beside the Cuvées, several pure

brand Crémants. Especially noble

are “Champagne”-Cuvées, which are mostly made only

from Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. And you can now, more

and more, find Rosé-Crémants, which are hugely popular.

People in the know value the vintage Crémants, which,

starting with the vintage 2016, must mature with yeast

for at least 24 months, in order to be recognised as

Crémant millesimé. The ultimate Cuvées are those,

which age with yeast for even longer and are only disgorged

after many years. To these kinds of Crémants

very few liqueur is added; they are often sold as Brut

Nature or Extra Brut. Naturally, these kinds of manufacture

are more expensive than normal Cuvées but they

are also often extraordinarily creamy, concentrated and

smooth. Be that as it may: a toast to Crémant, and not

only on holidays!

VINTAGE 2019

Small quantities, high quality

The vintage 2019 was a vintage of extremes: a late frost

in spring, sunburn in August and a constant mixture of

heat and rain. 2019 was one of those years with the

lowest yields. Yet, qualitatively this vintage will bring

much joy from 2020 onwards, because the quality of

the grapes was good to excellent.

The downpours during the harvest

came at exactly the right time, the

vines were revitalized and the grapes

could ripen and produce juice very

well. The phenolic ripening process

was very good in the end, the grapes

had produced enough sugar and the

proportions between the aromatic

tartaric acid and the rather unwelcome

malic acid was also advantageous.

One can, once more, look forward

to a thrilling vintage with big

wines – but now in winter it is time

to really enjoy the exceptional 2018

vintages!

08 th & 09 th FEBRUARY 2020

Wine Cheese Enjoy

Following the popular event Wine Taste Enjoy at Whitsun,

the ORT Région Moselle invites to their similar wine

experience Wine Cheese Enjoy on the second weekend

in February. This time it’s about wine and cheese. An

exciting prospect that guarantees light bulb moments

when a cheese is paired with the right grape variety.

Besides several restaurants you will find

numerous wine growers at this gourmet

event: Henri Ruppert, Caves du Sud,

Krier-Welbes, L&R Kox, Benoît Kox,

Caves St Remy – Desom, Caves

St Martin, Leuck-Thull, Beck-Frank,

Cep d’Or, Caves Poll-Fabaire,

Pundel vins purs, Steinmetz-Duhr,

Pundel-Hoffeld/Pundel-Err.

(Status: November 7th 2019)

100

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


plan K

LUXEMBOURG,

SMALL COUNTRY,

GREAT WINES

WWW.VINS-CREMANTS.LU


DOMAINE LAURENT & RITA

KOX IN REMICH

INNOVATIVE AND BRAVE

Actually, the name should be “Domaine Laurent, Rita & Corinne Kox”, for the next generation has

just stepped up. Officially, Corinne Kox, the fourth generation, is now at the helm of the family

business. She still calls herself “the most demanding trainee” in the business even though she

has gone through a long education and has a doctorate in molecular biology. After completing

her research she felt drawn to the family business. Her love for research and her curiosity have

stayed with her. “My father, Laurent, has always experimented a lot,” Corinne says, “this joy for

experimenting and for creativity will continue to be a building block of our passion and work.”

While her mother Rita continues to be responsible for the culinary events, such as “Le domaine

invite à table”.

An exceptional product

for exceptional customers

Bravery and innovation show themselves in many ways.

Since 2014 around 1600 litres of wine, buried in the earth

in Kvevri amphorae, have been vinified. This method,

which is thousands of years old, originated in Georgia

and produces wines with a completely different style.

Pinot-Blanc and Riesling grapes are processed with their

skin, like a red wine. “This so called orange wine is completely

hyped around the globe at the moment and has

made the international press aware of us,” says Laurent

Kox. In Luxembourg, this wine is only available at the Kox

winery. “This wine is truly earthy with a lot of tannin. It

works wonderfully with substantial meals.” As the wines

are not refinished the risk of a total loss is high. “That is

why we only use 100 % healthy grapes,” Corinne states

further.

For a different kind of clientele there are vegan wines and

wines without sulphites. “For vegan wines we do not use

refining agents derived from animal components,” the

vintner explains. “These are – if necessary – replaced with

plant-derived proteins.” On this level, too, the Domaine

Kox is unique on the Luxembourgish Moselle. Sulphites

protect the wine from an oxidation that is too fast and

raise storage capability. The winery offers three reds

without sulphites. “At the moment we’re experimenting,

because in 2020 we want to offer a Crémant without added

sulphites – a technical challenge,” says Corinne.

Innovation on the vineyard

On the 12-hectare growing area grapes such as Cabernet

Blanc are cultivated – a relatively young, new variety

with a high resistance to fungus – next to the main crop

of Riesling and Pinot Gris. “We are at the forefront for the

cultivation of fungi-resistant varieties on the Moselle,”

explains Laurent. “This means that we can go sparingly

on the use of fungicides, without which no vineyard can

work. We already grow without herbicides and have done

so for around 30 years.” For Corinne, too, the gentle and

eco-friendly treatment of the vines is paramount, not only

for the health of her bees. In 2019, together with Luxaviation,

she was the first wine grower on the Luxembourgish

Moselle to use drones in the upkeep of the health of the

vines. “Drones are more flexible to use than other plant

protection measures. They fly lower to the ground, which

means less driftage, and we can be more exact,” explains

Corinne.

Beside all that innovation, craftsmanship, oenological

competence, passion, and respect for a natural product

still stand at the centre of Domaine Kox. It is of especial

importance to father and daughter to improve the prominence

of Luxembourgish wines. “Luxembourgish wines

and Crémants are world class and will in future be seen

more often on wine menus within and outside of Luxembourg.”

domainekox.lu

102

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


VINTNER FAMILIES

103

TEXT Barabara Fischer-Fürwentsches

PHOTOS Ramunas Astrauskas

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


NOBLE DROPS

Opyos Navy Strength Gin

Opyos Navy Strength Gin is

created by adding an extra amount

of juniper berries to the classic

Opyos Luxembourg Dry Gin recipe

and bottled at a higher proof in

order to capture the entire essence

of the juniper berry. Crafted in

small batches, Opyos Navy

Strength Gin combines a unique

botanical bouquet with a fullbodied

palette of juniper-forward

flavours, balanced by hearty notes

of pine needles and spicy citrus

aromas, while stimulating a crisp

warmth.

€ 39.90 / 0.50 l

opyosbeverages.lu

Pinot Gris Grand Premier Cru

Domaines Vinsmoselle

As a good representative of the

characteristics of the grape variety,

this Magnum Pinot Gris Grand

Premier Cru offers smoky and

spicy notes of leather and orange.

The palate is elevated by its great

finesse and elegance, combined

with its power and concentration. In

the mouth, it is a voluminous wine

that is creamy and warm. The finish

is long and persistent. A perfect

combination of grape variety and

the art of winemaking.

€ 36.85 / 1.5 l

vinsmoselle.lu

Cuvée Cep d'Or

"Signature" 2014 AOP

The Crémant "Signature",

Champenois style, has a beautiful

golden yellow colour with trains

of fine bubbles. On the nose, a

bouquet of beautiful brioche aromas

blends with notes of cooked apples.

These aromas are reinforced in the

mouth and finish in all elegance and

harmony.

Crémant "Signature" is an excellent

aperitif crémant but can also be

drunk during your end-of-year

festivities.

€ 13.10 / 0.75 l

cepdor.lu

Cuvée "Savoir du Temps"

Domaine de Mujolan

The vines are located on the edge of

the Garelle, a stream that crosses

the estate. A silty soil allowing a

beautiful expression of the fruit

gives birth to this white wine made

from 100% Roussanne grapes. Its

brilliant color is very slightly golden,

the nose is flattering (candied citrus

fruits, peach syrup, floral touch) and

the palate is round, fresh and with

the sweetness of sugar with a great

aromatic persistence.

Serve with foie gras, dessert, or

simply as an aperitif.

€ 11.80 / 0.75 l

domaine-mujolan.fr

PRIZE DR AW

WE'RE GIVING AWAY ONE BOX CONTAINING ALL THE BOTTLES DEPICTED ABOVE

Answer the following question: How many bottles are we giving away on this page?

Send an email with your name and address under the heading NOBLE DROPS to gewinnen@kachen.lu

Submission deadline is 31.01.2020.

104

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19

105


MAINTAINING OPTIMISM

IN THE MODERN WORLD

In light of current events how can we remain optimistic

without being considered to be living in a world of absurdity?

Our oceans and air are polluted, our soils are degraded,

and more species are going extinct than ever before.

Being a pessimist, however, is not a viable option if one

intends to gain a deeper understanding of life.

Pessimism also leads to a victim mind-set, one that makes

us feel powerless to evoke any change or make a positive

impact.

ways of living that will eventually lead to a better world.

Developing a habit to care more about each other and

about our planet is what will help create a lasting change.

While only changes in government policies will have a

big enough impact, the small things we do every day, our

habits and routines are what builds our character and what

will make a difference in the way we perceive ourselves.

TEXT Vesela Savova Drews

106

Can we practice authentic optimism

in a world full of despair?

Sadness and even constructive anger might seem appropriate

considering the devastation of our environment

and the terrible destruction of species on our planet that

human development has caused.

Realizing that overabundance and materialism are not

sources of lasting happiness is the first step to claiming

our own power back. We need to realize that we cannot

sustain this manner of waste and harm to humanity and

the earth.

Implementing some techniques such as mindfulness,

compassion and patience can help a person develop a

sense of responsibility for one’s current situation, which

in turn can help prevent one from feeling despondent

about how fatalistic and dark our future looks.

Becoming aware of the power of our everyday actions can

help us develop more sensible, gentle and responsible

And there are reasons to be optimistic too

We’re in an energy and battery storage revolution. Renewable

energy is more affordable than it has ever been;

switching to it helps reduce carbon emissions. Single

plastic use will hopefully soon be a thing of the past with

increased government policies and awareness.

Around the world, that message is sinking in. People are

increasingly refusing to wait for the gloomy forecasts to

come true and are taking it upon themselves to protect

the environment, preserve biodiversity, and live more

sustainably. They realize that if we want to leave Earth habitable

for future generations, now is not the time to shirk

our responsibilities, but to act.

Because let’s face it: giving up is not an option.

Sustainability isn’t something that comes naturally to

most people. But with more awareness and practice it can

become second nature.

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


CONSUME DIFFERENTLY

HERE ARE A FEW ENVIRONMENTALLY

FRIENDLY CHOICES WE CAN

INCORPORATE INTO OUR LIFESTYLE:

Switch your car for a bike, train or public transport

From March 1st 2020, public transport will be free in Luxembourg.

And even now, buses in Luxembourg City are

free at the weekend, so take advantage of this availability.

Pay attention to vampire energy

Even if an appliance is “off” it uses electricity.

Plug your appliance into a power

strip and then shut the power strip off

when not in use.

Use natural and biodegradable cleaning products in

your home. Not only is this gentler for the environment, it

is also beneficial for your health as you’ll reduce exposure

to toxins. Some great all-purpose cleansers include lemon,

baking soda and vinegar.

Invest in energy-efficient light bulbs

Saves money and is eco-friendly

Vote with your money for organic & fair fashion

When buying clothes look for fair trade and organic products,

where the company offers favourable conditions for

workers. Avoid any products that contain harmful substances

or use materials that are harmful for the environment,

such as nylon, polyester, dyes, PVC and solvents.

Consume local food and be mindful of

the origins / conditions in which your

food has been produced

While nothing on this list is earth-shattering, new

information, it’s the small incremental changes that

add up.

107

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


LOCAL

PRODUCE

One common definition of “local” food is food

grown within 150km of its point of sale or

consumption. To many, local food means foods

grown and produced in your region and

coming from farmers you know and can talk to.

Local is also connected to values of small-scale

production and community. Consuming locally

grown food helps us become more aware of

what we put into our body, connects us with

the seasons and the region we live in, and

allows us to support foods and

growers we believe in.

Better for your health

There are plenty of benefits from consuming local produce

for our health and for our planet. Local foods tend to

have more nutrients, as fruits and vegetables are allowed

to ripen naturally. Food that travels long distances is often

picked before it’s ripe, which compromises taste and nutritional

value. Additionally, some fruits like pears, bananas

and tomatoes are artificially “ripened” with ethylene gas

before being put on the shelves of the supermarket.

More variety

Smaller farmers grow a variety of products, which you

might not find at the supermarket. If you subscribe for a

weekly produce box to be delivered by your farmer, you

will automatically be exposed to a variety of produce you

might otherwise not buy when shopping for food. In this

way, small farmers can challenge you to try new things,

get out of your comfort zone and become more creative

in the kitchen.

Foods from local growers may contain less (or no)

pesticides

Farmers have to pay an extra fee to become certified

organic. Some small-scale farmers use organic methods

but aren’t certified because they simply aren’t big enough

to be able to afford the certification fees. Even if they

aren’t organic, small farmers tend to use fewer chemicals

than large, industrialized farms.

You can talk to your farmers at your local market and ask

them what (if any) pesticides they use. Many of them also

pay more attention to nourish their soil and rotate their

produce regularly.

REZEPT TEXTE Vesela Firstname Savova Lastname Drews

FOTOS Firstname Lastname

Reduced CO 2 emissions

Opting for produce that doesn’t have to travel long distances

to get to your table is also beneficial for our planet.

Community-supported agriculture (CSA)

programs

In this community-based agriculture program, community

members support the farm through financial contributions,

which are typically paid up-front. The farm then

commits to growing food for the participating members.

108


PASSIONATE

LOCAL INITIATIVES IN LUXEMBOURG

This list is not exhaustive and if you, dear readers, know of similar initiatives

in your area, we would be happy to hear about them!

MULLER-LEMMER

Muller-Lemmer stands for highquality

brands and seasonally

produced fruits and vegetables.

They have a small boutique where

you can discover their products.

mullerlemmer.lu

KASS-HAFF

An organic farm, based in Rollingen,

near Mersch. It offers activities

for children, such as feeding the

animals, seeing how cows are

milked and learning about seasonal

produce. The farm offers potatoes,

milk, cheese and meat and you can

purchase specialties in the adjacent

Kass-Haff Naturata shop.

FERME NATURRHAFF

An organic farm in the north

of Luxembourg

naturhaff.lu

kass-haff.lu

TERRA COOP

TERRA is the first CSA in

Luxembourg, bringing producers

and consumers together in the

creation of resilient local food

systems that work with, rather than

against, nature. Ranging from

workshops to seminars, festivities

and a whole range of other events,

TERRA offers a truly participatory

centre for action-based learning

and sharing.

terra-coop.lu

LES PANIERS DE SANDRINE

Focused on traditional vegetable

production, Les paniers de Sandrine

offers you a beautiful seasonal

assortment of fresh produce. You can

subscribe for their weekly basket of

fresh produce to be delivered to your

door or visit the farm on Tuesdays

and Fridays from 3pm to 7pm.

lespaniersdesandrine.lu

CO-LABOR

Co-labor produces organic fruits

and vegetables on parcels of land

in Luxembourg, and grows a large

range of plants on their site

according to the principles of

sustainable development. It acts as

a cooperative, which developed on

the basis of the following principles:

sustainable development, social

commitment and environmental

responsibility, combined with

economic performance.

co-labor.lu

A STEFFEN’S

The family farm, Steffen-Majerus,

produces potatoes, zucchini,

pumpkins and free-range eggs.

sou-schmaacht-letzebuerg.lu

LABEL TERROIR

All products offered by Label Terroir

are selected from local producers

practicing sustainable agriculture

or Organic farming and offering

quality products. This guarantees

ultra-fresh and tasty products all

year long. You can order and

manage your subscription online.

labelterroir.lu

LE CHAT BIOTTÉ

Le Chat Biotté offers a great

choice of fresh, organic and

seasonal produce weekly with

flexible formulas that suit

your preferences.

lechatbiotte.lu

109

TEXT Vesela Savova Drews

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


SUSTAINABILITY!

A FEW TIPS

AVOCADO TOAST?

Though delicious and healthy, avocados need 1000 liters

of water for each 1 kg produced. The growing demand

for avocados is causing environmental issues, such as

deforestation in Mexico and increased greenhouse gas

emissions. Enjoying avocados as the rare snack is probably

still ok, but we need to rethink consuming it on a daily

basis.

BEEF OR TOFU?

Tofu it is! A kilogram of beef protein has the equivalent

carbon emissions of a passenger flying from London to

New York and back. Cows also release methane, which

makes this protein source the second worst for our environment,

with lamb being the first. The production of

soy on the other hand causes 15 times fewer emissions

compared to beef. Even soy production is not completely

innocent as it is a major cause of deforestation. However,

most soy production is grown as animal feed, so the reduction

of meat consumption could also reduce soy production.

While local is always better, in the case of meat

this isn’t true. Consuming less or, better yet, making meat

consumption a rare treat if not ready to give it up entirely,

is best.

TEXT Vesela Savova Drews

PAPER OR COTTON TOTE BAGS?

Cotton tote bags, but only if you already have them! A cotton

bag is only eco-friendlier if you use it more than 130

times. The reason for this is that cotton requires a lot of

water and pesticides. Organic cotton improves this ratio

a little. However, brown paper bags are also not a solution

– they require more resources than plastic and pollute

the air and water with chemicals. Additionally, most paper

bags are not made from recycled materials. The solution:

it is just as important what you choose to put into your bag

as well as carrying it as often as possible.

110

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


INFO INTOX

NETFLIX OR CINEMA?

Watching a half-hour show on Netflix leads to emissions

of 1.6 kg of carbon dioxide, which is equivalent to driving

6.2 km. 80% of digital electricity usage is tied to video

streaming. Much of the energy needed for streaming services

is consumed by data centres, which deliver data to

your computer or device. Last year, online video streaming

produced emissions equivalent to that of Spain. On

the other hand, a cinema movie with 7 kg CO2 emissions

seems quite economical.

JEANS OR TROUSERS?

8 000 litres of water are needed for the production of one

pair of jeans. In comparison, an average person uses 125

litres of water per day. What is the solution if you like your

jeans? Wear them as much as possible and, if you need a

new pair, opt for trousers or sustainably produced jeans.

COFFEE TO GO?

A person who buys a single cup of coffee each day of the

week will generate 10.5 kg of waste per year. A better way?

Carry a thermos or a KeepCup and ask the barista to fill it

up. You might even get a discount for doing this.

WOULD YOU LIKE A STRAW?

No! Unfortunately for the environment plastic straws are

not biodegradable. They are particularly harmful for marine

life and our oceans. If you really want to continue using

straws then opt for ones made out of glass, stainless

steel or bamboo and reuse them.

ARE CIGARETTES STILL A THING?

Notoriously known for the damage they do to our health,

turns out cigarette filters are just as poisonous to our environment.

Around 4.5 billion are thrown away each year,

making them not just a minor waste problem. They poison

our water and fish and birds die from them. It’s about time

to make this a habit of the past.

111

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


8

AMAZING FOOD STORAGE SOLUTIONS

THAT ARENʼT PLASTIC

Plastic wrap may be a convenient solution to store leftovers after whipping up

dinner, but you know better than to use it. The plastic we throw away has

longlasting consequences for our oceans, our soil, our drinking water supply,

the health of our bodies and our planet. And while you might think that using

plastic wraps just once in a while is not that much of a problem, think again.

Single-use plastic products are amongst the biggest waste generators.

Thankfully, there are plenty of practical and sustainable ways to store our food

while respecting our environment. You will find many of the suggested solutions

in health and zero-waste stores in Luxembourg, such as Naturata, Alavita, OUNI

and The Good Market, as well as online.

FABRIC BOWL COVERS

Use the bowls you already have

to store berries, pasta, salad, and

whatever else. Simply cover them

with a fabric bowl cover and you’re

good to go.

TEXT Vesela Savova Drews

SILICONE

STORAGE BAGS

Need to store or freeze liquids, like

soups? Reusable silicone bags are

a great option. And you can clean

them in the dishwasher!

Easy-peasy.

MASON JARS

They work great as food storage

containers. Whether you’re putting

away the leftovers from dinner or

storing dry goods, like rice, beans,

and flour.

GLASS FOOD STORAGE

CONTAINERS

Glass lasts longer and you don’t

have to worry about potential

contamination from your food

touching plastic.


CONSUME DIFFERENTLY

NATURAL WAXED

PAPER

Conventional waxed paper is coated

with paraffin wax — petroleumbased

product. Use waxed paper

made with soybean wax, which is

eco-friendly and just as convenient.

SILICONE

SUCTION LIDS

They make food storage easy

and fun. These food covers come

in a variety of sizes to fit different

containers.

CLOTH NAPKINS

Wrap up sandwiches, fruits and

veggies, and pretty much any food

that’s not liquid in a cloth napkin for

quick storage.

REUSABLE FOOD WRAP

Perhaps the ultimate plastic wrap

alternative is reusable food wraps.

Made from organic cotton infused

with beeswax and tree resin, they

are lovely to store food. Just rinse

and reuse. Over and over.

Premium Dairy Products


KACHEN WORKSHOPS

KACHEN WORKSHOPS

The team at KACHEN is always on the hunt for new subjects, talents and

cuisine. This is why we organize exclusive workshops for our readers on a

regular basis. The goal is to give the opportunity to everyone to learn more

about a specific subject or dish.

In the past, we have organized

a Baking Workshop with Cathy

Goedert where participants learned

how to make the best lemon and

meringue tart of Luxembourg. We

also had an Ayurveda workshop with

John Schlammes to learn more about

this ancient Indian cooking process

and to enjoy a nice dinner. Finally,

we also had the pleasure of welcoming

Francesco Micillo for a Pizza

Workshop, where the best Neapolitan

Pizzas were made.

WITH CATHY GOEDERT

Be sure to follow us on social media

and subscribe to our newsletter

to stay up to date with our next

workshops.

kachen.lu

WITH JOHN SCHLAMMES

WITH FRANCESCO MICILLO

114

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


ADVERTORIAL

ALaViTA,

A BREATH OF FRESH AIR

IN JUNGLINSTER AND BONNEVOIE

Are you looking to buy really good organic and natural products, which have been chosen

with care and passion, and are offered in a cosy atmosphere? At ALaViTA, you get all of that.

On the shelves of ALaViTA in Junglinster and

Bonnevoie you will find a selection of extra fresh

fruit and vegetables, a great selection of cheese,

gluten- and lactose-free products, cosmetic and drugstore

articles, and much more. The list is far from being exhaustive.

The main idea was the creation of an organic and

natural shop that aims for quality and, as far as possible, for

local produce.

Once you have tried organic products you cannot do without

them – the ALaViTA team is certain of this. You will find

seasonal products, authentic taste and passionate producers,

with healthy production methods that respect the soil and

work without pesticides.

As short journeys are very important for the preservation of

our planet, ALaViTA tries to select local or regional produce

as much as possible. For this reason, the group works with

the cooperative TERRA, for example, and offers a large

choice of produce from Luxembourg.

Eating healthily is especially important in the winter months

when the body is particularly fragile. That is why ALaViTA

carefully selects produce, which help to strengthen the

immune system such as spirulina, echinacea, propolis,

ginger and fir products.

Passionate about commerce and high-end products, Anne

and Julien lead a team of over 15 people. Their maxims?

Quality, drive and team spirit. The young entrepreneurs,

both graduates of hotel management schools, with atypical

backgrounds, have decided to harness their strengths in

order to revive local commerce. Surrounded by an incredibly

committed team they want to play a part in breathing new

life into the communes and villages of Luxembourg. The

well-being of their clients, supported by service, reception

and recognition, stands at the centre of the team’s efforts.

In Junglinster, ALaViTA has revamped their space so that

it is now bathed in light. Going shopping in a beautiful and

well-kept environment is essential for the group and a key

point in which to distinguish themselves from other organic

shops in the country.

Anne and Julien’s favourite day is Saturday; the day on

which customers meet in the shops to leisurely purchase

produce with their children, drink a coffee, and chat with

other customers. In those moments, they truly feel the value

of the work that they have accomplished during the week.

Their next project? Transforming market products and

offering organic cooking on site or to take away, which will

reduce food waste. Always in a young and cosy atmosphere

of course.

ALaViTA ORGANIC STORES

7, rue Nicolas Glesener — L-6131 JUNGLINSTER

+352 / 26 78 00 91 — junglinster@alavita.lu

1, rue Auguste Charles — L-1326 BONNEVOIE

+352 / 29 02 91 — bonnevoie@alavita.lu

alavita.lu

115

PHOTOS Ramunas Astrauskas

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


BLOG AWARD

BLOG AWARD 2020

2020

Time to vot e!

The Blog Award Ceremony is slowly approaching. Bloggers and

Influencers can register for the three categories FOOD, FASHION &

BEAUTY and LIFESTYLE (with topics such as health, wellness, DIY,

travel, architecture, and design) until November 30th 2019.

THE PUBLIC VOTE STARTS THIS DECEMBER 1ST!

And now it’s your turn! Starting December 1st, you can choose your

favourite blogger or influencer. Cast your vote on www.blogaward.lu.

By doing so you will help your favourite win the Audience Award for

each category: food, lifestyle, fashion & beauty.

The winners of the Blog Award 2020 will be announced during the

ceremony gala on May 13th 2020.

Our exclusive print partner Luxembourger Wort will present the Blog

Awards 2020 on a single page on a regular basis.

116

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


BLOG AWARD

MAIN PARTNER FOR THE CATEGORY

FASHION & BEAUTY

For more than 40 years, Paris 8, a Luxembourg family business,

has been the beauty reference in the Grand Duchy.

In addition to iconic beauty brands, the brand offers a wide

choice of exclusive brands combining ranges accessible to all as

well as ranges of excellence. A resolutely different approach that

puts exceptional service and personalized advice at the heart

of its activity for each client. This universe is embodied in its 12

shops, which can be found throughout Luxembourg. Real places

to share and discover, where know-how and attention to detail

take on their full meaning.

paris8.lu

MAIN PARTNER FOR THE CATEGORY FOOD

The kitchen appliance manufacturer from the USA celebrates

its 100th anniversary in 2019. Since 1919, the American

brand is the best kitchen aid among professionals and hobby

chefs worldwide. With its extensive product range and

numerous accessories, KitchenAid reliably fulfils all culinary

requirements. KitchenAid is the manufacturer of the most

famous food processor in the world and is known for its

colourful kitchen appliances. For their 100th anniversary,

KitchenAid presents the limited edition “Queen of Hearts”,

which will also be the main prize for the participants in

the baking contest organized for the 100th anniversary

celebration in collaboration with the BLOG AWARD, end of

November. For the BLOG AWARD 2020 winner in the category

“Food” an even more exciting prize is awaiting them: a trip to

the KitchenAid experience store in London, to pick their own

personalized KitchenAid appliance!

kitchenaid.lu

117

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


BLOG AWARD

PREMIUM PARTNER AUCHAN ORGANIZED A BLOGGER EVENT

FOR THE BLOG AWARD 2020

A master cooking class with Anne’s Kitchen for the bloggers and

influencers took place on October 26th at the newly opened Brasserie

in Auchan Cloche D’Or.

Participants got into a holiday mood and prepared a Festive Finger

Food Menu that they enjoyed together at the end of the class.

The festive menu included:

Marmelade Fizz Cocktails

Mettwurscht Muffins (Muffins à la Mettwurscht)

Wäinzoossiss Sausage Rolls (Feuilletés à la Wäinzoossiss)

Smoked Trout Crêpe Rolls (Crêpes à la truite fumée)

Truffle Hummus (Bouchées au hummus à la truffe)

Vietnamese Rice Paper Rolls

HERE ARE SOME OF THE BLOG PARTICIPANTS IN THE CATEGORIES FOOD, LIFESTYLE

AND FASHION & BEAUTY (CONTINUED FROM OUR LAST ISSUE):

CATEGORY

FOOD

Les desserts de Stéphanie

Stéphanie Remacle

lesdessertsdestephanie.be

Franzpizzalux

Francesco Micillo

instagram.com/franzpizzalux/

The Green Creator

Bianca

thegreencreator.com

118

© Dominika Montonen-Koivisto

Marinola

Hungry Gal

The Nomad Cooker

Fatoumata

Marina

Nada

Shery

Fatma

marinola.com

instagram.com/hungrygaaal/

instagram.com/the_nomad_

cookery/

instagram.com/fatoumata_

luxembourg/

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


CATEGORY CATEGORY

LIFESTYLE

Paulina on the Road

Paulina

paulinaontheroad.com

Sheila’s Adventures

Sheila Huss

instagram.com/

sheilasadventures/

FASHION

& BEAUTY

Dichisurile Ralucai

Raluca

dichisuri.ro

Yasdaksworld

Yasmina Dakhia

yasdaksworld.com

Travel with Mei & Kerstin

Mei and Kerstin

travelwithmk.com

Saccharine Soul

Ruxandra Soare

saccharine-soul.com

Incognito Travels

Julie and Renaud

instagram.com/incognito.travels/

Clothes and Camera

Carmen Baustert

instagram.com/clothesandcamera/

Aabir official

Aabir Rhardane

instagram.com/

aabir.official/

Flawlessyouu

Natasja David

instagram.com/flawlessyouu/

Explore With Steffi

Stephanie

explorewithsteffi.com

La Rivière Rose

Sarah Mignani

lariviererose.com

Maminfo

Anna Arbizzoni

maminfo.lu

LoveLux and Co

Celine Roget

instagram.com/loveluxandco

Martin Kettenmeyer

Martin

Lovely Blondie

Flore Meuris

The Louve Story

Louve Gordet

Lili Rose

Lili Martins

instagram.com/martin_kto

lovely-blondie.wixsite.com/

instagram.com/thelouvestory

lilimartinslm.blogspot.com

website

119

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


CULINARY THRILLER

KACHKÉIS, KNIDDELEN & CRIME ‒ PART 4

One thing has become clear: the poison found in the Kniddelen of the dead man in the

restaurant came from a frog. But how did it get into the dumplings in the first place?

And most importantly: who did it?

TEXT Susanne Jaspers

120

It was lucky that Guy was almost over of his sulk when he

came home that evening. And it was lucky that the sandwich

box, in which he had taken the rest of the Feierstengzalot

with him to work, was empty. To calm things down, Bea

had unpacked some more of the moving boxes, had laid the

table festively, decanted a wine, as well as bought a Rieslingspaschtéit

at the butcher’s. Luxembourgers apparently love

these things so much – surely that would do to appease her

Luxembourgish partner. It worked. As they sat companionably

on the couch after dinner, she told him about the latest

developments.

“It wasn’t the woman,” speculated Guy, “after all she looked

really shocked when her husband went down. That did not

look like play-acting to me. And how would she have added

the poison to his Kniddelen? He would definitely have

noticed that.” “Then it must have happened in the kitchen,”

Bea muses, “But who there would have had a reason to do

the deed? You don’t just kill your guests because they’re a bit

chubby! And who of the kitchen service would have known

that the man had problems with his stomach? Because

otherwise, the Batrachotoxin would not have worked anyway…”

“Hmm,” said Guy, “you know, I was standing at the

bar for a while, because I wanted to talk over something with

the owner. I had a fairly good view into the kitchen from

there. There was one person who was completely incompetent,

at least, judging by the chef’s yelling. She seemed to be

doing every possible thing wrong, which means she did not

to know anything about working in a kitchen. So, what was

she doing there? Was it perhaps a one-off, a purposeful trip

into the word of catering? My tip for our police colleague:

cherchez la femme!”

Bea didn’t need to be told twice. Before she rushed to phone

Christiane Scholtes, she looked at Guy questioningly: “Tell

me, what were you doing at the bar?”

“Ah, well…” but that was all she got for an answer. It took

two days until she heard back from Christiane Scholtes. She

invited Bea and Lis one afternoon to the Chocolate House

for Mendiants. She thought it would be a well-deserved treat.

“How would you feel about joining the police? You basically

solved the crime all by yourselves. You, Bea, because you

quick-wittedly pocketed the dumpling, and you, Lis, because

you discovered the poison, and, last but not least, Guy of

course, because he has a good powers of observation and the

right instinct!” “Don’t let us hanging! Who was it?”

“One of the oldest friends of the widow. They have known

each other since high school and had then lost touch. A few

months ago, they met again and they got on so well, just

like the old days. They poured out their hearts to each other.

Unfortunately, the widow must have also told her friend of

her husband’s digestive problems as well as their problems

in marriage. And, even more unfortunately, her friend

misinterpreted the new intimacy between the two of them.

She thought she would do them both a favour. As a former

biology student she knew how. She got the poison from

the Darknet; after all, anybody can get in there these days.

And kitchen service is always sought after. Since she knew

everything about her friend, she also knew of the visit to the

restaurant. So, she smuggled her way into the place and took

the opportunity to remove the gentleman and so carve a way

for a future together. Thing was, the widow would not have

been interested in a love affair. And, of course, the three of

you found her out. She’s already confessed. So, and now let’s

enjoy the Mendiants!”

Bea could hardly wait to tell Guy the news. When she got

home, he was the one who had laid the table, lit candles, and

opened an expensive bottle of wine.

“Is there something to celebrate?” she asked surprised,

“apart from the fact that we have just solved the crime?”

“Tell me about that later. Just sit down now,” he interrupted

her. “You wanted to know what I was doing in the restaurant.

Well, I had planned to surprise you. For obvious reasons,

that didn’t work out. So I thought to myself, we’ll just do this

at home.” He poured some wine, then he rummaged in his

trouser pocket and took out a small box: “Marry me?”

Bea was touched and stunned and speechless.

“Think about it for a moment. To mark the occasion I’ve

cooked us some Feierstengzalot, since you did not have the

chance to try it last time.”

He stood in front of her, carrying two plats of this disgusting

gloop. She almost thought of saying no. But then she said

yes after all.

TIP

Discover the previous

episodes on our webpage.

Just scan the QR-Code!

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19

121


MOOD & FOOD

RESET YOUR MOOD AND

BEAT THE WINTER BLUES

WITH FERMENTED FOOD

TEXT Vesela Savova Drews

122

Back in trend – the traditional way of

preserving food has many health benefits

Humanity has been fermenting food since the Neolithic

Age, long before people understood the science behind

the process. Today, following the scientific discoveries

of French microbiologist Louis Pasteur, which led to an

understanding of microbes, the scientific research on the

role of microbes for our health is booming. With the secrets

of the fermentation processes revealed and the benefits

of probiotics better understood, it’s no surprise that

fermented foods are becoming so trendy.

What is fermentation?

An ancient technique of preserving food, fermentation is

still used today to produce foods like wine, cheese, sauerkraut,

yoghurt, and kombucha. Fermentation is a process

through which microorganisms like yeast and bacteria

convert carbs – such as starch and sugar – into alcohol or

acids. The alcohol or acids act as natural preservative and

give fermented foods a distinct zest and tartness. Fermentation

also promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria,

known as probiotics.

Why is it important to consume fermented

foods regularly?

Regularly consuming foods rich in probiotics has been

shown to improve immune function as well as digestive

and heart health. Fermentation helps break down nutrients

in food, making them easier to digest than their

unfermented counterparts. As a result, those with lactose

intolerance are generally fine eating fermented dairy like

kefir and yoghurt. Additionally, fermentation helps breakdown

and destroy antinutrients – such as phytates and

lectins – which are compounds found in seeds, nuts, grains

and legumes that interfere with nutrient absorption.

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


MOOD

Mood booster

When we consider the connection

between the brain and the gut, it’s

important to know that 90% of serotonin

receptors are located in the gut.

Much research is currently done to

understand how gut health and diet

can positively or negatively affect

our mood.

A few studies have linked the probiotic

strains Lactobacillus helveticus

and Bifidobacterium longum to a

reduction in symptoms of anxiety and depression. Both probiotics are

found in fermented foods. Fermented food can be helpful in the treatment

of mild and moderate forms of depression and anxiety, and for Seasonal

Affective Disorder. Another reason to consume more fermented

foods in winter, to keep our mood high.

Fermenting your own food

Not all store-bought fermented foods are the same. Canned and jarred

sauerkraut for example does not offer the same nutritional benefits of

probiotics. And oftentimes we don’t really know what exactly is in the

fermented foods we buy or the fermentation process they have gone

through. Fermenting your own food can not only solve this issue, but it

also offers an excellent way to store food for longer, without losing quality

and good taste. Of course, the benefits are to be enjoyed only when

fermentation is done properly.

The place of fermentation in the busy, modern world

– the innovative method of Microjungle

Stefania and Björn from Microjungle will lead you through a discovery

of the fermentation process. Indeed, fermentation is a process which is

influenced by multiple factors.

Even if a recipe is followed to a T, it is not a guarantee the result will

be what we expected. Some of the factors that influence not only the

success of the fermentation process, but also the pleasant flavour of the

fermented product are:

› The terroir of your home. Bacteria come in touch with each other and

the bacteria present in your home will influence the result of your fermentation.

Temperature and humidity also play a role in the final result.

› The utensils and containers used to ferment food, can either favour

healthy bacteria to grow, or propel the building of mould and pathogenic

bacteria.

Fermenting food is a balancing act, one that requires knowledge, and

most importantly – time.

The idea of Microjungle is simple – to standardize the world of bacteria

and modernize the traditional fermentation methods by putting together

practice and research.

The Starter Kit of MICROJUNGLE

consists of a specially designed

container that allows optimal

fermentation. It comes with recipes

and four activators, containing the

exact amounts of salt, sugar, yeast

and certified organic spices, to

guarantee a successful fermentation

and an end product that tastes good.

This way Microjungle reduces the

margins of error and frustration but

still leaves room for creativity in the

fermentation process. It is a great way

to include these health-promoting

foods in our daily life, without the

traditional time-consuming process.

Stefania and Björn founded the

Microtarians Academy where they

regularly hold workshops to teach the

process of fermentation. Once you

learn how the process works, a door

opens for creativity in fermentation.

Microjungle pays a lot of attention to

the materials used in their Starter Kit

to avoid contamination and toxic exposure.

The activators are stored in recycled

and compostable paper. They

work with the foundation APEMH

to prepare the recipes and fill the activator

containers.

microjungle.lu

123

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


THE ABC OF CBD

Does CBD get you high? What are the actual benefits? What is the right way

to use it? What are some risks andvconcerns of the use of CBD?

Here’s everything you need to know about the product that’s suddenly everywhere.

TEXT Vesela Savova Drews

124

What is CBD?

Cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are

two natural compounds found in the plants of Cannabis

sativa. Cannabis sativa has two primary species, hemp

and marijuana.

CBD and THC have similar chemical structure, but don’t

have the same psychoactive effects. In fact, CBD is the

non-psychoactive portion of the plant and does not produce

a ‘high’ state. THC on the other hand is psychoactive

and produces a high or sense of euphoria. CBD can be

extracted from hemp or from marijuana. Hemp plants are

cannabis plants that contain less than 0.3% THC, while

marijuana plants are cannabis plants that contain higher

concentrations of THC.

Both CBD and THC release neurotransmitters in the

brain. Neurotransmitters are chemicals responsible for

relaying messages between cells and have roles in pain,

immune function, stress, and sleep, to name a few.

CBD in Luxembourg

Since 2016 the cannabis flower has been sold legally in

Luxembourg if the THC level of the ‘buds’ does not exceed

the 0,3% threshold. A number of shops have already

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


HEALTH & NUTRITION

popped up in Luxembourg, selling products containing

CBD. They are monitored regularly, and Luxembourg is

currently working on reframing the legislative processes.

However, the booming CBD business in Luxembourg

will face some serious challenges, as an increase in tax

of up to 50% could lead to fatal consequences for this

new sector in Luxembourg. Up until now, CBD has been

taxed at the same rate as tea, notably the standard 3% tax

on food items. Starting 1. December, an increase to 33%

will be applied, along with 17% VAT. This decision has

hit small businesses hard, and there is some uncertainty

around how these businesses will be able to afford the

tax increase.

CBD everywhere

It is difficult to pinpoint a moment in time when CBD

boomed the way it has. People have been using marijuana

to treat pain for a long time, but with marijuana stigmatized

the way it is, non-users have been hesitant to try it.

It is likely that people nervous to try THC for its health

benefits are more ready to accept CBD because it has the

advantage of not inducing a high and for its marketability

as a natural product.

CBD products now come in all sorts of forms: oils, tinctures,

sprays, lotions, edibles, bath bombs, gummies,

vapes and more. The seeds of industrial hemp and products

made from them, such as hemp oil, can be used as

food products. The flowers are well known as tea.

CBD oil is made by extracting CBD from the cannabis

plant, then diluting it with a carrier oil like coconut or

hemp seed oil.

Claimed health benefits

CBD has been touted for a wide variety of health issues,

but the strongest scientific evidence is for its effectiveness

in treating epilepsy. In numerous cases, CBD was able to

reduce the number of seizures, and in some cases, it was

able to stop them altogether.

CBD is commonly used to address anxiety and depression,

and for patients who suffer through the misery of

insomnia, studies suggest that CBD may help with both

falling asleep and staying asleep. Additionally, CBD may

offer an option for treating different types of chronic

pain. CBD applied on the skin could help lower pain and

inflammation due to arthritis. A study demonstrated

the mechanism by which CBD inhibits inflammatory

and neuropathic pain, two of the most difficult types of

chronic pain to treat. Some studies suggest that cannabidiol

can be beneficial for heart health, reducing acne,

migraine and more.

More study in humans is needed in this area to substantiate

the claims of CBD proponents about pain contvrol. As

most research is conducted on animals, evidence of CBD’s

effectiveness often comes from personal anecdotes.

Health risks and issues

While CBD does appear to be more or less safe, interested

individuals should consult with their doctors before adding

CBD to their diets. Known side effects from the use

of CBD include vomiting, nausea, drowsiness, diarrhoea,

increased anxiety and changes in mood and appetite.

There can be some confusion around the dosage of CBD

too, as some people react to a lower dose, while others do

not. There are no clear indications regarding this.

Are all CBD products the same?

The truth is that the CBD landscape can be dangerous.

The industry is dangerously unregulated. It is easy for a

business to say that its product contains CBD when, in

fact, it contains none at all – or too much, or even synthetic

cannabidiol.

Most CBD products are sourced from hemp. Hemp is a

bio accumulator, meaning it absorbs pesticides, heavy

metals, and other toxins from the soil and water around

it. These chemicals can end up in derived oils, creams,

and other products, which can be detrimental to intakers’

health.

When shopping for CBD products pay attention to:

› Where the company’s hemp is sourced from

› Look for the lab results to check purity of a CBD product

› Check the certificate of analysis if the content of CBD

is correct and that the CBD is not synthetic

› Make sure the product does not contain higher

amounts of THC than what is legal

› Avoid any company that makes claims about its

products’ effects

The bottom line

The main reason for the hype about CBD nowadays is

linked to its natural compounds. Many people see this as

an alternative to pharmaceutical remedies known to have

side effects if used for longer periods.

Despite CBD’s newness to the modern medical landscape

– and the fact that cannabis’ legal status makes research

difficult in humans – many people feel inclined to trust it.

CBD is the most promising drug that has come out for

neuropsychiatric diseases in the last 50 years. The reason

it is so promising is that it has a unique combination of

safety and effectiveness across a very broad range of conditions.

If you are curious to include CBD products in your diet,

discuss this with your doctor before using it, and do your

research on the origin and quality of the products before

committing to purchase.

125

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


GREEN KITCHEN

COOKING WITH CBD OIL

126

RECIPE & TEXT Vesela Savova Drews

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


GREEN KITCHEN

Cooking with CBD oil can be an enjoyable, safe, and realistic way to consume

CBD. But learning how to do it properly can make all the difference in your

final product. Follow these tips to make sure you get the most benefits of

cooking with CBD oil.

• Start small: start with just a small amount of CBD oil when you first

start using it in your cooking.

• CBD loves fat: CBD is most easily and readily absorbed when paired

with fat, such as olive oil, coconut oil, or ghee.

• Do not overheat your CBD oil: excessive temperatures can cause CBD

to evaporate and lose potency. Try adding a few drops of CBD oil to

your salad dressings, smoothies, coconut oil, or chia puddings.

• Let its natural flavour shine: CBD oil can taste earthy and a little

aggressive. You can balance it out by adding some salt or lemon, but in

general, if you decide to use it, let it shine.

CBD-INFUSED LAVENDER

HOT CHOCOLATE

Lavender hot chocolate is a great way to slow down and relax after a

busy day. Lavender offers calming and soothing properties that can

help reduce stress. And yes, chocolate can also help regulate your sleep

cycles. Combined with CBD oil, this hot chocolate can be turned into the

perfect evening elixir.

1 cup

10 minutes

5 minutes

› 250 ml milk* (we prefer almond

or oat milk for this recipe, but try

hemp milk too)

› 2 tbsp unsweetened cacao powder

› 2 tbsp maple syrup or honey

› 1 tbsp dried culinary lavender

› 1 tsp vanilla extract

› 1 dropperful neutral-flavoured,

high-quality CBD oil (or 10-15 drops)

› Pinch of sea salt

1 In a small pot, heat up the milk

but don’t bring it to a boil. Add

lavender and cover; let steep for 10

minutes. Pour through a tea strainer

or fine-mesh strainer to remove

lavender, reserving infused milk.

2 Blend with cacao powder, maple

syrup, vanilla, sea salt, and CBD oil.

3 Serve immediately.

127

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


LUXFIT

A DIFFERENT KIND OF

FITNESS STUDIO

Body positivity is a difficult thing to come by,

then there are the first signs of gout, overall,

one’s body fitness could be better… thoughts

known to most people. And yet, the difficulty of

mustering the energy or appetite or stamina to

exhaust yourself in a muscle factory is difficult

to conjure. This is where LUXFIT has an innovative

concept: fitness suitable for every day,

without extreme discipline but with measurable

and lasting results.

TEXT Barbara Fischer-Fürwentsches

PHOTO LUXFIT

128

Since its opening in 2012, LUXFIT offers individual

fitness programmes, developed with the needs

of each customer in mind. “Individual, short

and succinct,” as Marc Leinen, director of the gym in

Junglinster, summarizes. “Only short, intensive training

sessions of 30 to 45 minutes each can easily be integrated

into your daily life. We establish an individual training

programme with each customer, which is adapted and

overhauled regularly so that all muscle groups are trained

and weak points worked on. This is not the place for group

exercises, sauna and wellness! All that counts is efficiency

and individuality.”

This kind of approach needs highly qualified staff. All of

the coaches have a bachelor degree in fitness economy or

a similar qualification. All in all, there are twelve instructors

at the three locations in Junglinster, Leudelange and

Trier. This ensures that there is always a coach to speak

to. Cheating or a careless training attitude are not permissible,

as our editor knows only too well. The trainers see

everything and correct when an exercise is not executed

accurately. “It is far more efficient to perform an exercise

five times correctly than to do it ten times incorrectly,”

says Marc. Exercises are not only performed with your

classic fitness machines but a lot of the times with your

own body weight or with small equipment such as the

kettle bell. “Here, your own body is your sparring partner,

rather than the weight of the equipment. And when you

go on holiday, your coach provides you with your own

exercise programme, which you can do without any kind

of equipment.”

In contrast to other gyms, the atmosphere is familial

and the space manageable, in addition to the upmarket

ambience. People know each other, everybody is greeted

individually and nobody has to feel bad because they are

not (yet) fit as a fiddle. The founder of LUXFIT, Sebastian

Backes, explains the concept thus: “For us it’s important

that we begin at people’s starting points – health wise,

concerning their fitness and especially their goals. The

next component is their availability. All these factors

contribute to the final result: a highly individual fitness

concept. A good car motor runs for 300 000 kilometres; it’s

similar with a healthy body. Beside strength, other skills,

such as stamina, speed and coordination are a focus.”

Certainly, nutrition is also part of the programme. “For a

lot of our clients, losing a few pounds is something that,

next to fitness, is part of their goal. We can also help in

this area with a nutrition plan and tips. If desired, we can

create an individual cookbook for clients with the collaboration

of our partner,” says Marc Leinen.

luxfit.lu

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


ADVERTORIAL

Exclusive for

KACHEN readers:

When entering into a

LUXFIT membership the

one-time mentoring fee

of € 150 is waived for

KACHEN readers.

Valid until 31.01.2020.

Send an email to info@luxfit.com

with the reference

KACHEN.

129

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


LIVING BETTER

SLEEPING IN WINTER

Winter can bring both

enhancements and

challenges to a healthy

sleep routine. Winter

solstice on December 22nd

will mark the longest night

of the year and invites us for

more cozy, quiet, and

restful evenings. However, the

extended darkness leads to

changes in circadian rhythms,

which can throw our sleep

routines off course and leave

us feeling sluggish,

low-energy, and tired – even

after a long night spent in bed.

Knowing our daily habits –

good and bad – is the first step

towards sleeping well right

through until spring. Here are

a few things to watch out for

that can impact the quality of

our sleep in winter.

The right amount of sleep

In the heart of winter, we experience as little as 8 hours of daily light. Our bodies

rely on light and darkness to regulate our body clocks. This includes the production

of melatonin, a key hormone facilitating sleep. With less light, melatonin

production increases. This can be a factor in winter depression, also known as

seasonal affective disorder (SAD). While many might think that the more we

sleep, the better it is for us, this is not the case. Oversleeping can actually contribute

to negative psychological, cognitive, and physical effects. Sticking to a

standard and consistent routine of sleep (7-8 hours) all year long will help keep

circadian rhythms ticking in sync. Going to bed a little earlier in winter, while

waking up at the same time year round is fine.

Healthy and consistent evening routine

Creating healthy habits and routines are great ways to optimize the work of our

body without any conscious effort. Blue screens can disrupt sleep, so it’s best to

have your bedroom free from TV, phones, and other screens and to avoid them

for at least an hour before going to bed. This will calm down the nervous system

and prepare the body for rest. Taking some time to drink a warming sleep elixir

to wind down is a good evening habit. Lavender, ginger, chamomile, or turmeric

are great in teas and infusions. They can also replace the late-night snack before

bed, which can disrupt sleep. Placing some lavender essential oil on the pillow

and sleeping in a well-aired bedroom will help increase sleep quality. Remember

that the optimal temperature for sleep is between 18 and 19 degrees no matter

the season.

Seek out sunlight

Take maximum advantage during daylight hours to get light exposure. Open

the windows as soon as you wake up to get as much light in as possible. This

will help balance out hormones. Going for a brisk walk outside before noon will

improve mood and increase productivity. Using bright indoor lights to stimulate

wakefulness during morning and midday or trying out light therapy are other

solutions.

TEXT Vesela Savova Drews

The role of vitamin D

The most potent source of vitamin D is sunlight. And as this one is scarce in

winter, many of us suffer from low levels of vitamin D during the cold months.

Besides stabilizing mood and strengthening the immune system, vitamin D

also enhances sleep. Lack of vitamin D reduces sleep time and lowers sleep

efficiency – which can be translated into poor sleep quality. Additionally, lack of

vitamin D can make us feel tired, stiff and just under the weather. You can ask

your doctor to perform a blood test to check your vitamin D levels.

130

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


BEAUTY

NATURAL BEAUTY

Taking care of our skin year-round

is essential to looking and feeling

great, but our skin needs a little

extra love especially during the

winter months.

Not only is our skin the largest

organ of our body – it is also

highly permeable. What we put

on our skin is likely going into our

body and bloodstream.

Antibacterial soaps, skin care

products containing alcohol, and

fragrance-filled soaps strip our

skin of natural oils. We opt for

natural, organic products and

choose essential oils for that

pleasant fragrance.

Adding moisturizing components

in winter like natural oils, coconut

oil, vitamin E, and antioxidants,

will keep your skin feeling radiant,

healthy and moisturized.

Thankfully, more and more

natural beauty products are available

in Luxembourg too

as in specialized shops such as

J'adore Bio. Here are a few

natural products you want to

have in your bathroom

this winter.

1. USE AN OIL-BASED CLEANSER

Traditional cleansers often contain synthetic preservatives,

fragrances, and harsh soaps like sodium lauryl

sulfate. Ingredients like these can actually cause your

skin to become dry. If you don’t want to experience dry,

irritated, flakey skin, then choose an all-natural oilbased

cleanser.

2. USE A FACE SERUM

A hydrating serum is a great tool for glowing winter

skin. Try using a natural serum made with hydrating

ingredients like hyaluronic acid, vitamin C, aloe and rose

oil. Rich in antioxidants a face serum can help brighten

the skin, providing hydration and protection from the

harsh environment.

3. EXFOLIATE THE SKIN

Exfoliation is a must for keeping dry and flaky skin at

bay during the winter. It also stimulates circulation and

lymph. Using natural ingredients such as dead sea salt

and nourishing oils will gently exfoliate, nourish and

sooth the skin.

4. MOISTURIZE THE SKIN

Moisturizing the skin after exfoliation with high-quality

plant oils, will reveal silkier, softer skin. Use body lotions

with natural, delicate scents for a true home spa

experience.

5. HYDRATE

Using natural hydrosols from the distillation of plants

and leaves is a great way to keep your skin hydrated and

toned.

1. Organic cleansing tonic by Matarrania

2. Rose Otto nourishing face serum Bio

Damascena by Alteya

3. Patchouli, rosewood and geranium scrub by

Mirins Copenhagen

4. Chocolate fever body butter by Wooden

Spoon

5. Calming melissa hydrosol by Bioline

6. Pumpkin face mask by Beauty Garden

6. FOOD FOR YOUR SKIN

We believe our exterior is a reflection of our interior, but

skin care is a must too. Try a face mask with seasonal

vegetables for added vitamins and antioxidants that

will nourish and soften the skin.

TEXT Vesela Savova Drews

131

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


COLUMN

WINTER BLUES?

The days become shorter as autumn turns into

winter. A link between certain seasonal mental

health issues and light levels has long been

established, namely SAD or Seasonal Affective

Disorder. This form of disorder can range from

low mood to severe depression.

DR. MARC KEIPES

Director

ZithaGesondheetsZentrum

gesondheetszentrum.lu/blog/

The sun is the clock that sets our sleep and mood biological

rhythms. The day/night, light/dark cycle is the strongest timer

and synchronises the sleep/wake rhythm.

The effect of light exposure on the melatonin rhythm (a hormone

in the central nervous system that controls the sleep/

wake cycle) and mood has been extensively proven. SAD can

have the same symptoms as real depression: excessive sleep

requirements, chronic fatigue, a general lack of interest or

motivation, weight gain, poor concentration etc. It is vital to

recognise the reoccurring rhythm of seasonal depression.

That means it regularly appears in early autumn and then

decreases before disappearing around February-March.

Light therapy

Sufficiently intense light has been proven to help. In practice,

this requires light sources of at least 10,000 lux.

Other helpful solutions

Going outside as much as possible during the times of day

when light is at its peak, e.g. at lunchtime, can help. Ideally,

this is combined with exercise such as fast walking. Planning

a winter holiday in the sun (or at altitude in the mountains) is

a good idea too.

The main thing is to recognise the situation. It can worsen

some obesity-related illnesses such as diabetes, high blood

pressure and white blood cell issues. Treatment can help, but

anyone affected should speak to their doctor to choose the best

method for them, use it on a regular basis as soon as the days

begin to shorten and before depression/SAD has well and

truly set in.

Important: The artificial light we tend to have at home or at

work usually only produces around 300-700 lux whilst outdoor

light varies between 1500 lux in winter and 100,000 in summer

depending on the weather.

Around 10-20% of our country's population is estimated to be

affected by a "mild" form of SAD. Women in their 20s are 3 or

4 times more likely to be affected by SAD than men. Men tend

to be affected later in life, in their 30s. SAD tends to affect men

aged over 50 and 60 more than women.

132

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19

133


A DECORATION

FULL OF MAGIC

The excitement of the holidays is already felt, windows and

streets are adorned with lights and awaken in us this desire

to adorn our house with the Christmas spirit and to think of

our future holiday tables. In terms of design, the choice is vast.

From the extremely elegant atmosphere borrowing its deep

colours from the British style to the Scandinavian style which

gives a high place to natural materials and white, without

forgetting the country style and its multiple lanterns, here is a

small constellation of tables that will undoubtedly inspire you...

134

REZEPT Firstname Lastname

FOTOS Firstname Lastname

hm.com

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


MUST HAVES

maisonsdumonde.com

gardentrading.co.uk

nvgallery.com

lights4fun.co.uk

135

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


MUST HAVES

hm.com

tch.net

hm.com

GOLD &

NOBLE

MATERIALS

jardiland.com

nvgallery.com

caravane.fr

maisonsdumonde.com

136

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


Property for sale in Niederanven

B

eautiful freestanding house located

in a residential area. Facing south,

this house will offer its future occupants

or owners an unparalleled quality of life.

On the ground floor there is an entrance

hall, a large fully equipped kitchen with

access to the terrace and garden, a

double living room with open fire that

also offers access to the garden, as well

as a bedroom and guest toilet. On the

first floor are 3 bedrooms, one of which

is a master suite with a dressing room

and a bathroom. The attic is accessible

by a retractable staircase and serves as

storage. The basement offers a double

garage, a boiler room with a new gasfired

boiler, a wine cellar and 2 storage

rooms. The house is close to all amenities

and to the Aarnescht nature reserve.

Plot : 7a 94ca Approx. surface : 213 m 2 Price : 2.195.000 €

Sales Rentals Valuations www.FARE.lu contact@fare.lu +352 26 897 897


DESIGN IN LUXEMBOURG

LÉA SCHROEDER

A PASSION FOR PATTERN

After travelling the world to train in design and the

fine arts, Luxembourg's very own Léa Schroeder

settled down at 1535° in Differdange. She founded

her exciting studio, which is open to all kinds of

collaboration and where she designs her ceramic

and textile collections, merging craftsmanship and

design. Let's meet her.

138

TEXT Theodora Mutel

PHOTOS Paulo Lobo

Where does your passion for

design come from?

I've had it since I was a child! I've

always loved being creative and doing

DIY for as long as I can remember.

My parents were culture vultures

too. That all made me see that art and

design can be part of the mundane

everyday.

What were your training milestones?

I was very lucky to study in Luxembourg

as it enabled me to travel

through Europe. I began at Créapôle,

in Paris, where I did a Masters in

Luxury and Stage Art Design and

where I was able to explore a range of skills. I decided to

head to Milan to specialise in fine jewellery and accessories.

It was the most obvious way to bring art and design

together. Then I joined Lancel working as a leather goods

and accessories designer.

Why did you decide to return to Luxembourg given

your international career?

Luxembourg is my home. It was only natural for me to

give something back, especially in terms of local design

and showcasing fine crafts. That's why I took part in the

2018 De Mains de Maîtres Biennial and all my designs are

approved as "Made in Luxembourg". I have since had the

honour of representing our country overseas, e.g. at the

Révélations Fair in Paris in May and at the Paris Design

Week in September. I want to be part of the local scene as

well as showing the world what we do here.

Is design art?

Often, aesthetic comes from function

and technique. For example, I dismembered

my birds as the entire piece

wouldn't fit into my kiln! But function

is always key and the notion of design

ties into user satisfaction. As for my

work, the decorative and ornamental

aspect becomes the main function,

which is why it's called Art-Design.

Are sustainability and ethics part

of your specifications?

Of course. It's our role as designers

to educate and inform the public. We

encourage consumers to be part of

the journey by designing sustainable

pieces and working with eco-friendly materials. It's painstaking

work but essential to combat consumerism.

What are your plans for the future?

To continue down this path and really establish myself. I've

only had my own brand for a year.

I recently designed a textile collection that mirrors my

ceramics. I have created an entire graphic world which now

adorns silk scarves. I have a real passion for pattern and

its symbolism. I also have a keen interest in tribal art, the

connection between humankind and nature. It's a project

that's dear to me and that I want to explore!

leaschroeder.studio

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19

139


140

TEXT Barbara Fischer-Fürwentsches

PHOTOS Brigida Gonzalez, Valentiny Foundation

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


LUXEMBOURG

THE VALENTINY FOUNDATION

A MEETING PLACE FOR ART

AND ARCHITECTURE ALONG

THE MOSELLE RIVER

The Moselle region has more to offer than solely

excellent wines. In the romantic wine town of

Remerschen fans of architecture and art lovers will find

a very special jewel: the Valentiny Foundation. François

Valentiny, one of the best-known Luxembourgish

architects of international renown, has created a

place at the centre of his hometown, which, though

visually striking, harmoniously blends with the existing

buildings.

The Valentiny Foundation was set up, together with

the commune of Schengen, in 2014 and opened in 2016.

Valentiny had already put his recognizable stamp onto

several buildings in his home commune, such as Biodiversum

in Haff Remich, or the youth hostel nearby. The

building of the foundation stands on the site of the former

primary school, which the architect went to as a child. The

building, which is suffused with light still accommodates

the layout of the former school and offers room for the

manifold work of François Valentiny as well as for other

national and international artists.

Besides work by Rob Trier and Roswitha Grützke, the

permanent exhibition, with over 3000 exhibits, offers a

comprehensive overview of the artistic and architectural

work of François Valentiny. Drawings, sketches, models,

and sculptures document the development and artistic

talent of the studied carpenter, who first wanted to be a

painter and then a sculptor, before he started down the

path to capturing the world as architect from the Moselle.

Culture and art for everybody

The goal and task of the foundation goes beyond the

upkeep of an artistic heritage. It aims to advance the

conversation about architecture and especially the development

of future architects. Thus the collaboration with

the University of Luxembourg and the Luxembourgish

Association of Architects is accordingly close-knit. But

the general public is also focused on: a mixed programme

of changing exhibits, concerts, readings and talks aims to

contribute actively to the tourism of the border triangle.

Fernand Valentiny, the architect’s brother, is responsible

for the programme. “We make use of the wonderful space

of this building for a multifaceted programme: travel

and film talks, readings, conferences, workshops for children

and much more. Even music is not left out: once a

month we have a concert on Sunday afternoons, and from

January to May 2020 we will organise a cello festival,

with, among others, André Mergenthaler.” Various rooms

can be rented. In the near future a small museum café will

open.

The exhibition is open year round; entrance is free. For

opening hours, information on current exhibits and about

upcoming events, see valentiny-foundation.com

141

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


LUXEMBOURG'S FOOD AND LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

@kachenmagazine

FOR EVEN MORE

RECIPES

INFORMATION

INSPIRATION

142

kachen.lu

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


© Studio Fränk Weber

There are places where you quickly forget everyday life. Let

yourself be carried away by the charm of the Moselle region

and relax with a glass of Luxembourgish wine or sparkling

Crémant. In Luxembourg, you will enjoy life in a way you

would have never imagined.

visitluxembourg.com

143

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


GR AN

CANARIA

A MINIATURE CONTINENT

The Canary Islands and its seven diverse islands lie off the coast of Morocco just a

few hours' flight from Europe. In the middle, Gran Canaria stands out for its almost

perfect circle.

TEXT Martine Carret

144

It's a small continent in itself with contrasting, varied and

spectacular landscapes. A hint of America with canyons

like the ones in Arizona, high rocks and sheer cliffs, a

dash of Asia with heavenly golden sandy beaches, a pinch

of Africa with dunes reminiscent of the Saharan lands,

a European calm with age-old fishing ports and floral

villages, a slice of Oceania with volcanic regions and

misty mountains that bring New Zealand to mind and a

taster of Central America with banana plantations and

humid rainforests.

Gran Canaria is all this and so much more

Beaches account for 60 of its 236 km of coastline. They are

what catch your eye and make you want to get away from

cold, dark and wet Europe. The year-round warm climate

means you can even visit in winter. The Atlantic is a chilly

18°C but it's not freezing. The nights may get cool but your

skin will be warmed by the sun's heat in the day.

The iconic 2900m long Maspalomas beach (south) belongs

to a protected area. That means no buildings have

disturbed the landscape of dunes sculpted by the wind

of time. There are very long beaches in the north too and

some are in cities such as the capital, Las Palmas, where

you'll find the crescent-shaped 3km Las Canteras beach

and its fabulous promenade.

Near the “capital” you'll find the 27-hectare Viera y Clavijo

botanical garden home to over 500 endemic plants, some

of which are endangered. The Swede Eric Sventenius

founded it in 1952 to protect native flora. The setting is

incredibly beautiful with a tropical palm grove, a garden

with 2000 species of cactus, and a laurel forest (subtropical

forest).

The village of Lomo Quiebre, Mogàn fishing port and harbour

in the south west are a sight for sore eyes. Houses

clinging to sheer cliffsides lie alongside more modern constructions

standing in a lakeside area. Wander from bridge

to bridge wherever takes your fancy in this “little Venice”.

The white walls are often teeming with bright pink bougainvilleas

whose floral clusters artistically burst out onto

the walls, porches, arcades and footbridges.

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


ON TOUR WITH LUXAIRTOURS

The ultimate family destination with

the perfect microclimate, the island is

also perfect for a romantic or sporty

break. It has all sorts of things to do

for all ages. Whether it be kayak trips,

sea excursions to see the dolphins,

paddling or chilling under a parasol.

You can dance 'til dawn in all the seaside

towns too.

If you prefer places that are a little

less obvious, more relaxed and quiet,

the centre of the island with the

103km2 Caldera de Tejeda crater is

the place for you. 46% of the island's

land has been listed as a UNESCO

biosphere reserve since 2005: 1363

plant species including 125 endemic

to the island and 1094 animal species

including 543 endemic ones have

been identified.

The Risco Caído cultural landscape and sacred mountains in the centre have

been UNESCO World Heritage sites since July 2019. Troglodyte sites (dwellings,

storehouses and cisterns) in the hollow of cliffs, ravines and volcanic formations

prove that a pre-Hispanic island culture once lived here. Seasonal ceremonies

were held in the two sacred Risco Caído and Roque Bentayga temples.

You absolutely can't miss a walk around Roque Nublo, an 80m high photogenic

basalt monolith that peaks at an altitude of 1813m. Fitness fans can hike the

many nearby footpaths.

145

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


ON TOUR WITH LUXAIRTOURS

RESTAURANTS

La Aquarela, in Patalavaca

Booking required. Original, stylish,

and unique.

restaurantelaaquarela.com

Vega in Guayadeque

Exotic troglodyte setting.

restaurantevega.es

La Marinera in Las Palmas

Seafood.

restaurantelamarineralaspalmas.com

OUT AND ABOUT...

... Get sporty at one of the island's

seven golf courses.

... Get dancing in a club on Playa

del Inglés

pachagrancanaria.com

... Get stars in your eyes at the

Llanos de Garañón belvedere or

Roque Saucillo astronomy centre.

PRIZE DRAW

Win 7 nights for 2 adults with half board in the 4-star hotel

LOPESAN COSTA MELONERAS RESORT & SPA in a standard

double room, including flight tickets Luxembourg - Gran

Canaria (return flight) with LuxairTours.

The Lopesan Costa Meloneras Resort & Spa is a magical

place in Meloneras, the most exclusive tourist area in Gran

Canaria. The Maspalomas Dunes Nature Reserve's desert

landscape provides a unique backdrop where you can daydream

and relax whilst talking long walks along the beach.

As soon as you arrive at this Hotel in Gran Canaria you

will be welcomed by a majestic palace. Its windows, doors

and archways take visitors back to colonial times, which is

typical of the Island’s architecture. Once you've crossed the

entrance, more than 2,000 palm trees guide you to your

room, making you feel like you're in an oasis in the middle

of the desert. Everything is designed so that you can relax,

feel and experience the typical Canary culture in a warm,

welcoming environment that mesmerises you from the

get-go.

This Spa hotel in Gran Canaria is a superior 4-star hotel

located in a prime location, right on the seafront promenade,

a stone's throw from the beach and not far from the Maspalomas

Dunes Nature Reserve in the south of the island. An

idyllic place to lose yourself and enjoy taking a stroll until the

sun goes down, relaxing and feeling at one with nature.

Just answer the following question:

What is the name of the famous Gran Canaria Nature Park?

Send the answer with your name and address and the keyword GRAN CANARIA by e-mail

to gewinnen@kachen.lu

The trip must start by summer 2020. Air tickets and accommodation are subject to availability.

The closing date for entries is 31.01.2020

146

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


XX CATEGORIE XX

EXCELLENCE

Savour unique moments

in exceptional hotels

Discover our Excellence hotels in travel agencies or on luxairtours.lu

REZEPT Firstname Lastname

FOTOS Firstname Lastname

Travel in excellent company

147

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


NEED

A BREAK?

NEXT ISSUE:

13 JANUARY

ABONNEMENT

ABO@REESENMAG.LU

DEUTSCH

FRANZÖSISCH

ALLEMAND

FRANÇAIS

REESEN

LUXEMBOURG'S TRAVEL MAGAZINE

148

REESENMAG.LU

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


ON TOUR WITH CFL

LIÈGE

ARDENT ENERGY

Liège is a cosmopolitan city buzzing with visitors from nearby

Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Germany and France. The ‘ardent

city’ is full of surprises that thrive on its history whilst being

future-forward, accessible, joyful and festive.

© OFFICE DU TOURISME LIEGE

© OFFICE DU TOURISME LIEGE

S

pectacular. No other word could describe the

arched vault that make Liège station look like

a modern, bright, streamlined and futuristic cathedral

reminiscent of a vast ship whose sails reach for

the skies.

You don't tend to be awestruck when you arrive at a

station in Europe. But the Liège-Guillemins train station

stops every visitor in their tracks. Designed by the

Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava Valls and inaugurated

in 2009, this landmark is among the most photographed

in the city. Even the most blasé onlookers

are blown away by the beauty of its illuminated dome

with undulating curves at night.

Then it's time to head to the smart and floral cul-desacs

in the Hors-Château area before making for the

foot of the “Montagne de Bueren” staircase. It isn't a

mountain but you do have 374 steps at a 28% gradient

to climb. It may be exhausting but the panoramic views

at the top are worth the effort.

When you reach the Citadel's slopes you comprehend

the topography and instantly grasp the beauty of this

city with a population of 200,000 and the Meuse quietly

flowing through. From here there are footpaths with

miles of walks running through all hillside “areas”:

Favechamps, Le Péri, Carmélites woods, Fabry woods

and the Vivegnis hillside. It's always a surprise to end

up in one of these leafy areas covering 90 hectares

when you're in the bustle of the city. You can't miss the

© URBANISME VILLE DE LIEGE -JEAN-PIERRE ERS

heart of the Citadel and its myriad landmarks (60) including

the terraced ornamental garden in the ruins of

the former Minim convent. You may well see vines and

fig trees as its south-facing position means anything

can grow here.

Near the river, don't miss the exhibitions at La Boverie,

the former Fine Arts Palace built for the 1905 Universal

Exhibition and renovated in 2016.

After a good dose of culture, it's time to explore more

exciting areas. Cross the stunning Arches Bridge into

the popular Outremeuse area where the writer behind

Inspector Maigret, Georges Simenon, once lived. You

simply can't miss Tchantchès, a puppet dressed in traditional

work clothes: black and white check trousers,

blue smock, red scarf with white dots, black hat.

Don't leave Liège without trying the city's signature

round waffle, meatballs (beef and pork in Liège syrup),

cheese, pékèt (gin) and local beer.

149

TEXT Martine Carret

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


ON TOUR WITH CFL

OUT AND ABOUT...

Bar à cacao de Benoit Nihant Nestled in the Passage

Lemonnier (Art Déco), the chocolatier Benoît Nihant has

created a relaxing and rewarding setting based on chocolate.

benoitnihant.be

La Brasserie C One of the best terraces in Liège to enjoy the

Curtius lager brewed on site.

brasseriec.com

Brunch en famille à l’Opéra A family-friendly musical

foodie get-together one Sunday a month.

operaliege.be/activites/brunch-familial-et-musical

© OFFICE DU TOURISME LIEGE

RESTAURANTS

Le Moment The trendiest bistronomy eatery in town

moment-liege.be

Le bistrot d’en face A local institution: meatballs and café

liégeois ice cream sundaes

Le théâtre de Liège For those in the know, great menu,

fabulous interior, careful cookery

theatredeliege.be/restaurant-theatre

© OFFICE DU TOURISME LIEGE

© OFFICE DU TOURISME LIEGE

PRIZE DRAW

Win a trip for 2 people to LIÈGE* including the 1st class train ride from Luxembourg and 2 nights in a double

room, including breakfast in the 5-star hotel Les Comtes de Méan, Urban Resort® in the heart of Liège, and

2 dinners for 2 people in the restaurant L'atelier du Sélys (subject to availability).

A 5-star hotel with 126 rooms, restaurant, lounge bar,

wellness center and seminar rooms for a relaxing

and luxurious stay in the heart of Liège.

Hotel Les Comtes de Méan is located in the historic

heart of Liège, just 5 minutes from Place

Saint-Lambert. The elegantly furnished rooms are

fully equipped with flat screen TV, air conditioning

and free WiFi. All rooms are decorated with original

photographs by Yann Arthus-Bertrand.

The hotel blends traditional architecture with contemporary

design and offers excellent service and

comfort. The gastronomic restaurant Le Selys is part

of the facilities of the hotel, as are the brasserie Ô

Cocottes, the bar La Cave in a former 16th century

armory and the Osmose wellness area with fitness

centre, beauty area, relaxation rooms and swimming

pool.

150

Just answer the following question: What is Liège popularly called?

Send the correct answer with the keyword LIÈGE to gewinnen@kachen.lu

The closing date for entries is 31.01.2020

*The gift voucher is valid from the date of issue until 30.06.2020, subject to availability.

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


Europe

at your

fingertips!

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international

train tickets

Your international

timetables

in real time

Manage

your

e-tickets

Display of

platforms

for connections

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cross-border travelling

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19

REZEPT Firstname Lastname

FOTOS Firstname Lastname

www.cfl.lu

151

CallCenter + 352 2489 2489


LES GRAINS

D’ARGENT

A SPARKLING WEEKEND

IN THE CHAMPAGNE

Imagine a dreamy hotel in the heart of the Champagne,

sitting in midst the vineyards with a view onto the village

of Hautvillers and the abbey of the legendary cellarer and

Benedictine monk Dom Pérignon, who, in 1668, invented

the “méthode champenoise”.

The small but charming hotel is called Les Grains

d’Argent and is just under two and a half hours

away from Luxembourg. The owners are Annabelle

Hazard and Pascal Soutiran, who also transformed the

former MAHO in Luxembourg into the stylish hotelrestaurant

Les Jardins d’Anaïs last year. The chef of

which, Christophe Quentin, was instantly awarded a

Michelin star.

A few years ago, Les Grains d’Argent fulfilled a dream

for Annabelle Hazard. Born and bread in the Champagne

region, she basically has Champagne in her blood. Even

the art of hospitality was given to her with her mother’s

milk. Her professional path took her first to London after

her studies, where she worked for eight years as sommelier

and brand manager for big names such as Joël Robuchon

and Champagne Bollinger.

accompanied and advised by the renowned starred chef

and Meilleur Ouvrier de France Frédéric Simonin of

Paris.

No wishes of comfort and design are left open with 29

rooms, seventeen of those double, 2 twins, six junior suits,

and one full suite. Decorated in a warm and contemporary

style, in blue, rose, yellow and grey tones. All rooms are

accompanied by a large bathroom with separate WC. Two

of the rooms are wheelchair accessible.

There are numerous large and small Champagne houses

in the immediate vicinity of the hotel and reachable in a

few minutes by car. Just right for lovers of Champagne

and for those who need a small or not so small delightful

time out.

TEXT Bibi Wintersdorf

PHOTOS Les Grains d'Argent

152

Back home Annabelle did not hesitate long and took over

the place. After extensive remodelling and renovations,

Les Grains d’Argent shines like new, with a paired

back, elegant ambience and a down-to-earth and yet

refined kitchen. The large main room of the restaurant,

with space for eighty people, offers with La Cuisine de

Clément a modern, fresh kitchen in the style of a bistro.

The porch, which boasts one of the best views onto the

UNESCO world heritage vineyards of the Champagne,

is where you find La Table d’Annabelle, the gastronomic

restaurant of the house. The young chef Alexis Supiot is

LES GRAINS D’ARGENT

1 Allée du Petit Bois — F-51530 Dizy

Tel. +33 / 3 26 55 76 28

lesgrainsdargent.fr

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


GREATER REGION

153

© MICHEL JOLYOT © MICHEL JOLYOT © MICHEL JOLYOT

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


FISH &

SE AFOOD DRINKS

98

Dickens' punch

Leek quiche with

feta & dried

tomatoes

Roasted scallops,

voatsiperifery

crumble

127

CBD-infused

lavender hot

chocolate

70 73 74

Red endive curls

with cabbage

Wild prawns with

christmas salt

VEGETARIAN

Winter roots roll up

with lemon

42

Selection of

preserves

- 4 recipes

Salsify with pear

17 58 20

Raspberry meringue

cups

44

Selection of

flavourings

- 4 recipes

77 94

Cooked cheese

23

Raisin bread

29

Brutti ma Buoni

30

Fortune Cookies

35

Spéculoos cake

36

Chocolate cake

Chai cake

49 61 62 62 63 64

Dessert sauces

- 4 recipes

Quinces tarte tatin

Quince strudel

Baked fruit salad

Quinces baked in

orange juice

Quince preserve

with vanilla

154

SWEETS

& PASTRIES

36

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


RECIPE DIRECTORY & IMPRINT

46

Selection of oils

- 4 recipes

50

Vegetable stock

56

Christmas salt

57

Thai black rice &

fried egg

67

Creamy potato &

leek soup

68

Irish potato patties

with kale & leek

ME AT

18

Luxembourgish

venison fillets

69

Oven-roasted leeks

with smoked ham

82

Venison with small

onions & bacon

89

Fondue Vigneronne

neutral 01-18-619125

Drucksache myclimate.org

26

Oat biscuits with

cinnamon

38

Gingerbread cake

27

Anise biscuits with

blood orange jam

40

Airy brioche plait

28

Vanilla crescent

biscuits

47

Chestnut & black

currant

Mont-Blanc

28

Baci di Dama

48

Sweet offerings

- 3 recipes

Edition Luxe Taste & Style Publishing Sàrl,

4a, rue de Consdorf L-6230 Bech

Publisher Bibi Wintersdorf

Editor-in-chief Bibi Wintersdorf

Head editor Patricia Sciotti

Editors Yannick Burrows,

Vesela Savova Drews

Copy-editor Myriam Welschbillig (DE),

Cara Bland (EN),

Fabrice Barbian (FR)

Art Director Philippe Saliba

Graphc Designers Enia Haeck

Tanja Hammes

Sales Jill Sterba

Offiice Manager Vanessa Schmit

Printer Reka print+

Editorial Dept. redaktion@kachen.lu

Advertising sales@kachen.lu

Contests gewinnen@kachen.lu

64

Stewed quinces with

honey & lemon

78

Jerusalem artichoke

with hazelnut

streusel

91

Christmas stollen

93

Miss Eme's waffles

© Luxe Taste & Style Publishing

ISSN EAN 977-2535-8820-10

The publication accepts no liability for unsolicited articles, photos and

drawings. Reproduction, inclusion in online services or the Internet,

or duplication onto data carriers such as CD-ROM etc. shall only be

permitted with prior written consent from the publisher.

All rights reserved. All information has been carefully reviewed. We accept

no liability for the accuracy of information included.

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


THE SPRING ISSUE OF

KACHEN

WILL BE PUBLISHED ON

3 RD MARCH 2020

KACHEN No.21 | WINTER 19


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