KNITmuch Issue 10

anptmag

Welcome to another informative and exciting issue of KNITmuch! Among the several tutorials and yarn reviews in this issue is how Universal Yarn Bamboo Pop behaves in five knit stitch patterns. Using four yarns from the Super Saver family we play with another four extraordinary knitted stitch patterns you'll want to consider using in your next knitting projects. Experience the very soft Alaska yarn, a fluffy yarn highlighted in two very different cowls and a hat using easy color work and lace work patterns. The issue closes on a crafty note knitting a bath set using Red Heart Loop-it and Pomp-a-Doodle yarns. Certainly this is an issue you'll want to download! Until next time, stay safe and happy knitting.

KNITmuch

l a c y &plaid cowls·hats·bathmat·baby blanket

...to K, is to

Issue 10

KNIT STITCH PATTERNS

* fleck stitch

* butterfly stitch

* twisted stitches

* flared cables

* bi-directional

herringbone stitch

KNITTING with

Bamboo Pop

Rozetti Alaska

Pomp-a-doodle

Loop-it

Super Saver

pooling

fail isle

chunky

ombre

TESTING

BAMBOO POP in

6 STITCH PATTERNS

TIPS for

KNITTING WITH FLUFFY YARN


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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, ART DIRECTOR

Carla A. Canonico

Carla@KNITmuch.com

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John De Fusco

John@KNITmuch.com

PUBLISHER

A Needle Pulling Thread

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Carla A. Canonico, John De Fusco, Contributors

BLOGGERS/CONTRIBUTORS

Cynthia MacDougall

cgknitters.ca

Michelle Nussey

knitmuch.com/author/km_michelle/

Charles Voth

charlesvothdesigns.ca

Cindy O'Malley

cindooknits.blogspot.com

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Carla A. Canonico

Carla@KNITmuch.com

Sondra Armas

Sondra@KNITmuch.com

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Sondra Armas

Alejandro Araujo

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WHERE TO GET YOUR COPY

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local shop. KNITmuch is not available by subscription.

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EDITORIAL

Bloggers, designers and other contributors who would

like to be considered for future issues please email

Carla@KNITmuch.com with a brief description of your

work and your proposed project.

©2020 KNITmuch. All rights reserved. Issue 10.

ISSN 2368-5913.

No part of this publication may be reproduced without

written permission from the publisher.

All designs, patterns, and information in this magazine are

for private, non-commercial use only, and are copyrighted

material owned by their respective creators or owners.

Visit and download our free ebook:

Cynthia MacDougall's

Knitting Essentials!

2 KNITmuch | issue 10


KNITmuch

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Bamboo Pop makes twisting eyelets lace pattern shine

The Waffle Stitch using Bamboo Pop yarn

Bamboo Pop is like finding the perfect frame for a piece of knitted art

Knitting with Bamboo Pop yarn for a friend

Effortless Fern Grotto lace swatch knitted in Bamboo Pop

Knitting with Alaska yarn – soft and airy

1 trick for easy knitting when knitting with fluffy yarn

Knitting with Alaska The Choux Cowl

Knitting a matching plaid hat for the Choux Cowl

In Stormy Alaska, leftover yarn is a knitted lacy cowl to the rescue

Bi-directional herringbone stitch knitted in Dreamy Stripes

Fleck stitch knitted in Super Saver Pooling

Flared Diamonds knit in Super Saver Fair Isle

Twisted stitches and lace knit in Super Saver Chunky

Butterfly Baby Blanket knit in Super Saver Ombre

Learn to knit with Loop-it

Introducing knitting needles to Loop-it yarn

Giggle knitting with Loop-it leads to an adorable baby blanket

Pomp-a-Doodle – yarn without pomp & circumstance

Pomp-a-Doodle and Loop-it together make the best bathmat!

contents

KNITmuch | issue 10

3


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4 KNITmuch | issue 10


editor's

letter

I hope you have been able to acclimatize to your

‘new-normal’ lifestyle under the restrictions of

Covid-19. This year will be a year that will not only

make history, but a year that will be remembered

for forcibly giving us the opportunity to question

our way-of-life, career choices and relationships.

These are tumultuous times,

with so much to digest, process

and sort! One of the benefits

of knitting I count on is the

opportunity for reflection, even

on a very busy schedule. If I

don't have a chance to knit on

any given day (heaven forbid)

it's like not having had the

chance to process the events of

my day.

I hope you have been able to

play with yarn and needles

daily! It's so good for you.

In this issue, I offer you ways to

unwind with yarny thoughts of

how the featured yarns work

up in several projects. Bamboo

Pop, perfect for spring and

summer projects, and babies,

is highlighted to show how

it behaves in various stitch

patterns. The very soft Alaska

yarn is a fluffy yarn highlighted

in two very different cowls and

a hat using easy color work and

lace work patterns. Using four

yarns of the Super Saver family

we play with four extraordinary

knitted stitch patterns you'll

want to consider using in your

next knitting projects.

The issue closes on a crafty

note knitting a bath set using

Red Heart Loop-it and Pomp-a-

Doodle yarns.

Thank you for visiting

KNITmuch! Together we can

focus on keeping a steady heart

and a positive outlook.

Cheerfully,

Share the love of knitting. Own the obsession.

I hope this letter

finds you

in good health.

KNITmuch | issue 10

5


Bamboo Pop

makes twisting

eyelets lace

pattern shine

The Clematis Cowl knit in Bamboo Pop

Bamboo Pop has been featured

on KNITmuch before, Charles

gave a very thorough overview

of this yarn in Knitting with

bamboo-cotton yarn. And there

are more articles that will stem

from these posts under KNITmuch

Bamboo pop yarn.

As this is my first time working

with Bamboo Pop, I’ll scatter my

thoughts throughout this feature.

I started by knitting a pattern

called the Clematis Cowl. It’s

originally written for a larger yarn,

so if you like huge cowls with

more drape, you’ll want to add

more stitches.

I wanted to see the differences in

the pattern by simply changing

the yarn and nothing else. I

wasn’t surprised that the pattern

looks beautiful, Bamboo Pop

really shows off stitch patterns in

a clean and clear way. The stitch

used here almost looks like a

bamboo stitch (bamboo yarn,

bamboo stitch, the coincidence

is killing me) except it has yarn

overs. It creates a fun looking

lace stitch. I alternated between

two solid colors to give it a little

more depth and I think it turned

out really well.

6 KNITmuch | issue 10

Michelle Nguyen

The recommended needle size is

US Size 4 [3.5mm] which makes a

good fabric. I found myself using

a looser gauge because while this

yarn does have bamboo, it also

has cotton which does not stretch.

When knitting with cotton it’s

best not to use a tight gauge

or it will begin to hurt your

hands. It’s something to pay

attention to if you’re a naturally

tight knitter. The Clematis Cowl

did have stretch when it was

finished. Through the looser

gauge and the mixture of cotton

and bamboo I could stretch

the cowl over my head to put

it on. As I mentioned before

the circumference was not as

large as the pattern. It was large

enough to put around my neck

twice and have it close. If you’re

wearing this cowl inside of a coat

to keep cold drafts off your neck

it will be perfect.

The colors featured here are Grape and Royal.

First knitted garment with

Bamboo Pop was a huge

success. The Clematis Cowl

looks great in this yarn, the work

you put into the stitches won’t go

unnoticed with this pairing. The

pattern is easy to memorize but

keeps you engaged so you don’t

fall asleep while knitting it. And

that’s always a good thing.

The Clematis Cowl written for Classic Shades

Sequins Lite but could be knit up beautifully in

Bamboo Pop.

Photos by Michelle Nguyen


The Waffle

Stitch using

Bamboo Pop yarn

Bamboo Pop in the color Royal worked with a Waffle stitch

Since the Clematis Cowl stitch

worked out so well decided to

try out other stitches. Bamboo

Pop really is the perfect yarn for

stitch work. The cotton bamboo

blend will hold its structure well.

You won’t have to worry about

the stitch getting distorted with

blocking and age.

One of the stitches I decided to

test out was a Waffle Stitch. It

consists of four rows repeated.

Two rows of stockinette stitch and

two rows of K2P2 ribbing. This

creates a fabric with a dimpled

look like thermal underwear.

It’s a stitch that doesn’t take a lot

of mental bandwidth but creates

a little bit of interest in your

knitting. It also simply looks warm.

The texture of the fabric has been

associated with warm base layers,

hiking in the winter, or layering up

to go pick out a Christmas tree.

Since this is a subtle stitch I

thought Bamboo Pop would

present it really well.

Bamboo Pop with a stockinette stitch swatch in

the color Fairy Tale

The attractiveness of the stitch

is in the hills and valleys of the

pattern. While Bamboo Pop

doesn’t have the springiness of

other yarns because of the cotton,

it’s great for a more subtle, less

textured look to the stitches. If the

garment you’re making is using

a variegated yarn this stitches

would add texture while not

overpowering the garment.

The best stitches are those

that don’t take a lot of mental

bandwidth to knit, but look

beautiful nonetheless. This one

can be added into just about

any garment, it only takes a

multiple of four stitches which is

a small amount. It’s much more

difficult to fit in something that

requires a multiple of 11 stitches.

Adding in those extra stitches can

equal inches on a final product.

Bamboo Pop in the color Grape and Turquoise

Whereas if you’re one or two shy

of four stitches, it won’t affect your

final garment all the much.

If you’re looking for a more

delicate look to a rib stitch

Bamboo Pop will work very

well. The stitches are much more

relaxed because of the fiber

composition and won’t overpower

your pattern. Check out the

variegated colors of Bamboo

Pop and consider this stitch if

you’ve fallen in love with any of its

variegated colorways.

KNITmuch | issue 10 7


Bamboo

Pop is like

finding the

perfect

frame for

a piece of

knitted art

I went over the waffle stitch and

how it’s a more subtle stitch

knit up in Bamboo Pop yarn. I’ll

talk about a stitch that Bamboo

Pop does really well, lace! The

Ocean Lace stitch from Melissa

Leapman’s book The Knit Stitch

Pattern Handbook.

I still cannot believe how well

Bamboo Pop shows off lace

stitches. When knitting a garment

in a lace stitch you really want

the focus to be on the stitches.

Bamboo Pop is like finding the

perfect frame for a piece of art.

At a knitting conference, yes

they exist, I took a class on

Japanese lace knitting. It was

fascinating because it would take

the simplest stitches, put them

together, and make them into

one cohesive garment. It looked

like the best possible way to

make baby blankets, or afghans.

Any large flat piece of knitting

that you need to add interest to.

Ocean lace stitch in the color Turquoise. It really reminds me of the ocean!

I was apprehensive about it

getting really complicated and

becoming a slow and dreaded

chore to knit. However, all the

stitches were easy to execute and

memorize. My eyes were opened

to how amazing lace can be and

how simple you can make it!

Since I did pay for this book

and I highly doubt the author

would thank me for giving away

the secret sauce of this stitch I’ll

suggest you grab the book from

a bookstore or your local library.

What I can tell you is the lace

pattern is only one row repeated.

The pattern has a total of 8 rows,

but the actual lace is the same

every time. The lace is fairly

simple, made of yarn overs and

SSK or K2TOG.

With Bamboo Pop, you’ll want to

be very careful with your K2TOG

and SSK. Those two stitches

are either left leaning or right

leaning. In this yarn, it will be

very apparent if you’ve mixed up

your right and left.

If you’re looking to make a lace

garment I would highly suggest

picking up a ‘stitchionary’ to look

at the lace stitches. If you’ve never

knitted lace and are concerned

about starting with a baby blanket

try knitting some lace swatches.

After you’re finished you can

either rip them out or use them

as dish cloths. Cotton is a go-to

fiber for dishcloths, and while

these might be some particularly

luxurious dishcloths, you will

definitely know how you like that

lace stitch.

The light colors really make lace stand out.

8

KNITmuch | issue 10


Knitting with

Bamboo Pop yarn

for a friend

We all have those for which we want to knit. Using

bamboo yarn, being a relatively new fiber in the

yarn world, it’s important to know which fiber is best

for the job.

People allergic to wool is a very common problem

I’ve run into.

When people are shopping for yarn I hear, “I’m

knitting for a friend, but she is allergic to wool”.

Usually these people do not want to use a synthetic

fiber or 100% cotton, because it just doesn’t have

the same luxurious feel as wool. This is an ideal

place for Bamboo Pop yarn. Both cotton and

bamboo are hypoallergenic and antimicrobial.

This means, your allergenic friend won’t have a

reaction and they won’t have to wash this garment

quite as much as if it were made from wool because

anti-microbial also means anti-odor. It’s also a good

yarn with which to knit baby blankets, especially if

you’re talking about summer babies. While we do

want to keep these snuggly little bundles warm, we

don’t want them to overheat and sit in their own

sweat for long.

Cotton and bamboo cut down on any rashes

or adverse reaction from being in contact with

sensitive skin for any length of time.

The blend of cotton and bamboo gives this yarn a

much softer feel than simple cotton. If you’re not

able to wear wool and are sick of stiff and crunchy

yarn choices this is the one for you.

Bamboo Pop with lots of swatches to show off the beautiful stitch definition.

It also provides UV protection. There’s no other

natural fiber that provides UV protection used in

textiles today. With summer around the corner, it's

important to talk about UV protection. Bamboo

Pop yarn give that extra layer of UV protection as

the end of a long day at the beach, soccer field, or

at the outdoor market.

My last point in favor of Bamboo Pop is the

sustainability. Bamboo is harvested without killing

the plant; those farming this fiber simply need to

wait a few months and it’s ready to be harvested

again. If you’re looking to do any knitting to gift

for someone worried about the sustainability and

environmental friendliness of their gift, look no

further than Bamboo Pop.

Bamboo Pop is safe for many different skin types with colors to go along with it.

KNITmuch | issue 10

9


Effortless

Fern

Grotto lace

swatch

knitted

in Bamboo

Pop

Michelle Nguyen

knitmuch.com/author/km_michelle/

We went deep into the benefits

of bamboo fiber, but I’ve got to

do one more lace stitch with

this yarn because it just looks so

darn good.

The Fern Grotto Lace stitch is

from the same book as I talked

about before. I wanted to see

a stitch that had a little more

elevation than one that was a flat

lace stitch. This one looks like it

has a cable, but it doesn’t really.

Bamboo Pop can still show the

stitch definition to the point of

believable faux cables.

My feelings about cables

notwithstanding, I really like this

stitch. It lends a lot of movement

to the garment. Your eyes

naturally flow down through the

stitches to the bottom of the

swatch. It always reminds me of

the calming effect of water. If you

mixed this lace stitch with a few

yarn overs in between the repeats,

it would be a beautiful throw.

The shininess of this yarn is part

of the reason all the stitches

really pop. Even if you look at the

garter stitch around the edge

of the stitches. The purl bumps

are shiny and pronounced while

the space between is not. It’s

very similar to the concept of

contouring in makeup. You have

certain features that need to

be highlighted to make them

stand out more. So any part of

the stitch that is raised will be

highlighted. The opposite is true

as well; any depressed area will

be shadowed. It’s like highlighting

your cheekbones and bridge of

your nose while shadowing the

natural hollows.

No matter the stitch, your knitted

garment will look amazing with

Bamboo Pop. It’s the perfect yarn

for baby blankets, throws, shawls,

and will work well for just about

any garment you want durability

and excellent stitch definition.

Bamboo Pop is the perfect yarn for lace stitches

Fern Grotto lace in the color Grape

Even in the ball you can see the shine.

10

KNITmuch | issue 10


11


Knitting with Alaska yarn – soft and airy

Cindy O'Malley

I’ve been exploring Rozetti Yarns Alaska – a light

and airy yarn that surrounds you with warmth and

softness.

When I was first introduced to Alaska, it softly

whispered “touch me”. I was not disappointed, as

it is as soft on the hands as it appeared to be. The

type of softness that makes you squish it up to your

neck, the true test of softness.

Frozen Pond and Stormy colorways in Rozetti Yarns Alaska

The 8-color palette is equally soft with color names

like Icicle, Peach Puff, and Frozen Pond to name a few,

that are representative of an Alaskan powder puff.

When I read the label, there were several things

about it that surprised me. One of which is the

gauge. The yarn is rated as a DK/Light Worsted (3)

with a recommended needle size of US 5 [3.75mm]

to achieve a gauge of 20 stitches and 26 rows

over 4” [10cm]. As a gauge knitter, I would typically

expect to achieve this for most yarns with a US 7

[4.5mm].

Another pleasant surprise is the yardage. A 50g ball

contains a generous 246yds [225m], which is what

you would typically expect from a 100g ball of light

worsted. This speaks to the lightness and airiness of

the fiber.

The fluffiness of the yarn gives it an aura, making it

difficult for the eyes to focus on an individual strand.

Alaska is comprised of 44% Acrylic, 15% Alpaca,

15% Super Wash Fine Merino, and 26% Polyamide.

Although there is a high synthetic content, the

most delicate of the fibers, in this case Alpaca,

dictate the laundering requirements. The

recommended laundry care is hand wash, lay flat

to dry, and no iron.

I’m not what you would call a devoted yarn snob –

only a somewhat yarn snob. What’s more important

to me than the yarn content is the following:

1) Are the colors pleasing to me,

2) Do I like the feel of the yarn,

3) Do I like knitting with it, and most important of all,

4) Do I like wearing the finished project.

The fluffiness of the yarn gives it an aura.

12 KNITmuch | issue 10

Photos by Cindy O'Malley


Items 1 and 2 have been answered positively for me,

and the balance of the feature will focus on items 3

and 4 on my list. I’ll knit some swatches, then proceed

with projects for the remainder of the feature.

As Alaska is relatively new, there are only a few

patterns designed specifically for this yarn. The

Choux Cowl, a free pattern, is one of them. I have

elected to make this cowl, along with a hat to match,

and a lacy accessory to complement the ensemble.

I chose to use Frozen Pond and Stormy as my project

palette as I envisioned wearing the finished projects

with my comfy blue jeans.

These are the projects I designed for this feature: a toque, a small lacy cowl,

and a larger cowl. They're knitted using Rozetti Yarns Alaska, so soft to the

skin and warm.

1 trick for easy knitting when knitting

with fluffy yarn

I’m knitting some swatches to

measure my gauge and to get a

feel for what it’s like to knit with

the yarn.

I mentioned that the

recommended gauge and

needle size surprised me. Rated

as a DK/Light Worsted, the

recommended needle size is a

US5 [3.75mm] for 20 stitches and

26 rows over 4” [10cm]. Being a

little skeptical about this, I put it

to the test.

Sure enough, my gauge was

right on at 20 stitches using a

US5 [3.75mm] needle, however,

my row count was 30 over 4”

[10cm], even after blocking. Since

most patterns will instruct you to

knit until X inches, this should not

be a factor.

The fluffy aura of the yarn tends

to be a little sticky, as most fluffy

yarns can be. I used a technique

that I often use when a particular

yarn is sticky or when the plies

separate while knitting.

Use your left thumb to gently

pull the knitted fabric down from

the left needle. By doing so, you

create a clear hole for the right

needle to slide through without

getting caught in the fluff, or

catching an individual ply. This

makes for a much smoother knit.

I’m pleased with the fabric

created by the stocking stitch

swatch, but curious as to how

it will work with patterning. If

you’re using a yarn with a lot

of texture, variegated, or one

that has an aura such as Alaska,

it’s important to ensure that a

detailed pattern isn’t lost by the

yarn characteristics. So I went

through my Japanese Stitch Bible

and selected a pattern that had

yarn movement and lace.

I achieved 20 sts and 30 rows over 4'' using a US5

[3.75mm] needle.

I use my left thumb to gently pull the fabric away

from the left needle.

KNITmuch | issue 10

13


Lace and a traveling pattern swatch with Alaska to see the stitch definition

After blocking the swatch, you can clearly

see the pattern definition, although much

softer than it would be with a high twist

yarn and no aura. A good knitting friend

of mine always states that you should

never assess a lace pattern without

blocking it first. This is good advice

and also means that you should always

swatch the pattern to ensure the detail

comes through before you start knitting

the project.

I’m pleased with the results, and can

honestly say that I like knitting with

Alaska when I applied the technique

described above.

Knitting with Alaska

The Choux Cowl

Choux Cowl

14 KNITmuch | issue 10

I’m starting the Choux Cowl,

which is a free pattern, designed

specifically for Alaska yarn, I

chose to knit my cowl in colors

Frozen Pond (light blue) and

Stormy (dark blue).

I like wearing long cowls in

the winter because you can

wrap it around your neck

multiple times for warmth in the

outdoors, and easily unravel it

and let it hang as an accessory

when indoors. Quite often I find

that an unraveled scarf will slide

down and off when dangling,

but a long cowl will stay put.

Also, if you forget your hat on

a chilly day, you can wear it

over your head and then wrap

it around your neck to surround

you in warmth.

The Choux Cowl is knit as a

tube in the round. There are

two options for finishing. First,

you can sew the ends of the

tube together for a fast, simple

finish. If you prefer a more

professional, seamless look, you

can do a crochet provisional

cast-on with scrap yarn and

graft the ends of the tubes

together. For complete pattern

instructions, you can download

the Choux Cowl pattern.

For this project, I’m using 2

balls of the Main Color (Frozen

Pond), 2 balls of the Contrasting

Color (Stormy), a US6 [4mm] 24”

circular needle, waste yarn and

crochet hook for the provisional

cast on, and a stitch marker.


This excellent duo for a winter's day outdoors.

Pattern gauge is noted at 20 sts

and 32 rows over 4”, however,

it’s not really important for this

project, but it does affect the

overall size. My gauge is 20 sts

and 30 rows with a US6 [4mm]

needle. The finished size is 50”

circumference and 12½” in width.

If you want to make it wider

or narrower, cast on a greater

or lesser amount of stitches in

multiples of 4.

The pattern for this project is very

simple, yet the results are elegant.

To begin, I’ll use a crochet cast

on with scrap yarn and cast on

124 stitches. Although I haven’t

decided on a finishing technique,

this cast on gives me options.

Being careful not to twist, I place

a stitch marker and joined in

the round using my main color.

Now, I’ll proceed to knit the plaid

pattern as follows:

Plaid Pattern

(multiple of 4 sts)

Odd Rounds 1-7: With MC, knit

to end.

Even Rounds 2-6: With CC, * k3,

sl 1 purlwise wyib; rep from * to

end.

Round 8: With MC, knit to end.

Repeat Rounds 1-8 for pattern

until work measure 50” or

desired length.

Being curious about the name of

this cowl, I decided to research

it. Choux is French and has

several meanings, depending

on how it is used. Choux (or

chou) means cabbage; however,

pâte à choux is a puff pastry,

and the expression “Mon

petit chou” refers to chou à la

crème (cream puff), which is a

term of endearment. Both of

these expressions are better

descriptions for the knitted fabric

than a vegetable! As my fabric

was growing, the lightness and

coziness was more reminiscent of

a puff pastry.

Once I reached 50”, it was time

to pick up the stitches from the

provisional cast on. Using a US3

[3.25mm] circular needle (it’s

easier to pick up stitches using a

smaller needle), I unraveled the

crochet cast on and placed the

stitches on my needle.

Once all of the stitches were

picked up, it was time to finish.

One point of note, there’s always

one stitch short on the picked up

round than on the finished round

as the stitches are offset. You can

either make another stitch on the

picked up round from the small

gap at the join, or merely sew it

in at the end.

I often use a three needle bind

off instead of grafting or even

sewing shoulder seams. I decided

to try this method on the cowl,

knowing that it would not work

for the entire round, but thought

I could finish it with a crochet

hook. With right sides together, I

proceeded. It worked really well

for the first half. The second half

required the use of a crochet

hook to pick up a stitch from

each needle and work them

together. Again, this worked well

for the bit, but as the remaining

stitch count decreased, it became

more difficult.

Although I managed to

complete it in this fashion, in

the end, I don’t think I saved

any time or effort. It was an

experiment that I will not likely

do again, however, trial and

error is how new techniques

are discovered. We tend to only

hear about the successes, but

I think it’s important to hear

about the not-so-successful

attempts as we learn from

mistakes. My recommendation,

follow the pattern instructions

which is to either graft using the

Kitchener Stitch or sew the two

ends together.

I cast on 124 stitches, using a provisional crochet

cast on with scrap yarn.

Unraveling the crochet cast on and picking up

the stitches

KNITmuch | issue 10

15


This is amazing! It’s so soft and cuddly, and feels like

you’re wrapped in a warm puff pastry.

It’s a little large for my stature, but I do love it. I can

see other applications for this down the road. With

the double thickness of the tubular construction, I

envision a big warm wrap or blanket to snuggle up

in on a cold winter’s night.

I love the plaid pattern. It’s so simple, but elegant at

the same time.

Choux Cowl completed, just in time for a cold winter’s day.

Knitting a

matching plaid hat

for the Choux Cowl

I’m making a hat to match the

Choux Cowl. I was so impressed

with the plaid patterning of the

cowl I made that I want to make

a hat to go with it, but with the

colors reversed.

The effect is awesome! And again, Rozetti Yarn

Alaska is so light yet warm.

materials

• 1 ball of MC – Stormy, and 1

ball of CC – Frozen Pond

• 32” US5 [3.75mm] circular

needle (magic loop), or dpns

• 32” US6 [4mm] circular needle

(magic loop), or dpns

• stitch marker

16 KNITmuch | issue 10

gauge

20 sts, and 30 rows over 4”

[10cm] using US6 [4mm] needle

in pattern

finished measurements

approximately 19” circumference,

10” height, to fit size medium

head. The rib is very stretchy, so

if you knit loosely, you may need

to use a smaller sized needle for

the rib section.

Using MC and US5 [3.75mm]

needles, cast on 90 stitches, and

join in the round, being careful

not to twist the stitches. Place

a stitch marker to mark the

beginning of the round.

Knit a 1×1 rib (K1, P1) for 3”. On

the last round, increase evenly by

6 stitches (96 stitches).

Change to US6 [4mm] needles

and proceed to work the plaid

pattern as follows:

(multiple of 4 sts)

Odd Rounds 1-7: With MC, knit

to end.

Even Rounds 2-6: With CC, * k3,

sl 1 purlwise wyib; rep from * to

end.

Round 8: With MC, knit to end.

Repeat Rounds 1-8 for pattern

for a total of 4 pattern sets.

Your work should measure

approximately 7” from the cast

on edge.

Knitting a hat with the plaid pattern to match the

Choux Cowl using Magic Loop

Once all pattern sets are

complete, it’s time to start

the decreases for the crown. I

want to keep the plaid pattern

throughout the crown, so the

decrease sequence is as follows:


Round 1: With MC, k5, k2tog,

* k6, k2tog; rep from * to

1 stitch remaining, k1. (84

stitches)

Round 2: With CC, * k3, sl 1

purlwise wyib, k2, sl 1

purlwise wyib; rep from *

to end.

Round 3: With MC, knit to end.

Round 4: Same as Round 2.

Round 5: With MC, k4, k2tog,

* k5, k2tog; rep from * to

1 stitch remaining, k1. (72

stitches}

Round 6: With CC, * k3, sl 1

purlwise wyib, k1, sl 1

purlwise wyib; rep from *

to end.

Rounds 7 & 8: With MC, knit

to end.

Round 9: With MC, * k4, k2tog;

rep from * to end. (60

stitches)

Round 10: With CC, * k3, sl 2

purlwise wyib; rep from *

to end.

Round 11: With MC, knit to end.

Round 12: Same as Round 10.

Round 13: With MC, * k3, k2tog;

rep from * to end. (48

stitches)

Round 14: With CC, * k3, sl 1

purlwise wyib; rep from *

to end.

Round 15 & 16: With MC, knit

to end.

Round 17: With MC, * k1, k2tog,*

k2, k2tog; rep from * to

end. (36 stitches)

Round 18: With CC, * k2, sl 1 purlwise wyib; rep from * to end.

Round 19: With MC, knit to end.

Round 20: Same as Round 18.

Round 21: With MC, * k2tog, k1; rep from * to end. (24 stitches)

Round 22: With CC, * k1, sl 1 purlwise wyib; rep from * to end.

Round 23: With MC, knit to end.

Round 24: With MC, k2tog to end, cut yarn and gather up remaining

12 stitches with a tapestry needle and weave in ends.

The hat is designed to be worn with the ribbed band turned up to

provide a doubled fabric over the ears. This way, it will be warm and

soft to wear on a cold winter’s day.

I’m very happy with the finished product. Now I’m looking forward to

making a lightweight cowl to be worn with my new hat.

Finished Hat with plaid pattern from the Choux Cowl

KNITmuch | issue 10

17


In Stormy Alaska, leftover yarn is a

knitted lacy cowl to the rescue

Soft lacy cowl with Japanese Stitch pattern and Alaska – Stormy

I’ll make a lacy cowl to complete my very airy and

soft ensemble. I was very happy with the lacy swatch,

so I thought it would be lovely to have a lightweight

cowl to wear with my new hat that I created earlier.

You can get the pattern there.

The stitch pattern is from a book entitled Japanese

Knitting Stitch Bible by Hitomi Shida. It’s a wonderful

resource for cable and lace patterns that can be

easily incorporated into a project. I often reuse

a pattern stitch from one project to the next;

especially socks. I love taking a motif from a hat or

sweater that I recently completed and incorporating

it into the leg of socks. This makes for a unique sock

pattern exclusive to me.

This pattern is designed over 14 stitches and 24

rows, therefore, I’ll cast on using a multiple of 14

stitches on circular needles to work in the round. It

could also be done on straight needles and worked

flat, however, 2 extra stitches should be cast on as a

selvedge.

Here’s what you’ll need for this project:

materials

• 1 ball Alaska – Stormy

• 32” US5 [3.75mm] circular needle (magic loop),

or dpns

• stitch marker

• Japanese Knitting Stitch Bible: 260 Exquisite

Patterns by Hitomi Shida

gauge

21 sts, and 29 rows over 4” [10cm] in pattern using

US5 [3.75cm] needle.

finished measurements

approximately 18” circumference, and 8” in height.

Cast on 98 stitches using US5 [3.75mm] needle

and join in the round, being careful not to twist the

stitches. Place a stitch marker to mark the beginning

of the round.

18 KNITmuch | issue 10


I worked 5 rows of garter stitch,

and then began the pattern

repeat. I worked two pattern sets,

then another 5 rows of garter

stitch, and cast off all my stitches.

After sewing in the ends, and

blocking, I have a lovely soft cowl.

If you recall at the beginning of

this feature, I mentioned that my

criteria as a yarn snob is:

1. Are the colors pleasing to me,

2. Do I like the feel of the yarn,

3. Do I like knitting with it, and

most important of all,

4. Do I like wearing the finished

project?

I was knitting the Choux Cowl

in public amongst my social

knitting circles, and was quite

taken by the attention it drew.

The colors, the texture, and

the pattern attracted many to

where I was perched, and once

they felt it, the reaction was the

same . . . What is this yarn? It’s

so soft!

Yes, Rozetti Yarns Alaska qualifies

in my books. I checked off items

1 and 2 on my list earlier, but it

was confirmed for me by my

knitting friends. I also found that

the more I worked with it, the

less the stickiness of the yarn

impeded my progress, so item 3

has been answered positively. As

for item 4, I’m very pleased with

my finished projects as they are

all very soft and warm to wear,

and look great!

Happy Knitting!

The winning set! Knit up with Rozetti Yarns oh so very soft and airy Alaska yarn!

Cindy O'Malley

KNITmuch | issue 10

19


Bi-directional herringbone

stitch knitted in

Dreamy Stripes

Charles Voth

The soft pastels of this colorway of Dreamy

Stripes suit the bi-directional herringbone stitch

pattern very well.

The transitions between the stripes are not 100%

abrupt. The colors overlap for about 2''. The tones

of the colors are well-suited to each other, too.

The “private” side of the bi-directional

herringbone stitch pattern is equally lovely,

with it’s splayed columns stitches and slightly

crocheted appearance.

Knit a scarf or cowl with 1 ball of Red Heart

Dreamy Stripes.

20 KNITmuch | issue 10

Knitting with fuzzy yarn like Red

Heart Dreamy Stripes inspires me

to find stitch textures that have

a lace-like effect without always

being yarn-over eyelets. Bidirectional

herringbone is such

a stitch pattern because the

fuzziness fills the smaller lace

holes and the diagonal strands

also catch the light and the halo

is intensified.

The bi-directional herringbone

stitch pattern is great for a

balanced fabric that stretches

well four ways. The vertical

stretch is the best, but the

diagonal strands draw the

knit back to its original shape.

Stretching in either diagonal

direction has a similar effect,

but is slightly more resistant.

Horizontally, the fabric does

stretch some, but the give isn’t

as generous as the vertical. I

wouldn’t recommend this stitch

for socks or yokes because the

give isn’t flexible enough.

This stitch pattern doesn’t yield

fabric that is the same on

both sides, but regardless, the

“wrong side” is equally pretty.

In my books, that makes this a

reversible stitch pattern.

How to knit the bi-directional

herringbone stitch

Stitches AND Abbreviations

K= knit

RS= right side

yo= yarn over

sl1pw= slip 1 purlwise

psso= pass slipped stitch over

(in this case 2 stitches)

p= purl

WS= wrong side

rep= repeat

p2tog= purl 2 together

LH= left-hand

st(s)= stitch(es)

Instructions

With US10.5 [6.5mm] needles,

cast on a multiple of 3 stitches,

plus 1. This swatch was knit over

46 stitches and is 9″ wide.

Row 1 (RS): K1, *yo, sl1pw, k2,

psso2sts; rep from * across.

Row 2: P1, *yo, sl1pw, p2,

psso2sts; rep from * across.

Rep Rows 1 and 2 for pattern,

ending with a Row 1.

Bind off row (WS): *P2tog, slip

st back to LH needle; rep

from * across.

With 46 stitches and a gauge of

approximately 20 sts per 4″, and

1 ball of Red Heart Dreamy Stripes,

you’ll be able to knit a scarf that’s

55″ long x 9″ wide. I hope you

give this stitch pattern a try.


Fleck stitch knitted in Super Saver Pooling

Interrupting the colors in a

painted yarn like Red Heart Super

Saver Pooling is a design strategy

I like to use to make strands of

one color lay across one of the

others. The fleck stitch does this

very well.

To make the fleck stitch, one

starts with 2 stitches and ends

with 3. Naturally, repeating this

across a row would increase

the stitch count substantially. To

combat this, bunny ear decreases

(I talked about a version of

these in my article, Bunny Ear

decreases…) are needed to return

the stitch count back to normal.

How to work the fleck stitch

1. Bring yarn over the top of

the right-hand needle and

then back down between the

needles to the back of the work.

2. Insert the tip of the right-hand

needle into the front leg of the

next stitch, knit the stitch but

don’t slide it off the left-hand

needle.

3. Bring the yarn forward, insert

the right-hand needle back

into the same stitch and then

into the back leg of the next

stitch and knit them together

and slide off the left-hand

needle.

4. Take that first yarn over, it’s the

fourth stitch on the right-hand

needle, and pass it over all the

first 3 stitches.

How to work the bunny ear decrease

1. Insert the right-hand needle

into the next 2 stitches as if to

knit them together through

the front legs.

2. Wrap the yarn and bring it up

between the first and second

front legs.

3. Slide everything off the lefthand

needle.

4. Knit the next st, then take

the dropped leg, which now

looks like an obvious diagonal

strand and pass it over the first

2 stitches on the right-hand

needle.

I had to experiment with how

frequently I worked the textured

rows, so you may notice some

sections of the swatch have

more rows of stockinette stitch

in between. I still can’t decide

which one I like better, so I’ll let

you choose.

The fleck stitch pattern knit in Super Saver Pooling

keeps the eye moving as it looks for a repeated

color motif that isn’t there.

Abbreviations

K= knit

P=purl;

fle-st= fleck stitch

b-ears = bunny ear decrease

sl= slip 1 purlwise

rep= repeat

RS= right side

This worsted weight self-striping yarn with short

color repeats is perfect for the fleck stitch.

Photos by Charles Voth

KNITmuch | issue 10

21


I love this purl-side bind off. It’s quite stretchy.

Fleck Stitch Pattern

instructions

With US8 [5mm] needles, cast on a multiple of 5 stitches, plus 6. There

are 51 stitches on this swatch.

Row 1 (RS): Knit.

Row 2: Sl 1, k2, purl to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 3: Sl 1, k2, *fle-st, k3; rep from * to last 3 sts, k3–the stitch count

will increase by the number of times you repeat the fleck stitch.

Row 4: Sl 1, k2, purl to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 5: Sl 1, k2, *k3, b-ears; rep from * to last 3 sts, k3–the stitch count

returns to the original.

Row 6: Rep Row 4.

Row 7: Sl 1, k2, *k3, fle-st; rep from * across to last 3 sts, k3–stitch

count increases by number of motif repeats.

Row 8: Rep Row 4.

Row 9: Sl 1, k2, *b-ears, k3; rep from * across to last 3 sts, k3–stitch

count back to original.

Row 10: Rep Row 4.

Rep rows 3-10 for pattern.

If you want to work two rows of stockinette between rows 6 and 7,

that’s also a possibility.

When the piece is almost square, end with a RS row. Then knit 2 rows.

Then with the WS facing bind off as follows: [P2tog, slip stitch back to

left-hand needle] rep between [ ] across.

I hope you try this fun fleck stitch in Super Saver Pooling soon.

I think that the topdown

view of the fleck

stitch is the best.

22 KNITmuch | issue 10


Flared Diamonds knit in Super Saver Fair Isle

A few well-placed

shaping stitches and

a combination of

knits and purls, and

you have a unique

square motif that

merges the Fair Isle

stripes with textured

diamonds.

The flared diamonds are made with common

decreases and a twisted make one increase.

Pre-dyed Red Heart Fair Isle yarn

looks good when the number

of stitches across the work and

the tension are set just right for

the pattern to knit up looking

like a classic Fair Isle sweater

yoke. But trying to achieve that

exactness is not everyone’s cup

of tea. I have more fun exploring

how I can make the colors and

textured stitches mingle, which

I'll talk about now!

The only thing I would do

differently with this square would

be to knit it with size US6 [4mm]

needles instead of the US8

[5mm] I used. As you can see,

the ‘twisted make one’ stitches

are just a little too loose.

How to knit the twisted make

one increase.

1. With yarn at back of work,

bring over top of left-hand

needle and back down

between the needles.

2. Slip the loop over to the righthand

needle.

Other abbreviations for this

pattern include the following.

While the pattern isn’t reversible,

the diamonds are visible on

either side.

This pattern can be easily

adapted to knit wider pieces.

Simply add multiples of 44

stitches and work the first

and last sets of 3 stitches the

same for the edging as for the

original block.

This chart is also available as a

downloadable PDF that allows you

to zoom in for a closer look.

Flared Diamond Chart

KNITmuch | issue 10

23


The right-side of the Flared Diamonds block

If charts aren’t your thing, here are the text

instructions.

Cast on 50 sts.

Row 1: P47, k3.

Row 2: S2 wyif, k1, p14, k16, p14, k3.

Row 3: S2 wyif, k1, TwM1, k12, p4, k2tog, k8, ssk, p4,

k12, TwM1, k3.

Row 4: S2 wyif, k1, p2, [p10, k5] twice, p12, k3.

Row 5: S2 wyif, k1, TwM1, k10, p5, k2tog, k10, ssk, p5,

k10, TwM1, k3.

Row 6: S2 wyif, k1, p10, k6, p4, TwM1, p7, k6, p10, k3.

Row 7: S2 wyif, k10, p6, k2tog, k5, TwM1, p1, k5, ssk,

p6, k12.

Row 8: S2 wyif, k1, p8, k7, [p6, k2] twice, k5, p8, k3.

Row 9: S2 wyif, k8, p7, k2tog, k5, TwM1, p2, TwM1,

k5, ssk, p7, k10.

Row 10: S2 wyif, [k1, p6, k8, p6, k3] twice.

Row 11: S2 wyif, k6, p8, k2tog, k5, TwM1, p4, TwM1,

k5, ssk, p8, k8.

Row 12: S2 wyif, k1, p4, k9, [p6, k6] twice, k3, p4, k3.

Row 13: S2 wyif, k4, p9, k2tog, k5, TwM1, p6, TwM1,

k5, ssk, p9, k6.

Row 14: S2 wyif, k1, p2, k2, [k8, p6] twice, k10, p2, k3.

Row 15: S2 wyif, k2, p10, k2tog, k5, TwM1, p8, TwM1,

k5, ssk, p10, k4.

Row 16: S2 wyif, k2, [k10, p6] twice, k14.

Row 17: S2 wyif, k2, p10, TwM1, k5, ssk, p8, k2tog,

k5, TwM1, p10, k4.

Row 18: S2 wyif, k1, p2, k2, [k8, p6] twice, k10, p2, k3.

Row 19: S2 wyif, k4, p9, TwM1, k5, ssk, p6, k2tog, k5,

TwM1, p9, k6.

Row 20: S2 wyif, k1, p4, k9, [p6, k6] twice, k3, p4, k3.

Row 21: S2 wyif, k6, p8, TwM1, k5, ssk, p4, k2tog, k5,

TwM1, p8, k8.

Row 22: S2 wyif, [k1, p6, k8, p6, k3] twice.

Row 23: S2 wyif, k8, p7, TwM1, k5, ssk, p2, k2tog, k5,

TwM1, p7, k10.

Wrong side of the Flared Diamonds block

Row 24: S2 wyif, k1, p8, k7, [p6, k2] twice, k5, p8, k3.

Row 25: S2 wyif, k10, p6, TwM1, k5, ssk, k2tog, k5,

TwM1, p6, k12.

Row 26: S2 wyif, k1, [p10, k6, p2] twice, p8, k3.

Row 27: S2 wyif, TwM1, k12, p4, k2tog, k8, ssk, p4,

k12, TwM1, k3.

Row 28: P2, k1, p2, [p10, k5] twice, p12, k3.

Row 29: S2 wyif, k1, TwM1, k10, p5, k2tog, k10, ssk,

p5, k10, TwM1, k3.

Row 30: S2 wyif, k1, p10, k6, p4, TwM1, p7, k6, p10,

k3.

Row 31: S2 wyif, k10, p6, k2tog, k5, TwM1, p1, k5, ssk,

p6, k12.

Row 32: S2 wyif, k1, p8, k7, [p6, k2] twice, k5, p8, k3.

Row 33: S2 wyif, k8, p7, k2tog, k5, TwM1, p2, TwM1,

k5, ssk, p7, k10.

Row 34: S2 wyif, [k1, p6, k8, p6, k3] twice.

Row 35: S2 wyif, k6, p8, k2tog, k5, TwM1, p4, TwM1,

k5, ssk, p8, k8.

Row 36: S2 wyif, k1, p4, k9, [p6, k6] twice, k3, p4, k3.

Row 37: S2 wyif, k4, p9, k2tog, k5, TwM1, p6, TwM1,

k5, ssk, p9, k6.

Row 38: S2 wyif, k1, p2, k2, [k8, p6] twice, k10, p2,

k3.

Row 39: S2 wyif, k2, p10, k2tog, k5, TwM1, p8, TwM1,

k5, ssk, p10, k4.

Row 40: S2 wyif, k2, [k10, p6] twice, k14.

Repeat Rows 17 – 40 as many times as you wish.

Row 41: S2 wyif, k2, p10, TwM1, k5, ssk, p8, k2tog,

k5, TwM1, p10, k4.

Row 42: S2 wyif, k1, p2, k2, [k8, p6] twice, k10, p2,

k3.

Row 43: S2 wyif, k4, p9, TwM1, k5, ssk, p6, k2tog, k5,

TwM1, p9, k6.

Row 44: S2 wyif, k1, p4, k9, [p6, k6] twice, k3, p4, k3.

Row 45: S2 wyif, k6, p8, TwM1, k5, ssk, p4, k2tog, k5,

TwM1, p8, k8.

24 KNITmuch | issue 10


Row 46: S2 wyif, [k1, p6, k8, p6, k3] twice.

Row 47: S2 wyif, k8, p7, TwM1, k5, ssk, p2, k2tog, k5,

TwM1, p7, k10.

Row 48: S2 wyif, k1, p8, k7, [p6, k2] twice, k5, p8, k3.

Row 49: S2 wyif, k10, p6, TwM1, k5, ssk, k2tog, k5,

TwM1, p6, k12.

Row 50: S2 wyif, k1, [p10, k6, p2] twice, p8, k3.

Row 51: S2 wyif, p45, k3.

Row 52: S2 wyif, k1, p44, k3.

I hope you’ll give this stitch pattern a try. I’d love

to see one of the Red Heart Super Saver Fair Isle

colorways used in a blanket.

This yarn looks amazing in any format, in the hand, wound into a cake, and

knit into a subtly-textured stitch pattern.

Twisted

stitches and

lace knit

in Super

Saver Chunky

It’s so exciting to feature a lace

panel that features lace eyelets,

twisted stitches, and small cables

knit in Red Heart Super Saver

Chunky. Gone are the days where

lace motifs are only knit with

lace-weight yarn!

I used columns of twisted stitches

to isolate each panel of either

lace or small cables. I thought

that with chunky yarn, this would

help define each textured area.

stitches and abbreviations

K= knit

k-tbl= Knit through the back

loop.

k2tog = Knit 2 stitches

together.

p = Purl.

ssk = Slip 2 stitches knitwise,

then knit slipped stitches

together.

s2tog-k1-p2sso = Slip 2

stitches together knitwise, knit 1,

then pass slipped stitches over.

tuck = K1 into next st, but 3

rows below, yo, knit into the

same st, slide st 3 rows above

insertion point off needle, too.

yo = Wrap the working

yarn over the right needle,

from front to back (counterclockwise).

½ LPC = Slip 1 stitch to cable

needle and hold in front; p2; k1

from cable needle.

½ RPC = Slip 2 stitches to

cable needle and hold in back;

k1; p2 from cable needle.

For these columns of twisted stitches, I only knit

in the back loop on right-side rows, but to really

make those columns pop, purling in the back

loop on the corresponding stitches on the wrong

side rows really helps.

KNITmuch | issue 10

25


instructions

Row 1: K2, [k1, k-tbl] twice, p1,

k9, p1, k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, p2,

[k1, k-tbl] twice, p1, k9, p1,

[k-tbl, k1] twice, k2 (43 sts).

Row 2: K2, [k1, p1] 3 times, p8,

[k1, p1] twice, p1, k1, [k1, p1]

3 times, p7, [p1, k1] 3 times,

k2 (43 sts).

Row 3: K2, [k1, k-tbl] twice, p1, k9,

p1, k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, 1/2 RPC,

k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, p1, k9, p1,

[k-tbl, k1] twice, k2 (43 sts).

Row 4: K2, [k1, p1] 3 times, p7,

[p1, k1] 3 times, k1, p1, [p1,

k1] twice, p8, [p1, k1] 3

times, k2 (43 sts).

Row 5: K2, [k1, k-tbl] twice, p1,

k2, k2tog, yo, tuck, yo, ssk,

k2, p1, [k-tbl, k1] twice, p2,

k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, p1, k2, k2tog,

yo, tuck, yo, ssk, k2, p1,

[k-tbl, k1] twice, k2 (47 sts).

Row 6: K2, [k1, p1] 3 times, p9,

[p1, k1] 3 times, k1, p1, [p1,

k1] twice, p10, [p1, k1] 3

times, k2 (47 sts).

Row 7: K2, [k1, k-tbl] twice, p1,

k2tog, yo, k2tog, k3, ssk,

yo, ssk, p1, k-tbl, k1, k-tbl,

1/2 LPC, k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, p1,

k2tog, yo, k2tog, k3, ssk,

yo, ssk, p1, [k-tbl, k1] twice,

k2 (43 sts).

Row 8: K2, [k1, p1] 3 times, p8,

[k1, p1] twice, p1, k1, [k1, p1]

3 times, p7, [p1, k1] 3 times,

k2 (43 sts).

Row 9: K2, [k1, k-tbl] twice, p1,

ssk, yo, k2tog, yo, k1, yo,

ssk, yo, k2tog, p1, k-tbl, k1,

k-tbl, p2, [k1, k-tbl] twice,

p1, ssk, yo, k2tog, yo, k1,

yo, ssk, yo, k2tog, p1, [k-tbl,

k1] twice, k2 (43 sts).

Row 10: K2, [k1, p1] 3 times, p8,

[k1, p1] twice, p1, k1, [k1, p1]

3 times, p7, [p1, k1] 3 times,

k2 (43 sts).

Row 11: K2, [k1, k-tbl] twice, p1, k3,

yo, s2tog-k1-p2sso, yo, k3,

p1, k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, 1/2 RPC,

k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, p1, k3, yo,

s2tog-k1-p2sso, yo, k3, p1,

[k-tbl, k1] twice, k2 (43 sts).

Row 12: K2, [k1, p1] 3 times, p7,

[p1, k1] 3 times, k1, p1, [p1,

k1] twice, p8, [p1, k1] 3

times, k2 (43 sts).

Row 13: K2, [k1, k-tbl] twice, p1,

k9, p1, [k-tbl, k1] twice, p2,

k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, p1, k9, p1,

[k-tbl, k1] twice, k2 (43 sts).

Row 14: K2, [k1, p1] 3 times, p7,

[p1, k1] 3 times, k1, p1, [p1,

k1] twice, p8, [p1, k1] 3

times, k2 (43 sts).

Row 15: K2, [k1, k-tbl] twice, p1, k9,

p1, k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, 1/2 LPC,

k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, p1, k9, p1,

[k-tbl, k1] twice, k2 (43 sts).

Row 16: K2, [k1, p1] 3 times, p8,

[k1, p1] twice, p1, k1, [k1, p1]

3 times, p7, [p1, k1] 3 times,

k2 (43 sts).

Row 17: K2, [k1, k-tbl] twice, p1,

k2, k2tog, yo, tuck, yo, ssk,

k2, p1, k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, p2, [k1,

k-tbl] twice, p1, k2, k2tog,

yo, tuck, yo, ssk, k2, p1,

[k-tbl, k1] twice, k2 (47 sts).

Row 18: K2, [k1, p1] 3 times, p10,

[k1, p1] twice, p1, k1, [k1, p1]

3 times, p9, [p1, k1] 3 times,

k2 (47 sts).

Row 19: K2, [k1, k-tbl] twice, p1,

k2tog, yo, k2tog, k3, ssk,

yo, ssk, p1, k-tbl, k1, k-tbl,

1/2 RPC, k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, p1,

k2tog, yo, k2tog, k3, ssk,

yo, ssk, p1, [k-tbl, k1] twice,

k2 (43 sts).

Row 20: K2, [k1, p1] 3 times, p7,

[p1, k1] 3 times, k1, p1, [p1,

k1] twice, p8, [p1, k1] 3

times, k2 (43 sts).

Row 21: K2, [k1, k-tbl] twice, p1,

ssk, yo, k2tog, yo, k1, yo,

ssk, yo, k2tog, p1, [k-tbl, k1]

twice, p2, k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, p1,

ssk, yo, k2tog, yo, k1, yo,

ssk, yo, k2tog, p1, [k-tbl, k1]

twice, k2 (43 sts).

Row 22: K2, [k1, p1] 3 times, p7,

[p1, k1] 3 times, k1, p1, [p1,

k1] twice, p8, [p1, k1] 3

times, k2 (43 sts).

Row 23: K2, [k1, k-tbl] twice, p1,

k3, yo, s2tog-k1-p2sso, yo,

k3, p1, k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, 1/2

LPC, k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, p1, k3,

yo, s2tog-k1-p2sso, yo, k3,

p1, [k-tbl, k1] twice, k2 (43

sts).

Row 24: K2, [k1, p1] 3 times, p8,

[k1, p1] twice, p1, k1, [k1, p1]

3 times, p7, [p1, k1] 3 times,

k2 (43 sts).

Rows 25-48: Repeat rows 1-24.

Row 49: K2, [k1, k-tbl] twice, p1,

k9, p1, k-tbl, k1, k-tbl, p2,

[k1, k-tbl] twice, p1, k9, p1,

[k-tbl, k1] twice, k2 (43 sts).

Row 50: K2, [k1, p1] 3 times, p8,

[k1, p1] twice, p1, k1, [k1, p1]

3 times, p7, [p1, k1] 3 times,

k2 (43 sts).

26 KNITmuch | issue 10


A PDF of this chart is available

here for convenient viewing.

This stitch pattern would be

perfect for a cushion cover, a lap

blanket, or even a sweater. Knit

up in Red Heart Super Saver Chunky,

it will take no time at all! I hope

you give it a try.

This teal color of Red Heart Super Saver Chunky is one of 19 brilliant options.

The wrong side of the pattern also looks great! With this yarn, the textures really jump out at you.

50

48

46

44

42

40

38

36

34

32

30

28

26

24

22

20

18

16

14

12

10

8

6

4

2

49

47

45

43

3 3 41

39

37

35

33

31

3 3 29

27

25

23

21

19

3 3 17

15

13

11

9

7

3 3 5

3

1

Stitches

RS: k; WS: p

RS: p; WS: k

KNITmuch | issue 10

27


I'm so excited to design something with this

gradual ombre yarn.

Butterfly Baby

Blanket knit in

Super Saver Ombre

This pattern uses a multiple of 9 stitches, plus 6 for symmetry and edge stitches.

I get to play with Red Heart

Super Saver Ombre. I’ve always

been prone to gradient yarns.

With the advent of long color

repeat gradients, I was never

so happy. Having a gradient

repeat every 2 or 3 yards

is one thing, but having it

gradually change over a

much longer distance is just

exhilarating for me.

I’ve been playing around with

brioche knitting lately, but

the name of that technique

itself seems to make so

many knitters tremble with

misgivings. So I thought I’d

take the premise of brioche

(using extra horizontal strands

within knit stitches) and

simplify it to create a different

striking texture. I call this the

bundle stitch…but it does

really look like butterflies, too,

if you let your imagination

take you there.

stitches and

abbreviations

Sl = slip

K = knit

P = purl

Wyb = With

yarn in back

Bundle st =

with tip of

right-hand

needle lift 3

horizontal

strands from

lowest to top

onto needle,

knit next

st on lefthand

needle

trapping the

strands in

the stitch.

28 KNITmuch | issue 10


This square measured 14″ x 14″,

and it’s knit with 51 stitches, but

you can make a baby blanket

simply by adding a multiple of 9

sts and repeating the motif.

instructions

Cast on 51 sts.

Rows 1-3: Slip first st purlwise

with yarn in back, knit

across.

Row 4 (WS): Wyb sl1, [k4, p5] 5

times, k5–51 sts.

Row 5: Wyb sl 1, knit across.

Row 6: Wyb sl 1, k4, [p5, k4,

wyb sl 5 purlwise, without

tightening yarn across

back, k4] twice, p5, k5.

Rows 7–10: Rep rows 5 & 6.

Row 11: Wyb sl 1, k15, bundle st,

k17, bundle st, knit across.

Row 12: Wyb sl 1, k4, [wyb

sl 5 purlwise, without

tightening, k4, p5, k4]

twice, wyb sl 5 purlwise, k4.

Row 13: Wyb sl 1, knit across.

Rows 14 & 15: Rep Rows 12 & 13.

Row 16: Rep Row 12.

Row 17: Wyb sl 1, k6, bundle st,

[k17, bundle st] twice, k7.

Rep rows 6-17 until piece is

approximately square, ending

with either a Row 11 or Row 17.

Next Row: Rep Row 4.

Next 2 Rows: Wyb sl 1, knit

across.

Bind off: *P2tog, sl st back to

right-hand needle; rep

from * across.

I hope you enjoyed all the

diverse knit stitch patterns

offered here using the variety of

Red Heart Super Saver yarns. Please

share your bundle stitch projects

with us as soon as you knit them!

The gradual transition between ombre shades is visible from a butterfly’s eye view!

Create exciting texture with the bundle stitch.

Charles Voth

charlesvothdesigns.ca

KNITmuch | issue 10

29


Learn to knit with

Loop-it

Cynthia MacDougall

I sampled Loop-it in the Ice Ice Cream colorway. I love

that it has a hint of color in its whiteness!

Loop-it looks like this – a series of chenille loops. Near the

right of the photo I have formed the first stitch, by linking a

loop from the ball through the first “stitch” loop of my “cast

on.” The yarn is about the size of a fuzzy black-and-brown

caterpillar.

Loop-it and Pomp-a-doodle by

Red Heart are fun novelty yarns

that can be practical!

Loop-it's intended use is for

finger knitting, and it does this

job very well, teaching big or

little fingers to use fine motor

skills to draw loops through other

loops to make something with

their own hands.

Loop-it is a chenille yarn that is

anchored at intervals to form

loops. It comes in 16 colors, 7

of which have colorways, with

several colors per ball. American

knitting instructor Marly Bird has

prepared several how-to videos

on her YouTube channel, see a

video on how to Loop-it in garter

stitch at the end of this article.

The Red Heart site also has free

patterns for a hat, a scarf, a cowl,

and a pillow cover.

To work Loop-it, leave a length

of yarn the width of the desired

project. Fold the yarn at this

point, and beginning at the fold,

draw the loop from after the fold

through the loop before the fold.

In the photo, the loops to the left

of the linked stitches are the base

loops, and the yarn from the ball

goes off the photo on the right.

Work cross the foundation loops,

drawing the next loop from the

ball of yarn through the next

loop of the foundation. All of this

is done using nothing but your

fingers, and the fuzziness of the

chenille keeps the new loops in

place.

I quickly realized that one can

create garter or stockinette fabric,

and even ribbing, with Loop-it.

Garter stitch doesn’t look like

garter stitch as most knitters

know it – it looks a little “flat” and

stretched out, but you can still

see the “ridges.” I attribute the

flatness to the fact that the loops

have to be drawn up more than

regular knitting would.

To make garter stitch, work to

the end of the row, then turn

the work over. This brings the

working yarn back to the same

starting place as the previous row.

Lay the loops across, and draw

each loop up from underneath,

as for the previous row.

The only drawback I encountered

with this finger knitting is that

you have to be careful not to

miss a loop, because they aren’t

organized on a knitting needle.

30 KNITmuch | issue 10

Garter stitch made with Loop-it. Note the purple

stitch marker in the photo. This is the only

drawback I found with Loop-it – you have to pay

attention that you don’t miss a loop.

Photos by Cynthia MacDougall


The scale of the

stitches makes

the “V” of each

stockinette

stitch in this

sample clearly

visible. The

orange stitch

marker is just

there to hold

my last cast off

stitch in place.

To make a stockinette stitch

ground, begin the first row as for

garter stitch, but at the end of the

row, leave the work right side up.

Lay the working yarn back across

the top of the work, and work

back in the opposite direction.

By going through this exercise

in finger knitting, I realized that

Loop-it is perfect for teaching

the most basic principles of

knitting. It is PERFECT for

teaching children to knit! It would

also be useful for occupational

therapists to improve their

patients’ fine motor skills, and

it could be used in activation

programs for the elderly. The

size of the yarn makes it easy for

little fingers or arthritic hands to

manage, the scale of the fabric

makes it easy to see and talk

about what is happening, and

the concepts of cast on and cast

off don’t have to be introduced

right away, so the initial concepts

become second nature before

newer ones are introduced. Plus,

Loop-it is affordable!

Introducing knitting needles

to Loop-it yarn

Here, I’m using Loop-it to

introduce knitting needles, a

logical next step when using

Loop-it to teach a young

person to knit.

Like we did previously, take

loops and pull them through

old loops, and we’ll continue

to be careful not to miss any

loops. The knitting needles

actually make it easier to see

the loops from the previous

row, but care still needs to be

taken to make sure every loop

of the working yarn is linked in.

In this photo, I’m taking my few rows of finger knitting, and adding a knitting needle to the mix. I

insert the needle into the loop in the fabric, then pop the next loop over the tip of the needle and

bring that loop through the old one.

KNITmuch | issue 10

31


As we do with regular knitting, the needle goes into

the old loop, but instead of wrapping the yarn, we

draw up the next loop.

Now it becomes necessary to turn the work at

the end of every row. Working garter stitch will

go as described earlier. Once a knitting student

is comfortable with this concept, the idea of

stockinette stitch, and purl rows can be introduced.

This is the point when teaching goes pretty well

the way it would for standard knitting lessons, but

the advantage is that the knit stitch has been very

well reinforced by now, and the student is probably

ready to learn something new.

At the end of my knit row, I will turn the work and either knit or purl back.

Now the student learns the difference between

knit rows and purl rows, and how to hold the yarn

at the back or front of the work as needed. It’s at

this point in my teaching that I start to talk about

‘reading your knitting’ and about the ‘bumps’. This

is one thing I wish my grandmother had known to

teach me. The ‘bumps’ in knitting help us know the

difference between right side and wrong side of our

work, they help us find mistakes in our ribbing, and

they can even help us know when to make cables

without the aid of row counters.

Two balls of Loop-it will make an adult-size scarf,

and the free pattern even has some panels of

stitch interest.

I had even more fun with Loop-it – check out my

next article for more!

Free pattern on the label has an interesting stitch pattern,

32 KNITmuch | issue 10


What happens

when you take

the whole

strand of

Loop-it and

knit it with

broomstick

needles! I love

the subtle pink

undertone

in the Ice Ice

Cream color.

Giggle

knitting

with Loop-it

leads to an

adorable baby

blanket

I’m having so much fun with Loop-it, a new

novelty yarn by Red Heart. After my knitting

experiments I decided to try something else.

One night, when I had some knitting

friends over, I grabbed a pair of 1″ [25mm]

‘broomstick’ needles and cast on 8 stitches.

(Honest, there was no wine involved.)

Within 4 rows, I had used the lion’s share

of a whole ball of yarn (Loop-it has 7.6 yds

[7m] per ball). I ended up with this swatch of

knitting!

The three of us got quite a giggle out of this

piece, which you have to admit looks like

something that got trimmed off a poodle!

After it came off

the needles, I saw a

sheep in this piece.

You might well see

a poodle, but as a

knitter and spinner, I

usually see a sheep.

KNITmuch | issue 10

33


After the giggling was over, I

tinkered with this bit of knitting

and turned it into a reasonable

sheep! With a little button eye

and some bits of black ribbon

for legs, it makes a very cute

applique on the corner of a baby

blanket. Here’s how I did it:

Grosgrain ribbon makes suitable legs for a little sheep.

I took a knitting blanket from

my knit-and-purl class samples (I

also teach classes), then grabbed

some 1″ [2.5cm] grosgrain ribbon,

and one of those clear plastic

buttons frames you embellish

with yarn. I also grabbed black

thread and couple yards of black

double knitting weight yarn.

First, I fashioned legs from the

ribbon, pinned them onto the

blanket and stitched them down

with black thread.

Then, I took that whole swatch in

the second photo, cinched in a

‘neck’ with white baby yarn, and

laid the piece on the blanket so

that the body was fairly centered

over the legs. Continuing with

the baby yarn, I stitched down

the belly. When I got to the tail,

it happened that this was where

the short, cast on tail of yarn was,

so I looped it up into a tail and

tacked that down as I went.

Then, I tucked in the long tail of

yarn under the body and kept

sewing around the back of the

sheep. I sewed the head down

last, on a bit of an angle to give it

an air of grazing.

To make the eye, I wove the black

cotton yarn through the button

form, then anchored it onto the

head of the sheep.

Knitting with a full strand of

Loop-it isn’t really practical, but

you have to love that little sheep!

The final result of my giggle knitting – a sheep on a blanket!

34 KNITmuch | issue 10


Pomp-a-Doodle yarn was

designed for children’s craft

projects, but it is also a knitting

and crochet yarn. This is the

Pink Sand colorway.

Pomp-a-

Doodle – yarn

without pomp

& circumstance

Pomp and Circumstance is the march heard around the

world at graduation, commencement, and convocation

ceremonies. It’s a stuffy old, traditional tune.

Pomp-a-Doodle, on the other hand, is fluffy, new and fun! This

novelty yarn by Red Heart comes in 22 colors and colorways,

with 21 patterns/ instructions for knitting and craft projects.

One of my favorite ideas for this yarn are the wreath patterns.

The Christmas colorway was made for this! Even though

none of the wreaths are knitted (they’re all attached with pins

to a styrofoam wreath form), I would knit a strip from Pompa-Doodle

and do my own thing.

The pattern included on the ball band is a knitted bath mat

that takes 4 balls of yarn and is a modest 18″ x 22″ [45 x

56cm]. If you’ve priced a bath mat recently, you’ll know that,

cost-wise, Pomp-a-Doodle stacks up quite well for a mat of

this size.

Loop-it makes a great base for Pomp-a-Doodle. The scale of

both yarns fit together very nicely!

Pomp-a-Doodle is made up of pom-poms (about 1½” [4cm]

in diameter) joined by approximately 2-3” [5-7cm] of strong,

flexible cord.

Read on for the pattern and three ways to hem this bathmat.

I chose the Pink Sand colorway and the

Ice Cream colorway of Loop-it, because I

wanted to see what would happen when

I combined these two yarns to create a

bath mat for my bathroom.

My experiment was a success – the

thickness of Loop-it and the spaces

between the pompoms of Pomp-a-Doodle

go together nicely, as this swatch attests.

KNITmuch | issue 10

35


Pomp-a-Doodle

and Loop-it

together

make the best

bathmat!

Loop-it and

Pomp-a-Doodle

make an

interesting duo!

I started out this feature with

Loop-it yarn and put it through

some paces: the finger knitting

for which it was designed, adding

knitting needles to help organize

the loops and teach basic knitting

principles and even using it

full-on with broomstick needles.

Then, I introduced you to Pompa-Doodle,

an evenly-spaced

pompom yarn that has numerous

craft applications.

Both Loop-it and Pomp-a-

Doodle are made of 100%

polyester, which makes them

great for projects that will be

washed often.

Previously, I combined the two

yarns in a swatch with a view

to making a bath mat. As I was

finishing the mat (I chose to hem

the ends), I discovered that this

would be a fabulous lap rug for

anyone in a wheelchair because

the combination is warm! I used

the rug for a lap robe one night

while I watched television!

That same night I came up

with a neat idea for a little girl’s

bedroom. A bed scarf, like the

ones they have in stylish hotels,

but with pompoms, and a

fluffy background that can be

snuggled up around a chilly child

at night. How girly!

Loop-it and Pomp-a-Doodle

bathmat

materials

• 3 balls of Loop-it (Yarn A)

• 4 balls of Pomp-a-Doodle

(Yarn B)

• sock or baby yarn in a

complementary color for

anchoring ends and a

hemmed edge (if desired)

Circular knitting needle size 11

[8mm]

Tapestry needle

gauge

6 sts to 4″ [10cm] over stockinette

stitch, but gauge is not important

measurements

24 x 36″ [60 x 90cm]

before hemming

special instruction – Slide

At times, the next yarn needed

will be at the ‘wrong end’ of

the knitting. When instructed

to ‘slide,’ slide the knitting to

the opposite end of the circular

needle so work can continue with

the correct yarn for the next row.

Do not turn the work at the end

of a slide instruction.

36 KNITmuch | issue 10


In this photo, the mat has been finished with a full hem, which hides the

Loop-it yarn almost completely.

This is the mat as it looks from the cast on edge with no hem turned under.

instructions

Count off 40 loops of Yarn A.

Row 1: K 36 loops, turn work.

The 4 leftover loops are

worked in on the next row.

Row 2: (K 1 loop from ball, k 1

leftover loop) 4 times, k to

end of row.

Row 3: Join Yarn B, leaving a tail

of 4 pompoms. (K1, k1 from

tail) until the last pompom

from the tail has been

worked in, k to end of row.

Slide work to the other end

of the needle

Row 4: With A, p across. Turn

work.

Continue in pattern, as follows:

Row 1: With B, p across. Slide.

Row 2: With A, k across. Turn.

Row 3: With B, k across. Slide.

Row 4: With A, p across. Turn.

Repeat these 4 rows until mat

is 2″ [5cm] short of the desired

length. Break B, leaving 4-5

pompoms, and work these into

the next row of knitting.

If the last B row was a Row 1, k 4

rows with A.

If the last B row was a Row 3, p 3

rows with A.

Cast off.

finishing

With a length of like-colored

sock or baby yarn, stitch the

last few loops of Loop-it to the

underside. Hem the ends of the

Loop-it under, if desired.

As I was knitting this bath

mat, my ‘laddie’ proclaimed

that he has trouble finding a

bathmat small enough to fit in

his postage-stamp bathroom,

which was an afterthought in his

century-plus old home. I’ll need

different colors, but I think I’ll

make him one and a spare!

In this photo, the cast on edge from the photo

above has been turned under at the first ridge.

Cynthia MacDougall

cgknitters.ca

Bed Scarf

To make a bed scarf, count off

31 loops of Loop-it, and knit 27

loops. This should make a scarf

18″ [45cm] wide. The materials

for the bath mat should make

a scarf about 48″ [122cm] long,

so you might want to add one

ball of each yarn to make it

long enough to drape off the

sides of the bed. It would look

so adorable in a ‘big girl’s’

bedroom!

As you can see, I have had a

LOT of fun reviewing these two

yarns. I really encourage you to

get out and get some young

people involved with these yarns,

whether you teach them to finger

knit or make a pompom-themed

craft project!

I bought the supplies to make a bathmat for the

‘laddie.’ This mat is about 18” square and uses the

Granite colorway of Pomp-a-Doodle.

KNITmuch | issue 10

37


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projects & tutorials online!

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summertime Tee

with waves of color

and

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Contours Cowl

38 KNITmuch | issue 10


39


Standard Yarn Weight System

Categories of yarn, gauge ranges, Standard recommended Yarn Weight needle System and hook sizes

much

Standard abbreviations & terms

Standards & Guidelines For Crochet and Knitting • YarnStandards.com

KNIT

Standards & Guidelines For Crochet and Knitting • YarnStandards.com

Standards & Guidelines For Crochet and Knitting • YarnStandards.com

alt = alternate

Standard Yarn Weight System

approx = approximately

Yarn Weight

beg = begin(ning)

BO= bind off

Symbol &

Categories of yarn, gauge ranges, and recommended needle CC = contrast and color hook sizes

Categories Category of yarn, gauge ranges, and recommended needle and hook sizes

ch = chain

Names

Yarn Weight

cm = centimetre(s)

Yarn Weight

Symbol &

cn = cable needle

Symbol Type & of

Fingering, Sock,

Category DK,

Worsted, Chunky,

co = cast on

Category

Sport,

Bulky,

Jumbo,

cont = continue, continuing

Yarns in

10 count Fingering,

Names Light

Afghan,

Craft,

dc = double crochet

Names

Baby

Roving Roving

Category crochet thread Baby

Worsted

Aran

Rug

dec = decrease(s), decreasing

Type of

Fingering, Sock,

DK,

Worsted, Chunky, dpn = double-pointed needle(s)

Type of Knit Gauge Fingering, Sock,

Yarns in DK, 10 count Worsted, Fingering, Chunky,

Sport,

Bulky,

Jumbo,

Sport,

foll = following

BabyBulky,

Light

Jumbo,

Afghan,

Craft,

Yarns Range* in in 10 count Fingering,

Category Light crochet thread Afghan, Baby Craft,

Roving Roving

g = gram(s)

33–40** 27–32 Baby 23–26 21–24 16–20 12–15 Roving

Worsted

7–11 Roving 6 sts Aran

Rug

Category

hdc = half double crochet

Stockinette crochet thread Baby

Worsted

Aran

Rug

and

sts

sts

inc = increase(s), increasing

Stitch to

Knit sts Gauge sts

sts

sts

sts

fewer

Knit Gauge

in(s) = inch(es)

4 inches

Range* in

6 sts

k = knit

Range* in

33–40** 27–32 23–26 21–24

Stockinette

6 sts

16–20 12–15

7–11

33–40** 27–32 23–26 21–24 sts 16–20 sts 12–15 sts 7–11

kf&b or kfb = knit into front and and back of st (increase)

Stockinette

sts

Recommended

Stitch to

and

sts

sts

sts

ktbl = knit through the back loop

sts

sts

sts

sts

sts

sts

sts

fewer

Stitch k2tog = knit 2 sts tog (right-leaning decrease)

Needle

to

in 1.5–2.25 2.25–3.25 3.25–3.75 4 inches 3.75–4.5 4.5–5.5 5.5–8 8–12.75

fewer 12.75 mm

4 inches

and

k3tog = knit 3 sts together (double right-leaning

Metric Size

mm

mm

mm

mm

mm

mm

mm

Recommended

larger

decrease)

m = marker

Recommended

Range

12.75 mm

Needle in 1.5–2.25 2.25–3.25 3.25–3.75 3.75–4.5

12.75 mm

4.5–5.5 5.5–8 m = meter(s) 8–12.75

Needle in 1.5–2.25 2.25–3.25 3.25–3.75

Recommended

Metric Size 3.75–4.5 mm4.5–5.5

mm 5.5–8 mm8–12.75

and

mm

and 17mm

mmm1 = Make mm 1 stitch: pick up the horizontal strand

Metric Size

mm

mm

mm

between 2 stitches from front to back and knit it

Needle U.S. 000 to 1 1 to 3 3

Range mm

mm

mm

mm

larger

to 5 5 to 7 7 to 9 9 to 11 11 to 17 larger and

Range

tbl (lifted increase)

Size Range

Recommended

larger

MC = main color

17

Recommended

Needle U.S. 000 to 1 1 to 3 3 to 5 5 to 7 17 7 to 9 9 to 11

mm = millimetre(s)

11 to 17

and

Crochet

oz = ounce(s)

Needle U.S. 000 to 1 1 to 3 3 to 5 Size Range 5 to 7 7 to 9 9 to 11 11 to 17

and

Gauge*Ranges 32–42

6 sts

p = purl

larger

Size Range

21–32 16–20 12–17 11–14

8–11

7–9 larger

p2tog = purl 2 sts tog (decrease)

in Single

double

and

sts

Crochet sts

sts

sts

sts

sts

patt = pattern

Crochet Crochet to crochets**

Gauge*Ranges 32–42

fewer

pfb = purl into front and back 6 sts of stitch (increase)

Gauge*Ranges 4 inch 32–42

21–32 16–20 12–17

in Single

double

6 sts

11–14

8–11 pm = place 7–9 marker

21–32 16–20 12–17 11–14 sts 8–11 sts 7–9

and

in Single

double

sts

psso = pass slipped stitch over

Crochet to crochets**

and

sts

sts

sts

Steel*** sts

sts

sts

sts

sts

sts

fewer

RS = right side

Crochet Recommended

to crochets**

4 inch

fewer 15 mm

1.6–1.4 mm 2.25–3.25 3.5–4.5 4.5–5.5

6.5–9

9–15

rem = remain(ing)

4 inchHook in Metric

5.5–6.5mm

and

rep = repeat

Regular hook mm

mm

mm

mm

mm

Size Range

Steel***

larger

rev = reverse

Steel*** 2.25 mm

Recommended

15 mm

rnd = round

Recommended

1.6–1.4 mm 2.25–3.25 3.5–4.5 4.5–5.5

Hook in Metric

15 mm

6.5–9

9–15

1.6–1.4 mm 2.25–3.25 3.5–4.5 4.5–5.5 Regular hook mm 6.5–9 mm 9–15

5.5–6.5mm

sc = single crochet and

Hook in Metric

Size Range

5.5–6.5mm

mm

and

mm

mm

Regular hook mm

mm

mm

sl = slip

2.25 mm

mm

mm

larger

Size Range

Steel***

larger

skp = slip one st, knit next st, pass slipped st over knit

2.25 mm

Recommended 6, 7, 8

I–9

Q

st (dec)

K–10 ssk = slip, slip, knit: slip 2 sts knitwise, 1 at a time, insert

Hook U.S. Size Regular B–1 to E–4 E–4 to 7 7 to I–9

to

1 ⁄2 M-13

Steel***

and

to M-13

to Q

left-hand needle into front of both sts and knit

Range Steel*** hook

Recommended 6, 7, 8 K–10 1 ⁄2

larger I–9

K–10

them tog (left-leaning Qdecrease)

B–1

Hook U.S. Size Regular B–1 to E–4 E–4 to 7 7 to I–9

to

1 ⁄2

Recommended 6, 7, 8

I–9

Q

M-13

sssk = slip next three stitches and individually, knitwise.

K–10

Hook U.S. Size Regular B–1 to E–4 E–4 to 7

to M-13

Range 7 to I–9 hook to

1 ⁄2 M-13

and K–10 1 ⁄2

Insert tip to Qof left needle larger from front to back into

to M-13

to Q

Range

hook

the fronts of these three stitches and knit them

B–1K–10 1 ⁄2

larger

* GUIDELINES ONLY: The above reflect the most commonly used gauges and needle or hook sizes for specific yarn categories.

together (double left-leaning decrease)

B–1

st(s) = stitch(es)

** Lace weight yarns are usually knitted or crocheted on larger needles and hooks to create lacy, openwork patterns. Accordingly, a

St st = stocking stitch

gauge range is difficult to determine. Always follow * the GUIDELINES gauge stated ONLY: in The your above pattern. reflect the most commonly used gauges and needle or hook sizes for specific yarn categories.

tbl = through back loop

* GUIDELINES *** Steel crochet ONLY: The hooks above are reflect sized the differently most commonly from regular ** Lace used hooks--the weight gauges yarns and higher needle are usually the or number, hook knitted sizes the or for smaller crocheted specific the yarn on hook, larger categories. which needles is the and reverse hooks to create lacy, openwork tog = together patterns. Accordingly, a

** Lace of regular weight hook yarns sizing. are usually knitted or crocheted on larger gauge needles range is and difficult hooks to to determine. create lacy, Always openwork follow patterns. the gauge Accordingly, stated your a pattern.

tr = treble crochet

gauge range is difficult to determine. Always follow the gauge *** Steel stated crochet in your hooks pattern. are sized differently from regular hooks--the higher the number, the smaller WS the = wrong hook, which side is the reverse

This Standards & Guidelines booklet and downloadable symbol artwork are available at: YarnStandards.com

*** Steel crochet hooks are sized differently from regular of hooks--the regular hook higher sizing. the number, the smaller the hook, which is the reverse

yo = yarn over

of

40

regular hook sizing.

This Standards 11 & Guidelines booklet and downloadable symbol artwork are available at: YarnStandards.com

This Standards & Guidelines booklet and downloadable symbol artwork are available at: YarnStandards.com

11

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