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Oregon Coast Waves - 1.7 - February/March

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OC

W A V E S

THE MAGAZINE FOR THE OREGON COAST

VOL 1.7

FEBRUARY 2021


Taken on the Siletz Bay in Lincoln City.

Photo by Jeremy Burke


OC

W A V E S

Publisher

Jeremy Burke

Editor

Steve Card

Advertising Sales

Teresa Barnes

Kathy Wyatt

Natalie Lane

Contributing Writers

News-Times Staff

Kenneth Lipp

Michael Heinbach

Katie Wiley

Photographers

Jeremy Burke

Casey Felton

About the Cover Shot

I took this photo the day after Christmas in

2019. I recieved a text that it was going to be

a good day. Little did I know that I would take

a set of photos that would reach millions of

people. There is something special about the

way the Vicotry cuts through the water. She’s

a force and when the surf gets big she puts

on a show. Photo by Jeremy Burke

P.7

Burgers of Lincoln County

P.34

Jell-O Pretzel Salad

P.26

The Queen of the Fleet -

Cover Story

P.37

The Kitchen Wild

oregoncoastwaves.com

Facebook

@OregonCoastWaves

Instagram

@oregoncoastwaves

P.39

Crab Cake Recipe

P.41

Animal of the Month

All rights reserved. No part of this

publication may be reproduced without

the written permission from this publisher.

Photographs, graphics, and artwork are

the property of Newport Newspapers LLC

©2021 and J.burkephotos ©2021

Oregon Coast Waves 2021

A News-Times Publication

831 NE Avery Newport Or 97365

P.42

Elephant Seal

P.48

Dream Home of the Month


contents

P.46

Rainbow over Whale Cove in Depoe Bay by Jeremy Burke

5


URGERS

OF

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PHOTOS BY: JEREMY BURKE


PHOTO BY: JEREMY BURKE

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PHOTOS BY: JEREMY BURKE

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Photo by

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Victory

STATION YAQUINA BAY

PHOTO BY JEREMY BURKE - @J.BURKEPHOTOS ©2021


PHOTO BY JEREMY BURKE ©2021 J.BURKEPHOTOS


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VICTORY: ’THE QUEEN OF THE FLEET’

aging Coast Guard boat placed on restricted duty

or more than 60 years, one name was the best hope for

large commercial vessels stranded or imperiled at sea

off the central Oregon coast — Victory.

The 52-foot motor lifeboat Victory came to Newport’s Station

Yaquina Bay in 1956 (although it remained nameless until the

1970s). It was the first of four steel 52-foot vessels built by the U.S.

Coast Guard to replace its aging wooden lifeboats, Invincible

and Triumph, and was joined in the early 1960s by the Intrepid,

Invincible II and Triumph II, stationed at Grays Harbor, Coos

Bay and Cape Disappointment, respectively. The four boats are

the only named vessels smaller than 65 feet in the guard’s fleet.

“It’s probably the finest lifeboat of its size ever built,” Retired

Master Chief Petty Officer Thomas McAdams told the News-

Times. McAdams was among the first to crew the Victory — they

both arrived in Newport at about the same time — and within a

year of operations, McAdams was awarded the Gold Lifesaving

Medal for rescuing four people on a capsized boat.

McAdams is known in the Coast Guard as the “the champion

lifesaver and lifeboat roller of the Pacific Coast.” He’s credited

with saving more than 100 lives in his 27-year career, four of

which were spent in Newport as coxswain of the victory. He

retired to the city in 1977 after returning to Station Yaquina Bay

as officer in charge.

“The Victory could take tremendous breakers, and it survived

one call in winds up to 100 mph and sea swells over 50 feet high.

For 23 hours, it went out and found its quarry and brought it on

in. The only problem was, it was slow,” McAdams said.

Designed specifically for the rough waters of the Pacific

Northwest, it’s built to motor into conditions that would imperil

other boats. Victory is self-bailing and self-righting — allowing

it to stay afloat while powering into the region’s often violent,

massive surf — and has a range of just under 500 miles. It can

carry 40 survivors and tow up to 750 tons (compared to 150 tons


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for the newer 47- foot motor lifeboats).

It was the Coast Guard’s workhorse out of Newport from the

time it was commissioned until October of last year, when the

13th District commander ordered it and its sister ships’ use

restricted after incidents of equipment failures and breakdowns

at sea.

Lt. Russel Tibbets, a Coast Guard spokesman, told the News-

Times, “We’re worried about their ability to respond in heavy

surf conditions. Over the last few years, our engineers and

operators have expressed concern about the safety of the vessels,

specifically with regard to their ability to tow vessels in heavy

surf,” Tibbets said. For example, he said, the Victory experienced

a generator breakdown at sea, and it lost its radar navigation

capabilities during a mission.

“Right now, we’ve basically restricted the use of all four of our 52-

foot special weather boats here in the Pacific Northwest,” Tibbets

said. “We’re not decommissioning them yet. We still have them

in reserve, and if there was a case where we knew there was life at

stake at sea and only the 52 can do the job right now, we will still

use them with the permission of the 13th District commander.”

Taunette Dixon, co-president of the Newport Fishermen’s Wives,

said the Coast Guard notified her organization of the impending

restriction. The Victory is a familiar sight to the organization’s

members, many of whom have watched it with relief as it entered

port towing friends and family behind it. “Because we have a

large vessel fleet in Newport, the Victory was the boat that was

used the most,” Dixon said.

Given their deep interest in the vessel’s operations, the Coast

Guard invited organization members and elected officials to a

meeting late last year in Newport. Dixon said the Coast Guard

brought in marine engineering experts to explain problems with

the Korean War-era boat and issues surrounding its replacement.

“It was very informative. They let us know the problems they

were having, and why they couldn’t immediately replace the

Victory with a boat that has the same capabilities — they just

don’t have one yet,” Dixon said. She said she understood the

Coast Guard was in the process of designing and building or

acquiring such a vessel but that it could be years yet before one

is in the water (Tibbets would confirm only that the guard is

“studying possibilities for a replacement”).

“In the meantime, they’ve rearranged the fleets in other ports

and brought in extra 47s,” Dixon said.

In conditions where the Victory would have been deployed,

involving larger vessels, the Coast Guard now uses aerial assets

and two 47-foot motor lifeboats. That was the case with Dixon’s

husband’s ship, the F/V Seeker, when it was stranded shortly

after the Victory’s duty was restricted.

Dixon said she was “very happy” the Coast Guard reached out

to the Fishermen’s Wives to make them aware of the change. She

said that wasn’t the case in 2014, when the agency announced

in October it would close the Newport Air Facility, from which

it deploys rescue helicopters, at the end of the following month.

That decision was eventually reversed after outcry from the

community and elected leaders.

“I think it’s very important for everyone to know that unlike

when we had the rescue of the helo, this time the Coast Guard

has been very communicative. We have a full dialogue with

them, and any time we have questions, they’re there to answer

them. And they’ve said that throughout this process of acquiring

a new boat that they will keep updating us as new steps are taken,”

Dixon said. “I also think it’s really important for people to know

that our whole coalition is working on this too. It’s not just us,

it’s our representatives also making sure that our port is safe.”

WRITTEN BY KENNETH LIPP | PHOTOS BY: JEREMY BURKE

31


While she’s pleased with the level of communication, Dixon

said, the absence of the Victory on the waves is still felt as a huge

loss to the fishing community.

Chief Warrant Officer Thomas Molloy, who was commander

of Station Yaquina Bay until he was relieved by Chief Warrant

Officer Ryan O’Meara last June, was among the last to helm the

Victory. Molloy said he looked to the lifeboat, which he called

“the queen of the fleet,” when coming up with introductory

remarks upon taking command at the station in 2017.

“In order to get inspiration, I spent a lot of time in the line locker

— not a place that someone on a lifeboat would normally want

to spend much time but a good place to find inspiration for my

short greeting speech,” Molloy said.

“One thing you noticed no matter who you had with you — I was

out on the Victory with everyone from admirals to Master Chief

McAdams — whenever that boat approaches the waterfront,

everyone waves at you,” Molloy said.

Molloy, who is now commander of the National Lifeboat

Academy at Cape Disappointment (where he replaced his

replacement in Newport, O’Meara), said one of his fondest

memories of deployment from Yaquina Bay was a cruise in the

Victory up to Seattle for comparison to a new lifeboat in the

Canadian Coast Guard’s fleet. “To take that boat from Newport

to Seattle with a few select crew members — we saw whales —

that was kind of the highlight of operations,” Molloy said. At the

Victory’s 10-knot pace, the trip took 40 hours.

O’Meara, who is serving in his second tenure as commander at

Yaquina Bay, said, “The Victory is like a member of the crew,

and every single person that’s been stationed here is proud that

they’ve served on the Victory. Losing her is like losing a member

of the crew. She was also built in the Eisenhower era, and it’s

time for us to let her rest. She’s done her job.”

Because of the boat’s age, the Coast Guard must have parts

manufactured to conduct repairs, which means extended periods

out of service when something breaks down. “She’s been in and

out of service for a while now. When I was here the last time,

out of the three years I was here, she was broken for almost a

year total while we were trying to find and make parts,” O’Meara

said. “So we’re running into trouble trying to keep our crews

proficient on an aging asset that is difficult to keep running.

When it’s broken, it’s down, we can’t train. And in 25-foot surf,

you have to be at the top of your game.”

32


33


JELL-O PRETZEL SALAD

Ingredients:

1 box of raspberry Jell-O (mix 1.5 cups hot water with .5 cup

cold water)

1 can crushed Dole pineapple

1 bag of frozen raspberries,

1.5 containers of Cool Whip

1.5 boxes of Philadelphia Cream cheese

1/3 cup sugar

1.5 cups pretzels rolled finely

1 cube melted butter

9 x 13 casserole dish

Directions:

Put butter on bottom of the dish and pour the pretzels on top;

press down. Bake 10-12 minutes on 350 until golden brown.

Cool completely.

Whip the cream and Cool Whip with the sugar until smooth.

Set in the refrigerator for 15 minutes; watch that it doesn’t set up

completely — it still needs to be slightly liquid. Let it start setting

up slightly in the fridge while mixing the cream. (Start the Jell-O

ahead of time at the same time you spread the cream on the

pretzels).

This is definitely a recipe to try — one of our family favorites.

Almost 21 years ago, my sister-in-law, Natalie Lindquist, brought

Jell-O Pretzel Salad over for dinner. The name of the dish made

me suspicious at first, and I almost did not try it. I am so glad

that I did!

Since then, it has become a staple for celebration dinners and

a fun dish to introduce to friends and family. I have passed on

this dish to my daughters, who are continuing the tradition of

sharing this strange, yet delicious recipe. It is one of my most

requested desserts.

Once the cream is ready and the pretzels are cooled, dollop the

cream onto the pretzels very carefully with 6-8 spoonfuls all over

the top. Use a knife to gently seal the entire top of the pretzels

and make sure there are no gaps around the edges. Return to the

refrigerator and set up 15 minutes.

Pour the can of pineapple into the Jell-O. Pour gently over the

top of the cream without making holes in the cream. Move the

liquid around evenly while pouring it. Once that’s complete,

arrange the raspberries all over the top in the Jell-O and return

to the refrigerator to set up completely for at least 1-2 hours. Cut

in squares and serve.

WRITTEN BY: CELESTE MCENTEE | PHOTO BY JEREMY BURKE


TISH EPPERSON

Crow’s Nest Studio & Gallery

toledo, oregon


THE KITCHEN WILD

Fried Cockle Clams with Spicy Cocktail Sauce

It has been quite a while since my family

and I waded out waist deep into the

Alsea Bay to rake for cockle clams. In

fact, the last time we went clamming

was on the cold and gray evening of

Dec. 12, so I haven’t even purchased my

2021 shellfish license yet. But hopefully

with some mild weather and negative

tides in our near future, we can finally

head back out to replenish our freezer

stockpile of clams.

Thankfully, we still have enough in the

freezer for a giant platter of fried cockle

clams for this Sunday because these

are arguably the perfect Oregon coast

Super Bowl appetizer. I’ll admit, I know

absolutely nothing about the Super

Bowl, or the NFL in general, but I do

know a thing or two about appetizers.

And these light, crisp clams paired with

Spicy Cocktail Sauce are easily one of

my biggest crowd pleasers.

So whether you’re heading out to a big

Super Bowl party or just enjoying the

game at home, these fried clams might

just make Super Bowl 2021 one to

remember.

Fried Cockle Clams

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups flour

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon Johnny’s seasoning salt

1 egg

1 cup milk

Coarse sea salt

Directions:

In one large bowl, combine 1 1/2 cups

flour, baking powder, baking soda,

Johnny’s seasoning salt. Whisk to fully

combine the ingredients.

In separate bowl, whisk together milk

and egg.

Dredge clams on both sides with the

flour mixture, then to the egg mixture

on both sides, and again into the flour

mixture. For this step, I press the flour

mixture down onto the clams to ensure

they’re dredged fully. Gently shake off

excess flour.

Fry to a golden brown, sprinkle with

coarse sea salt, enjoy!

Spicy Cocktail Sauce

Ingredients:

1 cup ketchup

2 1/2 tablespoons prepared horseradish

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

Directions:

Mix all ingredients in a small bowl.

Enjoy!

PHOTOS AND STORY BY KATIE WILEY


MICHAEL WALISER’S FAMOUS DUNGENESS CRAB CAKES

Ingredients

Binding Sauce:

2 cups mayonnaise

1 cup fresh parsley leaves

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 tablespoon capers

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1 tablespoon sweet pickle relish

2 green onions, diced

Shrimp Puree:

12 ounces small white prawns, peeled and deveined

Salt and freshly ground pepper

Crab Cakes:

1 1/2 pounds fresh picked Dungeness crab meat

1 3/4 cups panko breadcrumbs

1 1/2 cups shrimp puree binding sauce

3 eggs, beaten

1/2 cup flour

3 ounces clarified butter

Directions

1. For the binding sauce: In a food processor, combine the

mayonnaise, parsley leaves, lemon juice, capers, Dijon mustard,

sweet pickle relish and green onions. Mix for about 1 minute.

2. For the shrimp puree: In the clean bowl of the food

processor, puree the prawns until smooth. Sprinkle with salt

and pepper. In a mixing bowl, combine the shrimp puree with

half the binding sauce. Mix well.

3. For the crab cakes: Fold all of the crab into the shrimp puree

mixture. Mix in 3/4 cup panko. Refrigerate for 15 minutes.

4. In 3 separate bowls, place the beaten eggs, flour and

remaining 1 cup panko. Divide the crab cake mixture into 6

balls. Form each ball into a cake that is approximately 1-inch

thick, using a dry measuring cup as an aid. One at a time, dip

each cake first into the flour, then the egg and then the panko.

You may need a little more panko to get them well coated.

5. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.

6. In a large, ovenproof skillet, heat the butter over mediumhigh

heat and brown the crab cakes evenly on both sides, 3 to

4 minutes per side. If the heat is too hot, adjust it down a little.

Transfer the crab cakes to the oven and bake to cook through,

about 10 minutes. Turn over as needed so the crab cakes do

not brown too much on one side.

Serve the hot crab cakes with the sun-dried tomato remoulade.

7. This recipe was provided by a chef, restaurant or culinary

professional. It has not been tested for home use.

Recipe courtesy Michael Waliser, owner Saffron Salmon.

Michael Waliser and Celeste McEntee

PHOTOS BY: JEREMY BURKE

39


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ANIMAL OF THE MONTH

Giant Pacific Octopus

Meet the giant Pacific octopus, also known

as the enteroctopus dofleini or GPO

for short. Before we go any further,

let’s set the record straight: despite

what you may have been told, the

proper plural form of octopus

is octopuses or octopodes.

However, if you call a group of

octopuses “octopi,” we don’t

think they’ll mind it much.

These captivating cephalopods

have brightly colored, wrinkly

skin, bulbous eyes and eight

stunning, sucker covered

tentacles. All of that is par

for the course with many

octopuses, but the largest

GPO gets the “G” in its name

from their enormous size — the

largest caught GPO recorded was 600

pounds.

As for the “P,” that comes from their habitat.

These creatures of the deep can be found around rocky

shores and tide pools along the western coast of North

America, from Alaska to southern California. They

creep along the ocean floor looking for their

next meal of crab, scallops, clams or other

crustaceans.

And while they look tough, these

octopuses actually have soft and flexible bodies,

which allow them to slide through extremely narrow

spaces. They can pack a punch however, using a venomous

parrot-like beak and the ability to eject ink into the water to

blind other animals. Perhaps more effective than those tools,

however, is how smart these cephalopods can be. Recent studies

have shown that they have the ability to use simple tools,

identify individuals, navigate mazes and access both long- and

short-term memories.

For hours and more information visit Aquarium.org

PHOTO BY: JEREMY BURKE


Please leave me be


WRITTEN BY MICHAEL HEINBACH | PHOTOS BY: JEREMY BURKE

photo by Jeremy Burke


Give molting seal a wide berth

ast week, a young northern elephant seal showed

up at South Beach and took up transient residence

in the pathway to the ocean from the South Jetty

parking lot.

The pinnipeds are not unheard of on Lincoln County shores,

but they’re a much less common sight than their cousins,

harbor seals and sea lions. Elephant seals live most of their

lives in deeper waters offshore — they are extraordinary divers

— and they are more often seen near shore in areas where they

breed and birth in Mexico and California. But they also haul

out year round at Cape Arago near Coos Bay.

The South Beach visitor that was first spotted on Thursday has

relocated by dozens of yards several times since then.

The animal doesn’t seem to be having a good time. Passersby

encounter it mostly motionless in the sand, except for when it

raises its head for a guttural moan in protest of being disturbed,

and large patches of hair are missing all over its body.

Jim Rice, stranding coordinator for the Marine Mammal

Institute at Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science

Center in Newport, said it’s normal behavior for what the seal

is currently going through — catastrophic molting.

Unlike most mammals, including other pinnipeds, Elephant

seals shed their fur and skin all at once annually during a oneto

two-week period.

“To accommodate the molt, they come out of the water, they

stop eating, and they basically look miserable for the duration

of the molting process,” Rice said. “But once they’re done

with it, they have a new coat of fur and new skin, and they

look a whole lot healthier. But it is a stressful period they go

through.”

And while the seal has chosen an inconvenient spot, Rice said

it’s important for the public to avoid disturbing it, and not

allow their pets to do so, either.

“It’s ironic, he or she — I haven’t had the chance to determine

the animal’s sex — really doesn’t want to be close to people.

Unfortunately, these animals don’t have a very good sense of

distancing. They come to shore where they feel like it,” Rice

said.

Signs have been placed along the path on the approach to the

WRITTEN BY KENNETH LIPP | PHOTOS BY: JEREMY BURKE


seal’s location warning of its presence and the need to respect

its privacy (“Keep at least 50 yards away,” the signs read.) The

Marine Mammal Protection Act prohibits harassment of

elephant seals, which the law defines as “acts that have the

potential to disturb a marine mammal or marine mammal

stock in the wild.” More importantly, Rice said, the South

Beach visitor is vulnerable to stress during an already stressful

period.

“They don’t have a great means of defense. They can’t flee

very easily. They will growl. This animal is quite alert and vocal

and does not like to be approached,” Rice said. “We definitely

want to minimize the amount of approaches that people have

to seals and sea lions, and elephant seals are no exception. The

molting process is a stressful period, and if they’re constantly

having to be vigilant for potential threats, that’s going to

increase their stress level and suppress their immune systems

to some degree, and it may make them more susceptible to

infections or complications of the molt itself.”

There’s also a risk of violent encounters between the seal and

pets — dog walkers in the area should be especially advised to

keep their animals on leash. “We’ve had dogs bite seals and

cause injuries, and seals can bite dogs and cause them injuries

and potentially spread diseases to them,” Rice said. “There’s a

risk of injury and infection when you’re encountering a wild

animal of any kind.”

Rice said he’s hopeful the seal will return to the water soon

— on Tuesday, it had moved several yards closer to the ocean

after days of incremental inland progress. He said it appears

to be a juvenile.

Northern elephant seals have a sandy brown colored coat with

no spots, differentiating them from harbor seals. Males can

grow to 12 feet in length and weigh over 4,000 pounds, while

females are smaller, approximately 9 feet long and about 900

pounds full grown. They range along the Pacific coast from

Mexico to Canada.


Photo taken of Whale Cover in Depoe Bay, Oregon by Jeremy Burke


OREGON COAST DREAM HOME OF THE MONTH

156 NW 73RD CT.

NEWPORT, OR

Elegance by the Sea. Pure craftsmanship is displayed in

every detail of this amazing Estate with its 180 degree

white water and lighthouse views. Complete ADA design

includes first floor deluxe Master Suite, gourmet kitchen

with Wolf range, double Dacor ovens, (2) Fisher/Paykel

dishwashers, custom cherry wood cabinets, heavy granite

counter tops, solid Brazilian cherry wood flooring.

Wheelchair accessible hydraulic 3-story elevator r. Walkout

basement includes 2 wine rooms, large shop space

wired for professional wood working equipment. Home

includes indoor heated SwimEx Therapy Pool with

Italian tile. Temp controlled Greenhouse w/granite

counters. Over 1200 ft of Ipe hardwood decking. And,

an over-size 2 car attached garage. Everything a family

could want in one home right

on the Oregon Coast.

$1,550,000

MLS # 21-9 THIS PROPERTY BROUGHT TO YOU BY

205 E Olive St, Newport, OR

(541) 265-2200

advantagerealestate.com

49


Resort, Restaurant & lounge

BREAKFAST 8am-11:30am

DINNER 5pm-9pm

LOUNGE 3pm-9pm

1555 Highway 101 N., Yachats, Oregon 97394

adoberesort.com

541-547-5820


Courtesy of the Oregon Coast Vistitors Association


Pick-Up Orders,

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& Indoor Dining

Burgers • Sandwiches • Soups • Salads • Bread Bowl with Homemade Chili or Chowder

Pancakes • French Toast • Stuffed French Toast • Breakfast Burritos • Cafe Omelettes

Fish & Chips • Shrimp • Crab • Oysters • Steamed Clams

Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner is served Every Day!

NE 6 TH STREET & HWY 101

541-574-6847 • THENEWPORTCAFE.COM GREAT BREAKFAST AND SEAFOOD ALL DAY

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