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OC

W A V E S

THE MAGAZINE FOR THE OREGON COAST

VOL 1.8

MARCH 2021


LISTINGS & SALES are on our website!

Freddy Saxton

Broker Owner, e-PRO, CRS, GRI, C2EX

Tammy Gagne

Broker, ABR, CRIS

Tim Myrick

Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI

Bonnie Saxton

Broker Owner,CRB, CRS, GRI

K. Scarlett Kier

Broker, CRS, GRI

Barbara Le Pine

Broker

Arjen Sundman

Broker

Audra Powell

Broker, e-PRO, CRS, ABR, GRI

Wendy Becker

Broker

Levi Grove

Broker

Marilyn Grove

Broker

Tony Holly

Broker

Joan Davies

Broker

Our Brokers

are Honored

to be serving

Lincoln County

with

over 235 years

of combined

Real Estate

experience.

“Let our

Experience

be your

Advantage!”

Bridgette Boekhout

Broker

Randy Olsen

Broker

205 E. Olive Street • Newport, OR 97365

www.AdvantageRealEstate.com • 541-265-2200

Susan Taylor

Broker

Matt Murray

Broker, e-PRO, SRS, ABR


OC

W A V E S

Publisher

Jeremy Burke

Editor

Steve Card

Advertising Sales

Teresa Barnes

Kathy Wyatt

Natalie Lane

P.7

Gyro Guys re-opens in its

new location

P.10

Dungeness Crab - a little

about why it’s so great

P.15

The Kitchen Wild

Contributing Writers

News-Times Staff

Kenneth Lipp

Michael Heinbach

Katie Wiley

Photographers

Jeremy Burke

Casey Felton

About the Cover Shot

I needed something green for the cover and

really wanted and close up view of the iconic

moss covered trees of the Oregon Coast. One

of my favorite drives is up Hwy 34. There are

thousands of stunning trees along the Alsea

River plus a few surprises like a water spickett

that comes out of a rock featured on page 43.

. Photo by Jeremy Burke

P.18

A New must-see on Newport’s

Historic Bayfront

P.20

Remembering the past

P.22

Landslide in threatens

homes

P.29

P.30

P.34

oregoncoastwaves.com

What is Watermelon

Tourmaline?

Port Dock 5 gets an

overhaul.

Newport Discovery Zoo in

South Beach

Facebook

@OregonCoastWaves

Instagram

@oregoncoastwaves

All rights reserved. No part of this

publication may be reproduced without

the written permission from this publisher.

Photographs, graphics, and artwork are

the property of Newport Newspapers LLC

©2021 and J.burkephotos ©2021

Oregon Coast Waves 2021

P.36

P.44

P.49

A News-Times Publication

831 NE Avery Newport Or 97365

High school sports’ first

game of the season.

When Mother Nature shows

us her power

Dream Home of the Month


contents

PHOTO BY JEREMY BURKE

5


Photo by

Luke Whittaker

N Y E

Historic

B

E A

C H

Located just a few short blocks off Highway 101,

the “European walking neighborhood” of Historic Nye beach is a

perfect spot to enjoy easy access to miles of perfect beaches

and offers the visitors lots of …

Beachcombing

Bike Riding/Rental

Beach Walking

Kite Flying

Surfing

Sail-boarding

Tide Pooling

Photography

Galleries

Jewelry

Visual Arts

Apparel

Lodging

Spa – Massage

Cafés & Fine Dining

Hours of Family Fun

Unique

Retail Shops

Professional

Services

Fine Gifts and

Home Decor

World Class

Performing Arts

Sweets - Ice Cream

- Chocolates

For more information: www.NyeBeach.org


PHOTO BY: JEREMY BURKE

PHOTO BY JEREMY BURKE


Gyro Guys opens doors at new location

yro Guys Mediterranean Grill is back in business,

opening the doors of its new location at 912 N.

Coast Highway in Newport last ThursdayFeb. 25

to a flood of excited patrons.

Staff had so many customers clamoring for a taste of authentic

Middle Eastern food during its grand reopening Thursday

that the restaurant was filled to its reduced 25 percent capacity

and the parking lot was packed with people waiting for to-go

orders.

“It was very, very busy,” M.J. Jasm, staff member and nephew

of owner Mohamud Alshemary, said the next morning.

“People were excited to see us open back up. We ended up

pretty backed up, about an hour, but we’re excited to be back.

We should also be able to open back up to 50 percent capacity

this weekend, and that’s great news.”

The new location, previously home to Flip ’N Chick ’N, has

undergone extensive renovations over the last few months to

make ready for Gyro Guys reopening.

The restaurant now seats a maximum of 42 people with booths

and a bar, which is reduced by 50 percent currently to adhere

to COVID-19 restrictions. The new location provides ample

parking space, whether you’re picking up or dining in. It also

has restrooms and plenty of room to expand.

“We did a lot of work over here, and we’re glad to bring back

the taste of the Middle East here,” Alshemary said. He added

that the restaurant was too constrained at its previous location

on the Newport Bayfront, but the new building has opened up

a myriad of new possibilities of what it can bring to Newport.

“It was a small location, a much smaller place. Our customers

were complaining there was no parking lot. Even if they just

called in to pick up their food they couldn’t find a place to park

and come get it. There was nowhere for us to have a loading

and unloading zone,” Alshemary said.

With more space to work with, Alshemary plans to expand in

ways he couldn’t at the old spot on the Bayfront. He’s applied for

an alcohol license and, when approved, plans to apply for Oregon

lottery machines as well. Eventually, he plans to add a hookah

bar in the back and create an outdoor seating area to expand

the restaurant seating. Alshemary said he would also like to hold

events like weddings or birthday parties at the location.

“Most restaurants in the Newport area are seafood and are

working for the tourists. My restaurant is Mediterranean,

and we do kosher slaughter meat like lamb, beef and chicken.

Many other restaurants use regular oils, while we use olive oil,”

Alshemary said. “We’re here for locals and might be the only

ones serving Mediterranean food on the Oregon coast.”

The full menu will be returning and has been expanded

with things like kebabs, Mediterranean drinks, yogurt, ice

cream, Turkish coffee, tea and a menu of weekly specials. The

restaurants signature dish is still its lamb gyro, served as a

sandwich, over rice or with a salad.

WRITTEN BY MATHEW BROCK | PHOTOS BY JEREMY BURKE


“Our food is Greek and Mediterranean

food, 100 percent. We use olive oil

100 percent, most of our veggie stuff is

organic, and we have a vegetarian menu

that is 100 percent veggie,” Alshemary

said. “We serve lamb, beef and chicken

as well. We pay extra for kosher meat

because we care both for the animals

and the humans who eat.”

Alshemary and his family were

inspired to open a restaurant while

they were vacationing on the Oregon

coast. While visiting Newport, they

realized that the closest place with

Mediterranean food at the time was

an hour away in Corvallis.

Before they first opened in 2017,

Alshemary and his family had prior

experience serving Mediterranean from

food carts in Portland, their recipes

handed down through the family from

generation to generation.

Gyro Guy’s full menu can be found

online at gyroguysgrill.com and on its

official Facebook page. The restaurant is

open seven days a week, from 11 a.m.

to 9 p.m.


A little about Dungeness Crab

WHEN TO BUY

During the peak of the Dungeness crab harvest (December

to April) fresh whole-cooked crab are readily available at

supermarket seafood counters and specialty seafood markets

throughout the region. Prolonged winter storms will

occasionally disrupt the supply so it’s a good idea to keep

an eye on the weather when planning an important event or

function that features fresh Dungeness.

AVAILABILITY

Availability of live crab is best during the winter and spring

months. Although not as abundant, fresh cooked crab is still

available during the summer months thanks to the efforts

of those crabbers who fish right up to the season closure in

mid-August. Crabs tend to be weaker during the summer

molting period and do not ship or travel well. Modern freezing

technology has made a full complement of frozen market

forms accessible on a year round basis.

Retail prices typically are at their lowest during the winter

months when the harvest is in full swing and crabs are being

landed by the boat load. As production drops off, prices at both

the wholesale and retail levels tend to increase accordingly.

Many supermarkets feature Dungeness crab at attractive ad

prices in conjunction with major winter holidays, making this

an especially good time to purchase and enjoy crab.

WHAT TO BUY

Oregon Dungeness crab is available in a variety of fresh

and frozen market forms. As a center-of-the-plate entrée

or an exciting appetizer, it is guaranteed to please the most

discriminating shellfish lover.

For the purist, Live Dungeness is the best there is. Delivered

nationwide overnight, live crab offer that fresh off the boat

flavor that will satisfy the most sophisticated palate. Cooking

is easy and the dining experience, unparalleled.

Bright orange Whole-Cooks epitomize crab eating West Coast

crab feed style. Purchased fully cooked and ready-to-eat, cooked

crab must be cleaned (eviscerated) before serving. Often done

at the point-of-purchase, cleaning is simple and requires only a

sink and running water.

Frozen Sections, or clusters as they are commonly referred to,

are simply a cooked and cleaned crab, minus the back shell

and split in half. They require minimum preparation labor

and provide the ‘crack the shell’ experience that makes crab

eating just plain fun.

Labor-saving Picked Meat is usually sold as a mixture of whole

and broken leg meat, accompanied by the pure white body meat

from the shoulder area under the shell back. It is fully cooked

and ready to add its distinctive flavor to the chef’s favorite recipe.

Fry Legs refer to a special pack consisting of only whole leg

portions and are the gold standard of enjoying Dungeness

crab.

HANDLING

Live crab should be put into a well-aerated chilled-saltwater

tank (temp 45°-50° F.) as soon after arrival as possible. Immerse

slowly to facilitate gill function. Oregon Dungeness crab can

be kept with live lobster, but should be separated by a divider.

Fresh Whole-Cook Crab should be refrigerated at 33° to 35°,

preferably in ice. If stored in shipping box, drain melted ice

water so crabs aren’t submerged. Keep lid closed and avoid

contact with blowing air so crabs won’t dry out. Shelf life is

approximately 7 days.*

Picked Meat (fresh) should be kept on ice in a sealed container

and refrigerated at 33° to 35°, preferably in ice. Shelf life is

approximately 5-7 days. Frozen picked meat should be stored at

10°F or colder. Shelf life is approximately 6-9 months.

Frozen Whole-cooks, sections and single legs should be stored

at 10°F or colder. Allow adequate cold-air circulation. avoid

temperature fluctuation. Shelf life is approximately 9-12 months.

* shelf life is dependent on handling, temperature & other

variable conditions

THAWING

Release vacuum from vacuum-packed products before thawing.

Frozen product should be thawed slowly under refrigeration.

Thawing in warm water or at room temperature compromises

product quality. Large quantities can be thawed under a cold

water spray, but avoid total immersion in water. Try to thaw on

an as needed basis and keep chilled until use. Do not refreeze

crab.

QUALITY SPEC’S

Live Oregon Dungeness crabs should show signs of activity

INFORMATION COURTESY OF THE OREGON CRAB COMMISSION | PHOTOS BY: JEREMY BURKE


and should react to stimulation. Fresh whole-cooks should

have heft and not feel light. Shell (back) should be moist and

intact, legs and claws should be attached.

Frozen product forms should show no signs of discoloration

or freezer burn. To maintain maximum quality, good product

handling and inventory practices should be applied to fresh as

well as frozen market forms. All boxes should be dated when

received and a first in, first out program should be adhered to.

SERVING SUGGESTIONS

Chefs in the Pacific Northwest have developed a reputation for

their creative use of local ingredients from the bounty offered

up by both land and sea. Dishes featuring seasonal items,

picked and harvested at their peak, have become a trademark.

Oregon Dungeness figures prominently in this cuisine and is

found on the menus of the state’s finest restaurants. Sometimes

it’s straight from the shell, crab feed style, with fresh slaw and

crusty bread; or, as an ingredient accompanied with delicate

sauces made with fresh herbs and spices to enhance a pastabased

dish. The light, sweet flavor of Dungeness meat works

well in a traditional crab cake recipe. A crab cocktail comes

alive with a zesty Chipotle Sauce. Dungeness serves up equally

as an appetizer or an entrée, and lends itself to both down

home and white tablecloth cuisine.

Whole crab presentations can be accomplished with some

simple preparations before serving that make cracking, on

the plate, simple and fun. The cooked crab should be cleaned

(gills & viscera removed) and the shell back washed out before

placing back on the crab body. Preliminary cracking of the legs

will make the at the table experience that much easier. Bibs,

plenty of napkins and a shell bowl round out the setting and

allow diners to get through a Dungeness with dignity.

Sections provide the crab cracking experience and work well

when served in combination with another item, combo style.

They are a popular item at ‘seafood buffets’ where they can be

served chilled or warm, depending on customer preference.

TASTING NOTES

Color: opaque white crabmeat and bright red shell when

cooked

Texture: tender and delicately textured with the leg meat

slightly firmer.

Flavor: The meat of the Dungeness crab is sweet, mild and

might even present a slightly nutty taste.

Perfect serve: The simplest serve—boiled in salted water

and served straight from the shell with melted butter and

bread warm from the oven—cannot be beaten. You can also

switch the salted water with a flavourful, but not too heavy,

microbrewery beer, for a fragrant twist. Crab cakes, seasoned

simply with onions, garlic, paprika, parsley, salt and pepper,

are also a treat.

ALL PHOTOS TAKEN AT LOCAL OCEAN IN NEWPORT, OREGON BY JEREMY BURKE


Amy Plechaty

DORETTA SMITH

Licensed Real Estate Broker in the State of Oregon

SEE ALL MLS PROPERTIES

FOR SALE AT:

DORETTASMITH.COM

541-961-6688

Cell: 541-992-4469

whalecoveamy@gmail.com

www.littlewhalecove.com

Michael Kessinger

CAROL OWENS

Licensed Real Estate Broker in the State of Oregon

Cell 541-961-2697 • cowens@actionnet.net

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

567 N Coast Hwy, Newport

541-265-8785

SEE ALL MLS PROPERTIES FOR SALE AT: MARTEKREALESTATE.COM

Cell: 541-992-4469

whalecoveamy@gmail.com

www.littlewhalecove.com

BERKSHIRE

HATHAWAY

HomeServices

Nicole Anderson

Northwest

Real Estate

SANDY GEORGE

Cell 541-961-1522

567 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

SEE ALL MLS PROPERTIES FOR SALE: www.SandyGeorge.Net

Netarts Bay, OR

Mobile: 503-880-8034

– “Pam’s Homes by the Water” –

Pam Zielinski

www.PamZielinski.com

Cell: 541-992-4469

whalecoveamy@gmail.com

www.littlewhalecove.com


The Kitchen Wild

Manhattan Cockle Clam Chowder

Oregon has 360 miles of coastline, so

you’re never far from a clamming hole,

especially here on the central Oregon

coast.

Siletz Bay. Some of the highest density of

purple varnish clams in Oregon can be

found here, and with the limits of purple

varnish clams being 72 per person, this is

a great species to harvest for some pretty

spectacular clam-packed family dinners.

The Yaquina Bay, which offers the widest

variety of clams, from gapers, butters,

cockles, littlenecks, softshells and purple

varnish.

No matter where you’re located here on

the central Oregon coast, you’re never far

from harvesting a spectacular dinner —

all you have to do is go out and dig it up.

Be sure to always check with ODFW

for licensing requirements and shellfish

regulations.

Ingredients:

8 pieces of bacon, chopped. Reserve

approximately 2 pieces for topping

chowder

1 tablespoon bacon fat reserved

2 limits of cockle clams (40 cockles),

cleaned and chopped

1 yellow onion

2 carrots, peeled and chopped

2 celery stalks, chopped

4 garlic cloves, minced

3 medium red potatoes, cubed or large

julienne.

28 oz. can San Mariano tomatoes,

crushed or blended

2 cups chicken stock

2 tablespoons fresh parsley. Reserve 1

tablespoon for garnish

1 bay leaf

1/2 teaspoon thyme

1/2 teaspoon Johnny’s seasoning salt

Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

Heat a large pot over medium heat. Add

the bacon and cook, stirring occasionally,

until crisp.

Remove bacon from pot, reserving 1

tablespoon of bacon fat and drain on

paper towels.

Add onions, carrots and celery to the pot

with reserved bacon fat. Cook, stirring

occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until

vegetables are tender.

Add the garlic and cook for 30 seconds.

Add chicken stock, thyme, bay leaf,

Johnny’s seasoning salt, whole can of San

Marzano tomatoes, and potatoes in the

pot. Stir to combine. Bring to a simmer.

Simmer for 15 minutes or until potatoes

are tender.

Stir in clams, reserved bacon and fresh

parsley. Simmer for 5 more minutes.

Season soup with salt and pepper to

taste. Serve, top with extra bacon and

parsley and enjoy!

15

PHOTOS AND STORY BY KATIE WILEY


Ahi Poke

tastes so delicious. It’s another great dish to introduce to friends

and family, opening up another doorway to the idyllic islands of

Hawaii.

Ahi Poke

Ingredients

Ahi Tuna steak (cube)

White or Brown rice

Cilantro

Green onion

Edamame

Cucumber

Avocado

Panko

Spicy Mayo (mayo + sriracha)

Optional:

Masago

Red Onion

Red Cabbage

Pineapple

Mandarin Oranges

Poke is a newer dish, at least on the Mainland, and one that

everyone can enjoy because it can be uniquely personalized

depending on one’s preferences.

Sauce:

Sesame Oil

Garlic

Soy Sauce

Chili Flakes

We first experienced Poke in Hawaii — when we lived on the

North Shore of Oahu we ate it almost every day. It’s so fresh and

healthy that it can become an everyday meal.

Poke bowls are similar to Acai bowls in the sense that they

can all start off with similar bases, but what is added on top is

completely up to whomever is eating it. The great thing about

Poke is that there is virtually no way to mess it up — it always

WRITTEN BY: CELESTE MCENTEE | PHOTO BY JEREMY BURKE


Butterfly wings incased in glass make the

perfect necklace. Photo by Jeremy Burke


Something new for Newport’s Bayfront

randy Cochran, of Albuquerque, N.M., and her

mother, Becky Fogo, of Newport, were waiting outside

Monica Ziegler’s latest enterprise, a unique shopping

experience at 818 SW Bay Blvd.

“We really like her other store,” Cochran said of Ziegler’s

Bohemian Candle a few blocks away at 342 SW Bay Blvd. “This

one is probably going to be just as awesome.”

“We got a little sneak peak. It’s incredible,” said Fogo. “Curiosities

and apothecary sums it up pretty well.”

Ziegler created a buzz, generating excitement and interest in

Femme Fatale long before opening her doors, posting intriguing

photos of specimens, antique photos, even a medical wax

moulage (a medical teaching tool dating to the early 1800s) on

social media. Before opening, the store’s Facebook page had

nearly 600 followers. The shop was making sales just minutes

after opening the doors.

“A femme fatale, sometimes called a man eater or vamp, is a stock

character of a mysterious and seductive woman whose charms

ensnare her lovers, often leading them into compromising,

dangerous and deadly situations. She is an archetype of literature

and art,” Ziegler explained on Facebook. “Femme Fatale

Curiosities and Apothecary is inspired by the practices of the

19th century. Femme Fatale is about embracing the light with

the dark. The lure as you enter her space arouses your desire to

explore the depths of her walls. Diving deeper, she takes you on

a journey through the beauty of life and the darkness of death.

She is a little shop of old and new for lovers of the curious and

macabre.”

“This is a shop of oddities and curiosities, and it’s an apothecary,

as well. We actually make all our products,” Ziegler said. “Now we

have a place where we can create,” she said, indicating the large

manufacturing space where her husband was working.

“We’re hoping to eventually open it up to serving herbal teas, but

that’s on hold until COVID-19 is complete. We’re going to have

organic herbs.” Ziegler indicated that hand sanitizer has been

a big seller. “We’re completely out,” she said, because she can’t

source the alcohol she needs.

“I love your store,” called out Sharon Hernandez, who was

visiting from Albany.

“I’m pretty much a professional shopper,” said Kelly Grady, who

was visiting from Denver. “I found a ton of things I’ve never seen

before.”

PHOTOS BY JEREMY BURKE

19


PHOTO BY JEREMY BURKE

Remembering t


he Past

YAQUINA CITY

ith the coming of the railroad, Yaquina

City (four miles east of Newport) boomed.

Originally, the railroad was to travel to

Newport, but that city refused to sell the land necessary for a

roundhouse and warehouses. As a result, the buildings were

placed on land the railroad already owned. In addition to serving

the trains, Yaquina City had a school, a church, a hotel, sawmill,

three salmon canneries, the only bank in the county other than

Corvallis, a shipyard, custom house, telegraph office and docks

for handling freight. The railroad tracks ran through the middle

of what was Main Street, leaving little doubt that this town owed

its existence to the railroad. A picture taken in 1938 shows a cow

walking up a deserted street with a neglected-looking section of

track next to it. The buildings are already starting to collapse.

The tracks would soon be torn up, and Yaquina City would

become a ghost town. The boom on the bay had moved down to

Newport or up to Toledo.

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FROM WIKIPEID

In the late 19th century, Yaquina City was the western terminus

of the Oregon Pacific Railroad, linking the harbor there to

Corvallisand Albany. Thomas Egenton Hogg, the rail line’s

chief promoter, and his Eastern financial backers believed that

a steamship–railroad combination using Yaquina Bay could

compete successfully with the usual Columbia River route to

Portland. The first train moved over the line in 1885, making

connections at Yaquina City with a steamer to San Francisco.

However, the Yaquina–Albany line and a partly completed

extension from Albany toward the Cascade Range, became too

expensive to continue. After the Oregon Pacific failed financially,

it fell into receivership and went through 17 years of financial

and legal complications before becoming a branch line of the

Southern Pacific in 1907.

Crow’s Nest Studio & Gallery

toledo, oregon

21


Homes threatened by seawall collapse

arly Saturday Feb. 27 morning, several Lincoln

Beach residents awoke to find a seawall on Lincoln

Avenue had collapsed from erosion, dozens of its 35-

foot tall concrete pilings breaking free and tumbling onto the

beach below by Monday afternoon.

Richard Grant owns the property where the wall was installed,

and his house there was most affected — the collapse leaving the

living room dangling slightly off the side of the cliff. Houses on

either side are also endangered, with precious few feet between

them and the newly eroded cliffside.

Grant is now looking for a “Band-Aid” solution so he can

figure out a long-term plan on how to save his property, but

according to county officials, there likely isn’t much to be

done because of Oregon Goal 18 restrictions, which prevent

installation of shore armoring structures like riprap or seawalls

for any property that began development after Jan. 1, 1977.

Goal 18 is one of many plans developed by the Oregon State

Department of Land Conservation and Development and

specifically applies to beach and dune land. Decades ago,

studies found beach armoring like riprap was causing widereaching

environmental impacts and in many cases was directly

responsible for shrinking beaches, so a ban was enacted for

property developed after a certain date.

According to Lincoln County Department of Planning &

Development Director Onno Husing, the county can’t legally

permit Grant to put up riprap or another type of beach

armoring construction due to Goal 18, even in light of the

collapse.

Grant is also responsible for cleaning up the collapsed wall

because any structure that falls onto the beach is the property

owner’s responsibility to dispose of, according to Jay Sennewald,

ocean shores coordinator for the Oregon State Parks and

Recreation Department.

Husing noted that the collapsed wall was technically

unpermitted as soon as it was exposed to the beach, and it

would have been within the Oregon State Parks power to have

it taken down prior to the collapse. Such constructions are

common on properties denied beach armoring due to Goal

18 restrictions. They exploit a workaround stemming from the

fact the county cannot stop property owners from building

them unless or until they are exposed to the beach, at which

point state parks can step in and have it taken down.

Situations like Grant’s aren’t uncommon in the Gleneden

22

WRITTEN BY MATHEW BROCK | PHOTOS BY JEREMY BURKE


Beach area, and the disaster punctuates a topic the county has

been preparing to discuss publicly soon. Husing said many

local properties are facing imminent danger from erosion, and

their one lifeline would be for the county to pursue Goal 18

exceptions, which would be no small feat. Talks would take

time and, even if approved by the state, could still be challenged

by environmental groups.

Grant has battled with Goal 18 restrictions for the last 30

years as he’s tried to get approval to put riprap onto the beach

below his property several times. He claims that via written

correspondence between him, the county and state, he was

assured he’d be eligible before he even purchased the property

in 1991.

Grant said for the first 14 years he owned the property, he

repeatedly applied for riprap and was told he was eligible, but

there needed to be an imminent threat to his property. In

2005, when signs of erosion became more clear and something

needed to be done, Grant said he was told by the county there

was a mistake and he had never actually been eligible. With few

other options, he installed the pilings instead, which showed

signs of erosion over the next 16 years before finally collapsing

last weekend.

“I’ve been here 30 years as of Feb. 13. We got permission with

the county to do riprap before we bought the house and did

probably more due diligence with it then any other piece of

property we’ve bought,” Grant said. “We got county and state

approval in writing that said we could have riprap for those 14

years and the only reason we couldn’t have it at the time was

because the house wasn’t in imminent danger. It made sense to

me. They didn’t want more rocks on the beach for no reason.

Then 14 years later, they decided, ‘Oh, well, we’re wrong.’ They

said they made a mistake and shouldn’t have allowed it.”

Husing said after reviewing saved correspondence between

Grant and the county, there is no clear indication that Grant

would have ever been eligible for riprap. However, Husing

noted that during the early 1990s, when Grant built the house,

there was less clarity about how Goal 18 would be applied

and enforced, so it’s possible he cold have slipped through the

cracks.

Husing said the county is open to working with Grant and his

attorney to find a viable, legal solution and hopefully save his

property by doing so, but as of right now, he said there’s no

legal option the county is aware of aside from the upcoming

talks about potential Goal 18 exceptions. It’ll be up to Grant to

provide a viable legal avenue, if it exists.

23


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Tides Tables

National Oceanic and

Atmospheric Administration

Low High

March 1

7:28 a.m. / 1.2 1:35 a.m. / 8.6

7:45 p.m. / 0.1 1:32 p.m. / 8.6

March 2

8:19 a.m. / 0.8 2:10 a.m. / 8.9

8:23 p.m. / 0.9 2:25 p.m. / 8.0

March 3

9:14 a.m. / 0.5 2:47 a.m. / 9.0

9:04 p.m. / 1.8 3:25 p.m. / 7.2

March 4

10:15 a.m. / 0.4 3:29 a.m. / 9.1

9:51 p.m. / 2.7 4:36 p.m. / 6.5

March 5

11:24 a.m. / 0.4 4:17 a.m. / 8.9

10:49 p.m. / 3.4 6:01 p.m. / 6.1

March 6

5:15 a.m. / 8.7

12:39 p.m. / 0.3 7:37 p.m. / 6.0

March 7

12:06 a.m. / 3.9 6:24 a.m. / 8.4

Su 01:54 p.m. / 0.1 8:59 p.m. / 6.3

March 8

1:35 a.m. / 4.0 7:38 a.m. / 8.3

2:59 p.m. / -0.2 9:58 p.m. / 6.7

March 9

2:52 a.m. / 3.7 8:48 a.m. / 8.4

3:54 p.m. / -0.4 10:43 p.m. / 7.1

March 10

3:53 a.m. / 3.2 9:47 a.m. / 8.5

4:40 p.m. / -0.5 11:21 p.m. / 7.4

March 11

4:43 a.m. / 2.7 10:39 a.m. / 8.6

5:20 p.m. / -0.5 11:53 p.m. / 7.7

March 12

5:27 a.m. / 2.2

5:55 p.m. / -0.3 11:25 a.m. / 8.5

March 13

6:07 a.m. / 1.7 12:23 a.m. / 7.9

6:28 p.m. / 0.1 12:07 p.m. / 8.3

March 14

7:45 a.m. / 1.4 12:51 a.m. / 8.0

7:58 p.m. / 0.6 1:47 p.m. / 7.9

March 15

8:22 a.m. / 1.2 2:18 a.m. / 8.1

8:27 p.m. / 1.1 2:28 p.m. / 7.5

March 16

9:00 a.m. / 1.0 2:44 a.m. / 8.1

8:55 p.m. / 1.8 3:10 p.m. / 7.1

March 17

9:39 a.m. / 1.0 3:11 a.m. / 8.0

9:24 p.m. / 2.4 3:55 p.m. / 6.6

March 18

10:22 a.m. / 1.0 3:39 a.m. / 7.8

9:55 p.m. / 3.1 4:46 p.m. / 6.0

March 19

11:12 a.m. / 1.1 4:10 a.m. / 7.6

10:31 p.m. / 3.6 5:49 p.m. / 5.6

March 20

12:12 p.m. 1.2 4:49 a.m. / 7.4

11:20 p.m. / 4.1 7:12 p.m. / 5.4

March 21

5:39 a.m. / 7.2

1:22 p.m. / 1.2 8:46 p.m. / 5.4

Low High Low High

March 22

12:37 a.m. / 4.3 6:47 a.m. / 7.1

2:32 p.m. / 0.9 9:54 p.m. / 5.7

March 23

2:10 a.m. / 4.3 8:03 a.m. / 7.1

3:32 p.m. / 0.5 10:38 p.m. / 6.1

March 24

3:23 a.m. / 3.9 9:12 a.m. / 7.5

4:21 p.m. / 0.1 11:12 p.m. / 6.5

March 25

4:20 a.m. 3.2 10:12 a.m. / 7.9

5:04 p.m. -0.3 11:43 p.m. / 7.1

March 26

5:08 a.m. / 2.5

5:43 p.m. / -0.5 11:06 a.m. / 8.2

March 27

5:54 a.m. / 1.6 12:14 a.m. / 7.6

6:21 p.m. / -0.4 11:57 a.m. / 8.5

March 28

6:39 a.m. / 0.7 12:45 a.m. / 8.2

6:58 p.m. / -0.2 12:47 p.m. / 8.6

March 29

7:25 a.m. / 0.0 1:17 a.m. / 8.7

7:36 p.m. / 0.3 1:38 p.m. / 8.4

March 30

8:12 a.m. / -0.6 1:51 a.m. / 9.1

8:15 p.m. / 1.0 2:31 p.m. / 8.1

March 31

9:02 a.m. / -0.9 2:28 a.m. / 9.3

8:57 p.m. / 1.8 3:27 p.m. / 7.5

April 1

9:56 a.m. / -0.9 3:08 a.m. / 9.3

9:42 p.m. / 2.5 4:29 p.m. / 7.0

April 2

10:55 a.m. / -0.8 3:53 a.m. / 9.0

10:36 p.m. / 3.2 5:40 p.m. / 6.5

April 3

12:01 p.m. / -0.5 4:45 a.m. / 8.6

11:45 p.m. / 3.7 7:02 p.m. / 6.2

April 4

5:49 a.m. / 8.0

1:14 p.m. / -0.2 8:26 p.m. / 6.2

April 5

1:14 a.m. / 3.8 7:07 a.m. / 7.5

2:27 p.m. / -0.1 9:35 p.m. / 6.5

April 6

2:43 a.m. / 3.5 8:28 a.m. / 7.3

3:32 p.m. / -0.1 10:28 p.m. / 6.8

April 7

3:54 a.m. / 3.0 9:41 a.m. / 7.3

4:25 p.m. / 0.0 11:09 p.m. / 7.2

April 8

4:49 a.m. / 2.3 10:41 a.m. / 7.3

5:09 p.m. / 0.1 11:43 p.m. / 7.4

April 9

5:34 a.m. / 1.7 11:32 a.m. / 7.4

5:47 p.m. / 0.3

April 10

6:14 a.m. / 1.1 12:12 a.m. / 7.7

6:20 p.m. / 0.7 12:17 p.m. / 7.3

April 11

6:50 a.m. / 0.6 12:39 a.m. / 7.9

6:51 p.m. / 1.1 12:59 p.m. / 7.2

April 12

7:25 a.m. / 0.3 1:04 a.m. / 8.0

7:20 p.m. / 1.6 1:40 p.m. / 7.1

April 13

7:59 a.m. / 0.0 1:29 a.m. / 8.1

7:49 p.m. / 2.1 2:20 p.m. / 6.9

April 14

8:33 a.m. / -0.1 1:54 a.m. 8.1

8:19 p.m. / 2.6 3:02 p.m. 6.6

April 15

9:10 a.m. / -0.1 2:21 a.m. / 8.0

8:50 p.m. / 3.0 3:46 p.m. / 6.3

April 16

9:50 a.m. / 0.1 2:49 a.m. / 7.8

9:23 p.m. / 3.5 4:37 p.m. / 6.0

April 17

10:36 a.m. / 0.3 3:22 a.m. / 7.5

10:04 p.m. / 3.8 5:36 p.m. / 5.7

April 18

11:30 a.m. / 0.4 4:01 a.m. / 7.2

11:00 p.m. / 4.1 6:48 p.m. / 5.5

April 19

4:53 a.m. / 6.9

12:32 p.m. / 0.5 8:02 p.m. / 5.6

April 20

12:21 a.m. / 4.1 6:02 a.m. / 6.6

1:38 p.m. / 0.5 9:00 p.m. / 5.9

April 21

1:50 a.m. / 3.9 7:23 a.m. / 6.6

2:38 p.m. / 0.3 9:43 p.m. / 6.3

April 22

3:02 a.m. / 3.2 8:41 a.m. / 6.7

3:30 p.m. / 0.1 10:18 p.m. / 6.8

April 23

3:59 a.m. / 2.4 9:49 a.m. / 7.0

4:17 p.m. / 0.1 10:51 p.m. / 7.5

April 24

4:49 a.m. / 1.3 10:49 a.m. / 7.3

5:00 p.m. / 0.2 11:24 p.m. / 8.2

April 25

5:36 a.m. / 0.3 11:46 a.m. / 7.6

5:41 p.m. / 0.5 11:58 p.m. / 8.8

April 26

6:23 a.m. -0.7

6:22 p.m. 0.9 12:41 p.m. / 7.7

April 27

7:09 a.m. / -1.5 12:34 a.m. / 9.3

7:04 p.m. / 1.4 1:36 p.m. / 7.7

April 28

7:57 a.m. / -2.0 1:12 a.m. / 9.6

7:48 p.m. / 2.0 2:31 p.m. / 7.5

April 29

8:47 a.m. / -2.1 1:53 a.m. / 9.7

8:35 p.m. / 2.5 3:28 p.m. / 7.2

April 30

9:40 a.m. / -1.9 2:37 a.m. / 9.4

9:28 p.m. / 3.0 4:30 p.m. / 6.9

25


PHOTO BY JEREMY BURKE - @J.BURKEPHOTOS ©2021


PHOTO BY JEREMY BURKE ©2021 J.BURKEPHOTOS


SJ Custom Jewelers

WHAT ARE WATERMELON TOURMALINES?

ll gems in the tourmaline family are mixed crystals

of aluminium boron silicate that also contain

elements such as iron, manganese, sodium,

lithium, or potassium. While tourmaline was

first discovered in Brazil in the 16th century, the green crystals

were initially confused with emerald. It was not until the 19th

century that the gem was classified as tourmaline.

Gemmologists now divide tourmalines into 11 different species

depending on their properties and chemical composition.

Elbaite is the name given to the most colorful members of

the tourmaline mineral family. The red or pink tourmalines

known as rubellites, the blue variety called indicolite and the

coveted Paraiba tourmaline are all Elbaites, as is the multicoloured

watermelon tourmaline.

The term tourmaline was derived from the Singhalese phrase

tura mali, meaning “stone mixed with vibrant colors”, and

the watermelon prefix refers to the unique color combination

that resembles the fruit of the same name. With a Moh’s scale

hardness of 7-7.5, the watermelon tourmaline is a relatively

durable stone for jewelry while its distinctive and eye-catching

colors mark it out as a favorite with designers.

For more information visit Styx, Stones N’ Bones 160 W 2nd St,

Yachats, OR | 541-653-3548

Resort, Restaurant & lounge

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M-F 10a-6p Sat 11a-5 Closed Sunday | 541-272-5300

sjcustomjewelers.com

PHOTOS BY JEREMY BURKE

1555 Highway 101 N., Yachats, Oregon 97394

adoberesort.com

541-547-5820


watermelon tourmaline

This watermelon tourmaline was

photographed at Styx, Stones n’ Bones in Yachats

PHOTO BY JEREMY BURKE


31


32


By KENNETH LIPP

Pier replacement an investment in the

future of Newport’s fishing industry

he more than 50-year-old deck of the Port Dock

5 pier has been removed from its aging creosote

pilings, and soon fisherman will once again be

able to drive their vehicles right up to the gangway

of the most active dock in the commercial marina.

Work to replace the bridge to shore for 80 commercial

vessels at the Port of Newport began at the end of January

with the installation of new steel pilings on either side of

the old posts, each driven about 48 feet below the sea floor.

The western row of pilings currently supports a temporary

walkway so fishermen and casual visitors alike can reach the

floating docks.

The pier is also the route for utilities vessels need to keep

working — fuel lines, electricity, potable and firefighting

water, and more.

Vehicle access to the dock has been restricted for many

years due to the pier’s deterioration condition. Aaron

Bretz, director of operations for the port, authored a white

paper on the pier’s condition when the port began seeking

funding to replace it several years ago.

“The Port Dock 5 Pier was built in the mid 1960s on

creosote pilings as a bridge to the floating Port Dock 5

complex,” Bretz wrote. “It underwent a renovation of the

superstructure in the early 1990s, but the pilings have

exceeded their lifespan and are failing.”

The last week of February, workers removed the old wooden

decking, detaching and removing section by section

with a crane, which lifted pieces to a waiting barge. The

deck sections were then transported to the International

Terminal for full dismantling.

and gangway float and install upgraded electrical service

with higher amperages available to vessels. The port expects

the new pier will open in May.

The improved structure will not just offer improved services

to existing vessels, which support 300 jobs, but also “set

the stage for reconfiguration and growth in the commercial

marina in the coming years,” Bretz wrote in his white paper.

The operations director noted that the port had forgone

tens of thousands of dollars in moorage fees, which might

represent dozens of jobs, because the commercial marina is

110 percent full and must turn away new moorage holders.

The improved structure will allow the port to build larger

moorage spaces when it replaces the floating docks, Bretz

wrote, accommodating new businesses.

“As fishing vessels have continually grown in size, more

and more businesses have sought to come to the Port of

Newport due to the robust support network that exists in

the maritime industry in Yaquina Bay,” Bretz wrote. “The

Port Dock 5 Pier replacement is a gateway project to the

marina of the future that has the potential to add more

businesses and jobs to the region.”

Advanced American Construction, of Portland, was

awarded the $2.1 million construction contract in January.

The full budget for the replacement is $2.4 million,

including project management and engineering, half of

which is paid through a grant from the U.S. Department of

Commerce Economic Development Administration.

Port Dock 5 is located on Newport’s Historic Bayfront

across from the Pacific Maritime Heritage Center.

The old pilings still must be removed, and workers will have

to wait about a month for fabrication before installing new

concrete decking in April. They’ll also replace the gangway

WRITTEN BY KENNETH LIPP | PHOTOS BY: JEREMY BURKE

33


Zoo offers hands-on experiences with exotic animals

hey’re unlikely stable mates: a pygmy goat, a silky

chicken, a couple of llamas, a few pigs, an emu and a

dog. A trio of kangaroos share an enclosure nearby.

The stable itself is unconventional — a large part of

a 7,000-square-foot former banquet hall at Aquarium Village

in South Beach. A pair of macaws walk along the fence; other

birds are perched up high in the rafters.

“My family has always had animals,” said Blaine Brown,

founder of Newport Discovery Zoo, an animal sanctuary

offering up-close encounters with threatened and endangered

animals, animals you are likely to only encounter in zoos.

His grandfather imported animals for zoos, Brown explained.

Brown owned pet stores in Spokane, Wash., before selling

them when he came to the coast to care for his grandfather.

“I thought about a pet store, but people just don’t know how

to take care of stuff,” he said. Instead of providing animals,

why not set something up where people could come visit these

animals and learn about them, he thought.

He pointed out that alligators are illegal in all the western

states, but people still seem to find ways to acquire them as pets.

When alligators are confiscated, they are usually destroyed,

Brown said. In addition to a pair of alligators, Brown said the

zoo is home to a Nile crocodile, as well.

Working with state agencies in Oregon and Washington, the

U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Department of Fish

and Wildlife and Washington Exotic Animal Rescue, the zoo

provides a home for animals that would otherwise be destroyed,

educating the pubic on the often rarely seen animals, Brown

said. The zoo works with Oregon Reptile Man, who usually

takes animals on visits to schools and libraries but is currently

doing online education.

The zoo has two Nile monitors, an African version of a

Komodo dragon. “They’ll rip your arm. They don’t make good

pets. People don’t comprehend how big they get, what their

needs are, what they’re going to eat,” Brown said

Some current residents at the Zoo are: alpacas, six-banded

armadillos, kinkaju, poison dart frogs, fennec foxes, tortoises,

African crested porcupine, Agouti, rattlesnakes, geckos,

cobras, chameleons, tarantulas, fruit-dove, ducks and rainbow

lorikeet.

“Resident critters come and go as they move on to other zoo,

sanctuaries, become a part of important breeding programs,

etc.”

The zoo is offering admission by appointment only at this

time. Appointments can be made on their Facebook page or

by phone at 541-961-6371. The zoo is located at 3101 SE Ferry

Slip Road, South Beach

Above: Baby Emu

PHOTOS BY JEREMY BURKE


PHOTO BY: JEREMY BURKE 37


Prep contests hit ground running

WRITTEN BY MICHAEL HEINBACH | PHOTOS BY JEREMY BURKE

igh school athletes from throughout Lincoln

County returned to the high school athletic fields

for interscholastic competition for the first time in

nearly a year earlier this week, with a handful of of soccer and

volleyball matches.

On Tuesday, March 2, local Season 2 prep competitions began

in earnest as the Eddyville Charter volleyball team downed

Siletz Valley in three sets in an all-Lincoln County School

District match. Also on Tuesday, the Taft boys’ soccer team

earned a hard-fought 2-2 draw while playing up a division at 4A

Tillamook.

Things really got cooking Wednesday when LCSD schools faced

off in girls and boys soccer as well as on the volleyball courts.

The Taft soccer teams traveled to face Newport, and the Cubs

girls posted a comeback 2-1 victory, before the Tiger boys rallied

to earn a 4-2 road win.

Tuesday on the area volleyball courts, Taft scored a four-set

victory home defeat of Waldport, and Newport bested Toledo

in three games.


Late last week, the Lincoln County School District issued a news

release clarifying its policies for game and match attendance for

spectators and the media.

“Although we will begin to evaluate spectator attendance, we

are not adding spectators beyond Senior Nights to our events

just yet,” the March 2 release reads. “We understand that our

County Risk Metrics allows for up to 300 spectators outdoors

and 50% capacity indoors, however, LCSD coaches, staff,

and student-athletes need time to develop safe and equitable

spectator procedures and re-evaluate current game management

practices, supervision expectations, and processes under this

new guidance. We know families are excited to watch their

student-athletes play and will try to have streaming options

available as often as possible.”

The school district additionally announced that media members

will not be issued game passes until March 29 at the earliest,

provided Lincoln County remains in the state’s COVID-19

lower-risk category.

Spectators will be permitted to attend one LCSD senior night

event through March 28. Those with the intention of attending

a senior night contest will be on a pre-approved list prior to the

day of the game, and each senior participating will be allowed

eight family members in attendance.

Should the county remain in the lower-risk category after March

28, all LCSD participating athletes will receive two guest passes

for in-district contests, whether at home or on the road. Until

media passes are issued, the school district is responsible for


eporting game and match results to

media outlets for publication.

Action was scheduled to continue

Thursday, with the Newport and Taft

boys soccer team meeting in Lincoln

City, and the Siletz Valley volleyball team

hosting Eddyville Charter. Final results

of those contests were unavailable as of

the News-Times’ deadline.

On Saturday, the cross country teams

from Taft, Toledo, Newport, Waldport

and Sweet Home compete at the Toledo

Olalla Valley Golf Course meet and the

Eddyville Charter football team travels to

face Siletz Valley.

High school sports schedules are subject

to changes with little notice due to

pandemic-prevention protocols and

other factors. For the latest information

concerning prep sports schedules, visit

the Oregon School Activity Association

website at osaa.org, and click on the

“Season 2” prompt.


Fresh Water Rock

Fed by a nearby freshwater spring on

Hwy 34 near Waldport.

Photo by Jeremy Burke


OREGON COAST DREAM HOME

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NETARTS BAY, OR

EVERLASTING ultracontemporary oceanview estate on

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lake, built for the ages with concrete ICF construction. Main

house is 5432 square feet including 5 bdrms, family room and

Grand Theater with fixed 100” professional projection screen.

Treat your feet with hydronically heated floors. The Chef’s

Dream kitchen is like a theater with a quartz cooking island

featuring 6 burner range and bar seating for 8. Subzero glass

front frig plus matching freezer, 2 sinks, walk-in pantry with

2nd refrigerator. Your cars will love the immaculate attached

double garage plus detached 1000 sq ft shop/Carriage House

with unfinished studio on upper level. Upscale neighborhood

with 35 acre commons including private lake & nature trail

to Netarts Bay. Custom design automatic steel & stone entry

gate forms an impressive entrance

to this idyllic private setting.

DETAILS

Bedrooms: 5

Bathrooms: 3.5

Est. Square Feet 5,324

Listing # 21-29

$1,600,000

Pamela Zielinski, Principal Broker, CRS

Berkshire Hathaway Home

Services NW Real Estate

1355 Phelps St #3, POB 193 Netarts, OR

503-906-4903 Office Direct


When the Ocean sh


ows us her power

Shore Acres photo by guest photographer Steven Michael of Coos Bay.


OREGON COAST DREAM HOME

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NEWPORT, OR

Luxury oceanfront living at it’s finest. Spacious 3 bedroom

condo with stunning ocean and beach views from both levels.

Featuring direct beach access directly behind the complex, the

sand is just feet away. Offered fully furnished and move in

ready, with wonderful community amenities including indoor

and outdoor tennis courts, pool, hot tub, saunas, fitness room

and clubhouse. Prime upper end location provides some of

the best views in the complex. Plenty of storage and detached

garage to keep the car out of the

weather.

Bedrooms 3

Bathrooms 3.00

Square Footage 2,243

Acres 0.00

$725,000

Year Built 1999

# of Garages 1

View Ocean

Waterfront Yes

MLS # 21-352 THIS PROPERTY BROUGHT TO YOU BY

205 E Olive St, Newport, OR

(541) 265-2200

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49


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