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W A V E S

VOL 2.1


Photo by

Luke Whittaker

N Y E

Historic

B

E A

C H

Located just a few short blocks off Highway 101,

the “European walking neighborhood” of Historic Nye beach is a

perfect spot to enjoy easy access to miles of perfect beaches

and offers the visitors lots of …

Beachcombing

Bike Riding/Rental

Beach Walking

Kite Flying

Surfing

Sail-boarding

Tide Pooling

Photography

Galleries

Jewelry

Visual Arts

Apparel

Lodging

Spa – Massage

Cafés & Fine Dining

Hours of Family Fun

Unique

Retail Shops

Professional

Services

Fine Gifts and

Home Decor

World Class

Performing Arts

Sweets - Ice Cream

- Chocolates

For more information: www.NyeBeach.org


OC

W A V E S

Publisher

Jeremy Burke

Editor

Steve Card

Advertising Sales

Teresa Barnes

Kathy Wyatt

Jenna Bartlett

Jeanna Petersen

Misty Berg

P.8

Dream Home in Salishan

P.10

Recipe - Stuffed Salmon

P.12

Recipe - Zucchini Fries

Contributing Writers

News-Times Staff

Kenneth Lipp

Susan Schuytema

Photographers

Jeremy Burke

About the Cover Shot

Fall has to be my favorite time to shoot. It is

not just the fall colors. We don't get a ton of

this on the coast. It's the Sunset and Sunrise,

the light is incredible during this season and

I thought I would share some photos that I

have been sitting on for awhile now. Enjoy!.

Photo by Jeremy Burke

P.13

Recipe - Lingcod Tacos

P.14

Recipe - Caldo

P.16

Recipe - S'mores Cookies

P.18

P.20

P.33

oregoncoastwaves.com

Recipe - Peanut Butter Bars

Dream Home of the Month

Local Ocean Mural

Facebook

@OregonCoastWaves

Instagram

@oregoncoastwaves

All rights reserved. No part of this

publication may be reproduced without

the written permission from this publisher.

Photographs, graphics, and artwork are

the property of Newport Newspapers LLC

©2021 and J.burkephotos ©2021

Oregon Coast Waves 2021

P.35

P.39

P.46

A News-Times Publication

831 NE Avery Newport Or 97365

Toledo artist making her

mark

Central Oregon Coast

Visitors Experience

Corvallis-to-Sea Trail opens


contents

P.35

FALL LIGHT

A PANORAMIC SERIES ON THE

SUNRISE AND SUNSETS OF FALL

5


Skate

Boards

& Equipment

Hoodies

Sports Memorabilia

Jewelry • LP’s

Star Wars • Hot Wheels

Collectibles • Trains

Dollhouse

Furniture

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Name

Only $35.00

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Regular price $49.99

VOL 1.10

MAY/JUNE 2021

Subscribe today and discover the best of the Oregon Coast.

Payment Enclosed

Bill Me (Email Required)

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Address

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Make checks payable to the Newport News-Times.

Send payment to PO Box 965 Newport, Oregon 97365.

W A V E S

“Sunset Study” Oil Painting Michael Gibbons

Signature Gallery

140 NE Alder Street, Toledo

Open: Friday–Sunday, Noon to 4PM

(541) 336-2797

www.michaelgibbons.net

VOL 1.9

APRIL 2021


OREGON COAST DREAM HOME

28 SPOUTING

WHALE LN

LINCOLN CITY, OR

DREAM ON! Watch the sun rise over

the mountain and bay...after a full day

at the beach, glory at the sunset from

your 120' frontage on the Pacific. Four

plus bedrooms Ranch features two

separate master suites, one 25' with

seating area, one with private sunroom.

Large kitchen/island eating area,

planning desk, built refrigerator. Stove

can connect to eight burners, or change

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$2,500,000

Bedrooms 4

Bathrooms 3

Square Footage 3,629

Acres 0.96

Year Built 1969

# of Garages 1

View Ocean

Waterfront Yes

MLS # 21-2075

9


THE KITCHEN WILD

BY KATIE WILEY

Dungeness Crab and Tiger Prawn

Stuffed Salmon

Ingredients:

1 large salmon fillet

1/2 teaspoon PS Seasoning king

shallot black garlic seasoning or

your favorite garlic seasoning

2 tablespoons of butter for searing

tiger prawns and salmon

8 ounces of cream cheese

1 cup of fresh chopped spinach

1/2 dozen tiger prawns (I purchased

these from Luna Sea Fish House)

1 heaping cup of picked Dungeness

crab meat

3 garlic cloves

Salt and cracked black pepper, to

taste

Directions:

1. Preheat oven at 400 degrees

2. Place salmon on a flat surface and

cut a slit about 3/4 quarter deep

into the fillet, creating a pocket in

the salmon for stuffing — so be sure

not to cut all the way into the fillet.

3. Season both sides of the salmon

and tiger prawns with salt and

pepper.

4. In a separate bowl, mix together

the cream cheese, spinach, garlic,

PS Seasoning black garlic seasoning,

salt, and pepper.

5. Heat butter in cast-iron skillet

over a medium-high heat. Sear

tiger prawns until about halfway

cooked, set aside. Cook salmon

skin side down for 5 minutes.

Once the skin is seared, flip the

fillet then fill salmon fillet pocket

with spinach and cream cheese

filling, Dungeness crab and tiger

prawns.

6. Place the entire cast iron skillet

in the oven for 10 minutes or until

inner salmon flesh and filling is

cooked thoroughly and cream

cheese is bubbly. Enjoy!

Farmers Market

Zucchini Fries

with Homemade

Marinara Sauce

Believe it or not, I took my very first trip

to the Waldport Farmers Market this

past Wednesday, a farmers market that

is located less than five minutes from my

house and runs every Wednesday from

9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and somehow, after

almost two years of living right down

the road, I’ve never stopped in. Such a

shame that I’ve been missing so many

incredible local goods all of this time,

because my little hometown farmers

market has it going on!

The produce was outstanding. I loaded

up on raspberries, plums, strawberries,

cauliflower, corn, gigantic onions and, of

course, this beautiful zucchini featured

in today’s recipe. There are homemade

cookies made by the sweetest woman

that are absolutely to die for, and even

a food truck serving my most favorite

meal on the planet, Albacore Fish &

Chips.

Aside from good eats, there’s local

photography, survival gear, the cutest

coastal apparel from PNW Life,

beautiful agates and so much more!

So if you’re anywhere near Waldport on

Wednesdays, be sure to stop in to the

Waldport Farmers Market from 9 a.m.

to 1 p.m., located at 160 NW Alder St.

You might even see me there because

there’s a very good chance I’ll be loading

up on farmers market goodies every

Wednesday from here on out!


Parmesan Crusted Zucchini Fries

Ingredients:

1 large zucchini or two medium

zucchini, sliced into 1/2 inch

strips

2 cups panko

2/3 cup Parmesan cheese

1 teaspoon garlic powder

2 teaspoons salt (divided)

2 eggs

1 cup milk

1 cup flour

1 teaspoon pepper

Oil for frying

Directions:

Heat oil to 375 degrees

In three separate bowls: first

bowl, mix panko, Parmesan,

garlic powder and salt; second

bowl, whisk together eggs and

milk; third bowl, mix flour, 1

teaspoon, salt, pepper.

Take zucchini strips and dredge

them in flour mixture, shaking

off access flour. Dip into egg

mixture, then into Parmesan

mixture. Set aside and repeat

with all zucchini.

Fry zucchini for 1-2 minutes,

depending on thickness, until

golden brown.

Serve with a side of homemade

marinara sauce.

Homemade Marinara Sauce

28-ounce can San Marzano

tomatoes

1/2 tablespoon olive oil.

8-ounce can tomato sauce

4 garlic cloves

3 teaspoons sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon Johnny’s

Seasoning Salt

1/4 teaspoon dried oregano

Handful (approximately 1/2

cup) fresh basil, chopped

Directions:

Heat olive oil in a saucepan on

medium-low heat. Stir in garlic

and sauté for approximately 1-2

minutes.

Add remaining ingredients and

simmer for 15-20 minutes.

Simple, quick and so delicious.

Fish Tacos

My husband and I left Newport’s Yaquina

Bay shortly after sunrise — around 6:30 a.m.

— this past Saturday with our dear friend

Tony Thiessen, owner and inventor of The

Crack’n Crab Cleaner. We headed out to sea

in less than ideal conditions. It was foggy,

the swells were bigger than I was used to, and

I could definitely feel the threat of rain in

the air.

But almost immediately after we stopped and

put our lines out, the fog began to clear, and

blue sky started to peek through the clouds.

Right about this point we were into salmon

— big time! Just when one rod would have a

bite on it, so did another and another, and

we pulled in keeper after keeper with only a

few natives having to be released.

By 8:30 a.m., everyone on the boat had their

salmon limits. Tony suggested we head over

to Seal Rock for some bottom fishing, which

is something I had still never done but have

always wanted to. The thought of coming

home with a lingcod or rockfish was beyond

exciting because those are some seriously

good eats!

Once we made our way to Seal Rock, Tony

got us all set up for bottom fishing, which is a

blast by the way. I’m not great at sitting still,

so to be up moving around with a rod in my

hands, constantly moving the rod up and

down, checking the depth and moving the

boat to chase the fish is definitely more my

speed. It was all such a thrill, especially when

I landed my first lingcod. What a moment!

Then just as quickly as I fell in love with

bottom fishing, Tony set me up for bass

fishing, and that jolted it’s way to the top

spot. Cast after cast, landing bass after bass,

was the ultimate definition of fun.

At the end of the day, the Crack’n (Tony’s

boat) pulled back into a beautifully sunny

and warm Yaquina Bay with eight coho

salmon, four black bass, one lingcod and one

cabezon (otherwise known as the mother-inlaw

fish).

Another huge thank you to my dear friend

Tony Thiessen for an incredible day out

there on the ocean with some priceless

memories made.

11


Lingcod Fish Tacos

Pride of the West batter mixed with Modelo beer. The

beer gives this batter a light and crispy texture, but

don’t worry, these tacos are still kid friendly because

your alcohol will cook out while deep frying.

Dip lingcod pieces in beer batter mix and deep fry for

3-4 minutes at approximately 360 degrees, until golden

brown.

Top with fresh crunchy red cabbage, sweet cherry

tomatoes, ripe avocados and that crowd-pleasing Spicy

Sriracha Mayo all tucked inside of a Don Pancho

yellow corn tortilla.

If you don’t have access to fresh lingcod, these fish

tacos would be fantastic with just about any fish you

have on hand.

Spicy Sriracha Mayo

Ingredients:

• 1/2 cup sour cream

• 1/3 cup mayo

• 1/2 teaspoon garlic

• 1/2 teaspoon cumin

• 1/4 teaspoon salt

• 3-4 teaspoons Sriracha

Mix well.

It’s already September, which means all

of these beautiful coastal berries will

be gone before we know it. So my little

ones and I have been working overtime

picking as many as we can to have on

hand throughout the winter months for

jams and pies.

Blackberries are jam packed full of

vitamin C, which can help shorten

common colds and viruses, a perfectly

delicious essential to have on hand

during the winter months. They’re also

Blackberry Jam/Salal Berry Jam

high in fiber, vitamin K and manganese

(another helper for our immune

systems).

Salal berries and salal leaves both

have some pretty incredible health

benefits too! The berries themselves

are among some of the healthiest

berries we commonly consume today

and are extremely rich in antioxidants

and shown to be protective against

cancer, cardiovascular disease and even

neurodegenerative diseases.

So take those little ones outside for some

berry picking before these delicious

and nutritious berries are gone for the

season. My little ones always have so

much fun berry picking, and although

only about 50 percent make their way

into the bowl because they’re snacking

as they go, I know they’re snacking on

some seriously healthy eats, so I’m one

happy mama!

Small Batch Blackberry Jam

Ingredients:

4 cups fresh blackberries

2 cups sugar

Directions:

Combine ingredients in a saucepan. Occasionally stir

until berries come to a boil. Reduce to a simmer. While

simmering, continuously stir for 10 minutes.

Test the set by dipping a metal spoon in the jam. If you are

happy with the consistency, ladle into sterilized jars.

Small Batch Salal Berry Jam

Ingredients:

2 cups fresh salal berries

1/2 cup sugar

Directions:

In a saucepan over medium heat, add berries and sugar

and simmer for about 10-15 minutes, stirring frequently.

Once berries have reduced by approximately half and have

thickened to a jam-like consistency, remove from heat. Ladle

into sterilized jars. Allow to cool for at least two hours, then

enjoy as you would any other jam.

12


Albacore Tuna Fish & Chips

Last week, my husband and I set out for our very first tuna fishing

trip aboard the Crack’n with Tony from Crack’n Crab Cleaner, and we

had such a thrilling and bountiful day out there on the ocean!

We left the dock at 5:30 a.m. in the dark, only to realize that one

of our buddy boats that we were headed out with decided to leave

early without us, and when you’re traveling 50 miles out to sea, it’s

comforting knowing there are other boats around to communicate

with. Luckily, the other buddy boat, Reel Addiction, that we were set

to travel out with met us at the ice docks at our scheduled time, so after

we snagged about 500 pounds of ice, we were on our way out to sea.

The ocean conditions were less than ideal, so much in fact that there

was a rumor that we may all turn around and stick closer to shore

to salmon fish. But we decided to keep going and risk it, and thank

goodness we did because once we were about 45 miles due west of

Newport, the ocean calmed down, the sun came out, and one after

one, tuna started to bite!

If you have ever been tuna fishing, you know that feeling because it’s

certainly one I’ll never forget! Another feeling I’ll never forget is trying

to reel in my very first tuna.

Here’s the thing, when I put my mind to something, I make it happen

— always. I’m stubborn like that, but trying to bring a tuna into the boat

that doesn’t want to be caught has just as much to do with strength as

it does will. It pains me to admit it, but that fighting tuna was almost

more than I could handle. But thanks to Tony, he anchored me down

and helped me every step of the way reel that fish into the boat. I

vividly remember exhaustedly saying, “I see it!” as it was finally visible.

That’s right when the guys yelled, “We see color!” They grabbed the

gaff, hooked that beautiful fish and brought it inside of the boat.

That was without question the most beautiful fish I have ever seen in

my life! This was the very first time I had ever seen a tuna up close,

and that smooth silver skin absolutely glistened in the sun. Its slick

streamline shape with its pectoral fin that fits just perfectly against its

body, those small saw-like finlets running down its tail and the metallic

blues and silver against its smooth skin were perfectly crafted by nature

and absolutely stunning.

Add the excitement of knowing I just landed my most favorite protein

on planet Earth, and it’s a moment in time that I will never, ever

forget. I couldn’t have done it without my dear friend Tony Theissen.

If it wasn’t for Tony, that fish wouldn’t have made its way into the

boat, and there’s a pretty good chance I would have found myself out

of the boat.

We ended up landing 17 tuna that day — 16 albacore and one bluefin,

the very first bluefin aboard the Crack’n, and it was brought into

the boat by my incredible husband, Jed. This was absolutely a day I

will never forget — the thrill, the exhaustion, the camaraderie and,

of course the many, many jars of tuna that will feed my family for

long into the future. I am so grateful for this bucket list opportunity

made possible by a chance meeting with Tony Thiessen, the co-owner

of the Crack’n Crab Cleaner on Instagram, which has turned into a

friendship that will undoubtedly last the rest of our lives.

Albacore Fish & Chips

Ingredients:

1 small/medium tuna loin

1 cup flour

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon Johnny’s Seasoning Salt

1 can Pelican Updrift IPA

Oil for frying

Directions:

Heat oil to 360 degrees. Mix all dry ingredients

in a bowl. Slice tuna into bite-sized pieces. Lightly

coat each piece of tuna in flour mixture, set

aside. Add beer to flour mixture until it’s about

the consistency of heavy cream, dip floured tuna

pieces in batter then deep fry until they’re golden

brown. Place on a cooling rack to drain access oil.

Serve with fries and tarter sauce.

Simple Homemade Tarter Sauce:

(These are very loose measurements, it was more

a dash of this and a dash of that until it tastes

good)

Approximately:

1 cup mayonnaise

1/2 cup chopped dill garlic pickles from Kurzhal

Family Kickin’ Pickles (I’m convinced the magic

of this sauce is in the pickles themselves. These

can be found at the Florence Farmers Market).

1-2 tablespoons pickle juice from the same pickles

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard.

Directions:

Mix all ingredients together. Refrigerate for at

least an hour before serving.

13


CELESTE’S KITCHEN PNW

BY CELESTE MCENTEE AND GUESTS

Guatemalan Caldo de Polo

(The family recipe of Pablo Beteta,

written by Carter McEntee, son of

Celeste McEntee)

Pablo and I were missionary

companions together for four months

in the mountains of Guatemala. We

were serving a mission for our church

for two years and had an amazing time.

Living on a diet consisting of mainly

beans and tortillas, caldo was our

favorite dish. Every week we bought

the ingredients necessary, which also

included bringing a live turkey or

chicken. We had caldo made for us by

the nice families that lived around our

area.

Pablo, being from Guatemala, knew

what caldo was and had his own family’s

recipe, but until now I had never tried

his family’s version. He lived in my

family’s home this summer, where he

was a guest on my mom’s cooking show

and taught us how to make caldo. As

great as all of the caldos I tried in my

mission were, this one might just be

the best!

Ingredients:

• 1 whole chicken, 3-4 pounds and

cut into parts

• 4 cloves garlic, peeled

• 1 medium onion, halved

• 4 whole peppercorns

• 1 teaspoon ground Annatto

• 1 bay leaf

• 3-4 large carrots, cut into large,

1-2-inch chunks

• 3 large or 8 small potatoes, cut in

half if using large

• 2 güisquil (in English Chayote

Squash), peeled (wearing gloves) and

cut into four large pieces each

• 3 roma tomatoes, chopped roughly

• 8 ounces of mushrooms, cut in

half

• 2-3 ears of corn, enough for 8

pieces of 2-3 inch thick pieces

• 4 medium güicoy (in English

Ayote Squash), cut in half

• 3 tablespoons cilantro, chopped

• 1-2 teaspoons salt, to taste

Guatemalan Caldo de Polo

• Cooked rice (for serving) cook

with salt and water

• Lime wedges (for serving)

• avocado (for serving)

Instructions:

To begin, place 2 tomatoes, 1 onion,

2 cloves of garlic, a red pepper chili, if

there is a little consommé or chicken

broth you put a large spoonful, all

that is blended and reserved.

Cut the vegetables you want into

medium squares.

In a separate dish, make a small

amount of 1/4 cup of hot chili oil,

1 teaspoon of chili flakes and 1 fresh

squeezed lemon.

Put your chicken in a large pot and

add water until chicken is covered by

at least four inches. Add half of the

onion, cut in two, and two whole

cloves of garlic, peppercorns and

bay leaf. Bring to a boil and simmer

for 30 minutes. Remove breasts to

a plate and reserve, boil remaining

mixture for 1½ hours.

In the meantime, slice other half of

onion long ways, so you have long

strips. Add onions, carrots, potatoes,

güisquil and tomatoes to the pot and

simmer for 20 minutes. Add güicoy,

cilantro, mint and salt to taste and

simmer for 10 minutes more.

Pull out other meat pieces and shred

along with reserved breasts and add

back to the pot.

Turn off heat and spoon 1-2 pieces

of each vegetable onto a plate, along

with a big spoonful of rice and some

lime wedges. Ladle broth into a bowl

and serve with plate of vegetables

and corn tortillas. If you want a little

kick, add the chili lemon sauce on

top and mix in. Enjoy!


Chocolate Chip S’mores Cookies

Every time I make these cookies, I find myself still changing the way I arrange chocolate pieces and marshmallows on top and

throughout the dough. I am still not quite satisfied, which also motivates me to continue making them until I feel I’ve got it!

This cookie gets requested by every one that has had one — perfect for any occasion.

Chocolate Chip S’mores Cookies

Ingredients

• 2 to 2 1/8 cups Kamut flour or 2 1/2 cups all purpose

flour

• 1 1/4 cups Nabisco graham cracker crumbs

• 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

• 1 teaspoon baking soda

• 1 1/2 teaspoons gray salt

• 1 cup salted butter, room temp.

• 1 1/3 cups packed light brown sugar

• 2/3 cup granulated sugar

• 2 large eggs, mix in each one separately.

• 2 1/2 teaspoons of vanilla

• 1 1/2 cups of Ghiradelli chocolate chips — I use a mix

of dark, milk and semi sweet chips

• 3/4 cup broken up pieces of Nabisco graham crackers

• A handful of large camp fire flat marshmallows, cut

in half

Directions

Mix all of the dry ingredients in a bowl — flour, graham

cracker crumbs, baking powder, baking soda and gray

salt.

Cream together the salted butter and both sugars with

a mixer. Add the vanilla and the eggs — don’t over mix.

Slowly mix the dry ingredients in. Fold in the chocolate

chips and graham cracker pieces.

Using a large cookie scoop, fill with cookie dough and

drop on a lined cookie sheet with plenty of room in

between each one. Make a well in the middle of each

cookie dough ball and stuff in a 1/2 marshmallow. Cover

the marshmallow with the cookie dough and form back

into a ball. Palm of your hand and gently flatten it. Place

a marshmallow half into the center of the dough and

make back into a ball.

Preheat the oven to 365 degrees and line a baking sheet

with parchment paper or a Silpat mat. Place the cookies

on your baking sheet, keeping 2-3 inches between each

cookie.

Bake the cookies for 12 to 14 minutes or until the edges

are slightly golden brown. The centers will look a little

underdone, take them out anyways. Top with broken

pieces of Hershey’s bar and graham cracker two-thirds of

the way through baking.

Take the pan out of the oven and sprinkle each cookie

with finishing salt. Let them cool on the baking sheet

for a few minutes. Add a couple more little pieces of

marshmallow and chocolate pieces to get the finishing

look you desire.

BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY

HomeServices

Northwest

Real Estate

Pam Zielinski

Netarts Bay, OR • Mobile: 503-880-8034

www.PamZielinski.com

– “Pam’s Homes by the Water” –


Peanut Butter Bars

These Peanut Butter Bars are the EXACT recipe the lunch ladies once served in schools! They have a soft, chewy

peanut butter cookie base, creamy peanut butter center and chocolate buttercream on top. These are the best peanut

butter bars of all time! I have tried a lot of peanut butter bars in my day, and these Peanut Butter Bars are the

best I have ever tried!My favorite treat growing up was the peanut butter bars that the lunch ladies served in our

elementary school. I would bring an extra 50 cents to school so I could buy one of these delicious peanut butter bars

whenever I could.These bars are made in a half sheet pan and you can cut them into as many bars as you need.

Ingredients

Peanut Butter Bars

1 cup butter softened

1 cup sugar

1 cup brown sugar firmly packed

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 large eggs

3 cups peanut butter divided

2 cups old fashioned oats

2 cups flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon salt

Frosting

2/3 cup butter softened

1/3 cup milk

2.5 teaspoons vanilla

5 Tablespoons cocoa powder

4 cups powdered sugar

Peanut Butter Bars

Add vanilla, eggs, and 1 cup of the peanut butter; stir to

combine.

Add oats, flour, baking soda and salt and mix until well

combined.

Spray a baking sheet (half sheet jelly roll pan that is

approximately 17.8 x 12.8 x 1 inch) with nonstick cooking

spray and spread out dough in an even layer.

Bake for 15 minutes and remove from oven.

Drop remaining peanut butter (about 2 cups) by very small

spoonfuls all over on top of warm bars. Let set for about 5-6

minutes and gently spread when peanut butter has begun

to melt. It will spread easily when the peanut butter has

softened on the warm bars. Don't try to spread it while still

thick.

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a large bowl, cream together butter, sugar and brown

sugar together.

Then let the bars cool until peanut butter has set up.

While cooling, mix together frosting ingredients with a

hand mixer until smooth and spread on top of bars.

Cut into bars and serve

LITTLE CREEK APARTMENTS

365 N.E. 36 th Street

Newport, OR 97365

• 2 Bed/ 1 Bath

• 3 Bed/ 2 Bath

• Play Area

• On-site laundry facilities

• Public Transportation

Call 541-265-2663

PROFESSIONALLY MANAGED BY SIMA MANAGEMENT, INC.

Michelle Hallmark

I look forward to helping you

buy or sell your home!

MHALLMARK@OCEANEQUITY.COM

541-430-5415

1107 SW Coast Hwy. Newport, OR 97365

WWW.OCEANEQUITY.COM


OREGON COAST DREAM HOME

29 SW COAST ST

NEWPORT OR

Three: 4 bedroom, 2 bath, Oceanview, furnished Victorian style homes

with Grandfathered vacation rental approval. Exquisite craftsman

details include high ceilings, custom trim and shingle work, and artistic

touches throughout. Each home has a private fenced yard with a hot

tub, deck and BBQ. Open concept main living upstairs with fireplaces

and great view of the ocean, Nye Beach and to the lighthouse. Sought

after location in the heart of Nye Beach directly across from Newport

Preforming Arts Center and just blocks to beach access Buyer can apply

for a new vacation rental license and have an excellent opportunity to

obtain a revenue generating homes that have been well managed and

meticulously maintained. Perfect 1031 exchange or investment property,

or live in one, rent the other two.The three Victorian style homes all

have distinct character, similar but with slight variations. Created in

the tradition of the turn-of-the-century community that was Newport's

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FALL

LIGHT

A series of panoramic photos highlighting the amazing

light of Fall. Sunrise or Sunset this is our favorite

season. Photos by Jeremy Burke


PHOTOS BY: JEREMY BURKE


25


27


31


Artist Monica Milligan, of

Beaverton, works on a mural

on the side of Local Ocean

Seafoods. The mural depicts

the late Clement “Pogo”

Grochowski as Old Man

Winter.


Mural pays tribute to late fisherman

or many locals, a new mural at a Bayfront business in

Newport will remind them of an old friend.

Laura Anderson, owner of Local Ocean Seafoods,

said the mural of Clement “Pogo” Grochowski is a

tribute to the man who helped launch the popular seafood

restaurant 16 years ago.

In 2005, Anderson and her business partner, Al Pazar, were

trying to open Local Ocean, a concept of a fish market with

a small attached restaurant. “We were talking to banks about

business loans with limited success,” recalled Anderson.

“Banks at that time were very anxious about loaning money

to restaurants.”

Through mutual friends, the business partners met

Grochowski. “He said he would loan us the money,” Anderson

said. “He felt we would do good things, and he wanted to

support that.”

As an early benefactor, Grochowski let Anderson and Pazar

make loan payments on interest only — great terms for the

start-up business. They eventually paid off the loan in full as

the restaurant continued to grow and increase in popularity.

When Grochowski died in April of this year, Anderson felt

compelled to honor his legacy. “I credit it to a conversation

many years ago with one of his former deckhands, Heather

Hively,” said Anderson. “Pogo had kind eyes and joyful cheeks

and wavy hair. I had the idea of him in the image of Old Man

Winter and held onto the idea for 15 years.”

Several artists had approached Anderson over the years about

painting a mural on the side of the Local Ocean building, but

there were always other priorities that took precedence. But

when Monica Milligan, an artist from Beaverton, approached

her in mid-June, Anderson felt the time was finally right.

Milligan had recently visited Local Ocean and inquired about

Anderson’s interest for a mural. Anderson was reminded of

her Old Man Winter image, and she agreed.

“I gave her my vision, and the following week she had put

together the draft,” said Anderson. After about a month of

sharing ideas and concepts, Milligan had submitted a final

draft of the mural.

Anderson gathered as many photos of Grochowski as she could,

but the quality of them were not ideal. “They were grainy, and

in most of them, he was wearing sunglasses or a hat. There just

wasn’t much detail in them,” explained Anderson.

Milligan said she had to dig deep for inspiration to honor

Grochowski, a man she had never met. “When you paint

portraits of loved ones and especially loved ones who have

passed, there’s a lot of responsibility that comes with that

as an artist to make sure you are doing them justice and for

their family and friends,” explained Milligan. “Really trying

BY SUSAN SCHUYTEMA | PHOTOS COURTESY

CONTINUED ON PAGE 34

33


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to understand their energy, who they were, what they meant to someone and then

trying to articulate that into a painting can be a hard task.”

Anderson wanted Grochowski’s face to be the focal point of the mural without a lot

of extraneous details. “After reviewing all his photos and finding some references

online, as well, that resembled his likeness, I found the full inspiration and confidence

I needed to make it happen,” Milligan said.

The artist and the restaurant owner both felt their partnership was serendipitous.

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Anderson and Milligan learned they shared a past life connection. Anderson was

stationed in Romblon, The Philippines, when she was in the Peace Corps 25 years

ago. Milligan’s father lives in Romblon. As part of her work in Romblon, Anderson

helped created the Looc Bay Marine Sanctuary, a place Milligan had visited as a child.

“It was kismet,” said Anderson of the coincidence. “It is a really remote island with

only 10,000 people.” The Philippines consists of around 7,640 islands — about 2,000

of which are inhabited.

“I thought that was a bizarre coincidence, or should I say connection,” Milligan

agreed. “She lived on the same small island as my dad. So needless to say, I felt that

much more connected to this body of work and experience having met her and

creating this piece for her.”

“The image of him blowing the fleet out to sea is powerful,” said Anderson. “Monica

was able to animate Pogo’s kindness, humility and strength.”

Anderson said Grochowski was a gentle spirit, simple and humble. His sister, Josie

Jenson, agreed.

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“He had a gruff personality but had a heart of gold under that,” Jenson said. “He

always believed in what Laura was doing with the restaurant … selling and serving

actual local fish.”

Grochowski was part of Newport’s commercial fishing fleet for about 50 years. He

started fishing on a dory right out of high school and continued to buy bigger boats

until he eventually landed on F/V Edgar A. “He was a self-starter,” said Jenson. “He

never wanted to work for someone else.”

Jenson thinks Grochowski would be pleased with the mural in his likeness. “He

probably wouldn’t let a lot of people know, but he would secretly have had a lot of

pride about it. He was humble, but I bet he would be strutting his stuff around.”

Anderson plans to post an informational plaque on the side of the building explaining

the meaning behind the mural. “Art is a powerful medium. People love the mural

without even knowing the story. I feel very glad to have done it.”

meaton@bhhsnw.com

mobile(541) 999-0241

office(541) 997-6000

1875 Hwy. Florence

To learn about muralist and painter Monica Milligan, visit her website at

mamartworks.com or keep up with her current projects by clicking on the social

media links on her site.

34


Veta shown with her childrens book 'The Traveling

Bunk Bed.' The book and all the original art are

on display at the COVE located at 831 NE Avery

Newport, Or. (Photo by Jeremy Burke)


Artist making her mark in Toledo

eta Bakhtina has travelled around the world and

painted murals in many major cities, including

Amsterdam, Rome, Budapest and in every place

that she has lived. Now, she is ready to make her impact in

Lincoln County.

Last fall, Bakhtina settled in the little town of Toledo, where

she is a resident artist at The Crow’s Nest Gallery, owned

by Janet Runger. While some people may wonder how such

a world traveler ended up in the rural town of Toledo, she

had always dreamed of moving to the Oregon coast but didn’t

think it would be possible.

“It seemed strangely unattainable to move to the coast,”

Bakhtina said. “I’m not sure why it seemed unreasonable.” But

the coast came calling in the form of an old friend.

Bakhtina was friends with Runger’s son when they all lived in

Colorado in the late ’90s, and they all have remained friends

ever since. Runger had recently moved her gallery to a larger

building in downtown Toledo and invited Bakhtina to join.

She jumped at the chance.

“We’ve been told we are a good pair,” Bakhtina said of Runger.

“We have a good connection, and we get inspiration from each

other. There are a million benefits in working there.”

Besides her work as a muralist, Bakhtina is a surrealist painter

and children’s book illustrator.

At first glance, Bakhtina’s paintings are dark, mysterious

and dramatic. But a closer look reveals colorful details that

are joyful and whimsical. Creating art has always been in her

blood.

Originally from St. Petersburg, Russia, Bakhtina said her

initial love for art came from reading a lot of children’s books.

“I grew up in a literary family. My mother’s father was a writer

and publisher of books,” she said.

Her parents had friends who were interpreters and brought

her children’s books from all over the world. “In Russia during

that time — the ’80s — we didn’t have a lot of TV. I spent a lot

of time reading, so my passion for illustration came from being

exposed to so much creativity.”

No one else in her family pursued art. Her mother is a doctor,

and most of the other women in her family went into medicine.

She felt a similar draw toward helping people.

“I wanted to go into a humanitarian career — whether it was

medicine or activism. I always had the need to help the woes of

the world. I struggled for a really long time because I struggled

to do something else,” she said.

But Bakhtina was also inclined toward art. “In school, all the

kids asked me to do illustrations for their projects,” she said. “I

was always the artistic, creative one. In Russia there was a lot of

art taught in school, and I did a lot of art at home.”

Veta Bakhtina (above) continues work on her latest oil painting at The Crow’s Nest Gallery in Toledo. An illustration by Bakhtina, right, is next to

a coordinating assemblage piece by Crow’s Nest Gallery owner Janet Runger. (Photo by Susan Schuytema)

BY SUSAN SCHUYTEMA | PHOTOS JEREMY BURKE & SUSAN SCHUYTEMA CONTINUED ON PAGE 38

37


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37

In the early ’90s, her family emigrated to the U.S. and settled

in the Denver area. That experience of leaving her homeland

at a young age and her being an emigrant is what continues to

drive her work.

“There are things that for me, as an emigrant of the United

States, have influenced my work in a very real way. That

longing and nostalgia for our homelands can be crippling at

times for emigrants. I paint what I need to paint.” Nearly all

her paintings include elements of the landscape of her youth.

“The closest link for me is the astounding visceral sensation

of being in a place you love. Place, for me, has always been an

important concept,” she explained.

She calls herself a landscape painter even though her work is

also filled with characters. Bakhtina pointed to a painting titled

“Morning Crow” as an example. In that piece, she wanted to

paint a rooster that also had a decorative motif on it. “I had

no idea when I started that the landscape would actually be a

heart portal. And I also had no idea I would place him in this

solitary environment. It all came out through the process of

painting, which is essentially adding and removing content.”

Bakhtina uses mostly oil paints in a glazing technique because

it has the truest-to-life color. Glazing is a traditional process

where thin layers of translucent paint are applied on top of

the main color to create depth. “Light is really important in

my pieces because they are dark, and the light really shines

through. I don’t paint on top of a black background. I paint on

the white and paint in layers. It gives it a really vibrant aspect

that appears like it is on fire in places.”

She published a coloring book in 2010, and her children’s

book, “The Magic Traveling Bunk Bed and the Key to

Moon City,” came out in 2019. “The book started first with

illustrations to recreate feelings I cherished as a child,” she

said. “The story took over and took on a life of its own. I wrote

it for myself but also for 6 and 7 year olds.”

Thousands of packs of her detailed animal divination cards

have been sold to customers all over the world. Now in its

second printing, this spirit guide card deck displays 56

creatures from the animal kingdom. She had been working

with scientific illustrations so included taxonomy in her

illustrations. “I gathered information for the cards by studying

behavior in the wild and spiritual painting. It was important

to me to have both.” Though adept at scientific illustration,

she never considered it as a career because it is too dry for her

taste. This is her way of putting a bit more whimsy in it while

keeping it accurate.

Her love of animals and nature is not only reflected in her

artwork but also in her side projects. She is involved in plant

care and pollinator support and sells bee friendly, pollinator

yard signs that promote food security on her website and in

The Crow’s Nest Gallery.

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Bakhtina is also making an impact in Toledo’s city beautification

project. She is planning a mural in downtown Toledo and

curated the color swatches for a downtown building palette

in dramatic colors. “People are on board with adding a lot to

Toledo in terms of whimsy and bringing people in. It’s really

exciting and speaks to what Toledo already has going on, which

is incredible. It been great seeing how the town transforms. I

moved to Toledo at this very interesting time.”

Bakhtina’s work can be viewed on her website at vetabakhtina.

com and at The Crow’s Nest Gallery on Main Street in Toledo.

www.oceanviewseniorliving.com


The front entry area at the News-Times has been converted into the COVE — Central Oregon Coast Visitors Experience — a visitor center that is home

to an art gallery. That gallery has been named the Lippman Gallery, in memory of Burt Lippman (lower right photo) who was a mentor to News-

Times publisher Jeremy Burke. COVE and the Lippman Gallery are open at the News-Times office, 831 NE Avery St., Newport, from 8 a.m. to 4:30

p.m. Mondays through Fridays.


News-Times adds visitor center, Lippman Gallery

Traditionally, a community newspaper office is the place to

go to for all kinds of information. The News-Times has taken

that a step further by remodeling its front entry area into

the COVE — Central Oregon Coast Visitors Experience — a

visitor center that is home to an art gallery, named after the

man publisher Jeremy Burke considers his mentor.

“This is an opportunity for the paper to give back to the artist

community, as well as to do something in Burt Lippman’s

memory,” said Burke. “Burt was one of my favorite people

ever. And most people don’t know how much he and his

wife, Bobbie, have done for this community.”

The gallery and visitor center are Burke’s idea, with the

gallery featuring his own photography as well as the work of

new and emerging artists of the Oregon coast.

Burke said his goal in converting the front of the office area

into a visitor center and art gallery is to visibly meld art and

community. “I saw a need for Newport area artists to be able

to display their work to the public and to get known,” Burke

said. “I wanted a place for the work of up-and-coming artists

to be seen. There are so many struggling artists who have no

place to hang their art. This is an opportunity for them.

”And I wanted to honor Burt,” he added.

Burke recalled that in 2009, shortly after he first arrived at

the News-Times, Lippman took him under his wing.

“He became like family,” Burke said.

Lippman died in 2013; his wife, Bobbie, a long-time News-

Times columnist, said, of her husband, “Burt had a fatherson

relationship with Jeremy. He took him to lunch a lot,

and Jeremy picked Burt’s business brain. He was like the son

Burt never had.”

In addition to hosting art, COVE offers local magazines and

brochures highlighting the coastal area, and will sponsor

spin-off events. It’s also decorated with coastal memorabilia,

including a surfboard.

“The remodeling of the newspaper office is a surprise to

visitors,” Burke said. “Most people are shocked when they

come into the paper — they think they’re in the wrong place.”

A News-Times logo will be placed on the entry door, but

Burke said that people soon realize the gallery and visitor

center are an integral part of the newspaper, and they like

what they see.

“We’re not overly pretentious like some galleries can be,”

Burke said. “And we’re not here to sell art. If someone wants

to buy a piece of art, they have to talk with the artist. We’re

not competing in any way with galleries or businesses.

“I want people’s eyes to pop open with what they see,” he

added. “That’s why I have a whole wall of photos, hopefully

By Leslie O’Donnell | Photos by Jeremy Burke

41


with something for everybody — waterfalls, lighthouses,

bridges. My work is meant to tell the story of the coast. My

hope is that by late September, when people come into the

paper, they can see 100 pieces of art.”

Burke has been a photographer for about a decade. As

newsrooms were downsized and the job of staff photographer

disappeared, Burke stepped beyond his publisher duties and

helped out by taking photos. He liked what that involved.

“I did it for 15 or 20 hours a week and got better and better

at it, figuring out how to do something new,” he said. Now

he studies throughout the year with a world-renowned photo

editor. And in addition to his full-time job as publisher, Burke

continues to shoot coastal photos that frequently appear on

the pages of the News-Times.

“I’m extremely serious about my art,” he said. “I can work on

one photo for up to 15 hours — not manipulating content but

making sure I got everything right.”

The current art on display in the gallery ranges from fish

paintings by Leighton Blackwell to oil paintings by Gina

Nielsen to carved block prints by Jenny Newell, along with

Newport Middle School student art and a wall of Burke’s

photographs of coastal scenes. In addition, the gallery

currently features work by the late Michael Gibbons of Toledo,

whose landscape paintings of the Yaquina River area were the

hallmarks of his work.

Display cases house Oregon sunstone jewelry from SJ Custom

Jewelry in Nye Beach and items from Wind Drift Gallery

and Childish Tendencies from the Bayfront. And Burke is

planning to commission both a metal sculpture of sea life for

the front of the newspaper building and a mural on the wall

facing the highway.

The chance to honor Lippman is important to Burke. “Burt

was my sounding board,” he said, calling him a genius

businessman. “He was an amazing person. Everyone who

knew him absolutely adored him. The first time you met him,

he made you feel that you knew him your whole life.”

Bobbie said she and Burt were thrilled to be involved with the

local arts community, mostly behind the scenes, when they

moved to the coast from southern California. “We helped

raise money from the very beginning to build the Newport

Performing Arts Center (PAC),” Bobbie said, noting that Alice

Silverman, for whom the main theater at the PAC is named,

and Burt worked very closely together. They all attended the

groundbreaking ceremony.

“This is a link from the newspaper to the community and to

the arts, and reinvigorates what we do for the community,”

Burke said of COVE and the Lippman Gallery. “It comes full

circle, making the paper more visible and more a part of the

arts community. After the front page and obituaries, the arts

section is the most read part of the newspaper, and it’s super

important to what we do.”

Bobbie Lippman said Burt would be honored to have the

gallery named after him. “The gallery is very nice, very classy,”

she said. “I’m very happy to be part of it.”

She is donating a large portrait of her husband to the gallery

as well. Done by John Solie, who painted the portrait of Alice

Silverman that hangs at the PAC, the painting has a back story.

Bobbie said Solie, who was living in Seal Rock at the time,

asked Burt to pose for a portrait he wanted to paint to advertise

his work in Southern-focused magazines. Burt agreed, and the

ad proved a success.

“Burt was such a good sport,” Bobbie said. “He’d agree to

anything if it was for the good of the order.”

She said Solie eventually gave the portrait to the Lippmans,

and now it will have a home in the gallery bearing Burt’s name.

COVE and the Lippman Gallery are open at the News-Times

office, 831 NE Avery St., Newport, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Mondays through Fridays.

43


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Corvallis-to-Sea Trail grand opening set

fter nearly 50 years of effort and thousands

of volunteer hours, the Corvallis-to-Sea

(C2C) Trail that links the Willamette

Valley to the Pacific Ocean is complete and

open for hikers and bikers.

To celebrate the milestone, the C2C Trail Partnership will

hold a grand opening on Saturday, Aug. 21 at both ends of the

trail: Ona Beach State Park in Seal Rock from 10 to 11 a.m.,

and the Benton County Fairgrounds in Corvallis from 2 to 4

p.m. The events are free and open to the public.

The trail is a culmination of 18 years of work on a 50-yearold

concept. The U.S. Forest Service proposed the idea of a

recreational trail from the Willamette Valley to the Oregon

coast in 1974, working with volunteers and other government

agencies for more than 25 years. But the project never came

to fruition.

In 2003, a coalition of about 30 people got together and

decided to revive the trail project. The time seemed right, and

the volunteers involved were enthusiastic.

According to C2C Trail Partnership President Gary Chapman,

many people who were opposed to the trail in the ’70s and

’80s had, over time, changed their views about the trail. The

group fostered a good working relationship with the U.S.

BY SUSAN SCHUYTEMA | PHOTOS COURTESY

Forest Service and was able to come to agreements with other

landowners.

“People were thinking more about recreation as time went

on,” Chapman said. “We decided to give it a go as a citizen’s

effort rather than a governmental effort.”

The grass roots effort proved to be a good idea. “This bottomup

approach took off and it really worked,” said Al LePage,

executive director of the National Coast Trail Association.

“We were finally able to move things forward by forming a

good coalition.”

Developing the 62-mile trail took several years. Volunteers

worked about 50,000 hours and explored more than 300

miles of potential trail routes, constructed new sections of

trail, brushed abandoned road corridors, weeded out invasive

species and installed trail signs.

The finished hiking trail is remarkable in the surrounding

beauty that spans over several geographical areas. “It starts in

the heart of the valley,” said LePage. “You can dip your hand

in the Willamette River and at the end, you can dip your hand

in the Pacific Ocean.”

The trail starts, or ends, in the urban area of Corvallis and

runs through small towns, active and decommissioned logging

47


oads, a national forest, farms, ranches and wetlands.

After Corvallis, the trail continues from the suburban area of

Philomath to a working landscape along Mary’s River. “There

are Christmas tree farms, timberlands and watershed land

areas in this natural forested setting,” said LePage.

The elevation on the trail doesn’t vary too much — the official

high point on the trail is near the road to Marys Peak at 1,780

feet, though hikers can go off trail and climb to the summit if

they desire.

The trail goes into a valley in the middle of the Coast Range

before it hits Gopher Ridge. “It is one of my favorite places to

travel,” said LePage. “It is a wilderness that is completely quiet

except for the sounds of nature. It gets dark — very dark. It

is a wonderful experience to embrace the natural beauty and

solitude.”

Once hikers reach an area about 10 miles from the coast, the

sounds of the mill in Toledo can be heard. “And you can feel

the coolness of the Pacific Ocean breeze before you can see it,”

said LePage.

Camping is allowed at most places on Forest Service land,

unless indicated by a no camping sign. Bear and cougar

sightings have occurred along many sections of the trail but the

odds, of meeting them are small. The biggest threat, according

to LePage, is mosquitos.

When LePage hiked the trail in June of this year, he walked

21 miles on his third day just to get to the ocean and away

from the biting insects. “It was tough both physically and

emotionally. And the mosquitos were eating me alive. Make

sure you bring mosquito repellant.”

The trail ends at Ona Beach south of Newport.

So far this year, 67 hikers have used the trail, with 50 of them

making the full journey. And 58 bicyclists have explored the

trail.

The entire C2C hiking trail will take most people three to six

days to complete. Bicyclists complete the journey in one or

two days.

Hikers and bikers don’t need to commit to the entire trail.

There are trailhead access points that people can use for day

trips or an overnight experience. “There are many enjoyable

shorter hikes that people can take advantage of,” Chapman

said.

N

Marys

River

east

hiking

N

N

N

To Newport

To Waldport

20

34

County Rd. 26440

C2C Phase 2 to

Ona Beach

20

Big Elk

Campground

Grant

34

west and east

hiking

Old Peak Rd.

west

hiking

Hiker’s Guide to Hwy 34

30 mi

C2C Hwy 34/20

Interchange

Scheele

Creek Rd.

To Corvallis

Grant Creek

Marys River

To Blodgett

Tum Tum Rd.

Creek

Big Elk

20

34

Woods

Harlan Rd.

Creek

Feagles

Creek

Creek Rd.

NF-62

Marys River

Marys River

Grange

Feagles

Creek Rd.

C2C Summit

1,780 ft Corvallis Watershed

No Entry

Please stay on the trail

North Ridge Trail

Marys Peak

Spout

Harlan-Burnt Woods Rd.

20

34

Marys River

Park

Creek

20

9th St.

34

Skyline Dr.

Gate

Permit

Required

Anyone going the full distance, however, does need to obtain

a free permit from Starker Forests. C2C trail users will cross

approximately 4.4 miles of Starker Forests-owned forestlands.

The free recreation permit may be obtained by calling the

office at 541-929-2477 during business hours. Camping,

campfires and smoking are prohibited at all times on Starker

Forests lands. Check their website, www.starkerforests.com for

closures due to fire danger. If the risk becomes too high, all

To Burnt Woods

15 mi


Bald Hill

Natural Area

West Hills Rd.

Harrison Blvd.

20

34

West Hills Rd.

20

Fairgrounds

Benton-Oaks

Campground

(summer only)

SW Campus Way

Dixon Creek

19th St.

53rd St.

34

35th St.

Oak Creek

Oregon State

University

15th St.

99W

Willamette River

Newton Creek

Applegate St.

5 mi

Bike Path

Starker Forests

Office

Country Club Dr.

Bike Path

Bike Path

Marys River

Avery

Park

0 mi

County Rd. 26440/Woods Creek Rd.

Old Peak Rd.

Corvallis Watershed

No Entry

Please stay on the road

Gate

Permit

Required

Old Peak Rd.

To Hwy 20

Woods

Creek

10 Miles

10 mi

Woods Creek

Old Peak Rd.

Marys River

20

Marys River

C2C Elevation

300 ft

Greasy Creek

34

Marys River

Grange

To Burnt Woods

Shot Pouch

Trail Rd.

Gate

Shot Pouch

Rd.

Shot

20 mi

Woods Creek Rd.

To Blodgett

Tum Tum

Big Elk Creek

Marys Peak Rd.

C2C Elevation

300 ft

25 mi

To Marys Peak

Gate

Sugar Bowl

Creek

Lincoln

Benton

Pouch

Creek

Mile

0 0.5

1

0 0.5 1

km

Scale: 1:36,000

Legend

Road

State/Federal Hwy

Main C2C Route (Road)

Main C2C Route (Trail)

Alternative C2C (Bike) Route

Stream/Creek/River

National Forest Land

Digital Elevation Basemap Data Credit:

Oregon Geospatial Enterprise Office

05/23/2017

Starker lands may be closed to public access.

Trail maps will be available at the opening ceremony

celebrations and at local merchants yet to be determined. Trail

merchandise will also be available on Saturday.

Chapman said the ceremony will be an important public

recognition of what has been accomplished. “There’ll be

heartfelt speeches, partners will be acknowledged and

volunteers thanked,” he said. “Ribbon cuttings, presentations,

light refreshments will be served. C2C Trail T-shirts, hats and

other great trail items will be offered, while supplies last. All

we need is for you to join us for all the fun.”

Visit C2CTrail.org for maps, updates on trail work, route

changes and to view permit requirements.

Above, this is the old map of the trail system. New maps will be available soon at C2CTrail.org

49


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