Conference Book - Fryske Akademy

fryske.akademy.nl

Conference Book - Fryske Akademy

Conference Book

13th International

Conference on Language and

Social Psychology (ICLASP)

20 - 23 June 2012

Leeuwarden

Fryslân

The Netherlands

2


CONTENTS

CONTENTS

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Multilingual speakers: proficiencies, practices and identities

Durk Gorter & Jasone Cenoz .......................................................................................... 16

Comprehending Conversational Utterances: Experimental Studies of the Comprehension

of Speaker Meaning

Thomas Holtgraves ......................................................................................................... 18

“French was wedged between the cobblestones and my flowered dress” The symbolic

world of multilinguals

Claire Kramsch ................................................................................................................ 19

Language Maintenance in/and Cyberspace: A wake up call for dormant bilinguals

Anne Pauwels .................................................................................................................. 20

Reclaiming, Protecting and Growing Minority Languages: A “Genuine” Community-Based

Approach

Donald M Taylor ............................................................................................................... 21

Making Contact? Verbal Play and Multilingual Display in Tourism

Crispin Thurlow and Adam Jaworski ............................................................................. 22

Communication Across Diverse Health Contexts: A Language and Social Psychology

Approach

Bernadette M Watson ...................................................................................................... 23

Intercultural traits and intercultural training

Karen van der Zee, Jan Pieter van Oudenhoven .......................................................... 24

SYMPOSIUM Multicultural Perspectives on Linguistic Landscapes

Multicultural Perspectives on Linguistic Landscapes

Durk Gorter and Jasone Ceñoz ...................................................................................... 25

The multilingual cityscape of Donostia/San Sebastián

Durk Gorter and Jasone Ceñoz ...................................................................................... 26

Legislating the linguistic landscape for competing language groups: A Quebec case study.

Richard Y. Bourhis .......................................................................................................... 27

3


Linguistic Landscapes: Studies of Languages in Societies

Olga Bever ........................................................................................................................ 28

SYMPOSIUM : Diversity in health communication research:

Perspectives on patients, carers and analyzing discourse

Introduction

Bernadette Watson .......................................................................................................... 29

Discursis, a Visual Discourse Analysis Technique.

Daniel Angus .................................................................................................................... 30

Visualizing Doctor and Patient Communication: Insights into Effective Doctor-Patient

Consultations

Daniel Angus .................................................................................................................... 31

Open Disclosure Analysis using Discursis

Bernadette Watson .......................................................................................................... 32

Visualising Conversations between People with Dementia and Residential Care Staff

Cindy Gallois .................................................................................................................... 33

Politeness in Adult Children‟s Conversation Openers with Parents about Later Life Health

Care

Margaret J. Pitts ............................................................................................................... 34

Does it matter who translates your feelings? The deaf person in therapy

Renata Meuter .................................................................................................................. 35

The role of patient willingness to communicate in the health care experience

Susan C. Baker ................................................................................................................ 36

Intentional or unintentional influence? How language use shapes medical treatment

decisions

Janice L. Krieger .............................................................................................................. 37

SYMPOSIUM: Pupils’ anxiety, self confidence, attitude and motivation to

speak a foreign language

Introduction

Jildou Popma, Mirjam Günther-van der Meij ................................................................. 38

Improving Self-confidence and English Speaking Performances through Multilingual

Education

Marrit Jansma .................................................................................................................. 39

4


Attitude and Motivation of Frisian and Basque Secondary School Pupils towards learning

English

Truus de Vries .................................................................................................................. 40

“I don‟t dare speaking this language”: Applicability of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy on

Anxiety to use a Foreign Language

Rob Faltin ......................................................................................................................... 41

SYMPOSIUM: Language effects: cognitive, evaluative and identity

impacts

Introduction

Richard Clément .............................................................................................................. 42

Investigating language, ethnicity and space in Flanders: indexicality and space perception

Evy Ceuleers .................................................................................................................... 43

Disentangling the LIB from the LEB: The Unexpected Role of Social Judgement and

Social Norms

Katherine A. Collins ......................................................................................................... 44

Bilingualism in minority French Canadians: Assimilation or fusion?

Nathalie Freynet ............................................................................................................... 45

SYMPOSIUM: Extracting lexical retrieval information from word

association data: A users’ guide

Extracting lexical retrieval information from word association data: A users‟ guide

Tess Fitzpatrick ............................................................................................................... 46

Lexical retrieval and age

David Playfoot .................................................................................................................. 47

Lexical retrieval and cognition

Cristina Izura .................................................................................................................... 48

Lexical Retrieval in Semantic Dementia

Jeremy Tree ..................................................................................................................... 49

SYMPOSIUM: How can Caretakers Influence Children’s Multilingual

Language Development?

Introduction

Mirjam Günther-van der Meij .......................................................................................... 50

5


Parental Beliefs of Bilingual Antillean Mothers: Stability of the Construct and Comparison

with Monolingual Dutch Group

Nienke Boomstra ............................................................................................................. 52

Early Multilingual Transmission and Learning from the Perspective of European Regional

and Minority Language Communities

Idske Bangma .................................................................................................................. 53

Motivations and attitudes of stakeholders in bilingual kindergarten programs: prestige vs.

migrant languages

Katarina Wagner (presenter 1) 1 , Astrid Rothe ............................................................... 54

SYMPOSIUM: Bicultural identities and language attitudes and use

Bicultural identities and language attitudes and use

Kimberly A. Noels ............................................................................................................ 56

Building a bilingual profile: A bi-dimensional approach

Sinthujaa Sampasivam .................................................................................................... 57

How to be a Franco-Albertan without Speaking French: Ethnolinguistic Vitality, Sense of

Community, and Bicultural Identity in a Minority Language Group

Kimberly A. Noels ............................................................................................................ 58

European identity and attitudes to multilingualism in three contexts

Ruxandra-Silvia Comanaru ............................................................................................. 59

SYMPOSIUM: Context of Language Attitudes

Explicit and implicit answers to the question why non-standard speakers are warmer than

standard speakers

Christiane Schoel ............................................................................................................ 61

“To speak or not to speak?” Expectancy violations and the interplay of accent and

appearance in impression formation

Karolina Hansen .............................................................................................................. 62

The “Affect Behavior Cognition” of accent perception – On the role of negative affect in the

perception and evaluation of accented speakers in persuasion

Janin Roessel .................................................................................................................. 63

Gender in style. On the influence of gender and speech style on speaker evaluation

Tamara Rakić ................................................................................................................... 64

Panel for "Language and Tourism"Task Force

6


IALSP Task Force Language and Tourism

Crispin Thurlow and Adam Jaworski ............................................................................. 65

Talking about Tourism and Touring Around Its Talk: An Intergroup Communication

Accommodation Perspective

Heritage and authenticity in tourism

Linguistic commodification in tourism

Tourism, multilingualism and minority language spaces

Performing tourist in travel spaces

SYMPOSIUM: ‘Travelling to learn’: New conceptual, temporal and

thematic perspectives on the ‘international’ student experience

Introduction

Tony Young ...................................................................................................................... 72

From the decision to study abroad to the arrival in the host country: Exploring the role of

pre-arrival factors in the international student experience

Alina Schartner ................................................................................................................ 73

Home is no longer far away for international students: Communication and support from

family and friends „back home‟

Sik hung Ng ...................................................................................................................... 74

A Model of International Students‟ Adjustment to Life and Study in Higher Education in the

UK

Tony Young ...................................................................................................................... 75

Cross-Sectional and Time Sequential Analysis of Re-entry Narratives from US Student

Sojourners

Margaret Jane Pitts.......................................................................................................... 76

SYMPOSIUM sponsored by the Asian Association of Social Psychology

(AASP)

How do Aussies Respond to the Use of Australian Slang by the Cultural Newcomers?

Emiko Kashima ................................................................................................................ 77

Relational Stress in a Hierarchic Society: The case of Korea

Gyuseog Han ................................................................................................................... 78

The Perception of Linguistic Distance from Ingroup and Outgroup Members is Calibrated

to the Costs of Infection Risk

7


Scott A. Reid .................................................................................................................... 79

Mother/Daughter-In-Law Conflicts: Retrospective Accounts by Taiwanese Daughters-inlaw

Yan Bing Zhang ............................................................................................................... 80

Language and Culture: Can the Priming of a Linguistic Practice Affect Holistic and Analytic

Cognitive Style?

Yoshihisa Kashima .......................................................................................................... 81

Which is More Important in Trust Decisions, an Intermediary or Shared Group

Membership? A comparison between Chinese and Australians

Jiawen Ye ......................................................................................................................... 82

Cultural Knowledge and Interpersonal Relationship as Bases of Cultural Identification

Ching Wan ........................................................................................................................ 83

Acculturation Strategies, Social Support, and Cross-Cultural Adaptation among Mainland

Chinese University Students in Hong Kong

Ting Kin Ng ...................................................................................................................... 84

INDIVIDUAL PAPERS

Language Use, Sign Intent, and Health Access: Linguistic Landscape of San Antonio‟s

Public Transit System

Donald N. Allison ............................................................................................................. 85

Establishing New Norms of Language Use in the Home; how is family language policy

renegotiated as both parents and children learn a second language?

Timothy Currie Armstrong .............................................................................................. 86

Qualitative Word production analysis of Native speakers and Second language learners‟

by phonemic and categorical Verbal Fluency Test

Keiko Asano ..................................................................................................................... 87

The influence of printed media on the construction of Hezbollah‟s representations

Pascale Asmar ................................................................................................................. 88

When using of linguistic abstraction leads to a speaker being seen as a good member:

Examining the linguistic intergroup bias from a normative perspective

Yvette Assilaméhou ......................................................................................................... 89

Incorporating World Englishes into a Teacher Education Course

Burcu Ates ....................................................................................................................... 90

The boundaries of a word: dialectical meanings in the term barebacking

8


Rubén Ávila ...................................................................................................................... 91

Timing Control of Japanese Speech and Temporal Fluctuation of Music Performance

Junichi Azuma ................................................................................................................. 93

Necessity of Universal Symbolic Language for Disaster Alert and Warning

Junichi Azuma ................................................................................................................. 94

How do I Say it? The Relationship Between Impression Management Concerns and

Advice Seeking Behavior for Message Construction in Social Predicaments

Krystyna Aune ................................................................................................................. 95

Being victim of Linguicism in Québec and Canada

Richard Y. Bourhis 1 ......................................................................................................... 96

“Our Languages re-visited: presentation of new research into the evolving attitudes of

young Londoners to issues of language and identity”

Sarah Cartwright .............................................................................................................. 97

Presence, role and value of crossborder contacts and meaningful relationships

development in neighbouring language classroom. The case of mainstream primary

schools of the Littoral zone of Slovenian-Italian border.

Irina Moira Cavaion.......................................................................................................... 98

A cross-cultural comparison of apologies by native speakers of American and Chinese

Yuh-Fang Chang .............................................................................................................. 99

The war on language: A content analysis of how modern U.S. presidents have used “war”

as a metaphor in political addresses

Sarah Chenoweth .......................................................................................................... 100

Building Blocks of Identities in The EFL Classroom: Frames And Footings

Hatice Çubukçu ............................................................................................................. 101

Cultural Bias in Language Assessment: English as a French examination

Martine Derivry .............................................................................................................. 103

Parental reading attitudes versus the child‟s bilingual vocabulary growth

Jelske Dijkstra ............................................................................................................... 105

The On-going Changes in Turkish as a Minority Language in the Netherlands

A. Seza Doğruöz ............................................................................................................ 106

Native brittophones and the néo-bretonnants: constructions of the linguistic identity

Nicole Dolowy-Rybinska ............................................................................................... 107

9


Does Radon Gas Kill or Do People Lose Their Life to It? Effects of Linguistic Agency

Assignment in Health Messages

Marko Dragojevic ........................................................................................................... 108

The potential contributory role of Critical Welsh Language Awareness Training in

transforming civil society and the development of post-colonial identity in Wales

Steve Eaves .................................................................................................................... 110

Language attitudes of young Estonians in 2003 and 2012

Martin Ehala ................................................................................................................... 111

Language Technology for Multilingual Automatized Content Analysis in Group Research

Bea Ehmann ................................................................................................................... 112

An Artistic View on Onomatopoeia

Ingeborg Entrop ............................................................................................................. 114

Mentalization and interaction analysis. Integrating language and psychology.

Christina Fogtmann Fosgerau ...................................................................................... 115

Side effects of gender-fair language

Magdalena Formanowicz .............................................................................................. 117

Study of verbal communication of improvised music

Lara Frisch ..................................................................................................................... 118

“I Was Impolite to Her Because That‟s How She Was to Me”: Effects of Attributions of

Motive on Responses to Non-Accommodation

Jessica Gasiorek ........................................................................................................... 120

The implications of accented speech and cultural representations: When implicit and

explicit attitudes affect real‐life choices

Sabrina Goh ................................................................................................................... 121

The Use of Information Technology for the Safeguarding and Teaching of Siberian

Languages

Tjeerd de Graaf .............................................................................................................. 122

Where fiction becomes reality: A narrative of language learning motivation

Lou Harvey ..................................................................................................................... 124

Standardised Language and Regional Dialect Levelling

Nanna Haug Hilton......................................................................................................... 125

10


The Lost Generation: Regaining the mother tongue for their children- Parental Incentives

and Welsh-medium Education in the Rhymni Valley, south Wales.

Rhian Siân Hodges ........................................................................................................ 126

Easy to opt-in, hard to opt-out: A comparison of subscription and unsubscription messages

in e-mails and websites

Brian W. Horton ............................................................................................................. 127

Communication of and about spiritual/religious identity in the workplace

Brian W. Horton ............................................................................................................. 128

Hidden Ukrainian minorities in the South-West Russia.

Nadja Iskoussova .......................................................................................................... 129

Ethnic and Sex Bias in Televised Non-Verbal Behaviors?

Lucy Johnston ............................................................................................................... 130

History of intergroup communication

Liz Jones ........................................................................................................................ 132

Language policy, language strategy and multilingualism

René J. Jorna ................................................................................................................. 133

A diachronic perspective on language prestige and language attitudes in Catalan and

Occitan

Aurélie Joubert .............................................................................................................. 134

An Investigation children‟s responses to unanswerable questions

Claire Keogh .................................................................................................................. 135

Legal language Manipulation in War and Peace Contexts: The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict .

Rajai Khanji .................................................................................................................... 136

Forming impressions of others from the nonverbal gestures they use while speaking

different languages

Jeanette King ................................................................................................................. 137

Māori language revitalisation: new generation, different motivators?

Jeanette King ................................................................................................................. 138

Language attitudes and social identities in Montreal: a contemporary perspective

Ruth Kircher ................................................................................................................... 139

Exploring the narrative organization of social identity category related experiences

11


Tibor Pólya ..................................................................................................................... 140

Do Men have a lot to Bitch about? Analysing the Language of Metrosexuals

Mohd Khushairi Bin Tohiar ........................................................................................... 142

Language policy of the European Union - Cementing the minority language status?

Láncos Petra Lea ........................................................................................................... 143

The project on Nomadic Education in the Yamal-Nenets Autonomous District

Roza Laptander .............................................................................................................. 144

The effectiveness of apologies and thanks in favor asking messages: A cross-cultural

comparison between Korea and the United States

Hye Eun Lee ................................................................................................................... 146

Types of Prototype Descriptions about Support Group Attendees Elicited by Women with

Breast Cancer

Legg, M. .......................................................................................................................... 147

Port worker‟s retirement experience, language use and intergroup relations

Laura Camara Lima ....................................................................................................... 148

The acquisition of the Irish language by pupils in Irish-medium schools in Belfast

Dr Seán Mac Corraidh ................................................................................................... 150

Importance of contextual biases in argumentation processing

Jens Koed Madsen ........................................................................................................ 151

Learning relativity: creating knowledge in the cosmic world

Arthur Brogden Male ..................................................................................................... 153

Role of Intergroup Contact and Friendship in Learning and Speaking a Minority Language

Enikő Marton .................................................................................................................. 155

Semi-automated content similarity analysis as an innovative approach to examining

attitudes: the case lay explanations for the 2011 London Riots

Eric Mayor ...................................................................................................................... 157

Preventing prostate cancer through early detection: The importance of understanding how

men integrate information about prostate cancer into judgements about risk and screening

McDowell, ME ................................................................................................................. 158

Constructing masculinities: A discourse analysis of the accounts of single-at-midlife

women

Jennifer A. Moore .......................................................................................................... 159

12


Spanish scholars‟ perceived difficulties writing research articles for publication in Englishmedium

journals: the impact of language proficiency versus publication experience.

Ana I. Moreno ................................................................................................................. 160

Conversation table as an environment for (re)signification of subjectivity and identities in

Portuguese as a Foreign Language

Ricardo Moutinho .......................................................................................................... 161

What motivates men to participate in PSA testing? The appeal of information.

Occhipinti, S ................................................................................................................... 162

Insights into the Social Psychology of Ethnolinguistic Decay

Conchúr Ó Giollagáin .................................................................................................... 163

Sharing responsibility after error occurrence? The effect of group membership on

intergroup communication about errors

Annemiek van Os........................................................................................................... 164

The effect of out-of-school exposure on children‟s foreign language learning

Liv Persson .................................................................................................................... 165

« You really don‟t sound like us » Effect of proper names on listener expectations

Alexei Prikhodkine......................................................................................................... 166

Separation and Connection: A Discourse Analysis of Young Men‟s Talk about Their

Mothers

H. Lorraine Radtke ......................................................................................................... 167

Urban Multingualism and Language Attitudes in Lithuania

Meilutė Ramonienė ........................................................................................................ 168

Sports fan identity and basking in reflected glory: a content analysis of pronominal usage

and expressions of emotion by social networking users

George B. Ray ................................................................................................................ 169

Trilingual primary and secondary education in Friesland: developments and challenges

Alex M.J. Riemersma ..................................................................................................... 170

Research on identity issues by using a combined social theoretical approach in a case

study of adult female migrants learning English in the U.K.‟

Luz Alma Rodriguez-Tsuda .......................................................................................... 172

Spanish Researchers Publishing in English-medium Scientific Journals: attitudes and

motivations across disciplinary areas

13


Itesh Sachdev ................................................................................................................ 174

Pronouns, Address Forms and Politeness Strategies in Odia

Kalyanamalini Sahoo ..................................................................................................... 175

Fostering Multilingualism through (Public) Bilingual Education in Spain: Projects,

Prospects... and Complications!

Ignacio Gregorio Sales .................................................................................................. 176

Reporting on the 2009 „Burqa Ban‟: Deconstructing Ideology

Nadia Sarkhoh ............................................................................................................... 177

Transnational comparability of degree programmes: Global policy and local practices

Dr. Carole Sedgwick ...................................................................................................... 178

Communication in neonatal nurseries: Differences in attributions and perceived support for

adult and adolescent mothers.

Nicola Sheeran ............................................................................................................... 179

How the doc should (not) talk: When breaking bad news with negations influences

patients' immediate responses and medical adherence intentions

Lisa Sparks .................................................................................................................... 180

The Effects of Language Attitudes on Semantic Processing: An Implicit Approach

Stewart, C.M ................................................................................................................... 182

Formulations in e-mental health chat sessions

Wyke Stommel ............................................................................................................... 183

Language management in context of social psychology

Karolina Suchowolec .................................................................................................... 184

The effects of identification with one‟s national in-group on implicit linguistic biases in an

inter-ethnic context

Zsolt Peter Szabo........................................................................................................... 186

Gender-specific implicature comprehension and donation behavior in bilingual social

marketing campaigns

Dieter Thoma .................................................................................................................. 187

Verka Serduchka as carnivalesque heteroglossia in post-Soviet Ukraine

Alla V. Tovares ............................................................................................................... 188

Dream Denied: Undocumented Mexican youths and the U.S. DREAM Act

Raúl Tovares .................................................................................................................. 189

14


Language attitudes among youngsters in Barcelona and Valencia

Anna Tudela Isanta ........................................................................................................ 190

Exploring the role of amount and type of exposure in bilingual acquisition

Sharon Unsworth ........................................................................................................... 191

Naming and referring: Doctors‟ and patients‟ use of medical vocabulary

Stavroula Varella ........................................................................................................... 192

Poles and Russians in Lithuania: Some Tendencies of Use and Proficiency of Mother

Tongues and State Language

Loreta Vilkienė ............................................................................................................... 193

Ethnolinguistic Identity and Television Use in a Minority Language Setting

László Vincze ................................................................................................................. 194

Implying lesbian identity in everyday interaction

Rowena Viney ................................................................................................................ 195

Ethnic Minority, Heritage Tourism and Authenticity: Reinventing Tujia in China

Xuan Wang ..................................................................................................................... 196

Teachers‟ views on Putonghua Education in Hong Kong

Yang Ruowei, Robin ...................................................................................................... 197

Attitudes towards multilingual signs in biethnic Tallinn

Anastassia Zabrodskaja ................................................................................................ 198

Gender difference in secondary school graduates‟ views on Putonghua education in Hong

Kong

Zhang, Bennan ............................................................................................................... 199

European Americans‟ Cultural Orientations and Intergenerational Conflict Management

Styles: The Indirect Effects of Filial Obligations

Yan Bing Zhang ............................................................................................................. 200

Negotiating Masculine Identities Within Group Therapy For Men Victims of Abuse

Michaela Zverina ............................................................................................................ 201

15


Title

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Multilingual speakers: proficiencies, practices and identities

Durk Gorter & Jasone Cenoz DATE: WED 20.06

University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) TIME: 18.00-18.45

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

16

ROOM: New York 1&2

Durk Gorter is Ikerbasque research professor at the Faculty of Education of the University of the

Basque Country UPV/EHU, Donostia-San Sebastián, Spain. Nowadays he does research on

multilingual education, European minority languages and linguistic landscapes.

From 1979 to 2007 he was a researcher in the sociology of language and

head of the department of social sciences at the Fryske Akademy in

Ljouwert/Leeuwarden, The Netherlands. From 1994 until 2008 he was

also part-time full professor at the University of Amsterdam in the

sociolinguistics of Frisian. He has been involved in sociolinguistic survey

studies of the Frisian language situation and the analysis of language

policy. He also did comparative work on European minority languages, in

particular in education in the context of the Mercator-Education project.

Among his recent publications are Focus on Multilingualism in School Contexts (2011, co-edited

with Jasone Cenoz as a special issue of the Modern Language Journal) and Minority Languages in

the Linguistic Landscape (2012, co-edited with Heiko Marten and Luk Van Mensel). He is the

leader of DREAM, the Donostia Research Group on Education and Multilingualism.

Further information on: www.ikerbasque.net/durk.gorter and http://multilingualeducation.eu/en/

Jasone Cenoz is Professor of Research Methods in Education at the University

of the Basque Country. Her research focuses on multilingual education,

bilingualism and multilingualism combining psycholinguistic, social psychological,

sociolinguistic and educational perspectives. Her most recent book is Towards

Multilingual Education (Multilingual Matters, 2009) got the Spanish Association

of Applied Linguistics 2010 award. She has published extensively on

multilingualism and multilingual education including the special issue of the

Modern Language Journal Focus on Multilingualism in School Contexts (2011,

co-edited with Durk Gorter). She is the coordinator of the European Master in

Multilingualism and Education (EMME) at the University of the Basque Country.

She is the vice-president of the International Association of Multilingualism (IAM) and has served on

the boards of the International Association of Applied Linguistics (AILA) and the International

Association for the Study of Child Language (IASCL). She is currently working on ―Focus on


Multilingualism‖ a research approach that looks at multilingual speakers and the interaction of the

languages they learn and use rather than each language in isolation.

ABSTRACT

Globalisation goes hand in hand with an increasing use of English and the spread of

multilingualism, even though the number of languages worldwide is diminishing.

In our ―Focus on Multilingualism‖ approach we distinguish between the speakers, all the languages

in their repertoire and the social context. We want to leave the traditional monolingual perspectives

and move towards a holistic perspective on multilingualism.

In this keynote address we will concentrate on multilingual speakers and their

characteristics as a group. We will consider multilingual speakers in their own right. We will look

into the issue of their competences in different languages and analyze how these proficiencies can

be assessed. We will relate this to the use of more than one language in daily life and demonstrate

how language practices shape different multilingual patterns such as codeswitching, receptive

multilingualism and the use of English as a lingua franca. Important questions concern the identity

of multilinguals and the way they see themselves or how they are perceived by others. We discuss

if multilinguals can be treated as a group and whether or not they behave as such.

Most of our research takes place in the Basque Country in Spain. This is a dynamic society

where language relationships have fundamentally changed over the past 30 years. The Basque

language was severely endangered, but has been revived in education, old and new media,

government and other social fields. Spanish is still the dominant language in society, but also

English is gradually expanding, as well as other foreign languages. At some points we can

compare with the situation in the province of Friesland, The Netherlands and some other regions

where a minority language is spoken in Europe.

17


Title

Comprehending Conversational Utterances: Experimental Studies of the Comprehension of

Speaker Meaning

Thomas Holtgraves DATE: SAT 23.06

Department of Psychological Science, Ball State University TIME: 08.45-09.30

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

18

ROOM: New York 1&2

Thomas Holtgraves is a professor of Psychological Science at Ball State

University. His primary research program examines the social-cognitive

underpinnings of language production and comprehension. Recently he has

extended his language research into the applied and neurological realms by

studying pragmatic language comprehension in people with Parkinson‘s

disease and the lateralization of speaker meaning. This research program has

been of interest to scholars working within a variety of disciplines and has

helped foster cross-disciplinary awareness of the social psychological aspects

of language use. His research has been supported by the National Science

Foundation and National Institute of Health, and he is the author of Language

as social action: Social psychology and language use (Erlbaum, 2001), as well as a chapter

on language for the fifth edition of the Handbook of social psychology (Fiske, Gilbert, & Lindzey,

2010). Currently, he is editing the Handbook of language and social psychology for Oxford

University Press.

ABSTRACT

In this talk I provide an overview of studies conducted in my lab examining the social, cognitive,

and neuropsychological processes involved in the comprehension of speaker meaning.

Experimental studies of language processing typically examine the comprehension of isolated

sentences. Conversation utterances, on the other hand, take place in an interpersonal,

interactive context and these interpersonal processes should play a role in their comprehension.

The goal of my research has been to examine experimentally how this occurs. I assume that

conversations are demanding and that interactants will frequently generate a quick

interpretation of a speaker‘s intention. In my research I have focused on both conversational

implicatures , and the comprehension of illocutionary force (or speech act recognition). Our

research has demonstrated that the recognition of illocutionary force is an important and

automatic component of conversation comprehension. In terms of conversational implicatures,

we have demonstrated that face management can play a critical role in the interpretation of

certain types of remarks (e.g., indirect replies), and that a Gricean inference process is involved

in the comprehension of these utterances. In terms of neuropsychological processes, our

studies with Parkinson‘s Disease participants point to the important role played by executive

function in both speech act recognition and the generation of conversational implicatures. Our

research using a split screen procedure suggests that the Right Hemisphere (RH) plays an

important, initial role in speech act processing, a result that helps explain why people with

damage to their right hemisphere are sometimes deficient in pragmatic processing.


Title

“French was wedged between the cobblestones and my flowered dress”

The symbolic world of multilinguals

Claire Kramsch DATE: THU 21.06

UC Berkeley TIME: 08.45-09.30

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

19

ROOM: NEW YORK 1&2

Claire Kramsch is Professor of German and Affiliate Professor of Education at UC Berkeley, and

the former Director of the Berkeley Language Center, which she founded in 1994. She teaches

second language acquisition and applied linguistics and directs PhD

dissertations in the German Department and in the Graduate School of

Education. She is the past president of the American Association of Applied

Linguistics and the past editor of the international journal Applied Linguistics.

Over the last thirty years, she has been active in foreign language teacher

development and has written extensively on language, discourse, and culture

in applied linguistics. In 1998, Prof. Kramsch received the Goethe Medal from

the Goethe Institute in Weimar for her contributions to cross-cultural

understanding between the United States and Europe. In 2002, she received

the Distinguished Service Award from the American Modern Language

Association as well as the Faculty Distinguished Teaching Award from UC

Berkeley. She is the 2007 recipient of the Distinguished Scholarship and

Service Award of the American Association for Applied Linguistics. Prof.

Kramsch is the author of several books including Discourse Analysis and Second Language

Teaching (1981), Language and Culture (1998), Context and Culture in Language Teaching (1993)

and The Multilingual Subject (2009). These last two publications received the Mildenberger Prize

from the MLA. She is the editor of Redrawing the Boundaries of Language Study (Heinle 1995)

and Language Acquisition and Language Socialization. Ecological Perspectives (Continuum 2002).

ABSTRACT

Many adults, remembering their struggles with irregular verbs, unpronounceable ‗r‘s, and

impossible grammar rules, cannot imagine that learning a foreign language has anything to do with

emotions other than anger and frustration and the fear of making a fool of yourself. And yet

adolescent language learners, when asked to describe their language learning experience, often

seem to have a very intimate, affective relationship to the language, which they seem to imbue

with their innermost yearnings and aspirations.

What is it in the acquisition of a new symbolic system that can trigger such intense feelings of

attraction or repulsion? While second language acquisition research has focused mainly on the

cognitive and the social communicative aspects of acquisition, it has largely neglected the

emotional domain that is so prominent in research on bilingualism. This paper shows that the

emotional impact of learning another language, even in educational settings, holds aesthetic,

cultural and political promise and is a force to be reckoned with.


Title

Language Maintenance in/and Cyberspace: A wake up call for dormant bilinguals

Anne Pauwels DATE: THU 21.06

University of London TIME: 17.15-18.00

20

ROOM: NEW YORK 1&2

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Anne Pauwels is Professor of Sociolinguistics and Dean of Languages and Cultures at the School

of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Her research over the past thirty years has

focused on immigrant multilingualism with specific reference to Australia, language and gender

and language policies in higher education. Her more recent books include Language and

Communication: Diversity and Change (with M.Hellinger), Boys and language learning (with J.

Carr) and Maintaining minority languages in transnational contexts (with J.Winter & J. Lo Bianco).

ABSTRACT

Advanced transport systems and communication technologies have had a profound impact on how

we live our lives including how we communicate with each other. Constraints on travelling and

communications across vast distances have been largely lifted thanks to increased virtual mobility.

These developments have not bypassed language scholars. There is now a vast and ever growing

body of research examining ‗language and/on the internet‘, on the use of communication

technologies in language learning and more recently, on the impact of such communication

advances on language revitalization and language maintenance. Perhaps least developed is the

latter area: the role and impact of new communication technologies on language maintenance in

situations of unstable (dynamic) bi-and multilingualism. In this presentation I shall build upon the

findings of earlier research projects to examine the role and impact of new communication modes

and technologies on the language use patterns and practices of a group of second generation

Australians, i.e. Dutch-Australians. This group is characterized by low ethnolinguistic vitality with

very high levels of language shift (around 90%). Yet members of this group have expressed

renewed interest in the language and culture(s) linked to their parental heritage although they have

shown little support for existing language maintenance ‗institutions‘ and initiatives (e.g., Dutch

language classes, Dutch local media, Dutch social clubs). This makes them an interesting group

in which to examine the impact of new modes of communication on bilingual practices. Here the

focus will be on (1) establishing their awareness and knowledge of the availability of

communication technologies and resources that could support language maintenance or continued

bilingualism, (2) examining their use of such technologies and resources, and (3) establishing the

impact this has on their continued bilingualism.


Title

Reclaiming, Protecting and Growing Minority Languages:

A “Genuine” Community-Based Approach

Donald M Taylor DATE: FRI 22.06

McGill University TIME: 08.45-09.30

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

21

ROOM: NEW YORK 1&2

Donald M. Taylor is professor of Psychology at McGill University, Montreal. He has conducted

research in a variety of cultural and minority language settings including South Africa, Indonesia,

Philippines, India and innercity Detroit and Miami. By far his longest term

commitment has been with Aboriginal peoples with a special focus on the

Inuit of Arctic Quebec (Nunavik). His most recent book is entitled ―The

Quest for Identity‖ and is published by Praeger.

ABSTRACT

The ethics that surround conducting research and theory driven interventions in minority

communities are formulated to make researchers appear entirely respectful. The problem is that

what is now labeled ―community-based‖ research is not addressing the real issues. Using minority

languages under threat as an example, a ―genuine‖ community-based model will be presented.


Title

Making Contact? Verbal Play and Multilingual Display in Tourism

Crispin Thurlow 1 and Adam Jaworski 2 DATE: THU 21.06

1 School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the

University of Washington, 2 Centre for Language and

Communication Research, Cardiff University, Wales, UK

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

22

TIME: 11.30-12.15

ROOM: NEW YORK 1&2

Crispin Thurlow is Associate Professor in the School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the

University of Washington where he also holds adjunct appointments in

Linguistics, Anthropology and Communication. Two of Crispin‘s recent books

are Digital Discourse: Language in the New Media (2011, Oxford) and, with

Adam Jaworski, Tourism Discourse: Language and Global Mobility (2010,

Palgrave). In 2007, Crispin received the University of Washington‘s

Distinguished Teaching Award. His website is at:

faculty.washington.edu/thurlow/.

Adam Jaworski is Professor at the Centre for Language and Communication

Research, Cardiff University, Wales, UK (until July 2012). In August 2012 he is taking up the post

of Professor at The School of English, University of Hong Kong. His books include The Power of

Silence (Sage), Discourse, Communication and Tourism (with

Annette Pritchard, Channel View) and The New

Sociolinguistics Reader (with Nikolas Coupland, Palgrave

Macmillan). He is co-editor of the book series Oxford Studies

in Sociolinguistics (OUP).

ABSTRACT

Described as ‗one of the greatest population movements of all time‘, tourism is firmly established

as a truly global cultural industry. And it‘s not just people who are on tour; language too is on the

move. In this talk, we will examine a number of ways that we find language/s being taken up in

tourism‘s search for difference, exoticity and authenticity. Specifically, we will present a series of

common touristic genres (spoken and written) in which languages (local and global) are

recontextualized, stylized and commodified for servicing the ideology of cosmopolitanism at the

heart of tourism. These often playful productions (or stagings) of language are usually

characterized by a highly ritualized, fleeting kind of intercultural contact which involves tourists

being exposed to or using isolated words and linguistic formulae. This is undoubtedly a meaningful

form of contact between tourists and hosts, but it is unlikely to be the kind of long-lasting,

transformative contact to which social psychologist have long aspired. In fact, the ―sociolinguistics

of tourism‖ reveals the kind of banal globalization that structures the ways many people learn what

it means to be ‗global citizens‘.


Title

Communication Across Diverse Health Contexts: A Language and Social Psychology

Approach

Bernadette M Watson DATE: FRI 22.06

School of Psychology, The University of Queensland TIME: 15.30-16.15

23

ROOM: ON BOARD

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Bernadette Watson (PhD Queensland) is a senior lecturer in psychology at The University of

Queensland. As a health psychologist her research focuses on the interpersonal and intergroup

communication dynamics that exist between health professionals and their patients in the health

setting. She investigates how a person‘s role or professional identity in clinical settings influences

his or her communication behaviours with members of multidisciplinary teams and patients and

how these behaviours reflect effective or ineffective communication.

ABSTRACT

In this talk I discuss my health communication research over the past ten years in. I describe my

key findings on interactions between different types of health professionals and patients and

specifically what they each define as effective communication. I look at what is most important for

different health professionals in patient consultations and conversely examine what acute and

chronic patients feel are the important features of a good interaction with a health professional. I

focus on the challenging situations where a health professional has to disclose to a patient an

adverse outcome. How is this difficult encounter managed well and what does that mean for the

patient and the health professional? I expand on work my colleagues and I have been conducting

in the hospital environment around the clinical handover of patient care. All these important health

contexts can be understood from a language and social psychology perspective that bring to life

the communication dynamics and interplay of the various health professional and patient

identities. I conclude with my research directions for the next decade.


Title

Intercultural traits and intercultural training

Karen van der Zee 1 , Jan Pieter van Oudenhoven 2 DATE: SAT 23.06

1 University of Twente, 2 University of Groningen TIME: 12.45-13.30

24

ROOM: NEW YORK 1&2

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Karen van der Zee, is Dean of the Faculty of Behavioral Sciences at the University of Twente

and Professor of Organizational Psychology, Cultural Diversity and Integration at the University of

Groningen. Her research focuses on cultural diversity in organisations and determinants of

successful secondment of employees to countries abroad. She authored and co-authored many

articles in top-ranking international journals. She also is a member of the Supervisory Council of

the University Campus Fryslan.

ABSTRACT

The world has increasingly become a place where people from different cultures meet. Some

individuals appear to be better in having constructive intercultural contacts than others. William

Gudykunst spent much of research to studying the behavior of a stranger adjusting to a new

culture, as well as in examining how individuals communicate with strangers and often accurately

predict their behavior. He has been a great example for us. On the basis of the literature and

research we found a long list of relevant traits, which we could summarize into five key traits:

Open-mindedness, Cultural Empathy, Social Initiative, Emotional Stability and Flexibility. People

scoring high in the first three traits (the social-perceptual traits) see cultural diversity as a

challenge; people scoring high in Emotional Stability and Flexibility (the stress buffering traits) do

not easily feel threatened by cultural differences. The traits may be measured by the Multicultural

Personality Questionnaire, an instrument that has been proven to be reliable, valid, and applicable

in many different cultures. Interestingly, two intercultural traits, open-mindedness and cultural

empathy, are predictors of foreign language acquisition. As another product of this intercultural trait

approach traits an audiovisual intercultural training, the Intercultural Effectiveness Training, has

been developed. This training focuses on the three social perceptual traits (open-mindedness,

cultural empathy, social initiative), because they are particularly apt to be trained in role playing

and social exercises.


Title

SYMPOSIUM Multicultural Perspectives on

Linguistic Landscapes

Durk Gorter and Jasone Ceñoz (Co-presenting)

Multicultural Perspectives on Linguistic Landscapes

Richard Y. Bourhis (presenter) and Rana Sioufi (co-author)

Olga Bever (presenter)

25

DATE: THU 21.06

TIME: 09.30-11.10

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

ABSTRACT

This panel brings together four scholars from around the world who have devoted a significant

amount of attention to the study of Linguistic Landscapes. In this panel, they will present current

research, challenges, and opportunities for the study of linguistic landscapes in a globalized era.

Cumulatively, their data derive from several international scenes where physical, social borders,

and identity borders are in flux. Presenters consider Basque language in Spain, Quebecois in

Canada, and Ukrainian and Russian in post-soviet Ukraine as they are all juxtaposed to dominant

languages in the area (i.e., Spanish, English).


Title

The multilingual cityscape of Donostia/San Sebastián

Durk Gorter and Jasone Ceñoz DATE: THU 21.06

University of the Basque Country in Donostia - San Sebastián TIME: 9.30-11.10

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Durk Gorter is Ikerbasque research professor at the Faculty of Education of the University of the

Basque Country UPV/EHU, Donostia-San Sebastián, Spain. Nowadays he does research on

multilingual education, European minority languages and linguistic landscapes.

From 1979 to 2007 he was a researcher in the sociology of language and head of the department

of social sciences at the Fryske Akademy in Ljouwert/Leeuwarden, The Netherlands. From 1994

until 2008 he was also part-time full professor at the University of Amsterdam in the sociolinguistics

of Frisian. He has been involved in sociolinguistic survey studies of the Frisian language situation

and the analysis of language policy. He also did comparative work on European minority

languages, in particular in education in the context of the Mercator-Education project. Among his

recent publications are Focus on Multilingualism in School Contexts (2011, co-edited with Jasone

Cenoz as a special issue of the Modern Language Journal) and Minority Languages in the

Linguistic Landscape (2012, co-edited with Heiko Marten and Luk Van Mensel). He is the leader

of DREAM, the Donostia Research Group on Education and Multilingualism.

Further information on: www.ikerbasque.net/durk.gorter and http://multilingualeducation.eu/en/

Jasone Cenoz is Professor of Research Methods in Education at the University of the Basque

Country. Her research focuses on multilingual education, bilingualism and multilingualism

combining psycholinguistic, social psychological, sociolinguistic and educational perspectives. Her

most recent book is Towards Multilingual Education (Multilingual Matters, 2009) got the Spanish

Association of Applied Linguistics 2010 award. She has published extensively on multilingualism

and multilingual education including the special issue of the Modern Language Journal Focus on

Multilingualism in School Contexts (2011, co-edited with Durk Gorter). She is the coordinator of the

European Master in Multilingualism and Education (EMME) at the University of the Basque

Country. She is the vice-president of the International Association of Multilingualism (IAM) and has

served on the boards of the International Association of Applied Linguistics (AILA) and the

International Association for the Study of Child Language (IASCL). She is currently working on

―Focus on Multilingualism‖ a research approach that looks at multilingual speakers and the

interaction of the languages they learn and use rather than each language in isolation.

ABSTRACT

In our research we investigate the interaction between the different languages on display in the

public space. On the one hand the two official languages in the Basque Autonomous Community:

Basque as the minority language and Spanish as the majority language. On the other hand,

English as the global language along with other languages. These languages are allocated in

various ways on and across the signs which can provide insights about the strategies and

practices of various actors who shape the multilingual cityscape.

26


Title

Legislating the linguistic landscape for competing language groups: A Quebec case study.

Richard Y. Bourhis (presenter) and Rana Sioufi DATE: THU 21.06

Département de psychologie Université du Québec à Montréal,

Canada

27

TIME: 09.30-11.10

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Richard Y. Bourhis was educated in the French and English school system in Montreal, obtained

a BSc in Psychology at McGill University, Canada, and a PhD (1977) in Social Psychology at the

University of Bristol, England. He was Associate Professor in the Psychology Department at

McMaster University in Ontario until 1988 and is currently full professor at the Psychology

Department of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). Richard Bourhis published in

English/French 170 journal articles/chapters on cross-cultural communication, language planning,

acculturation and immigrant/host community relations, social psychology of discrimination. He was

director of the Concordia-UQAM Chair in Ethnic Studies in Montreal from 1996-2006 and director

of the Centre des études ethniques des universités montréalaises (CEETUM) at the Université de

Montréal from 2006-2009. He received the ‗Robert C. Gardner Award‘ for outstanding research on

Bilingualism from International Association of Language and Social Psychology and an award from

the Canadian Race Relations Foundation for excellence in anti-racism in Canada. He was elected

Fellow of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues and the Society for Experimental

Social Psychology. He received a doctorate ‗Honoris causa‘ from Université de Lorraine, France.

bourhis.richard@uqam.ca, http://bourhis.socialpsychology.org.

ABSTRACT

The linguistic landscape in Montreal was predominantly English for over 150 years, a situation

which was partly reversed by Law 22 in 1974, which imposed French on all public signs while

allowing bilingual French/English commercial signs. French nationalist decried bilingualism on

commercial signs leading to the election of the separatist Parti Québécois which adopted Bill 101

making French the only official language of Quebec. In addition to imposing French unilingualism

on all road and government signs the law banned English and all other languages from commercial

signs. Bill 101 established the ascendency of French in the Quebec linguistic landscape thus

satisfying the Francophone majority while forcing the Anglophone minority to challenge the law as

infringing Charters of Rights and Freedoms. The Canadian Supreme Court ruled that freedom of

expression included not only the content of speech but also the freedom of language choice, thus

invalidating French unilingualism on commercial signs. Faced with French nationalist outcry, the

Quebec government adopted Bill 178 in 1988 maintaining French unilingualism on external

commercial signs but allowing English signs inside stores as long as French was predominant. The

Canadian Supreme Court forced the Quebec Government to change Bill 178. This paper presents

the results of our 1993 linguistic landscape poll conducted with 830 Francophones, 95

Anglophones and 39 Allophones commissioned by the Quebec Government. Results of this poll

contributed to the adoption of Bill 86 in 1993 which allowed multilingual commercial signs as long

as French was twice as predominant as all other languages combined.


Title

Linguistic Landscapes: Studies of Languages in Societies

Olga Bever DATE: THU 21.06

Linguistics Department, The University of Arizona, USA

TIME: 09.30-11.10

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

ABSTRACT

The foundational work on Linguistic Landscapes (LLs) by Landry and Bourhis (1997) stressed the

importance of languages in the signage in the public spaces as a distinct marker of relative power

of linguistic groups on a given territory and the informational and symbolic functions of language.

The growing field of Linguistic Landscapes offers analysis of intersection of language policy and

language use in a particular region through publicly displayed texts of advertising posters and

billboards, shop signs, official notices, etc. These multilingual multimodal texts reveal the interplay

between social, political, cultural and linguistic spaces. Research on LLs has turned into a vibrant

interdisciplinary field, covering sociolinguistics, language policy, communication, advertising, etc.

This paper examines how Linguistic Landscapes reflect the negotiation of ‗competing‘ and

‗coexisting‘ local, national and global ideologies and discourses in an urban area of post-Soviet

Ukraine. The multilingual multimodal texts use Ukrainian, Russian and English, and Cyrillic and

Roman scripts, reflecting language choice and emphasizing the role of English as the language of

globalization.

The genetic closeness of Ukrainian and Russian allows a powerful textual tool, ‗bivalency‘.

Bivalency contributes to negotiation of the local, national and global discourses and ideologies by

reconciling linguistic conflicts through overlapping written elements on the different levels:

alphabetic, phonological, morphological and syntactic. The paper presents and analyzes actual

multilingual multimodal signs with the mixture of languages, orthographies and other visual

representations.

28


Title

SYMPOSIUM : Diversity in health communication

research: Perspectives on patients, carers and

analyzing discourse

Introduction

Bernadette Watson - introduction DATE: THU 21.06

The University of Queensland, Australia TIME: 9.30-15.10

29

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Bernadette Watson (PhD Queensland) is a senior lecturer in psychology at The University of

Queensland. As a health psychologist her research focuses on the interpersonal and intergroup

communication dynamics that exist between health professionals and their patients in the health

setting. She investigates how a person‘s role or professional identity in clinical settings influences

his or her communication behaviours with members of multidisciplinary teams and patients and

how these behaviours reflect effective or ineffective communication.

ABSTRACT

Thematic Summary This panel explores the nature and dynamics of intergroup communication

processes across a diverse range of theoretical perspectives, health contexts and analytic

techniques.

The first three papers investigate language and communication barriers that can occur between

health care providers or carers and aging parents (paper 1), deaf patients (paper 2) and cancer

patients facing clinical trials (paper 3). These papers highlight the importance of effective

communication and the quality of the carer-patient relationship in patient care. The next two

papers emphasize the significance of patient involvement in health care. They consider the

patient‘s experience with the health care system by examining the patient‘s willingness to

communicate (paper 4) and active patient participation (paper 5) in health care. The last three

papers explore the utility of Discursis, a computer-based tool for analysing communication. This

discourse analytic technique is employed to investigate health care professional consultation

practices (paper 6), the challenges of doctor-patient interactions (paper 7) and the communication

difficulties between patients with dementia and their carers (paper 8).

These eight papers give an extensive picture of communication by health professionals, carers and

patients. The papers all highlight the importance of effective and active communication to the

quality of health care and perceptions of the health care experience. The papers presented in this

panel extend our understanding of various communication dynamics in health environments.

Although they all take differing theoretical and analytical approaches, they all aim to uncover the

key variables and strategies that improve the effectiveness of health communication and the

quality of the health care experience.


Title

Discursis, a Visual Discourse Analysis Technique.

Dr Daniel Angus DATE: THU 21.06

The University of Queensland TIME: 09.30-11.10

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

30

ROOM: MADRID

Dr Daniel Angus is a Lecturer with the University of Queensland who has spent the last three years

working on a large interdisciplinary ARC project called Thinking Systems. In 2012, a UQ Vice-

Chancellor's Strategic Initiative grant sees Dr Angus collaborating between the School of

Journalism and Communication and School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering.

Dr Angus‘s research explores how conceptual information is processed and stored by mammals to

inspire the development of conceptual mapping tools. An outcome of this research is the Discursis

text analytic tool which is a useful way to visualise and obtain metrics from conversation transcripts.

ABSTRACT

Discursis is a new communication analytics technology that allows analysts to objectively analyse

any text based communication data, in the form of conversations, web forums, training scenarios,

and many more. Discursis quickly, and automatically, processes transcribed text to show

participant interactions around specific topics and over the time-course of the conversation.

Discursis can assist practitioners in understanding the structure, information content, and interspeaker

relationships that are present within input data. Discursis also provides quantitative

measures of key metrics, such as topic introduction; topic consistency; and topic novelty. In this

workshop Dr Angus will offer a practical demonstration of the Discursis software.


Title

Visualizing Doctor and Patient Communication: Insights into Effective Doctor-Patient

Consultations

Daniel Angus (presenter), Bernadette Watson, Andrew Smith,

Cindy Gallois, & Janet Wiles

31

DATE: THU 21.06

The University of Queensland, Australia TIME: 09.30-15.10

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

ROOM: MADRID

Dr Daniel Angus is a Lecturer with the University of Queensland who has spent the last three years

working on a large interdisciplinary ARC project called Thinking Systems. In 2012, a Vice-

Chancellor's Strategic Initiative grant is allowing Dr Angus to collaborate between the School of

Journalism and Communication and School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering.

Dr Angus‘s research explores how conceptual information is processed and stored by mammals to

inspire the development of conceptual mapping tools. An outcome of this research is the Discursis

text analytic tool which is a useful way to visualise and obtain metrics from conversation

transcripts. Discursis assists practitioners in understanding the structure, information content, and

inter-speaker relationships that are present within input data.

Dr Angus has previously worked with the Complex Systems Laboratory at Swinburne University,

Melbourne. There he completed his PhD thesis in Ant Colony Optimisation, a group of algorithms

inspired by the foraging behaviour of Argentine ants that are useful for finding solutions to complex

engineering problems.

ABSTRACT

Effective communication between healthcare professionals and patients is critical to patient health

outcomes. The doctor/patient dialogue has been extensively researched from different

perspectives, with findings emphasising a range of behaviours that lead to effective communication.

Primarily these analyses rely on manual coding techniques that analyse conversation at the turnby-turn

level and therefore have potential to miss details at the whole conversation level, and are

limited to processing small numbers of transcripts due to time constraints. The use of

computational text analysis software has potential to widen the scope of analyses and provide new

insights into input data. The Discursis technique was specifically designed for analysis of topic

usage patterns by conversation participants. Discursis displays a conversation turn-by-turn and

analyses

the extent to which participants are engaging in similar topics, repeating their own topics, or are

unrelated. Conversation features are highlighted on a single interactive graphical display to allow

an analyst to gain an overview of the conversation; filter the conversation based on popular topics;

zoom into a specific section of the conversation; or obtain details such as the original spoken text,

or degree of topic consistency.

The findings from this study show that Discursis is effective at highlighting a range of consultation

techniques, including accommodation, engagement and repetition.


Title

Open Disclosure Analysis using Discursis

*Bernadette Watson¹, Dan Angus¹, Jillann Farmer², Janet Wiles¹

& Andrew Smith¹,

¹The University of Queensland

²Queensland Health, Australia

32

DATE: THU 21.06

TIME: 09.30-15.10

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Bernadette Watson (PhD Queensland) is a senior lecturer in psychology at The University of

Queensland. As a health psychologist her research focuses on the interpersonal and intergroup

communication dynamics that exist between health professionals and their patients in the health

setting. She investigates how a person‘s role or professional identity in clinical settings influences

his or her communication behaviours with members of multidisciplinary teams and patients and

how these behaviours reflect effective or ineffective communication.

ABSTRACT

In this study we used a text analysis tool called Discursis to analyse interactions between clinicians

and patients who were involved in an open disclosure training program. Open disclosure is a

difficult and challenging communication task which, if handled badly, may have negative

consequences for both the clinician and patient affecting their ability to move forward. Discursis

uses computer visualisation to map interactions across time to capture patterns and sequences in

the discourse. These visualisations reveal a range of distinctive trends and features. This work

was a preliminary evaluation of Discursis to determine if it could be used as a training tool in the

program. Seven transcripts were analysed and it was found that Discursis was able to identify

three important features within the interactions. These features related to i) the patterns of

communication between the patient and clinician that clearly demonstrated effective and ineffective

open disclosure management; ii) specific types of communication problems resulting from the

clinician not managing the interaction in a way that provided support for the patient, and iii) those

clinicians who may have potential to be trained as open disclosure consultants. The findings from

this analysis have important implications for using Discursis as both a training aid and a screening

tool for clinicians wishing to become competent in a difficult area of patient and clinician interaction.


Title

Visualising Conversations between People with Dementia and Residential Care Staff

Cindy Gallois*, Rosemary Baker, Daniel Angus, Erin Conway,

Andrew Smith, Janet Wiles & Helen Chenery

33

DATE: THU 21.06

The University of Queensland, Australia TIME: 09.30-15.10

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Cindy Gallois is Emeritus Professor in psychology and communication at The University of

Queensland. She is a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, International

Communication Association, Society of Experimental Social Psychology, and International

Academy of Intercultural Relations, and past president of ICA, International Association of

Language and Social Psychology, and Society of Australasian Social Psychologists. Her research

encompasses intergroup communication in health, intercultural, and organisational contexts,

including the impact of communication on quality of patient care. She is particularly interested in

the role of communication accommodation through language and non-verbal behaviour in

interactions between health providers and patients, as well as among different groups of health

providers. Finally, she is interested in developing theory (including CAT) and methodology

(including visualisation techniques) in health communication

ABSTRACT

Maintaining social interaction is important to the wellbeing of people with dementia, but many face

the dual disadvantage of a progressive decline in discourse skills and reduced opportunities for

conversation. In residential aged care settings, the communication skills of the care staff are key to

enabling residents with dementia to engage in conversation and convey their meaning. The aim of

this study was to investigate communicative behaviours by care staff that might facilitate (or

impede) engagement by people with dementia. We analysed transcripts of individual ten-minute

conversations between care staff-resident dyads using Discursis, an automated conversation

visualisation tool that extracts the main semantic content (‗concepts‘), and displays it graphically

across the time course of the conversation. This method allows visual inspection of the

contributions of each speaker, accommodation (concepts recurring within and between speakers),

and the overall conversational structure. Overall, there was relative paucity of content contributed

by the participants with dementia. Most topics were initiated by care staff, and conversations

tended to proceed as a series of separate topics rather than as a connected flow. Most recurrence

of semantic content was attributed to care staff rather than to participants with dementia. However,

there were striking sequences where participants with dementia engaged with and elaborated on

topics, even in the face of marked communication impairment. Our case examples will illustrate

this novel method for analysing and displaying the conversations, and we will discuss the care staff

communicative behaviours that best support interactions with people with dementia.


Title

Politeness in Adult Children‟s Conversation Openers with Parents about Later Life Health

Care

Margaret J. Pitts¹, Stephanie Smith¹ (presenter), Craig Fowler², &

Carla Fisher³

¹University of Arizona, ²California State University – Fresno

³George Mason University, United States

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

34

DATE: THU 21.06

TIME: 09.30-15.10

ROOM: MADRID

Stephanie Smith, MSC, is a PhD student in Communication at The University of Arizona. She

received her B.A. in Communication from DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois and earned a

Masters of Science in Communication from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois.

Stephanie‘s interests are in studying interpersonal and intergenerational communication.

ABSTRACT

This paper reports on the first phase of a larger research project designed to test message

effectiveness of conversation openers between adult children and their aging parents concerning

later life health care. Specifically, we coded 108 conversation openers generated by adult children

with parents 65+years old to determine (a) the extent to which adult children attend to parents‘

positive and negative face needs, (b) the extent to which adult children use positive and negative

politeness strategies, and (c) the contextual features prominent in conversation openers. We found

the majority of adult children do create messages that attend to positive and negative face needs.

Moreover, the majority of messages demonstrate use of both positive and negative politeness

strategies, often in concert. However, many of the messages are composed of complex strings of

face-threatening and face-supporting statements (i.e., messages that simultaneously threaten

and/or honor positive and negative face). Finally, the context embedded in the messages are

primarily (although not solely) concerned with decline and negative life changes. These findings

demonstrate that although adult children are sensitive to some parental face needs in opening

conversations in this difficult topic (e.g., honoring positive face by emphasizing love and concern

for the parent), their messages also indicate an insensitivity toward other face needs (e.g.,

threatening negative face by emphasizing parent‘s dependence). We discuss implications of these

findings in light of their potential to aid us in helping adult children construct conversation openers

about later life health care that are effective, positive, and productive.


Title

Does it matter who translates your feelings? The deaf person in therapy

Renata Meuter (presenter) & Gillian K. Moore DATE: THU 21.06

Queensland University of Technology, Australia TIME: 09.30-15.10

35

ROOM: MADRID

ABSTRACT

For deaf individuals in therapy the ease with which the therapeutic relationship develops, and the

quality of this relationship, may be variably affected by the involvement of a signing interpreter. To

establish the impact of an interpreter on the traditional client-therapist dyad, trainee psychologists

viewed a videotaped therapy session between a deaf client and a hearing therapist assisted by a

signing interpreter. A second videotaped session depicted a continuation of the therapy with the

same or a different interpreter. Ratings of the therapeutic quality of the therapist-client relationship

and the interpreter-client relationship indicate that the interpreter was seen as therapeutically

important to the triad dynamic. The client was seen as forming a relationship with the interpreter

across sessions, underscoring the importance of involving the same interpreter. Psychologists with

experience in working with deaf clients were more likely to appreciate the interpreter‘s role in the

triad. Importantly, interpreter presence was not believed to adversely affect the therapeutic

relationship between therapist and client. Although client-interpreter engagement was perceived to

be greater in the first session, compared to the client-therapist engagement, both relationships

were rated as equally strong in the second session. Thus, while the interpreter is vital in facilitating

communication, and while the client may form a relationship with the interpreter, the therapist-client

relationship does not appear to be threatened. Whether deaf individuals perceive the therapy triad

relationships similarly, remains to be established.


Title

The role of patient willingness to communicate in the health care experience

Susan C. Baker¹, Cindy Gallois (presenter)² , & Bernadette

Watson²

¹Cape Breton University, Canada

²The University of Queensland, Australia

36

DATE: THU 21.06

TIME: 09.30-15.10

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Cindy Gallois is Emeritus Professor in psychology and communication at The University of

Queensland. She is a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, International

Communication Association, Society of Experimental Social Psychology, and International

Academy of Intercultural Relations, and past president of ICA, International Association of

Language and Social Psychology, and Society of Australasian Social Psychologists. Her research

encompasses intergroup communication in health, intercultural, and organisational contexts,

including the impact of communication on quality of patient care. She is particularly interested in

the role of communication accommodation through language and non-verbal behaviour in

interactions between health providers and patients, as well as among different groups of health

providers. Finally, she is interested in developing theory (including CAT) and methodology

(including visualisation techniques) in health communication.

ABSTRACT

This study represents the first in a larger project examining the role of patient willingness to

communicate in shaping health care experiences. Specifically, the study is aimed at

demonstrating that, while seeking medical services is an important part of participation in health

care, a willingness to interact with the health care provider predicts key psychological outcomes

derived from the doctor-patient relationship. In this study, we asked 195 participants to indicate

their willingness to communicate with a variety of health care providers across different health

contexts. Results show that participants who were more motivated to live a healthy lifestyle and

who perceived greater personal control were significantly more willing to communicate with their

health care providers. Further, higher willingness to communicate was significantly associated

with higher general satisfaction with health care, adherence to treatment, understanding of

information and health care options, seeking health information, perceived patient respect and

satisfaction with the doctor, nurse and access to health care. It is suggested that a patient‘s

willingness to interact with their health care provider is an important determinant of quality health

care and that promoting active patient participation is a key step in achieving positive health care

experiences.


Title

Intentional or unintentional influence? How language use shapes medical treatment

decisions

Janice L. Krieger (presenter) & Angela Palmer-Wackerly DATE: THU 21.06

Ohio State University, United States TIME: 09.30-15.10

37

ROOM: MADRID

ABSTRACT

Cancer is a leading cause of death in many countries, and as such, improving methods of cancer

detection and treatment are a global health priority. Despite the large number of people who have

cancer, many clinical research studies have difficulty recruiting a sufficient number of participants

for clinical trials. Conversations with physicians, nurses, family and friends are all known to be

important sources of influence when patients are making decisions about participation in a clinical

trial. Previous research has identified the use of certain types of language as barriers to cancer

clinical trial participation. For example, medical personnel might describe technical concepts, such

as randomization, in demeaning or offensive ways. Likewise, friends and family members might

have limited knowledge about medical research and rely on understandings based on common

vernacular, such as clinical trial participants as ―lab rats‖ or ―guinea pigs.‖ Using in-depth

qualitative interviews, the current study explores the association between language and decisionmaking

in conversations between rural cancer patients and members of their social network (i.e.,

physicians, nurses, family, and friends) about their medical treatment choices. The rural cultural

context is of particular interest because of the significant health disparities in rural areas with

regard to cancer clinical trials. The results of this study have significant implications for both

understanding the importance of language for health decision-making and for improving treatment

for cancer patients.


Title

SYMPOSIUM: Pupils’ anxiety, self confidence,

attitude and motivation to speak a foreign

language

Introduction

1st chair: Jildou Popma, 2nd chair: Mirjam Günther-van der Meij DATE: THU 21.06

Mercator European Research Centre on Multilingualism

and Language Learning c/o Fryske Akademy, The Netherlands

38

TIME: 13.30-15.10

ROOM: BRUSSELS

ABSTRACT

The theme of this symposium is pupils‘ anxiety, self-confidence, attitude and motivation to speak a

foreign language. The symposium offers a mix of theoretical and practical information on the topic

combined with research in this area. In three presentations we will discuss and learn more about:

1) the influence of multilingual education on primary pupils‘ level of selfconfidence to speak a

foreign language;

2) the attitude and motivation of secondary school pupils towards speaking a foreign language;

3) how to reduce foreign language speaking anxiety amongst pupils.

In the first presentation, Marrit Jansma will present her research in which she studied whether the

type of school Frisian pupils attend (mono-, bi- or trilingual) influences their level of self-confidence

in speaking English. In the second presentation, Truus de Vries will present her research on

Frisian and Basque secondary school pupils‘ attitude and motivation towards English language

learning. In the third presentation, Rob Faltin will provide theory on pupils‘ anxiety to speak a

foreign language. He will also discuss techniques, from a theoretical and interdisciplinary

perspective, that can reduce anxiety. After the three presentations, there will be room for further

discussion between the speakers and the audience. With this symposium we want to contribute to

understanding what aspects might influence pupils‘ success in foreign language learning.


Title

Improving Self-confidence and English Speaking Performances through

Multilingual Education

Marrit Jansma DATE: THU 21.06

Mercator European Research Centre on Multilingualism

and Language Learning c/o Fryske Akademy, The Netherlands

39

TIME: 13.30-15.10

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Marrit Jansma is a PhD student at the Fryske Akademy and the University of Groningen. She

studied Remedial Education in Groningen. After that, since 2009, she is working as a PhD student

on the English speaking performances and self-confidence of pupils of primary education in Fyslân.

First results have been presented in national (Boppeslach) and international conferences (e.g.

ISB8 and BMI). Within this longitudinal study, she will study whether there are differences in

English speaking performances and self-confidence, between pupils of mono-, bi-, and trilingual

schools.

ABSTRACT

The study presented in this paper, focuses on the effect of multilingual primary education on pupils‘

level of self-confidence when speaking in English. At multilingual schools, where pupils have

knowledge of more languages and use these languages often, pupils could experience a lower

level of anxiety (Dewaele, Petrides & Furnham, 2008). In other words, pupils could be more self

confident when speaking a foreign language. In addition, from previous research can be

hypothesized that there is more positive transfer when pupils, who already are educated bilingual,

learn an additional language (Brohy, 2001; Cenoz & Genesee, 1998; Cummins, 1987). When this

is applied to the multilingual language situation of this study, pupils of multilingual schools could be

advantageous when learning English.

In a cross-sectional comparison, we tested whether trilingual education indeed enhances the level

of self-confidence during speaking in English. The study includes monolingual, bilingual and

trilingual schools with a total of 600 participating pupils from 4th till 6th grade (age 9-12). Pupils‘

level of self-confidence was measured through a self-report questionnaire asking about their

anxiety and self-perceived English speaking proficiency. Furthermore, the oral language

competences were tested with a picture story. We found that pupils of trilingual schools, 9-11 years

old, are more proficient in English compared to pupils of monolingual and bilingual schools.

However, for 11-12 year old pupils, this effect does not seem to exist. During the presentation,

details of the results concerning self-confidence will be presented and possible explanations will be

discussed.


Title

Attitude and Motivation of Frisian and Basque Secondary School Pupils towards learning

English

Truus de Vries DATE: THU 21.06

Mercator European Research Centre on Multilingualism

and Language Learning c/o Fryske Akademy, The Netherlands

40

TIME: 13.30-15.10

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Truus de Vries works as a researcher at the Mercator Research Centre on Multilingualism and

Language Learning (www.mercator-research.eu), which is part of the Fryske Akademy

(www.fryske-akademy.nl/en). The project she works for is the FRY-EUS project. On behalf of this

project she researches multilingualism in Fryslân (the Netherlands) and the Basque Autonomous

Community (Spain). She has studied Communication and Information Science and Frisian

Language and Culture.

Her interest is in peoples‘ attitudes and motivations with respect to (learning) a certain language

and the relationship with the proficiency level in this language. Furthermore, she is interested in

sign language, as an alternative way of communicating.

ABSTRACT

English fulfills the function of a worldwide lingua franca, but how do secondary school pupils in

Fryslân and the BAC feel about this foreign language? Our current research assessed the attitude

of Frisian and Basque secondary school pupils towards English and their motivation to learn this

language. The study belongs to a series on multilingualism in Fryslân (the Netherlands) and the

Basque Autonomous Community (Spain). The questionnaire we used, inspired by Baker (1997)

and Gardner (2001), contained items like ―If I get an English exam, I do my best to get a good

grade‖ or ―I think that if you are good at English, this will help you in finding a job‖. In order to

interpret the scores in a broader perspective, attitudes and motivation towards the minority

language (Frisian/Basque) and the dominant language (Dutch/Spanish) were also taken into

account. Next to the questionnaire, we asked pupils to keep a language diary about their English

language use and exposure outside school. Although Basque pupils start learning English much

earlier (around 5 years) than Frisian pupils (around 10 years), pupils in Fryslân proved to be far

more exposed to English than pupils in the Basque Autonomous Community. This can have

consequences for the attitude and motivation towards this language. In the presentation we will

present and discuss the results.


Title

“I don‟t dare speaking this language”: Applicability of Cognitive

Behavioural Therapy on Anxiety to use a Foreign Language

Rob Faltin DATE: THU 21.06

GGZ ingest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands TIME: 13.30-15.10

41

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Rob Faltin is behaviour therapist, psychologist and psychotherapist. He works at the anxiety

department of the GGZ inGeest/Vumc in Amsterdam. His therapies can be individual, systemic or

in group, but they are always evidence based, empowering exposure and cognitive methods. He

gives regularly workshops and master classes about exposure and cognitive therapy for anxiety

disorders. Particular interests of Rob are the application of evidence based psychotherapy

methods in atypical cases, motivation techniques, and therapies with patients who do not share a

common language with the therapist. Inside and outside work, he daily applies principles of

learning through participating/exposure, for example by speaking several languages partly

correctly, partly with mistakes but generally with his French accent.

ABSTRACT

Amongst pupils, anxiety to use a foreign language is a well-known issue (see Horwitz, Tallon, Luo,

2010 for a theoretical and empirical overview). Symptoms can manifest in automatic frightening

thoughts (i.e. ―they will laugh at me‖, ―I‘m incompetent‖) and in avoidance strategies (i.e. not

speaking a language, or using ―safe‖ expressions).

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT; Craske, 1999, Trimbos Instituut, 2011) is one of the best

evidence based therapy methods for treating anxiety disorders. However, the application of CBT

on foreign language anxiety does not seem to have been researched yet.

The present lecture will address the possibilities of applying CBT interventions in reducing anxiety

from a theoretical and interdisciplinary perspective. We will discuss:

(1) techniques in order to increase motivation to use a foreign language, (2) cognitive restructuring

and (3) exposure techniques.


Title

SYMPOSIUM: Language effects: cognitive,

evaluative and identity impacts

Introduction

Richard Clément (chair and introduction) 1 , Kimberly Noels

(discussant) 2

42

DATE: THU 21.06

University of Ottowa, Canada 2 University of Alberta, Canada TIME: 13:30 - 15:10

ABSTRACT

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

Over the past 50 years, the role of language in influencing social behaviour has received

increasing attention, much in contrast with the early stand of social psychologist relegating it to

peripheral concerns or even treating it as nuisance in well-designed experiments. From early

matched-guise to more recent priming experiments it has now been established that a wide array

of social phenomena cannot be understood outside paradigms including language and

communication. The papers included in this symposium each exploit a different facet of this

phenomenon. The first one by Ceulers and Marzo looks at the perception people have of a specific

Dutch dialect as a function of varied settings. The second paper by Collins and Clément examines

how the social context biases the impact of the linguistic intergroup bias and the linguistic

expectancy bas. It is specifically shown that the logic underlying predictions from both models is

thwarted by social judgments and norms. Finally, the last paper by Freynet and Clément looks at

the impact of language on identity in the context of the presence/absence of a second language.

Bilinguals show singular patterns of identity across a number of regions. All in all, all three studies

point to the strong influence of the social context on three phenomena which are at the core of the

relationship between language and social behaviour.


Title

Investigating language, ethnicity and space in Flanders: indexicality and space perception

Evy Ceuleers (presenter) 1 , Stefania Marzo 2 DATE: THU 21.06

1 University College Ghent/Ghent University; Vrije Universiteit

Brussel, Belgium, 2 University of Leuven, Belgium

ABSTRACT

43

TIME: 13:30 - 15:10

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

Citétaal is a label that is used to refer to a variety of Dutch spoken by (local and multiethnic)

youngster in the Eastern part of Flanders (Limburg). It is a melting pot language, based on Dutch

but with a high amount of code mixture from immigrant languages, mostly Italian, Turkish and

Moroccan. In a previous study (Marzo - Ceuleers 2011) we have demonstrated that Citétaal seems

to be spreading among speakers in Limburg and that it is shifting from marking ethnicity to

indexing a new, localized identity: a sense of belonging to and identifying with the local

neighbourhoods or cités were these youngsters live and hang around. Moreover, our data

suggests that the emergence of this new identity seems to be related to the mechanism of

enregisterment (Johnstone et al. 2006).

In the present paper, we will focus on the perception of the Citétaal variety by people (youngsters

and adults). By means of different techniques (a.o. matched guise, an adapted matched guise

technique and focus groups) we aim at understanding (a) how the Citétaal variety (in terms of the

Citétaal accent) is perceived, by people living both in Limburg as well as in other Belgian provinces

and (b) to which extent youngsters and people link the Citétaal accent to a certain locality, viz. the

cité or neighbourhood.


Title

Disentangling the LIB from the LEB:

The Unexpected Role of Social Judgement and Social Norms

Katherine A. Collins (Presenter), Richard Clément DATE: THU 21.06

University of Ottaw TIME: 13:30 - 15:10

44

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Katherine Collins (HBSc, University of Toronto) is a doctoral candidate in experimental social

psychology at the University of Ottawa, under the supervision of Dr. Richard Clément. As a

member of the Social Psychology of Language and Communication Laboratory, she conducts

research on the causes and consequences of linguistic bias. Her research interests include

intergroup relations and communication, stereotypes, prejudice, and research methods and

statistics.

ABSTRACT

The Linguistic Category Model (Semin & Fiedler, 1988) provided an objective measure of linguistic

abstraction, which has since been used to define two linguistic biases. The Linguistic Expectancy

Bias (LEB) refers to the tendency to describe expected behaviours of ingroup and outgroup

members at a higher level of abstraction than unexpected behaviours, regardless of behaviour

valence. The Linguistic Intergroup Bias (LIB), in contrast, describes the tendency to describe

positive ingroup and negative outgroup behaviours at a higher level of abstraction, which may

reflect systematically distorted expectations for groups based on stereotypes or implicitly held

prejudices. Research has yet to conclusively explicate both the causes and consequences of both

linguistic biases, a state which may be the result of linguistic tasks that cannot adequately measure

both typicality and behaviour valence. In this study, 63 Canadian participants completed a newly

developed linguistic task, featuring 16 items that varied along both typicality and behavioural

valence. Although this task succeeds in distinguishing between the LIB and LEB, preliminary data

shows unexpected interactions between typicality, group, and behavioural valence, suggesting that

the phenomenon may be influenced by social judgement and norms thus highlighting the important

role of social context.


Title

Bilingualism in minority French Canadians: Assimilation or fusion?

Nathalie Freynet (Presenter), Richard Clément DATE: THU 21.06

University of Ottawa

45

TIME: 13:30 - 15:10

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Nathalie Freynet is a graduate student in Experimental Psychology at the University of Ottawa,

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Her current research interests include the effects of intergroup

interactions and ethnolinguistic vitality on psychosocial components such as identity, attitudes,

language confidence and retention.

ABSTRACT

Recent ethnographic studies of the French Canadian minority have consistently reported a

tendency for youth to identify as ―bilingual‖. While some suggest bilingual identification serves as a

stepping-stone to the anglo-dominant end of an identity continuum, others suggest it is a legitimate

and distinct form of identity encompassing francophone and anglophone identities. The current

study aims to explore whether bilingualism can be distinguished from unilingual predominance on

factors considered important for the maintenance of identity. Specifically, the purposes here are (1)

to validate language confidence as an indicator of identification; (2) to explore whether bilingual

(high levels of confidence in both languages) participants can be significantly distinguished from

predominantly unilingual (high levels of confidence in one language) individuals on various factors

related to the maintenance of linguistic identity and (3) to verify if the results vary based on the

ethnolinguistic vitality of a particular. Data from Francophones living outside of Quebec (N= 4847)

collected via the SVOLM survey (Statistics Canada) were analyzed. Results revealed that

language confidence does predict levels of identity and that bilinguals are significantly distinct from

anglo- and usually franco-dominant participants on all factors for maintenance of linguistic identity

except evolution of vitality, in all regions studied. The implications of these findings on the

understanding of the nature of bilingual identity will be discussed.


Title

SYMPOSIUM: Extracting lexical retrieval

information from word association data: A users’

guide

Extracting lexical retrieval information from word association data: A users‟ guide

Tess Fitzpatrick DATE: THU 21.06

Swansea University, United Kingdom TIME: 13.30-15.510

46

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Tess Fitzpatrick is a Reader in Applied Linguistics at Swansea University, Wales, UK. Her

research interests are in the areas of lexical acquisition, storage and retrieval, with a specific focus

on word association studies and vocabulary measurement tools. She has recently led research

projects investigating the effects of variables such as age, cognitive performance, cognitive decline

and heredity on lexical retrieval behaviour. An experienced EFL teacher and teacher trainer, she

has also worked on projects exploring extreme language-learning methodologies and the role of

formulaic sequences in second language use. Her publications include a number of book chapters

and articles in journals such as Studies in Second Language Acquisition, Language Testing,

Language Learning Journal and International Journal of Applied Linguistics. She is co-editor of

Lexical Processing in Second Language Learners (2009).

ABSTRACT

The word association task has the potential to reveal important information about lexical retrieval

and as such has been employed in linguistics and psychology for over 100 years, in relation to

neuropsychology, psychosis, dementia, ageing, and language acquisition. However, findings in all

these areas have been somewhat inconclusive, and we argue that this is due to a lack of

consistency and validity in the research paradigms underlying these studies. By revealing ways in

which differences in the treatment of data may radically alter findings, we demonstrate the need to

address important methodological issues in word association research.

This paper presents a novel framework for collecting, scoring and analysing word association

responses, which is informed by protocols and theoretical approaches from psychology and

linguistics. The framework produces a profile for each respondent‘s data, based on both the

stereotypy of their responses (i.e. the similarity to their reference cohort) and the type of cueresponse

link made (e.g. synonym, collocation). The validity of the framework is tested using new

data sets with two important characteristics. Firstly, two data sets, from twins, are matched for all

major environmental variables including age, allowing for near-exact replication. Secondly, two

data sets collected two years apart, from the same informants, allow for a test-retest analysis.

Findings indicate that the new analytic framework has a high degree of validity and reliability, and

can be used to assess the relative influence on lexical retrieval of variables such as age and

cognition.


Title

Lexical retrieval and age

David Playfoot (presenter) and Tess Fitzpatrick DATE: THU 21.06

College of Arts and Humanities, Swansea University, United

Kingdom

47

TIME: 13.30-15.10

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

David Playfoot: I

achieved my PhD in Psychology from Swansea University in April 2012, and have worked as a

research assistant on several funded projects alongside my studies. My research to date has

focussed on two main issues. The subject of my thesis was the processes involved in reading and

recognising a special case of written language, that of acronyms. The research examined the

characteristics of acronyms which particularly influenced the speed and accuracy with which they

are processed, and drew comparisons with mainstream words. The findings from the acronym

research suggest that currently influential models of single word reading may require adjustment

before acronym reading can be accommodated. The second issue addressed by my work to date

is the processing involved in lexical storage and retrieval, and how it is affected by age, cognitive

performance and neuropsychological presentation. I am currently in an administrative role in

Swansea University while I seek out post-doctoral research and funding opportunities.

ABSTRACT

Word association response data have the potential to reveal patterns of lexical retrieval behaviour

in ageing and dementia (e.g. Gollan et al 2006; Hirsh and Tree 2001). Identifying age-related

differences in associative links will contribute to creating ―healthy ageing‖ profiles of lexical retrieval

patterns and an improved understanding of semantic and lexical networks. However, the findings

of research carried out in this area to date have been limited by conventions of norms list

compilation. Further, the types of association which are generated by participants have not yet

been considered in relation to ageing. This paper reports the findings of a project which aims to

examine the impact of age on both the stereotypy of word association responses and the types of

association that participants generate, using a novel method which is reliable and robust.

Comparisons are made between participants from two distinct age cohorts (adolescents versus

over-65s). The results are consistent with age being an important factor in the production of

unusual responses, form-based responses and collocations. The ways in which healthy ageing

affects lexical retrieval are discussed in relation to dementia and cognitive decline.


Title

Lexical retrieval and cognition

Cristina Izura 1 (presenter) and David Playfoot 2 DATE: THU 21.06

1 Department of Psychology, Swansea University, United

Kingdom 2 College of Arts and Humanities, Swansea University,

United Kingdom

48

TIME: 13.30-15.10

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Dr. Cristina Izura Cognitive Psychologist trained at the University Pontificia of Salamanca, Spain

(BSc) and at the University of York (PhD). My doctoral work was on ―The age of acquisition effects

in first and second languages”. In 2004 I took a full time position as a lecturer at Swansea

University. During this time I have authored sixteen journal articles and book chapters and

supervised three PhD students. I have received over £200,000 in research grants. In May 2012 I

received the prize of ‗the best paper of the year 2011‘ as the first author of the article: Izura, C.,

Pérez, MA., Agallou, E., Wright V.C., Marín, J., Stadthagen-González, H., & Ellis, A.W. (2011).

Age/order of acquisition effects and the cumulative learning of foreign words: A word training

study. Journal of Memory and Language, 64, 32-58.

ABSTRACT

Word association studies began as a diagnostic tool for psychological disorders, and as a result

the literature demonstrates differences in response patterns between individuals due to

psychoticism (Merten 1993), criminality (Banay 1943), dementia (Gewirth et al 1984) and

schizophrenia (Schwartz 1978). Differences between individuals from non-clinical populations have

also been reported. For example, research findings indicate that while some individuals

demonstrate a preference for semantically-related word association responses, others tend to

generate collocations (Fitzpatrick 2007). These preferences appear consistent across time

(Fitzpatrick 2007) and across a participant‘s first and second languages (Fitzpatrick 2009). While

the reasons for exhibiting a particular response style remain unclear, it is possible that word

association responses are affected by aspects of cognitive ability. This paper reports findings from

a project which analyses the word association responses of 315 participants in relation to working

memory and verbal comprehension scores on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale. The results

revealed that stereotypy scores for word association responses were affected by working memory,

and individuals‘ response type profiles were influenced by verbal comprehension. The relevance of

these findings for models of lexical access and research into conditions associated with cognitive

impairment such as dementia will be discussed.


Title

Lexical Retrieval in Semantic Dementia

Jeremy Tree 1 (presenter) and David Playfoot 2 DATE: THU 21.06

1 Department of Psychology, Swansea University United

Kingdom, 2 College of Arts and Humanities, Swansea University,

United Kingdom

49

TIME: 13.30-15.10

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Jeremy Tree is a Senior Lecturer in Neuropsychology at Swansea University, Wales, UK. He has a

broad range on interests linked to acquired disorders of language in neuropsychological

populations such as stroke, neurodegenerative disease and head injury. He has more than two

dozen peer reviewed publications in a number of neuroscience journals and In each case the work

seeks to better illuminate the processing components of specific cognitive functions (such as

speech production, reading and spelling) in the normal population.

ABSTRACT

Semantic dementia is a focal neurodegenerative condition in which patients become progressively

less able to remember the meaning of words and to use them correctly. As the name implies, this

fronto-temporal dementia involves the progressive deterioration of the semantic memory system:

at the early stage cases have word-naming problems but eventually lose all comprehension of

language form. Such cases enable researchers to have a window into understanding the storage

and retrieval routes of lexical items and the degree to which these are vulnerable to, or resistant to

change. This work is fundamental to understanding the mechanisms underlying such processes

and those linked to other conditions associated with cognitive degeneration. Greater understanding

of semantic dementia is also vital to the promotion of early differential diagnosis and potential

effective intervention in cases of language dysfunction. This paper analyses the word association

responses collected from a semantic dementia patient every 6 months across a two-year period. It

aims to discover the impact of semantic decline on word association stereotypy and on the types of

association response generated. Further, an assessment of the characteristics of words which are

retained is offered.


Title

SYMPOSIUM: How can Caretakers Influence

Children’s Multilingual Language Development?

Introduction

Dr. Alex Riemersma (discussant), Name chair: Mirjam Günthervan

der Meij

Mercator European Research Centre on Multilingualism and

Language Learning c/o Fryske Akademy

50

DATE: THU 21.6

TIME: 15.30-17.10

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Mirjam Günther-van der Meij completed a Bachelor‘s International Degree in English and

Education (Amsterdam Faculty of Education/University of Wolverhampton) and a Master‘s Degree

in Applied Linguistics (VU University Amsterdam). She specialised in language learning disabilities

and multilingual education. For her master thesis she looked at the oral language proficiency in

Frisian, Dutch and English of primary school pupils, comparing pupils from bilingual (Frisian-Dutch)

and trilingual (Frisian-Dutch-English) schools. She worked as a trainee in the Trilingual School

project and later as a research assistant in the F-TARSP (Frisian Language Assessment

Remediation Screening Procedure) project at the Frisian Academy. Since 2010 she is a PhD

candidate at the Mercator Research Centre of the Frisian Academy. She is involved in the FRY-

EUS project, a comparative research project of the linguistic situation in the province of Fryslân in

the Netherlands and in the Basque Autonomous Community in Spain. Within this project she

studies the English language development of beginning secondary school pupils in the two regions,

looking at pupils‘ proficiency as well as cognitive processes that are involved in English language

development. The PhD-thesis is planned to be finished in 2014.

ABSTRACT

The central question of this symposium is how caretakers can influence children‘s multilingual

language development. The symposium offers a mix of theoretical and practical information on the

topic combined with research in this area. In three presentations we will discuss and learn more

about:

1) how parents‘ beliefs on the use of several languages can change;

2) how pre-school education and parents together can contribute to children‘s language

development;

3) the influence of parents (informal setting) and the role of educators (formal setting) in

the implementation and success of bilingual kindergarten programs and language

programs.

The central theme of our symposium evolves around the cooperation between parents and

educators in the bilingual language development of pre-schoolers.

In the first presentation, Nienke Boomstra will present her research on enhancing the parental

beliefs of bilingual Antillean mothers on book reading and language development of their children.


In the second presentation, Idske Bangma will present more information about the MELT

project. This project looks at the early years provision in four bilingual language communities,

taking into account approaches to language immersion and the resources available to parents and

practitioners.

In the third presentation, Katarina Wagner and Astrid Rothe will present their research on

the motivations and attitudes of parents and educators in bilingual kindergarten programs. Their

research looked at prestige and migrant bilingual kindergarten programs: German-Turkish and

German-English.

After the three presentations, there will be room for further discussion between the

speakers and the audience, led by our discussant Alex Riemersma. We will discuss several

statements on best practises and pros and cons of how caretakers can influence and guide

children‘s multilingual language development: at home and through preschool programs, and in

that way learn from each other‘s experiences. To round off the symposium, we will try and come to

a conceptual model showing the outcomes of our discussion and in that way answer our

symposium title question.

51


Title

Parental Beliefs of Bilingual Antillean Mothers: Stability of the Construct and Comparison

with Monolingual Dutch Group

Nienke Boomstra DATE: THU 21.06

Mercator European Research Centre on Multilingualism and

Language Learning c/o Fryske Akademy

52

TIME: 15.30-17.10

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Nienke Boomstra completed her Masters‘ degree in Child and Educational Studies at Leiden

University in the Netherlands (2007). She has special interest in cultural anthropology and

(dynamic) family systems. The master thesis combined these interests in a research with a group

of international adoptees. Since 2009, she is a PhD candidate at the Frisian Academy (Mercator

European Research Centre on Multilingualism and Language Learning) and the University of

Groningen. In this research, she focusses on the bilingual language development of Antillean

toddlers and the influences several family characteristics have on the language development. To

improve the interactional skills in these families, Nienke Boomstra used characteristics of several

existing preschool interventions to develop a tailored intervention for the Antillean target group.

The intervention and the PhD research again combine both interests, cultural perspectives and

family systems. The PhD-thesis is planned to be finished in 2013.

ABSTRACT

―More languages, more opportunities‖ is an intervention program in which Antillean families are

stimulated to use both Papiamentu and Dutch at home. Through the means of role models - here,

language coaches - who visit the families, the primary caretakers receive guidance in bilingual

language transmission with their toddlers. The project started in 2009 and is performed in

Leeuwarden and Rotterdam, with a total of 23 mother-child dyads.

The research focusses on three constructs: parental beliefs, mother-child interaction and

bilingual language development. This presentation will only discuss the beliefs. Parental beliefs

can be defined as: ideas, knowledge, cognition, values, goals and attitudes parents have about

child rearing, child development, children in general and parents‘ own role. This is a broad area,

but for this study, the parental beliefs concerning the child‘s language development are studied.

Beliefs are considered to be leading in the actions of the mothers. The purpose of the intervention

is that ―More language, more opportunities‖ may change the parental beliefs towards the positive

end, which might lead to a more diverse language input from the mother, both in Papiamentu and

in Dutch. The focus in this presentation is on 1) the parental beliefs of the participants in the

intervention, 2) how these beliefs change over time, and 3) how the beliefs of the bilingual Antillean

mothers relate to the beliefs of a monolingual Dutch comparison group. An adaptation of the

Parent Reading Belief Inventory (DeBaryshe & Binder, 1995) is used as the primary research

instrument.


Title

Early Multilingual Transmission and Learning from the Perspective of European Regional

and Minority Language Communities

Idske Bangma DATE: THU 21.06

Mercator European Research Centre on Multilingualism and

Language Learning c/o Fryske Akademy

53

TIME: 15.30-17.10

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Mrs. Idske Bangma is a researcher at the Mercator European Research Centre on Multilingualism

and Language Learning / Fryske Akademy in Leeuwarden. She completed her Masters‘ degree in

Pedagogy and Educational Studies at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands (2009). In

2011, she was responsible for carrying out the MELT (Multilingual Early Language Transmission)

research on current best practices in pre-school education for children 0-4 years old in a minority

language environment in four European MELT project regions. The partners represent four

multilingual communities: Welsh/ English in Wales, United Kingdom; Breton/French in Brittany,

France; Swedish/Finnish in Finland and Frisian/Dutch in Fryslân, the Netherlands. All products and

results of the MELT project (2009-2011) are available at: http://www.mercatorresearch.eu/research-projects/melt.

ABSTRACT

It is widely accepted that the early years is an advantageous time to acquire language skills

simultaneously in additional languages. The promotion of regional and minority languages from an

early age is crucial for the long term future of those languages, particularly in an age of ever

increasing globalisation. To stimulate this, parents and professional workers in pre-school

provisions need to be better informed about the positive effects of a multilingual start for their

children.

This is what the Multilingual Early Language Transmission (MELT) project tried to achieve.

MELT (LLP Comenius, 2009-2011) was a project initiated by the Network to Promote Linguistic

Diversity (NPLD) and a partnership between four language communities – Breton in Brittany

(France), Frisian in Friesland (Netherlands), Welsh in Wales (UK) and the Swedish community in

Finland.

The main products were: a Brochure for parents, a Guide for pre-school practitioners and a

Research paper. This MELT publication was augmented by three contributions of international

experts (Dr. De Houwer- Germany, Dr. Holm- Finland and Dr. Hickey- Ireland).

The presentation will summarise the similarities and differences concerning multilingual preschool

education (in particular 0-4 years) and the different immersion strategies, starting with the

key concepts and common perspectives of multilingual education. Also, divergent perspectives

towards total immersion and two-way immersion, related to the four project regions involved will be

discussed. ―Immersion‖ in these communities refers to mother-tongue education in minority

languages. Finally, recommendations concerning early language learning and training of preschool

practitioners as well as topics for further research, data gathering and development of

didactic concepts will be discussed.


Title

Motivations and attitudes of stakeholders in bilingual kindergarten programs: prestige vs.

migrant languages

Katarina Wagner (presenter 1) 1 , Astrid Rothe (presenter 2) 2 DATE: THU 21.06

1 Institut für Deutsche Sprache und Literatur I, Germany, 2 Institut

für Deutsche Sprache, Germany

54

TIME: 15.30-17.10

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Katarina Wagner works as a research assistant at the University of Cologne since 2009. In her

studies of German language and literature and European Linguistics she focused on applied

linguistics and sociolinguistics. Her main areas of interest are language acquisition, multilingualism

and language policy. In addition to her work at the university Katarina Wagner holds workshops on

multilingualism, multilingual education and language acquisition for parents and educators. She is

currently doing her PhD thesis on ―Child-child-interaction in a bilingual German-Turkish

kindergarten group‖. Since 2010 she is a member of the a.r.t.e.s. Research School at the

University of Cologne and since 2011 a member of the Research and Study Program on Education

in Early Childhood of the Robert Bosch Stiftung.

Astrid Rothe: After her undergraduate studies at the University of Cologne (Germany), Astrid

Rothe completed her Masters degree in Paris (France) at the Sorbonne-Nouvelle in 2005 and her

PhD on gender and language mixings at the University of Mannheim (Germany). She has been

working as a researcher at the University of Cologne and at the Institut für Deutsche Sprache in

Mannheim. There, she has been working in a project on language attitudes funded by the

Volkswagen-Stiftung. Currently she is working as a project assistant to the director of the Institut

für Deutsche Sprache. Her interests lie e.g. in language attitudes, grammatical gender and

language mixings, especially the distinction of code-switching and borrowing.

ABSTRACT

Bilingual kindergarten programs are becoming increasingly popular in Germany, but mostly they

offer prestigious languages such as English or Spanish and they mostly target monolingual parents

who wish their children to become bilingual. Bilingual programs for migrant languages such as

Turkish or Russian are seldom offered and oftentimes met with controversy.

Our paper investigates stakeholders‘ attitudes, i.e. parents and educators, towards so called

prestige languages and migrant languages on the macro and micro level. Therefore, we outline the

sociopolitical background of bilingual education in Germany and analyze the results of several

studies on language attitudes.

The role of parents and educators is very important for the implementation and success of bilingual

kindergarten programs and language programs (cf. Kiziak et al. 2012). Hence, we examine their

language attitudes, their expectations and concerns towards the bilingual kindergarten program

based on the results of a current questionnaire study amongst parents and educators of bilingual

kindergartens – two German-Turkish kindergarten groups and two German-English kindergarten

groups. We then compare these results with the results of a representative public opinion poll

(N=2004) and a study amongst pupils (N=628) about language attitudes.


References

Kiziak, T./Kreuter, V./Klingholz, R. (2012): Dem Nachwuchs eine Sprache geben. Was

frühkindliche Sprachförderung leisten kann. Discussion Paper 6. Berlin-Institut für Bevölkerung und

Entwicklung.

55


Title

SYMPOSIUM: Bicultural identities and language

attitudes and use

Bicultural identities and language attitudes and use

Kimberly A. Noels 1 (chair and introduction), Richard Clément 2

(discussant)

56

DATE: THU 21.06

1 University of Alberta, Canada, 2 University of Ottawa, Canada TIME: 15.30-17.10

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

KIMBERLY A. NOELS is a professor in the Social and Cultural Psychology area of the Department

of Psychology and an adjunct professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the

University of Alberta, Canada. Her research concerns the psychology of language and

communication processes, with a focus on intercultural communication. Her current program of

research involves two lines of inquiry. The first concerns motivation for language learning, with a

focus on how the social context affects people‘s experience of intrinsic and self-determined

motivation. The second centers on the role of communication in the process of cross-cultural

adaptation, particularly how the languages we speak are linked to feelings of ethnic identity. Her

research has been recognized through awards from the Modern Language Association, the

International Association of Language and Social Psychology, the International Communication

Association, and the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues.

ABSTRACT

In recent years, studies of ethnic identity have shifted from conceptualizing identity as a categorical

or bipolar construct to a multidimensional phenomenon. It is assumed that people can have

multiple, dynamic identities, which are configured in different ways depending on a variety of

factors. Because language processes are central to the negotiation of identities, the studies in this

symposium look at the link between multi- and bicultural identities and language use and attitudes.

Sampasivam and Clément found that French Canadians‘ attitudes towards English depend upon

the configuration of their first and second identities, such that those who reported strong

Anglophone and weak Francophone identities have more positive attitudes towards English than

people with other identity profiles. In a second study of French Canadians Noels, Gaudet, and

Marchak found that, for French users, the correlations between Francophone and Anglophone

identities were negative, suggesting a polarization of identities, although the magnitude of the

relation was stronger in more private domains than in more public domains. For French non-users,

there were no relations between the two identities in any domain, consistent with their claim that

these identities are complementary. Comanaru and Dewaele examined the relations between

European and national identities of people from Romania, Belgium and Britain. Across these

countries, people felt that the two identities were compatible, although other evidence indicated

that some internalized their identity more than others. The implications of these various patterns of

identity opposition, alternation, complementarity, and hybridity for language are discussed by

Richard Clément.


Title

Building a bilingual profile: A bi-dimensional approach

Sinthujaa Sampasivam (presenter) & Richard Clément DATE: THU 21.06

University of Ottawa, Canada TIME: 15.30-17.10

57

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Sinthujaa Sampasivam is a graduate student in the School of Psychology at the University of

Ottawa. Her research interests include the social psychological determinants of first language shift

and maintenance, as well as the processes influencing second language communication.

ABSTRACT

Researchers often assess identity using a unidimensional approach, such that identification varies

from affiliating with one group to affiliating with another group, passing through a forcibly volatile

state of belonging to both groups. In the case of bilingualism, where people adopt an identity

associated with each language, a unidimensional measure fails, however, to capture the fact that a

bilingual identity can be a stable characteristic. The present study applies a bidimensional

approach to bilingualism, assessing identification to each language group independently and

evaluating the relation of different bilingual profiles to attitudes and motivation. Francophone

students (n=589) responded to measures assessing their, attitudes and motivations towards their

first language group (French) and their second language group (English). They were then

classified into one of four groups depending on their level of identification (high or low) to each

group. Results suggest that bilingual participants‘ attitudinal and motivational profiles differed as a

result of their linguistic identity. High second language identity was related to more positive

attitudes towards the second language group, but only for students with low first language identity.

These results are discussed with reference to both uni-dimensional and bi-dimensional

approaches to identity, and current conceptualizations of the consequences of having a bilingual

identity.


Title

How to be a Franco-Albertan without Speaking French: Ethnolinguistic Vitality, Sense of

Community, and Bicultural Identity in a Minority Language Group

Kimberly A. Noels (presenter) 1 , Sophie Gaudet 2 , Kristan

Marchak³

1 University of Alberta, Canada, 2 University of Alberta, Canada,

³University of British Columbia, Canada

58

DATE: THU 21.06

TIME: 15.30-17.10

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Kimberly A. Noels is a professor in the Social and Cultural Psychology area of the Department of

Psychology and an adjunct professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the

University of Alberta, Canada. Her research concerns the psychology of language and

communication processes, with a focus on intercultural communication. Her current program of

research involves two lines of inquiry. The first concerns motivation for language learning, with a

focus on how the social context affects people‘s experience of intrinsic and self-determined

motivation. The second centers on the role of communication in the process of cross-cultural

adaptation, particularly how the languages we speak are linked to feelings of ethnic identity. Her

research has been recognized through awards from the Modern Language Association, the

International Association of Language and Social Psychology, the International Communication

Association, and the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues.

ABSTRACT

Although some minority language group members might cease to use their heritage language, they

do not necessarily cease to identify with that community. This study considered how language use

is linked to ethnic identities, and how this relation depends upon perceptions of the community's

vitality and people‘s sense of belonging with that community. Self-identified French Canadians in

Alberta (N = 200) participated in a telephone survey that assessed their Francophone and

Anglophone identities and perceptions of how the identities to related to each other (e.g.,

conflictual, alternating, blended); their use of French; and their sense of belonging to the regional

Francophone community and its current and future vitality. Path analyses showed that objective

vitality predicted subjective perceptions of vitality, which in turn predicted a sense of community.

For the French-users, objective vitality also predicted greater French language use, which

predicted Francophone identity positively and Anglophone identity negatively, and these two

identities were polarized. For the French non-users, Francophone identity was unrelated to

Anglophone identity, which was consistent with their reports that the two identities were

complementary. Moreover, although Francophone identity was supported by French use, it was

also bolstered by a sense of belonging to the Francophone community. These results are

discussed with reference to models of language maintenance and acculturation.


Title

European identity and attitudes to multilingualism in three contexts

Ruxandra-Silvia Comanaru (presenter), Prof. Jean-Marc Dewaele DATE: THU 21.06

Birkbeck College, University of London, UK TIME: 15.30-17.10

59

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Ruxandra-Silvia Comanaru is a doctoral research student at Birkbeck College, University of

London, in the Department of Applied Linguistics and Communication. She is nearing the

completion of her doctoral studies, in which she investigates the influence of multilingual attitudes

and practices on the emergence of European identity in different contexts. Her research interests

include the relation between identity construction and change, and multilingualism, from the

perspectives of socio-linguistics and socio-psychology. Her research makes use of mixed

methodologies due to the fluidity and processual nature of concepts such as bicultural, national or

European identity.

ABSTRACT

The language policies proposed by the European Union aims at encouraging the member

countries to implement multilingual policies (White Paper 1995). The increasing importance of

English as a lingua franca between EU citizens seems to challenge these policies (see Wei,

Dewaele & Housen 2002, Jenkins 2007). Language plays an important role in understanding

cultural and linguistic contact, since through it people construct social interactions and identities

(see Pavlenko & Blackledge 2004, Dewaele & van Oudenhoven 2009). We investigated the

relation between language attitudes, and proficiency in multiple languages and the feelings of

European identity (Bruter, 2005) using online surveys and interviews. The contexts chosen added

depth to the study: Romania, one of the newest member-states of the EU (N = 300), Belgium (N =

337), one of the oldest members, and Britain, where English is the mother tongue (N=119). These

countries have a complex linguistic landscape, which influences the construction of regional,

national and European identity. A bicultural identity scale (Comanaru & Noels, in preparation) was

adapted to reflect the relation between these layers of identity. The results indicate that most

participants endorse a compatible relation between their identities. Results of the comparison of

their levels of European identity suggested the newest EU members feel significantly more

European than the other participants. Nonetheless, the interview data indicates the Belgian

participants have internalised their European identity, while the British participants still have more

distant feelings towards Europe, and the Romanian participants see Europe as an opportunity to

grow personally and professionally.


Title

SYMPOSIUM: Context of Language Attitudes

Context of Language Attitudes

Speakers: Christiane Schoel, Karolina Hansen, Janin Roessel,

Tamara Rakić, Jessica Gasiorek (discussant)

60

DATE: FRI 22.06

TIME: 09.30-11.10

ROOM: BRUSSELS

ABSTRACT

The aim of this symposium is to give an integrative approach to language attitudes.

The first talk looks at the evaluation of competence and warmth for standard and nonstandard

speakers. Thereby the role of a compensatory mechanism is taken into account to explain why

particularly after competence devaluation of nonstandard speakers, a positive evaluation of

warmth for the same group occurs.

The second talk deals with the interaction of non-native (native) accent and foreign (German) looks

on target evaluation; again, the order of presentation of two stimuli is important in creating

expectancies about the person and consequently for the final evaluation outcome.

The third talk investigates the mediating role of feelings and stereotypes on the evaluation of

German-accented English speakers. Whereas negative feelings triggered by a strong accent

instigated downgrading evaluations among a non-native English speaking German audience, the

same was not the case in the United States

where positive stereotypes seemed to influence evaluations.

Finally, the last talk addresses the use of speech style by standard speakers. Results showed that

especially women tend to use significantly more powerless-speech-style-cues and in return this

caused lower competence attributions. Whereas accents have until now received most attention

for language attitudes we show that also other cues, such as appearance and speech style, as well

as the context and the perceiver, play an important role in person perception and evaluation.

Keywords:

language attitudes, stereotype content model, non-standard speakers, speech style.


Title

Explicit and implicit answers to the question why non-standard speakers are warmer than

standard speakers

Christiane Schoel (presenter), & Dagmar Stahlberg DATE: FRI 22.06

University of Mannheim TIME: 09.30-11.10

61

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Christiane Schoel is a research associate in social psychology at the University of Mannheim,

Germany. Her research interests include language attitudes and speaker evaluations, leadership

preferences and power motivation as well as consequences of social exclusion.

ABSTRACT

A typical research finding is that status and competence are attributed to standard

speakers, whereas solidarity and warmth are attributed to non-standard speakers. In four studies,

we address the question why particularly non-standard speakers often receive better warmth

ratings. We show that this is particularly the case when a devaluation of this group on the

competence dimension precedes the evaluation on the warmth dimension and argue for a

compensation mechanism. Study 1 and 2 show on explicit measures that evaluating the

competence of standard speakers before evaluating the warmth of non-standard speakers leads to

a stronger preference for the non-standard speakers on the warmth dimension than in the

opposite order. Study 3 replicates and extends these findings by employing implicit measures

revealing that the compensation process is at least in part automatic. Finally, Study 4 investigates

the interplay of explicit and implicit judgments.


Title

“To speak or not to speak?” Expectancy violations and the interplay of accent and

appearance in impression formation

Karolina Hansen (presenter), Tamara Rakić, & Melanie C.

Steffens

Friedrich Schiller

62

DATE: FRI 22.06

University Jena, Germany TIME: 09.30-11.10

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Karolina Hansen received her MSc in psychology from University of Warsaw, Poland. In her MSc

thesis she explored influence of language and culture on interpersonal distance in conversation.

Currently she is a last year PhD student at the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany. Her

PhD thesis examines interaction of appearance and accent on social categorization and

impression formation. Her research interests are in the fields of social psychology, sociolinguistics,

intercultural psychology, and experimental economics.

ABSTRACT

Ethnicity-based impressions are at times unambiguous, but not always: Speech styles may violate

expectations people hold about ethnicity. In our experiments, we examined how varying auditory

(accent) and visual (appearance) information about others affects people‘s evaluations of the

targets. We presented targets who spoke with an accent either congruent or incongruent to their

(German or Turkish) appearance. Based on the ethnolinguistic identity theory (Giles & Johnson,

1981, 1987), which posits that language and accent are important social markers, we hypothesized

that accent would influence evaluations more than appearance. Furthermore, based on the

expectancy violations theory (Burgoon & Jones,

1976), we predicted that incongruent targets (e.g., Turkish appearance/German accent) would

violate participants‘ expectations and lead to extreme evaluations. Our predictions were confirmed.

Turkish-looking job candidates speaking with a German accent were evaluated as most competent

and German-looking candidates with a Turkish accent, as least (Experiment 1). Experiments 2a

and 2b replicated these findings using our new dynamic approach to expectancy violation theory,

which shows differences between what is expected and how the impressions change. Results also

showed order effects: Turkish-looking standard speakers were evaluated better if seen first, rather

than heard first. With a new approach we obtained stronger support for the expectancy violations

theory and showed that bringing together visual and auditory information yields a more complete

picture of the processes underlying impression formation.


Title

The “Affect Behavior Cognition” of accent perception – On the role of negative affect in the

perception and evaluation of accented speakers in persuasion

Janin Roessel (presenter), Christiane Schoel, & Dagmar

Stahlberg

63

DATE: FRI 22.06

University of Mannheim TIME: 09.30-11.10

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Janin Roessel received her Diploma in Psychology at the University of Mannheim, Germany. In her

diploma thesis, she investigated means of reducing discrimination against accented speakers in

international English communication. At present, Janin is a research assistant at the Chair of

Social Psychology (Prof. Dr. Dagmar Stahlberg) and a PhD student in Psychology at the Graduate

School of Economic and Social Sciences at the University of Mannheim. Her research focuses on

the impact of accents in international English communication and the role of affect in accent

perception. Further interests lie in the areas of social cognition, methodology, and culture.

ABSTRACT

Strong foreign accents commonly elicit pejorative evaluations, especially regarding competence

and status dimensions. In the light of internationalization, this draws a dark picture for global

communicators who try to present themselves and their ideas in accented English at universities or

at the job market. Will their qualification be considered? Or do automatic processes trigger

negative reactions no matter how qualified an accented speaker is? In a series of studies we

investigated how Germans are evaluated when speaking English with a German accent. In Study 1,

we presented German participants with the recordings of an ostensible job candidate (for a junior

professorship at a German university). We orthogonally manipulated the candidates‘ German

accent (strong vs. weak) and the candidates‘ quality of arguments (high vs. low). Although

participants were informed that classes would be held in German, candidates speaking with a

strong German accent received low qualification ratings end few positive hiring decisions

regardless of the argument quality. Pejorative reactions toward the strong accent were driven by

negative feelings. Study 2 replicated this finding and demonstrated that the hint to control ones

stereotypes and feelings was potent to reduce discrimination. Studies 3 and 4 applied the same

experimental material in the United States and found a major effect of argument quality and the

tendency of a favorable evaluation for the German accent.


Title

Gender in style. On the influence of gender and speech style on speaker evaluation

Tamara Rakić (presenter), Irena D. Ebert & Melanie C. Steffens

Friedrich Schiller

64

DATE: FRI 22.06

University Jena TIME: 09.30-11.10

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Tamara Rakic received her PhD in Social Psychology at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena in

2009. Currently she is a research associate at Person Perception Research Unit (FSU Jena). Her

research interests include: influence of accents on person perception and categorization, different

language and cross-cultural aspects of Social Psychology.

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to test the influence of participants‘ speech style usage on the evaluation

of personality traits. We additionally manipulated whether the audience was responsive or nonresponsive

to the participant‘s speech. Participants had approximately 3 minutes to present

verbally their strengths and weaknesses. Presentations were video-taped, typewritten and coded

for indicators of powerless speech style (e.g., intensifiers, disclaimers) as an increased number of

these cues is related to lower status and competence. Our results showed that women ―suffered‖

more from a non-responsive audience and used more disclaimers and intensifiers than men did.

Generally women tended to use more powerlessspeech- style-cues than men regardless of type of

audience. They were also perceived as being less competent than men by independent raters.


Panel for "Language and Tourism"Task Force

IALSP Task Force Language and Tourism

Crispin Thurlow and Adam Jaworski DATE: FRI 22.6

University of Washington, USA and Cardiff University, Wales

65

TIME: 9.30-11.10

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

Background

Arguably the largest international trade in the world, the great population movement of tourism

affects almost everyone these days, be it those people privileged enough to ―tour‖ or those who

are ―toured‖. Tourism is certainly a major – truly global – cultural industry shaping a wide range of

social, political and economic processes. This is one good reason why the academic study of

tourism has already become so important to fields like sociology, anthropology, geography and

cultural studies. What sociologists like Mimi Sheller & John Urry fail to note, however, is that

language and languages too are on the move in tourism. A small but growing number of

sociolinguists and discourse analysts have started to situate the analysis of language squarely

within the field of tourism studies, and to consider what tourism reveals about language and social

interaction in contemporary life. Typically, these scholars of language and tourism are interested in

the role of language/s in representing and constituting identities, relationships and communities in

the context of tourism. There is often also a concern for the ideologies of difference and relations

of inequality reproduced in tourism discourse, and the role of language as a commodity in ―new‖

service and information-based economies.

For scholars of language and communication, tourism is a particularly rewarding domain for

research: not only is tourism a major global cultural industry, but it is also a key site for intergroup

encounter, for language contact, for the construction and negotiation of social identities, and for the

reproduction (or perhaps reformation) of cultural attitudes, stereotypes and prejudices. Indeed,

host–tourist interactions embody the very essence of intercultural and globalizing processes. It is in

communication with each other, in every particular instance of contact, that hosts and tourists

negotiate the nature of the tourist experience, the meaning of culture and place, their own identities

and their relationship with each other. Any such interpersonal, face-to-face encounter is also

heavily pre-figured at any number of discursive moments in the tourist enterprise; for example, in

reading holiday brochures, travel guides and newspaper travelogues, watching TV holiday shows,

flicking through inflight magazines or friends‘ Flickr albums, etc.

As a major service-based industry, tourism also helps drive postindustrial economies in which

goods are discursively mediated and increasingly semioticized. Not only does tourism involve faceto-face

(or more mediated) forms of visitor-host interaction, but the ―products‖ purchased by

tourists during their travels are symbols, ideals, memories, stories – the fantasy and performance

of ―going native‖, having ―safe adventures‖, meeting new peoples and experiencing ―exotic‖

cultures. This is where language and communication become both commodities and the vehicle for

their exchange; it is also where the traditional places of language are dislocated. Snippets of


language formulae, not unlike material goods such as souvenirs, are brought back from foreign

trips as useful props in the enactment of tourist narratives.

The IALSP task force

In constituting this Task Force, our goal is to bring to highlight the scholarly significance of tourism

in general, and its relevance to social psychology in particular. Such a vast and complex social

domain – with an equally extensive and varied interdisciplinary coverage – makes it difficult to

address everything. As we‘ve noted before (Thurlow & Jaworski, 2010; cf also Jaworski & Thurlow,

2010), there are as many tourisms as there are tourists, and it is only ever for analytic or

commercial convenience that they come to be organized into ―types‖ or ―modes‖ of travel. As such,

the Task Force cannot possibly hope to account for all tourisms or all tourists. Nor can it cover the

numerous ways in which language/s figure in contemporary tourism or the many different ways

scholars choose to feature tourism in their work. Nonetheless, our goal is to offer a variety of

perspectives focused on the role of language in tourism – what we ourselves dub ―the

sociolinguistics of fleeting relationships‖ (Jaworski & Thurlow, forth.). These, then, are some of the

most typical and/or most relevant topics:

66


Title

Talking about Tourism and Touring Around Its Talk: An Intergroup Communication

Accommodation Perspective

Howard Giles¹, Hiroshi Ota² DATE: FRI 22.6

¹University of California, Santa Barbara, USA; ²Aichi Shukutoku

University, Japan

67

TIME: 09.30 – 11.10

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

ABSTRACT

Tourism is big business globally, as witnessed recently by the World Tourism Organization that

predicts that there will be more than billion tourists in 2012. It can also be construed an arena of

intercultural communication as tourists engage (and sometimes impose themselves on) host

communities. Perhaps surprisingly, the fields of intergroup and intercultural communication and

relations have, as yet, only spawned a few studies invested in understanding the processes of

host-tourist language practices. In this paper, and drawing on recent interculturally-defined

contributions to intergroup communication accommodation theory, we propose a new model for not

only understanding past cross-disciplinary research on resident-host relations, but also for it being

a blueprint to guide further research of this genre.


Title

Heritage and authenticity in tourism

Bethan Coupland¹, Nikolas Coupland², Crispin Thurlow

(presenter)

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DATE: FRI 22.6

¹University of Exeter, England; ²Cardiff University, Wales TIME: 09.30 – 11.10

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ABSTRACT

Heritage tourism commonly involves displays designed to represent - typically to celebrate and

commemorate - a valued cultural past. Our particular focus in this paper is mining heritage, and

how it has been developed in Wales and Cornwall to reflect their rather different, but nationally

defining, industrial histories. From some historical and critical perspectives, heritage is a

controversial concept. To what extent can a performative cultural display capture the valued

essence of a distinctive cultural place and time? Is 'heritageisation' inevitably deauthenticating?

We try to meet the theoretical challenge of modelling authenticity and inauthenticity in a heritage

context. In our Welsh and Cornish data, heritage sites are promoted largely in terms of their

authentic value. Visitors can 'experience' the past (e.g. by going underground, being guided by

'real miners' and engaging with material artifacts of mining) not merely observe it. Heritage sites

necessarily perform authenticity, as they can only display representations or reconstructions of the

past. Nonetheless, curatorial integrity strives for historical authenticity, and consumers bring their

own contexts of consumption to heritage, often finding value that meets their own criteria of

authentic experience.


Title

Linguistic commodification in tourism

Monica Heller¹, Alexandre Duchêne², Joan Pujolar³, DATE: FRI 22.6

¹University of Toronto, Canada, ²Institute of Multilingualism,

Switzerland, ³Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, Spain

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ABSTRACT

One of the characteristics of the globalized new economy is the commodification of language and

identity, complexifying and transforming modern ideologies linking language to authentic

belonging, to the nation, the State and the land. Tourism is arguably the most important terrain for

the development of this process, as it turns in late capitalism to greater investments in symbolic

added value and to niche markets, as manifested in particular in the growth of heritage and cultural

tourism. In these areas, symbolic capital developed through modern nationalist inventions of

traditions, cultural practices, canons (even vernacular ones), languages and identities is mobilized

as marketable. Language thereby becomes both a means of attributing authenticating value to the

tourist product, and a means of selling it, requiring stakeholders to take into account the complex

nature of the consumer market as well as the production one. One result is that language becomes

a constitutive work practice in tourism worksites, and needs to be understood in those terms. In

this chapter, we will review what is known about how these processes have been unfolding in the

past few decades, why they take the shape they do, and what their con sequences are for the

reshaping of ideologies of language and identity in late capitalism.


Title

Tourism, multilingualism and minority language spaces

Sari Pietikäinen¹, Helen Kelly-Holmes², Máiréad Moriarty², DATE: FRI 22.6

¹University of Jyväskylä, Finland; ²University of Limerick, Ireland;

²University of Limerick, Ireland

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ABSTRACT

The desire for ―new‖ and ―unspoilt‖ destinations in contemporary cultural tourism is leading to a

transformation of minority language spaces and communities. Previously peripheralised and even

stigmatised languages have come to have increased capital as a source of authenticity for tourists

in an ever more homogenised market. While the relevant minority language may be used to market

and to differentiate these destinations, these spaces are multilingual, not only as a part of the

minority language community language politics and practices, but also related to tourism,

commerce and technology, creating markets for various language skills. Multilingualism in such

spaces is multilayered, dynamic and often contentious. It also has a history with tourism, since

services and tourism have, throughout the 20th century, formed at least some part of the income

earned by many people living in minority language spaces. In this article, we draw on our longstanding

work in two minority language tourist destinations, namely Sámiland in northern Finland

and the Gaeltacht area in western Ireland. Both of these places are simultaneously popular tourist

destinations and designated areas for minority languages, and hence subject to complex and

evolving language ideological processes related to access, ownership and legitimacy.


Title

Performing tourist in travel spaces

Adam Jaworski¹, Crispin Thurlow² DATE: FRI 22.6

¹Cardiff University, Wales; ²University of Washington, USA TIME: 09.30 – 11.10

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ABSTRACT

In laying claim to their identity as ―tourist‖ and to the cultural capital it bestows, travellers must

commit to an ongoing series of performances or narrative enactments. This might start in

conversation with friends about potential destinations or in service encounters with travel agents; it

typically ends in the ―tourist haze‖ created as they return home with their travel stories, souvenirs

and photos. Clearly organized through language, these performances are also grounded in

multisensory encounters with the tourist sites – in other words, through visitors‘ embodied

interactions with space/place. In this paper, we therefore take a more multimodal approach to

thinking about ―language and tourism‖, although we remain focused on social interaction and

communicative practice. Referring to allied work in anthropology, performance studies and

geography, we consider tourists‘ nonverbal, mediating actions and their mediatized (or

remediating) identity displays in online photo albums.

Discussant

Itesh Sachdev, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, UK

Objectives

The International Association for Language and Social Psychology (IALSP) regularly arranges for

a select group of scholars to put together a ―state of the field‖ report to share with the broader

academic community oriented to the social psychology of language, sociolinguistics, discourse

analysis, etc. The main outcomes of these task forces are presented in a panel at the International

Conference on Language and Social Psychology and in a special issue (or colloquy) of the Journal

of Language and Social Psychology. The task force chairs usually also present a summary at the

International Communication Association conference. The results of the current Task Force on

Language and Tourism will be presented first at the IALSP 13 conference in mid-June 2012 at the

Fryske Akademy, Leeuwarden, Netherlands – hosted by the Mercator European Research Centre

on Multilingualism and Language Learning.


Title

SYMPOSIUM: ‘Travelling to learn’: New

conceptual, temporal and thematic perspectives

on the ‘international’ student experience

Introduction

Tony Young DATE: FRI 22.06

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TIME: 11.30-13.10

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ABSTRACT

Introduction The adjustment of ‗international‘ students to higher education (HE) is a phenomenon

of increasing importance to researchers, educators and policy makers worldwide. Over the past

decade, the number of people ‗travelling to learn‘ through higher education has increased year-on

year: in 2009 almost 3.7 million students were enrolled in HE institutions outside their country of

origin, an increase of 77% since 2000. Projections indicate that this number could grow to 7.2

million by 2025, representing a further increase of over 250%. (OECD, 2011). These students

make a large financial contribution to host institutions, and to the diversity of student bodies around

the world.

The small but burgeoning literature on the challenges facing international students has

consistently shown these to be greater than those faced by their local counterparts, even when

they are of a similar nature – loneliness and social acceptance, and adjustment to the specific

demands of university study, for example (Andrade 2006). Challenges more particularly salient to

international students include issues of language and intercultural adjustment, and high levels of

stress and anxiety. Social networks have received some attention, but their nature and influence

remains under-explored.

The four interlinked studies presented here aimed to broaden the conceptual, temporal and

thematic perspectives currently being taken, and to bring a truly international perspective to bear,

both in terms of research context and in terms of students‘ points of origin and their destination.

Schartner‘s study explores the hitherto neglected period encompassing decision to sojourn,

embarkation and the first phase of adjustment of a diverse cohort who studied in the UK. Ng,

Rochelle, Shardlow, and Chan investigate the role of ‗distant‘ support networks in the adjustment

of East Asian students to predominantly English-speaking countries. Young and Sachdev explore

the role of a range of predispositional, psycho-social and language ability contributory factors to

various adjustment indices among a group of international students to life and study in the UK.

Pitts examines the re-entry processes and identity and adjustment trajectory of a group of US

student sojourners. A brief discussion of issues arising will follow the presentation of papers.

Reference OECD (2011). Education at a Glance. http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/61/2/48631582.pdf.

Accessed 31 January 2012.


Title

From the decision to study abroad to the arrival in the host country: Exploring the role of prearrival

factors in the international student experience

Alina Schartner DATE: FRI 22.06

Newcastle University, UK TIME: 11.30-13.10

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ABSTRACT

The international student experience goes beyond the time spent abroad and begins before the

actual arrival in the host country, an issue that is often overlooked by researchers and educators. A

consideration of this ‗pre-arrival‘ phase is crucial in order to develop an empirical understanding of

international students‘ motivations, goals, expectations and wellbeing. The purpose of the present

study is to investigate a range of ‗pre-arrival‘ factors; including cross-cultural personality

dispositions, motivation and goals for study abroad, English language proficiency and overall

wellbeing; and their interrelationships. This enquiry widens the scope of previous research in the

field by examining the crucial phase between the decision to embark on a sojourn abroad;

integrating elements leading to this decision; and the first few weeks in the new environment.

Scholarly work on sojourner adjustment has pointed to the importance of motivation (Chirkov et al.,

2007; Chirkov et al., 2008), however investigations into the link with personality characteristics are

scarce.

This study was multimethodological, involving a quantitative survey, including the Multicultural

Personality Questionnaire (MPQ, Van Oudenhoven and Van der Zee, 2002), and semi-structured

interviews. A cohort of 104 international postgraduate students undertaking Masters programmes

in the humanities and social sciences at a UK university were surveyed at the very start of their

programme; additionally, a sub-sample of 20 students took part in individual interviews within three

weeks of their arrival. Results suggest that aspects of intercultural competence, self-determined

motivation to study abroad, English language proficiency and wellbeing upon arrival are

inextricably linked.


Title

Home is no longer far away for international students: Communication and support from

family and friends „back home‟

Sik hung Ng*, Tina Rochelle,* Steven M. Shardlow**, and On

Fung Chan*

* City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, ** University of

Salford, UK.

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DATE: FRI 22.06

TIME: 11.30-13.10

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ABSTRACT

International students, especially those from East Asia studying at Western, English-speaking

universities, are an increasingly numerous group of sojourners. They are keenly sought after by

host countries for their fee income and also because of their contribution to the realization of

internationalization strategies of host universities. Their overseas experience in recent years has

outstripped traditional models of research that have overlooked the role of friends and relatives

living in the country/city of origin, although these models have been successful in showing the

roles of social networks within the host country in students‘ cultural, communicative and psychosocial

adjustments (e.g., Berry, Kim, Minde, & Mok, 1987; Bochner, McLeod, & Lin,1977; Ward,

Bochner, & Furnham, 2001).

To explore the roles of home networks, we surveyed Hong Kong Chinese students studying at

universities in England and, through the cooperation of about half of them (N=20), successfully

contacted their friends or relatives in Hong Kong for interview. Bringing the home networks into the

research provided a relatively unique perspective for the study of international students. In this

paper, we report results bearing on communication, social support, and relational development

from this perspective.

Contact from relatives, especially parents, was more frequent than those from friends. Means of

communication used by relatives included both traditional (e.g., phone), computer-based (e.g.,

email., msn, facebook and skype) and smart phone (e.g., Whatsapp and Talkbox), whereas those

used by friends were mostly restricted to computer-based means and smart phone. Support

rendered by relatives covered emotional (e.g., on adjustment problem, study and work-related

problems) and financial support, advice on health care, and couriering of foods and other daily

necessities. Some parents escorted their sons or daughters to the UK, or visited them when they

fell ill. By comparison, friends‘ support was narrower and focused mainly on emotional and

practical support revolving around study. Relational development varied a great deal from person

to person and showed both gains and losses. The overall results showed that the home networks

continued to be a source of the students‘ emotional and relational support as well as a referential

in-group, suggesting the need to include home networks into research on international students‘

adjustment and development.

Acknowledgements: The work described in this paper was fully supported by a grant from the ESRC/RGC

Joint Research Scheme sponsored by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong and the Economic &

Social Research Council (Project No: RES-000-22-3656)


Title

A Model of International Students‟ Adjustment to Life and Study in Higher Education in the

UK

Tony Young*, Itesh Sachdev** DATE: FRI 22.06

*Newcastle University, UK

** School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London,

UK.

ABSTRACT

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This study considerably widened the scope of previous investigations of the adjustment of

‗international‘ students by integrating associations between a broad range of adjustment indices –

academic grades (here, measured as the products of both taught and research assignments) ,

psychological wellbeing, and satisfaction with life in the new environment – and contributory

factors such as aspects of participants‘ intercultural competence, their language proficiency, and

the degree, quality and patterns of social contact during their sojourn. Investigation was

multimethodological, involving a questionnaire with both quantitative and qualitative responses,

triangulated with the findings from semi-structured interviews over the period of study. Participants

were 108 non-UK postgraduate students from a variety of countries worldwide studying in the UK.

Analysis showed significant associations between participants‘ language proficiency, cultural

empathy, openmindedness, social initiative and degree of contact with non conational international

students, and their academic achievement. There were also significant associations between

language proficiency, emotional stability, amount of social contact with the host community and the

quality of social support (both in the UK and from home), and participants‘ psychological wellbeing

during the sojourn. Participants‘ general satisfaction with life in the new environment was

significantly associated with their proficiency in English, their emotional stability and their degree of

social contact with hosts.

Results provided empirical foundation for a new Model of International Student Adjustment, which

adds considerably to our understanding of the interrelationships between contributory factors and

outcomes. We will detail the model and discuss its implications for researchers, educators and

policy makers.


Title

Cross-Sectional and Time Sequential Analysis of Re-entry Narratives from US Student

Sojourners

Margaret Jane Pitts DATE: FRI 22.06

University of Arizona, USA TIME: 11.30-13.10

ABSTRACT

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The international sojourning experience encompasses much more than the actual time spent

abroad. Serious inquiry into the adjustment and acculturation processes of sojourners must now

move beyond the sojourn proper to account for the full trajectory of the sojourning experience

including the sojourners‘ re-entry process and long-term identity and adjustment trajectory.

Although models of acculturation and adjustment gesture at these process elements (predeparture

honeymoon phase or re-entry shock) there is very little scholarly investigation in these

processes. As Szkudlarek (2010) notes in her comprehensive review of sojourner re-entry, despite

a number of substantial concerns regarding the re-entry experience – including, for some,

significant social, physiological, and psychological difficulties – re-entry has been neglected in the

scholarly literature. The purpose of the investigation abstracted here is to analyze re-entry

narratives from two groups of US student sojourners – students who completed a short-term

sojourn in 2005 and students who completed a short-term sojourn in 2011. I use a time-sequence

design to capture longitudinal re-entry experiences among the 2005 cohort by comparing time one

re-entry narratives (collected within 3 months of initial re-entry) with time two re-entry narratives

(collected 6 years later). I also use a cross-sectional design to capture re-entry narratives from a

new (2011)cohort of student sojourners. My data collection processes include focus group and

individual interviews, as well as participant journaling. Participant narratives are analyzed using

thematic and narrative analysis techniques (e.g.Riessman, 1993) to uncover ways participants give

meaning to their re-entry experience. Comparisons are made within and across groups and time.

References

Reissman, C. K. (1993). Narrative Analysis: Qualitative Research Methods, vol. 30. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Szkudlarek, B. (2010). Re-entry – A review of the literature. International Journal of Intercultural Relations,

34, 1-21.


Title

SYMPOSIUM sponsored by the Asian Association

of Social Psychology (AASP)

How do Aussies Respond to the Use of Australian Slang by the Cultural Newcomers?

Emiko Kashima (presenter) 1 , Evan Kidd 2 , Sara Quinn 2 , and

Nenagh Kemp 3

1 La Trobe University, 2 Australian National University, 3 The

University of Tasmania

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DATE: SAT 23.06

TIME: 09.30-12.45

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BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Emi Kashima received her PhD in 1989 from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She is

currently a senior lecturer at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia. Her research interests

include the effects of culture and language-use on the self and identity, and the role of

psychological threats in the maintenance of culture.

ABSTRACT

Language use is an important vehicle for the transmission and maintenance of culture and identity.

Newcomers learn the local culture through the use of local tongue. However, among cultural oldtimers,

sharing the local linguistic practices with newcomers may pose issues concerning their

ingroup identity and group boundaries. To shed greater light on the implications of shared linguistic

practices in multicultural context, we examined Australians‘ reactions to the use of Australian slang

by a cultural newcomer. The Australian dialect has a large number of hypocoristics (e.g., Aussie,

brekkie, cuppa) that are frequently used and are believed to communicate the cultural ideals of

informality, mateship, and egalitarianism emphasized in Australia. Sixty-one Australian subjects

engaged in a map-direction task with a female Japanese confederate who spoke in the Australian

accent or a Japanese accent, using hypocoristics or not (a 2 × 2 design). As anticipated,

confederate‘s hypocoristic-use was often reciprocated, and moreover, it increased the subjects‘

perception that they shared cultural knowledge with the confederate. This nevertheless occurred

only when confederate spoke in the local accent, suggesting that slang-use enhanced the sense of

shared culture only with highly-acculturated newcomers. Further, when the confederate used

hypocoristics, subjects with Australia-born fathers perceived her as more similar to the self than

when she did not.


Title

Relational Stress in a Hierarchic Society: The case of Korea

Chanki Moon & Gyuseog Han (presenter) DATE: SAT 23.06

Chonnam National University, Gwangju, S. Korea TIME: 09.30-12.45

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BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Currently Prof. Han is a professor of psychology of the Chonnam National University in Gwangju of

South Korea. His primary research area is socio-cultural psychology of Korean people. More

specifically, he works on the social hierarchy, interpersonal stress, and indigenous construction of

mind. His previous publication covers social values, indigenous psychology, history of psychology

in Korea, and theoretical issues in psychology.

ABSTRACT

An implicit conversation rule among Koreans is that a person in an inferior position (younger age

and/or lower social status) has to observe honorific when conversing with a superior partner to

avoid challenging the status hierarchy. Three studies were conducted to test this relational stress

of hierarchy. In the first study, 30 university students were asked to write a letter requesting a

recommendation letter from a hypothetical partner who was either superior, equal, or inferior to

oneself. The number of words written was almost 1.5 times as many in the superior compared to

the inferior condition. Participants reported greater uneasy feelings of writing to a superior than to

an inferior. Three naive raters evaluated the letters as more politely written in the superior than in

the inferior condition. The former also contained more ritualistic expressions than the latter. In a

second study, 100 students were asked to write an email to decline a request for a

recommendation letter sent by a hypothetical partner who was senior or junior to oneself. Email

writing took much longer time in the superior than in the junior condition. A third study provided a

number of incidents violating hierarchy norms against the participants. When the violations were

committed by a junior or by an unfamiliar partner, participants reported greater relational stress.

Overall the results show that Koreans experience relational stress of hierarchy in daily interaction.

Understanding this stress will foster more smooth interactional flow during intercultural interactions.


Title

The Perception of Linguistic Distance from Ingroup and Outgroup Members

is Calibrated to the Costs of Infection Risk

Scott A. Reid (presenter) 1 , Jinguang Zhang 1 , Grace Anderson 2 ,

Jessica Gasiorek 1 , Susana Peinado 1 , and Marko Dragojevic 1

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DATE: SAT 23.06

1 University of California, Santa Barbara, 2 Samford University TIME: 09.30-12.45

ROOM: MILAN

ABSTRACT

To avoid disease, people should keep close to ingroup members but away from outgroup

members who possess novel pathogens. Consistent with this disease-avoidance hypothesis,

pathogenic stimuli and increased personal vulnerability to disease are associated with xenophobic

and ethnocentric attitudes, leading to the widely held assumption that the disease-avoidance

process is an automatic emotional response that compels negative attitudes and behavioral

avoidance. However, findings from five studies show that the process is not just an automatic

disgust-based reaction; it also operates through the cognitive appraisal of social distance. We

predicted that the perception of linguistic similarity to ingroup speakers and dissimilarity from

outgroup speakers would increase with individual differences in pathogen disgust, and that this

association would be most apparent when threat of disease was salient. In Study 1, individual

differences in pathogen disgust but not sexual or moral disgust predicted accent distance between

ingroup and outgroup-accented speakers. In Studies 2 and 3 this linkage between pathogen

disgust and perceived linguistic distance was stronger under a disease than violence prime. In

Study 4, people perceived less similarity and ease of understanding of both ingroup and outgroup

accented speakers when they were exposed to images of diseased white people. In Study 5,

women judged the physical attractiveness of 16 white male voices and were afterwards asked to

estimate the proportion of the speakers who were white. The more women were disgusted by sex

acts, the fewer white males they perceived.


Title

Mother/Daughter-In-Law Conflicts:

Retrospective Accounts by Taiwanese Daughters-in-law

Yan Bing Zhang (presenter) 1 , Shu-Chin Lien 2 DATE: SAT 23.06

1 University of Kansas, 2 Taiwan University of Arts TIME: 09.30-12.45

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BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Yan Bing Zhang is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the

University of Kansas. From a broad perspective, Dr. Zhang studies communication, culture, and

intergroup relations. One specific area of Dr. Zhang‘s research has focused on the influence of

cultural values and stereotypes of age groups on intergenerational communication. A closely

related area of her research has also focused on the influence of mass media on individuals‘ value

systems and mass communication portrayals of cultural values and aging. Another area of her

research has focused on contact and intergroup/intercultural relations, in which she examines the

ways that personal and mediated contact impacts intergroup relationships and attitudes in

intercultural contexts. In addition to experimental and survey studies, Dr. Zhang‘s research

includes contextually-grounded qualitative analysis in the form of discourse/thematic analytic work.

Dr. Zhang‘s work has been published in U.S. and international communication journals such as

Journal of Intercultural and International Communication, Journal of Communication,

Communication Monographs, Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, Asian Journal of

Communication, Journal of Asian Pacific Communication, Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology,

New Media & Society, and Journal of Language and Social Psychology.

ABSTRACT

Grounded in attribution theory, interpersonal and intergroup conflict frameworks, this study

examined the written accounts of intergenerational communication in mother/daughter-in-law

conflicts from 120 Taiwanese daughters-in-law (M age = 40.81, SD = 8.94; age range 22-60).

Specifically, this study investigated the associations among relational closeness, general beliefs of

filial obligations, attribution of responsibility, communication satisfaction, and participants' reported

use of intergenerational conflict management styles. Participants were first asked to think of their

relationship with their mother-in-law and a recent conflict in that relationship. In order to identify

conflict initiating factors and management styles in greater detail, participants were explicitly

instructed to write down their communication exchange during the conflict. Using a content

analytic approach, the written accounts were coded for conflict initiating factors (e.g., criticism) and

management styles (e.g., accommodative, competitive). In addition, age salience, attribution of

responsibility, and communication satisfaction during the reported conflict were also measured.

Implications of the findings are discussed with reference to the prior literature on intergenerational

communication research, conflict management, family relationships, as well as culture change in

Taiwan.


Title

Language and Culture: Can the Priming of a Linguistic Practice Affect Holistic and Analytic

Cognitive Style?

Yoshihisa Kashima (presenter) 1 , Matt Pennell 1 , Evan Kidd 2 , and

Emiko Kashima 3

1 University of Melbourne, 2 Australian National University, 3 La

Trobe University – Australia

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DATE: SAT 23.06

TIME: 09.30-12.45

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BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Yoshi Kashima is Professor of social psychology at the University of Melbourne in Australia. After

completing his undergraduate degree in law at the University of Tokyo, he changed his career and

completed his psychology undergraduate degree at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and

PhD in psychology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He then migrated to Australia

for his job in 1985, and has stayed there ever since. His main research area is social psychology of

cultural dynamics; believing that language use plays a prominent role in the formation,

maintenance, and transformation of culture, his current research explores the interplay between

embodiment, language use in social interaction, and macro-level cultural processes.

ABSTRACT

Ever since Benjamin Whorf‘s theorizing, the relationship between language and thought has been

a critical question for those who are interested in language and culture. Recent research suggests

that there is a correlation between language use and cognitive style. On the one hand, East Asians

tend to have more holistic and less analytic cognitive styles. On the other hand, East Asian

language users tend to have more contextualizing linguistic practices than Western European

language users. Namely, East Asian language users tend to drop personal pronouns as the

subject of a sentence, to use verbs (e.g., talks a lot vs. talkative) rather than adjectives, and

include more contextual qualifiers (e.g., when John is with his friends, at home) in describing social

objects. In light of the work on culture priming, we surmised that a contextualizing vs.

decontextualizing linguistic practices can also be primed to affect cognitive styles as well. An

experiment was conducted with those who were born in Australia and from a Western European

background with English as the first language, in which scrambled sentence tasks were used to

prime the linguistic practice of verb (vs. adjective) use and the linguistic practice of contextual

qualifier use (vs. no use) in a factorial design. Participants then worked on a visual memory task,

which examined the effect of context change on recognition memory. The results showed that

visual recognition was affected by context change more when the linguistic practices of verb and

contextual qualifier uses were both primed (i.e., East Asian linguistic practice) relative to the other

conditions. This suggests that a holistic style of information processing was observed when the

East Asian linguistic practice was primed in English speakers. This provides novel evidence for

linguistic effects on cognition, shedding some light on the question of language-thought

relationship.


Title

Which is More Important in Trust Decisions, an Intermediary or Shared Group Membership?

A comparison between Chinese and Australians

Jiawen Ye DATE: SAT 23.06

City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China TIME: 09.30-12.45

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BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Jiawen Ye (master‘s degree of education, developmental and educational psychology, South

China Normal University) is a PhD candidate at the City University of Hong Kong. Her research

interests include trust in Chinese and Western cultures and biculturalism in Hong Kong. She is a

student member of the Asian Association of Social Psychology.

ABSTRACT

Trust has long been regarded by psychologists and other social scientists as a fundamental

component of social competence and social functioning. It has attracted even stronger attention in

recent years as globalization spreads and calls for greater understanding of trust across cultures.

The present research draws from social identity theory and cross-cultural communication research

to form hypotheses concerning the effects on trust decision due to shared group membership and

an intermediary (between the trustor and the trustee). In support of the hypotheses, results of a

trust game showed, first, that both Chinese and Australians trusted ingroup more than outgroup

strangers. Second, Chinese were more inclined than Australians to trust strangers through an

intermediary, especially when the stranger was an outgroup than an ingroup member. The cultural

difference in the influence of an intermediary on trust decisions is discussed in terms of different

communication styles between Chinese and Australians in expanding social networks.


Title

Cultural Knowledge and Interpersonal Relationship as Bases of Cultural Identification

Ching Wan (presenter) and Pony Yuen Ga Chew DATE: SAT 23.06

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore TIME: 09.30-12.45

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BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Ching Wan is currently an associate professor at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

She received her PhD in social psychology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her

research focuses on understanding culture as shared knowledge representations. She is

interested in the creation and maintenance of shared knowledge representations in a culture, and

the interactive role that cultural knowledge representations play in individual psychological

processes. Her current research concerns the social functions of shared knowledge

representations and the effects of the representations on decision-making.

ABSTRACT

Cultural identification entails an individual‘s emotional attachment to a culture. In this research, we

examined two possible bases of cultural identification – knowledge-based cultural identification and

relationship-based cultural identification. Knowledge-based cultural identification relies on the

alignment between individuals‘ personal characteristics and the characteristics perceived to be

important to the culture. In contrast, relationship-based cultural identification relies on the

alignment between individuals‘ personal characteristics and the characteristics held by the

individuals‘ close others. The former basis of cultural identification has been examined in research

on the link between intersubjective cultural representations and cultural identification. The latter

basis, however, has not been examined in the literature on cultural identification.

The present research provides preliminary evidence in demonstrating that close interpersonal

relationships can serve as a distinct basis of cultural identification. Singaporean undergraduates

responded to items pertaining to their personal endorsement of their family and significant others‘

values and beliefs. They also rated their personal endorsement of Singapore culture‘s values and

beliefs. Results showed that the degree to which the participants personally agreed with their

family and significant others‘ values and beliefs had unique predictive effect on their identification

with Singapore culture and that the relationship was moderated by the participants‘ need for

belongingness. Implications of the findings for furthering research on cultural identification and

understanding of enculturation processes will be discussed.


Title

Acculturation Strategies, Social Support, and Cross-Cultural Adaptation

among Mainland Chinese University Students in Hong Kong

Ting Kin Ng (presenter) 1 , Yi Lian and Kwok-kuen Tsang 2 DATE: SAT 23.06

1 City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China, 2 The

University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China

84

TIME: 09.30-12.45

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Ting Kin Ng is a PhD candidate at the Department of Applied Social Studies, City University of

Hong Kong, currently undertaking research on the social psychology of biculturalism, individual

and collective self-esteems.

ABSTRACT

The present study aimed at examining the relationships among acculturation strategies, social

support, and cross-cultural adaptation of Mainland Chinese university students in Hong Kong.

Specifically, it was hypothesized that social support would enhance the positive effect of

integration strategy and buffer the negative effect of marginalization strategy on cross-cultural

adaptation. A total of 188 Mainland Chinese studying at universities in Hong Kong completed

scales measuring (a) integration and marginalization strategies, (b) social support from family,

local friends, and non-local friends, and (c) sociocultural and psychological adaptation. Results

indicated that sociocultural adaptation was predicted by integration strategy and family support,

whereas psychological adaptation was predicted by integration and marginalization strategies, and

social support from family and local friends. Concerning the moderating effects of social support,

local friends support was found to strength the positive effect of integration strategy and weaken

the negative effect of marginalization strategy on sociocultural and psychological adaptation.

Contrary to the prediction, it was revealed that support from non-local friends impaired the

contribution of integration strategy to psychological adaptation.


Title

INDIVIDUAL PAPERS

Language Use, Sign Intent, and Health Access: Linguistic Landscape of San Antonio‟s

Public Transit System

Donald N. Allison PA-C, MPAS DATE: FRI 22.06

University of Texas at San Antonio

Culture, Literacy, and Language College of Education and

Human Development

Department of Bicultual and Bilingual Studies

85

TIME: 09.55-10.20

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Donald Allison, MPAS, PA-C has practiced medicine as a physician assistant for 20 years with an

interest in caring for the medically underserved in Migrant Community Health and Emergency

Room settings in Colorado and England. He is currently working on his PhD in Culture, Literacy,

and Language at The University of Texas at San Antonio. Mr. Allison‘s research focuses on the

role of culture, language, and gender as it intersects with health and health disparity. His research

interest includes the concept of linguistic landscape, specifically as it corresponds to language use

and medical intent.

ABSTRACT

San Antonio is a multilingual, multicultural community in southwest Texas. Of the 44% Spanishspeaking

inhabitants, 15% are low-English proficient (LEP), requiring Spanish-language

accommodation. Medical care is a basic human right for all individuals. Without accommodation,

language barriers impede health care access. There is insufficient research evaluating language

use as it relates to health intent signage. Linguistic landscape (LL) refers to linguistic objects that

mark the public space. It represents the relative power and significance of a language within a

given sociolinguistic setting and impacts policymaking.

The conceptual practice of linguistic landscape is utilized to determine if the public space of the

transit system provides an environment conducive to linguistic needs of individuals using buses to

access two major medical centers. Two questions guide this research: First, is there a difference

in the frequency of language use among English and Spanish as represented by linguistic

landscape (LL)? Second, is the use of English and Spanish independent of sign type as it relates

to health or non-health?

Results of Descriptive and Chi Square analysis demonstrate that there is a difference in language

use of LL in public spaces of buses surrounding San Antonio‘s medical centers. Secondly, there is

no difference in sign intent for health as compared to non-health. Findings indicate that English is

the prominent language of LL in San Antonio, suggesting lack of accommodation for LEP Spanishspeakers.


Title

Establishing New Norms of Language Use in the Home; how is family language policy

renegotiated as both parents and children learn a second language?

Timothy Currie Armstrong DATE: THU 21.06

Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, the Gaelic College on the Isle of Skye

86

TIME: 15.30-15.55

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Timothy Currie Armstrong is the Soillse Research Fellow based at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, the Gaelic

College on the Isle of Skye. His research focuses on language policy and planning at the micro

level, in communities, in education, in the home and in small organizations, and he is particularly

interested in language ideology and the ways in which different ideologies influence the outcome of

language redevelopment. His PhD thesis was a study of new Irish-language communities in

Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, and he is currently involved in research on adult

learners of Gaelic, their identities and language use.

ABSTRACT

Parents who send their children to be educated through a threatened minority language frequently

do not speak that language themselves and classes in the language are sometimes offered to

parents in the expectation that this will help them to support their children's education and to use

the minority language in the home. Providing language-learning opportunities for parents with

children in minority-language education is understood as good practice in language

redevelopment, but there is little research on the efficacy of this practice. Parents who hope to

change language use in the home have to establish and enforce a new language norm in the

family in opposition to a common background ideology that understands language as a natural

object, and therefore, that it is wrong and bad parenting to 'force' a language on a child. Can

parents realistically hope to succeed in this difficult task and what are some of the strategies they

might follow? I will present data from narrative, life-history interviews with parents who are

learning Scottish Gaelic and who have children who attend Gaelic-medium education, and I will

discuss the difficulties they encounter in establishing new norms of language use in the family and

the strategies they used to effect a new language policy in the home.


Title

Qualitative Word production analysis of Native speakers and Second language learners‟ by

phonemic and categorical Verbal Fluency Test

Keiko Asano DATE: THU 21.06

Juntendo University, School of Medicine TIME: 15.55-16.20

87

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Keiko Asano was graduated from the doctor course in Tokyo University, Graduate School of

Medicine in 1997. Since 2004, She is hired as an associate professor of Juntendo University,

School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. She belongs to the Liberal Arts departments in the University

and has taught a lecture course of Communication and Medical related English. She obtained her

Degree of Ph.D. of Information Science in Tohoku University, Graduate School in 2009. Her

specialized research field is originally about Phonetics especially speech perception and

production for Japanese as second language learners of English. The recent her research area is

expanded to examine the brain mechanism of language activated areas used by fMRI. She is a

member of Acoustical Society of America and Phonetic Society of Japan.

ABSTRACT

This cross-linguistics study investigated how different Japanese, Arabic and Thai second language

learners orally produce words from their native languages aspects of Verbal Fluency Test. This

test, which is widely spread using as clinical and language developmental assessments, is

consisted on two different tasks: phonemic and categorical sections. As for phonemic procedure,

the participants were to produce orally as many different words as possible beginning with the

certain letter within a 1 minute. With regards of categorical one, specified item‘s names such as

animals were asked to produce. These scores used in clinical field are only adopted as quantitative

information. However, in this study, the qualitative relationship between the phonemic and

categorical sections is also analyzed as the ability of second and native language learners‘ word

production.

As for the second language learners‘ phonemic Verbal Fluency aspects, there are different

tendency that the characteristics of the generated words varied from the different proficiency level

groups: the higher proficiency group produce similar words as what the native participants did

while the intermediate group learners produced far less the 10-most common words of natives.

On the contrary to the phonemic sections, despite the different cultural linguistic backgrounds,

remarkable similarities were found between three groups in their native languages categorical

Verbal Fluency performance. It was concluded that culture and language differences do not

contribute to categorical Verbal Fluency performance. The further studies will be focused on the

way how the words are clustered and switched to generate among the different groups.


Title

The influence of printed media on the construction of Hezbollah‟s representations

Pascale Asmar DATE: FRI 22.06

Language Sciences Paris III – Sorbonne Nouvelle

Lebanese University of Beirut

88

TIME: 12.45-13.10

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Joint PhD student in Language Sciences at Paris III – Sorbonne Nouvelle and the Lebanese

University under the joint supervision of Sonia Branca (Pr.) and Leila Osseiran (Pr.) since

September 2010 Master‘s of Research in Language Sciences in 2010 from Paris III – Sorbonne

Nouvelle. Grade: Very Good

« La subjectivisation de la représentation du Hezbollah dans la presse française et la

presse libanaise francophone. Le cas du Monde et de L’Orient-Le Jour » under the

supervision of Sandrine Reboul-Touré (MC, SYLED-Cediscor)

Bachelor‘s degree in 2008 from the Lebanese University in French language and literature

ABSTRACT

In this paper, we will focus on the construction and fixation of the identity of the Other in the press.

Through our corpus‘ examples, we will identify the differences in representing the same object of

discourse – Hezbollah – in a selected range of newspapers: Lebanese, French and American

newspapers. This study aims to demonstrate the use – and abuse – of language by media despite

a claim of objectivity and distance to reality. The media is not representing the Reality itself; it‘s

about the way it sees and identifies this R/reality according to a specific linguistic, cultural and

political system that helps in shaping stereotypes and opinions, as well as oneself representation

when representing the other‘s.

Thesis: « Les diverses représentations du Hezbollah dans la presse libanaise et

internationale »


Title

When using of linguistic abstraction leads to a speaker being seen as a good member:

Examining the linguistic intergroup bias from a normative perspective

Yvette Assilaméhou (presenter) and Benoît Testé DATE: FRI 22.06

University of Rennes 2, France TIME: 10.45-11.10

89

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Yvette Assilaméhou is a PhD student in social psychology at the University of Rennes 2 (France).

Her work focuses on the consequences of subtle linguistic discrimination, such as the linguistic

intergroup bias, on the perpetuation of ingroup bias and prejudice. Her thesis is supervised by

Benoît Testé, who is an associate professor of the University of Rennes 2 and co-director of the

CRPCC-LAUREPS, the laboratory of social psychology of the University of Rennes 2. His research

interests include ideology, social norms, intergroup relations, social cognition and language.

ABSTRACT

The Linguistic Intergroup Bias (LIB, Maass, Salvi, Arcuri, & Semin, 1989) is a systematic bias in

language use, wherein people describe positive ingroup and negative outgroup behaviors

abstractly (e.g. ingroup members are altruistic; outgroup members are aggressive), but use

concrete language for positive outgroup and negative ingroup behaviors (e.g. outgroup members

are helping somebody; ingroup members are hurting somebody). Our goal was to show that using

the LIB corresponds to a normative behavior in intergroup contexts, in that it is a cue to attribute

social value to speakers. We hypothesized that speakers using descriptions congruent with the LIB

will be judged better group members than speakers using descriptions reversed with respect to the

LIB. In two studies, French university students (N = 64 in each study) evaluated speakers using a

congruent-LIB vs. reverse-LIB description of a positive vs. negative behavior by the speaker‘s

ingroup vs. outgroup. The speakers were members of either the participants‘ ingroup or the

participants‘ outgroup. The intergroup context was based on participants‘ nationality (i.e. French vs.

Italian). In study 1, participants evaluated speakers‘ group member attractiveness (Marques et al.,

2001). In study 2, participants evaluated in addition the social reactions the speakers would elicit

among the other group members. Results supported our hypothesis, as they showed social

approval for speakers using the LIB when describing the ingroup. Our hypothesis was not

supported when speakers described the outgroup. Social approval of applying the LIB when

describing the ingroup throws light onto the normativity of the LIB.


Title

Incorporating World Englishes into a Teacher Education Course

Burcu Ates 1 & Zohreh Eslami 2 DATE: THU 21.06

1 Department of Language, Literacy and Special Populations

Sam Houston State University,Huntsville, TX

2 Department of Teaching, Learning & Culture

Texas A&M University, College Station, TX

90

TIME: 13.30-13.55

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Burcu Ates is an Assistant Professor of ESL/Bilingual Education at Sam Houston State University,

Huntsville, Texas, U.S.A. Her research interests include ESL/EFL education, teacher education,

native English speaking (NES) and nonnative English speaking (NNES) language and teacher

educators, World Englishes, and English as a Lingua Franca. She has a B.A in Foreign Languages

Education, M.A. in TESOL, and Ph.D. in ESL and multicultural education. Burcu‘s first language is

Turkish.

Zohreh Eslami is an Associate Professor of ESL Education at Texas A&M University, College

Station, Texas, U.S.A. Her research interests include ESL/EFL teacher education, cross-cultural

pragmatics, pragmatics and language teaching and intercultural communication. She has more

than 25 years of experience in ESL/EFL teacher education both in the USA and overseas Zohreh‘s

first language is Farsi.

ABSTRACT

The colonial and postcolonial spread of English worldwide has created a number of varieties of

world Englishes (WE). The global spread of English has increased opportunities for native English

speakers in the United States to interact with other speakers of world English (Kubota, 2001).

However, native speakers are rarely encouraged to develop the knowledge and skills necessary

for intercultural communication, often resulting in a one-way communicative burden imposed on

the WE speakers (Kubota, 2001).

This paper focuses on a study conducted in spring 2011 involving 261 preservice teachers in five

English as Second Language (ESL) Education courses. The aim of the study is to create

awareness among future teachers on WE and have them explore ways to communicate effectively

with WE speakers. ESL Education courses generally focus on language acquisition and ESL

methodology topics and fell short in including the topic of world Englishes.

The researchers implemented a semester long activities to educate preservice teachers about

issues related to world Englishes and diversity. The activities researchers created on WE

consisted of six sessions (60 minutes each) and were taught every other week throughout the

semester. A pre and a post survey were given to preservice teachers to evaluate the effectiveness

of the activities used and to determine if preservice teachers' awareness towards world Englishes

has increased. This study employed a qualitative and quantitative methods approach. The data

was collected through classroom observations, discussions, activities and pre-post surveys. The

qualitative data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Descriptive statistics was used to report the

survey results.

Ideas and practices in helping the future teachers understand WE in their journey to become global

citizens are discussed in the light of the results of the data analysis.


Title

The boundaries of a word: dialectical meanings in the term barebacking

Rubén Ávila DATE: THU 21.06

Social Psychology Department,

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

TIME: 16.45-17.10

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Rubén Ávila is a junior research fellow in the Social Psychology Department at the Universitat

Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB). He is working on a PhD at the same Department about

barebacking in Spain. He is also a member of the Fractalities in Critical Inquiry research group. His

research interests include power and resistance movements, biopolitics, sexual health, situated

knowledge and narrative inquiry.

He has also worked for a few years as a sexual health promotion specialist at different official

organisms and NGO‘s. His work has dealt with HIV prevention for men who have sex with men

(MSM), especially young men and sexual workers.

ABSTRACT

Selecting a word to designate a social phenomenon is not a mere linguistic decision. It carries

psychosocial implications for the identity of those included in the category defined in that particular

word. Social naming, indeed, involves dynamic processes in which conceptual boundaries stand

out and act as ―barriers‖ or limits between what and who is included or excluded in the category 1 .

The present paper addresses these processes of social naming, focusing specifically on the

meanings associated with the term bareback.

In recent years, barebacking has become a popular term to refer to intended risky sexual activity

between Men who have Sex with Men (MSM). Many studies have been devoted to the definition of

barebacking leading to the following standard definition: barebacking is intentional anal sex without

a condom with men who are not a primary partner 2 .

This definition, however, easily comes into question when confronted with the evidence, for

instance, of sex video websites for MSM, in which oral sex is also referred to as barebacking. Such

cases show that there is a sharp contrast between the conventional definition of barebacking and

the meanings of this term for those who practice it.

In this paper, I explore the concept of barebacking through a qualitative analysis of a corpus of

personal narratives produced by barebackers. A core of dialectical meanings of barebacking

1

Romero Bachiller, Carmen (2003): ―Of differences, excluding hierarchisations, and materialities in

culture: an approach to precariousness from the standardpoint of feminism and the queer theory‖

in Cuadernos de relaciones Laborales, 20(1), 33-60.

2

Halkitis, Perry N.; Wilton, Leo & Drescher, Jack (2005): Barebacking: Psychosocial and Public

Health Approaches. New York: The Haworth Medical Press.

91


emerges from the personal narratives, and sheds light on the current boundaries between

individual practices and mainstream sexual health promotion practices addressed to MSM.

Keywords: Signification; Dialectical; Exclusion; Narratives; Sexual health.

92


Title

Timing Control of Japanese Speech and Temporal Fluctuation of Music Performance

Junichi Azuma DATE: FRI 22.06

Juntendo University, School of Medicine, Tokyo and Chiba,

Japan

93

TIME: 10.20-10.45

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Junichi Azuma is currently a professor of English as a foreign language and media and

communication studies at Juntendo University, School of Medicine, Tokyo and Chiba, Japan. His

research area covers the use of ICT and innovative media in teaching English as a foreign

language, e-Learning and future communication system employing universal visual symbols. He is

also known as a researcher of phonetics (especially, prosodic features of Japanese and English)

and is currently conducting research in timing control of Japanese speech.

ABSTRACT

Short Japanese sentences uttered by a Tokyo dialect speaker were analyzed acoustically to

investigate the temporal fluctuation of syntactic phrases within an utterance. Each analyzed phrase,

called "bunsetsu" in Japanese linguistics, comprise one lexical unit and one particle, such as

"Kariya-de" (meaning in Japanese "in Kariya" (name of a town)). With reference to the average

duration of the phrase-only utterances, the duration of each phrase within the sentence utterance

was analyzed to observe the temporal deviation supposedly caused by the syntactic environment

of the relevant phrase. Overall, the "Final-lengthening" phenomenon was verified, and a sentencefinal

phrase or a phrase just before a deep syntactic boundary was relatively uttered slower.

However, it was also found that a phrase just before a slowly-uttered one was in most cases given

a relatively shorter duration.

Within a sentence with four phrases, a durational patten of "Short-Long-Short-Long" was often

observed. Actual measured duration of each bar of some classical music performances with

seemingly regular tempo (for example, the beginning of the fourth movement of Beethoven's 7th

Symphony) also shows the tendency of "Final-lengthening" at the end of a musical phrase but in

most cases the duration of the third bar within a four-bar phrase is significantly short. A "Short-

Long-Short-Long" pattern was also observed in such music performances. These facts suggest our

temporal activities are not only constrained by the structure of a sentence or a musical phrase but

also by some fundamental mechanism controlling our overall temporal and rhythmic activities.


Title

Necessity of Universal Symbolic Language for Disaster Alert and Warning

Junichi Azuma DATE: THU 21.06

Juntendo University, School of Medicine, Tokyo and Chiba,

Japan

94

TIME: 10.45-11.10

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Junichi Azuma is currently a professor of English as a foreign language and media and

communication studies at Juntendo University, School of Medicine, Tokyo and Chiba, Japan. His

research area covers the use of ICT and innovative media in teaching English as a foreign

language, e-Learning and future communication system employing universal visual symbols. He is

also known as a researcher of phonetics (especially, prosodic features of Japanese and English)

and is currently conducting research in timing control of Japanese speech.

ABSTRACT

This research will discuss the necessity of a new type of universal symbolic language for disaster

alert/warning. Some tentative syntactic and semantic rules for such universal visual language will

be proposed and actual icon-like universal visual signs meant for disaster-related alerts/warnings

will be also illustrated which are supposed to match the development of today's digital technology.

If we consider today's cruel reality that even the metropolises in highly developed countries are not

immune from large-scale natural disasters, local governments in question and the related media

are supposed to ensure that the transmitted disaster alert/warning is reliably received and

understood by all people in the relevant metropolitan area, where people with varied linguistic and

physical backgrounds live. With the possible use in local government and the relevant media in

mind, an experimental Web-based disaster management language repository is being developed.

It is hoped this language repository system with multi-lingual disaster alert/warning descriptions,

audio files for each description in each language and universal visual signs will contribute toward

more efficient transmission of disaster alerts/warnings when the metropolitan area encounters a

large-scale disaster in the future.


Title

How do I Say it? The Relationship Between Impression Management Concerns and Advice

Seeking Behavior for Message Construction in Social Predicaments

Krystyna Aune – Presenter, Lisa van Raalte DATE: FRI 22.06

University of Hawaii at Manoa TIME: 10.45-11.10

95

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Krystyna Aune has been at the University of Hawaii at Manoa since 1991. For the past three years,

she has been serving as Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. Prior to that, she was

Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Humanities. Her academic home is the Department of

Communicology where she is a professor and has served as Chair as well as Director of Graduate

Studies. She teaches courses on Interpersonal Relations, Family Communication, and Theories in

Communication. She was awarded the Board of Regents Medal for Teaching Excellence in 2004.

Dr. Aune‘s research examines emotion expression in romantic relationships, adult play, jealousy in

different types of relationships, and how couples negotiate the division of household labor

ABSTRACT

This study examined the extent to which individuals seek advice for message construction in social

predicaments and how face concerns impact this behavior. Hypotheses predicted a positive

relationship between self-/other-/mutual-face and advice seeking behavior in the construction of

messages directed at others within the context of social predicaments. In an online survey, 84.3%

participants (N=134) indicated that they engage in such advice seeking behavior. Face concern

(self, other, and mutual) was assessed using Ting-Toomey and Oetzel‘s (2001) 22 item scale.

Significant positive correlations were found between self and other face with advice seeking

behavior, but not for mutual face concern. Regression analysis showed the concern for other face

was the most predictive of advice seeking behavior, followed by self face concern and then mutual

face concern. Implications are discussed.


Title

Being victim of Linguicism in Québec and Canada

Richard Y. Bourhis 1 , Nicole Carignan 2 DATE: FRI 22.06

Université du Québec à Montréal Canada 1 Département de

Psychologie 2 Faculté des Sciences de l‘Éducation

96

TIME: 11.30-11.55

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Richard Y. Bourhis was educated in the French and English school system in Montreal, obtained

a BSc in Psychology at McGill University, Canada, and a PhD (1977) in Social Psychology at the

University of Bristol, England. He was Associate Professor in the Psychology Department at

McMaster University in Ontario until 1988 and is currently full professor at the Psychology

Department of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). Richard Bourhis published in

English/French 170 journal articles/chapters on cross-cultural communication, language planning,

acculturation and immigrant/host community relations, social psychology of discrimination. He was

director of the Concordia-UQAM Chair in Ethnic Studies in Montreal from 1996-2006 and director

of the Centre des études ethniques des universités montréalaises (CEETUM) at the Université de

Montréal from 2006-2009. He received the ‗Robert C. Gardner Award‘ for outstanding research on

Bilingualism from International Association of Language and Social Psychology and an award from

the Canadian Race Relations Foundation for excellence in anti-racism in Canada. He was elected

Fellow of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues and the Society for Experimental

Social Psychology. He received a doctorate ‗Honoris causa‘ from Université de Lorraine, France.

bourhis.richard@uqam.ca, http://bourhis.socialpsychology.org.

ABSTRACT

The paper first documents actual income differentials suffered by Anglophones (English L1)

Allophones (other language L1) compared to the Francophone (French L1) dominant majority in

Quebec. We present results from the post census Ethnic Diversity Survey (2003) conducted by

Statistics Canada (N = 42,000) dealing with experiencing discrimination/linguicism in Quebec and

rest of Canada (ROC). Results show that in Quebec, Anglophones (25%) and Allophones (20%)

are more likely to report being victim of discrimination than Francophones (7%). Visible minorities

whose L1 is English are more likely to report being victim of discrimination (41%) than visible

minorities whose L1 is French (28%), attesting to the double jeopardy suffered by visible minority

Anglophones in Quebec. Compared to skin colour and cultural background, language/accent is

seen as the main cause of discrimination for the three language groups attesting to enduring

linguistic tensions in Quebec. In the ROC, Allophones (22%) are more likely to report being victim

of discrimination than Francophones (12%) and Anglophones (12%). Visible minorities with English

as L1 are more likely to report being victim of discrimination (47%) than those with French L1

(32%). In the ROC, skin colour is seen as the main cause of discrimination for Anglophones and

Allophones, while Francophones see language/accent as the main cause of discrimination. In both

Quebec and the ROC discrimination is most likely to be experienced in the work setting followed

by public settings such as stores, banks and restaurants. This Canadian data calls for more

research on linguicism in multilingual states worldwide.


Title

“Our Languages re-visited: presentation of new research into the evolving attitudes of young

Londoners to issues of language and identity”

Sarah Cartwright DATE: THU 21.06

Freelance Teacher Educator TIME: 09.55-10.20

97

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Sarah Cartwright worked at CILT, the National Centre for Languages, 2006-2011. In 2010 she was

working on secondment at SOAS where she fulfilled the role of ―research facilitator‖ for six months.

From 2007 to 2009 Sarah led a major UK government project, ―Our Languages‖, promoting the

benefits of bilingualism and supporting the teaching of ―community‖ languages which are known as

―migrant languages‖ in Europe. The project and its website www.ourlanguages.org.uk was

awarded the Threlford Cup by the Institute of Linguists.

Sarah concurrently managed ITT MFL which provided support for universities involved in Initial

Teacher Education (ITE) through a web-based network, a bi-annual publication, the ―Links bulletin‖,

of which she is the editor and a dedicated website.

Before joining CILT, Sarah was PGCE Course Leader for Modern Languages/Senior Lecturer in

Education at London Metropolitan University.

She holds a BA Hons from the University of Leeds in French with subsidiary Italian, 1976, and an

MA in French from Pennsylvania State University, USA, 1978. Her MA thesis focused on the

Venice 4 version of the ―Chanson de Roland‖.

ABSTRACT

In 2007 a group of plurilingual 17 year old school pupils were interviewed on video as part of the

Our Languages project, a UK government sponsored initiative aiming to support the teaching and

learning of community languages. The series of video clips, entitled ―Bright & Bilingual‖, were

hosted on the project website and have been extensively used in teacher training in the UK to

challenge the notion of any link between bilingualism and educational underachievement. For, on

the contrary, these state school students were articulate, high-achieving and ambitious. This

positive message seemed of paramount importance in an educational culture in the state system

where the label ―English as an Additional Language‖ (EAL) had almost become synonymous with

Special Educational Needs (SEN).

Over 4 years later the subjects are re-interviewed using the same sets of questions to explore

whether there has been any shift in their sense of social identity now that they have graduated

from university and are entering the workplace - in a very difficult economic climate.


Title

Presence, role and value of crossborder contacts and meaningful relationships development

in neighbouring language classroom.

The case of mainstream primary schools of the Littoral zone of Slovenian-Italian border.

Irina Moira Cavaion DATE: THU 21.06

Faculty of Education, University of Primorska, Koper - Slovenia TIME: 16.20-16.45

98

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Irina Moira Cavaion is a Ph.D candidate in Plurilingualism and Intercultural Communication Studies,

at Faculty of Education - University of Primorska, Koper. She is a primary English teacher in Triest

– Italy, also engaged in projects supported by the Italian Ministry of Education, aiming at improving

neighbouring language teaching at primary level. Her doctoral research investigates crossborder

contacts as a key strategy to implement neighbouring language learning and teaching

methodology with a focus on meaningful relationships development. She is also involved in

research investigating the role of empathic understanding in the educational relationship, and

committed to spread the idea of empathic understanding as a key value in postmodern school

environments.

ABSTRACT

Contact with the target language speakers is the most desirable context for a second language

classroom, a key strategy capable to respond to all the challenges foreign language teaching is

nowadays called to answer: authenticity, sensitivity to otherness, linguistic communicative

competence. More, if leaded towards a development of meaningful relationships among groups of

teenagers, contacts between adolescences - learning each the language of the other - could

answer the need of disclosing their personalities, transforming the foreign language classroom into

highly motivated learning, as well as a means of social integration, both through personal and

intergroup relationships development.

This is even more possible in neighbouring language classrooms where geographical proximity of

the languages taught allow crossborder contacts development but where there is a need to share a

positive perception, a comfortable feeling of their feasibility and sustainability. The research in fact

- within the framework of Allport (1959) and Pettigrew's (1998, 2008) intergroup contact theory -

aims to assess the presence, the role and the value characterizing so far realized crossborder

contacts in all the 11 mainstream primary schools of the Littoral zone of Slovenian/Italian border

offering compulsory teaching of the neighbouring Italian language, in order to shed the foundations

of a language teaching methodology based on the establishment of continue contacts and the

development of meaningful relationships among students, respectful of the past experiences and

beliefs identified throughout the survey, but also daring towards new experiences, that is, towards

a more affective language learning approach.


Title

A cross-cultural comparison of apologies by native speakers of American and Chinese

Yuh-Fang Chang DATE: THU 21.06

National Chung Hsing University TIME: 09.55-10.20

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

99

ROOM: PARIS

Yuh-Fang Chang is an associate professor in the Department of Foreign languages and literatures

at the National Chung Hsing University. Her research emphasis has been on interlanguage

pragmatics, language transfer and teacher education. Among her recent publications are:

Interlanguage pragmatic development: The relation between pragmalinguistic competence and

sociopragmatic competence (in Language Sciences) and Refusing in a Foreign Language: An

investigation of problems encountered by Chinese learners of English (in Multilingua: Journal of

cross-cultural and interlanguage communication)

ABSTRACT

Several researchers have investigated cross-cultural differences of speech act realization. There is,

however, relatively little research on the cross-cultural difference between apologies in Mandarin

Chinese and English. American and Chinese cultures differ in many ways. When distinguishing

cultures based on communication styles, American culture is placed toward the low-context

communication end, whereas Chinese culture is placed toward the high-context communication

end on a continuum of cultural communication differences (Ting-Toomey, 1988). The former has

been characterized as ―valuing individual value orientation, line logic, direct verbal interaction‖; the

latter as preferring ―group value orientation, spiral logic, indirect verbal interaction‖ (Ting-Toomey,

1988, p.225). American and Chinese cultures also differ in that the former is classified as an

individualistic culture, in which one considers the preservation of the autonomy of the individual

significant and the latter as a collectivistic culture, in which one considers the preservation of the

harmony within group important (Triandis, 1995). In cross-cultural communication, a lack of

understanding of different sociolinguistic rules and principles of face-to-face interaction often

results in cross-cultural misunderstanding and may affect interpersonal relationships. The present

study examines the difference in the perception of and the reaction to situations that require an

apology between English native speakers and native speakers of Mandarin Chinese. There were

two groups of participants in this study: 100 Americans and 100 Chinese. The data were collected

using discourse completion task. The results showed that Americans and Chinese differ in their

perception of the severity of the offences and their use of apology strategies.

References

Ting-Toomey, S. (1988). Intercultural conflict styles: A face-negotiation theory.

In Y.Y. Kim and W.B. Gudykunst (Eds.). Theories in intercultural communication (pp.213-235).

Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Triandis, H.C. (1995). Individualism & collectivism. UK: Westview Press.


Title

The war on language: A content analysis of how modern U.S. presidents have used “war” as

a metaphor in political addresses

Sarah Chenoweth DATE: SAT 23.06

University of Arizona TIME: 10.20-10.45

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

100

ROOM: MADRID

Sarah Chenoweth is a Ph.D. student in communication at the University of Arizona, in Tucson,

Arizona. She has two M.A.s, one in communication and the other in English, from Pittsburg State

University, in her hometown of Pittsburg, Kansas. Her current research interests are political in

nature and include: presidential rhetoric with a focus on religious discourse, current social

movements in the U.S, and moral foundations. Her past research has focused on communication

law and policy with an emphasis on First Amendment issues and privacy laws. She can be

contacted at: schenoweth@email.arizona.edu."

ABSTRACT

History is replete with descriptions of war. For millennia people have fought and died for the things

they, or others to whom they are pledged, believe in. Certainly no one intentionally wishes to

reduce the tragedy and experience of war, yet through the improper use of language, many

Americans do so every day. The use of the word ―war‖ as a metaphor in U.S. culture does not

carry with it the horror and death of historic war; rather, war has become a surrogate for any type

of conflict or disagreement; including disagreements over economic policies, civil liberties, and

even religious holidays. This paper examines the use of the word ―war‖ as a metaphor by the

modern U.S presidents, 1933-2012. Because presidential rhetoric ―defines political reality‖

(Zaresky 611) for citizens of the U.S., the ways in which presidents use language can be seen as a

reflection of how the nation understands political and social concepts. By doing a computer

assisted content analysis of presidential speeches, from Franklin Roosevelt through Barak Obama,

this paper identifies the ways in which these presidents have used ―war‖ as a metaphor for

disagreements about policies on drugs, poverty, economics, etc. Additionally, comparisons of

these presidents are made concerning their relation to historic war, including whether or not the

president has military experience or is in office during war time. Finally, this paper makes a case

as to how this misuse of language both desensitizes society and promotes the uninformed use of

language in American culture.


Title

Building Blocks of Identities in The EFL Classroom: Frames And Footings

Hatice Çubukçu DATE: FRI 22.06

Faculty of Communication of Çukurova Univesity, Adana , Turkey TIME: 11.30-11.55

101

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Hatice Çubukçu, currently a faculty member and Vice Dean at the Faculty of Communication of

Çukurova Univesity, Adana , Turkey, previously taught for 10 years in the ELT department of the

same university. She obtained her BA and MA degrees from Dept. of English Language and

Literature, Hacettepe University, Ankara, and Ph.D, from Istanbul University in the field of

Linguistics (2001). She served as the Local secretary for the Cambridge University English

Language Certificate program (UCLES) for Adana region(1990-1995), and later as the Vice

director of Center for Foreign Languages of Çukurova University (2004-2006). Her research

interests mainly include: Pragmatics, Sociolinguistics and Conversation Analysis. Some of her

recent publications are entitled:"Towards a dynamic model of ınterpersonal communication" ,

"Gender ideology in ELT coursebooks in Turkey", "Analyzing wedding invitations as a genre" ,

"Conversational Code switching in Turkish-Arabic bilingual talk", ―Asking for the hand of the girl:

marrige arrangement discourse in Turkish culture",Power in disguise: women‘s strategies for

mitigating a powerful self image in conversation‖, ―Beyond the borders of speech communities:

construction of identity as members of the Global Discourse Community‖, ―Contruction of house

wife identity through discourse.‖

ABSTRACT

Recent scholarship has emphasized the vital relationship between social identities and language

as rooted in the Social constructionist theories which suggest that identities develop and emerge

through social interaction (Anderson,1991; Holland et al,1998; Auer,2005; Kiesling,2006 ). This

dynamic view of identity has also opened new paths towards a better understanding of the

nature of second/foreign language learning through the investigation ‗multiple identities of

language users‘. However, it has been observed that while substantial amount of research was

conducted on L2 learning in naturalistic (eg. immigrant) settings, studies in FLA classrooms are

limited both in number and scope (Block 2007).

With the above mentioned concern in mind, this paper tries to uncover the linguistic processes

by which learners and teachers actively co-construct various social identities during the

classroom interaction in the EFL context, with specific focus on footings.

The conversational data were obtained from 3 language instructors and 65 students in six

classroom hours and Frame Analysis (Riberio 2007) was employed to identify the types of social

identities constructed by both teachers and learners during the classroom interaction. Also


described were the linguistic steps or so called footings that initiate, maintain and terminate the

frames, and signal who participants think they are-and others are, during specific instances of the

interaction. Findings suggest that participants co-construct a series of other social identities while

performing institutionally defined teacher and learner identities.

Key words: Identity, Frames, Footing, Positioning, Classroom Discourse,

102


Title

Cultural Bias in Language Assessment: English as a French examination

Martine Derivry DATE: FRI 22.06

UPMC, Paris, France TIME: 10.20-10.45

103

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Martine Derivry-Plard is a senior lecturer at UPMC, Paris 6 where she teaches EFL and Applied

Linguistics and is involved in CLIL issues related to higher language education in Europe. She also

oversees the questionnaire seminars at the University of Luxembourg within a CLIL context and is

a member of the Diltec (EA 2288), Sorbonne Paris 3 and Paris 6 and Plidam (EA 4514), Inalco —

Paris research groups. Her research interests deal with language teachers and the notion of

native/non native, ideologies such as native-speakerism, and beliefs and representations on

languages and language teachers within a linguistic global market of languages and cultures. She

participated in the international research network which published in 2011, the Handbook of

Multilingualism and Multiculturalism by Zarate, G., Levy D., Kramsch, C., Paris : Éditions des

Archives Contemporaines.

ABSTRACT

Assessment and evaluation are usually perceived by teachers as scientific and therefore neutral

and objective. However even if a scientific approach is necessary to build strong indicators in

order to measure language levels and attainments, the scientific value of the results often depends

on the clear presentation of the procedures and constructs (how reliability and validity are tested

for example). The way a language examination is designed and all the decisions taken for its

contents, for designing an assessment grid, and even for marking itself, are social practices.

These practices are deeply rooted within the culture of a country, and the educational system

reflects as much as it builds a national culture (Durkheim, 1922; Bourdieu, 1967; Schultheis et al.,

2008). Developing this theoretical framework, an empirical study has been carried out to confront

theory and practice (Derivry-Plard, 2005).

A survey comparing teachers‘ results on the English part of the BTS examination (similar to HND-

Higher National Diploma in Britain) shows that ‗French‘ (or ‗non-native‘) teachers obtained better

results for their students than their ‗English‘ (or ‗native‘) colleagues. The analysis reveals that

success is linked not only to explicit teaching/learning processes but also to ‗implicit‘ cultural

practices embedded within an assessment system. Assessing students is based on explicit rational

discourses and norms, but norms as social practices also belong to a hidden agenda or a hidden

code of practice. Within a French examination, English is assessed in a ‗French way‘

corresponding to some culturally-based or biased ‗school subconscious‘.


References

Bourdieu, P., 1967. « Systèmes d‘enseignement et systèmes de pensée », Revue internationale

des sciences sociales, n° XIX, 3, pp. 367-388. Durkheim, E. 1922. Education et sociologie, Paris,

Alcan.

Derivry-Plard, M., 2005. « L‘évaluation de l‘anglais : une pratique française », Les dossiers des sciences de l‟éducation, n°13, pp 33-42.

Schultheis, F., Roca i Escoda, M ., Cousin, P-F, 2008. Le cauchemar de Humboldt, Paris, Raisons

d‘ Agir.

104


Title

Parental reading attitudes versus the child‟s bilingual vocabulary growth

Jelske Dijkstra 12 , Folkert Kuiken 2 , René J. Jorna 13 , Edwin L.

Klinkenberg 1

1 Fryske Akademy / 2 University of Amsterdam / 3 University of

Groningen

105

DATE: THU 21.06

TIME: 09.55-10.20

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Jelske Dijkstra is a PhD-student at the Fryske Akademy and University of Amsterdam. Her

research focusses on the bilingual (Frisian/Dutch) language development of 98 young children

aged between 2,5-4 years old in Fryslân, a province in the north the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Reading aloud has an important impact on language acquisition of young children (Sénéchal,

1997). Several studies have shown that young children who are poor readers will probably remain

poor readers in later life (a.o. Cunningham & Stanovich, 1997). Therefore, parents should start

stimulating their children to read at a very young stage. However, their reading practices are highly

dependent on their reading attitudes. Parents who have positive attitudes towards reading tend to

read more to their children. This, in its turn, will have a positive effect on the children‘s receptive

vocabulary.

In a longitudinal study, 98 young participants are monitored in their receptive vocabulary of both

Frisian and Dutch. The participants all live in Fryslân (the Netherlands) where Frisian (minority

language) is spoken next to Dutch (majority language). The research question for this paper is: Are

positive parental reading attitudes correlated with a significant growth in receptive vocabulary both

in the child‘s home language and second language?

From the age of 2,5 years onwards, the participants were assessed in their receptive vocabulary in

both Frisian and Dutch during three successive periods of six months each. The languages were

tested on separate occasions with a few weeks in between. Questionnaires revealed information

on home language and parental reading attitudes and practices. Consistent with previous research

we see that positive parental attitudes towards reading will lead to a higher performance in

receptive vocabulary. This is especially true for Dutch, the majority language.


Title

The On-going Changes in Turkish as a Minority Language in the Netherlands

A. Seza Doğruöz DATE: FRI 22.06

Tilburg University, School of Humanities, NL TIME: 12.45-13.10

106

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

A. Seza Doğruöz obtained her Ph.D. degree in linguistics from Tilburg University (NL). Through

obtaining a post doctoral research grant from Netherlands Organization for Science (NWO), she

worked at University of California Santa Barbara (USA). Currently, she is a researcher at Tilburg

University, School of Humanities. Her research focuses on language contact and change in

immigrant settings. More specifically, she analyzes on-going linguistic changes in Turkish spoken

in Europe through computational methods of analyses.

ABSTRACT

Turkish spoken in the Netherlands (NL-Turkish) has been in contact with Dutch for fifty years and it

sounds ―different‖ in comparison to Turkish spoken in Turkey (TR-Turkish). Using comparative

spoken corpora (NL-Turkish vs. TR-Turkish), this study investigates the structural changes in NL-

Turkish and how NL-Turkish speakers perceive them.

Word order is expected to be one of the first aspects to change in contact situations. However,

analyses of NL-Turkish corpus reveal that SOV is still the prevailing order but that there are a few

violations of the information structure.

In usage-based approaches to language, there are no clear boundaries between lexicon and

syntax. Language is made up of several constructions which have the characteristics of both

lexicon and syntax. As part of the change process, NL-Turkish speakers use literally translated

Dutch constructions (e.g. [tren almak] ―take a train‖). These constructions sound ―different‖ to TR-

Turkish speakers since they would use other ones [e.g. [trene binmek] ―get.on the train‖). The

identification and classification of these changing constructions will be discussed with examples

from the data.

NL-Turkish constructions are still in competition with their TR-Turkish equivalents. NL-Turkish

speakers recognize these on-going changes but they prefer TR-Turkish constructions when asked.

Sociolinguistic factors (e.g. influence of Turkish satellite TV, frequent visits to Turkey, marriage

with TR-Turkish speakers) that influence the judgments of the NL-Turkish speakers and lead to

idealization of TR-Turkish as the ―norm‖ will be discussed through qualitative analysis of interviews

with NL-Turkish speakers.


Title

Native brittophones and the néo-bretonnants: constructions of the linguistic identity

dr Nicole Dolowy-Rybinska DATE: FRI 22.06

Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa Poland

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Nicole Dolowy-Rybinska, anthropologist, PhD Human Sciences.

107

TIME: 11.55-12.20

ROOM: PRAGUE

Nicole Dolowy-Rybinska studied and graduated at the end of her doctoral studies at the Institute of

Polish Culture at the University of Warsaw where she participated in the linguistic anthropology

research group. Since 2010 she has been employed in the Polish Academy of Sciences where she

is working on the problems affecting endangered languages, their transmission and the methods of

safeguarding these languages. She has also carried out research on the cultural and linguistic

identity of the members of minority cultures. Nicole Dolowy-Rybinska is interested in the relation

between the usage of a minority language and the maintenance of cultural consciousness and has

conducted field sociolinguistic and anthropological studies in Kashubia (Poland), Lusatia

(Germany), Brittany (France) and Wales. She is the author of three monographic books (two in

Polish and one in French) and many scientific papers (in Polish, English and French). She is a

laureate of the French Government Scholarship (2005), UNESCO/Keizo Obuchi Fellowship (2006),

and the Foundation of Polish Science ‗Start‘ award (2011). At the present, and within the

framework of the grant from the National Science Center in Poland (2011-2014), she is involved in

comparative studies on the strategies for engaging young people from European minorities in

ethnic cultures.

ABSTRACT

According to the statistics there are approximately 200,000 people today who know the Breton

language, with 75% of them over 70 years old. Added to this, the inter-generational transmission of

the Breton language was almost totally interrupted at the beginning of the second half of the XXth

century. However, thanks to the re-valorization of Breton in the 1970's, every year more than a

thousand young Bretons learn the language in schools and another several thousand adults attend

language courses. Nevertheless, the possibilities of using the Breton language are not the same

as during past generations. For native brittophones the use of the Breton language was natural.

They thought and felt in this language and it was strongly associated with their lifestyle.

Consequently, the Breton language was a very strong (if not the most important) marker of the

Breton identity. However, the Breton identity of today is not based on knowledge of the language

but rather on the strong emotional relation to it. Few consider that one cannot be Breton without a

knowledge of the language. But even those who say so use almost only French in their everyday

life. This report, based on open interviews conducted with pupils in the Diwan immersion High

School and students of the Faculty of Breton at Rennes University, comments on the differences

between Breton L1 speaker identity versus Breton L2 identity.


Title

Does Radon Gas Kill or Do People Lose Their Life to It? Effects of Linguistic Agency

Assignment in Health Messages

Marko Dragojevic, M.A. 1 (presenter), Robert A. Bell, PhD 2 ,

Matthew S. McGlone, PhD 3

1 Department of Communication, University of California, Santa

Barbara, 4005 Social Sciences & Media Studies Bldg

2 Department of Communication and Department of Public Health

Sciences, University of California, Davis

3 Department of Communication Studies, University of Texas,

Austin

108

DATE: FRI 22.06

TIME: 11.55-12.20

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Marko Dragojevic (M.A., University of California, Davis) is a doctoral student in the Department of

Communication at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research focuses on the effects

of linguistic variability, particularly accents and politeness, on intergroup communication and

persuasion. He has published and is currently conducting research in the areas of persuasion,

language attitudes/ideologies, and interpersonal/intergroup communication.

ABSTRACT

The linguistic agency effect is the finding that the linguistic ascription of agency (i.e., action or

change) to one or more entities involved in an event influences how those entities are perceived.

For example, when describing a health threat, agency can be assigned to the threat (e.g., ―HIV

infects people‖) or humans (e.g., ―people contract HIV‖). We demonstrated the robustness of this

effect in health messages (McGlone et al., in press; Bell et al., in revision), finding that agency

assignment to five different bacterial and viral threats increased perceptions of threat susceptibility

and severity. Agency assignment did not, however, undermine efficacy, possibly because effective

recommendations were offered in our stimulus materials. The present study extends this line of

research in three ways. First, we will determine if the linguistic agency effect generalizes to

nonliving pathogens (i.e., radon gas). Second, we will compare the persuasive effects of two types

of threat agency – implicit threat agency (e.g., ―radon will end the life of…‖) and sentient threat

agency (e.g., ―radon will kill…‖) – to each other and to human agency (e.g., ―you will lose you life

to radon…‖). Third, we will determine if recommendation effectiveness moderates threat agency‘s

effect on efficacy. We hypothesize that, compared to human agency: (1) agency assignment to

radon gas (particularly sentient threat agency) will lead to higher ratings of susceptibility, severity,

and fear arousal; (2) agency assignment (implicit or explicitly sentient) to radon gas will undermine

efficacy when recommendations are described as marginally (50%) but not highly (100%) effective.


References

Bell, R. A., McGlone, M.S., & Dragojevic, M. (revise & resubmit). Bacteria as bullies: Effects of

linguistic agency assignment in health messages. Journal of Health Communication.

McGlone, M. S., Bell, R. A., Zaitchik, & S. T, McGlynn, J. (in press.) Don‘t let the flu catch you:

Agency assignment in printed educational materials about the H1N1 influenza virus and vaccine.

Journal of Health Communication.

109


Title

The potential contributory role of Critical Welsh Language Awareness Training in

transforming civil society and the development of post-colonial identity in Wales

Steve Eaves DATE: FRI 22.06

Iaith –Y Ganolfan Cynllunio Iaith /The Welsh Centre for Language

Planning

110

TIME: 11.30-11.55

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Steve Eaves is Senior Consultant with Iaith –Y Ganolfan Cynllunio Iaith /The Welsh Centre for

Language Planning. He has worked in the field of public sector Welsh language policy for over 30

years, and is currently an external PhD candidate of the School of Welsh at Cardiff University,

Wales. His thesis is on the current role and future potential of critical Welsh Language Awareness

training.

ABSTRACT

Following the historical suppression of Welsh until the latter part of the 20 th century, public policy

on the Welsh language in Wales currently seeks to revitalise the use of Welsh in civil society, and

equalise the validity and prestige of Welsh with English. Key to this policy agenda is an inclusive

approach to promoting the concept of a bilingual Wales where citizens may choose to live their

lives through the medium of Welsh or English or both languages. In tandem with these

developments, Welsh Language Awareness Training (WLAT) is a specialist form of training which

has been developed since the early 1990s to raise the awareness of public sector employees of

this equalising agenda and its relevance to their services.

This paper considers critical forms of WLAT, and their potential as a much-needed means of

engaging citizens in language planning discourse. As language planning in Wales involves the

undoing and de-legitimising of hegemonic discourses and practices from which the low prestige of

Welsh derives, this necessarily involves a critical appraisal of Welsh history, governance and

identity. The paper argues that mainstreaming critical forms of WLAT in key domains could play an

important contributory role in transforming civil society and the development of post-colonial identity

in Wales.


Title

Language attitudes of young Estonians in 2003 and 2012

Martin Ehala DATE: THU 21.06

Institute of Estonian and General Linguistics, University of Tartu,

Estonia

111

TIME: 13.30-13.55

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Martin Ehala is a professor of Literacy Education at the University of Tartu in Estonia. His main

research interests are the theory of ethnolinguistic vitality, language maintenance and the

development of the Estonian linguistic environment. He has also published on topics related to

language and identity, and contact-induced changes in Estonian. Currently his main research

projects are ―Ethnolinguistic vitality and identity construction: Estonia in the context of other Baltic

countries‖ which aims to compare the vitalities of the Baltic Russian minorities using an innovative

quantitative model of ethnolinguistic vitality; and ―Sustainability of Estonian in the Era of

Globalisation‖ the goal of which is to develop a systemic interdisciplinary approach to language

ecology and to use it on modeling the development of Estonian.

ABSTRACT

In the era of globalisation, language maintenance is not only a problem for traditional minority

languages. In a global setting many smaller national languages function in the situation of diglossia.

Although these languages are well developed and have elaborated support systems, language

maintenance or loss is ultimately the result of the choices of their users. Even though language

attitudes need not directly be connected to language choice and use, they would give indication

about speakers‘ language orientation for the future. The paper compares the language attitudes of

Estonian secondary school students in 2003 and 2012. The 2003 study, based on a representative

sample of 1887 revealed that although the students value Estonian as the marker of their ethnic

and national identity, they were also in favour of extending the use of English as language of

instruction, and were sceptical about the future sustainability of Estonian. The 2003 questionnaire

was repeated in 2011-12 amongst next generation of secondary school students as well as

amongst the generation that was questioned 9 year ago (now of the age of 24-26). Besides

changes in language attitudes, the comparison of data also revealed a considerable increase of

self-reported daily use of English. As the utilitarian reasons strongly favour the usage of English,

the maintenance of smaller national language is going to depend on the value these languages

have for collective identity.


Title

Language Technology for Multilingual Automatized Content Analysis in Group Research

Bea Ehmann 1 , Laszlo Balazs 1 , Janos Laszlo 1 , Dmitry Shved 2 ,

Vadim Gushin 2 , Max Silberztein 3

1 Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Cognitive

Neuroscience and Psychology, Research Centre for Natural

Sciences, Hungary

2 Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Biomedical

Problems, Russian Federation

3 Universite de Franche-Comté, Paris, France

112

DATE: SAT 23.06

TIME: 09.55-10.20

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Bea Ehmann, PhD, is a social psychologist, senior research fellow at the Institute of Cognitive

Neuroscience and Psychology, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of

Sciences, Budapest, Hungary. Her fields of interest are small group research and psychological

content analysis. She is a founding member of the Hungarian Narrative Psychological Research

Group which has developed a methodological system for the investigation of intragroup and

intergroup processes by content analysis of language behavior. She teaches the theory and

practice of computerized psychological content analysis at the ELTE University of Budapest. In the

recent years, she investigates processes of groups in isolated, confined and extreme environments

(ICE-groups) in the field of space psychology. In the scope of a bilateral institutional cooperation,

she participates in the content analysis of communication of the crew of the Mars-500 space

analog experiment organized by the Institute for Biomedical Research, Moscow, Russia, and the

European Space Agency in 2010-2011. Along with the knowledge of other psychological content

analysis programs, she has experience in doing multilingual psychological content analysis with

the NooJ Linguistic Development Environment software.

ABSTRACT

The recent years have witnessed dramatic progress in the field of language technology and

corpus linguistics, and also the ―marriage‖ of language technology and psychology.

In this scope, well-granted efforts have been made in Europe to foster the building of

linguistically annotated national corpora (a collection of digitalized linguistic treasury of nations).

Among others, a corpus linguistic development environment, NooJ, has been developed as a

tool for multilingual annotation (Silberztein, 2003) (http://www.nooj4nlp.net).

A spin-off of this multinational achievement is psychosemantical annotation which allows for

psychological content analysis. (For example, for the word ‗happy‘, the linguistic annotation is

‗adjective‘, and the psychosemantical annotation is ‗positive emotion‘.) Psychosemantical

annotation allows for developing large word and expression categories for a variety of

psychological constructs. On the basis of the theory of Scientific Narrative Psychology (Laszlo,

2008), Hungarian psychologists developed a NooJ-based method for the distant monitoring of

isolated small groups (Ehmann, et al, 2011).


Space psychological content analysis of the communication between the Cosmonaut Crew and

the Earth Mission Control has a thirty-year tradition in Russia, in the Institute for Biomedical

Research (Myasnikov, 1982, Gushin, 2001). The crossover of this tradition and the methodology

developed by the Hungarian team allowed computerized analysis of Russian and English

language crew communication during the Mars-105 space analog simulation with promising

results (Gushin, et al, 2011).

The paper intends to offer a deeper insight into this field and to demonstrate the results of the

content analysis of the crew communication in the Mars-500 space analog simulation recently

completed in Moscow (http://mars500.imbp.ru/en/index_e.html). A broader goal of the paper is to

share the language technological knowledge with social psychologists.

113


Title

An Artistic View on Onomatopoeia

Ingeborg Entrop DATE: SAT 23.06

Independent Visual Artist TIME: 11.05-11.30

114

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Ingeborg Entrop (1970, Netherlands) studied theoretical physics at the University of Groningen and

did PhD research in the field of plasma physics at the Forschungszentrum Jülich. In 2005 she

started the bachelor program of fine arts at Academie Minerva, Groningen. After graduation she

attended an open course Phonetics & Phonology at the University of Groningen and continued her

art studies at the Dutch Art Institute in Arnhem, where she is currently attending the masters

program of fine arts.

Ingeborg likes to discover and investigate the various mental constructions or models that mankind

has developed to get a grip on the surrounding world, itself and everything in between. In her

artistic practice, she is interested in language as the most primal of all mental tools. She has

investigated the linguistic sign as image and the (im)possibility of translating sound into sign. This

has lead to an on-going interest in onomatopoeia. Current focus in her art work is on sounds,

silence and polyphony.

Her work has been shown at several exhibitions. Forthcoming exhibitions are the graduation show

and book launch of the Dutch Art Institute and the inauguration of a mural-installation in the city of

Groningen. www.ingeborgentrop.nl

ABSTRACT

How to capture a sound in signs? This is one of the questions that I explore in my visual work as

an artist. In my practice, I often make use of onomatopoeia. Onomatopoeia is a fascinating

phenomenon. It often discloses the language that traps the sound; in that sense, it is languagespecific

and an onomatopoeia could be considered as part of a linguistic system, as a proper word

even. Simultaneously, it imitates a sound and acts as a trace of a sound source, whose cause is

not always clear. The context gives it meaning; hence, it appears as an indexical sign. Finally, an

onomatopoeia in written form can be interpreted and performed over and over again; in that sense

it functions as a score of a musical piece. In this contribution, I present the case study of a series

of painted onomatopoeic words that have been exhibited in a music school. The exhibition

questioned various distinctions between visual art, music, sound and linguistic signs. The

environment of musical sounds clearly demonstrated the silence of the written signs. It also made

clear the distinction between music and sound. The one is intentional; the other is unintentional,

and often referred to in a negative way. Students interpreted the onomatopoeic words not only as

noises but as sounds of failure that should be avoided at all times while playing an instrument. The

distinction is apparently more than just a harmless division; it tells us how to judge the audible,

including onomatopoeias.


Title

Mentalization and interaction analysis. Integrating language and psychology.

Christina Fogtmann Fosgerau DATE: FRI 22.06

Department of Scandinavian Studies and Linguistics, University

of Copenhagen, DK

115

TIME: 12.20-12.45

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Christina Fogtmann Fosgerau, MA; PhD Assistant Professor at Psychology of Language,

Department of Scandinavian Studies and Linguistics, University of Copenhagen.

In general, my research concerns integrating psychological theories and processes with interaction

analytic methods in order to account for ways in which understanding is established and

relationships enacted. In my PhD dissertation I studied naturalization interviews between Danish

police officers and applicants for Danish citizenship. During the naturalization interview the police

officer decided whether applicants fulfilled a language requirement by law. By integrating methods

of conversation analysis and systemic functional linguistics with theories of shame I showed how

the police officers‘ decisions were dependent upon the degree of rapport established between

interactants. At the moment I am – in collaboration with Annette Sofie Davidsen from The

Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, University of Copenhagen –

working on the project ‗Understandings of depression in general practice and psychiatry‘. We

explore how different understandings express themselves in the clinical meeting with the patient in

the two sectors. Mentalization is a central theme in our study since it refers to a process that can

be seen as fundamental in theorizing and studying understandings.

ABSTRACT

Mentalization refers to the ability to hold mind in mind – it refers to the process by which individuals

interpret actions of themselves and others as meaningful on the basis of mental states such as

feelings, needs and reasons (Allen, Fonagy & Bateman 2008). As we interact we fluctuate

between implicit and explicit processes of mentalization, that is between conscious and reflective

mentalization (explicit) and automatic and unreflective mentalization (implicit). Within the

mentalization based framework it has been suggested how performances of explicit mentalization

can be accounted for. However, performances of implicit mentalization have not yet been

addressed and studied.

The paper suggests an integration of the framework of mentalization with interaction analysis in

order to study how processes of implicit mentalization in interaction can be accounted for.

Especially the sequential perspective of Conversation Analysis will be applied.

Data consists of extracts from a General Practitioner‘s consultation with a depressed patient. It will

be argued that the GP‘s actions of preemptive completion and the GP‘s acoustic mirroring of the

patient‘s utterances can be interpreted as performances that unconsciously deal with the patients‘

mental states, and therefore as performances that can be seen as enactments of implicit

mentalization.


Also, the paper suggests that that by integrating the framework of mentalization with interaction

analysis, attention can be given to ways in which unconscious processes are influencing the

general establishment of intersubjectivity in interactions.

References:

Allen, Fonagy & Bateman (2008): Mentalizing in Clinical Practice, Washington: American

Psychiatric Publishing.

116


Title

Side effects of gender-fair language

Magdalena Formanowicz 1 (presenter) , Aleksandra Cislak 1 , Sabine

Sczesny 2

1 Department of Psychology, Warsaw School of Social Sciences

and Humanities

117

DATE: FRI 22.06

TIME: 12.20-12.45

2

Department of Psychology, University of Bern, Switzerland. ROOM: PARIS Warsaw, Poland

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Magdalena Formanowicz

I'm an Assistant Professor at the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in Warsaw and

from September 2012 a post doc fellow at the Bern University working together with prof. Sabine

Sczesny. My research interests in the field of language and social psychology refer to three

domains: grammatical gender of occupational titles, relabeling and finally linguistic abstraction. My

presentation during the ICLASP in Netherlands, coauthored with Aleksandra Cislak and Sabine

Sczesny will refer to the side effects of gender-fair language.

ABSTRACT

Gender-fair policies include the introduction of guidelines for the use of language.

Recommendations advocate the equal representation of women and men and suggest to refrain

from using a masculine generic form (e.g. chairman) as referring to men and women. Masculine

generics are to be substituted by either gender-neutral terms (e.g. chair) or feminine-masculine

word-pairs (e.g. Leserinnen und Leser). The criticism of masculine generics is supported by

evidence from numerous studies on English, German, and French (for a review see Gastil, 1990,

Stahlberg, Braun, Irmen, & Sczesny, 2007). The studies have verified that when categories are

referred to with masculine generics (e.g. Musiker), respondents name mostly male exemplars

(Stahlberg, Sczesny, & Braun, 2001). When asked to recall representatives of occupations referred

to with a feminine-masculine word-pair (e.g. Musikerinnen und Musiker), respondents mention

significantly more females.

However, up to date, little is known about possible side effects of gender fair language use,

although some studies have shown it might reduce competence (McConnell, & Fazio, 1996),

credibility (Mucchi-Faina, 2005) and hiring potential (Formanowicz, Bedynska, Cislak, & Sczesny,

in preparation) of a women labelled in a feminine form. In the presentation, four studies conducted

in Polish will address possible factors influencing negative perception of feminine role nouns,

namely perceived targets' feminism and intentions of disrupting gender status quo, availability of

feminine forms in language and participants' acquaitanance with feminine form as well as political

views.


Title

Study of verbal communication of improvised music

Lara Frisch DATE: THU 21.06

International Association of Language and Social

Psychology

118

TIME: 10.45-11.10

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Lara Frisch is a Berlin-based researcher in verbal communication and musical improvisation,

currently completing a PhD at the Bauhaus University, Weimar. Her research explores the dialogic

processes, which lead to collective ideation, within musical improvisation.

Born in Luxembourg, she graduated from the University of Kent, Canterbury, and the Goldsmiths

College, University of London. She has recently worked on various projects including project

management of the TEDxHamburg and TEDxBerlin in 2011.

Her research interests are: linguistic ideation, creative collaborations and their dynamics, the role

of creative processes such as musical improvisation in the global marketplace and its

consequences.

The outcome of her PhD is to facilitate and promote the use of effective creative collaborations in

academia, business and culture.

ABSTRACT

My PhD project focuses on the verbal communication of improvised music, this means that I study

the communication of musicians before, while and after they improvise. The main field research

takes place in Berlin, where an improvisation scene called Echtzeitmusik has developed since the

early 1990s.The aspect that interests me most in studying/analyzing the verbal communication of

these ensembles is the type of communication they create; namely a dialogue which goes beyond

the conventional concept of exchange. Within this dialogue, ideas are being collectively created by

means of several features, including metaphor, repetition and misunderstandings. This paper is

about developing a better understanding of how, in the framework of creative group work, ideas

get collectively produced by means of a shared dialogue. The outcome of this study is to facilitate

and promote creative collaborations on the level of verbal communication.

In the context of improvisation, the verbal communication of a group tends to go beyond the

consensus orientated discussion, towards a process orientated dialogue, which includes obscurity

of expression, thematic irrelevance and occasional conflict (Bohm, 2004, Krause & Ratz-Heinisch,

2009). It constitutes a type of group communication which allows the production of figures of

speech (Carter, 2009), linking it thus to the concept of ideation; the collective production of ideas.

This study is a qualitative research, which follows the Objective Hermeneutics methodology as laid

out by Ulrich Oevermann. Hence, the main documentation will be the rehearsal sessions of the

ensembles, recorded via portable recorder and video camera. In addition, problem specific

interviews (Scholl, 1993) with volunteers from the ensembles will be conducted.


Keywords: dialogue, ideation, collaborative group work.

Bibliography

Bohm, D. On Dialogue. Routledge Classics. London 2004.

Carter, R. Language and Creativity: The Art of Common Talk. Routledge. London.

2004.

Krause, H. U. (ed.) Soziale Arbeit im Dialog gestalten: Theoretische Grundlagen und methodische

Zuga nge einer dialogischen sozialen Arbeit. Farmington Hills. EU 2009.

Scholl, A. Die Befragung als Kommunikationssituation. Westdeutscher Verlag. 1993.

119


Title

“I Was Impolite to Her Because That‟s How She Was to Me”:

Effects of Attributions of Motive on Responses to Non-Accommodation

Jessica Gasiorek DATE: THU 21.06

Department of Communication, University of California, Santa

Barbara

120

TIME: 09.30-09.55

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

"Jessica Gasiorek is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Communication at the University of

California, Santa Barbara. Her research focuses on the effects of social cognitive processes on

communication accommodation, non-accommodation and related outcomes. She has presented

and published research in the areas of intergroup/interpersonal, intercultural and intergenerational

communication."

ABSTRACT

Within the framework of communication accommodation theory (CAT), this paper traces a program

of research investigating how perceptions and attributions of motive affect our psychological and

behavioral responses to non-accommodation, defined as communication that is not adjusted

appropriately for one or more participants in an interaction. Study 1 focuses on psychological

responses to non-accommodation; its results indicate that our perceptions of speakers‘ motives

influence our evaluations of non-accommodation and of non-accommodative speakers. Study 2

then explores behavioral responses to underaccommodation, one type of non-accommodation,

introducing a new typology of communicative response strategies. Finally, Study 3 analyzes how

people engage in combinations of these communicative responses using latent class analysis.

Three distinct response patterns (i.e., classes of responders) emerged. Perceptions of negative

motive predicted a significantly greater likelihood of engaging in particular patterns relative to

others; certain response patterns were also associated with significantly higher levels of negative

affect, as well as significantly more negative evaluations of the interaction, than others. On the basis

of these three studies‘ findings, a model of how attributions of motive affect our responses to nonaccommodative

communication is advanced, and the implications for CAT are discussed.


Title

The implications of accented speech and cultural representations: When implicit and explicit

attitudes affect real‐life choices

Sabrina Goh & Tamar Murachver DATE: THU 21.06

Department of Psychology, University of Otago TIME: 16.45-17.10

121

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Sabrina Goh I started my MSc with Dr Tamar Murachver at the University of Otago in August

2007. The initial plan was to carry out research in the area of Developmental Psychology. However,

after reading several papers provided by Tamar, the area of attitudes towards language piqued my

interest. For the past 5

years I have been exploring implicit measures of attitudes towards accented speech. I have been

using speech samples from New Zealand, Australia, United Kingdom, North America, China, and

France as stimuli. When I began my tertiary education in New Zealand in 2003, I noticed varying

reactions (both positive and negative) to different accents. The ones that stood out to me were the

reactions to my Malaysian accent. Little did I realize then, that this passing observation in my first

year at Otago would turn into PhD research.

ABSTRACT

The use of selfreports to assess attitudes allows people to deliberate and reflect on their

responses. This provides an explicit measure of attitudes. We used the Implicit Association Task

(IAT) and the Go/No--‐Go Association Task (GNAT) to assess automatic (i.e., implicit) attitudes

towards accented speech and cultural representations. We previously presented

data on speakers and cultural icons from English--‐speaking regions – New Zealand, Australia,

Britain, and North America. Results from the IAT demonstrated a stereotypical evaluation of

accented speech (i.e., Americans are friendly, British are competent), but

greater in--‐group bias with the cultural representations. However, the GNAT results did not

correspond with these findings. A subsequent study used the same implicit measures, but stimuli

represented speakers and cultures where English is a second language (i.e., China and France).

The IAT results showed a highly significant in--‐group bias, where the New Zealand accent and

culture were strongly associated with positive attributes. The GNAT results mirrored data from the

IAT, except for the test of cultural representations and solidarity attributes. These findings, along

with data from a current study using behavioural measures, will be presented. These data will

highlight the possibility of measuring implicit attitudes towards accented speech, and will

demonstrate the mediating effects of these implicit attitudes on behaviour.


Title

The Use of Information Technology for the Safeguarding and Teaching of Siberian

Languages

Tjeerd de Graaf DATE: SAT 23.06

Foundation for Siberian Cultures and Mercator European

Research Centre on Multilingualism and Language Learning,

Frisian Academy, The Netherlands

TIME: 11.05-11.30

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Since 1990, Tjeerd de Graaf, associate professor of Phonetics at Groningen University until 2003,

has specialized in the phonetic aspects of Ethnolinguistics. In 1990, he made his first fieldwork trip

with a Japanese expedition to the minority peoples of Sakhalin. Since then, he has contributed to

various research projects on endangered languages and the use of sound archives related to

ethnic minorities in Russia. This takes place in co-operation with colleagues in the Russian

Federation and Japan. Most of these projects were financially supported by special grants from the

European Union and the Netherlands Organization of Scientific Research NWO. In 1998, Tjeerd

de Graaf received a Doctorate Honoris Causa from the University of St.Petersburg for his work in

the field of ethnolinguistics. Since 2002, he has been a board member of the Foundation for

Endangered Languages (Great Britain) and a research fellow at the Mercator Centre of the Frisian

Academy, which co-ordinates research on European minorities - in particular the language, history

and culture of Frisian, one of the lesser used languages of Europe. He is also a member of the

Groningen Centre for Russian Studies and the Foundation for Siberian Cultures. In the first half of

2003, he spent a semester as visiting professor at the University of St.Petersburg and in 2004 and

2005, Tjeerd de Graaf worked as guest researcher at the Slavic Research Center of Hokkaido

University (Japan). Since 2006 some of his projects have been financially supported by the

Endangered Archives Programme at the British Library.

ABSTRACT

In this contribution a report is presented about several projects devoted to the study of endangered

languages and cultures of the Russian Federation. Work on the reconstruction technology for old

sound recordings has made it possible to compare languages still spoken in the proposed

research area to the same languages as they were spoken more than half a century ago.

The aim of our projects is to re-record the materials on sound carriers according to up-to date

technology and store them in a safe place together with the metadata. The storage facility provided

by the project will modernise the possible archiving activities and bring them up-to-date with the

present world standards.

The projects are related to the work of the Foundation for Siberian Cultures, which has been

established in 2010. The idea for this foundation emerged from many years of research with the

peoples of the North in the Russian Federation and from initiatives for the preservation of their

cultures. The aims of the foundation are: the preservation of indigenous languages, the knowledge

expressed in them, and the preservation and further enhancement of art and craft traditions of

indigenous peoples.

Learning tools and teaching materials by and for indigenous communities may help to counteract

the forces bringing about the loss of cultural diversity and the dissolution of local and ethnic

122


identities. Relevant materials have been and will be produced together with local experts using

modern technologies. A digital library and ethnographic collections on the world wide web provide

above all to indigenous communities open access to relevant scholarly resources and research

materials (see: www.kulturstiftung-sibirien.nl )

123


Title

Where fiction becomes reality: A narrative of language learning motivation

Lou Harvey DATE: THU 21.06

University of Manchester TIME: 13.55-14.20

124

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Lou Harvey is a PhD researcher at the University of Manchester, UK. She holds an MA (Hons) in

English Language and Literature from the University of Edinburgh, and an MA in TESOL (2008)

and MSc in Educational Research (2010) from the University of Manchester. She has 7 years‘ EFL

and EAP teaching experience in Slovakia and in the UK, and is an undergraduate tutor on the

interdisciplinary Manchester Leadership Programme. Her PhD research is in L2 motivation, and

she is currently exploring the ways in which a Bakhtinian dialogic/narrative approach may

contribute to a more holistic, person-centred, contextually-grounded and socially engaged

understanding of language learning motivation.

ABSTRACT

This paper draws on data from my PhD, a narrative study of six UK-based university students‘

motivation for learning English. My research aims to foreground the experience of learners, who

have rarely been given voice in past second-language (L2) motivation research, and to explicitly

acknowledge the agency of individual learners and their power to accept or resist the pressures

and influences they face, and the identities they are negotiating, as English speakers. I will focus

on the narrative of one student, Emma, illustrating how her motivation was shaped by her

perception of a shift in the English language from ‗fictional‘, in her home country of Italy, to ‗real‘,

when she came to the UK. Drawing on Bakhtin‘s dialogism (1981, 1986), I illustrate how the

narrative concept can contribute to an understanding of Emma‘s language learning experience and

the way in which she interprets this experience. Bakhtin‘s conception of the author is of a narrative

consciousness, entering into active dialogue with the specific others of whom and with whom they

speak, creating narrative in a multi-voiced process of meaning-making. I suggest that Emma‘s

language learning story represents a move from understanding English as a monologic subject to

be studied and lacking communicative context, to dialogic, requiring agentive response to and

engagement with other voices; engagement through which Emma is constantly re-storying her

identity as a language learner. I argue that this view represents an important move in L2 motivation

research: to illuminate ways in which motivation is socially negotiated and constructed.


Title

Standardised Language and Regional Dialect Levelling

Nanna Haug Hilton DATE: SAT 23.06

University of Groningen, NL TIME: 10.20-10.45

125

ROOM: PRAGUE

ABSTRACT

This paper investigates the relationship between standard language ideology and language

change in progress. It looks at individually held notions about correct language and speakers‘

language choices when dialects converge, and assesses the impact of a standardised variety and

a variety spoken in a capital city on dialect change.

The investigation uses data from Norway‘s capital city, Oslo, and a smaller town, Hønefoss, in the

vicinity. Quantitative analyses of morpho-syntactic, phonological and prosodic variables show

convergence of the Hønefoss and Oslo varieties. In previous literature the possible influences

behind this regional dialect levelling remain unclear. Some studies argue that vernaculars spoken

in cities work as linguistic norms (cf. Kerswill 2003, Røyneland 2005) whereas others report that

the standard language impacts levelling (e.g. Kristoffersen 2000). There has been relatively little

focus on the driving forces behind regional dialect levelling, although convergence of local dialects

and emergence of supra-local forms is a trend found across Western Europe (cf. Auer and

Hinskens 1996).

In the current study qualitative analyses of speakers‘ linguistic norms and language ideologies

complement the quantitative linguistic analysis. Qualitative data show that whereas vernaculars in

Oslo and Hønefoss are converging, Bokmål is a probable force behind the language change.

Speakers in Hønefoss do not consciously converge towards the variety spoken in the capital city,

but towards the variety made prestigious through the education system, the standardised language.

This finding gives important insights into the process behind regional dialect levelling and has

implications for future research into language change.

References

Auer, P. & Hinskens, F. (1996) The convergence and divergence of dialects in Europe. New and

not so new developments in an old area. Sociolinguistica No. 10. Tübingen: Max Niemeyer

Kerswill, P. (2003) Dialect levelling and geographical diffusion in British English. In D.Britain and J.

Cheshire (eds.) Social dialectology. In honour of Peter Trudgill Amsterdam: Benjamins. 223-243.

Kristoffersen, G. (2000) The Phonology of Norwegian. Oxford: Oxford University Press

Røyneland, U. (2005) Dialektnivellering, ungdom og identitet. Oslo: University of Oslo. Dr.art


Title

The Lost Generation: Regaining the mother tongue for their children-

Parental Incentives and Welsh-medium Education in the Rhymni Valley, south Wales.

Dr Rhian Siân Hodges DATE: THU 21.06

Bangor University, Wales TIME: 10.45-11.10

126

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Dr Rhian Siân Hodges is a Sociology and Social Policy Welsh-medium lecturer at the School of

Social Sciences, Bangor University. Her research interests include new minority language

speakers, parental educational incentives, language transmission and minority language education.

She lectures on several Sociology, Research Methods and Language Planning undergraduate

modules and delivers core modules on Language Planning for the MA in Language Policy and

Planning at Bangor University.

ABSTRACT

Minority language education is a powerful mechanism for language planners worldwide. However,

school-based language revitalisation is not without its disadvantages. Research has argued that

minority language education creates new speakers who simply possess a ―schools dialect‖ (Jones

1998:258) rather than native speakers‘ natural proficiency in their mother tongue. In Wales, Welshmedium

education in the Anglicized localities of South Wales is creating ‗new‘ Welsh speakers

mainly due to the parental incentives of non-Welsh-speaking parents. Paradoxically, despite

producing high levels of formal linguistic competency, education cannot compensate for low

informal, social usage of the Welsh language in the study location, the Rhymni Valley. This paper

attempts to decipher why non-Welsh-speaking parents in the Rhymni Valley choose Welshmedium

education especially as Welsh is not a language readily heard on the streets of the

Rhymni Valley. Moreover, it assesses the connection between parental incentives and subsequent

language use by their children. Furthermore, this paper asks whether ‗new‘ speakers will ever fully

have ownership of the Welsh language as their mother tongue if their usage is limited to education.

50 in- depth interviews with parents from all educational sectors were conducted and incentives

were categorised as cultural, educational, economic and personal incentives. Interestingly, an

attitudinal shift became apparent from instrumental incentives such as economic prestige of the

1970s and present integrative incentives such as culture and nationhood found during this study.

Furthermore, this paper hopes to address how this integrative value ascribed to Welsh-medium

education may be incorporated into language planning initiatives in Wales.


Title

Easy to opt-in, hard to opt-out: A comparison of subscription and unsubscription messages

in e-mails and websites

Dr. Brian W. Horton (Presenter) DATE: SAT 23.06

The University of Texas at Arlington, USA

Department of Communication

127

TIME: 10.20-10.45

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Dr. Brian Horton currently serves as an assistant professor of communication technology at The

University of Texas at Arlington. This is his third time participating in the ICLASP Conference,

first attending ICLASP 11 in Tucson, AZ. His primary research interests focus on cooperative

and coordinating strategies employed in collaborative activities, the moral and ethical

dimensions of communication, and user experience design in human-computer interaction

environments. Currently, he is completing a multi-country investigation on religious and spiritual

identity in organizational contexts. Part of this research is being presented at this conference.

He is also an active application developer and multimedia designer, his primary teaching areas

at UT-Arlington.

ABSTRACT

This study compares the persuasive design and message techniques used by online

companies at when subscribing or unsubscribing to a feature, service, or communication

preference. The major focus was on unsubscription messages generated by the company. For

the first part of the study, screen captures were taken from the web pages of 200 companies

from various retail sectors during the subscription stage. The author signed up for the services

and collected e-mail messages from the companies for 3 months. At this point, the author

attempted to unsubscribe from the service. Messages from these e-mails were analyzed using

inductive constant comparison techniques, which were collapsed into larger themes. The author

also recorded the number of steps it took to successfully unsubscribe from the service or

communication. For the second part, 80 participants evaluated messages and design

characteristics from the e-mails and websites that were part of the unsubscription process.

Respondents gave the most favorable ratings to companies that (a) explained why the message

recipient was receiving e-mails, (b) made it easy to change their mind after being presented

options, and (c) communicated in a transparent, cooperative manner yet infrequent manner with

the recipient. For design characteristics, participants preferred unsubscribing by clicking on

labeled as "unsubscribe" rather than clicking on a link buried within text because the former was

seen as more empowering. Furthermore, they were more likely to have a favorable view of the

company and re-subscribe in the future if the unsubscribe function was viewed as a feature and

affordance.


Title

Communication of and about spiritual/religious identity in the workplace

Dr. Brian W. Horton DATE: FRI 22.06

The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington USA TIME: 09.30-09.55

128

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Dr. Brian Horton currently serves as an assistant professor of communication technology at The

University of Texas at Arlington. This is his third time participating in the ICLASP Conference, first

attending ICLASP 11 in Tucson, AZ. His primary research interests focus on cooperative and

coordinating strategies employed in collaborative activities, the moral and ethical dimensions of

communication, and user experience design in human-computer interaction environments.

Currently, he is completing a multi-country investigation on religious and spiritual identity in

organizational contexts. Part of this research is being presented at this conference. He is also an

active application developer and multimedia designer, his primary teaching areas at UT-Arlington.

ABSTRACT

Past research indicates that individuals are likely to experience some form of religious or spiritual

discomfort, including discrimination, in the workplace. Additionally, past research indicates that

communicating about religious and spiritual matters, intentionally or otherwise, is difficult and

effortful. This study investigates two aspects of spiritual and religious identity in the workplace. The

first part of the study explores perceptions of norms and practices about communicating one's

spiritual or religious identity in the workplace. The second part examines self-reports of memorable

communicative interactions between individuals that share the same religious or spiritual

perspective and interactions between individuals holding different religious or spiritual perspectives

from their own. A total of 120 participants from a variety of religious and spiritual perspectives

(Evangelical Christian, Catholic, Sunni and Shi'ite, Athiest) completed an online survey related to

their religious and spiritual communication experiences at work. The author conducted semistructured

interviews with religious leaders from the religious groups represented in the study.

Inductive constant comparison methods were used to identify message and interaction themes.

Results show that hurtful and sometimes prejudicial messages and actions exist between

individuals from different religious perspectives, but also within the same perspective, although the

forms of the messages and actions differ. All groups identified messages and behaviors that were

harmful, as well as beneficial, to their religious conceptions of self. The paper concludes with a

section on applications for religious and spiritual communication in organizational contexts.


Title

Hidden Ukrainian minorities in the South-West Russia.

Nadja Iskoussova, DATE: FRI 22.06

Leiden University Centre for Linguistics, NL TIME: 12.20-12.45

129

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Nadja Iskoussova was born in Voronezh, Russia. In 1999 she obtained her law degree at

Voronezh State University (specialisation in constitutional law). In 2000 she moved to the

Netherlands, where she graduated from Leiden University with a master`s degree in International

and European Law in 2006. Her thesis was dedicated to the implementation of the European

Convention on Human Rights into Russian legislation.

Subsequently she worked for different Dutch Ministries (Interior, Economics, Education) and

interned at the Council of Europe (Committee on Migration, Refugees and Population at the

Parliamentary Assembly and INGO division).

In 2011, she passed a competition for Russian lawayers at the European Court of Human Rights

and, at the same time, enrolled as an associated PhD student at Leiden University Centre for

Linguistics. The main focus of her research is on the right to one`s native language and regional

identity.

ABSTRACT

Voronezh region is situated in the South-West of Russia on the border with Ukraine. The region is

divided into 35 districts. The official language of the region is Russian, although about 12 of these

districts are basically bilingual and (unofficially) Ukrainian-speaking. Information on the languages

or dialects spoken in the region is hardly available. One exception is the faculty of Russian

language and Literature from the State University, which collects relevant information on the

regular basis and organises ethnographic expeditions to the country-side. A remarkable

occurrence was the recent publication of the Dictionary of Ukrainian dialects.

The census of 2010 has shown that Voronezh region has 43 thousand inhabitants who declared

themselves as Ukrainians, which is 1.9 % of the whole population of that region. This does not

seem to show the real picture of ethnic diversity in the region, but only the changes of attitude of

the people to their ethnic identity over the years. The figure of 1.9 % of Ukrainians is puzzling for

a region, which was founded mostly by Ukrainians in the 17 th century and experienced a policy of

Ukrainisation in the late twenties- early thirties of the 20 th century. Still today the rural population in

those districts speaks Ukrainian and its dialects at home.

In my presentation I would like to take a look at the current ethno- linguistic situation, to analyse

trends and address the question, why people change their attitude to their ethnic identity.


Title

Ethnic and Sex Bias in Televised Non-Verbal Behaviors?

Lucy Johnston (presenter), Jeanette King, Jennifer Hay DATE: FRI 22.06

New Zealand Institute of Language, Brain and Behaviour,

University of Canterbury, NZ

130

TIME: 11.55-12.20

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Lucy is Dean of Postgraduate Research at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand and

Professor of Psychology in the New Zealand Institute of Language, Brain and Behavior

(NZILBB). She joined the Psychology Department at Canterbury in 1994 after completing her

BA (Hons.) at the University of Oxford and her Ph.D. at the University of Bristol and lecturing at

the University of Cardiff from 1991 to 1993. Her research expertise is in social perception and

the impact of nonverbal communication within social interactions. She has over 80 international

peer-reviewed publications spanning these domains. She is also on the Management Group of

NZILBB and leads the Language and Social Cognition theme. Lucy also has a specialist MSc

in Sport and Exercise Psychology and works with a number of individual athletes and coaches

and sports teams. Lucy received a University Teaching Award in 2008 and in 2004 she held a

Distinguished Visiting Professor position at the University of Connecticut. Following the

Canterbury earthquakes of 2010 and 2011 Lucy was appointed to the Psychosocial Recovery

Advisory Group for the Joint Centre for Disaster Research, a joint Massey University-

Geological and Nuclear Science collaboration.

ABSTRACT

Building on research by Weisbuch et al (2009), we investigated the transmission of bias in

televised nonverbal behaviour. Perceivers were shown silent video-clips extracted from a longrunning

popular New Zealand television soap-opera. The clips were of conversations in English

between two characters but edited to display only one character. The visible character was always

Pakeha (NZ-European) but the off-screen conversation partner either Pakeha or Maori (indigenous

minority of NZ). Eighteen Pakeha perceivers (9 male) aged 20-35 years who had not previously

watched the soap-opera viewed 80 video-clips. After viewing each clip perceivers were asked to

rate (i) how much they thought the visible character liked the (off-screen) target they were

interacting with and (ii) how positive they thought the interaction was. Results indicate no

meaningful differences in perceptions as a function of sex or age of perceivers but, the sex and

ethnicity of the interaction partners had significant impact on perceptions. When talking to a target

of the same sex, ratings of the positivity of the interaction and liking of the target were higher when

the target was Maori (i.e., different ethnicity to the speaker) than Pakeha (i.e., same ethnicity as

the speaker). When talking to a target of the opposite sex, however, ratings were higher for

Pakeha (same ethnicity) than Maori targets. That is, the non-verbal behaviours of Pakeha (ethnic

majority) targets were judged to be more positive toward own ethnicity interaction partners of the

opposite sex but more positive toward other ethnicity interaction partners of the same sex.

Comparisons were made of the ratings made for the same target when being spoken to by a male

and a female speaker. Male Maori and Pakeha targets, and female Maori targets were rated more

positively when being spoken to by a female than a male speaker. Female Pakeha targets,


however, were rated more positively when being spoken to by a male than a female speaker. The

results are discussed in terms of ethnic and sex biases in social interactions and consideration is

given to identifying the non-verbal information that may specify liking in social interactions.

Ongoing research is looking at the impact of perceiver ethnicity on perceptions of the video-clips.

131


Title

History of intergroup communication

Liz Jones 1 , Bernadette Watson 2 DATE: SAT 23.06

1 School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, 2 School of

Psychology, The University of Queensland

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

132

TIME: 11.30-11.55

ROOM: MADRID

Assoc Prof Liz Jones is Director of Organisational Psychology at Griffith University in Brisbane

Australia. Her research interests are in intergroup communication, particularly in health and

organisational contexts. She is currently researching inter-professional practice in hospitals,

nurse-parent communication in neonatal nurseries and the use of patient and carer narratives to

improve health service delivery. She was co-chair of the IALSP Health Communication

Taskforce. She is a member of the IALSP executive and Chair of the Intergroup Communication

Interest Group within the International Communication Association.

ABSTRACT

Members of the International Association of Language and Social Psychology have been integral

to the development of the field of intergroup communication. Indeed, since their beginning, ICLASP

conferences have featured developments in intergroup communication. The aim of this

presentation is to celebrate the history of intergroup communication by presenting an overview of

interviews with eminent intergroup communication researchers. The presentation will document

key points, publications and researchers in the history of the field, and will conclude by addressing

―where to from here?‖.


Title

Language policy, language strategy and multilingualism

René J. Jorna DATE: FRI 22.06

Frisian Academy and University of Groningen, NL TIME: 12.45-13.10

133

ROOM: BRUSSELS

ABSTRACT

The debate or discussion about language from a socio-psychological perspective focusses on

three main issues: a) organizational forms, b) coordination mechanisms and c) (cognitive and

social) psychological views of multiple languages in a country or region, especially if a country or

region has a dominant and a minority language. This contribution will be conceptually and not

empirically motivated.

To start with, I argue that policy and strategy, in whatever domain, are in general forms of

mid-term or long-term planning. A plan consists of goals and constraints. Goals (contradictory or

with cohesion) are what actors, groups or a society aim at, whereas constraints are conditions

under or based on which aspects goals can be reached. A policy or strategy concerning language

or multilingualism answers to the same kind of discussion concerning planning in general. I expect

that long-term is more dominant than short-term or midterm. This may be seen as positive, but the

negative side of this situation is the difficulty that quantification of constraints and goals is mostly at

the nominal of ordinal levels of measurement and not on the interval or ratio levels.

In every discussion in multilingual settings (policy or strategy) we have dominant and

minority languages. Until now very little has been conceptualized which respect to organizational

forms, such as clans, democracies, networks or monarchies, or coordination mechanisms, such as

authority, standardization or mutual relationships based on trust and distrust, have been analyzed

and showed better or worse societal constellations for languages. Because language(s) are by

definition based on higher cognitive processes of individuals and interactive language and

communication processes of groups of individuals, we start our presentation with some basic

(social and cognitive) psychological assumptions on language as a communication process and as

an identity process.

We end our presentation with two extreme examples in which organizational forms and

coordination mechanisms are in contradictory positions. The first is about Frisian and Dutch in

Fryslân (The Netherlands) the second is about France or Spain dealing with their own minority

languages, like Occitan or Basque.


Title

A diachronic perspective on language prestige and language attitudes in Catalan and

Occitan

Aurélie Joubert DATE: THU 21.06

University of Leicester, UK TIME: 15.55-16.20

134

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Aurélie Joubert graduated from the University of Manchester with a PhD in Linguistics in 2010.

Her research interests cover the Romance speaking area and different aspects of sociolinguistics

and sociology of language: minority languages, language endangerment and language death,

language and group identity. Her recent work focuses on the application of language prestige to

minority languages, especially in Catalan and Occitan. She is currently a Teaching Fellow in

French Studies at the University of Leicester, UK.

ABSTRACT

This presentation aims to explore the perception of prestige and the declaration of attitudes of

Catalan and Occitan speakers. The many similarities in the early development of the two

languages allow us to draw an interesting parallel whilst the striking differences in their recent

status and social functions offer crucial insights into the evolution of the perception of prestige and

the declaration of attitudes. Prestige and attitudes are generally interpreted as static and given

entities enabling to predict the chances of survival of a language but a diachronic overview of the

external history of Catalan and Occitan shows great variability.

The two concepts at hand call for a multidisciplinary approach which utilises principles of social

psychology and historical sociolinguistics to explore in depth the importance of the relation

between language, individual and group identity. Thus, the multidisciplinary framework highlights

the interaction between the formation of language prestige and the regulation of language attitudes.

The present study investigates the changes in language prestige and language attitudes by

analysing, firstly, Catalan and Occitan grammar traditions and secondly, data collected in

interviews with Occitan and Catalan speakers in 2008. An additional point of interest for the

comparison of the Occitan and Catalan linguistic situations resides in the transnational position of

their linguistic communities. Since Occitan and Catalan are both spoken in France and in Spain,

the influences of national policies on individual attitudes is a factor to keep into account when

analysing the complexity and the dynamicity of prestige and attitudes.


Title

An Investigation children‟s responses to unanswerable questions

Claire Keogh, BA (Hons) & Dr. Tina Hickey DATE: THU 21.06

School of Psychology, College of Human Sciences, University

College Dublin, Dublin 4.

135

TIME: 10.20-10.45

ROOM: BRUSSELS

ABSTRACT

Recent studies have suggested age to be a major determinant of children‘s vulnerability to

suggestion (Ceci & Bruck, 1993). Although there has been a surge in research into children‘s

suggestibility, much research is lacking in ecological validity. The present research used a mixed

method approach to investigate how children respond to and cope with unanswerable questions.

Participants (n = 146) from two age groups (First and Third class Primary School children) were

assigned to either a reminder condition or no reminder condition where they were informed/not

informed that ‗don‘t know‘ was an acceptable response. Findings from the study suggest that the

reminder condition can increase children‘s level of accurate ‗don‘t know‘ responses to

unanswerable questions and that older children were significantly more accurate in their responses

to unanswerable questions. Qualitative interviews were also conducted with Primary school

children (n = 79) and teachers to investigate their experiences of questions in an educational

setting. Findings from the interviews suggest that children‘s perceptions of teachers‘ expectations

can influence how children feel and react to questions they cannot answer. Findings also

suggested that teachers‘ perception of children‘s class and individual needs influenced how

teachers approach questions in the classroom. Findings were discussed in relation to their

practical implications for questioning in an educational setting.


Title

Legal language Manipulation in War and Peace

Contexts: The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict .

Rajai Khanji DATE: SAT 23.06

University of Jordan.Amman TIME: 09.30-09.55

136

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Professor Al-Khanji was appointed at the English Department, University of Jordan in 1983. He is a

recipient of several research and study grants, including the American International Development

Agency grant for his B.A degree at AUB in Lebanon 1970-1974, Suny-Fredonia College grant for

his M.A degree, a fellowship for his doctorate degree from the university of Delaware, U.S.A, 1980-

1983, a senior Fulbright grant on child language acquisition at Suny-Fredonia in 1993, and other

short-term fellowships in Spain, Delaware and North Carolina. As an administrator, Professor Al-

Khanji was appointed Director of the Language Center, and Chairman of the Modern Language

Department at U.J. (1996-1998). He was also appointed as Dean, College of Arts (Sept. 2002-

Sept. 2006).

ABSTRACT

The aim of the proposed paper is to investigate the misinformed legal language used by Israeli

diplomats when adressing the western media on the status of the Palestinian occupied territories.

Critical discourse analysis(CDA) will be used as a framework tool to look into the framing of the

Palestinian legal language in a specific context for serving a purpose like war and peace(Van Dijk

2001).Among the objectives of CDA is to uncover inequality and injustice (Wodak 1989).The object

under investigation is language behavior in media and political discourse between enemies.

The paper will explore how language in the media misinterprets legitimate Palestinian human

rights and how the media reflects power or weakness between the two sides of the conflict.

Words and texts, according to Sornig (1989) can be used as instruments of power and

deception.Key factors in shaping the illegal shaping of language is enhanced by power,media

spinning and ideology.

Data collection for the study will be based on 25 texts taken from an Israeli document,Hasbara

2009.The document demonstrates how Israeli media leaders are asked to alter

words,expressions,and phrases that are considered to be legally used by Palestinians into what

appears to be illegal misinterpretation.That is ,how the interlocuter's outlook on reality is

expressed through either legal or illegal claims reflected in language use in order to convince the

international community of either viewpoints.


Title

Forming impressions of others from the nonverbal gestures they use while speaking different

languages

Jeanette King (presenter), Lucy Johnston, Jennifer Hay DATE: FRI 22.06

New Zealand Institute of Language, Brain and Behaviour,

University of Canterbury, NZ

137

TIME: 11.30-11.55

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Jeanette is Head of the Māori language programme in Aotahi: School of Māori and Indigenous

Studies at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. She is also a member of the MAONZE

(Māori and New Zealand English) project which, with the help of two Marsden Fund grants, has

been investigating sound change in the Māori language over the last 100 years. This project has

produced over 25 refereed outputs. Jeanette has published on many areas relating to the Māori

language: Māori language revitalisation initiatives, changes in the phrasal lexicon of Māori, Māori

English, and aspects of second language acquisiton of Māori, including the use of metaphor and

aspects of motivation. She is also on the Management Group of the New Zealand Institute of

Language, Brain and Behaviour (NZILBB) where she leads the Bilingualism theme. Jeanette‘s

recent work in the Institute focusses on the use of non-verbal cues by Māori/English bilinguals. As

part of the UC CEISMIC Canterbury Earthquake Digital Archive she is involved in a project which

is deploying a portable recording studio (UC Quake Box) to sites around Christchurch to record

people‘s earthquake stories, with a particular focus on collecting stories in multiple languages.

ABSTRACT

Previous research has shown that the impressions formed of speakers are influenced by both (i)

the language being spoken and (ii) the way speakers move when they talk. The present research

extended this past research by investigating the interaction between language and movement on

perception of speakers. We considered the consequences of the different movements (i.e., gesture

and posture) produced by bilingual speakers when speaking Maori and English. Would the

different gestural patterns associated with each language lead perceivers to form different

impressions of the speakers? Speakers were video- and audio-recorded while retelling a cartoon

story and their gestures coded. Only visual cues were made available to perceivers, who viewed

video-clips of the speakers with no sound and with the speaker‘s lips covered. They then evaluated

the speakers in terms of likability and attractiveness. Ratings of the speakers differed as a function

of the language being spoken: the same speakers were evaluated more positively when speaking

Maori than when speaking English. Further, the differences in gestural patterns used when

speaking Maori and English moderated these effects. Implications for understanding social

interaction will be considered.


Title

Māori language revitalisation: new generation, different motivators?

Jeanette King 1 (presenter), Nichole Gully 2 , Briar Tuiali‘i 1 DATE: SAT 23.06

1 New Zealand Institute of Language, Brain and Behaviour,

University of Canterbury, NZ, 2 Core Education

138

TIME: 12.20-12.45

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Jeanette is Head of the Māori language programme in Aotahi: School of Māori and Indigenous

Studies at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. She is also a member of the MAONZE

(Māori and New Zealand English) project which, with the help of two Marsden Fund grants, has

been investigating sound change in the Māori language over the last 100 years. This project has

produced over 25 refereed outputs. Jeanette has published on many areas relating to the Māori

language: Māori language revitalisation initiatives, changes in the phrasal lexicon of Māori, Māori

English, and aspects of second language acquisiton of Māori, including the use of metaphor and

aspects of motivation. She is also on the Management Group of the New Zealand Institute of

Language, Brain and Behaviour (NZILBB) where she leads the Bilingualism theme. Jeanette‘s

recent work in the Institute focusses on the use of non-verbal cues by Māori/English bilinguals. As

part of the UC CEISMIC Canterbury Earthquake Digital Archive she is involved in a project which

is deploying a portable recording studio (UC Quake Box) to sites around Christchurch to record

people‘s earthquake stories, with a particular focus on collecting stories in multiple languages.

ABSTRACT

It has been thirty years since Māori language revitalisation initiatives began with the kōhanga reo

(language nest) movement in 1981. The first wave of revitalisation was headed by second

language speaking adults who were the passionate instigators of kōhanga reo and a range of

Māori immersion schooling initiatives. In investigating motivators for these adults (King and Gully,

2009) it was found that second language acquisition (SLA) contrasts between integrative and

instrumentive motivation did not adequately capture the aspects of commitment involved. Typically

SLA theory describes the motivation of immigrant and other communities who are involved in

learning a Language of Wider Communication. With indigenous languages the situation is quite

different as most are also minority languages. For example, in the Māori situation, it was found that

adults were motivated by a strong personal relationship with the Māori language that they found

transforming (King, 2009). This paper presents results from an investigation of the key motivators

for 18-30 year old speakers of te reo Māori. Results from a questionnaire administered to 99

participants reveal an overall similarity to previous results for an older cohort, in particular a focus

on personal, identity focussed motivators. However, differences include the younger cohort

reporting less of need to be connected to Māori culture and society as well as less of a feeling of

being responsible for the survival of the Māori language. The results are discussed within the

different context of the younger generation‘s upbringing.


Title

Language attitudes and social identities in Montreal: a contemporary perspective

Ruth Kircher DATE: THU 21.06

University of Birmingham TIME: 10.20-10.45

139

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

I am a sociolinguist with a strong interest in the social psychology of language. I am particularly

interested in societal bilingualism and related phenomena such as social identities, language

attitudes, and language policy and planning. For my doctorate, which I obtained from Queen Mary

University of London, I investigated the effects of language policy and planning on language

attitudes in Montreal. My current research project is a comparative study of the implications that

social identities and language attitudes have for future language policy and planning measures in

Quebec and Wales. I am currently a Teaching Fellow in English Language at the University of

Birmingham.

ABSTRACT

As the urban centre of Quebec, Montreal is home not only to many francophones but also to

comparatively large communities of anglophones and allophones – that is, those who have a

mother tongue other than French or English. This diversity makes it a fascinating location for

language attitudes research. This paper thus presents the findings of a contemporary study of

young Montrealers‘ attitudes towards French and English in terms status and solidarity. The study

made use of both a questionnaire and a matched-guise experiment. Since Lambert et al. (1960), it

is the first investigation amongst Montreal anglophones and francophones to use a combination of

direct and indirect methods of attitude elicitation, and it is the first investigation ever to do so

amongst Montreal allophones. This combination of methods leads to a more comprehensive

understanding of attitudes than any one method on its own. The findings of the study show that

more status is attributed to English – most likely as a result of the utilitarian value it holds as the

global lingua franca. Regarding the solidarity dimension, it appears that while the social desirability

of an affective attachment to the French language is recognised, at a more private level, again,

more positive attitudes prevail towards English. It is hypothesised that this can be accounted for by

different forms of social identity: either a Montreal-based identity that encompasses English as the

ingroup language, or an international youth identity that is expressed with the help of English – or

possibly a combination of both.

Reference: Lambert, W.E., Hodgson, R.C., Gardner R.C. and Fillenbaum, S. (1960) Evaluational

reactions to spoken language. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology 60, 1: 44–51.

Dr Ruth Kircher, Department of English, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston Park Road,

Birmingham B15 2TT, UK


Title

Exploring the narrative organization of social identity category related experiences

Tibor Pólya 1 , Pál Kővágó 2 (presenter) DATE: FRI 22.06

1 Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Centre for Natural

Sciences, Department of Cognitive Brain Sciences and

Psychology 2 University of Pécs, Institute for Psychology, Hungary

140

TIME: 11.55-12.20

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

I have received my MA in psychology in clinical and health psychology in 2011 at the Károli

Gáspár University of the Reformed Church, Budapest, Hungary. Currently I am enrolled in doctoral

studies at the University of Pécs, Hungary. At the same time I am working as a trainee at the

Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

For the past four years I have specialized in researching the psychology of the Internet (more

specifically the online identity, personality perception, presentation of the self, etc.). In all of these

researches I rely heavily on content analytical methods. I am also training as an art therapist based

on Jungian psychotherapy.

I am currently member of the Narrative Psychological Research Group, further developing the

NarrCat (Narrative Categorial Content Analysis) system. My main field of interest is the interaction

of the social and personal identities, the interaction between the online and the offline identities of

the self and specific linguistic markers transmitting information about the identity states of the

writer in an online environment.

ABSTRACT

Narrative approaches to identity focus almost exclusively on the personal identity. This research

attempts to apply the narrative approach to the construct of social identity. It is hypothesized that

the narrative structure of stories recounting some social identity category related life events reflects

the quality of those experiences which are related to that social identity category.

To test this hypothesis we asked people with threatened sexual identities (20 women participating

in an In Vitro Fertilization treatment and 20 homosexual men) about how they coped with threats.

To assess the quality of social identity category related experiences three questionnaires were

used (Sense of Coherence Scale, Antonovsky, 1987; Profile of Moods Scale, McNair, Lorr,

Droppleman, 1971; and State Self-Esteem Scale, Heatherton, Polivy, 1991; to reflect the cognitive,

affective and self-esteem component of the experiences respectively). The stories had been

analyzed by the method of Narrative Categorial Content Analysis (László, 2008), which allows for

an automated coding of the stories‘ time structure (Ehmann et al., 2007), psychological perspective

(Pólya et al., 2007a) and spatio-temporal perspective (Pólya et al., 2007b), etc.

The correlational analysis revealed several relationships between quality of experiences and

narrative structure of stories. For example there is a significant correlation between the Tension

factor of POMS and the stories‘ time structure; there is also a significant correlation between the

Manageability factor of the SoCS and the stories‘ spatio-temporal perspective. The results will be


interpreted by elaborating the idea of narrative organization of social identity category related

experiences. Keywords: social identity, narrative approach, narrative categorical content analysis

141


Title

Do Men have a lot to Bitch about? Analysing the Language of Metrosexuals

Mohd Khushairi Bin Tohiar 1 (presenter), Sheena Kaur 2 DATE: THU 21.06

1 Centre for Languages and Pre-University Academic

Development, International Islamic University Malaysia

2 Faculty of Languages and Linguistics, University of Malaya

142

TIME: 15.30-15.55

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Mohd (pronounced as ‗Mohammad) Khushairi was born and raised in Klang, Selangor. He

completed his B. Ed. TESL (Hons.) at the University Putra Malaysia in 2003. Upon graduation, he

joins Centre for Languages (CELPAD) of the International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM) as an

English language instructor, teaching language proficiency courses to pre-university and

undergraduate students. He is also an administrator officer in the Testing and Measurement Unit at

CELPAD, dealing with the assessment of English language proficiency for the IIUM‘s students. In

2011, he completed his master‘s degree at the University Malaya. He wrote a dissertation entitled

―Speech Patterns and Styles of Young Malaysian Metrosexuals‖ as partial fulfilment of his Master

of English as a Second Language. His research areas are Sociolinguistics (gender and language,

language and masculinity) and also language testing (evaluation of English language proficiency

among L2 learners).

ABSTRACT

According to Coates (1997), ―It‘s a strange paradox but, despite the androcentric tendencies of

sociolinguistic research, we know very little about the informal talk of male speakers‖ (p. 107).

Even so, researchers within the area of gender and language such as Coates (ibid.) and Holmes

(2008) claim that men tend to discuss subjects such as sports, cars and possessions, rather than

personal experiences and feelings. Meanwhile, gossip is a form of speaking, which is normally

associated with women (Coates, 1989). Nevertheless, are those gendered-stereotypes mentioned

above true? This case study attempts to examine the themes, topics and men‘s gossip in informal

talks by a group of young Malaysian men between the ages of mid-twenties to late thirties who live

and work in Kuala Lumpur and its surrounding urban areas. The subjects involved in this study

were randomly selected using the definition of ‗metrosexual men‘ by Simpson (1994). As there

have been no studies on metrosexual language particularly in the Malaysian context, it should be

noted that this study is the first to be carried out in the context of Malaysian men. In order to find

out the most talked-about topics in their talk, the researchers conducted a series of ethnography

observation and interview, used audio-recording instrument to record their talk and later

transcribed their conversations for analysis. The results from data analysis are discussed within

the theoretical frameworks in language and gender (deficit, dominance, difference and gender

performativity), while Communities of Practice framework (Wenger, 1998) is used to describe the

production of themes and topics by this group of metrosexuals.


Title

Language policy of the European Union - Cementing the minority language status?

dr. Láncos Petra Lea DATE: FRI 22.06

Pázmány Péter Catholic University of Budapest (Hungary) TIME: 09.55-10.20

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Petra Lea Láncos is a Ph.D. candidate in European Law at the Pázmány Péter Catholic University

of Budapest (Hungary). She is a law graduate from the Pázmány Péter Catholic University (2003),

an LL.M. graduate in European Law and Comparative Law from the Andrássy Gyula

Deutschsprachige Universität (2006) and holds a master‘s degree in conference interpreting from

the Université Marc Bloch (2009). Her research interests include ethical and legal aspects of

linguistic diversity in the European Union, democracy deficit in the European Union, theory of

sovereignty and the jurisprudence of national constitutional courts on integration clauses enshrined

in national constitutions.

ABSTRACT

European nation-states traditionally rely on a restrictive language policy 3 selecting a ―national‖

official language in order to integrate different language groups and communicate efficiently with

citizens. Although speakers of minority/non-official languages are granted the same rights as

speakers of official languages the effect of the ―national‖ language on political, economic and

cultural life is overwhelming. As regards political participation, access to the job market and the

preservation of cultural identity, minority/non-official language speakers encounter significant

difficulties in the national setting, notwithstanding the fact that they are formally equal to speakers

of the ―national‖ language.

The language policy of the European Union actually cements this minority language status – and

with this, the secondary status of minority language speakers – on the Union level. ―National‖

languages are elevated to the rank of official language of the Union, leading to a questionable

situation where the speakers of certain official languages (e.g. Maltese, Slovakian, etc.) are greatly

outnumbered by speakers of ―minority‖ languages (e.g. Catalan). Paradoxically, speakers of such

―minority‖ languages encounter similar disadvantages on the Union level as regards employment

chances, political participation and funding for the preservation of cultural identity.

The proposed presentation explores the alternatives to the current linguistic regime of the Union as

well as their feasibility.

3

Daniel M. Weinstock: The Antinomy of Language Policy, in: Will Kymlicka, Alan Patten (eds.):

Language Rights and Political Theory, OUP (2007), 253; Toggenburg (2005), 5-6. Trócsányi

László: Az anyanyelv használatához való jog a nemzeti alkotmányokban, Romániai Magyar

Jogtudományi Közlöny, (2006); 7., Weber (2009) 12.

143


Title

The project on Nomadic Education in the Yamal-Nenets Autonomous District

Roza Laptander DATE: SAT 23.06

Arctic Centre, Anthropology Research Team

University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland

144

TIME: 11.30-11.55

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

ABSTRACT

This presentation is about the modernization of the educational system for indigenous peoples in

the Russian Federation. In the Yamal peninsula there are over 14,000 nomadic people on the list

of the indigenous peoples of the North in the Russian Federation. The indigenous population of the

Yamal-Nenets Autonomous District is represented by Nenets, Khanty, and Selkups. These people

live according to their traditional way of life with fishing and working with reindeer. Their pre-school

age children stay with them and older children are brought up in boarding schools, at a distance

from their families and traditional culture. This situation is one of the main reasons of indigenous

language loss among the young generation.

From 2010 the District‘s department of education started an experiment to modernize the

educational system for reindeer herders‘ children and to help them to get primary education in the

tundra, where they are living with their parents. This idea was introduced by the Nenets writer

Anna Nerkagi. It is reaction to on the sad memory of elderly indigenous people about boarding

schools. This still has a negative impact on the language and cultural situation among these

people in the Russian North, Siberia and Far East.

Anna Nerkagi stated that the educational system of a district cannot ignore the culture and lifestyle

of reindeer herders, hunters and fishermen. Their children, studying and living in boarding schools,

are for a long period of time separated from their ethnic background. Children are not taught how

to do elementary things for themselves, whereas in boarding schools they live in an artificial world.

As a result, after finishing boarding school, these young people show a low level of socialization.

Nerkagi‘s Laboravaja primary school is very different from all other schools in the Yamal-Nenets

Autonomous district. In this school children do not just study school subjects, but they are taught

how to fish, hunt and work with reindeer. Her original idea is that school, family and tribal education

together should give children education and provide knowledge about their traditional culture and

working skills in the tundra.

For the first time such Nenets traditional pedagogic methods have officially been recognized. This

is because of the ‗Concept of Sustainable Development of Indigenous Peoples of the North,

Siberia and the Far East of the Russian Federation‘, which was adopted by the Russian

Government on 4 February 2009. This concept focuses on the idea of socio-economic, ethnic and

cultural development of the minorities of the Russian North and on the modernization of their

education.

These changes in education made it possible in Yamal to organize new forms of teaching where

teachers will travel to the tundra and teach children in their traditional living conditions. Teachers

will have some privileges compared to ordinary teachers but this would be a small compensation


for their hard work in the tundra. Every tundra teacher will have emergency equipment for traveling

to the tundra, e.g. satellite phones and a first-aid kit. Nevertheless, the conditions are not easy.

Especially during the polar winter teachers will have to travel by themselves to the location of the

herders in the tundra and meet practical difficulties on the road, such as a limited amount of petrol.

This education is not obligatory. Parents could choose for their children: there will be the possibility

to study either in a traditional village boarding school or in the place of their residence in tundra.

According to the idea of this project nomadic teachers will teach in the district‘s native languages.

This will help people to preserve these indigenous languages and cultures. The Russian language

will be also introduced to pupils as a language of teaching. This bilingual (possibly trilingual)

education will help to skip the language barrier and will assist pupils to get primary education in

and about their native language.

To summarize, we should state again that the work of nomadic teachers is based on the idea to

provide access to the preschool, the primary and the secondary general education in the tundra

without separating the children from their parents and their traditional nomadic way of life.

145


Title

The effectiveness of apologies and thanks in favor asking messages: A cross-cultural

comparison between Korea and the United States

Hye Eun Lee, PhD DATE: THU 21.06

Department of Communicology

University of Hawaii at Manoa

146

TIME: 10.20-10.45

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Hye Eun Lee (PhD, Michigan State University) is an assistant professor in the Department of

Communicology at University of Hawaii at Manoa. Her research areas are cross-cultural differences

in speech acts and customers‘ perceptions, and communication network approaches to

organizational attitudes and behaviors at the workplace.

ABSTRACT

A speech act refers to a minimal unit of discourse which is transferable from language to language

(Coulmas, 1981). Apologies and thanks are two extremely frequent and routine speech acts

(Coulmas, 1981). People‘s use of and responses to these two speech acts are culturally very

different (Barnlund & Yoshioka, 1990; Sugimoto, 1997; Tanaka, Spencer-Oately, & Cray, 2000).

Two distinct objectives of apologies and thanks are to express regret and gratitude, respectively,

but both speech acts are also a gracious way of favor asking (Coulmas, 1981; Ide, 1998; Searle,

1969). Studies showed that Koreans included apologies in their messages more often than

Americans while Americans contained thanks more often than Koreans (Lee, & Park, 2011; Park,

Lee, & Song, 2005).

Three studies investigated whether apologies and/or thanks in a favor asking email message

increase normality of the message, positive attitude about the message, sender credibility and

willingness to give the favor in the U.S. and Korea. After reading one of four favor asking email

messages for a given situation, participants in study 1 (N = 634) and study 2 (N = 417) indicated

their perceptions of normality of the message, attitude about the message, sender credibility and

willingness to give the favor to measure individuals‘ evaluation of the apologies and thanks

included messages. In study 3, 807 participants completed one of seven versions of a

questionnaire, which included a prototype of an email message for a different situation from

studies 1 and 2. The findings showed some cross-cultural differences in the effectiveness of

apologies and thanks in favor asking messages. Implications and future research directions were

discussed.


Title

Types of Prototype Descriptions about Support Group Attendees Elicited by Women with

Breast Cancer

Legg, M. 1 , Occhipinti, S. 1,2 , and Chambers, S.K. 2 DATE: FRI 22.06

1 School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, Mount

Gravatt, Australia

2 Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia

147

TIME: 11.30-11.55

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Melissa Legg is currently in the last year of her PhD candidature in social psychology at Griffith

University, Brisbane, Australia. Her main research interest is group identity development, in other

words, the processes by which people come to accept or reject a group identity that is imposed on

them. Her PhD project is concerned with group identity development in the context of breast

cancer and peer support. Specifically, this PhD project examines the degree by which group

identity motivates the uptake of peer support (e.g. support groups). Throughout her candidature,

Melissa Legg has employed both quantitative and qualitative methods to examine her research

question. In addition, she is working as a qualitative interviewer for the Cancer Council

Queensland on a project examining stigma and lung cancer.

ABSTRACT

The present paper examines open-ended prototype descriptions that were elicited as part of an

ongoing, longitudinal project investigating the role of group-level beliefs as determinants of peer

support behaviour (e.g. support group attendance) for women with breast cancer. Overall, peer

support utilisation is low amongst people with cancer, and to date, qualitative evidence suggests

that negative beliefs about peer support may contribute towards low attendance. This project

examines beliefs about peer support at the group-level, specifically, how beliefs about support

group members may motivate or demotivate support group membership. Preliminary results of this

project suggest that perceived similarity to prototype perceptions of support group attendees

contribute to the intention to utilise peer support by women with breast cancer. The present paper

will examine the language used in prototype descriptions elicited from women, as part of the

overall prototype measure. Participants were instructed to describe, in their own words, the typical

woman with breast cancer who seeks support by meeting with other women with breast cancer.

The content of these prototypes will be discussed in light of how group-level beliefs may influence

peer support behaviour in the context of breast cancer.


Title

Port worker‟s retirement experience, language use and intergroup relations

Laura Camara Lima DATE: FRI 22.06

ABSTRACT

Theoretical and Methodological approach

148

TIME: 12.45-13.10

ROOM: MADRID

The program ALCESTE is capable of identifying what Reinert (1993, p. 13) named lexical worlds

and describe as being ―spaces of reference, statistically defined, associated to a big number of

enunciations‖. Lexical worlds are kinds of stable structures (distribution of words into the unities of

text), which take form and remain, in spite of the local instabilities, which characterize the

enunciation, in terms of a more stable and more permanent position (―commonplace‖ or ―general

view‖). Lexical worlds are also dynamic structures, which refer to the movement of alternation

between two (or three) antagonistic orientations, each one of which trying to impose a particular

―point‖ to the others. This ―point‖ is not only an opinion or an argument; moreover it is an entire

―position‖, regarding relational issues (which always involve others parts and a prized social object).

ALCESTE‘s algorithm operates in the following steps. Firstly, it identifies all the ―full words‖ that are

present in the text and reduces them to their radical (lexicon). Reinert named ―full words‖ as those

that are ―full of sense‖, meaningful by themselves, independently of others‘ words; namely: names,

adjectives, adverbs, numbers, etc. In opposition, he named ―tool words‖ as those words whose

sense is dependent on (or relative to) the sense of others‘ words; namely: articles, propositions,

pronouns, auxiliary verbs, etc. Secondly, the algorithm splits the text in many equal size parts,

which Reinert called as ―unities of context‖.Thirdly, the algorithm verifies the presence of ―full

words‖ in these ―elementary unities of context‖ and considers their relative distribution by mapping

groups of words. Finally, making specific statistical calculations, ALCESTE detects the clusters

and the factors (related to theses clusters), which better represent the lexical topology.

ALCESTE‘s output is a report that contains a) graphics that represent the structure of the clusters

(lexical worlds) based on how and where they get apart one from the other; b) a summary of the

lexical contents of each cluster (lexical world); and c) a plan (figure) composed by orthogonal

factors by means of which the relationships between variables can be represented.

Results

The program found out three stable clusters. Together these clusters explain what occurs within

68% of the elementary unities of context of the corpus text. This percentage indicates that it is a

good analysis, since only less than a third part of the elementary unities of context is not explained

by the output (clusters and factors).


The image below shows the results of the analysis. The number of elementary unities of context

(euc) indicates the size of each one: the larger one contains 43% (n=240 euc) of them, the second

one 39% (n=219) and the third one 18% (n=104).

----|----|----|----|----|----|----|----|----|----|

Cl. 1 ( 240uce) |----------------------------+

17 |-------------------+

Cl. 3 ( 104uce) |----------------------------+ |

18 +

Cl. 2 ( 219uce) |------------------------------------------------+

In order to examine the three clusters from the point of view of their contents, we checked out the

list of lexicons, which each one of them contained, giving special attention to the most significant

ones (those with highest chi-square). Having studied these lists of lexicons we were able to

acquire a comprehension of the different lexical worlds and to give them a name, respectively: 1.

Productive work: container (35), engine (29), truck (26), ship (22), work (15), etc. ; 2. Worker

interviewer: says (39), worker (24), modernization (21), competition (17), etc. 3. Retirement and

illness: have+ (70), fear (59), thing (48), return+ (39), know (39), go (35), stayed (35), retired (31),

etc.

The three graphs (Alceste output) show the distribution of three kinds of words: graph 1. the

variables used in the study, graph 2. the lexicons (full words) which have the highest Chi-square;

3. the lexicons (tool words) which have the highest Chi-square. Their allocations, in relation to the

factors, provide precious information about the dichotomies they keep alive. The results presented

and discussed here are those related to the use of the main words (high Chi-square), verbs and

pronouns.

In relation to the horizontal factor, they are distributed like this: in the left side, there are many

verbs «let», «operate», «do», «wan», «call», «arrive», «enter», «stay», «finish», etc. while, in the

right side, there is the noms ―competition», «modernization», «union», and the presence of the

interviewer and his socio-historical perspective. In relation to the vertical factor, they are

distributed like this: in the topside, there is the lexicon «busyness», «obligation», «work», «boss»,

while in the bottom side, there are the verbs «illness», «retirement», «professional», «retirement»,

«.depression», company», etc.

Observing the location of the pronouns in the graphs, we observed what follows. In relation to the

horizontal factor: in the left side, there are the pronouns «with me», «me», «you», «your», which

indicates proximity between speakers; while, in the right side, there are the pronouns «she», «this»,

«that». In relation to the vertical factor: in the topside, there is the pronoun «they», «their», «their»,

«that one», «other», while and in the bottom side, there is the pronoun ―I‖.

— Reinert, M. (1993): Les «mondes lexicaux» et leur «logique» à travers l'analyse statistique d'un

corpus de récits de cauchemars. Langage & Société, 66, 5–39.

149


Title

The acquisition of the Irish language by pupils in Irish-medium schools in Belfast

Dr Seán Mac Corraidh DATE: FRI 22.06

St Mary‘s University College, Belfast TIME: 10.45-11.10

150

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Dr Seán Mac Corraidh is presently the coordinator of the Irish-medium Post Graduate Certificate in

Education at St Mary‘s University College, Belfast. He has wide experience of teaching Irish and of

teaching through the medium of Irish at primary and tertiary phases in education. His experience

also includes eight years as a regional adviser to teachers and principals in Irish-medium schools

at nursery, primary and post-primary levels. He has published extensively on the teaching and

learning of the Irish language and on Irish-medium education. His doctoral thesis on the quest for

best practice in Irish-medium schools was published in book format in 2008 and is entitled Ar Thóir

an dea-chleachtais: The Quest for Best Practice in Irish-medium Primary Schools in Belfast. He

has also been involved in devising techniques and methods for the active learning of the Irish

language in mainstream schooling. The area of greatest interest for him within the area of

immersion education is the acquisition of the immersion language and how immersion pupils‘

awareness and knowledge of that language can be advanced.

ABSTRACT

The subject of my paper will be the Irish language as spoken and written by pupils at various

phases of their formal education in Irish language schools in the city of Belfast. The majority of

these pupils are native speakers of English and are exposed to Irish normally at pre-school level

through typical nursery activities but with a strong emphasis on second language development, in

this case Irish. These Irish language skills are developed in order to equip pupils to study the

learning areas of the curriculum at primary level through Irish. Belfast city also offers post-primary

education through the medium of Irish at a large independent college and a wide range of subjects

are offered there. I will look at the processes involved in the acquisition of Irish by these pupils, the

nature of their oral and written production of it and strategies and teaching methods employed in

facilitating that acquisition. As a teacher educator I will also consider the pathways by which

student teachers learn to become effective immersion Irish language teachers both at primary and

post-primary phases.


Title

Importance of contextual biases in argumentation processing

Jens Koed Madsen DATE: FRI 22.06

151

TIME: 10.20-10.45

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Jens Koed Madsen studied rhetorical theory at the University of Copenhagen before moving to

London to study at University College London. Following a MRes in Speech, Language, and

Cognition, he got accepted as a Phd at Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences with supervisors

Nick Chater, David Lagnado and Adam Harris. The thesis revoles around describing persuasion

from a point of view of contextually enriched utterances, mentalizing, joint action, the

phenomenological position of the subject, as well as subjective, contextual reasoning processes.

Taken together, Jens hopes that these provide an interesting approach to the complex human

phenomenon of persuasion. The research carried out by Jens thus garners on theoretical positions

from his studies in rhetoric, but also from psychology, logic, marketing, and economy to approach

persuasion from an interdisciplinary point of view.

So far, Jens has published three papers in collaboration or by himself, presented his work

at numerous conferences as well as several invited talks. Alongside this, he is engaged in

collaborations with researchers from University Berkley California, University of Southern Denmark,

Warwick Business School, the institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technology in Rome as well as

other researchers from UCL. He finishes his PhD ultimo September 2013.

ABSTRACT

Traditional logical models of language processing tend to focus on structural issues to determine

whether a given formula is logically valid of inconsistent. Such structural approaches are difficult,

though not impossible, to fuse with contextual influences. Recent development in psychological

and decision-making literature suggests that contextual biases (i.e. being influenced by subjective

perception of elements such as colour of surroundings, framing devices etc., see e.g. Thaler &

Sunstein for a collection of such biases and nudges) play a large part in how we perceive the world

and consequently shape our beliefs. Indeed, when confronted with evidence from how subjects

approach experimental designs, traditional logical models face difficulty in accounting for their

reactions.

The talk presents and discusses an alternative Bayesian approach (Oaskford & Chater,

2006; Hahn & Oaksford, 2007; Harris et al., forthcoming) to argumentation processing, which is

based on subjective estimations of probability, i.e. the content of the argument, rather than the

formal structural aspects of the argument. In such an account, contextual and subjective biases

may be considered part of the human approach to content rather than a normative flaw or fallacy.

Furthermore, given the contextual element in the Bayesian approach, contextually shared

representations (Vesper et al., 2010; Pezullo, submitted) become central for processing and

governing communication.


The approach has theoretical implications in that it suggests a novel account of

argumentation, which may render significantly different evaluations of fallacies. The approach also

has analytical implications given the differences in theoretical estimations. Finally, the approach

has practical implications for practitioners of argumentation and reasoning. The aim of the talk is to

give an indication of the theoretical and empirical support for such as account and to suggest it as

a viable alternative to traditional models based on predicate logic.

152


Title

Learning relativity: creating knowledge in the cosmic world

Arthur Brogden Male DATE: FRI 22.06

Doctoral School, Institute of Education, University of London TIME: 12.45-13.10

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Arthur Brogden Male, born in New York City, migrated to Quebec Canada, London England and

Limousin France; family second generation immigrants from England, France and Germany;

residential social worker (retired), educator, community organizer, farmer, artist and volunteer;

doctoral student January 2000 to present, Doctoral School, Institute of Education University of

London; three years Graduate School of Arts and Science, University Fellowship, New York

University; BA (Honours) and MS, City University of New York; multi-disciplinary educational,

community and professional background in the creative arts.

ABSTRACT

The focus is the experience of making an original contribution to knowledge in the context of

producing a doctoral thesis. Staff and student colleagues interact and work together linking

collaborative conversations, supervisory relationships, community participation, courses, seminars

and conferences, warranted understandings, empirical data collection and self-evident

demonstrations to craft feedback and associations into a thesis. The aim of the research project is

to revise the framework for experiencing learning relativity: the fluctuating boundaries of warranted

argumentation in intergradient educational discourse. Humanistic, egalitarian colleague

relationships facilitate collaborative conversation methodology in staff and student interviews and

classroom settings. Experiments engage various activities and media to investigate research

participant interactions with authority in academe. Spontaneous, episodic, evidentiary events

produce subsequent frames and framings of time, space and form one nested within the other.

Creating knowledge, people practice transformation and academic freedom in cosmic contexts.

Collaborative conversations come into conflict with perceived understandings of mainstream

educational practice as a reified mode. The error is to treat controlling situations as the real thing:

over investing in competitive learning environments because that is what is happening in the

classroom. This leads to the focusing hypothesis: in knowledge creating experiments, individuals

triangulate new educational experiences to evaluate self–common–subject knowledge. And

inspires the research question: why do learners open conversations to conceptualise educational

entanglements?

1 Experience experiments successively approximate the ineffable polysemy of ontology,

epistemology, content, contexts and communication.

2 Learning = energy (awareness) ² trans-formulations synthesise spontaneity–authenticity–

originality and mimicry–mastery interactivity.

3 Collaborative conversations organise insight methodologies and changing perspectives

explicating arts–science–education–in–performance.

153


4 Self-study inspirations, activist aspirations and research journeys generate artworks-in-progress,

quests-in-process and projects-in-development.

5 Diverse fractal metric art forms fuse episodic, evidentiary events nesting energy within

awareness manifesting nine universal elements of education.

Key words Spontaneity, authenticity, originality, experiment, encounter

154


Title

Role of Intergroup Contact and Friendship in Learning and Speaking

a Minority Language

Enikő Marton DATE: FRI 22.06

University of Helsinki, Department of Finnish, Finno-Ugrian and

Scandinavian Studies

155

TIME: 09.30-09.55

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Enikő Marton is a PhD student at the Department of Finnish, Finno-Ugric and Scandinavian

languages at the University of Helsinki.

She is a researcher at the Center of Research on Ethnic Relations and Nationalism (CEREN) in

Helsinki. Her research interest includes bilingualism, language learning motivation and the

maintenance of minority languages.

ABSTRACT

The present paper provides an insight into how intergroup contact and intergroup friendship

affect the motivation in learning and using the minority language among the speakers of the

majority language in the bilingual region of Dolinsko/Lendvavidék, Slovenia.

Based on earlier research (Clément, 1980; MacIntyre, 2001; Noels et al., 2001), the paper

integrates intergroup contact theory and the idea of intergroup friendship (Pettigrew, 1997) with

tenets of the socio-educational model of L2 learning (see Gardner, 2010), willingness to

communicate and ethnolinguistic vitality (Giles et al., 1977), and extends the scope towards

learning a minority language by majority language speakers in a traditional bilingual environment.

Despite its very low demographic capital (5000 speakers or 40% of the population of the

region), the Hungarian language has a high status and broad institutional support in

Dolinsko/Lendvavidék which also implies that Hungarian is taught as an obligatory second

language for Slovene-speakers.

The empirical data was collected among young ethnic Slovenes in Lendava/Lendva

(N=119) in the only secondary school of the region and reached about 60% of the total population

of Slovenian-speaking secondary school students. The hypotheses were tested by serial multiple

mediation with the help of SPSS-macro PROCESS (Hayes, 2012).

The study found substantial support for the hypotheses, and confirmed that friendship and

positive contact with Hungarian-speakers enhance the motivation in learning and speaking the

Hungarian language. Findings and implications are discussed.

References

Clément, R. (1980). Ethnicity, contact and communicative competence in a second language.

In H. Giles, W. P. Robinson & P. M. Smith (Eds.), Language: Social psychological

perspectives (pp.147-154). Oxford, England: Pergamon Press.

Giles H., Bourhis, R. Y., & Taylor, D. (1977). Towards a theory of language in ethnic group

relations. In:

H. Giles (ed.) Language, ethnicity and intergroup relations (pp. 307–348). New York:

Academic Press.

Hayes, A. (2012, under review). PROCESS: A Versatile Computational Tool for Observed Variable


Mediation, Moderation, and Conditional Process Modelling

MacIntyre, P.D., Clément, R., Baker, S.C., & Conrod, S. (2001).Willingness to communicate, social

support and language learning orientations of immersion students. Studies in Second

Language Acquisition, 23, 369-388.

Noels, K. A., Clément, R., & Pelletier, L. G. (2001). Intrinsic, extrinsic, and integrative orientations

of French Canadian learners of English. Canadian Modern Language Review, 57(3), 424-444.

Pettigrew, T. F. (1997). Generalised intergroup contact effects on prejudice. Personality and Social

Psychology Bulletin, 23, 173–185.

156


Title

Semi-automated content similarity analysis as an innovative approach to examining

attitudes: the case lay explanations for the 2011 London Riots

Eric Mayor (presenter) 1 , Oriane Sarrasin 2 DATE: THU 21.06

1 University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland, 2 University of Lausanne,

Switzerland

157

TIME: 09.30-09.55

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Eric Mayor is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland. His

research interests include interpersonal communication in natural and experimental groups,

cognitive appraisal and risk perception, and lay explanations for societally relevant issues. Using a

diversity of methods such as content analysis and computational techniques, he investigates how

discourse and non-verbal actions inform us about collaboration, opinions and social processes. He

analyses the modalities of conversations, interview data, participant's written productions, as well

as news corpora and social media.

ABSTRACT

Lay respondents explain violent crowd behaviour by structural (e.g., economic crises) and/or nonstructural

(e.g., gangs) causes (Litton & Potter, 1985): causes for such behaviour are perceived as

respectively external versus internal to individuals. Our research demonstrates how content

similarity analysis, an innovative method in the field, can inform on attitudes regarding violent

crowd behaviour. We examine whether lay explanations explains similarity between lay and the

authorities‘ verbal productions about the origins of the 2011 London riots, and whether LOC

impacts similarity. In an online study conducted during the riots, British residents (N=99) indicated

on Likert scales their agreement with excerpts of the British Prime Minister's official address. Other

items measured respondent‘s LOC and agreement with various causes for the riots. Respondents

also provided open comments on the riots, which were stop-word filtered and stemmed. A

measure of similarity was produced (the multiplicative inverse of the Euclidian distance of each

comment to the overall excerpts content). We used regression analyzes to examine how structual

and non structural causes and LOC impacted similarity. Controlling for age, gender, stress and

worry, structural and non-structural causes, and internal LOC had a main effect on similarity. No

interaction was found significant. Thus, the strength of attributions, regardless of the cause types,

predicted similarity with the official address, and this both in respondents with an internal and an

external LOC. Overall these results show that content similarity analysis is a promising alternative

to scales measuring attributions in the study of relations between lay and authorities' explanations.


Title

Preventing prostate cancer through early detection: The importance of understanding how

men integrate information about prostate cancer into judgements about risk and screening

McDowell, ME 1 (Presenter), Occhipinti, S 1 , & Chambers, SK 2 DATE: THU 21.06

1 School of Applied Psychology, Mt Gravatt campus Griffith

University

2 Griffith Health Institute, Gold Coast campus, Griffith University

158

TIME: 16.45-17.10

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Dr Michelle McDowell is a Research Fellow working at the Griffith Health Institute at Griffith

University in Brisbane, Australia. Dr McDowell received her PhD in Psychology in November 2011

examining risk perceptions and decision-making about prostate cancer screening for men with a

family history, focusing on the influence of the family history context on decision processes and the

conceptualisation of risk. Her research interests are in risk perception, the psychology of decisionmaking

(how people actually make decisions), and the effect of the decision context, motivation,

and personal experience on decision-making.

ABSTRACT

Health communications about prostate cancer screening emphasise an informed decision-making

process owing to the lack of evidence that early detection screening for prostate cancer is

efficacious. Thus, health practitioners are faced with the difficult communication task of helping

men navigate through the many pros and cons of prostate cancer screening in order to facilitate

their decision-making. Using a list aloud technique, the present study investigated the information

men use to make judgements about prostate cancer risk and screening decisions and explored

whether family history influenced strategy use. First-degree relatives (FDRs) of men with prostate

cancer (n=32) and men from the general population (PM; n=50) completed a verbal protocol

analysis interview. Responses were coded according to the use of heuristic (e.g., mental shortcuts)

and systematic strategies (e.g., information seeking). FDRs reported a greater total number

of heuristic strategies on average than did PM whereas mention of systematic strategies was low

for all men. Lay beliefs included the belief that screening could prevent the development of cancer

(e.g., screening can prevent, control, or limit the development of prostate cancer) or could reduce

one‘s risk of getting cancer (e.g., by not screening one is ―tempting fate‖). Results highlight the

potential challenges that such biases raise for health practitioners in communicating with men

about the efficacy of screening. The mental models approach to communicating cancer information

is discussed in terms of how health professionals should consider how information about prostate

cancer will be integrated into the intuitive formulations of cancer that men already hold.


Title

Constructing masculinities: A discourse analysis of the accounts of single-at-midlife women

Jennifer A. Moore (presenter), H. Lorraine Radtke DATE: THU 21.06

University of Calgary, Department of Psychology, Canada TIME: 16.20-16.45

159

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Jennifer Moore is a doctoral student in Psychology at the University of Calgary in Canada. Her

current research activities include the study of discourses and identities in relation to single-atmidlife

women, gender, and marginalized groups. Previous research projects have included an

examination of the experiences of lesbian and gay soldiers in the Canadian Armed Forces.

ABSTRACT

In most Western countries, demographic and socio-cultural changes have contributed to a retreat

from the ‗married with children‘ pattern of family life and a growing number of singles (DePaulo &

Morris, 2005; Sandfield & Percy, 2003). As more single women are living without a romantic

partner, this marks a dramatic shift in both intimate and family relationships with men. This paper

explores women‘s representations of men with whom they have previous or current relationships

(i.e., male relatives, friends, and current and former lovers), and their various constructions of

masculinity. The analysis draws on semi-structured interviews with 12 never-married, child-free,

midlife women (ages 35-44) from Calgary, Alberta, who provided accounts of their lives as single

women. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using discourse analysis

(Edwards & Potter, 1992; Potter & Wetherell, 1987). The women‘s constructions of masculine

identities drew on various versions of masculinity and served a number of rhetorical purposes,

including explaining and justifying their singleness and constructing identities as autonomous

women. This paper contributes to the discussion of contemporary, heterosexual masculinity as it

arises in this unique context—‗girl talk‘ with single women who are living ‗without‘ men. The

implications for relationships between women and men at midlife are discussed.


Title

Spanish scholars‟ perceived difficulties writing research articles for publication in Englishmedium

journals: the impact of language proficiency versus publication experience.

Ana I. Moreno (presenter), Jesús Rey-Rocha, Sally Burgess,

Irene López-Navarro and Itesh Sachdev

University of León (Spain)

160

DATE: SAT 23.06

TIME: 09.55-10.20

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Ana I. Moreno, Senior Lecturer in English at the University of León (Spain), has lectured in

English for Specific Purposes, grammar, discourse analysis, pragmatics and research procedures

in English-Spanish cross-cultural studies. She is currently the Director of the interuniversity

research group called ENEIDA (Spanish Team for Intercultural Studies on Academic Discourse)

and the Principal Investigator of a research project on Rhetorical Strategies to Get Published in

International Scientific Journals from a Spanish-English Intercultural Perspective funded by the

former Ministry of Science and Innovation. Her current research interests concern English for

academic purposes, needs analysis, academic writing difficulties, intercultural rhetoric, academic

criticism and genre analysis. Her work has appeared in TEXT, English for Specific Purposes,

International Journal of English Studies, The Journal of English for Academic Purposes and

TEXTandTALK. She has collaborated in international collective volumes on Applied Linguistics,

Intercultural Rhetoric, Review Genres and Scholarly Criticism, published by Multilingual Matters,

John Benjamins, Palgrave-MacMillan and Peter Lang. She has written the entry on Intercultural

Rhetoric in Languages for Specific Purposes for the Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics published

by Wiley-Blackwell. Her cross-cultural research has implications for those teaching academic and

professional communication or anyone working with academic L2/L1 English and Spanish texts

(http://blogs.unileon.es/amoreno/).

ABSTRACT

Previous quantitative studies suggest that the burden scholars who use English as an additional

language perceive when writing research articles (RAs) for publication in English (as L2) is 24%

greater than the burden they perceive when they write RAs for publication in their L1. It remains

unclear precisely which aspects of RA writing in English present these writers with the greatest

challenge and just why they perceive this increase in difficulty. A structured questionnaire

comprising thirty-seven questions about scholars‘ publication experiences in scientific journals in

English and in Spanish was designed and sent out to all (8,794) Spanish scholars with doctorates

at five Spanish research and/or teaching institutions, yielding responses from 1717 researchers.

Our first results show that the section that is perceived as more difficult to write for publication in

English-medium journals across the four broad knowledge areas in a way that cannot be fully

explained by their lower level of proficiency in English (as L2) is the discussion. This article

proposes the rhetorical transfer hypothesis as a possible explanation for their additional difficulty.

Our results also reveal that on average Spanish scholars‘ perceived difficulty starts to decrease

when they report their proficiency as high or very high in writing EAP or EGP or have published at

least 10-22 RAs in English-medium journals.


Title

Conversation table as an environment for (re)signification of subjectivity and identities in

Portuguese as a Foreign Language

Ricardo Moutinho (Presenter) 1 , Denise Gomes Leal da Cruz

Pacheco 2

1 University of Macau, China, 2 Universidade Estácio de Sá Rio

de Janeiro, Brazil

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

161

DATE: THU 21.06

TIME: 09.55-10.20

ROOM: PRAGUE

Ricardo Moutinho works as a Senior Instructor at the University of Macau (China). He holds a PhD

in Linguistics from UM, Master‘s in Linguistics from Federal University of Sao Carlos (Brazil) and a

Bachelor in Language and Literature from the same institution. Currently, he has started his Post-

Doctoral project at University of Campinas (Brazil) related to the topic: the washback of proficiency

tests in the teaching and learning of Portuguese as a foreign language. He has worked in

Interactional Sociolinguistics and Foreign Language Teaching and Learning, especially in

Portuguese as a Foreign Language. His works are concentrated in the following topics:

participation framework, proficiency tests, washback in cultures of learning, cultural diplomacy in

language teaching, didactic materials for language learning and new identities in foreign language.

ABSTRACT

As Foreign Language teachers, we always wondered about the silence of our students during the

lessons. However, when we started the project ―Conversation Table in Portuguese‖ (CTP), we

realized that the students assumed a more active role during the interactions, probably due to the

less hierarchical situation they were in. The CTP provided the students the opportunity to express

themselves in a foreign language without the interdiction they felt inside the classroom. Within this

new context, the lack of confidence they might be facing in communicating in a foreign language

started to disappear, giving place to a motivation to express what they felt in this ‗new‘ language.

Therefore, the target language started to become a new locus, a new way that made them not feel

scared, but free and curious to say things that they would not say in similar situations when

communicating in their mother tongue. In other words, the foreign language can be the place

where everything seems to be possible as we do not have the control or interdiction imposed by

the social values presented in our society and manifested in our mother tongue. In this study, we

analyze some discursive situations taken from a session of CTP in which the students show their

new identities in the foreign language. The results show that acquiring another language is much

more than acquiring new linguistic aspects of communication, but also giving birth to new identities

that make us become new subjects.

Keywords: Conversation Table, Portuguese as a Foreign Language, subjectivity, identities,

(re)signification.


Title

What motivates men to participate in PSA testing? The appeal of information.

Occhipinti, S 1 (presenter), McDowell, ME 1 , & Chambers, SK 2 DATE: FRI 22.06

1 School of Applied Psychology, Mt Gravatt campus Griffith

University

2 Griffith Health Institute, Gold Coast campus, Griffith University

162

TIME: 09.30-09.55

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Stefano Occhipinti was trained in experimental social cognition and has spent some years

applying this to issues such as decision making about screening and treatment for cancer and

especially prostate cancer. His other research interests are in the social psychology of food

(especially as regards cultural and biological influences on the relationship between food, identity

and prejudice; collaborating with Liz Jones) and most recently in the psychology of ordeal.

Although he is primarily a quantitative researcher, he has come to appreciate the richness of the

various qualitative paradigms and participates enthusiastically in mixed methods research teams.

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of prostate cancer screening continues to increase in Australia despite ongoing

debate about the efficacy of early detection testing. As a consequence, health communications

about prostate cancer screening emphasise an informed decision-making process and health

practitioners are faced with the difficult communication task of helping men navigate through the

many pros and cons of prostate cancer screening. The present study investigated the reasons

men give for testing for prostate cancer and examined the influence of family history. First-degree

relatives (FDRs, n = 207) of men with prostate cancer and population men (PM, n = 239) listed

what they thought about when considering whether or not to get a PSA blood test. Thirty-one

unique reason categories were identified and categorised into four classes using Latent Class

Analysis: general positive attitudes to health behaviour (Class 1; 13% of participants); testing as a

way to conquer or prevent cancer/risk (Class 2; 10%); having an outcome-focused orientation

(Class 3; 52%); and weighing up or evaluating risk factors (Class 4; 25%). FDRs were more likely

than PM to be classified in Classes 2 and 4. LCAs were supplemented with software-based

analyses of texts. Results suggest men may approach PSA testing with different decisional

processes and that these processes need to be considered both by health professionals involved

with one on one contact with men and by designers of mass education programs. Results are

discussed in terms of underlying lay beliefs regarding screening and their impact on the

communication processes involved in decision making.

Key words: PSA test, risk, decision, reasoning


Title

Insights into the Social Psychology of Ethnolinguistic Decay

Conchúr Ó Giollagáin, MA, PhD (NUI) DATE: SAT 23.06

Language Planning Unit, Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge

National University of Ireland, Galway

National Institute for Regional and Spacial Analysis, National

University of Ireland, Maynooth, Ireland

163

TIME: 09.55-10.20

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Conchúr Ó Giollagáin is the Head of the Language Planning Unit in Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta

Gaeilge (Irish-medium university), National University of Ireland Galway and an External Fellow of

the National Institute for Regional and Spatial Analysis, National University of Ireland, Maynooth,

Ireland. He is the academic director of the Acadamh‘s (NUIG) MA in Language Sciences. He coauthored

the government-commissioned Gaeltacht survey Comprehensive Linguistic Study of the

Use of Irish in the Gaeltacht (2007). Alongside his interest in language planning, his published

works includes research on sociolinguistics, linguistic anthropology and oral biography. He has

devised, in conjunction with local communities, language planning strategies for several Gaeltacht

communities.

ABSTRACT

This paper seeks to identify and explore various aspects of the social psychology of ethnolinguistic

minorities as they grapple with the communal pressures of language shift. In seeking to

differentiate what is hybrid and assimilatory in the social production of identity in stressed minority

linguistic cultures, this paper will examine the socio-psychological aspects of intercultural contact

from the minority ethnolinguistic perspective. The emergence of cultural hybridity as a salient

discursive trope, which seeks to depict the minority/majority socio-cultural dynamic as a

consensual accommodation, will be contrasted with the communal response adopted by linguistic

minorities to negotiate the pressures of uni-directional bilingualism which are integral to language

shift. The creative tension between the attention afforded to performative aspects (art, aesthetics

and media) of minority cultures in contact with minority and majority audiences, on the one hand,

and the implications of the power relations which determine the social functionality of minority

linguistic cultures, on the other hand, will also be addressed. This paper poses the question

whether the engendering of a socially neutral aesthetic interest in minority cultures is a defence

mechanism which seeks to mitigate the effects of ethnolinguistic fragility.


Title

Sharing responsibility after error occurrence? The effect of group membership on intergroup

communication about errors

Annemiek van Os (presenter), Dick de Gilder, Cathy van Dyck,

and Peter Groenewegen

164

DATE: SAT 23.06

VU University Amsterdam, Department of Organization Sciences TIME: 09.30-09.55

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Annemiek van Os (1986) studied Work and Organizational Psychology at the Radboud University

in Nijmegen (The Netherlands). After obtaining her Master‘s degree (MSc) in 2009, she started

working as a junior teacher and PhD candidate at the Department of Organization Sciences at VU

University Amsterdam. She is interested in how identity is expressed through language use and

how this may affect organizational processes. In her PhD project she focuses on social identity and

error communication in organizations. The research is carried out using multiple methods, with

experimental studies as well as (qualitative and quantitative) field studies.

ABSTRACT

Communication about errors is essential for learning from them, especially when groups are

dependent on each other for task performance. However, social identity processes may affect

intergroup communication about errors, e.g. by disfavoring the outgroup. In the current experiment,

we were interested in the extent to which, in e-mail communication, people would share the

responsibility for an error they did not make themselves. In particular, we investigated whether the

extent to which responsibility was shared depended on the group membership of the person

making the error and the person receiving the e-mail.

Participants (N = 83) read a scenario in which, during a cooperative task in pairs as part of a

student project, an error was made by the other student in their pair (the subject). Subsequently

participants had to send an e-mail to the student coordinator of the project about what had

happened. We manipulated group membership (ingroup versus outgroup) of subject and receiver,

resulting in a 2 x 2 between-subjects design.

Two independent raters (κ = .71, p


Title

The effect of out-of-school exposure on children‟s foreign language learning

Liv Persson 1 (presenter) & Tineke Prins 2 DATE: THU 21.06

1 Utrecht University, 2 University of Groningen

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

165

TIME: 14.45-15.10

ROOM: PRAGUE

Liv Persson (Utrecht University) and Tineke Prins (University of Groningen) are linguists working

on the Foreign Languages in Primary school Project (FLiPP). This longitudinal research project

addresses the role of starting age, and quantity and quality in English as a foreign language

education in primary schools in the Netherlands. Over the course of 2 years, the language

development of pupils at 14 schools with early foreign language learning is studied.

Liv attended Roosevelt Academy, a Liberal Arts & Sciences College, and completed her master on

Language Development at Utrecht University. Tineke completed her bachelor Dutch language and

culture and her Research Master Linguistics at the University of Groningen. Liv and Tineke are

both interested in what factors influence the rate of language acquisition of young learners of

English in instructed settings.

ABSTRACT

Anecdotal evidence of the effect of mass media on language learning abounds, but little

systematic investigations into the effect of out-of-school exposure on language learning exists.

Previous research suggests that in experimental settings, where children are briefly exposed to a

foreign language through movieclips, limited but measurable development in receptive vocabulary

size –but not grammar – can be observed (Gery d‘ Ydewalle & Van de Poel, 1999; Koolstra &

Beentjes, 1999; Lommel, Laenen, & d‘ Ydewalle, 2006). Studies investigating the effect of

longitudinal exposure to the target language remain rare (but cf. Kuppens, 2007) and it remains

uncertain if, and if so, to what extent out-of-school exposure influences individual language

proficiency.

This paper reports on data from Dutch children learning English at school and encountering

English at home. Foreign language proficiency of 4-year-olds (N=188), 8-year-olds (N=25), 9yearolds

(N=15) and 10-year-olds (N=29) is reported after having had one year of formal

instruction in the target language. The amount and type of foreign language input at home was

established using parental questionnaires. Not all input at home was found to be a significant

predictor for foreign language scores, with certain types of television programmes explaining more

variance in the children‘s scores than others. Age correlated with type and amount of out-of-school

input, and the different age-groups were found to be affected differently by mass media. This paper

aims to identify what types of input in the target language at home influence children‘s foreign

language proficiency, in relation to the input they receive at school. --

Liv Persson (Utrecht Institute of Linguistics), Tineke Prins & Sieuwke Reitsma (University of

Groningen) Project FLiPP - The Foreign Languages in Primary school Project.


Title

« You really don‟t sound like us »

Effect of proper names on listener expectations

Alexei Prikhodkine DATE: FRI 22.06

University of Lausanne, Department of General Linguistics, CH TIME: 09.30-09.55

166

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Alexei Prikhodkine recently completed his PhD and is now Lecturer in Sociolinguistics at the

University of Lausanne (Switzerland). His research interests address variation in French-speaking

area of Switzerland, processes of (de)standaradization in French and effect of eliciting conditions

on language regard. He is particularly interested in investigating how life-course events and

language ideologies influence other- and self-identifications of speakers of immigrant descent. He

is author and co-author of several publications (more details:

www.unil.ch/unisciences/AlexeiPrikhodkine).

ABSTRACT

There is ample evidence in sociolinguistics that linguistic stimuli enable speakers‘ social

identification. However, recent research shows that speech perception can be affected by nonverbal

cues of speakers‘ social group. While the incidence of several cues has been investigated,

no research, to our knowledge, has highlighted the role of proper names.

In this presentation, we will discuss the effect of the conveyed ethnicity by proper names on

speech perception in a French speaking area. 150 Swiss listeners, divided into two identical

samples, were asked to evaluate several female speakers – having all French as a first language

and a Master degree –, the only difference between the two samples being the speakers‘ proper

names. Minority names were of Lusophone and Arabic origin; their social meaning has been tested

in previous research. The listeners had to judge the suitability of the speakers for a job as a

communication manager in a Swiss bank and were also asked to evaluate them on different

aspects, such as the presence of a foreign accent.

Results provide evidence that mastering a Standard variety of French is not a key for nondiscriminatory

treatment of people of immigrant descent. Speech stimuli associated with ethnic

minority names receive significantly less positive evaluation. Ethnicity leads, moreover, to a

different perception of two excerpts coming from one speaker. While the ethnicity of proper names

indeed has an incidence on the way the speakers are perceived, the composition of the names

(fully exolingual or mixed) also has an effect on the evaluation.


Title

Separation and Connection: A Discourse Analysis of Young Men‟s Talk about Their Mothers

H. Lorraine Radtke (presenter), Dane Burns DATE: THU 21.06

University of Calgary, Department of Psychology, Canada TIME: 15.55-16.20

167

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

H. Lorraine Radtke is a Professor in the Department of Psychology, University of Calgary. Her

research interests broadly fit within the psychology of gender and have focused on mothers and

mothering, young women‘s identities, and the impact of feminism on women. For this work, she

adopts the theoretical and methodological framework of discourse analysis. She is also a coinvestigator

on two longitudinal research projects. The first is a study of women, living in the Prairie

Provinces of Canada, who have been abused by their intimate partners. The other is a randomized,

clinical trial of an educational intervention aimed at fostering young women‘s resistance to sexual

assault. In addition, she has co-authored several papers on intersectionality theory as an approach

to incorporating social diversity into research with women.

Dane T. Burns is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Psychology, University of Calgary. His

research interests span psychology, philosophy, and social history, with a particular emphasis on

the philosophical underpinnings and fundamental and foundational assumptions of psychological

practice. His Masters thesis explored the discourse of critical thinking in postsecondary institutions.

His current dissertation research is an historical investigation of John Dewey‘s psychological

theorizing situated in the beginning of the 20th century.

ABSTRACT

Despite some interest in the relationships between mothers and sons in the last two decades of

the 20 th century, there has been relatively little research in the first decade of the new millennium.

Within everyday life, on the other hand, the mother-son relationship continues to be portrayed

variously as ―special‖ and as problematic for the son‘s development (at least within the Canadian

context in which this project is embedded). Framed within discursive psychology, our project aimed

to elucidate the concerns of sons in relation to their relationships with their mothers and the cultural

resources related to masculinity and mothering that they drew on in articulating these concerns.

Ten men, who were registered in an undergraduate psychology course, participated in a

conversational interview about their relationships with their mothers. The interviews were taperecorded,

transcribed, and analyzed using a synthetic approach to discourse analysis. The sons

positioned themselves as independent and self-sufficient, and in positioning their mothers, they

oriented to the ―intensive mother‖ (Hays, 1996). Furthermore, in their accounts of the relationship,

they negotiated the degree of connection versus distance as something they worked to control. We

argue that the sons‘ positioning within discourses of masculinity rests on their denying on-going

dependency or attachment to their mothers. As a consequence, a version of masculinity that is

traditional, at least to the middle-class Canadian context, is retained, making problematic the

possibility of intimacy in their mother-adult son relationship. We discuss implications for the power

relations of gender, mothering, and masculinities.


Title

Urban Multingualism and Language Attitudes in Lithuania

Meilutė Ramonienė DATE: THU 21.06

Vilnius University TIME: 14.20-14.45

168

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Meilutė Ramonienė is a professor of the Department of Lithuanian Studies at the University of

Vilnius. She was Head of the Department of Lithuanian Studies 1990-1995 and 1999-2010. Her

research interests include applied linguistics, teaching foreign languages, sociolinguistics and

onomastics, which she also lectures on at the University of Vilnius. From the 1990 she became

involved with issues of language education and assessment. She taught Lithuanian as a foreign

language at the University of Helsinki. She is an author of several textbooks and teacher reference

books for teaching Lithuanian as a second language including Teach Yourself Lithuanian (2006,

Hodder Education), Colloquial Lithuanian (Routledge, 1996, 2010), Practical grammar of

Lithuanian (2003, Baltos lankos), Threshold Level of Lithuanian etc. Her published output also

includes papers on language use and language attitudes, language and identity, bilingualism and

multilingualism in Lithuania. She was engaged in a survey-based British Academy funded research

project on the Lithuanian language communities. She has coordinated an international Socrates

Lingua two project ‗Oneness‘, a research project ‗Language usage and ethnic identity in urban

areas of Lithuania‘. Currently she is coordinating two research projects: ‗Sociolinguistic map of

Lithuania: cities and towns‘ and ‗Language of emigrants‘.

ABSTRACT

Since the restoration of independence in 1990, Lithuania like other Baltic countries, has

undergone a dramatic socio-political transformation accompanied by socio-linguistic changes.

The nature of bilingualism and multilingualism has completely changed in Lithuania. A radical

departure from the Soviet-era asymmetric bilingualism model that meant bilingualism of titular

ethnicities and monolingualism of Russian-speakers has occurred. The new language policy

influenced, in particular, language attitudes and behaviour of ethnic minorities. The most

obvious changes in language attitudes and behaviour are noticed in the biggest cities of

Lithuania where the increasing process of globalisation stimulates the development of new

multilingualism. Not only ethnic minorities but also Lithuanians in the cities of Lithuania are

distinguished for their linguistic repertoire which has changed. The linguistic attitudes and

behaviour of the people living in the biggest cities of Lithuania make a big influence on the

changes of sociolinguistic situation in Lithuania.

Based on a newly acquired quantitative and qualitative data from two research projects of

language use and language attitudes carried out in Lithuanian cities and towns this paper aims

at exploring new developments of multilingualism in Lithuania and language attitudes. The

paper will focus on the following issues: the repertoire of home languages; language dominance

and preference; the relationship between home languages and construction of ethnic identity;

the role of the age factor and the ethnic factor in these processes.


Title

Sports fan identity and basking in reflected glory: a content analysis of pronominal usage

and expressions of emotion by social networking users

George B. Ray (presenter), Shawna L. Jackson, Kimberly A.

Neuendorf, Anup Kumar

School of Communication, Cleveland State University, Cleveland,

USA

169

DATE: SAT 23.06

TIME: 09.30-09.55

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

George B. Ray is Professor of Communication and Director of the School of Communication at

Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A.. Professor Ray‘s principal area of research is

language and social interaction. He has conducted ethnographic research in Appalachian

communities, studied micro-level interactional processes during initial encounters and in physicianpatient

communication, and has also investigated language attitudes toward Standard American

English and New Zealand English. In 2009 he published Language and Interracial Communication

in the United States: Speaking in Black and White, a book that examines the nature of interracial

communication in contemporary U.S. American society. His published work has appeared in

prominent journals such at Communication Monographs, Social Psychology Quarterly, and the

Journal of Language and Social Psychology.

ABSTRACT

Sports fans show a level of dedication to their respective teams; however, the strength of the

relationship between a fan and his or her team can cause mixed results in the way a fan chooses

to act out following a team‘s victory or loss. This research provides an in-depth look at the fans of a

professional sports team using the theories of basking in reflected glory (Cialdini et al., 1976) and

spiral of silence (Noelle-Neumann, 1974) via computer-mediated communication. It will examine

the motivations of fans of a U.S. American professional football team, personal pronouns fans use

in their sports-related messages, and changes in verbal expression following a loss or victory by

the team. Messages posted on the team Facebook page will be content analyzed for pronominal

usage as well as expressions of emotions. Further, participants will be surveyed on their personal

habits as a fan, media habits, and personality traits. The data analysis will pay particular attention

to patterns of expression after a loss or victory, as well as expressions that may run counter to the

opinions of a majority of fans after a game.

Cialdini, R. B., Borden, R. J., Thorne, A, Walker, M. R., Freeman, S., & Sloan, L. R. (1976)

Basking in reflected glory: three (football) field studies. Journal of Personality and Social

Psychology, 34, 366-375.

Noelle-Neumann, N. (1974). The spiral of silence: A theory of public opinion. Journal of

Communication, 24, 43-51.


Title

Trilingual primary and secondary education in Friesland: developments and challenges

Dr. Alex M.J. Riemersma, Dr. Reitze Jonkman DATE: SAT 23.06

TIME: 09.30-09.55

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Dr. Alex M.J. Riemersma (* 1953) studied Dutch and Frisian, specialised in education and

language planning. His thesis (together with Sikko de Jong) was on Testing of language command

of both Dutch and Frisian at the end of primary school (1994). From 1984 onwards he gained

expertise as teacher trainer at the NHL and Stenden universities of applied sciences in

Ljouwert/Leeuwarden, where he was appointed Lecturer on Frisian and Multilingualism in

Education (2010).

From 1982 he also worked as professional language planner of the Provincial Government of

Friesland (Netherlands); his expertise is mainly in the field of Frisian as a minority language in the

domains of education, public authorities, media and culture. 1998-2007, he served as secretary of

the Dutch national consulting body for the Frisian language in the European Charter for Regional

or Minority Languages.

From 2007 appointed at the Mercator: European Research Centre on Multilingualism and

Language Learning at the Fryske Akademy

From 2009 member of the Steering Committee of the Network to Promote Linguisitc Diversity

(NPLD).

Dr. Reitze Jonkman (1957) his Ph. D. was on the multilingual situation of the capital of Friesland

concerning Frisian, Dutch and the (Dutch) city dialect. He investigated this unique social interaction

of languages with several types of sociolinguistic research. Together with Durk Gorter he

conducted a sociolinguistic survey of the bilingual situation of the province of Friesland (1995).

Later Jonkman specialized in the Non-Convergent Discourse (NCD), the phenomenon two

interlocutors speaking two languages in the same conversation, each participant using his own

variety. As a teacher in secondary education he practiced long-distance learning by teaching

Frisian at the same time to pupils at three different school locations by video conference.

Nowadays he is engaged in constructing a tool for measuring the school results of education

concerning the Frisian language in the parameters of the Common European Framework of

Reference.

ABSTRACT

Since 1997, the model of trilingual education is applied in Friesland with Dutch, Frisian and English

as a subject and medium of instruction. The actual number of primary schools is around 40 (out of

480) and 3 secondary schools (out of 77). Results so far are encouraging with regard to language

command of Frisian and Dutch, and self-esteem on English fluency. Challenges are the continuity

of teaching and learning, integral didactic approach on subject and medium teaching, and

comparability of language command in three languages. The main concerns are the quality of

teachers in both English and Frisian, differentiation in the class room, and the lack of a coherent

170


school policy. Another challenge is the continuity from primary to secondary education. Students at

secondary schools where both English and Frisian are taught as a subject only, suffer from

discontinuity.

Recently undertaken research will be presented on the language command in the first grade of

secondary school, based on the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) levels.

Synergy between the three target languages is aimed at through integral didactics and Content

and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL).

Furthermore, attention will be paid to trilingual teacher training stream for primary school which has

started recently as well as a Minor which includes student‘s research in school practice during

their internship. Finally, a Master Multilingualism is being developed.

171


Title

Research on identity issues by using a combined social theoretical approach in a case study

of adult female migrants learning English in the U.K.‟

Dr. Luz Alma Rodriguez-Tsuda DATE: THU 21.06

University of Southampton

TIME: 14.20-14.45

ROOM: PRAGUE

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

With a background as a writer, I studied Spanish language and literature in Mexico City then I

moved to Barcelona. There, I had several books published in Spanish. I completed a Masters

degree in Applied Linguistics at the University of Southampton in 2006 and a PhD in the same

subject at the above mentioned university in 2011. I have two main areas of research, namely

second language learning and feminist linguistics. My research interests in second language

learning are the interrelation between adult informal second language learning processes, the

social context and the learner‘s identity, which involves elements such as gender and social class.

With regard to feminist linguistics, I am interested in initiatives –both individual and collective, that

challenge the gender order. I am currently writing a book based on my PhD thesis while looking for

a postdoctoral position.

ABSTRACT

Research on identity in the field of linguistics has been significant in the last 20 years (Hall 1996;

Benwell and Stokoe 2006; Heller, 2011). My line of inquiry involves a social constructionist

approach in the area of second language learning, which has investigated the interrelation

between the learning process and the learners‘ identity issues (Bremer, Roberts et al. 1996;

Norton 2000; Pavlenko, Blackledge et al. 2001; 2004; Block 2007). However, the complex concept

of identity raises some challenges for research activities (e.g. data analysis).

This paper explains how I tackled some of these problems in my longitudinal ethnographic case

study. I used a combined theoretical framework that stated my approach to identity, while tackling

its complexity in the data from a range of complementary perspectives. This made a solid starting

point for a deeper analysis of issues of identity linked to second language learning. The

investigation is grounded in a combination of poststructuralist theory (Norton 2000), social

psychology‘s identity hierarchy theory (Stryker 1968, 1980; McCall and Simmons 1978) and

activity theory (Engeström, Miettinen et al 1999). The two former theories have been drawn upon

to explain the links between the individual‘s hierarchical set of identities and her decision making,

attitudes, degree of involvement in activities and communities, and others‘ perceptions and

positioning. The third theory has been used to identify other related traits (actions, social networks,

relationships).

The case study documents the relationship between identity and the English learning processes of

six adult female migrants living in a Southern English city, which are theorised and explained in

reference to identity and gender issues.

172


References

Benwell, B. and E. Stokoe, 2006. Discourse and Identity. Edinburgh. Edinburgh University Press.

Block, D. 2007. Second Language identities. London. Continuum.

Bremer, K., C. Roberts et al. 1996. Achieving understanding: discourse in intercultural encounters.

Language in social life series. London. Longman.

Engeström, Y., R. Miettinen et al. 1999. Perspectives on activity theory. Cambridge. Cambridge

University Press.

Hall, S. 1996. Who needs identity? Questions of cultural identity. S. Hall and P.d. Gay. London.

Sage.

Heller, M. 2011. Paths to post-nationalism : a critical ethnography of language and identity. New

York ; Oxford. Oxford University Press.

McCall, G. and J.L. Simmons. 1978. Identities and interactions: an examination of human

associations in everyday life. New York. The Free Press.

Norton, B. 2000. Identity and language learning : gender, ethnicity and educational change.

Harlow, Longman.

Pavlenko, A., A. Blackledge et al. 2001. Multilingualism, second language learning, and

gender. Berlin, Mouton de Gruyter.

Pavlenko, A., A. Blackledge et al. 2004. Negotiation of identities in multilingual contexts.

Clevedon. Multilingual Matters.

Stryker, S. 1968. ―Symbolic interaction as an approach to family research‖. Journal of Marriage

and Family 30(4): 558-564

Stryker, S. 1980. Symbolic interactionism: a social structural version. Menlo Park, Cal. The

Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Company.

173


Title

Spanish Researchers Publishing in English-medium Scientific Journals: attitudes and

motivations across disciplinary areas

Sally Burgess, Pilar Mur, Rosa Lorés, Jesús Rey Rocha, Ana I.

Moreno & Itesh Sachdev (presenter) .

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

174

DATE: SAT 23.06

TIME: 10.20-10.45

ROOM: PARIS

Itesh Sachdev was born and brought up in Kenya, completed secondary and undergraduate

education in the UK (Psychology, University of Bristol), and doctoral training in Social Psychology

in Canada (McMaster University, Ontario). He then taught in Applied Linguistics at Birkbeck,

University of London, and is currently Professor of Language and Communication at the School of

Oriental & African Studies (SOAS, University of London). He has also been Director of the SOAS-

UCL Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning 'Languages of the Wider World', served as

President of the British Association for Canadian Studies, and is the current (20010-2012)

President of the International Association for Language and Social Psychology. He has published

widely in the social psychology of language and intergroup relations, having conducted research

with various ethnolinguistic groups including those in/from Bolivia, Canada, France, Hong Kong,

India, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, Tunisia and the UK.

ABSTRACT

Disseminating research outcomes in English-medium journals represents a challenge for those for

whom English is not a first language and who have been offered little to support the acquire

English for Research Publication (ERPP) skills. As part of a larger and more ambitious project, the

ENEIDA team (Spanish Team for Intercultural Studies of Discourse) sought to explore Spanish

academics‘ needs for training in English for Research Publication Purposes (ERPP) in different

disciplinary communities. Questionnaire data were obtained from 1717 Spanish Higher Education

staff with doctorates in a variety of fields about level of proficiency, motivations, attitudes and

views, past experiences and difficulties, current writing strategies and future training needs in

relation to both English and Spanish for Publication Purposes. Scholars in Chemistry, Business

and History had high levels of interest in ERPP training, whereas the Historians were notable for

the wide range of languages they used for research publication purposes and their perception of

the dominance of English as a threat. Other findings concerning attitudes and motivations for

ERPP are discussed to identify long-term opportunities and training for publication in English.


Title

Pronouns, Address Forms and Politeness Strategies in Odia

Kalyanamalini Sahoo DATE: THU 21.06

English & Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad, INDIA TIME: 10.45-11.10

175

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Kalyanamalini Sahoo, Ph.D in Linguistics, works as an Assistant Professor in linguistics at the

Department of Linguistics & Contemporary English, English & Foreign Languages University,

Hyderabad, India. Her research interests lie mainly in morpho-syntax and gender studies.

ABSTRACT

This paper discusses how various politeness strategies are implemented linguistically and how

linguistic usage is related to social and contextual factors in the Indic language Odia. It deals with

different levels of politeness found in society and considers politeness strategies like choice of

lexical words, use of indirectness, indirect speech and sophisticated vocabulary, avoidance of

negative questions, etc. It also discusses linguistic sub-strategies implemented for making

requests, commands, suggestion, prohibition and seeking permission in a polite way.

Exploring different forms of pronouns and address forms employed in a wide range of contexts in

Odia society, this study finds that the choice of the appropriate variant of the second person

pronoun indicates the correlation of the structure of language and the structure of society including

a differential treatment of women and men. Non-reciprocal usage of address forms, asymmetrical

greeting rituals, etc. indicate the types of politeness strategies practiced in the society. Besides,

age, occupation, education, social status, etc. play an important role.

The study extends the validity of politeness theory (Brown & Levinson, 1978) with reference to

Odia and shows that Odia usage of politeness would be more differentiated according to the social

relationship and gender than the content of the message. In Brown and Levinson‘s model,

individual speech acts are considered to be inherently im/polite. However, in Odia, it is found that

communities of practice, rather than individuals, determine whether speech acts are considered

im/polite. Thus, politeness should be considered as a set of strategies set by particular groups or

communities of practice as a socially constructed norm for themselves.


Title

Fostering Multilingualism through (Public) Bilingual Education in Spain: Projects, Prospects...

and Complications!

Ignacio Gregorio Sales DATE: FRI 22.06

Regent‘s College London, United Kingdom TIME: 11.55-12.20

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

176

ROOM: BRUSSELS

Ignacio Gregorio Sales is full-time Lecturer within the Department of Languages and Cross-

Cultural Studies at Regent‘s College (London) and teacher at the London School of Economics

and Political Science. He has a BA (Honours) in Applied Modern Languages from the University of

Northumbria, graduated in English Studies and has an MA in Teaching English in Bilingual

Contexts from Universidad de Alcalá. Expecting to complete his PhD this year, his research

focuses on the role of new technologies in the teaching and learning of the lexical component of

foreign languages in bilingual settings. He also works and collaborates with different higher

education institutions as lecturer and teacher trainer, and develops learning materials for several

online platforms, training courses for teachers and various post-graduate and MA courses in

different British, Spanish and Latin-American universities. His areas of professional interest focus

on bilingual education, language policy and the use of new technologies for language teaching and

learning.

ABSTRACT

The Spanish experience of CLIL is eclectic. There is no single CLIL model for the whole country.

There are as many models as regions; different in application, but following the same

fundamentals. Spain develops different models which share the same main objective: upgrading

(public) education and competence in languages throughout the population. There are different

scenarios where education is: 1. Partly in Spanish, and partly in one or two foreign languages; and

2. Partly in Spanish, partly in a joint official language other than Spanish (Basque, Catalan and

Valencian, or Galician), and partly in one or two foreign languages.

This reality has given the Spanish CLIL spectrum a leading place in Europe. Implementation of

CLIL programmes have received (and receive) strong political support. The different models differ

considerably from one region to another, but can be summarised as following one of these

objectives: Promoting bilingualism in a monolingual community or fostering multilingualism in an

already bilingual community.

The aim of this paper is to understand the organization of the Spanish case regarding languages in

the Education System, to examine the different models already set up and coexisting throughout

the country and its regions, and to highlight problems already arising within these models.


Title

Reporting on the 2009 „Burqa Ban‟: Deconstructing Ideology

Nadia Sarkhoh (presenter), Prof. Itesh Sachdev DATE: SAT 23.06

School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), London, UK TIME: 12.20-12.45

177

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Nadia Sarkhoh developed her interest in Discourse Studies while completing her MA degree in

TESOL at the University of Bristol. She is currently carrying out her PhD research at the School of

Oriental and African Studies (SOAS). Her research is primarily interested in investigating the

ideological discursive representation of Islam and Muslims in the press. Her academic interests

generally lie in Sociolinguistics and Discourse analysis with particular focus on Critical Discourse

Analysis (CDA) and the discursive construction and representation of Self and Other in various

social and political contexts.

ABSTRACT

―The burqa is not welcome in France‖, these were the words made by Nicholas Sarkozy in his now

infamous 2009 presidential speech, echoing earlier events in French history, while simultaneously

triggering a domino effect across borders with various government officials following suit by

resonating similar sentiments and rhetoric. Indeed, the ‗Burqa Ban‘ is one of the latest

controversial Muslim and Arab related stories attracting extensive global media coverage and

conflicting views among various worldwide communities. As part of a larger study focusing on the

ideological discursive representation of Islam and Muslims in the British and English language

Arab quality press, this paper represents an important part of the analysis focusing on the crucial

initial period following the proposal of a face veil ban in France (19/6/09 – 30/6/09). Using

quantitative content analysis and the various tools offered by Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA),

the paper investigates the ideological representation of Islam, Muslims and women wearing the

face veil in the UK press; and whether this representation is reproduced or resisted in the Arab

based press which is sourced extensively by ‗Euro-centred‘ news agencies. Preliminary findings

indicate that while there are some similarities in the representation of Islam and Muslims actors in

both contexts, a clear divergence in representation was detected in the macro and micro strategies

utilised in the ‗burqa ban‘ discourse.


Title

Transnational comparability of degree programmes: Global policy and local practices

Dr. Carole Sedgwick DATE: FRI 22.06

Centre for Research in Language Assessment, University of

Roehampton

178

TIME: 10.45-11.10

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Dr. Carole Sedgwick is a Senior Lecturer at Roehampton University. She is interested in the

assessment of writing, qualitative research and cross-cultural issues associated with

standardisation of language qualifications. Her recently completed PhD thesis was an investigation

of literacy practices on the same academic programme in two different linguistic and cultural

contexts in Europe in relation to the Bologna Process. She has published and delivered papers on

different aspects of this research as well as earlier projects in her field of interest. She delivers

undergraduate modules on sociolinguistics and individual differences in language learning and a

postgraduate online module on Language Assessment. She has acted as external examiner for

degree and pre-sessional programmes and participated as external expert on university validation

panels for new bachelor‘s and master‘s programmes in the UK. She has also assisted as an

external expert in CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference) benchmarking projects for

commercial organisations.

ABSTRACT

This paper reports research into academic literacy practices of MA thesis writing on English

studies programmes in two different national locations in Europe. The research was prompted by

the aims of the Bologna Process to create a globally competitive European higher education space

with a system of ‗comparative‘, ‗compatible‘ degrees to enable mobility across Europe for

employment and study. The research was concerned with how similarities and differences in

practices in each location, and the social contexts embedded in those practices, could relate to

Bologna aims for ‗comparablility‘. An ethnographic perspective was adopted to research design in

order to collect ‗rich‘ data on thesis writing practices for six MA theses, three from each location,

treated as separate case studies. Multiple contexts that students, supervisors and assessors

perceived to be relevant to thesis making and to determine, influence and constrain practices were

identified across the case studies. These contexts, global and local, illustrate different dimensions

of location, geographical, geo-political and geo-linguistic, identified by Lillis and Curry in their

ethnographic study of the practices of publishing of eight European academics (2010). Moreover,

the rich range of practices identified in these case studies demonstrates the creative potential of

the local and challenges top-down specification for degree qualifications in the European

Qualifications Framework. The paper concludes with a proposal for alternative bottom-up

approaches to the harmonisation of degree qualifications.

Lillis, Theresa and Mary Jane Curry. 2010. Academic Writing in a Global Context: The politics and

practices of publishing in English, London: Routledge.


Title

Communication in neonatal nurseries: Differences in attributions and perceived support for

adult and adolescent mothers.

Nicola Sheeran¹, Liz Jones¹ and Jen Rowe² DATE: THU 21.06

¹School of Psychology, Mt Gravatt Campus, Griffith University

²School of Health and Sport Sciences, University of the Sunshine

Coast

179

TIME: 09.30-09.55

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Nicola Sheeran recently submitted her PhD in Clinical Psychology at Griffith University, Brisbane,

Australia. Her research interests include the effects of stressful events on the adjustment to

parenthood, adolescent parenting, prejudice and discrimination, communication in health settings,

and intergroup/intergenerational communication.

Nicola is currently working part time as a researcher/lecturer at Griffith University and is also

practicing part time as a Psychologist in private practice. She currently has 3 manuscripts in

preparation based on the work from her PhD in the area of preterm birth and adolescent

motherhood. Current and future research projects include investigating how nursery ward design

influences adjustment to parenthood for parents and communication and support for nurses,

nursing perspectives on communication between adolescent mothers and nurses, and a long term

follow up of adolescent mothers of preterm infants.

ABSTRACT

The birth of a preterm infant is associated with psychological distress and disruption to the

parenting role for adult mothers. Parents rely on health professionals for information and support

and have to negotiate shared care of their child making communication an important aspect of the

experience. However, little research has investigated whether there are differences in perceptions,

attributions or interactions within the neonatal nursery based on the age of the mother. The current

study presents the findings from a thematic analysis of interviews with adolescent (N= 20) and

adult (N=39) mothers at the time of infant discharge from hospital. Findings suggest that adult

mothers consider communication vital for positive adjustment and perceive staff as important

sources of support with relationships developed and explained at an interpersonal level. However,

few adolescent mothers reported that communication with staff was helpful or that staff were an

important source of support. Instead, adolescent mothers reported that staff watched, judged, and

lacked understanding. Communication was explained at an intergroup level as young mothers

attributed the nurse‘s communicative and unsupportive behaviours to be due to age. Further, the

discourse of the young women positioned them as objects of adult surveillance and control and not

autonomous mothers. These findings have important implications for service delivery in neonatal

nurseries and help to redress the deficit of research on how adolescents experience

communication.


Title

How the doc should (not) talk: When breaking bad news with negations influences patients'

immediate responses and medical adherence intentions

Christian Burgers 1 , Camiel J. Beukeboom 1 , Lisa Sparks 2 (presenter) DATE: FRI 22.06

1 VU University Amsterdam, NL

2 Chapman University, Orange CA/ University of California, Irvine

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

180

TIME: 12.20-12.45

ROOM: MADRID

Lisa Sparks (Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, 1998) is Foster and Mary McGaw Endowed

Professor in Behavioral Sciences at Chapman University in Orange, California where she serves

as Head/Director of the Master of Science graduate program in Health and Strategic

Communication in the Schmid College of Science and Technology. Dr. Sparks also serves as Full

Member of the Chao Family/NCI Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of

California, Irvine in the School of Medicine, Division of Population Sciences; and Adjunct Professor

in the Department of Population Health and Disease Prevention, Program in Public Health. Prior to

joining Chapman in 2006, Dr. Sparks occupied faculty positions at George Mason University in

Fairfax, Virginia and the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Dr. Sparks is a highly regarded teacher-scholar whose published work spans more than 100

research articles and scholarly book chapters, and is the author and editor of more than ten books

in the areas of communication, health, and aging with a distinct focus on intersections of providerpatient

interaction and family decision-making as related to cancer communication science. Check

out Dr. Sparks‘ invited talk on Health Risk Messages and Decision-Making at 2011 TEDx

OrangeCoast event: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4JNyyuonko

Dr. Sparks has served as Principal Investigator (PI) and Co-PI on a number of research grants

including the ASCO-Komen Improving Cancer Care Grant, funded by Susan G. Komen for the

Cure (2011-2012): An intervention trial of text messaging to improve patient adherence to adjuvant

hormonal therapy (with PI Neugut; Co-PI‘s Hershman); California Mental Health Services Authority

(CalMHSA) Grant Award: Statewide Stigma and Discrimination Reduction: Partnering with Media

and the Entertainment Industry (2011-2014); and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Grant

Award: Hablamos juntos: Improving patient-provider communication for Latinos. Dr. Sparks has

also served as a scientific consultant and advisor to the National Institutes of Health/National

Cancer Institute, Institute for Healthcare Advancement, American Medical Association, American

Medical Student Association, Educational Testing Service, Southwest Oncology Group, American

Association of Cancer Research, Entertainment Industries Council and the United States House of

Representatives at the Library of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. She is a Founding

Senior Scientific Research Fellow for the Entertainment Industries Council (EIC), Burbank,

CA/Reston, VA and a National Scientific Advisor for the Entertainment and Media Communication

Institute, Center for Sun Safety and Skin Cancer Prevention in partnership with the Sun Safety

Alliance. Dr. Sparks is a former Cancer Communication Research Fellow for the Health

Communication and Informatics Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of

Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health,

Bethesda, MD and has served as an External Scientific Reviewer for NIH. Dr. Sparks‘ recent

books include Patient-Provider Interaction: A Global Health Communication Perspective (Polity


Press, 2010 with M. Villagran), Health Communication in the 21 st Century (Blackwell, 2008 with K.

B. Wright and H. D. O‘Hair) 2 nd edition (2012), Handbook of Communication and Cancer Care

(Hampton Press, 2007 with H. D. O‘Hair and G. L. Kreps), Cancer, Communication and Aging

(Hampton Press, 2008 with H. D. O‘Hair and G. L. Kreps), La Comunicación en el Cancer:

Comunicación y apoyo emocional en el laberinto del cancer (Aresta, 2009 with M. Villagran). Dr.

Sparks has served as Editor of Communication Research Reports; Guest Editor of Patient

Education and Counseling, Health Communication and Communication Education and serves on

several editorial boards including Health Communication, Journal of Applied Communication

Research, Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, and Communication Quarterly.

Dr. Sparks‘ research goal is to understand and create evidence based health messages that

effectively change health behavior resulting in better health outcomes by applying social science

theory and methods to the continuum of cancer care surrounding issues of health promotion,

disease prevention, survivorship, and health disparities. Dr. Sparks‘ research and teaching

interests in intergroup (intergenerational, intercultural) communication and aging approaches

merge with her research in health, risk, and crisis communication domains including providerpatient

interaction, family caregiving, health information and decision-making, patient-centered

communication, breaking bad news, health literacy, health organizations, interpersonal based

public health campaigns, communicating about crises, and communicating relevant messages with

vulnerable populations when information is uncertain during periods of health risk. Her

achievements, leadership qualities, and strong commitment to advance the intersections of

Communication, Health, Aging and Cancer Communication Sciences are significant as evidenced

by: a) the number of publications (over 100) most of which are peer-reviewed; b) the obtainment

and consistent effort to obtain competitive peer-reviewed research grants and contracts; c) the

recognition of her scientific stature; d) her collaborations with the top national and international

scientists in communication and related scientific fields such as public health, medicine, and

gerontology; e) her teaching and mentoring of numerous undergraduate and graduate students

and junior faculty; and f) her demonstrated leadership and administrative roles as Head/Director of

the Health and Strategic Communication Graduate Program at Chapman University, Editor of

Communication Research Reports, Guest Editor of Health Communication, Patient Education and

Counseling, and Communication Education as well as her editorial service for a number of peerreviewed

journals and continued service on several executive boards and associations.

ABSTRACT

Objective: We investigate the role of specific formulations in a doctor's bad news delivery. We

focus on the effects of negations and message framing on patients' immediate responses to the

message and the doctor and long term consequences like medical adherence intentions.

Method: Two lab experiments with 2 (language use: negations vs. affirmations) x 2 (framing:

positive vs. negative) between-subjects designs. After reading a transcription (experiment 1) or

seeing a film clip (experiment 2), participants rated their evaluation of the message and the doctor,

expected quality of life, and medical adherence intentions.

Results: Positively framed bad news with negations scores more negative on these dependent

variables than positively framed affirmations (both experiments). For negatively framed negations,

these results are reversed (experiment 2). Furthermore, the evaluation of the message

(experiment 1) and the doctor (both experiments) mediate the interaction of framing and language

use on medical adherence intentions.

Conclusions: Small linguistic variations (i.e., negations) in breaking bad news can have a big

impact on patient satisfaction and on medical adherence intentions.

Practice implications: Doctors should refrain from using negations to break positively framed news

and but use negations to break negatively framed news.

181


Title

The Effects of Language Attitudes on Semantic Processing: An Implicit Approach

Stewart, C.M. 2 (presenter), Kenworthy, J. B. 1 DATE: THU 21.06

1 Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Arlington

2 Department of Modern Languages, University of Texas at

Arlington

182

TIME: 16.20-16.45

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Christopher M. Stewart is currently an Assistant Professor of French Linguistics at the University of

Texas-Arlington. He completed his dissertation, entitled ―Perceptions of Parisian French: From

Language Attitudes to Speech Perception‖ in 2009 at the University of Illinois at Urbana-

Champaign. His current research uses implicit methodologies to study the role of social cognition

concepts in sociolinguistic processing. In addition to Parisian French, Dr. Stewart has studied

sociolinguistic processing in American English and Mexican Spanish.

ABSTRACT

Recent studies (e.g., Vande Kamp, 2002; Pantos, 2010) have developed implicit measures of

language attitudes by adapting the Implicit Association Test (IAT) to include auditory stimuli. These

studies have used semantically neutral auditory stimuli to test associations between language

attitudes and different attributes. This limitation has, to date, ruled out implicit measures of

language attitude effects on semantic processing. The current study fills this gap by including

auditory stimuli in a semantic priming task.

Sixty undergraduates (35 Caucasian, 25 African-American) quickly classified positive and negative

adjectives produced in African-American English (AAE) and Standard American English (SAE)

guises. Participants were on average 33.75 ms faster to classify adjectives heard in the AAE guise,

F(2, 58) = 4.18, p = .045 (d = .52). Unexpectedly, they were similarly on average 32.33 ms faster in

classifying negative adjectives, F(2, 58) = 11.56, p = .001 (d = .92). Closer inspection revealed that

this result was driven by African-American participants who classified negative adjectives produced

in the AAE guise on average 61.14 ms faster than positive AAE adjectives, F(2, 58) = 5.52, p = .02

(d = .64). This processing advantage is likely due to the increased salience of stereotypically

negative traits that the AAE guise evoked in African-American listeners.

These results indicate notable effects of language attitudes on semantic processing, particularly for

African-Americans. Because this task requires listeners to engage in semantic and phonetic

processing simultaneously, it presents an efficient alternative to the auditory IAT and another tool

for implicitly accessing language attitudes.

Works Cited

Pantos, A. (2010). Measuring implicit and explicit attitudes towards foreign-accented speech.

(Doctoral Dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. (Accession Order No.

[3646228]).

Vande Kamp, M. E. (2002). Auditory Implicit Association Tests. (Doctoral Dissertation). Retrieved

from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. (Accession Order No. [3072151]).


Title

Formulations in e-mental health chat sessions

Wyke Stommel (presenter), Fleur van der Houwen DATE: THU 21.06

VU University Amsterdam TIME: 15.30-15.55

183

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Wyke Stommel works as a post doc research in Language and Communication at VU University

Amsterdam, specialized in qualitative interaction analysis of computer-mediated communication.

Her current research project concerns an analysis informed by Conversation Analysis of chat and

e-mail interaction between counselors and clients. Wyke received an NWO-grant for a new project

(starting in September 2012) on a comparison of chat and telephone interactions from the Dutch

Alcohol and Drugs help line. CAMeRA (Center for Advanced Media Research Amsterdam)

Trimbos Instituut and Sensoor are co-financing this project. In the past, Wyke analyzed issues of

identity and community in German forum threads on eating disorders.

ABSTRACT

E-mental health services are recommended and pushed by current health policies. Our

presentation is based on a qualitative analysis of a case of e-mental health: chat interaction

between help-seekers and coaches. Being important in face-to-face therapeutic interactions

(Antaki, 2008), we describe the organizational and interactional tasks of formulations (Heritage &

Watson, 1979) in these sessions. Research has indicated that media structure is intricately related

to social interaction and interactional management (e.g., Herring, 1999; Schönfeldt & Golato,

2003). With the analysis of formulations in chat interaction, we attempt to get more insight in

differences between spoken and chat therapeutic interaction. The data used for the analysis

consist of 53 individual chat sessions of approximately 25 minutes each between a coach and a

client with moderate symptoms of depression and/or anxiety. Our method of analysis is Institutional

Conversation Analysis (Drew & Heritage, 1992). In our presentation we will show three uses of

formulation: 1) formulations that organize the chat sessions as a whole as well as at a topical level,

2) formulations that aim at clarifying ambiguity, and 3) formulations that articulate a particular view

on the client‘s account by either formulating a positive aspect of the client‘s account or formulating

the problem in terms of feelings.


Title

Language management in context of social psychology

Karolina Suchowolec DATE: FRI 22.06

Universität Hildesheim, Germany TIME: 09.55-10.20

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Karolina Suchowolec was born 1984 in Białystok, Poland. After graduating from high school in her

hometown, she obtained her M.A. in Linguistics and Applied Linguistics from the Dresden

University of Technology, Germany. Her scientific interests: specialized languages, terminology

and interdisciplinary communication also consolidated during her one year as a Graduate Assistant

at the Ohio State University, USA.

Since 2010, Karolina Suchowolec has been pursuing her Doktor degree at the University

Hildesheim, Germany. The dissertation with the working title Sprachlenkung – Aspekte einer

übergreifenden Theorie [Language management – aspects of an integrative theory] is supervised

by Professor Dr. Klaus Schubert.

Karolina Suchowolec derives her ideas for the dissertation from her long-term cooperation

experience with the company Koenig & Bauer AG, Germany, where she currently holds a PhDposition

as a terminologist.

ABSTRACT

Working as a terminologist in a company, I am often confronted with problems regarding changes

to the current language use and establishment of a new linguistic standard, in spite of well

developed methods in terminology work. The main problem is a lack of acceptance of the new

linguistic standard among the speakers (status planning) rather than the development of the

standard itself (corpus planning). On the other hand, terminology work is not the only discipline

facing these difficulties. Similarly, a success of such attempts of intentional language change as

revitalization of languages (Hebrew), change to morphosyntax (German spelling reform) or

introduction of a new standard variety (Rumantsch Grischun, Switzerland) depends on private and

public acceptance of the postulated norm.

In my Ph.D. research I propose an integrative view on different instances of intentional language

change and refer to it as language management (Spolsky 2009). In particular, I address the issue

of why it is generally difficult to intentionally change a language. I argue that this question cannot

be answered from a purely linguistic perspective. The process of language management can be

better understood if certain social psychological constructs are brought into the linguistic research.

In my presentation I would like to outline a new theoretical model of language management that

combines both linguistic and social psychological view. The model addresses the difficulties

mentioned above and shows how constructs such as identity, attitudes and group processes can

be used to classify different types of language management. In addition, I point out implications of

the model for further practical work and empirical research.

184


Bibliography

- Blanke, D. (1985): Internationale Plansprachen. Eine Einführung. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag

- DIN (2011): DIN 2342. Begriffe der Terminologielehre. Berlin: Beuth

- Jonas, K., Stroebe, W., Hewstone, M. (ed.)(2007): Sozialpsychologie. Eine Einführung. 5. vollst.

überarb. Auflage. Heidelberg: Springer Medizin

- Kloss, H. (1969): Research Possibilities on Group Bilingualism. A report. Québec: International

Centre for Research on Bilingualism

- Spolsky, B. (2009): Language Management. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

- Turner, J. C., Hogg, M. A., Oakes, P. J., Reicher, S. D., Wetherell, M. S. (1987): Rediscovering

the Social Group. A Self-Categorization Theory. Oxford: Basil Blackwell

185


Title

The effects of identification with one‟s national in-group on implicit linguistic biases in an

inter-ethnic context

Zsolt Peter Szabo* (presenting author), Csilla Bräutigam*, Noemi

Meszaros*, Janos Laszlo**

*Univeristy of Pecs, Psychology Department

**University of Pecs, Psychology Department; Institute for

Psychology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

186

DATE: SAT 23.06

TIME: 09.55-10.20

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Zsolt Péter Szabó. I am PhD student in Social Psychology at the University of Pécs. I‘ve earned

my Master‘s Degree in Psychology at the University of Pécs as well. My research interests are

mainly focused on the implicit semantics of language, the group-based emotions and the national

identification. Aside from research, I perform educational tasks as well.

ABSTRACT

The present studies explore the relation between identification with one‘s nation and implicit

language use in an inter-ethnic context. First we have developed a multidimensional identification

questionnaire (N=616), which differentiated between glorifying the in-group and feel attached to the

in-group. Subsequently, in two studies (N=200) we explored the relationship between implicit

linguistic biases and identification patterns. We used two measures of implicit linguistic bias.

Linguistic intergroup bias is the tendency to describe positive behavior of ingroup members and

negative behavior of outgroup members in a more abstract way than negative in-group and

positive out-group behaviors. Linguistic agency bias is the tendency to use more active forms

when the out-group is the perpetrator and the in-group is the victim than when the out-group is the

victim and the in-group is the perpetrator. Four photographs were presented to the participants.

The pictures depicted positive (eg. helping at flood) and negative historical events (eg. deportation

and massacre). Different picture captions were created for each photograph, varying in linguistic

abstraction in the first study, and linguistic agency in the second study. The participants also filled

out the national identification questionnaire. We found, that higher glorification scores predicted

higher linguistic bias, namely the exculpation of the ingroup and impeachment of the outgroup. For

example, when in-group members were the perpetrators, high glorifiers prefered passive forms

(„Romanians were killed‖), however when out-group members were the perpetrators, they choose

more active forms („Romanians killed the Hungarians‖).


Title

Gender-specific implicature comprehension and donation behavior in bilingual social

marketing campaigns

Annegret Bauer & Dieter Thoma (presenter) DATE: SAT 23.06

University of Mannheim, Germany

187

TIME: 11.05-11.30

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Alla V. Tovares received her Ph.D. in Linguistics from Georgetown University. Her research

interests include public/private intertextuality in media and everyday discourse, gender discourse,

family discourse, dialogicality in literary discourse and everyday conversations. She is the coauthor

of How to Write about the Media Today (Greenwood Press, 2010). Her articles have

appeared in Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Text and Talk, and Narrative Inquiry.

She has also contributed chapters to Family Talk: Discourse and Identity in Four American

Families (Oxford University press, 2008) and Appropriation of Media Discourse (John Benjamins,

forthcoming). Dr. Tovares has presented scholarly papers at professional meetings in the United

States and abroad. She is currently interested in discursive features, specifically internal polemic,

of endurance athletes' self-talk and Bakhtin‘s concept of the carnivalesque. She also researches

the life and work of the renowned African American theater actor Ira Aldridge and his influence of

European, especially Ukrainian, theatre, culture, and society.

ABSTRACT

Since Ukraine‘s independence in 1991, many politicians, educators, and activists have

concentrated their efforts on reviving the Ukrainian language, its prestige and role in society. One

such initiative has been to ―purify‖ Ukrainian, mainly to eradicate Russian influence. This attempt

further stigmatized a Ukrainian/Russian mixed variety known as surzhyk. Many Ukrainian public

figures have equated surzhyk, and by extension its speakers, with an impoverished mentality,

inertia, and lack of patriotism. Meanwhile, many Ukrainians claim that few citizens can speak or

write in ―pure‖ Ukrainian.

This tension between the official discourse and the reality of everyday life was reflected, amplified,

and challenged by the carnivalesque performances of Verka Serduchka, a surzhyk-speaking

persona of a female train conductor (turned singer) created by male performer Andrij Danylko. This

study situates Serduchka‘s performances within Bakhtin‘s (2009) theoretical conceptualizations of

carnival and the carnivalesque. Namely, in line with the principles of the carnivalesque—where the

borderline between art and life is ambivalent—Verka Serduchka uses surzhyk as a subversive

linguistic tool for creating a carnivalesque counter-culture, now adding English and German to the

mix and quickly spreading via the Internet, to ridicule and challenge stereotypes, criticize those in

power, and subvert linguistic and socio-cultural norms. While official discourse has stigmatized

surzhyk and insisted on promoting everything purely and authentically Ukrainian, the carnival of

Verka Serduchka, using the Internet as the 21 st century Bakhtinian ―carnival square‖ with its

diverse voices, suspends and subverts linguistic and cultural officialdom and celebrates

heteroglossia (Bakhtin 1981) in language and culture.


Title

Verka Serduchka as carnivalesque heteroglossia in post-Soviet Ukraine

Alla V. Tovares DATE: SAT 23.06

Howard University, Washington, DC, USA TIME: 11.30-11.55

188

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Alla V. Tovares received her Ph.D. in Linguistics from Georgetown University. Her research

interests include public/private intertextuality in media and everyday discourse, gender discourse,

family discourse, dialogicality in literary discourse and everyday conversations. She is the coauthor

of How to Write about the Media Today (Greenwood Press, 2010). Her articles have

appeared in Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Text and Talk, and Narrative Inquiry.

She has also contributed chapters to Family Talk: Discourse and Identity in Four American

Families (Oxford University press, 2008) and Appropriation of Media Discourse (John Benjamins,

forthcoming). Dr. Tovares has presented scholarly papers at professional meetings in the United

States and abroad. She is currently interested in discursive features, specifically internal polemic,

of endurance athletes' self-talk and Bakhtin‘s concept of the carnivalesque. She also researches

the life and work of the renowned African American theater actor Ira Aldridge and his influence of

European, especially Ukrainian, theatre, culture, and society.

ABSTRACT

Since Ukraine‘s independence in 1991, many politicians, educators, and activists have

concentrated their efforts on reviving the Ukrainian language, its prestige and role in society. One

such initiative has been to ―purify‖ Ukrainian, mainly to eradicate Russian influence. This attempt

further stigmatized a Ukrainian/Russian mixed variety known as surzhyk. Many Ukrainian public

figures have equated surzhyk, and by extension its speakers, with an impoverished mentality,

inertia, and lack of patriotism. Meanwhile, many Ukrainians claim that few citizens can speak or

write in ―pure‖ Ukrainian.

This tension between the official discourse and the reality of everyday life was reflected,

amplified, and challenged by the carnivalesque performances of Verka Serduchka, a surzhykspeaking

persona of a female train conductor (turned singer) created by male performer Andrij

Danylko. This study situates Serduchka‘s performances within Bakhtin‘s (2009) theoretical

conceptualizations of carnival and the carnivalesque. Namely, in line with the principles of the

carnivalesque—where the borderline between art and life is ambivalent—Verka Serduchka uses

surzhyk as a subversive linguistic tool for creating a carnivalesque counter-culture, now adding

English and German to the mix and quickly spreading via the Internet, to ridicule and challenge

stereotypes, criticize those in power, and subvert linguistic and socio-cultural norms. While official

discourse has stigmatized surzhyk and insisted on promoting everything purely and authentically

Ukrainian, the carnival of Verka Serduchka, using the Internet as the 21 st century Bakhtinian

―carnival square‖ with its diverse voices, suspends and subverts linguistic and cultural officialdom

and celebrates heteroglossia (Bakhtin 1981) in language and culture.


Title

Dream Denied: Undocumented Mexican youths and the U.S. DREAM Act

Raúl Tovares DATE: SAT 23.06

Trinity Washington University, Washington, USA TIME: 12.20-12.45

189

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Raúl Tovares is associate professor and chair of the Communication Program at Trinity

Washington University, Washington, DC. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Radio-

Television-Film at the University of Texas, Austin. His M.A. in intercultural psychology is from the

Universidad de las Américas in Puebla, Mexico. His major areas of interest are Latinos and mass

communication, mass communication theory, television news production, intercultural

communication, and film theory.

Dr. Tovares, a Fulbright scholar, is the author of Manufacturing the Gang: Mexican American youth

on local television news, and co-author of How to Write About the Media Today. Dr. Tovares has

also published articles in Latino Studies, Journal of Broadcast Education, Howard Journal of

Communications and Journal of Communication Inquiry. He has also contributed articles to the

Encyclopedia of Television and the Encyclopedia Latina.

Dr. Tovares has received fellowships from the Radio Television News Directors Foundation, the

American Society of Newspaper Editors and the Poynter Institute.

He is a member of the National Communication Association (NCA) and the Association for

Educators in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC).

ABSTRACT

While popular discourse about citizenship often assumes a static definition of the term, several

scholars report that citizenship is a fluid phenomenon that changes over time. The DREAM Act,

currently supported by some members of the United States Senate and House of Representatives,

is the latest challenge to the static definition of U.S. citizenship. The DREAM Act is a piece of

proposed legislation that would give undocumented young people brought to the U.S. as children

by their undocumented parents a chance to apply for citizenship and access federally funded

university grants and loans. This paper critically examines the discourse in newspaper editorials

about the DREAM Act that were printed six months before Congress voted to table the DREAM

Act in December of 2010. While the DREAM Act would apply to hundreds of thousands of

undocumented immigrants currently living in the U.S., a majority of these immigrants are of

Mexican descent. Consequently, most media coverage of the DREAM Act focuses on the

undocumented Mexican population. Building on the work of Bourdieu, Massey, Wodak, and van

Dijk, this paper examines how the movement in support of the DREAM Act is forcing U.S. nativists

to redefine U.S. citizenship vis-à-vis educated, mainstream Mexican youths who are demanding

the opportunity to become official members of the U.S.


Title

Language attitudes among youngsters in Barcelona and Valencia

Anna Tudela Isanta (presenter), Raquel Casesnoves Ferrer DATE: THU 21.06

190

TIME: 15.30-15.55

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Anna Tudela Isanta PhD student at UVAL (Unitat de Variació Lingüística – Language Variation

Unit) at Institut Universitari de Lingüística Aplicada, in Barcelona, since 2010. She is currently

collaborating in a project funded by the Spanish Department of Innovation and Science, in which

Dr. Raquel Casesoves is the IP, which studies the language attitudes towards Catalan and

Spanish in different contexts; inside Spain (in Barcelona, Palma de Mallorca and Valencia) and

among Catalan immigrants living in the USA. Her research focuses on language attitudes, social

psychology, language in contact and sociolinguistics.

ABSTRACT

When two language varieties coexist, they are rarely on equal terms (López Morales, 1994; Laur

2008), and this inequality influences how and when speakers use each variety. One of the factors

that plays an important role in language choice is language attitudes. Studying language attitudes

can help predict and explain the linguistic behavior of a language group (Bierbach, 1988; Baker,

1992; Solís, 2002), as well as highlight existing sociolinguistic conflicts (Blas Arroyo, 2005). Our

study focuses on the language attitudes of university students in both Barcelona and Valencia,

where Catalan (the historical language) and Spanish are co-official and compete daily.

Many language attitude studies have gathered data with the matched-guise technique. This

technique has been widely used in Catalonia and Valencia since the process of Catalan

revitalization started (Pueyo, 1980; Ros, 1982; Woolard, 1989; Woolard 1992; Blas Arroyo, 1995;

Gómez Molina 1998; Casesnoves Ferrer, 2001; Casesnoves Ferrer and Sankoff, 2004; Newman

et al. 2008; González, 2009; Woolard, 2009; Casesnoves Ferrer, 2010). We have thus been able

to observe the evolution and change of speakers' feelings and perceptions in two very different

social, political and geographical contexts. The results of these investigations, however, have to be

compared carefully due to their methodological differences. The study we report here ensures total

comparability of the results from the two cities, since the same matched-guise questionnaire was

used both in Valencia and Barcelona.

Specifically, this presentation aims to show the different roles, in terms of status and solidarity that

the same language can play among youngsters. Moreover, the divergence of attitudes in

Barcelona and Valencia is closely linked to the different uses of Catalan.


Title

Exploring the role of amount and type of exposure in bilingual acquisition

Sharon Unsworth DATE: FRI 22.06

Utrecht University, NL TIME: 12.20-12.45

191

ROOM: BRUSSELS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Sharon Unsworth is Assistant Professor in the Department of English Language and Culture at

Utrecht University. Her research focuses on the language development of bilingual children and

the role of various factors affecting bilingual and second language acquisition, including age of

onset, and amount and type of language exposure, in both naturalistic and instructed settings. She

also regularly gives workshops to parents of multilingual children, and together with colleagues

recently set up a website on this topic: www.growingupbilingual.org.

ABSTRACT

Considerable individual variation exists amongst simultaneous bilingual children in their rate and

patterns of linguistic development and the amount and type of exposure they receive. Previous

research suggests that effects of language exposure may differ depending on the linguistic domain

(e.g., Pearson et al. 1997) and whether the language is used at home/school (e.g., De Houwer

2007). Following Paradis (2011) and Place and Hoff (2011), amongst others, this paper reports a

comprehensive assessment of quantity‐oriented and quality‐oriented exposure variables and their

impact on the linguistic development of 137 English/Dutch simultaneous bilingual children, aged 3

to 17 for a range of variables including vocabulary, grammatical gender and verbal morphology.

The ‗quantity‐oriented‘ variables include language at home, language at school, cumulative length

of exposure and child‘s output, and the ‗quality‐oriented‘ are richness, proportion of native

exposure, number of monolingual and variety of conversational partners. In brief, results show

children‘s output to be the most significant predictor variable for English vocabulary and

morphosyntax (more specifically: 3 rd person singular –s), whereas for Dutch morphosyntax

(grammatical gender-marking on definite determiners), quantity-oriented (cumulative length of

exposure, language at school) and quality-oriented (richness) variables proved significant

predictors. In line with previous work (e.g., Gathercole & Thomas 2009), the minority language

(English) was affected more than the majority language (Dutch). The results are discussed in

terms of the differential effects of quantity vs. quality of language input, whether and why different

linguistic domains should be affected similarly, in addition to theoretical and practical implications.


Title

Naming and referring: Doctors‟ and patients‟ use of medical vocabulary

Dr Stavroula Varella DATE: FRI 22.06

Department of English, University of Chichester, Bishop Otter

Campus, Chichester, UK

192

TIME: 10.20-10.45

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Stavroula Varella received her PhD from the University of Sussex, UK. She had held teaching and

research posts at the universities of Sussex, Hertfordshire and Portsmouth, before joining the

University of Chichester as co-ordinator of the Linguistics strand. She teaches various courses,

including Grammar, Historical linguistics, Discourse analysis and Stylistics, while her research falls

in the area of lexicology, in particular lexical borrowing, etymology, and the historical semantics of

specialist words. She is currently writing her second monograph on the development and use of

medical vocabulary.

ABSTRACT

This paper focuses on two related areas: (a) the development of the occupational register of

medicine, in particular the formation of a specialised lexicon; and (b) register variation in the area

of healthcare, including the motivations, perceptions and attitudes of people at either end of

medical provision.

Using data mainly from English, the paper presents an overview of vocabulary enlargement in the

field of medicine. Diachronic data are juxtaposed with recent research findings on medical

discourse. Two current phenomena are considered: the increased availability of medical

information to the general public, along with a changing culture that finds people less inhibited to

discuss their own conditions and symptoms.

Three approaches are employed: corpus-based (investigating current usages of medical

terminology), text or discourse-analytic (exploring demographic and register variation in the use of

words for disease and illness) and experimental (examining how ill-health sufferers perceive and

use referents to their conditions). The study reveals the role of metaphor and other cognitive and

linguistic phenomena in conceptualisation and word manufacture; it demonstrates the role of

technical terminology in the communication of illness in different situations; it substantiates, finally,

the need to pay attention to individual words themselves, often overlooked by discourse

approaches which look for general patterns in text organisation and the underlying ideologies of

whole texts.


Title

Poles and Russians in Lithuania: Some Tendencies of Use and Proficiency of Mother

Tongues and State Language

Loreta Vilkienė DATE: THU 21.06

Department of Lithuanian Studies Vilnius University, Vilnius

Lithuania

193

TIME: 13.55-14.20

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Loreta Vilkienė is an Associate Professor of the Department of Lithuanian Studies at the

University of Vilnius. She has been the Head of the Department of Lithuanian Studies from 2010.

Her research interests include Second Language Acquisition, Language Teaching and Testing,

Stylistics and Academic Writing. In 1996 she became involved with issues of language education

and assessment and since then she has participated in preparation and assessment of state

exams of Lithuanian as second language. She is an author of several textbooks and teacher

reference books for teaching and assessing Lithuanian as a second language. She has also

published papers on language teaching and testing, language and identity, bilingualism, etc. She

was engaged in various national research projects such as ‗Language Usage and Ethnic Identity in

Urban Areas of Lithuania‘ (2007-2009), ‗Sociolinguistic Map of Lithuania: Cities and Towns‘ (2010-

2012) and ‗The Language of Emigrants‘ (2011-2013).

ABSTRACT

In "the Hague Recommendations Regarding the Education Rights of National Minorities" (1996), it

is said that "the right of persons belonging to national minorities to maintain their identity can only

be fully realised if they acquire a proper knowledge of their mother tongue during the educational

process. At the same time, persons belonging to national minorities have a responsibility to

integrate into the wider national society through the acquisition of a proper knowledge of the State

language."

There are several national minorities in Lithuania, but the biggest ones are Poles (6.6%) and

Russians (5.4%). In 1988, Lithuanian was declared a state language of Lithuania, which every

Lithuanian citizen is obliged to know. However, the national minorities have the right to education

in schools where their native languages are used for teaching, although these schools do teach

Lithuanian as well.

The aim of this paper is to ascertain whether, in the context of the document mentioned above, it

can be claimed that Lithuanian national minorities (Poles and Russians) have maintained their

mother tongues whilst at the same time becoming competent in the State language. It is also

analyzed to what extent the mother tongues of the national minorities are used in a public sphere

compared to the Lithuanian language. The paper is based on the quantitative data of

two sociolinguistic projects: ―Cities and Languages‖ (2007-2009) and ―Sociolinguistic map of

Lithuania: cities and towns‖ (2010-2012).


Title

Ethnolinguistic Identity and Television Use in a Minority Language Setting

Dr. Jake Harwood 1 , László Vincze 2 (presenter) DATE: SAT 23.06

1 University of Arizona

2 University of Helsinki

194

TIME: 11.55-12.20

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

László Vincze (PhD, linguistics, University of Pécs, Hungary) is a postgraduate student in media

studies at the University of Helsinki and acts as a researcher of the Social Science Research

Council of the Society of Swedish Literature in Finland. His research interest includes intergroup

communication and media use in bilingual settings.

ABSTRACT

Based on the models proposed by Abrams, Eveland and Giles (2003), and Reid, Giles and

Abrams (2004), this paper describes and analyses the relation between television use and

ethnolinguistic coping strategies among the German minority in South-Tyrol, Italy. The data were

collected among secondary school students (N = 415) in 2011. The results indicated that the

television use of the students is dominated by the German language. A mediation analysis

revealed that TV viewing contributed to the perception of ethnolinguistic vitality, the permeability of

intergroup boundaries and status stability, which, in turn, affected ethnolinguistic coping strategies

of ethnolinguistic mobility (moving towards the outgroup), ethnolinguistic creativity (maintaining

identity without confrontation) and ethnolinguistic competition (fighting for ingroup rights and

respect). Findings and theoretical implications are discussed.

References

Abrams, J., Eveland, W., & Giles, H. (2003). The effects of television on group vitality: Can

television empower nondominant groups? Communication Yearbook, 27, 193–220.

Reid, S. A., Giles, H. & Abrams, J. S. (2004). A Social identity model of media usage and effects.

Zeitschrift für Medienpsychologie, 16 (1), 17–25.


Title

Implying lesbian identity in everyday interaction

Rowena Viney DATE: THU 21.06

Department of Social Sciences, Loughborough University TIME: 15.55-16.20

195

ROOM: PARIS

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

"Rowena Viney is a PhD candidate in the Department of Social Sciences at Loughborough

University, UK. While studying for her MA in Sociolinguistics at the University of Essex, UK, she

developed an interest in the detailed examination of interaction afforded by conversation analysis.

For her PhD thesis, she is using conversation analysis to research how and why people draw on

various identities in everyday interaction, with a particular focus on lesbian identity, and how

participants manage multiple involvements in everyday interaction. She is also involved in

collaborative conversation analytic projects on time and place references and television-watching,

and teaches on undergraduate courses and conference workshops on conversation analysis at

Loughborough University."

ABSTRACT

Seidman (2002) described the increasing ‗normalisation‘ of homosexuality, with this aspect of

lesbians‘ and gay men‘s identities becoming less important in their personal lives as homosexuality

becomes more culturally ‗normalised‘. This ‗normalisation‘ is reflected in a data-set of videorecorded

everyday interactions in UK lesbian households, where talk about specifically lesbian

issues is rare. More frequently, participants ‗mention‘ their identity as lesbian incidentally: implying

their lesbian identity rather than explicitly articulating it. Furthermore, when a speaker implies her

own or an interlocutor‘s identity as lesbian, she does so in the course of some interactional project,

such as making a joke or an assessment, or giving an explanation.

Research shows how speakers index categories in order to further their project in an interaction,

(e.g. Stokoe 2009, Kitzinger 2005), and the participants in this data-set draw on their identity as

lesbian in a similar fashion. Their lesbian identity can be described as a background identity,

where despite not being topicalised it can be drawn on to do particular interactional things. Using

conversation analysis and membership categorisation analysis, I demonstrate how these mentions

imply lesbian identity, and what they do for the interactional project underway.

Kitzinger, C. (2005) Speaking as a heterosexual: (How) is sexuality relevant for talk-in-interaction.

Research on Language and Social Interaction, 38:221-265.

Seidman, S. (2002) Beyond the Closet: The Transformation of Gay and Lesbian Life. New York,

NY: Routledge.

Stokoe, E. (2009) Doing actions with identity categories: complaints and denials in neighbour

disputes. Text & Talk, 29(1):75-97.


Title

Ethnic Minority, Heritage Tourism and Authenticity: Reinventing Tujia in China

Xuan Wang DATE: SAT 23.06

Department of Culture Studies at Tilburg University, NL TIME: 12.20-12.45

196

ROOM: NEW YORK 3

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Xuan Wang is a PhD student in the Department of Culture Studies at Tilburg University, the

Netherlands. She is interested in issues of multilingualism, identity, globalization, and China

studies. Her PhD thesis aims to gain ethnographic insight into the sociolinguistic impact of

globalization upon the margins of society in China – with specific reference to Enshi, a rural,

minority region in Central China – by examining the (trans)local phenomena of globalization such

as digital media, consumerism, and heritage tourism, and how language as social resources

creates new forms of diversity and offers new opportunities and challenges of identity making for

marginalized groups. She has published in several journals including Applied Linguistic Review,

the UNESCO journal of Diversities, and Sociolinguistic Studies.

ABSTRACT

To what extent does the new economy of heritage tourism – seen as part of the current processes

of globalization – impact on the construction of an ethnic minority identity? Taking the case of the

Tujia in Enshi in Central China, an ethnic minority group whose identity markers are increasingly

commodified for tourist consumption during China‘s economic and social modernization, this paper

offers an ethnographic understanding of the changing politics and discursive practices of ethnicity

as minority in contemporary China. The data under discussion were collected during fieldwork in

Enshi in 2009 and 2010, and contain fieldnotes of observations, notes and minutes of group

meetings, interviews with key participants, and wider contextualizing data on the gradual

development of Enshi in China‘s globalization processes. I focus particularly on the discourse and

metadiscourse of designing a unique set of ‗authentic‘ Tujia outfit that can serve as both a tourism

brand and an ethnic emblem. This issue of authenticity, that is, the visibility and recognizability of

Tujia as ethnic minority demanded by the global quest of authenticity in tourist industry, must be

produced, above all, according to the logic of what counts as authentic in China‘s state vision of

multiculturalism. The deliberate semiotic intervention and reinvention of an ‗authentic‘ identity

marker of Tujia reveals the ethnic and cultural diversity promoted by the state as a subtle form of

dominance and hegemony of the majority which operates by inspiring the minority to perform ‗an

authentic difference‘ in exchange for its political and economic recognition.

Keywords: ethnic minority, heritage tourism, authenticity, semiotic reinvention, Tujia, China,

multiculturalism


Title

Teachers‟ views on Putonghua Education in Hong Kong

Yang Ruowei, Robin DATE: THU 21.06

School of Education and Languages

The Open University of Hong Kong

197

TIME: 10.20-10.45

ROOM: PRAGUE

ABSTRACT

Education debates on the medium of instruction (MOI) in Hong Kong have been taken place over

the last decade. One of the key issues concerns whether the MOI for teaching Chinese subject

should be Cantonese (the local dialect) or Putonghua (the national language)? As the Hong Kong

government set a goal of ‗long-term development (after 2011)‘ for adopting Putonghua as the

medium of instruction (PMI) for Chinese language education (CDC, 2002:11), and as the pace of

Chinese education development has being stepped up since 2011, the prominent question

appears to be whether or not implementation of the policy is now supported by teachers in

schools?

Within theoretical framework of research on language attitudes (Gardner, 1985; Baker, 1992) and

language policy (Spolsky, 2004), this paper reports findings from an on-going research project

concerning teachers‘ view on Putonghua education in Hong Kong. Teachers of Putonghua and

Chinese subjects at 18 schools (9 secondary and 9 primary schools from different districts of Hong

Kong) were asked to answer a questionnaire between February and March, 2012. 133 completed

questionnaires were received (return rate of 69.6%). The results of quantitative analysis showed

that while the teachers‘ attitude towards Putonghua education in schools is very positive, most of

them do not support PMI at the present time. Relevant issues about environmental and attitudinal

factors influencing the adoption of PMI and the appropriate stage to introduce PMI at school are

discussed, and implications of the findings for PMI are recommended.

Key words: Putonghua; attitudes; Chinese teachers; medium of instruction; language policy

References

Baker, C. (1992) Attitudes and language. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.

CDC (Curriculum Development Council) (2002) Chinese language education: Key

learning area curriculum guide (Primary 1- Secondary 3). HKSAR: Printing Department.

Gardner, R. (1985) Social Psychology and Second Language Learning: The Role of Attitudes and

Motivation. London: Edward Arnold.

Spolsky, B. (2004) Language Policy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.


Title

Attitudes towards multilingual signs in biethnic Tallinn

Anastassia Zabrodskaja DATE: THU 21.06

Tallinn University, University of Tartu, Estonia TIME: 14.45-15.10

198

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Anastassia Zabrodskaja (PhD) is a sociolinguist specialising on Russian-Estonian bilingual

situation, linguistic landscapes and ethnolinguistic vitality. She is a postdoctoral research fellow at

the University of Tartu. She also works as a senior researcher at Tallinn University, where she has

taught Linguistics, Cross-Cultural Communication and related courses.

She has been involved in the following research and development projects: ―The analysis,

modelling and control of the Estonian linguistic environment‖ (2003-2007), ―New language learning

system in Tallinn University‖ (2006-2008), ―Ethnolinguistic vitality and identity construction: Estonia

in the context of other Baltic countries‖ (2008-2011), ―Russian-Estonian and English-Estonian

code-switching and code-copying corpora creation and management‖ (2009–2013) and postdoctoral

research grant ―Transfer of morphosyntactic patterns in the Estonian-Russian contact

setting‖ (2010–2013). Her publications are downloadable.

ABSTRACT

Linguistic landscape is shaped by language policy, cultural legacies, language dynamics and

language attitudes. It exhibits covert and over prestige of certain varieties, contested linguistic

hierarchies. The nature of linguistic environment and the demands of the everyday social life

greatly affect languages on public signs. In Estonia, Russian is often used in advertising. All major

companies, banks, chain-stores, etc issue information in Russian. Estonian LL actors (shopkeepers

/ restaurant owners) enact their own natural language policies balancing between the

strict requirements of the Language Act and the real multilingual language preferences of

Estonians, Estonian Russians and tourists. This happens because businessmen need to satisfy

both parts of the Estonian community. On the one hand, LL actors try not to lose Estonians‘

interest with using too much Russian on advertisements but on the other hand, they also wish to

attract attention of local Russians towards their production. The LL is also directly affected by the

number and density of speakers of different speech communities in a particular area. The contrast

between the two languages / alphabets combined within a single word is sharp and attracts

attention most probably only of a bilingual reader. The paper analyses the attitudes of Russian-

and Estonian-speaking mono- and bilingual youth towards the bilingual Estonian-Russian signs.

The data come from in-group interviews held in Russian and Estonian among students from Tallinn.

Estonian-speaking students show rather negative reactions to the presence of multilingual signs.

Russian-speaking students express mainly positive response to Russian language or Russian-

Estonian hybrid signs.


Title

Gender difference in secondary school graduates‟ views on Putonghua education in Hong

Kong

Zhang, Bennan (Dr.) DATE: THU 21.06

Faculty of Education University of Hong Kong TIME: 09.30-09.55

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

199

ROOM: PRAGUE

Dr. Bennan Zhang is Associate Professor at the Faculty of Education, the University of Hong

Kong. His research interests and experiences are diverse and cover teaching and learning

Chinese as a second language, classical Chinese literature and criticism, modern and classical

Chinese, and language teacher education. He has published, as author or co-author, 12 books and

over 60 academic papers. He teaches courses and supervises postgraduate students on second

language acquisition, modern and classical Chinese, classical Chinese literature, Chinese

language teaching and learning, and educational research methodology. His newly publication

includes ‗Gender dissonance in language attitudes: A case of Hong Kong‘, International Journal of

Arts & Sciences, 2011, 4(18): 77-109. Email address: bennan@hku.hk.

ABSTRACT

Hong Kong is language complex. Traditionally, the Chinese language as a subject is taught in

schools in Cantonese, the local language. The Putonghua or Mandarin Chinese, the official

language of China, is taught as an independent subject in most primary and secondary schools

paralleling with Chinese subject after the change of sovereignty in 1997. However, it is evidenced

that a noticeable growth of using Putonghua as the medium of instruction to teach Chinese subject

has appeared in more and more schools since the last decade. This study investigates the

attitudes of secondary school leavers towards Putonghua language education in Hong Kong,

especially the using of Putonghua as the medium of instruction in Chinese subject teaching and

learning, focusing on the gender difference in language attitudes. Total of 67 secondary school

leavers, with 53 females and 14 males, were asked to complete a written questionnaire. The

results showed that there were significant differences between male and female school leavers,

with finding of that the female school leavers held more positive or favorable language attitudes

towards their Putonghua education in schools than the male students did. However, this is only

true for indirect or affective attitudes, not for direct or cognitive attitudes.

Keywords Gender difference; Putonghua education; Language attitudes; Using Putonghua as the

medium of instruction


Title

European Americans‟ Cultural Orientations and Intergenerational Conflict Management

Styles: The Indirect Effects of Filial Obligations

Yan Bing Zhang 1 (Presenter), Chong Xing 1 , Astrid Villamil 2 DATE: FRI 22.06

1

Department of Communication Studies, University of Kansas,

USA

2

Department of Communication, University of Missouri-Columbia,

USA

200

TIME: 09.55-10.20

ROOM: MILAN

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Yan Bing Zhang is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the

University of Kansas. From a broad perspective, Dr. Zhang studies communication, culture, and

intergroup relations. One specific area of Dr. Zhang‘s research has focused on the influence of

cultural values and stereotypes of age groups on intergenerational communication. A closely

related area of her research has also focused on the influence of mass media on individuals‘ value

systems and mass communication portrayals of cultural values and aging. Another area of her

research has focused on contact and intergroup/intercultural relations, in which she examines the

ways that personal and mediated contact impacts intergroup relationships and attitudes in

intercultural contexts. In addition to experimental and survey studies, Dr. Zhang‘s research

includes contextually-grounded qualitative analysis in the form of discourse/thematic analytic work.

Dr. Zhang‘s work has been published in U.S. and international communication journals such as

Journal of Intercultural and International Communication, Journal of Communication,

Communication Monographs, Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, Asian Journal of

Communication, Journal of Asian Pacific Communication, Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology,

New Media & Society, and Journal of Language and Social Psychology.

ABSTRACT

The current study examined the relationships among European American young adults‘ (N = 184)

endorsement of individualism and collectivism, perceptions of filial obligations, and their

intergenerational conflict management styles. Structural equation modeling results showed that

collectivism had an indirect effect through filial obligations on the integrating, accommodating, and

avoiding styles, indicating the important mediating role of filial obligations. Results also indicated a

positive association between individualism and the competing style. These findings are discussed

in light of prior research literature in cultural values, conflict management styles, and

intergenerational relationships.


Title

Negotiating Masculine Identities Within Group Therapy For Men Victims of Abuse

Michaela Zverina 1 (presenter), Henderikus J. Stam 1 , H. Lorraine

Radtke 1 , Robbie Babins-Wagner 2

1 University of Calgary, Department of Psychology,

2 Calgary Counselling Centre

201

DATE: THU 21.06

TIME: 16.20-16.45

ROOM: MADRID

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Michaela Zverina is a clinical psychology doctoral student at the University of Calgary, Calgary,

Alberta, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Claiming victim status in cases of domestic violence is heavily dependent on whether the victim is

a man or woman. The status of men as victims and women as perpetrators is still deeply

controversial. The majority of therapeutic services are designed for women victims and men

perpetrators of violence. Within less common therapeutic groups designed for men victims of their

female partners‘ abuse, the participants must manage various cultural discourses of masculinity

while constructing their identities. This paper will report on how male victims of intimate partner

abuse construct and negotiate their masculine identities within group psychotherapy. In 2009, six

men (ages 24 to 55 years) participated in Calgary Counselling Centre‘s group program titled ―A

Turn for the Better‖. This program focuses on therapeutic change for abused men who want to

pursue non-abusive futures and develop healthy relationships. Fourteen, two-hour sessions were

recorded and transcriptions were analyzed using the methods and theoretical perspective of

discourse analysis. The men and the group facilitators actively drew on and resisted traditional

notions of masculine identity. Versions of masculine identities were negotiated in service of various

rhetorical purposes, such as positioning themselves as legitimate victims of their female partner‘s

abuse or as non-passive acceptors of their abuse. The results will inform a discussion on the

nature of intimate partner abuse and victimization in relation to discourses of masculinity.


202

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