08.11.2017 Views

Home is where the heat is

You also want an ePaper? Increase the reach of your titles

YUMPU automatically turns print PDFs into web optimized ePapers that Google loves.

canberra glassworks

HOME

IS

WHERE

THE

HEAT

IS

26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Image: Sydney Noble Edwards, Canberra Powerhouse, circa 1920s Courtesy of David Paterson


Home is a very loaded word that can mean many things to different people: warmth;

love; shelter; haven; personal space to name a few.

In this exhibition, I asked artists to respond to a place that is very familiar to them;

one where they spend much of their waking time.

Canberra Glassworks, previously known as the Kingston Powerhouse can

accommodate 15 artists working in their own studios and at any one time 20 other

artists might be working in the facility – in the hotshop; coldworking; sandblasting or

using the kilns.

The heritage building has been internally converted to be a working glass facility, one

of the few in Australia. It has an international reputation for excellence and quality

resources alongside several gallery spaces and a retail space.

The artists in this exhibition all have an affinity with the building and the facility, and

the works in the exhibition show the diverse way they feel about their sometimes fiery

Home Away from Home. You can find their works scattered throughout the building

in sites that they have responded to.

– Jane Cush, curator

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


ARTIST STATEMENTS

Elizabeth Casling and Graeme King

Through Make Your Own, CIT and Courses-on-Demand,

members of the wider community are enabled to make glass

works at Canberra Glassworks and, in that sense, they’re all

artists. Many are just one offs, but some people take advantage

of Courses-on-Demand and the mentoring program to increase

their skills and become independent hirers.

This is a valuable aspect of the Glassworks community

engagement and a selection of pieces made by these artists

would make an important contribution to an exhibition

showcasing 10 years at the Canberra Glassworks. Graeme and I

are two of these artists and have each contributed a piece of work

to this exhibition.

Ellen Collins

A revolutionary aspect of Walter Burley Griffin’s design for

Canberra was to have every house supplied with electricity,

generated by the Kingston Powerhouse. It is difficult to believe

that having a reliable electricity supply 24/7 has only been a

convenience available in (many) cities for less than a century.

These pieces reflect on the short life span of technological devices

which are all too soon relegated to historical objects, often

unrecognisable to future generations. The use of transparent

glass adds fragility and alludes to the transient nature of the

original object. I am inspired by the Vanitas still life genre that

emerged in 17th Century Dutch paintings at the height of the

Dutch Empire. They were a didactic message to the masses about

the transience of life and the dangers of the excesses of wealth

and indulgence – a message highly appropriate to our own

contemporary Western culture.

Jacqueline Knight

I am constantly fascinated by the phenomenological experience

of using glass as a sculptural metaphor. I aim to speak to the

viewer by way of a visual experience that reflects their sense of

self.

Mounted on a wall, the wings represent the essence of flight

yet they are trapped, mid-flight and frozen in time. This in turn

pushes the sculpture into the realm of architectural adornment.

The adorned room becomes a metaphor for relationships and

a current state of being. The materiality of glass offers many

ambiguities resembling human interactions.

Both humans and glass contain intriguing polarities; glass is

strong yet fragile, luscious yet cold, heavy yet allows light to pass

through. In black lustre, the reflective glass mirrors the outside

world, outwardly opposing everything that is presented to it.”

Jennifer Kemarre Martiniello

Prior to the creation of Lake Burley Griffin the area where the

Canberra Glassworks stands was a grassy landscape dotted with

lowland native trees and shrubs. Close to the confluence of the

Molonglo River and Jerrabomberra Creek the area may have been

occasionally flooded giving rise to seasonal mudflats, yielding

fertile soil for food species, including grains, seeds and bush

fruits, enhancing its capacity to sustain traditional rotational

habitation, camps, meetings and ceremonies. In these two works

I have sought to evoke some of the textures, colours, forms and

life-cycle changes across seasons of the more than 30 species of

native grasses, shrubs, trees , reeds and rushes that characterised

the landscape before non-Indigenous habitation. This diversity

included multiple species of sedges, reeds, tussock and kangaroo

grasses, eucalypts, casuarinas, Xanthorreas, kunzea, lomandras,

grevilleas, bursarias, dianellas, acacias, she-oaks, wattles, tea

trees and paperbarks which sustained more than 180 species of

native and migratory birds, 34 of which are now endangered.

Mark Elliot

In the context of architecture (and town planning), I see the

tree as the improvisational other - needed by humans to

counterbalance the order of the built environment yet not always

trusted for its independent mind - somewhat like an unruly artist -

commissioned to provide an unspecified artwork for a building.

The tree is a wild thing, which can be partially but never entirely

tamed with its tendency to sprout roots and branches in

unexpected places. In another sense, each tree is itself a piece of

architecture which has grown as a unique variation on its own

genetic plan and plays host to a vast array of inhabitants both

above and below ground - many of whom either contribute to, or

challenge its integrity.

I encounter this tree each time I stay at the Glassworks Chapel

where it stands sentinel (from a human viewpoint). Since reading

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Peter Wohlleben’s The Hidden Life of Trees, I have come to think

of it as a lone voice: a strong and independent presence. Each

morning I smell the intense aroma of Eucalyptus – (or is it possum

piss) as I walk barefoot around its base, my mind awakening to

the raw sensation of gumnuts crushing underfoot.

Emeirely Nucifora-Ryan

Measured Spaces explores ideas of internal space through a

series of three parts. These objects, through form, are vessels of a

space or void. The circle represents a possibility of endless space

through the expansion on all sides, while the materiality explores

the oppositions between the roughness of concrete, the strength

of metal, and the lightness and grace of glass.

I am inspired by the rough masculinity of the Canberra

Glassworks, which indicates it’s industrial use and age. The

handmade quality of the lines inherent in the made forms, as

well as the handmade quality of the drawn line, creates tension

between the planed, mapped, and built architecture and

industrialism. My hand etched lines map and interact with the

light within the void, while also referencing the drawn, mapped

and traced lines of architecture. To pay homage to the building

and it’s reclaimed purpose, concrete and metal have been

juxtaposed with blown glass.

Meagan Jones, Louis Grant

One of Canberra’s first public buildings, the Kingston power

house was built between 1913 and 1915. Designed by John Smith

Murdoch and built just as the planned Capital arose. This

beautiful piece of Canberra history is a narrative of industry,

labour, man and machinery. Now housing the Canberra

Glassworks, the building is a reclaimed gem open to the public

and to artists, crafts people and designers alike. A transitory

space, drenched in light, shrouded in history and built into the

fabric of the heritage listed building. This collaborative work by

two Canberra Glassworks Visitor Experiences colleagues, one

a glass artist, the other an arts manager with a background in

visual communication, is inspired by the industrialised textures,

materials, qualities and histories of the building. Photographs

taken by Meagan Jones, capture fleeting moments within the

building. Passages of movement are bathed in lustrous light,

these details are highlighted through the etching onto industrial

glass, by Louis Grant.

Louis Grant

The cast glass elements of this piece were made in 2015 as part

of a second year exploration into the void, the built environment,

and urban decay. Originally large and small arcs sat vicariously

balancing on fine edges or points, holding each other up. These

studies have been reimagined for this exhibition, responding to

the original concept and to the new context.

Cement has been cast onto the glass elements. Inspired by the

poured cement walls of the 1915 Kingston Powerhouse, the

moulds were created using wood panels. The wood grain is visible

through out the cement elements, similar to that of the building.

Further more, to add contrast, parts of the cement have been

spray painted, referencing graffiti that was left while the building

was laid dormant.

This work pays homage to the narrative and history of the

building, while playing with the constructed forms of decay and

the void.

Lucy Palmer

Lucy strives to utilise the unique qualities of kiln formed glass to

create an illusory sense of distance and depth; depicting vast

landscapes, expansive skies and the quiet horizon where the two

dissolve. Her inspiration derives from an interest in the incredible

potential of distance and space to draw the viewer away from

their immediate physical environment and allow the mind to

escape.

Ngaio Fitzpatrick

A Mandala is a metaphysical representation of the cosmos, or

a microcosm of the universe. A compass is a type of mandala

indicating directions on earth, useful as a tool of navigation, a

symbol of guidance encompassing the known universe towards

a type of enlightenment. The work responds to the architectural

window, space and void revealing a secular quality found in the

elevated proportions, sweeping staircase and ever changing light

conditions. Industrial steel components are often hidden behind

building facades and the repurposed vintage glass is often hidden

in collections, cabinets and op shops, both exposed in all their

light filled glory in this location.

Nick Doran Adams

Born and raised in Ballarat, Victoria, Nick Adams was surrounded

by history and grew up visiting one of the best collections of

Australian Art at the Art Gallery of Ballarat. He studied glass

at ANU, under Richard Whitely and Nadege Desgenetez,

completing his honours year in 2014.

At a young age Nick was exposed to early handheld gaming

devices, such as the Nintendo GameBoy. The characters in these

games are a basis for inspiration of his work. The images are a

modern contrast to the ancient process which he used, mosaic

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


glass (murrini). Nick recognised potential between the square

pixels on a GameBoy screen and the stacked patterns made by

the murrini.

Nick completed the Emerging Artists Support Scheme residency

at the Canberra Glassworks, where he developed a body of work

about glitches out of grey scale to represent the lack of colour

availability on the old original devices such as the Nintendo

GameBoy. Still using the origins of the process as inspiration to

help chose forms that work with the visuals.

Nikki Main

#1: Molonglo on Tap

My glass piece “Molonglo on Tap” is a nod to the often forgotten

role of water in industry. The Kingston Powerhouse was cited on

the banks of the Molonglo River to allow for fresh water to be

drawn up for the coal fired boilers to create steam. I have used

clear glass to represent ‘tap water’ – water refined for human use.

The mold for the casting was made using an impression of the

Murrumbidgee riverbed from a property called Riverview, where I

lived for twenty years.

#2: Drawings 1-9 (3 in gallery, 6 in Engine Room)

Drawing is an integral part of my art practice. It is a way of

honing my skills at looking, playing with ideas and having a direct

hand to eye experience. I see it as a major part of the “engine

room” of my practice.

I do many observational drawings and drawings that allow me

to play with materials and effects. I find myself selecting drawing

materials that mirror my glass making practice in some way.

When my glass practice was primarily blown glass with powders

I used to do a lot of ink drawings. Ink is an immediate and

permanent material, similar to the application of glass powders

in trails and blobs on my rock forms. Ink mirrors the movement of

water, significant for glass works that refers to moving water.

I am currently reigniting my glass casting practice and have

shifted to using charcoal in my drawings. I use a base of charcoal

powder and work back into it, much like hand surfacing or

polishing glass. It is a much slower process with a focus on

texture. For me the process of hand surfacing glass is very similar

to the meditative process of applying charcoal powder and

working back into it. The resultant product in both drawing and

glass has a softness and stillness, a change from the gestural fluid

quality of ink and my blown glass. I have been drawing on site at

the steelworks in Port Kembla close to where I now live.

Patricia Parker

Transition conveys the journey of the first 100-years of the

Kingston Power House from the output of energy in the form of

electricity to the containment of energy in the creation of hot and

kiln-formed glass. As the building is heritage listed its evolution

may see future iterations serving a different purpose. The external

skeletal image of the building attempts to convey that journey.

Rob Schwarz

My work combines glass processes to create simple geometric

forms that examine the idea of interlocking sections. Inspired by

nature and architecture, I have built a system where single units

come together to create new sets of components expanding into

larger systems that appear to grow continually. This studio-based

enquiry has informed my research question: How can I use the

materiality of glass to provoke wonderment in the complexity and

ingenuity of the amalgamation of elements in even the simplest

of forms?

Through the exploration of the properties of glass, I have focused

on the way structures in nature, specifically the connection

between soap bubbles, can inform structural design in

architecture. I examine this through the process of glass casting

by joining multiple blown glass bubbles into structural forms that

focus on the interfaces between the bubbles. I have identified and

drawn comparisons between various elements in nature, design

and process to influence and guide my making and aesthetic

decisions - man-made and natural phenomenon, glass blowing

and casting, multiple components and interconnections.

The formation of the systems I am creating relies on the

materiality of glass - clear, fluid and structural - and the ability to

cast and fuse the bubbles to create the connections. The entire

process relies on the connection between the two glass processes,

blowing and casting; one cannot work without the other.

Structural Void, is an example of taking my exploration of systems

and relating it to an existing structure. The concrete corridor

wall in The Glassworks, is a perfect example of the complexity

in how things are made. Concrete has no form of itself, it had to

be poured into a mold made from timbers that came from across

the world. The texture of the wood is ingrained in the concrete’s

surface. Constructing a building is an amalgamation of systems

that have their own individual process before becoming part of

the whole. By inserting my work into the space in this wall, I am

trying to highlight the features remaining from making process

in the structure. The slight space between the glass form and the

existing concrete reveals the organic textured side of the cast

glass bubbles. This view suggests the idea of nature influencing

an internal built structure. Even though we may have difficulty

seeing or understanding the process of how it was made, it

creates within us a sense of wonder.

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Rose-Mary Faulkner

The body is simultaneously familiar and foreign to us- it is with

us always, yet we only ever have a restricted personal viewpoint

of ourselves. My work presents a study of my own body from this

unique and subjective line of sight, as I aim to map and record

the female figure through abstracted and layered photographic

imagery in order to analyse form and surface. I investigate ways

to observe and experience the body, expressed visually through

soft dappled imagery and subtle colour evocative of feeling

and sensation. My practice primarily explores decal imagery

on glass. I firstly photograph sections of the body and abstract

these images through digital manipulation. Transferring them to

glass, I layer several related images before further manipulating

the surface and form through multiple fusings or cold working.

This expands the imagery beyond the original photograph as

the transparency of glass enhances layering for the purpose of

depth and overlapping, which enables me to utilise the specific

materiality of glass to suggest bodily form. I also enjoy the

process of marking the surface, tracing the lines of the images to

become almost like a topographical map. Through this work I am

also able to consider the role of the gaze and express a female

perspective on the female form.

Ruth Oliphant

This works looks at how the changing light throughout the day

interacts with the building that houses Canberra Glassworks.

Through this interaction it marks the passage of time. I have

spent many hours at Canberra Glassworks, at all different

times of the day. I have observed the changing light through the

windows of the Engine Room over many years. This work is about

the relationship I have built with this space over the years and

how it is constant but always changing.

Windows have always played an important role in my work and

in this exhibition they act as the threshold between the inside and

outside world, through which change happens.

Scott Chaseling

Scott Chaseling’s practice reveals sculptures that represents a

liminal space between a sense of place and one of being lost.

Chaseling presents art works relating to Heterotopia (a place

between Utopia and Dystopia).

By constructing with glass and mirrors, these artworks

demonstrate that it is possible to establish a liminal space that

consists only of a state of becomingness. Liminality, in this

application, is characterised by the unsuspecting, abstraction

and innocence.

The sculptures and wall works reveal a point of transition, either

through materials that are in a liminal process or by exploiting the

viewer’s visual perception. This temporal shift of reading, along

with a change in material expectations, will allow the viewer to

participate with the sculpture via the introduction of their own

interpretation/s.

Simon Maberley

Clean air and clean water make sense. The notion that you

can make coal “clean” is an oxymoron. The damage to our

environment caused by coal mining and coal fired power

generation clearly contradict the assertion that “coal is good for

humanity”. As we reaching a tipping point, the balancing act is

becoming harder and harder maintain. What can you live without

– cheap power or clean air, water and a stable climate?

Sophia Emmett

For the glassblower, the breath – blown into molten glass – is the

material and the process of art making, but whatever our calling,

we take for granted our right to breathe clean air. Humans

breathe on average twenty-five breaths a minute, 8.5 million

breaths a year, or six hundred seventy-two million, seven hundred

and sixty-eight thousand over an eighty year lifetime.

Our breath – the air we breathe – links us to the ancestral past

and the generations of the future. It is our most precious tenure,

though we have no possession of it: breath is only a means to an

end, and the end of breath is the end of us.

Twenty-five breaths draws awareness to the ephemeral and

invisible signature of a single breath. The cloud-like array of

glass bubbles were blown in the hot-shop by twenty-five people

aged between four and ninety-two. The height at which the

transparent ‘lung prints’ are suspended registers the standing

height of each subject, creating a transparent portrait of the

individual and a ghost of the group.

The lifetime rhythm of inhaling and exhaling enters us into an

unspoken contract, the cost of exchange mostly ignored. Gasping

represents our instinctive greed for resources: air, water, fuel,

material. There is a fine line between drawing breath and sucking

the life out of our shared inheritance. We may sigh in despair, or

we may take a deep breath and take a bit less.

Stephen Skillitzi

Stephen Skillitzi’s artistic aspiration to become an innovative

solo maker in the Crafts Movement, focusing firstly on Clay then

Glass, was initiated 55 uninterrupted years ago in 1960 at age

13 via his homemade solo-use electric-kiln and ceramics studio.

his diverse ongoing career embraced 1/ Academia:-studying//

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


lecturing/demonstrating/course initiating/mentoring (both in

USA 1967-1970 and Australia 1970 to present); and 2/ Glass

(blown and/or cast: for exhibition, corporate, home-wares

projects and commissions); and 3/ Non-commercial (street

theatre/performance, environmental installations, playable

mixed-media games). Following his brief pioneering involvement

in the 1960’s USA university-centered Glass ‘renaissance’, he

returned to Sydney to establish the very first independent furnacefocussed

Glass Studio in Australia springing from a 4/1971 Craft

Board grant (its first for Glass). Obviously other mainstream

glass products, techniques and factory traditions were already in

place. Since then other craft-artists have fundamentally matured

and broadened the nation’s Studio Glass profile propelling it into

justified international prominence, eclipsing its humble ‘Studio’

origins of 1971. That multi-faceted Aussie Glass history (which

has come to dominate the Crafts scene) was 1/ outlined by

Skillitzi, his scholarly paper is online, and presented at the 2009

conference of Ausglass, (the ‘backbone’ association supporting

Aussie glass activities since 1978).Skillitzi has attended every

bi-annual conference; and 2/ been documented by him in the

“Eminent Persons Program” archived at the National Library,

Canberra. Skillitzi’s contribution to Australian Studio Glass was

acknowledged via ‘The Ausglass Medal’ for 2015.

of stitching. This further exploits the complex dichotomy of the

‘speaking subject’ narrative in my artworks. Abject experiences

are dispelled and imbued in the material when the objects

unexpectedly tears, shreds, pulls and breaks apart so it is on the

edge of falling apart, or holding itself together, paradoxically

giving it strength and tenacity.

1

Pâte de verre is French for glass paste

2

Kay Moloney Caball, Kerry Girls: Emigration and the Earl Grey Scheme (The History

Press, 2014). The Kerry Girls, (2014) is in-depth account of the Irish famine is it affected

Co. Kerry in southern Ireland, an over view of the Earl Scheme. It includes details case

studies and witness accounts which follow some of young Kerry female famine orphans

that were transported to Australia to work as indentured domestic servants, as part of

the scheme.

Ursula Halpin

Working between Ireland and Australia my visual arts practice is

characterised by a deep relationship with my homeland in Ireland,

my Irish language and culture. I forge connections between my

artwork and Irish literature that evoke the textile traditions of

my childhood while exploring the emotional implications of my

material. My visual vocabulary uses a pâte de verre 1 technique,

a-kin to lace making as I ‘stitch’ my work slowly and meticulously,

summoning and weaving the histories of vulnerable women

into my work, mimicking the domestic technique and decorative

household objects.

I have been creating artwork in response to research carried out

on residency at Canberra Glassworks in April of this year. While

there I uncovered the fates of some of the Irish famine orphans

that were part of the Earl Grey Scheme 2 that saw up to 4000

thousand young Irish women ages 9-17 sent to Australia from

Irish workhouses as indentured domestic servants from 1848-

1852.

My chosen material, is both strong and fragile. The tension

between the ease my material can break and strength of its

structure echo the narratives of my work; vulnerable, resilient and

survivors of abject experiences.

Using the serendipitous nature of my kiln firings, the initial

element of control is cast aside in subsequent firings as my objects

are slumped, stretched and torn, making visible the undoing

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018

Catalogue of works


Ngaio Fitzpatrick

Glass Mandala, 2017

glass, steel

150 x 150 cm

$2,800

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Sophia Emmett

Twenty Five Breaths, 2016

blown glass, mesh

dimensions variable

POA

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Ursula Halpin

Náire Orthu, 2017

pate de verre

dimensions variable

POA

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Simon Maberley

Clean Coal?, 2017

glass, coal, water, stainless steel

60 x 15 x 20 cm

$1,890

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Ruth Oliphant

Crest, 2015

kiln formed glass

68 x 36 x 0.8 cm

$2,600

Ruth Oliphant

Passage of Time 2, 2015

kiln formed glass

78 x 42 x 1 cm

$2,000

Ruth Oliphant

Golden Hour, 2015

kiln formed glass

68.5 x 37.5 x 0.8 cm

$2,600

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Ruth Oliphant

Half Light, 2015

kiln formed glass

68 x 37.5 x 1 cm

$2,600

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Jacqueline Knight

Flight, 2017

hot-sculpted glass, steel

30 x 80 x 15 cm

$3,300

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Scott Chaseling

A Day At Home, 2017

coffee and wine on paper

40 x 60cm

$350

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


John White

Needle in a Haystack, 2017

kiln formed glass, steel, timber and glass base

90 x 45 x 35 cm

$11,500

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Nikki Main

Meanderings: the Engine Room of an Artist Practice

Contemplate,

2017

Taking a line for a walk 1,

2017

Caught in Thought,

2017

Generate,

2017

Taking a line for a walk 2,

2017

The Heat is on,

2017

charcoal powder,

charcoal, paper

53.3 x 43.4 cm

$300

charcoal powder,

charcoal, paper

53.3 x 43.4 cm

$300

charcoal powder,

charcoal, paper

55.9 x 43.8 cm

$300

charcoal powder,

charcoal, paper

55.9 x 43.8 cm

$300

charcoal powder,

charcoal, paper

53.3 x 43.4 cm

$300

charcoal powder,

charcoal, paper

53.3 x 43.4 cm

$300

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Nikki Main

Light Bulb Moment, 2017

charcoal powder, charcoal, paper

53.3 x 43.4 cm

$300

Nikki Main

Outpouring, 2017

charcoal powder, charcoal, paper

53.3 x 43.4 cm

$300

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Nikki Main

Dam Plan, 2017

charcoal powder, charcoal, paper

53.3 x 43.4 cm

$300

Nikki Main

Molonglo on tap, 2017

cast glass

30 x 30 x 3 cm

$1,800

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Jennifer Kemarre Martiniello

Confluence Landscape #1, 2017

blown glass, murrine

38 x 13.5 cm

$6,000

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Rob Schwartz

Structural Void, 2017

cast glass

53 x 46 x 15cm

$8,500

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Meagan Jones

and Louis Grant

Transitory Spaces 1, 2017

etched glass, photo print, ply

42 x 30 x 1.2 cm

$250 each ($900 set of four)

Meagan Jones

and Louis Grant

Transitory Spaces 2, 2017

etched glass, photo print, ply

42 x 30 x 1.2 cm

$250 each ($900 set of four)

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Meagan Jones

and Louis Grant

Transitory Spaces 3, 2017

etched glass, photo print, ply

42 x 30 x 1.2 cm

$250 each ($900 set of four)

Meagan Jones

and Louis Grant

Transitory Spaces 4, 2017

etched glass, photo print, ply

42 x 30 x 1.2 cm

$250 each ($900 set of four)

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Louis Grant

Built Decay, 2017

cast glass, concrete

dimensions variable

POA

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Nick Doran Adams

Single Player (white), 2016

blown and carved glass, murrine

20 x 12 cm

$1,500

Scrambled Egg (grey), 2016

blown and carved glass, murrine

20 x 12 cm

$1,500

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Rose-Mary Faulkner

Traced IV, 2017

kilnformed glass, decals

each panel 12 x 9 x 0.7 cm

$560

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Emeirely Nucifora-Ryan

Measured Spaces, 2017

blown glass, cast concrete, nickel silver

dimensions variable

NFS

Lucy Palmer

Atmos, 2017

kiln formed glass, aluminium

20 x 10 x 6 cm

$400

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Elizabeth Casling and

Graeme King

Antarctica, 2015

kiln formed glass

33 x 35 x 9 cm

NFS

Graeme King

Curved, 2014

kiln formed glass

39 x 12 x 1.7cm

NFS

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Elizabeth Casling

Divergent on black, 2017

kiln formed glass

20 x 20 x 3cm

NFS

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Ellen Collins

untitled #1, 2017

cast glass

9 x 6.5 x 5.5 cm

$380

untitled #4, 2017

cast glass

9 x 6.5 x 5.5 cm

$380

untitled #2, 2017

cast glass

9 x 6.5 x 5.5 cm

$380

untitled #5, 2017

cast glass

9 x 6.5 x 5.5 cm

$380

untitled #3, 2017

cast glass

9 x 6.5 x 5.5 cm

$380

untitled #6, 2017

cast glass

9 x 6.5 x 5.5 cm

$380

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Mark Elliot

A Mind of It’s Own, 2017

blown, hot-sculpted and sandblasted borosilicate glass

50 x 30 x 30 cm

$4,900

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Sui Jackson

Memory Drift, 2017

crystal

dimensions variable

$3,000

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Stephen Skillitizi

The Confrontation, 2017

photo print

60 x 70cm

NFS

Stephen Skillitizi

The Ventriloquist, 2017

photo print

60 x 70 cm

NFS

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Sydney Noble Edwards

Kingston Powerhouse, 1914

glass, photo print

courtesy of David Paterson

NFS

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Wendy Dawes

Untitled, 2017

cotton, Aida, embroidery hoop

16 x 16 cm

POA

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Patricia Parker

Transition, 2017

kiln formed glass

49 x 24 x 12 cm

$1,400

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


Exhibition partners

Canberra Glassworks is supported by the ACT Government through artsACT and the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

Major Sponsor Exhibition accomodation partner Wine partner

Photographs: Adam McGrath

HOME IS WHERE THE HEAT IS | 26 OCTOBER 2017 TO 14 JANUARY 2018


canberraglassworks.com

11 Wentworth Ave, Kingston ACT 2604

T 02 6260 7005

E contactus@canberraglassworks.com

opening hours

Wed to Sun 10am to 4pm

Hooray! Your file is uploaded and ready to be published.

Saved successfully!

Ooh no, something went wrong!