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July 2015 Final Web

July 2015

Northeast North Carolina

Northeast North Carolina Family History - Documentation! By: Irene Hampton - nencfamilyhistory@gmail.com Yawn. Boring, I know, but bear with me. When I taught genealogy classes at the public library, the one thing I stressed the most was documenting why you thought your family history information was correct. In genealogical terms it is referred to as citing your sources. The source may be as simple as a conversation with Aunt Edna at cousin Jane Doe’s wedding on the date and place, or a detailed book citation with publication, page and paragraph information. But why, you ask as your eyes glaze over and your mind drifts off to pleasanter occupations... Why? So anyone needing to, can verify that the information is correct - or not! Let me give you a couple of examples. French-Canadians in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s seemed to have taken the border between Canada and the USA as a suggestion as they moved back and forth quite freely. Some years ago one of my father’s distant relatives in Maine decided to put together a surname book and my mother asked me to submit our Canadian family information which I did. You can imagine my excitement when the inch thick book arrived. I was surprised to find that my father’s sister as well as mine had been left out. And I had been given my husband’s birth date and Currituck birthplace. That inch thick book suddenly became a very questionable source of information. When I would drop that bombshell in my classes, there were some very crestfallen faces, but I made my point that in order to check information, you have to know where it has come from to be able to verify or disprove its accuracy. As hard as you look, you will not find me in Currituck county’s records! So you have a wonderful book, and you may cite it and the page number, which CITATION will be correct, but it will not make the information correct. I also used an excerpt from a 1958 publication “Abstracts of Wills and Other Records, Currituck and Dare Counties, North Carolina (1663-1850)” in my classes. One of my husband’s ancestors was incorrectly identified as Esther instead of Easter, and a grandson I needed to find was left off of the abstract. I know this because I checked the abstract against the recorded will and found the errors. We generally like to take an easy route to information which includes sources compiled some time after an event has occurred, known as secondary sources. Both of the books I have referred to are such sources. Primary sources (a birth, marriage, death certificate, or census record as examples) are created as close to the event as possible and are considered more reliable. Many websites now allow you to attach primary sources directly to your online family tree. Just because they are primary sources doesn’t make them infallible, either. I have a favorite vital record error story for my grandfather. In Canada these records are held at the provincial level and I opened a requested death certificate only to discover it could not be true! Back in the days of snail mail, I returned it to them with the compliment that they were a most efficient governmental body as they had registered his death ten days before it occurred!! With a similarly joking “Typo!” and apology, they sent the corrected record. Lesson to be learned - when humans are involved, there will be errors - in books, obituaries, censuses and vital documents. In researching our family history, it is our obligation to pass on as correct information as possible. Next time I’ll discuss my favorite for profit and even better, free websites for research in the quest to find the most accurate information. Irene Hampton earned a Certificate in Genealogy from Brigham Young University and worked as the Genealogical/Local history Researcher for the Pasquotank- Camden Library for over 12 years. She has also abstracted and published “Widow’s Years Provisions, 1881-1899, Pasquotank County, North Carolina”; “1840 Currituck, North Carolina Federal Census” and “Record of Marriages, Book A (1851-1867) Currituck County, North Carolina”. Irene Hampton earned a Certificate in Genealogy from Brigham Young University and worked as the Genealogical/Local history Researcher for the Pasquotank-Camden Library for over 12 years. She has also abstracted and published “Widow’s Years Provisions, 1881-1899, PasquotankCounty, North Carolina”; “1840 Currituck, North Carolina Federal Census” and “Record of Marriages, Book A (1851-1867) Currituck County, North Carolina”. You may contact her at nencfamilyhistory@gmail.com. Sudoku Sudoku is easy to play and the rules are simple. Fill in the blanks so that each row, each column, and each of the nine 3x3 grids contain one instance of each of the numbers 1 through 9. 26 Albemarle Tradewinds July 2015 albemarletradewinds.com

Jim the Eclectic Collector Born and raised in Lancaster County, PA, Jim lived in an area where antiques were plentiful and the Amish and Mennonite traditions and customs were strong and their furnishings and tools dated back to the 1700’s. As a young boy, Jim started going to Public Farm and Home Auction Sales with his father. His father would always bid on the whole attic or cellar of the house because one could buy them cheap, no one else wanted them, and even the auctioneers didn’t want to get dirty. They often had different critters like rodents, snakes, spiders, and ground hogs in them. Some cellars were damp because of springs. Jim would get the job of cleaning out these areas and finding various items. In attics, he remembers finding bottles of wine, spices, smoked meats, guns, dishes, furniture, and just about anything that people wanted to keep in dry storage. In cellars, Jim found crocks filled with pickles and sauerkraut, and many canned vegetables and fruits; remember this was the refrigerator in the olden days. He remembers finding a wooden keg of root beer and drank so much, he was sick for three days. Jim also found money. It took him a while to catch on to his father’s philosophy: If Jim finds it and digs it out, father keeps it. Dad did not believe in sharing. After Jim realized this, he kept some of the money for himself. Jim became interested in Nautical, Waterman, and Pirate items later after being involved with the Mel Fisher family and the Spanish Galleon, the Atocha in Key West, FL. He has collected objects up and down the East Coast and in the Caribbean Islands. Puerto Rico is one of his favorite places to find unusual items. According to Jim, it is really the hunt to find unique items and learn the history behind them that is the most fun. He also shares some of his collection with the public by lending objects to museums and visitor centers in North Carolina. Now it is time to sell his collection and move on to other things. He hopes others enjoy the objects as much as he has. As you look for your treasures, it’s not the price you pay, it’s the enjoyment you get from the hunt and the pleasure you receive from looking at the objects, no matter how large or small the item is. Always looking for that next treasure, Jim Butz, Grandy, NC Phone # : 2525620987 Cree small tactical flashlight. Runs off of AA battery and is really bright. Local hardware has these at $6.99 but visit River City Computers and we will sell you one for $5.99 facebook.com/AlbemarleTradingPost Albemarle Tradewinds July 2015 27