BeatRoute Magazine BC Edition - February 2020

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BeatRoute Magazine is a music monthly and website that also covers: fashion, film, travel, liquor and cannabis all through the lens of a music fan. Distributed in British Columbiam Alberta, and Ontario. BeatRoute’s Alberta edition is distributed in Calgary, Edmonton, Banff and Canmore. The BC edition is distributed in Vancouver, Victoria and Nanaimo. BeatRoute (AB) Mission PO 23045 Calgary, AB T2S 3A8 E. editor@beatroute.ca BeatRoute (BC) #202 – 2405 E Hastings Vancouver, BC V5K 1Y8 P. 778-888-1120

Green Day

Destroyer

Ralph

Odario

& More

BC • FEBRUARY 2020 • FREE


SHOES AS

UNIQUE AS A

QUIET VEGAN

(THESE ARE FOR LOUDISH VEGANS BTW)

JOHNFLUEVOGSHOESGRANVILLEST··WATERST··FLUEVOGCOM


Contents

Music

5n UP FRONT

Canadian musician, broadcaster,

and the host of the evening

program Afterdark on CBC

Music, Odario Williams makes

our hearts skip a beat with his

Valentine’s Day playlist.

6n Artist Features

Green Day, Destroyer, The

Beaches, Non La, Andy Shauf

and more.

13n STYLE

Toronto’s rising pop star RALPH

shows BeatRoute her bedroom

closet and shines a light on her

uncompromising career that’s

taken her from opening for Carly

Rae Jepsen to dazzling new

heights.

17n Monthly Playlist

All the singles we can’t stop

listening to this month.

25nAlbum Reviews

Grimes, Mac Miller, Halsey, Tennis,

Cindy Lee, Soccer Mommy,

and more.

BC

Cover Story

Green Day

Destroyer

Ralph

Odario

& More

20 Tame Impala

The unassailable empathy of

Australian psych-everything

mastermind, Kevin Parker.

BC • FEBRUARY 2020 • FREE

LifeStyle

28nPhoto Essay

Photographer Annie

Forrest goes on the road

with Orville Peck and gets

an intimate inside scoop on

today’s hottest stars from

behind the lens.

30nTravel

Mexico City: Explore the

sprawling metropolis where

tradition and cutting edge

converge

33nScreen

The next playlist of couldbe

timeless classics, we

shine a light on 2020 Academy

Awards’ Best Song

Nominees.

YVR

35nJFLNW Comedy

Festival

From Maria Bamford to

Hannah Gadsby and Josh

Thomas, JFL Northwest

comedy festival returns,

bringing top tier talent to

the city for their annual

side-splitting affair.

36nYVR Agenda

David Sedaris jumps off the

page and into our hearts,

contemporary dance meets

hip-hop and martial arts in

Ghost, while Lil Fest brings

hip-hop to the masses for

an all ages spectacular featuring

the likes of Lil Tracy,

Shoreline Mafia, and more.

38nThe Cheat Sheet

BeatRoute’s Essential List

— the must-see shows this

month in Vancouver.

Khruangbin & Leon Bridges’

collaborative EP Texas Sun,

read our review on page 29.

Photographer Annie Forrest goes on

the road with psychedelic country

crooner Orville Peck. Page 28.

ANNIE FORREST

POONEH GHANA

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 3


NHL and the NHL Shield are registered trademarks of the National Hockey League. © NHL 2020. All Rights Reserved.


READ OUR FULL PROFILE WITH ODARIO WILLIAMS

UpFront

Publisher

Julia Rambeau Smith

@beatroutemedia

Editor in Chief

Glenn Alderson

Layout/Production Manager

Rachel Teresa Park

Managing Editors

Josephine Cruz

Melissa Vincent

Contributing Editors

Sebastian Buzzalino

Dayna Mahannah

Contributors

Ben Boddez • Corinna Burford

Reeghan Carroll • Jaime Eisen

Fraser Hamilton • Natalie Harmsen

Chayne Japal • Kate Killet

Brendan Lee • Katherine McFarlane

Maggie McPhee • Isaac Nikolai Fox

Luke Ottenhof • Shania Perera

Michael Rancic • Drew Yorke

Aurora Zboch

Contributing Photographers

Lindsey Blane • Sebastian Buzzalino

Harry Chan • Jason Cipparrone

Nathan Denette • George Fok

Annie Forrest • Toni Hafkenscheid

Megan Hill-Carroll • Neil Krug

Pamela Littky • Kira Locke

Colin Medley • Nabeel Pervaiz

Angela Ricciardi • Kelly Schovanek

Jason Tipton • Felice Trinidad

Hector Vasquez

Coordinator (Live Music)

Darrole Palmer

Advertising Inquiries

Glenn Alderson

glenn@beatroute.ca

778-888-1120

Distribution

BeatRoute is distributed in

Vancouver, Victoria, Calgary,

Edmonton, Winnipeg,

Saskatoon and Toronto

Contact Us

26 Duncan Street,

Suite 500

Toronto ON

M5V 2B9

editor@beatroute.ca

@beatroutemedia

beatroutemedia

beatroute.ca

FEBRUARY

ODARIO WILLIAMS'

VALENTINE'S DAY

PLAYLIST

M

usic plays a central part in

everything Odario Williams

does. This modern day

Renaissance man is an actor, songwriter,

producer, journalist, poet, and rapper,

and is the current host of “Afterdark”

on CBC Music. He’s put together an

unconventional Valentine’s Day playlist full

of classic bangers and underrated gems.

VISIT

BEATROUTE.CA

Etta James - "I'd Rather Go Blind"

A perfect blues song to soundtrack a

bruised heart. Kills me every time. I love

this tune.

D'Angelo - "Send It On"

Voodoo is one of my favourite albums of

all time. It's a sexy record, and “Send It

On” is the sexiest track on that record.

Dionne Warwick - "You're Gonna Need Me"

Dionne's vocal delivery is simply dirty, with

extra sass. I didn't know sweet Dionne

had it in her.

George Michael - "Kissing A Fool"

This is one of the best jazz-pop songs

ever written. This song solidified George

Michael as a fantastic songwriter.

Prince - "Adore"

Make sure you listen to the extended

6-minute version; you'll hear Prince

practically make love to his own song.

By CHAYNE JAPAL

Erykah Badu - "Green Eyes"

I love this song. It's so long (10 minutes),

but it ain't long enough!

Sade - "Nothing Can Come Between Us"

My playlists about love will always have

Sade involved. Sade IS love.

Jennifer Lara - "I Am In Love"

I tend to keep a few reggae tunes in my

playlists because reggae is in my DNA.

This song is perfect for hot sticky summer

nights.

Marvin Gaye - "After The Dance"

This song is basically four and a half

minutes of foreplay.

Eric B & Rakim - "What's On Your Mind"

At a time when rap songs were not

allowed to be romantic, Rakim penned a

perfect scenario of meeting his soulmate

one day in Brooklyn.

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 5

JASON CIPPARRONE


MUSiC ARTIST INTERVIEW

SAY HELLO TO A

NEW, OLDER, AND

LESS MATURE

GREEN DAY

THE POP PUNK FOREBEARS

COME OF AGE, AGAIN.

PAMELA LITTKY

It’s mid-January, and Tre Cool is looking forward to

the National Hockey League’s All-Star Weekend

in St. Louis, Missouri. The Green Day drummer is

hoping to drive a zamboni at some point during the

weekend. “It’s like a fancy lawnmower that squirts

water, and I’m driving the motherfucker,” he says.

I ask if he needs a special license to drive one. “Just a

license to fuck shit up,” he fires back.

Cool and his long-time Green Day bandmates—

hyper, pointy-haired frontman Billie Joe Armstrong

and stoic, always-sleeveless bassist Mike Dirnt—are

prepping for a whirlwind year. They’re co-headlining

with Weezer and Fall Out Boy on this summer’s highprofile

Hella Mega Tour, but first they’ll release their

13th studio album, Father Of All Motherfuckers. Gone

are Green Day’s early-oughts days of nine-minute

medley epics, hour-plus album runtimes, and sobering

sociopolitical narratives.

With 10 tracks that run just over 26 minutes, Father

is a frantic coke binge, a glammed-up garage-rock

record that’s committed more to revelry than revolution.

I wonder if, at this stage in their career, it’s hard to tap

into that shithead-teenager mindset. “We’re still in our

high school band,” laughs Cool. “What you’re hearing is

a new, older, less mature Green Day.”

Father marks the first record for which the band

worked with producer Butch Walker, who scaled back

their tendencies for the grandiose and nudged them

towards something that felt more intuitive. “It was very

freeing,” says Cool. “[Walker] is no-nonsense. You lock

in a sound and go. You don’t chase your tail looking for

that perfect sound.”

The approach is somewhat surprising. Walker’s work

with acts like Fall Out Boy, P!nk, and Avril Lavigne has

carved space for their records in the sweet spot between

pop and punk. He helmed Taylor Swift’s prescient

country-to-pop shift with 2012’s Red and catapulted

English rock band The Struts to international fame with

their dancey rock jam “Body Talks.” Father borrows

sonically from that 2018 Struts single, especially on the

titular opening track with Armstrong’s overdriven falsetto

vocals and dirty-sleek guitars.

Green Day have zig-zagged from basement punks

to acoustic balladeers to pop punk trend-setters, but

pressed for a high-water mark, there are two obvious

answers: 1994’s slacker-hymnal Dookie and 2004’s anti-

American treatise American Idiot. The latter remains

their most influential and memorable, not least of all for

its accompanying red-white-and-black aesthetic. It was

clear, scathing, and distinctly repulsed by George Bush’s

jingoism and American imperialism.

But while the band has repeatedly shared their disdain

for the current American president, Father doesn’t

waste breath on him.

There are two frames of mind on art post-Trump: it

either absolutely should, or absolutely shouldn’t, be

informed by his presidency. Green Day circa-2004

6 BEATROUTE FEBRUARY 2020


By LUKE OTTENHOF

might have opted for the former. In 2020, they’re opting

for the latter. “The last thing we wanted to do was make a

record about that idiot,” says Cool. “Just because we have a

tyrant, fascist asshole in the White House doesn’t mean that

we have to sacrifice our art.”

He admits, though, that things are bad. Really bad. “The

pendulum swings, and it swings a little higher,” he says. “I

think it goes back and forth, and right now, it’s at the height

of the bad side of history. Right now, the racist rhetoric and

all that stuff that was hiding under the rocks, now they’re

emboldened and they’re out there. They feel like it’s their

moment. But the pendulum’s gotta swing back the other way.

Hopefully it’ll swing a little bit harder, and people will be even

more aware and more conscious of their environment, their

society, and the place where they live.”

For Cool, it’s important in the meantime to focus on

amplifying the things that make us feel good, even for a

moment. The drummer rhymes off his strategies: listening to

records, time with his family, being around water. “Oh, and

hard, hard drugs,” he chuckles. “There’s certain drugs I think

should be mandatory. Everybody should drop acid at least

once, and take mushrooms a couple times.

“When things are this bad, you want to just party. It’s like

dancing through the apocalypse. This might just be it for this

planet, so who knows. Let’s go out with a bang.”

This approach is understandable. If you committed your

band’s entire existence to very visibly raging against the

American machine and 16 years later, things had gotten

worse, you too might be resigned to defeat. But Cool

caveats that this isn’t a total withdrawal; Nazis still need to

be punched. But they can’t steal away our records and our

families and the ocean and drugs.

“They can’t take those away from us,” Cool says. “They

cannot take away your joy. They cannot take away your heart,

as long as you just wear it on your sleeve. As a wise man, Bill S.

Preston once said, ‘Be excellent to each other.’”

STAR

Green Day’s thirteenth studio album Father Of All

Motherfuckers… will be released February 7th 2020.

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 7


MUSiC ARTIST INTERVIEW

DESTROYER

TAKES THE MIC

DAN BEJAR

EMBRACES HIS

ROLE AS A SINGER

CRAFTING AN

ALBUM FROM HIS

KITCHEN

MEGAN HILL-CARROLL

By GLENN ALDERSON

8 BEATROUTE FEBRUARY 2020


Dan Bejar steps out of the rain

into Vancouver’s Pat’s Pub on

a typically dreary winter day

wearing an old brown jacket

and a grey toque with side

flaps. When he walks up to the

table he takes off his hat, unleashing his

large frazzled mane.

Pat’s Pub is somewhat of an historic

musical landmark in the city’s Downtown

Eastside, a jazz club in the 1920s once

home to famous American jazz pianist

Jelly Roll Morten who lived and played in

the building for a stint of time. The pub is

a few blocks away from JC/DC Studios,

run by producers John Collins of the New

Pornographers and Dave Carswell, where

the majority of Bejar’s life’s work has

been set to tape.

He looks down at the original wooden

flooring etched with decades of memories

and pauses for a moment before he

speaks. “I knew a lot of the old big band

bands would come through but I didn’t

realize this was one of those places.”

His pensive and calculated demeanor

is comforting. It’s the same demeanor

he’s carried with him throughout his

compelling career as Destroyer. Even

his facial expression on the cover of

his new album, Have We Met, seems

purposefully detached, but his apathy

is overshadowed by the magnificent

microphone he’s posing with: the

Sennheiser 441 — the same retro mic

Stevie Nicks used on Tusk.

True to the signature wit and cynicism

that he exudes both in life and his

songwriting, the mic is both an accessory

and extension of himself.

“I wanted the record to be like an

action shot. And an action shot of my

world means me singing. That’s what I do.

It’s literally the only thing I ever do now,”

Bejar says, taking a sip from his pint.

“I wanted it to be kind of generic

as well but in a visually nice way,” he

continues. “Just like, ‘There’s Neil

Diamond, holding a microphone and

singing his songs.’ Which is kind of my

world at this point — like Neil Diamond

but in bars instead of stadiums.”

For more than 20 years, the 47-yearold

Bejar has worn multiple hats as both

the patron saint of lo-fi indie folk, building

rock and roll spectacles out of ballads

recorded on a four-track; and as the

modest on-again-off-again member of

pop rock outfit, the New Pornographers.

With 13 Destroyer albums now under

his belt, 2011’s smooth, suave and

undeniably sophisticated Kaputt signaled

a creative breakthrough for Bejar, who

morphed into an elegant lounge singer,

which garnered international acclaim and

helped set the pace for indie music in the

decade to come.

It was around then Bejar set his career

on a new path by putting down his guitar.

“I think that’s the biggest thing that ever

happened to me, when I decided to put the

guitar down forever, in the band at least,

and focus on being a singer,” he says.

Bejar opted instead for whatever

midi keyboard he could get his hands

on. This is what brought the world the

brash and bold Poison Season (2015),

the dark and brooding ken (2017) and

now, Have We Met, an ominous album

that he recorded on a laptop from the

kitchen of his Strathcona home in the late

hours of the night and from hotel rooms

while on the road performing a string of

solo dates supporting his former New

Pornographers bandmate, Neko Case.

“Technically they’re really poor

recordings, done in my kitchen, singing

really quiet because it’s late and I don’t

want to wake anyone up. I thought for

sure once we had a better idea of how

the music would go I would redo them,

but there’s kind of an alone sounding but

also very comfortable sounding quality

to them for me that I haven’t been able

to get on other records and it became

something to really anchor the songs. I

thought we could make the music as wild

as we wanted once that was in place.”

When asked how he’s going to bring

Have We Met to life when he takes it on the

road, he cracks a rare but welcomed grin.

“With a seven-piece band playing

loud rock music,” he says, pausing for

a moment, as if to imply there’s simply

no other way. “That’s one thing about

Vancouver: I’m pretty attached to my

band. I feel like musicians here are kind of

smarter than other places. They’re also

kind of negative, which I like. When you

play in Vancouver your back is against

the wall and I like that. It’s not the most

positive but it’s creative. Music here is not

congratulatory. It’s more like, ‘oh... fuck…’”

Bejar trails off and stops again to

collect his thoughts.

“No slight to Toronto or Montreal or

places like that, but it feels like in Toronto

you could just get by being a band in

Toronto and have a Toronto based career,

but here that’s just like an insane idea or

fantasy. You pretty much need to be Jelly

Roll Morton to make that work.” STAR

SECRET LOCATION

Feb 04–Mar 01, 2020

100 people,

100 puppets,

a secret location,

and the one and

only Ronnie Burkett!

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THECULTCH.COM

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 9



FELICE TRINIDAD

THE BEACHES

ARE PAVING THEIR

OWN PATH

Guitarist Kylie Miller

breaks down their plan

for world domination.

n a cold January night, Kylie

Miller, The Beaches’ esteemed

Oguitarist, calls after a tiresome

rehearsal ahead of her band’s debut

Canadian headlining tour. For anyone

accustomed to a traditional 9-5, it’s the

stuff of rock folklore.

Named after the neighborhood in

Toronto’s east end, the band channels

both the warm languidness of 70s

rock, with the earnest, bold and biting

attention to detail of PJ Harvey and Kim

Gordon. On their most recent EP, The

Professional (2019), Miller utters a retort

that feels built for the age of internet

dating: “Stop sending me all your dick

pics/ they are boring me to pieces.”

Miller is candid about what it felt

like to navigate the industry at a young

age: “At the beginning it was a bit of an

unknown territory. We didn’t exactly

know what we were getting into, but

luckily we had each other.”

She notes the type of microaggressions

she and her fellow

band members encountered in the

early stages of their career, like

concertgoers assuming they were fans

when they’d appear at a gig. “Obviously

the music industry, especially the rock

industry, is very male-dominated,” she

says, “I think being a force in the rise of

female rock artists is really cool. I think

we’ve been able to grow and help be

a part of this movement that hopefully

By SHANIA PERERA

becomes way more accessible.”

And now in a position to bring up

a new generation of rock stars, The

Beaches are excited to put on rising

bands in Toronto’s rock scene. Miller

name-drops the teen folk duo Moscow

Apartment, who attend her former high

school: “They are so tight, they are so

badass. They’re literally as tight as we

are, and much younger.”

Now, The Beaches are driven by

their devoted fanbase. “We love

performing. As long as we continue

to do that, and it also inspires other

women to get involved, that’s really

awesome for us.”

STAR

The Beaches will embark on their first

national tour on February 6th, starting in

Victoria, British Columbia.

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 11



ARTIST INTERVIEW MUSiC

THE WORLD

By JAIME EISEN

Photography by

NABEEL PERVAIZ

Clothing provided by

HAYLEY ELSAESSE

ACCORDING

TO RALPH

THE CANADIAN

DISCO-POP PRINCESS

TALKS VULNERABILITY

IN POP MUSIC, LETTING GO,

AND KEEPING IT REAL.

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 13


Stepping into RALPH’s bedroom feels

like gaining access to her brain.

Sitting on a bed made with hotel

corners, RALPH looks perfectly at

home. “When I’m in my room, I feel

a sense of peace and joy,” she says.

“It’s chaotic, but in my own way it’s organized.”

This comfort extends to RALPH’s unique

live shows, where she punctuates colourful

costume changes with special guests like altrock

girl band The Beaches and supermodel

drag performer Tynomi Banks. RALPH’s

shows are light, fun, and seemingly carefree.

But “nothing happens without me creating it,

or being a huge part of it,” she says. “I work

fucking hard.”

Since the debut of her self-titled EP in

2017, RALPH has cultivated a loyal following

hungry for more fresh, disco-infused synthpop.

She has honed her nostalgic pop sound

on earworm tracks like the Electric Circusinspired

“Gravity” and 80s throwback “Tease,”

while claiming her spot on charts, streaming

playlists, and fashion “best” lists.

Now, following the release of her latest EP

Flashbacks and Fantasies, and fresh off a tour

with Canadian pop icon Carly Rae Jepsen,

RALPH is ready to try something new.

“The beauty of being an artist is that you

get to evolve,” she says. Referencing Billie

Eilish, Normani, Maggie Rogers, and Lizzo,

she feels this moment in pop music should be

viewed through a kaleidoscope—as a hybrid

genre with endless possibilities.

For RALPH, impact comes with taking risks

and maintaining authenticity. “I think people

appreciate me creating moments that are

real and honest and interesting. I’d prefer to

do that than just be someone contrived that

people can’t access.”

Born into a large, tight-knit family of

creatives, RALPH knows that swimming

against the tide can sometimes feel futile,

but has “learned there’s no harm in

continuing to grab everything by the horns

and building a community.” She admires

artists like Orville Peck and Jessie Reyez

who are carving out unique spaces for

Canadian pop on their own terms.

RALPH’s own music community is built on

specific values: “If each show is a place that

I’ve created, then I want to make sure that

everyone here feels safe and welcomed and

loved and celebrated.”

Despite the care she puts into every detail,

it’s clear that RALPH is not a traditional

perfectionist. She has learned to let go and

embrace the (organized) chaos: “You know

when you’re baking cookies with someone?

There are people whose icing tends to be

perfect and stunning. My cookie is fine. It’s

okay. That doesn’t mean that I don’t work

fucking hard and put a lot of thought into

things. But I also can accept when something

isn’t perfect and I don’t beat myself up about

it forever.”

She smiles: “I always just want to eat the

fucking cookie.”

STAR

14 BEATROUTE FEBRUARY 2020


Photography by

NABEEL PERVAIZ

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 15


Artist to Watch

THIS IS NOT A LOVE SONG

NON LA: INDIE ARTIST DJ ON RECLAIMS MIXED

HERITAGE AND RISES UP WITH NOT IN LOVE

By MAGGIE MCPHEE

EMMA ARKELL

V

ancouver DIY scene mainstay

DJ On will release his solo

project’s debut LP, Not In

Love, after nearly a decade performing

in a half-dozen local bands. Under the

moniker Non La (the vietnamese word

for a traditional hat style), On hopes to

reclaim his identiy as a queer Chinese-

Vietnamese Canadian through blownout,

gritty pop.

“A lot of the time our [QPOC] art

has to be sad and kind of like torture

porn for white audiences,” Non La tells

Beatroute at a Mount Pleasant cafe.

”I didn’t want to take that angle. I just

wrote pop songs that I want people to

dance to.”

Not In Love oscillates from personal

to political, propelled by every dramatic

drumbeat and glittery guitar solo. The

album’s brightness irriadiates queer

love stories while heavy rhythms root

the themes to something universal. On’s

idiosyncratic vocals capture this backand-forth

between levity and depth,

a near-staccato approach that has

On singing multiple notes across

single syllables.

The multi-instrumentalist spent

eight years playing bass and drums

in various Vancouver pop and punk

groups — amongst them, Thee Ahs, TV

Ugly, Maneater and Megamall — while

completing a degree in English and

Gender Studies at SFU. Jaded and

tired of prejudiced barriers in the music

industry, On boarded a plane to Taiwan

without even attending his graduation

ceremony. There, Non La crystalized.

With ample alone time to write songs

and reflect, On discovered the impetus

for finally venturing out as a solo artist.

“Growing up and listening to indie

rock I never saw and still don’t see gay

asian men fronting popular bands and

that’s the reason I never wanted to

focus on [a solo project],” he explains.

With Non La and Not In Love, “I’m trying

to be what fourteen-year-old me needed

to see reflected in the indie rock scene.”

Not feeling represented in media

damaged On’s sense of identity. “It’s

caused me to internalize racism and

homophobia,” to the point where he

rejected his maternal and paternal

languages. Now he feels ready to

reclaim all aspects of himself. “That’s

why there’s both Vietnamese and

Chinese on the album art.”

These personal ties lend a sense

of honesty to the album’s more

political notes. On sings about the

corporatization of pride and the

fetishization of asian people with wit

and candor. With the release of Not

In Love, On adds his voice to a crucial

dialogue gaining momentum every

day. Hopefully it’s only a matter of time

before this chorus of indignant artists

washes out the noise.

STAR

Non La performs at Red Gate on Feb. 15

Destroyer

Have We Met

16 BEATROUTE FEBRUARY 2020


The Playlist

BEATROUTE

RIGHT

BEATROUTE

BEAT

ROUTE

BR

BRLIVE

BRYYZ

10 SONGS IN

HEAVY ROTATION

AT THE BR OFFICES

NOW

CHECK OUT

BEATROUTE.CA

FOR MORE HOT

TRACKS ON

OUR ROTATING

PLAYLIST

+ VIDEOS,

ARTIST

INTERVIEWS

AND MORE!

Porches

Do You Wanna

Porches new

track sounds

like an all-out

celebration on

the surface

but there’s

something

unsettling

lurking

underneath.

Synth-pop

mastermind

Aaron Maine

plays a repetitive

and jubilant ode

to the joys of

losing yourself

to dance.

U.S. Girls

Overtime

(Ft. James Baley &

Jake Clemons)

An update of a

track from their

2013 EP that

adds some more

funk flavour and

a sax solo from

Jake Clemons

of the legendary

E Street Band,

U.S. Girls turn

the discovery of

a partner’s lies

into a soulful

and cathartic

call-andresponse

jam

session that

only grows more

chaotic as it

progresses.

Jessie Reyez

LOVE IN THE DARK

Released

alongside an

announcement

that her debut

album is finally

on its way, one

of Canada’s

most promising

songwriters

drops a lovelorn

and cinematic

orchestral

ballad. Reyez

emphasizes the

astral power

of her love

through a variety

of galactic

metaphors,

heavily layering

her vocals

for the most

grandiose effect.

Megan Thee

Stallion

Diamonds

(Ft. Normani)

From the

soundtrack of

the upcoming

Birds of

Prey movie,

one of rap’s

biggest new

personalities

recruits the

effortlessly cool

Normani for a

confident and

bass-heavy trap

banger. Normani

tries out some

raps of her own

on the hook, but

this is Megan’s

comfort zone

to excel as

she steps into

the unhinged

persona of

Harley Quinn.

Kehlani

All Me

(Ft. Keyshia Cole)

R&B star Kehlani

drops a smooth

track where

she dials up

the harmonies

as she thanks

her partner

for embracing

her flaws, but

it’s Keyshia

Cole making

her grand

return from

somewhere

deep in the

mid-2000s that

really elevates

things. Taking

over the second

verse, her vocal

range is still as

impressive as

ever.

TOPS

I Feel Alive

The Montreal

retro-pop

quartet kick off

a new era with

an upbeat and

cheerful track

destined to be

played over the

swaying arms

and floating

beach balls

of a summer

music festival.

Driven by a

catchy rhythmic

guitar hook, the

track captures

the overjoyed

feeling of new

love. To add

to that, the

video sees the

band playing

with adorable

bunnies. What

else do you

need?

Peach Pit

Shampoo Bottles

Peach Pit

frontman Neil

Smith believes

“coping with a

loss can make

you do weird

things.” The

empty shampoo

bottles that

once belonged

to his exgirlfriend

pile up

in the corners

of Smith’s

bathroom as he

runs through

a list of all

the items she

left behind in

a mournful

falsetto.

The 1975

Me & You Together

Song

The English rock

band drop the

artsy surrealism

of their last few

projects and

return to their

old pop-rock

sound complete

with the bouncy

percussion and

wall-of-sound

guitars that

characterized

their breakout

hit singles.

Frontman Matty

Healy tries

to convince

a friend to

take the next

step in their

relationship.

Joel Plaskett

Head Over Heels

Into Heaven

The Haligonian

indie-rock hero

unleashes the

first taste of

his upcoming

QUADRUPLE

album 44

with a driving

acoustic track

accompanied by

a big band-style

horn section

hook. The track

will belong to

the first stage

of the project

documenting

his life’s journey

of the past four

years, and sees

him getting

ready to follow

someone to

the ends of the

earth.

Alec

Benjamin

Demons

Rising singersongwriter

Alec Benjamin

continues to

exorcise his

own personal

demons

through his

highly personal

songwriting

depicting the

darkest, most

anxiety-riddled

corners of his

mind. In a more

hopeful turn

than usual,

Benjamin

instead thanks

his sister for

being there for

him and keeping

him alive in his

trademark airy

falsetto.

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 17


RIO

THEATRE

1660 EAST BROADWAY

FEBRUARY

FEBRUARY

6

FEBRUARY

7

FEBRUARY

8

FEBRUARY

9

FEBRUARY

10

FEBRUARY

11

FEBRUARY

15

FEBRUARY

16

FEBRUARY

23

MARCH

3

Paul Anthony’s Talent Time

GAME SHOW NIGHT!

First Thursday of Every Month

Must-see Doc

FANTASTIC FUNGI

*Additional dates www.riotheatre.ca

Elijah Wood

COME TO DADDY

Friday Late Night Movie

An Evening of

TOM PETTY & STEVIE NICKS

Anime!

PERFECT BLUE

THE OSCARS

LIVE Screening & Party

CATS

*Additional dates www.riotheatre.ca

THE PRINCESS BRIDE

Baz Luhrmann’s

CASABLANCA

WILD AT HEART

FEBRUARY The Rio Theatre’s Dating Game

LET’S MAKE A DATE

Hosted by Patrick Maliha

12

FEBRUARY

JFL NORTHWEST

Live at The Rio February 13 - 21

www.jflnorthwest.com for lineup & tickets

13

ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF

THE SPOTLESS MIND

Happy Valentine’s Day!

FEBRUARY

April O’Peel Productions’

14

FEBRUARY

22

ROMEO + JULIET

BURLESQUE DUOS

THE NOTEBOOK

WEATHERING WITH YOU

*Additional dates www.riotheatre.ca

NATURAL BORN KILLERS

PRINCESS MONONOKE

*Additional dates www.riotheatre.ca

Anime!

GHOST IN THE SHELL

Must-see Documentary

DOSED

With Filmmaker Q & A!

Phoebe Waller-Bridge

FLEABAG

FEBRUARY

THE CRITICAL HIT SHOW

27

A #DNDLive Epic Fantasy Adventure

We Can Abide!

THE BIG LEBOWSKI

THE JESUS ROLLS

Double Bill!

MARCH

The Gentlemen Hecklers Present

4 A VIEW TO A KILL

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA

S

THE NEON

SKYLINE

IS ANDY

SHAUF'S

SMALL

WORLD

AFTERALL

The Canadian singer-songwriter's

sixth album is an homage to small

moments.

"

I

like to keep my world

small,” Andy Shauf

laughs. Why? “Maybe I

don’t have the capacity

for a lot.”

In this case, he’s

referring to the couple

block radius of the city

that helped inspire his

new album, The Neon

Skyline, a romantic

homage to a beloved

diner in a rapidly

gentrifying Parkdale. It makes sense that Shauf likes

to keep his focus on the micro: Small moments are

the singer-songwriter’s specialty as his lyrics often

find magnificence in the mundane, focusing on tiny

memorable moments versus broader themes.

“The Skyline reopened right when I moved to Toronto

and I ended up going there a lot,” Shauf says of the

inspiration. It’s close to his home in Parkdale and he quickly

became a regular, making friends with the owners and staff

and falling for the diner’s little community.

The Neon Skyline indeed reflects the inner narratives

we project and how the characters we portray intermingle

within our community. For Shauf, these exchanges act as

lyrical inspiration. Relationships with acquaintances—and the

outcome of those relationships—has always been something

that Shauf’s found intriguing: "I think it’s interesting in that sort

of scenario when you are getting to know someone just by

the small little pieces of themselves that they’ll give up every

once in a while. There’s no real reason why you know them,

but you can get a little glimpse into their life.

Compared to Shauf’s Polaris Prize short-listed

record The Party, the mood of The Neon Skyline is

slightly more subdued and vulnerable, with the record’s

narrator remarking, “Sometimes I feel like I should never

speak again.”

With the release of this very personal piece of work,

Shauf hopes that his small world stays small—despite

letting everyone in on a section of it. “I’m a little scared,” he

admits. “That’s my quiet bar. I hope that people go there

but I also hope that I can still go there.”

The Neon Skyline out now via Arts & Crafts.

By KATE KILLETT

STAR

COLIN MEDLEY

18 BEATROUTE FEBRUARY 2020


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FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 19


MUSiC ARTIST INTERVIEW

NEIL KRUG

20 BEATROUTE FEBRUARY 2020


THE UNASSAILABLE EMPATHY

OF KEVIN PARKER

By MELISSA VINCENT

A

year and a half ago,

I made the trip from

Toronto to Moreno

Beach, Lake Perris

in Ontario, California

for Desert Daze, the

always impressive psychedelic rock

festival. It marked the festival’s first

year in a new home after previously

being held at the mythical Joshua

Tree Park. Tame Impala were the

festival’s opening night headliner,

followed by King Gizzard and the

Lizard Wizard, and My Bloody

Valentine. It was supposed to be a

slam dunk.

But the festival grounds,

stationed deep in the mountains of

a region experiencing a multi-year

drought, was overcome by an

extreme electric storm with near

torrential downpour to match. Less

than half an hour into Tame Impala’s

set, the show was cut off citing

safety concerns. Piling onto the

gargantuan task of attempting to

evacuate thousands of people was

the added challenge of relieving

an equally gargantuan traffic jam,

estimated at six hours, that caused

a particular logistical nightmare for

the festival.

Groups of teenagers resorted

to huddling under trees, blasting

“Let It Happen” out of muddy

phone speakers and singing along

desperately. It was extremely corny,

and just as beautiful, because for

legions of kids, this was their band,

and the show will always go on.

It’s a cheesy example, but a vivid

one—a single case, and one of

many, that illustrates exactly how

popular the Australian psycheverything

band from Perth had

actually become. Because since

releasing a string of singles to

MySpace in 2007, Kevin Parker’s

solo project has become big.

Not popular, but properly big: As

in, Rihanna-sampling; top tier-

Coachella headlining; Grammy

Award-nominating; platinum

record-selling; Lady Gaga and

Kanye West-collaborating; GQ

Magazine cover star-featuring big.

And at the core of Tame Impala’s

success is an ongoing question:

why now, does this music resonate

so broadly? Somehow—everyone

from purists of genre and taste,

and expats from the hyperprecious

era of audio exclusivity

and microblogging; to a newer

generation of fans who are frequent

participants of Big Experiential

Music Moments®, raised on a diet

of precisely-formed algorithms

capable of generating endless

Tik Tok memes—have all been

indoctrinated into the ecosystem

that Parker has built around himself.

For the better part of the last

decade, Parker has been on the

frontlines of psychdelia’s most

recent elevation to the top of the

cultural forefront, which, historically,

has been a reoccurring and resilient

salve during eras of aggregate

social and political uncertainty.

And often superficially pegged as

music made for private people and

introverts searching for like-minded

flock, Parker’s music has always

gotten at something slightly more

complicated and arresting.

Instead, he’s remained invested

in exploring the limits of emotional

intelligence, directed at the self

and then utilized as a tool to

understand an ever-confusing

outside world. Starved for

answers, Parker generously offers

a reminder that answering big

questions starts with addressing

smaller, human-sized ones. By

design, his music casts a wide net.

“I wouldn't write a song that I feel

is only applicable to me,” he muses

over a Skype call from Australia.

Resisting the urge to speak

superfluously, but undertaking

a comprehensive analysis of

legitimate facts, Tame Impala are

an unusual success story in a genre

that’s long battled an identity crisis.

Though bona fide “rock star” might

not have been in the initial blueprint,

it’s Parker’s reality now. After years

spent gracing festival stages with

his eyes fixed on the ground, now

he looks up and out.

“I used to have a massive

imposter complex and it's funny,

I didn't really cure my imposter

complex until I realized it was a

‘thing.’ I heard this word ‘imposter

complex’ and I was like ‘holy shit. I

have that.’”

“It was a real turning point for

me. I still see a tour poster, or see a

festival poster, and it's like: “Tame

Impala headlining” with a picture

of my face, and I'm like, ‘What are

you doing? Why are you getting

this fucking idiot to headline your

festival, that doesn’t make sense.’

I still think that, but I’m trying to

outsmart it—I’m trying to push back

equally as hard and counsel myself

into believing that I do deserve it,

you know?”

Over the phone Parker is warmly

conversational and comfortably

adept at catching a question

that’s morphed into a sprawling

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 21


MUSiC ARTIST INTERVIEW

statement, then releasing an answer that

goes even further, capable of really going

there. It’s a useful skill, evidence of an

understated confidence necessary for

trusting the outcome of one’s curiosity

that’s become foundational to his music.

Innerspeaker, the band’s 2010 critical

breakthrough, utilized the weight of

climactic, soaring riffs to sympathize with

the rigors of merely slogging your way

through ordinary life. His sophomore effort,

Lonerism (2012), saw Parker nudging his

aspirations larger, exhuming the textures of

70s synths to take a stab at pop splendor.

And 2015’s Currents refined his interest in

sanding down any lingering, discernable grit

from the project to produce a near-pristine,

airtight container of hyper-lush psych-pop.

Parker’s newest album, The Slow Rush,

is a sprawling inquisition into a sonic

environment Parker has been hinting

at for years, and has now finally given

himself the license to execute. “When I

actually felt like I wanted to make another

Tame Impala album, I had gotten so many

new perspectives on music that I realized

how much more I could be doing with

Tame Impala.”

“Everything I did was eyeopening,

so the goal

was to

kind of blow it open and embody a lot of

the qualities of people that I've worked

with in myself,” he remembers. “[Working

with] Travis Scott, I learned not to sweat

the small stuff, which helped me realize

that self-doubt doesn't get you anywhere,

[and] doesn't help anything or anyone.”

As a result, The Slow Rush is largely

ambitious—weirder, compelling, and frayed

at the edges. And still, specially crafted

for both the airwaves and the dancefloor.

Album opener “One More Year” finds

Parker gripping a mic stand with both

hands while dealing in a heady Baleric

melody—Parker’s own decadent take on

Screademelcia-era Madchester—that, inch

by inch, superimposes a metallic, galactic

melody towards an unhurried revelation,

declaring a short-term strategy for longlasting

love.

“Breathe Deeper” is a bouncy support

anthem, drenched in the, now, nostalgic,

spirit of peak chillwave, before collapsing

into an industrial, IDM-adjacent breakdown;

“Tomorrow’s Dust” plants a deliberately

disordered rhythm over a propulsive Latin

guitar riff; “It Is True” grinds its hips into

both a slice of dancehall and an identifiable

homage to 80s funk that even Prince might

appreciate; and “Glimmer” wraps itself

around the irresistibly pulsating panache

of shiny 90s euro-house, complete with a

spoken word intro.

Throughout all of it, Parker sounds welltravelled

because he is. Yet, still capable

of remembering to drop his anchor on the

shores of the clearly defined vista he’s built

around himself. But, as always, the album

reaches a little further.

Responding to a world that often feels

consumed by micro and macro fires, too

insurmountable to easily locate a site of

relief, there’s a new urgency to Parker’s

lyricism. It’s almost as if he’s working

double time, and against mounting

external forces, to validate the fact that

the seemingly mundane parts of life—bitesized

aspirations that often feel not only

unreachable, but unimportant; like trying

to atone with your parents (“Posthumous

Forgiveness”), or really and truly believing in

yourself (“Breathe Deeper”)—are worthy of

the time necessary to figure out.

It’s possible to imagine that when these

songs are heard under spindly, neon strobe

lights, or under a sea of confetti cannons

rivalling Beyoncé, that they might exist as

an affirmation that investigating the root of

the small stuff is mutually exclusive with all

the big stuff; that you can concurrently try

to save the world, while figuring out how to

save yourself in the process.

Speaking slowly and thinking carefully, he

pinpoints the foundation of this ethos with

a clear-headed self-description: “I’d like to

think that I’m one of the most empathetic

people I know. But I’m pretty sure that

there are people I know that think I have no

empathy. Which is kind of weird.”

He continues, acutely observant of his

own limitations. “I think to some people I can

come across quite cold because I've always

been quite a withdrawn person. Music is the

thing that I channel my emotions into the

world with, because I've never really been

good at doing it personally.”

“I enjoy the idea of seeing things from

other people's perspective because there’s

no more valuable trait than to see that the

way that you see things isn’t objective.”

Perhaps purposefully, the lines of his

protagonists are almost always undefined,

capable of taking on a character profile

selected solely by the listener. It’s possible

that this is the root of his empathy: In the

face of unrestricted and unusual levels of

success, removing yourself from the center

of your own party feels like an enduringly

selfless act.

“I want the best for Tame Impala.

It's bigger than me now. I just...feel

a sense of responsibility; not to

make it as big as it can be, but

to make it as whole as I can.

That's kind of my job.”

STAR

22 BEATROUTE FEBRUARY 2020


Loving

“..a mix of pop, folk and

lo-fi with a hint of nostalgia

that Paul McCartney

in his heyday wouldn’t

have refused.”

“Mellow, folky indie rock

with a twist of psychedelica.”

“They strive when it comes

to making beautiful,

indie rock lullabies.”

“Reminiscent of a

slightly darker Whitney.

Nostalgic and lovely”

C 2020 L AST GANG RECORDS INC.

If I am only

my thoughts

THE DEBUT ALBUM FROM VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA GROUP LOVING

AVAIL ABLE NOW ON ALL STREAMING SERVICES, AND IN RECORD SHOPS.

EXCLUSIVELY FROM L AST GANG RECORDS, WORLD WIDE.


“One of our generation’s definitive

jazz masters, a vocal stylist of

extraordinary skill and vivacity”

–The Huffington Post

SUN MAR 8 2020 / 7PM

Dianne

Reeves

Beleza Brazil

chancentre.com

24 BEATROUTE FEBRUARY 2020


Reviews

ALBUM

GRIMES

Miss Anthropocene

Grimes Creative Corporation under

exclusive license to Crystal Math Music

Climate change may just kill us all, so

Claire Elise Boucher, famously known

as Grimes, wanted to make an album

dedicated to a fictional goddess who

personifies the disaster. Thus, Miss

Anthropocene was born.

After many delays, false starts and

lack of information, Grimes’ first album

in almost five years is finally here.

Overall, it was well worth the wait.

Melding the poppy and accessible

sounds of 2015’s Art Angels alongside

the more experimental tunes of

Visions, Miss Anthropocene tackles

a more villainous mindset, with songs

about Boucher’s dissatisfaction and

weariness with humanity.

Some of the high points of the

album involve sides to the artist we’ve

never seen before. “Delete Forever”

is a beautiful elven ballad about loss

backed up by an acoustic guitar, an

instrument that seems alien in Grimes’

world. On “My Name Is Dark,” Grimes

goes full rock god, vengeful and cynical

in the best way possible.

Miss Anthropocene is a chaotic

album, revelling in its messiness and

reminding us that Grimes is still here

making music unlike anybody else.

It’s best to just sit back and enjoy the

show.

Best Track: Delete Forever

Fraser Hamilton

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 25


MUSiC ALBUM REVIEWS

CHRISTIAN WEBER

CINDY LEE

What’s Tonight

to Eternity

W.25TH/Superior Viaduct

Cindy Lee’s journey to the

deepest depths of beauty

continues on What’s Tonight

to Eternity.

Eclipsed only by 2015’s

shattering Act of Tenderness,

What’s Tonight continues to

refine songwriter Patrick Flegel’s

explorations in harsh noise,

oldies pop, guitar witchery and

recording experimentation.

The album’s most breathtaking

moments can be found on

“I Want You to Suffer”. In seven

and a half minutes, the song

exquisitely encapsulates all that

Cindy Lee has shown us since

2012’s Tatlashea and solidifies

the fact that Flegel is one of

this generation’s most gifted,

smartest and exciting artists.

Best Track: I Want You To Suffer

John Divney

MAC MILLER

Circles

Warner

Quite a few recent posthumous releases

have been handled haphazardly,

often forgoing artistic integrity

in favour of name recognition.

Mac Miller’s final album Circles

is far from one of those releases.

Nearly finished by the time of his

passing and lovingly completed by

legendary producer Jon Brion, it’s

clear just how much Circles was

meant to be a companion piece

- “swimming in circles” being the

ultimate takeaway.

Circles mostly touches on the

same topics of isolation, heartbreak,

depression and unhealthy

coping mechanisms, but this time

with a much-needed injection of

hope that he could beat it and

come out thriving on the other side

– which only makes it all the more

heartbreaking.

Miller was one to push himself

further out of his musical comfort

zone with every release - he barely

raps on this project. Instead, his

jazzy, mumbling singing voice is

applied to soft and dreamy reverberating

tones that verge on 70s

psychedelic rock. He even covers

a 1972 hit from Arthur Lee, which,

chillingly, centers on accepting

one’s eventual death and living in

the moment.

Miller notes that he spends a lot

of time in his head on the lead single,

“Good News,” and most of this

plays out like Miller acknowledging

the critical inner monologues we

all have, wondering if we’re on the

right path. It’s a shame we never

got to see where he was going.

Best Track: Blue World

Ben Boddez

SARAH HARMER

Are You Gone

Arts & Crafts

If it took a decade for anger to

morph into the exquisite, love to

become a roar, and evocation

to magnify, then Sarah Harmer’s

new album, Are You Gone, has

been worth the wait.

Exploring climate change,

loss, and love through folksy

indie rock ballads, Harmer

wields her intricately dynamic

voice with restraint, such as

on “St. Peter’s Bay” and “The

Lookout,” while “New Low”

and “Take Me Out” punch up the

pace.

Harmer guides us with

grace and a gentle kick in the

gut. Are You Gone is a tender

warning that we aren’t—yet—and

reminds us that the pursuit of art

remedies nihilism.

Best Track: Wildlife

Dayna Mahannah

TENNIS

Swimmer

Mutually Detrimental

The husband-and-wife duo Tennis’

Swimmer is an ode to their pictureperfect

relationship and standing

strong together in the face of tragedy.

Full of starry-eyed declarations

of admiration for her husband,

frontwoman Alaina Moore sings of how

she’d be completely lost if not for his

support. She even jokes that they’re

so eternally intertwined that she’ll likely

end up haunting him as a ghost.

Tennis has always sounded directly

out of another time with their replication

of the glossy sheen of 70s pop, but they

play around with experimental rhythmic

switch-ups and modern percussion

quirks more than ever before.

The album’s title draws reference to

a feeling of uncomfortable suspension,

fighting to keep yourself upright. It’s a

good thing Moore has someone to hold

onto, keeping her afloat.

Best Track: Need Your Love

Ben Boddez

SOCCER MOMMY

color theory

Loma Vista Recordings

Coming off her successful debut,

Clean (2018), Soccer Mommy aka

Sophie Allison dives into deeper and

darker material with color theory,

playing with the concept of nostalgia

and how it warps our perception

of memories, all while assisted by a

throwback alt rock sound similar to

the likes of Liz Phair or Sheryl Crow.

The gorgeous track, “night swimming,”

features Allison’s wavering

vocals about a lost relationship,

weaving through distorted sounds

of a chattering crowd. Many of

color theory’s songs melt into a

somewhat sunny disposition, while

revealing a much darker undercurrent

within its lyrics that’s not

completely explained. It’s a deep

and engrossing album that pushes

the artist known as Soccer Mommy

into fascinating territory.

Best Track: night swimming

Fraser Hamilton

26 BEATROUTE FEBRUARY 2020


DRIVE-BY

TRUCKERS

The Unraveling

ATO Records

KHRUANGBIN &

LEON BRIDGES

Texas Sun EP

Dead Oceans

Perhaps no other rock band can

write so frankly and so accurately

about the American tragedy than

the Drive-by Truckers. After a

three-year absence where lead

songwriters Mike Cooley and

Patterson Hood suffered from

a severe case of writer’s block,

the DBT’s lock, stock and two

smoking barrels are back taking

aim at the good ol’ US of A and its

perilous journey.

Cooley and Patterson simply

do not mince words. In the

sludgy, funk-grunge driven

“Heroin Again” they pose

the question, “why?” and try

slapping some sense into a new

generation of users condemned

to their brain orgasms.

“21st Century USA” recounts

a drive though any beat-up

town filled with fast food joints

and crappy retail outlets where

salvation is finally found in a

“good-time bar to get your bad

swerve on.” But this isn’t a game

of pitching us against them,

it’s a cultural demise that has

everyone trapped in its dead-soul,

commercialized landslide.

Although sometimes the line is

clearly drawn and blame comes

tumbling through. “Thoughts

and Prayers” echoes politicians’

overused expression after another

senseless outburst of domestic

gun violence takes its lethal toll. In

protest with that empty do-nothing

rhetoric comes the chorus, “You

can stick it up your ass, with your

useless thoughts and prayers.”

The Unraveling is the Drive-by

Truckers’ rebel yell — angry, fierce

and all too real.

Best Track: Awaiting

Resurrection

Brad Simm

Khruangbin & Leon Bridges’

collaborative EP Texas Sun

marks the first time the exotic

funk band has written with

a vocalist. The collaboration

finds their colourful rhythm

section masterfully crowned

with Bridges’ bright and soulful

melodies that transport the

listener to the dry heat of the

title track. Tasty basslines and

perfectly pocketed drumming

provide Khruangbin’s classic

hypnotic effect, allowing

listeners to float in and out

for hours on end, catching a

different fruitful lick with

each listen.

A sense of déjà vu from this

collaboration is owed to a joint

North American tour where

their paths converged for the

first time. The EP is an ode to

the “big sky country” of Texas.

Although the artists ride in very

different stylistic lanes, their

origins embody a common

musical vanguard. Speer and

Johnson met at St. John’s United

Methodist Church in Houston –

more commonly referenced as

the house of worship Beyoncé

grew up singing in. Bridges, who

discovered his sound listening

to Texas blues, gospel and R&B,

was a natural detour from their

instrumental norm.

Although this creative side-trip

confirms depth from the trio,

Khruangbin fans still eagerly

await a third album, showcasing

unrestrained flamenco-style

strums, bass-lead melodies,

and dialled in drumming without

accommodations.

Best Track: Texas Sun

Reeghan Carroll

SELENA GOMEZ

Rare

Interscope

Going through trauma can’t be

easy when you’re one of the most

followed people on Instagram.

After some highly-publicized health

struggles – both physical and mental

– and a lengthy breakup with a

certain Canadian pop heartthrob,

Selena Gomez uses her new album

as an opportunity to move past

the pain with upbeat dance-pop

production from the industry’s

most reliable hitmakers and lyrics

centered around self-love.

With her trademark whispery, vulnerable

vocal delivery, she casually

drops references to her medication

in the context of fun pop songs.

There are more than a few less-thansubtle

shots at The Biebs.

Linking up with a kindred spirit in

Kid Cudi, who has had his own fair

share of mental health problems,

on the album’s closing track is

another very powerful moment.

Rare, at its core, is about finally

being able to go out and have fun

once again without everything

weighing on her. Gomez is back,

and “Look At Her Now.”

Best Track: Vulnerable

Ben Boddez

HALSEY

Manic

Capitol Records

The pop landscape can be disorientating,

but on Manic, Halsey’s

third studio album, she works effortlessly

to control that pressure

from within.

The title is a reflection of her

feelings about the loneliness

and euphoria fame brings, while

also accurately representing the

album’s overall sound, which, according

to a recent interview she

did with Rolling Stone, is “literally

just, like, whatever the fuck I felt

like making.”

Manic is far from cohesive, but

that’s likely the point. It still brings

whiplash when you go from a

bitter, country-tinged bop about a

toxic relationship (“You should be

sad”), to angsty pop-rock (the undeniably

fun “3am”), followed by

a smooth hip-hop track featuring

Korean rapper SUGA of boyband

BTS (“SUGA’s Interlude”).

Halsey deserves credit for her

ability to jump in and adapt to

multiple genres within the pop

spectrum. Pop music may be in

a state of disarray, but it’s nice to

Halsey is out there working hard

to evolve, adapt and bare it all.

Best Track: You should be sad

Fraser Hamilton

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 27


ON THE ROAD

WITH PHOTOGRAPHER ANNIE FORREST

By CORINNA BURFORD

Ever wanted to go on tour with a band and

see what really goes on behind the scenes?

Vancouver born-and-raised photographer

Annie Forrest jumped at the chance to get

on the bus with rising star Orville Peck this

year and through her latest project, Giddyup,

you can get an inside glimpse at life on the road.

Forrest has a keen eye – and ear – for rising

music talent, having captured images of artists

including Peck, along with avant-garde electronic

musician and performer Arca and the soulful

singer Zsela before they gained global recognition.

Now based in New York, Forrest’s work has also

appeared in publications including Vogue, Paper,

Subbacultcha, and Vice.

With a knack for highlighting the theatrical and the

absurd, her subjects span a diverse range of genres,

but have a certain spirit or aesthetic in common.

“I’m interested in exploring how we tell our own

stories and construct our own identities,” she says.

“I gravitate towards bold characters and storytellers

who have a strong point of view — whether it’s

a musician or a regular person who questions

standards of beauty, fashion, gender or sexuality.”

Forrest began her career in music and events,

working for companies including South By

Southwest in Austin and Reading Festival in the UK.

Always taking photos, she started creating intimate,

behind-the-scenes portraits of musicians that

crossed her path, including ASAP Rocky, Mish Way

of White Lung, and now Orville Peck.

Peck was the subject of Forrest’s most recent

project, a solo exhibition titled Giddyup, which

debuted at the prestigious Leslie-Lohman Museum’s

Project Space, a fixture of NYC’s LGBTQ+ art scene,

in the fall of 2019. The show gave a never before seen

view of Peck’s early 2019 tour and was accompanied

by an 80-page photo book of the same name.

“Orville is a fascinating subject,” she says. “He

has created a truly authentic character that people

connect with, all while wearing a mask and being

relatively anonymous – which is not an easy feat.”

In 2019, Forrest also began working closely with

Arca, the Venezuelan producer, electronic musician

and performance artist recently named “Artist of the

Decade” by Vice. Forrest has photographed her on

multiple occasions, including at the premiere of the

DAU institute in Paris, at her home in Barcelona and

at several live performances.

“Working with Arca is unlike anything else. Her

capacity for experimentation and improvisation

is genius level, spilling out and touching everyone

around her,” Forrest says. “I would love to continue

shooting her as she evolves, and who knows? maybe

it will be the material for another exhibition.”

This year Forrest plans to continue exploring

this intersection of music, style and identity during

a three-month residency in Mexico City. She is

showing new work next at Leap Year 2020, a group

show at 22 Ludlow Gallery in New York, and hopes to

bring Giddyup to a city near you.

STAR

1 Orville Peck’s mask, on the cover of Annie

Forrest’s book, Giddyup.

2 Zsela for BeatRoute Magazine

3 Duncan Hay Jennings (left) and Kris

Bowering, Giddyup Exhibition

4 A$AP Rocky, 2017 me Convention

5 Arca at DAU Institute 2019

6 A$AP Rocky, 2017 me Convention

7 Orville Peck, Giddyup Exhibition

8 Giddyup Exhibition

1

2

28 BEATROUTE FEBRUARY 2020


3

7

4

5 6

8

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 29


TRAVEL

MEXICO CITY

EXPLORE THE

SPRAWLING METROPOLIS

WHERE TRADITION AND

CUTTING EDGE CONVERGE

By KATHERINE MCFARLANE

Mexico City, the seventh largest city in the

world, is almost impossible to get to know

in one lifetime. A city deserving of multiple

visits, its rich cultural history permeates every

aspect of life; the cuisine, the architecture,

and the sounds; all distinctively Mexican, yet

welcoming to anyone open to discovery.

The city has evolved into a vibrant cultural travel

destination thanks in large part to its dedication to urbanism

and an abundance of thoughtful public spaces, an inventive

and modern culinary scene and a long tradition of influential

contemporary art that will satisfy travelers looking for

something beyond a typical resort vacation.

Music is an ever-present part of daily life in the city.

Traditional Mariachi music is ubiquitous in any tourist area and

you will hear modern Latin pop and rock on the radio, spilling

into the streets from every car, store and bus you pass.

The city is a major touring market for artists and has

become home to a number or large-scale music festivals

such as The Corona Capital and the newest addition of

Ceremonia Festival, last year, drawing top tier international

artists such as Rosalia, Kaytranada, and Massive Attack

alongside local talent. Toronto label Arts & Crafts, ahead of

the curve, even set up an outpost in the city in 2008.

DESTINATIONS

Frida Kahlo Museum

The Blue House

Calle Londres 247,

Colonia Del Carmen

The house where the world’s most

famous Mexican artist was born

and died is an essential experience

for any fan of contemporary

culture and anyone who ever

went to art school. Located in the

historic Coyoacán neighbourhood

and close to the amazing artisanal

Mercado de Coyoacan (Ignacio

Allende, between Malintzin and

Xicoténcatl), the museum is one

most popular places to visit in the

city. Book your tickets in advance

online, you’ll still have to wait, just

not as long!

Canals of Xochimilco

Calle del Mercado 133, San Jerónimo

Xochimilco, the Venice of Mexico,

is a truly unique experience. Rent a

boat by the hour, be serenaded by

live Mariachi bands and order freshmade

food and drinks from boats

floating right beside you. Equal parts

relaxing and floating party!

Parque Mexico

Av. Mexico, Cuauhtemoc,

Colonia Hipódromo

Speaking of thoughtful public

spaces, this park is one of the most

beautiful and relaxing refuges from

the hustle and bustle of the city.

Situated in La Condesa, a charming

and walkable neighborhood with

many Art Deco buildings. Take a loop

around lush Amsterdam Avenue and

imagine your potential new life as a

resident of Mexico City!

Casa Luis Barragan

Calle General Francisco Ramirez 14

It’s impossible not to be moved

by this masterpiece of modernist

architect and pioneer of emotional

architecture, Luis Barragan’s

house and studio. A UNESCO

World Heritage Site, it’s extremely

popular and limited spots are available

for the English tour, so book

online ahead of time.

Museo Jumex

Avenida Miguel de Cervantes

Saavedra 303, Miguel Hidalgo

One of the largest private collections

of contemporary art in Latin

America, Museo Jumex features

some of the heaviest hitters in the

contemporary art world. Housed

in a striking building designed by

British architect David Chipperfield,

it is a work of art itself.

30 BEATROUTE FEBRUARY 2020


EATS & DRINKS

Hotel Condesa

Avenida Veracruz 102,

Colonia Condesa, Hipódromo

Even if you don’t stay in this luxury boutique

hotel, head up to the rooftop bar for

a relaxing day-time drink (tequila!) and a

fantastic view of the tree-lined streets of

Condesa. Bonus: they have a fantastic

sushi menu!

Tortas Al Fuego

Avenida Sonora 205,

Colonia Condesa,

Hipódromo

Cheap, casual hole in the wall with delicious

tacos, tortas (Mexico's version of

the Italian sandwich) and open all day. A

local spot (so brush up on some Spanish

ordering skills) and definitely try the al

pastor tacos.

Rosetta

Calle Colima 166, Roma

One of the most beautiful restaurants in the

city, Rosetta is located within a renovated

colonial-era townhouse in the Roma neighborhood.

The menu is Italian with a Mexican

sensibility and it changes seasonally. For a

special occasion, or just to live your best life,

give yourself the gift of this magical dining

experience!

NIGHTLIFE

Patrick Miller

Merida 17, Colonia Roma

Hidden behind an unassuming warehouse

façade, every Friday night (the only night

it is open) the space becomes a wild disco

party, complete with dance-off style battles.

Drawing a diverse, mixed crowd, the

dancers who take up the spotlight do not

come to mess around.

El Plaza Condesa

Calle Juan Escutia 4,

Colonia Condesa,

Hipódromo

A 1600-capacity concert venue right in

the heart of Condesa, El Plaza plays host

to buzzy international acts that you likely

wouldn’t get to see in such an intimate

space anywhere else, as well as regional

artists about to hit it big.

Sunday Sunday

facebook.com/sundaysundaymx

Local party collective who throw dance

parties with a rotating lineup of DJs and

special guests, both local and international.

Location and guestlist are somewhat of a

secret, you have to RSVP to the Facebook

page with a message to get in, so don’t

forget to download Google translate!

SHOPPING

Tianguis Cultural del Chopo

Cuauhtemoc Buenavista 06350

Mexico has a well-documented love for

all rock subcultures, up to and including

The Smiths. These aesthetic choices

culminate here at the city’s goth-punkmetal-etc

themed flea market. Only open

on Saturdays, you’ll find some definitively

underground live music, vinyl and band

t-shirts galore.

Retroactivo Records

Jalapa 125, Colonia Roma

A comprehensive and well-priced selection

of used vinyl in every genre, located in Roma.

Be prepared to dig! If the thrill of the hunt

isn’t your thing and you’re already in the

neighborhood, head over to Roma Records

(Álvaro Obregón 200 Bis 1, Col. Roma) for

the latest releases and reissues. STAR

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 31


32 BEATROUTE FEBRUARY 2020


Screen Time

A CLOSER LOOK AT THE

2020 ACADEMY AWARDS’

BEST SONG NOMINEES

By BRENDAN LEE

S

omething magical happens

when a musician is asked to

write a song for a movie.

The jumping off point of the film acts

as a perfect catalyst for what ends in

lasting hits, sometimes even eclipsing

the film itself.

A song can only be nominated for the

‘Best Song’ category at the Oscars if

it was written specifically for the film.

Past winners, such as “Raindrops Keep

Falling on My Head” and “I Just Called

to Say I Love You” have been played so

much out of the context from the films

they were written for that it can be a

struggle to remember their exact origin

story. That’s what makes the category

so interesting, and why we’re taking a

closer look at this year’s nominees, the

next set of could-be timeless classics.

Into the Unknown (Frozen II)

Kristian Anderson-Lopez & Robert

Lopez, performed by Idina Menzel

The husband-wife duo, Kristian

Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez,

catapulted themselves to the

international stage with their first ‘Best

Song’ Oscar in 2013 for ‘Let it Go’

(Frozen) and followed that up with a

second win in 2017 for ‘Remember Me’

(Coco). There’s an argument to be made

that ‘Into the Unknown’ might be the

most impressive of all three. While maybe

not an instant hit with the kids like ‘Let it

Go’, the song has a maturity that begins

chilling and timid but grows to a point of

uncontainable energy, utilizing the vast

range of Idina Menzel’s powerful voice.

I Can’t Let You Throw Yourself Away

(Toy Story 4)

Randy Newman

It’s a bit of a tradition for Randy

Newman and the Toy Story team to get

nominated for the category, and with

this little diddy, the man himself goes

four-for-four. It’s a repetitive yet cheery

piano tune that manages to invoke a

glimmer of what the original film and

soundtrack captured all those years ago.

While nowhere near the level of “You’ve

Got a Friend in Me,” Newman proves his

ever-enduring superpower to at the very

least put a smile on your face.

Stand Up (Harriet)

Joshuah Brian Campbell & Cynthia Erivo,

performed by Cynthia Erivo

This song boasts the heaviest weight

of all five nominees, telling the story of

slavery in America in such a way that

truly shines through the music. Cynthia

Erivo officially arrives, playing the lead

role of Harriet Tubman and is staggering

in this five-minute-long gospel-inspired

ascent to the heavens. It’s less of a song

and more of a movement in the direction

of brighter and better times.

I’m Standing With You (Breakthrough)

Dianne Warren

If there’s one thing that Dianne

Warren knows how to do, it’s get

Academy Award nominations. Eleven

nods deep, Warren’s still searching for

that ever elusive win. “I’m Standing With

You” is performed by actress Chrissy

Metz, who also plays the lead in the

Christian-drama, Breakthrough, about a

boy who tragically plunges into an iced

over lake. It’s the weakest of this year’s

five entries but the simplistic ballad still

pulls a few heart strings here and there.

(I’m Gonna) Love Me Again

(Rocketman)

Elton John & Bernie Taupin, performed

by Elton John and Taron Egerton

When they inevitably perform this one

on the night of the show, Taron Egerton

and Elton John may very well bring down

the house. There’s few more decorated

musicians in the biz than Elton, and

combined with Egerton’s sensational

vocal performance they’ve gifted us

with a jam-packed feel good tune that’s

already won big at the Golden Globes.

Even if this one manages to miss out on

the ultimate prize, we’ll be hearing those

raspy piano-backed vocals on the radio

for years to come.

STAR

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 33


HEAR IT. FEEL IT.

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Get $15 Tickets

BUY TODAY! myVSO.ca/allaccesspass 604.876.3434

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THE SUNDAY TIMES

Organized by the National Portrait Gallery, London

in collaboration with the Vancouver Art Gallery

Major support provided by

Supporting sponsor

Additional sponsor

TICKETS AT VANARTGALLERY.BC.CA

[Left to right] Cindy Sherman, Untitled #588, 2016/2018 (detail), dye sublimation metal print; Untitled #415, 2004 (detail),

chromogenic print; Untitled #602, 2019 (detail), dye sublimation metal print; Untitled #574, 2016 (detail), dye sublimation metal

print. All images: Courtesy of the Artist and Metro Pictures, New York.

Cathy Zuo

Generously supported by

Artworkers Retirement Society

Additional support from

Sheahan and Gerald McGavin


YVR

JUST FOR LAUGHS

NORTHWEST:

RETURNS FOR 5TH ANNUAL

COMEDY FEST WITH

EMPHASIS ON LOCAL TALENT

By YASMINE SHEMESH

02.20

J

ust for Laughs has become an institution

in the comedy world since it was launched

in Montreal in 1983, now standing as

the largest international festival of its

kind. Its Vancouver transplant, the JFL

NorthWest Comedy Festival, continues to

carry the touch forward with its fifth annual

edition, featuring an impressive lineup that

includes world-renowned and up-andcoming

comedians performing stand-up,

sketch, and improv.

Among the festival’s biggest headliners

are Saturday Night Live alum Jay

Pharaoh, trailblazing Korean American

comedian Margaret Cho, and Maria

Bamford, best known for her hilarious

and candid approach to mental health.

Podcasters Todd Barry and Off Book:

The Improvised Musical Podcast will be

on-site, too, hosting their shows live.

One of the most exciting components

of JFLNW, though, is its strong emphasis

on homegrown talent. Their Best of the

West series presents a fantastic crosssection

of B.C.-based performers, like

Little Mountain Improv, Graham Clark’s

Quiz Show, and Hip.Bang!. There will

also be a special short film showcase,

Comedy Short Shorts, that celebrates

the work of Pacific Northwest

moviemakers. A panel of industry

judges will vote for their favourite film,

with the first-place winner taking

home $1,000 and going on to vie

for a coveted slot at the Montreal

festival in July.

February 13-25

@ Various Locations

jflnorthwest.com

VANCOUVER’S ESSENTIAL FEBRUARY HAPPENINGS

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 35


02.20YVRAGENDA

DAVID

SEDARIS

February 12

Vogue Theatre

Tix: eventbrite.ca

Musings on an unconventional

upbringing gained David Sedaris

a cult following in the ‘90s, but his

acerbic wit and spot-on observations

of human nature are what have made

his relevance span three decades.

Sedaris will be in Vancouver this month

performing live readings of new stories.

His latest collection, Calypso, was

released in 2018.

JENNIFER ROESSLER

KDOCS FILM

FESTIVAL

February 20-23

Vancity Theatre

Tix: viff.org

With 13 award-winning documentary

films, as well as keynote speakers,

panel discussions, and exhibitors, this

social justice film festival shines a light

on many of the critical issues affecting

our world today. Some of the program’s

highlights are Beyond Climate, which

examines how climate change has

affected B.C. and features a Q&A

with David Suzuki after the screening,

and Toxic Beauty, an investigative

exploration on how the chemical

contents of popular beauty products

can lead to serious health problems.

36 BEATROUTE FEBRUARY 2020


VANESSA FORTIN

TABOO…THE NAUGHTY

BUT NICE SEX SHOW

February 7-9

Vancouver Convention Centre East

Tix: tabooshow.com

Whether you want to expand your

bondage knowledge, learn new techniques

to please your partner, or buy

some toys to enhance your solo sex

life, nothing is off limits at this annual

adult trade show. Long renowned for

its inclusive and sex-positive environment,

Taboo offers a thoughtfully

curated lineup of live entertainment,

exhibitors, and educational seminars.

Don’t miss one of the many wide-ranging

talks by renowned author and

sexologist Dr. Jess.

FORGET ME NOT

February 4-March 1

Secret Location

Tix: thecultch.com

Puppet master Ronnie Burkett gives

the crowd an all-important role in

his mysterious new production:

the navigator. Onstage during the

whole show and each given one

of Burkett’s handmade puppets,

audience members quite literally

hold the story’s fate in their hands

in being responsible for moving the

narrative along as it develops. Set in

a time where the written language

has been phased out, Forget Me

Not is at once absurd, thrilling, and

whimsical.

DAHLIA KAT

By YASMINE SHEMESH

LOCAL

ARTIST

SPOTLIGHT

We Are The City

Largely inspired thematically by the unexpected passing of Kyle

Tubbs, the band’s childhood friend and early collaborator, We

Are The City’s newest effort RIP is an intimate rumination on

mortality in various capacities. With lines on the title track like

“Man, I’m afraid to die—were you?” floating over sharp swells

and a pounding beat, the prog rockers’ fifth full-length draws

their usual wild experimentals into a focused and nuanced place.

They are celebrating the album’s release on tour in Europe.

Trulla

They may only have been playing together for a few months,

but Trulla’s Selina Koop and Heather Ross have the chemistry

of bandmates who have jammed together for years. Omens,

the first EP from the duo, is out now and, well, wow. Think

infectious melodies anchored by soulful vocals and big,

fuzzed out riffs that, together, hit you right in the guts from the

onslaught of opening track “Mama.” We can’t wait to hear what

comes next from these two.

KRISTEN HUCULIAK

GHOST

February 12-15

Historic Theatre

Tix: thecultch.com

Fusing elements of contemporary

dance, hip-hop, and martial arts, Montreal’s

Tentacle Tribe use their bodies

as a means to interpret the life-giving

rhythm of breathing. Ghost has the

street dancers, known for their philosophical

approach to choreography,

rise, fall, and constantly shift in tandem

to the music.

LIL FEST

February 16

PNE Forum

Tix: ticketleader.ca

It may be small, but it sure is mighty.

This festival is both providing

much-needed access to all-ages

shows and presenting some of hiphop’s

most exciting emerging artists.

Alongside international favourites

like Shoreline Mafia and Lil Tracy,

the lineup features local powerhouses

such as Prado—already a star in

her own right here in the city.

lié

You Want It Real, lié’s newest effort, is out this month on

February 28. Produced by Jesse Gander, the eight-track

full-length aims to blur out the punk band’s usual direct lyrical

approach in favour of metaphor and place a larger emphasis

on imagery. Songs like “Digging in the Desert,” achieve that

balance well, with growling guitar and feverish drum patterns

that claw through hazy tones.

FEBRUARY 2020 BEATROUTE 37


02.20YVRMUSIC

The Cheat Sheet BR PICKS THE 5 ESSENTIAL LIVE MUSIC SHOWS

1 BEWHY

Tues, Feb 4 at The Vogue Theatre

Intense, thunderous hip-hop

from Korea’s burgeoning rapper

converges dramatic beats, pomp,

and Christian influence with searing

skill.

2

SUDAN ARCHIVES

Thurs, Feb 20 at Fortune Sound Club

An idiosyncratic hurricane of

electronic production, Sudaneseinspired

fiddle and stunning vocals.

Soul-shifting R&B musings of pure

gold.

3 ATMOSPHERE

Sun, Feb 23 at The Commodore

Slug and Ant continue to twirl

heartfelt lyrics and sweltering rhythm

into thoughtful hip hop that ruminates

on grief, Earth, and life.

4 RAPSODY

Tues, Feb 25 at Fortune Sound Club

This gale force of rhyme and rhythm

commemorates inspiring black

women on her A Black Woman

Created This. tour, in the wake of her

third studio album, Eve.

5 THUNDERCAT

Fri, Feb 28 at The Vogue Theatre

The former Suicidal Tendencies

bassist and long-time musical collab

savant knows how to make a whole

room groove with a fusion of soul,

70s funk, and R&B.

1

THE BEACHES

Fri, Feb 7 at The Commodore

The Torontonian all-girl band are

not to be taken lightly—expect a

sexy, high-energy show and headbanging

glam-rock vibes.

2

WOLF PARADE

Wed, Feb 12 at The Commodore

Their 2020 album, Thin Mind, was

named in reference to the state of

our brains in the tech age. Power

down, rock out, free your mind.

3

TOVE LO

Sun, Feb. 23 at The Vogue Theatre

The self-made indie pop star weaves

electronic, synthy sounds with

confessional lyrics, and the Swedish

musician’s love of grunge gives her a

raw edge.

4

ANDY SHAUF

Wed, Feb 26 at The Commodore

Soft surrealism surrounds the folksy

sounds of the Canadian indie-darling

and The Neon Skyline Tour will be no

different.

5

BLACK BELT

EAGLE SCOUT

Fri, Feb 28 at The Commodore

This musical auto-didact of

Swinomish/Iñupiaq roots has

a grungy, post-rock sway and

seductive vocals that command deep

listening.

1

GALACTIC PEGASUS

Sat, Feb 8 at Red Gate Arts Society

The belligerent thrashing of these

“djent” metalheads will leave your

bones cracking while their wild,

underworldly vocals express dissent

in no uncertain terms.

2

ROSS THE BOSS

Tues, Feb 11 at The Rickshaw

The legendary Manowar and The

Dictators founding member shreds

guitar and tramples the stage in all

the glory of Manowar’s classics.

3 SOULFLY

Wed, Feb 12 at The Rickshaw

An aggressive black spirituality

underlies Brazilian tribal influences

and melodic moments in their latest

album, Ritual, acclaimed as some of

their best groove thrash to date.

4

THE PALMS

Thurs, Feb 13 at Fortune Sound Club

A deviation from conventional metal

constructs, this post-metal group

brings forth an eclectic combo of

psychedelia, breezy alt-rock, and

shoegaze elements.

5

CHURCH OF MISERY

Fri, Feb 28 at Venue

Japan’s legendary doom metal

band hits notes of stoner rock and

screamo—an underground giant

who will make you pray you have

eardrums post-show.

1

THE BLACK HALOS

Fri, Feb 7 at The Rickshaw

The revival of Vancouver’s own punk

luminaries on home soil will inspire

fist-raising and body-thrashing

through a blend of nostalgic riffs and

fresh bangers.

2

BISHOPS GREEN

Sat, Feb 8 at The Rickshaw

They’ve been jamming since 2011

and still play with the same street grit,

blue-collar slant, and middle-fingersin-the-air

revolutionary spirit they

always have.

3

PUNK ROCK

VALENTINE’S

Fri, Feb 14 at CBDBs

NEEDS, Storc, Mess, Mi’ens, and

Pedlar come together to form a

V-Day brigade of punk to fall in love

with even if the commercialism of

romance has burst your bubble.

4

PUSSY RIOT

Wed, Feb 19 at Fortune Sound Club

The famous all-female Russian

protest punk group has been

arrested and charged with

“hooliganism” before. One cannot

afford to miss out.

5

AMERICAN NIGHTMARE

ANNIVERSARY TOUR

Sat, Feb 29 at The Imperial

Celebrating 20 years of rocking out,

the DIY icons unleash a doubledecade

rolodex of hardcore punk for

your earballs.

1 AUTOGRAF

Thurs, Feb 6 at Fortune Sound Club

Their glittery, tropical beats will

move you on the dance floor with a

plethora of futuristic verve and 80s

pop nostalgia.

2 EKALI

Sat, Feb 8 at The Commodore

With a new album under his belt, A

World Away, the Vancouver-bred DJ

continues to make waves with his

production of swirling, bright beats,

breathy vocals, and R&B influence.

3 MONSTERCAT

UNCAGED: ORIGINS

Sat. Feb 15 at The PNE Forum

Immerse yourself in an electric

night of EDM heavyweights: Seven

Lions, Joyryde, Kill The Noise,

Crankdat, Riot, Going Quantum, and

Monstercat.

4 LANE 8

Sat, Feb 22 at The Commodore

The deep house wunderkind dishes

emotionally sublime sentiment,

dreamy build ups, and epic beat

drops from his brand new album,

Brightest Lights.

5

JACQUES GREENE

Fri. Feb 28 at Beaumont Studios

The Canadian DJ’s latest LP, Dawn

Chorus, is a shoegazey electronica

experiment that roves intimately

between the dark and the light.

38 BEATROUTE FEBRUARY 2020



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