October Newsletter

greenwoodvillage

Greenwood Village

N EEW S LLE ET TTE ER

2020

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GOVERNMENT

THE MAYOR’S

message

PLANNING FOR 2021 BUDGET

The City Council conducted our annual budget retreat

on September 18. Based on current information,

without knowing the pandemic's exact

course, the City Council and staff are

working together to develop a balanced

2021 budget. It is our goal that resident

and business services such as police

protection, street maintenance, road

construction, snow and ice control, trash,

recycling, large item pick up, and the

recreation reimbursement program remain

the same. However, City Council may

need to implement some cuts that could

impact other services or programs.

George Lantz

The City Council is scheduled to consider

glantz@

greenwoodvillage.com adopting the 2021 Budget including an

303-486-5741 Operating Budget and Capital Improvement

Program (CIP) on Monday, November 2,

2020. The budget’s second reading is scheduled for Monday,

December 7, 2020. A summary of the 2021 Budget will be

featured in the January 2021 edition of this Newsletter.

PICKLEBALL COURTS

OPENING IN OCTOBER

In the 2018 Citizen Survey, we heard from a number of

residents about their desire to have pickleball courts in

Greenwood Village. The City Council listened and approved

the construction of two pickleball courts in Westlands Park.

Staff is preparing for the courts grand opening on October

23. Due to popularity of this sport, there will be an Open

Play Courtesy Rule — If courts are full and there are players

waiting, players are asked to limit play to one 11-point game

and then rotate off the court. No reservations will be taken at

this time and no lessons will be allowed. We hope you enjoy

this new and exciting amenity.

COMMUNITY SHREDDING

EVENT A HUGE SUCCESS

The second

annual

Community

Shredding

event was held

September 19.

The event was

so popular,

the shredding

truck could

not accept any

additional

documents necessitating the event end 20 minutes early.

This year 217 vehicles participated in the event. There were

20 cars before 9 a.m., 74 cars by 9:30 a.m. with 109 total

cars within the first hour. These numbers are an increase over

last year, when we had 271 vehicles in two days. I would like

to thank District 4 Councilmember Tom Dougherty and the

City Clerk’s staff who assisted participants with their

documents.

2020 GENERAL ELECTION

The 2020 General Election is fast approaching. If you signed

up to receive a mail ballot, you should be receiving your mail

PG. 2 GV NEWSLETTER | OCTOBER 2020


GOVERNMENT

CITY council

NOT SURE WHO YOUR

ELECTED OFFICIALS ARE?

Obtain a list of your state and national government

representatives at www.arapahoevotes.com

DISTRICT 1 DISTRICT 2 DISTRICT 3 DISTRICT 4

Dave Bullock

dbullock@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4137

Anne Ingebretsen

aingebretsen@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4135

Libby Barnacle

ebarnacle@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4129

Tom Dougherty

tdougherty@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4132

Jerry Presley

jpresley@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4138

Dave Kerber

dkerber@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4136

Donna Johnston

djohnston@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4128

Judith Hilton

jhilton@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4131

ballot starting October 9. If you have

any questions about your voter

registration, where to register, etc.,

please refer to pages 6-7 of this

Newsletter. We have complied some

information that we believe you will

find useful. I encourage everyone to

vote.

— George

OCTOBER 2020 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 3


GOVERNMENT

GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY

COMMISSION APPOINTMENTS

The following resident was appointed by the Greenwood Village City Council to

serve on the various Village boards and commissions:

Erin Ficken, District 2

Parks, Trails and Recreation Commission

Erin and her family have resided in the

Greenwood Hills neighborhood for seven years

and have happily enjoyed raising their three

children in the Village. Before becoming a fulltime

mom, Erin practiced as a Registered Nurse

at Children’s Hospital of Colorado and Swedish

Hospital. She then continued to take her passion

for patient advocation to the education system

and was very active in volunteerism at her

For more information on how to serve on a

Village board or commission, please call the City

Clerk’s Office at 303-486-5752 or email Susan

Ortiz, City Clerk, at sortiz@greenwoodvillage.com.

children’s local school, Greenwood Elementary.

This is Erin’s first experience serving on a

municipal commission and she is honored to

provide a voice to the citizens of District 2, as

well as others in the Village. The parks and trails

were an integral part of bringing her family to

Greenwood Village and have remained a daily

source of enjoyment for the Ficken crew. Erin is

looking forward to preserving the amazing

resources the Village has been blessed with.

IMPORTANT NUMBERS

DEPARTMENTS

Mayor and City Council 303-486-5745

City Manager’s Office 303-486-5745

Community Outreach/ 303-486-5749

Public Information

City Prosecutor 303-486-1598

Economic Development 303-486-5764

Administrative Services

Liquor Licenses 303-486-5755

Voter Registration 303-486-5752

Municipal Court 303-773-6033

Human Resources 303-486-1579

Employment 303-486-1579

Community Development

Building Permits/ 303-486-5783

Planning and Zoning/

Zoning and Nuisance

Complaints

Finance

Accounts Payable 303-486-1597

Accounts Receivable 303-486-8282

Budget Information 303-486-8290

Tax Assistance 303-486-8299

and Information

Park Planning 303-486-5743

and Development

Park Permits 303-486-5773

Recreation and 303-486-5773

Special Events

Reimbursement Program 303-486-5773

Parks and 303-486-5773

Trail Maintenance

Police Department

Emergency 9-1-1

Animal Control 303-773-2525

Parking 303-773-2525

Police Records 303-773-2525

School Resource Officers 303-773-2525

Traffic Information 303-773-2525

Victim Assistance 303-486-8211

Public Works

Environment 303-708-6100

(Drainage/Water Quality)

Roadways 303-708-6100

Traffic 303-708-6100

Residential Trash 303-708-6100

and Hazardous Waste

Greenwood Village City Hall

6060 South Quebec Street

Greenwood Village, CO 80111

Phone: 303-773-0252

Fax: 303-290-0631

After Hours Phone: 303-773-2525

(for questions or service requests

outside normal business hours)

E-mail: thevillage@greenwoodvillage.com

Website: www.greenwoodvillage.com

An after-hours drop box is available by

the flagpole in front of City Hall and is

checked Monday through Friday.

The drop box can be used to deliver

customer comment cards, recreation

reimbursement forms, employment

applications, and municipal court fines

and documents.

GV Website

Parks, Trails & Recreation

Art Activities 303-797-1779

and Programs

Conservation/Open 303-708-6142

Space Easements

PG. 4 GV NEWSLETTER | OCTOBER 2020


VILLAGE CALENDAR

Visit WWW.GREENWOODVILLAGE.COM

for information on all public meetings

being conducted in person and

remotely due to COVID-19.

november 2020

SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY

1 2

3

4 5

6 7

City Council

Study Session

6 p.m.

Meeting

7 p.m.

City Hall

Election

Day

★ SINGLE FAMILY HOUSEHOLD RECYCLING ★

8 9 10

11

Parks, Trails

and Recreation

Commission

7 p.m.

Maintenance

Facility

Veterans

Day

Village Facilities

Closed

12 13 14

15 16

17

18

19

20 21

City Council

Study Session

6 p.m.

City Hall

Planning &

Zoning

Commission

7 p.m.

City Hall

Arts and

Humanities

Council

Meeting

6 p.m.

Curtis Center

★ SINGLE FAMILY HOUSEHOLD RECYCLING ★

22 23 24 25 26

27

Thanksgiving

Day

Thanksgiving

Holiday

28

Village Facilities

Closed

Village Facilities

Closed

29

30 1 2

NO TRASH SERVICE

3

4 5

There will be NO trash service on

Thursday, November 26 —

In observance of Thanksgiving,

normal Thursday service will be on

Friday, November 27 of that week.

OCTOBER 2020 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 5


GOVERNMENT

MAKING A difference

NOVEMBER 3

2020 ELECTION INFORMATION

AND HELPFUL TIPS

VOTING BY MAIL

All currently active registered voters in Greenwood Village

will receive a ballot by USPS mail beginning October 9.

There are no Greenwood Village candidates or questions on

this ballot.

RETURNING BALLOTS

Please follow the instructions regarding how to complete

your ballot and prepare it for return.

• Drop off Locations: Voters may drop off a voted ballot at

any of 32 secure Ballot Drop Boxes 24 hours a day, seven

days a week throughout the County. Convenient locations

can be found at arapahoevotes.com/ballot-drop-locations.

The City of Greenwood Village has made available a

drive- up 24-hour ballot box. The Ballot box is monitored

by video security surveillance recording system; and is

located at Greenwood Village City Hall near the east end

of the main parking lot located at 6060 S. Quebec St.,

Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111.

• Mailing Ballots: Voters may affix 55 cent postage (one

Forever stamp) and place the ballot in the mail.

• Voter Service and Polling Centers (VSPCs): Voters may

also drop off a ballot with no waiting at any VSPC during

hours of operation.

TRACK YOUR BALLOT

Voters can use Ballot Track to check their ballot’s status

online and sign up to receive text, email or phone messages

when it’s been mailed to them and received by Arapahoe

County Elections: arapahoevotes.com/ballot-track.

REPLACEMENT BALLOTS

Voters who have not received a ballot by mail may request a

replacement by calling the Arapahoe County Elections

Division at 303-795-4511 and making a curbside ballot

pickup appointment or having the replacement mailed before

October 26. Between October 19 and November 3 voters

may also come to a VSPC and request a take-home ballot.

This process voids the original mailed ballot, ensuring no

elector may vote twice.

CURBSIDE BALLOT PICKUP

Five VSPCs in Aurora, Littleton, Byers and Centennial will

offer replacement ballots via appointments for Curbside

Ballot Pickup. Beginning October 19, voters may call

303-795-4511 to schedule a day, date and time to pick up

their replacement ballot in a designated parking space

without leaving their vehicle. The County is requesting voters

bring their ID and may only pick up their own ballot.

VOTER SERVICE AND POLLING CENTERS

(VSPCS)

Beginning October 19, Residents can register or update voter

registration, vote in person, get a replacement ballot, drop off

a ballot, or use accessible voting equipment at any of the

County’s 29 VSPCs. Find your nearest location at:

arapahoevotes.com/voter-service-polling-centers. Please check

Arapahoe County’s website for hours and locations for

VSPCs. VSPCs will open in two phases. VSPCs will also

continued on page 7

PG. 6 GV NEWSLETTER | OCTOBER 2020


GOVERNMENT

IMPORTANT DATES

October 9: Ballots mailed to all registered

voters

October 9: 24-hour Ballot Drop Boxes open

October 19: Phase 1 VSPCs & Curbside

Ballot Pickup open

October 26: Last day to register or update

registration info and have ballot mailed to

your home

October 30: Phase 2 VSPCs open

October 31: In person voting and ballot

drop off available at ALL VSPCs from

8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

• November 3: Election Day! All ballots must

be received no later than 7 p.m. In person

voters must be in line to vote by 7 p.m.

continued from page 6

have hours on Saturday, October 31 from 8

a.m.–5 p.m. VSPCs will be open on Election

day from 7 a.m.–7 p.m. Language

interpretation services are also available. There

are two locations in Greenwood Village that

are serving as VSPC for this election

beginning October 30.

• City Hall, 6060 South Quebec Street

• Hope United Methodist Church, 5101

South Dayton Street

HEALTHY VOTING GUIDELINES

Arapahoe County is encouraging voters to

vote using their mail ballot and return it to a

Ballot Drop Box, at a VSPC or by mail.

However, VSPCs follow several Health

Department protocols to ensure voters can

safely cast a ballot including sanitizing voting

equipment between uses, social distancing,

and making hand sanitizer and facial coverings

readily available. GV OCTOBER 2020 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 7


GOVERNMENT

PG. 8 GV NEWSLETTER | OCTOBER 2020


GOVERNMENT

BICYCLE SAFETY

AVOID A COSTLY MISTAKE

Before you take to the road

with your bicycle, it’s

imperative to know and

practice all the fundamentals

of riding a bicycle. Did you

know bicyclists are subject

to the same rules, laws and

regulations as motor

vehicles? Ignoring rules of

the road that regulate

passing, riding abreast, use of hand signals, stop signs, and

other etiquette will determine your fate on the roadway. If all

else fails, always adhere to the lug nut rule: he who has the

most lug nuts wins. In other words, a car will always win

over a bicycle. So ride carefully and cautiously to avoid a

costly mistake and a crash course in bicycling.

• Always ride on the RIGHT. Remember to “go with the

traffic flow.” Never ride against traffic. Cars will not be

expecting to find a biker when they round a corner or go

over a hill.

• Ride single file. When passing other bikers or pedestrians,

let them know your position by shouting something like,

“On your left!”

• When riding two abreast, do not impede the movement

of traffic. If you are on a road with lanes, you must ride

within a single lane.

• Always check behind you when changing lanes.

• Watch out for dangerous things on the roadways or on

trails. Road litter, puddles of water, loose gravel, and

storm gates can cause you to lose control of your bicycle.

• Stop at all stop signs and traffic signals. Be extra careful at

crossroads. Walk your bicycle across busy intersections.

• Always signal before making a left or right turn. To make

a left turn, look behind you, hold your left arm straight

out and proceed carefully. For a right turn, hold your left

arm out and up in an ‘L’ shape.

• Keep control of your bike. Do not swerve or make sudden

turns. Drivers may not be able to react fast enough to

avoid colliding with you.

• Ride at least three feet away from parked cars. Someone

could open his or her door unexpectedly.

• Listen for cars approaching from the side or behind you.

• Do not follow cars too closely (you may be in their blind

spot).

• Know your road signs and obey them. A smart biker

follows the rules of the road.

• Always be prepared to stop. Keep your hands on or close

to the brakes.

• Do not forget to wear your helmet! And do not wear

headphones; you will not be able to hear what is going on

around you.

For more information on driver, pedestrian, bicyclist, and

motorcycle safety, please call the Greenwood Village Police

Department at 303-773-2525. GV

PEDESTRIANS: RULES OF THE

ROAD TO PROTECT YOUR LIFE

According to the U. S. Department of Transportation,

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, in 2018,

6,283 people were killed in pedestrian/motor vehicle crashes,

which was a 3.4% increase from the 6,075 pedestrian

fatalities in 2017. Pedestrian deaths accounted for 17% of all

traffic fatalities in 2018. This equates to a traffic-related

pedestrian death every 84 minutes.

Traffic and Pedestrian Signals: Pedestrians must yield the

right-of-way to drivers by obeying traffic signals, observing

pedestrian signals and using crosswalks. The pedestrian

signals are:

WALK (Constantly Lighted):

Pedestrians facing the signal may cross

the roadway in the direction of the

signal.

DON’T WALK (Flashing): Pedestrians

may not start to cross the roadway. Any

pedestrian who has partly completed his

cross may continue.

DON’T WALK (Constantly Lighted):

Pedestrians may not enter the roadway.

Crossing a Roadway: Always cross the street at a designated

crosswalk. Pedestrians must give the right-of-way to drivers.

Within a

Crosswalk:

If a

pedestrian

is in the

crosswalk, a

vehicle has

to yield.

However, if

a vehicle is

20 feet

away from

the

crosswalk and traveling at 30 mph, the pedestrian must yield

as the vehicle does not have enough time to stop safely.

Intersections: Be careful at intersections, where drivers may

fail to yield the right-of-way to pedestrians while turning

onto another street.

Joggers and Walkers: Joggers and walkers should use

jogging paths when provided. On public roads, joggers

should try to select wide roads with good shoulders. They

should face oncoming traffic and remember to look and

listen for cars. At night or anytime visibility is poor, joggers

and walkers should be in well-lighted areas and wear

reflective clothing.

For more information, please call the Police Department at

303-773-2525. GV

OCTOBER 2020 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 9


GOVERNMENT

ENHANCING OUR

community

2020 PAVEMENT

MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

IMPROVES ROADWAYS

In 2020 the Village’s Annual Pavement Management

Program extended the life of approximately 30 of the

Village’s total 224 roadway network lane miles (see map).

The maintenance strategies consisted of preservation

treatments including rejuvenator seal and chip seal as well as

rehabilitation treatments like asphalt mill and overlays. Work

began in early summer and was completed in the early fall.

To achieve the outcomes of the Pavement Management

Program a variety of maintenance strategies are applied to

sustain a high-quality pavement network throughout the

Village that results in safe, smooth, and visually appealing

roadways. The specific strategy selected for each street is

determined based on several factors including: traffic

volumes; the remaining structural life of the pavement; and

types and severity of the distresses present. The goal is to

apply the right treatment, to the right road at the right time.

Preservation treatments are cost effective surface treatments

that are placed on a roadway surface early in its life cycle.

The goal of a preservation treatment is to protect the asphalt

surface from oxidation caused by air, sun and water.

Oxidation leads to the pavement becoming less flexible,

which in turn leads to cracking and degradation of the

asphalt surface. By applying a preservation treatment early,

the life of a roadway is extended, and future rehabilitation

costs are minimized. Preservation treatments were applied to

17 lane miles of roadway in 2020.

A preservation treatment known as a chip seal was applied in

the Green Oaks subdivision. Chip seals are performed on

streets that are still in relatively good condition to provide a

long lasting, asphalt rich seal that results in a new wearing

surface. Ahead of the chip seal application, crack sealing and

minor patching is performed to repair and seal these localized

areas.

PG. 10 GV NEWSLETTER | OCTOBER 2020


GOVERNMENT

Rejuvenator Seal in Greenwood Hills Subdivision Chip Seal in Green Oaks Subdivision

Mill and Overlay on Yosemite Street

Another effective preservation treatment that was performed

in 2020 is a rejuvenator seal. This application serves to renew

the asphalt binder on the surface of the pavement, thus

deterring oxidation and cracking. This treatment is typically

applied 3 or 4 years after a pavement has been overlaid with

new asphalt. For streets that continue to show very low

amounts of cracking, a second application of rejuvenator seal

may be applied 6 to 8 years after the hot mix overlay. This

year, rejuvenator seals were applied in five residential

neighborhoods.

Pavement rehabilitation is a more robust maintenance

strategy performed later in the life cycle of a roadway to

provide additional structural support to the pavement.

Rehabilitation was performed on 13 lane miles of roadway in

2020. This year, rehabilitation included major asphalt

patching of structural deficiencies, followed by removal and

replacement of the top few inches of the roadway surface.

This treatment is commonly referred to as a mill and overlay.

Rehabilitation was completed in two residential

neighborhoods and on Fiddlers Green Circle and Yosemite

Street.

For further information about of the Pavement

Management Program, please contact John Wannigman,

Project Manager, at 303-708-6139 or

jwannigman@greenwoodvillage.com. GV

PUBLIC INFORMATION MEETING

HUNTINGTON CALEY OPEN SPACE MASTER PLAN IMPROVEMENTS

You are invited to a public information meeting to review the current

design for proposed improvements for the final phase of the

Huntington Caley Master Plan. The meeting will be held on

Wednesday, October 21, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Silo Park

(9300 E. Orchard Road).

The Huntington Caley Master Plan was adopted by the City Council in

2014. Previously completed master plan improvements include the

pedestrian undercrossing of Caley Avenue, extension of the regional

trail, braided gardens, Caley Pond improvements, stream and

wetland restoration, and park landscape enhancement. The current

project being presented will include a small parking area off Caley

Avenue, sculpted and landscaped berms around the open space

perimeter, an informal lawn, and a natural play area.

If you are unable to attend this public meeting and would like

information on the current design, please visit Village Voices at

greenwoodvillagevoices.com, our new online community

engagement tool, starting October 14th where you can view the

design and provide feedback directly to Village staff. For more

information, please call Josh Morin, Parks Project Manager, at

303-708-6113 or email jmorin@greenwoodvillage.com.

OCTOBER 2020 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 11


GOVERNMENT

COVID-19 UPDATE

we’re all in this together!

WEAR YOUR MASK PLEASE!

IT’S THE LAW AND THE RIGHT THING TO DO

At the time of the publication of this Newsletter, the State

Mask Mandate is in effect that requires people in Colorado

to wear a mask. Anyone, over the age of 10 years old, must

wear a mask when entering or moving within any public

indoor space. The state-wide mask mandate also requires

people to wear a mask outdoors while using or waiting to

use public transportation services such as bus, light rail,

ride shares or taxis.

To keep up-to-date on the State’s Mask Mandate, please

visit covid19.colorado.gov.

CDPHE RELEASES

COLORADO’S DIAL FRAMEWORK

FOR PROTECT OUR NEIGHBORS,

SAFER AT HOME, AND STAY AT HOME

In September, in an effort to manage the pandemic in

Colorado, the Colorado Department of Public Health and

Environment (CDPHE) released a new dial graphic to help

local governments and communities have a simple tool to

make life amidst the pandemic more sustainable until we

have a major breakthrough in testing, treatments, or a

vaccine.

This dial includes five levels, from least to most restrictive,

and counties move between levels based on three metrics:

1. Protect Our Neighbors: Local public health agencies are

able to contain surges in cases and outbreaks through

testing, case investigation, contact tracing, isolation,

quarantine, site-specific closures, and enforcement of

public health orders.

2. Safer at Home 1: Cautious – This is less restrictive than

Safer at Home Level 2, for counties with low virus

Current Arapahoe County level at the time of publication.

transmission but that have not yet achieved Protect Our

Neighbors.

3. Safer at Home 2: Concern – The baseline. While we are

all still safer at home, we are also able to practice greater

social distancing in our great outdoors than in confined

indoor spaces.

4. Safer at Home 3: High Risk – This is more restrictive

than Safer at Home Level 2, for counties experiencing

increases in the metrics. Action is needed, but Stay at

Home may not be warranted.

5. Stay at Home: Everyone is required to stay at home

except for grocery shopping, exercise and necessary

activities. Only critical businesses are open.

Metrics that Counties move between levels based on these

metrics:

Number of new cases. The case count provides information

on how prevalent the virus is circulating in communities.

Percent positivity of COVID tests. The percent positivity is

a clear indication if enough testing is being done.

Impact on hospitalizations. Hospitalization data provides

information about health care capacity.

To move to a less restrictive level (e.g., Level 2 to Level 1),

counties need to meet and sustain all three metrics for two

weeks. Counties must engage in a consultation process with

CDPHE, which may entail moving to a more restrictive

level, when they are out of compliance with any of the

metrics for more than two weeks.

The dial replaces most variances. CDPHE will continue to

consider applications for site-specific variances for unique

facilities, stadiums, or other extra-large venues or events.

Variance requests must conform to CDPHE requirements

and be submitted by the local public health agency.

For more information, please visit:

covid19.colorado.gov/data/covid-19-dial.

PG. 12 GV NEWSLETTER | OCTOBER 2020


GOVERNMENT

SCHOOL CLOSURES, QUARANTINE AND

ISOLATION, AND OTHER SCHOOL ISSUES

As many students

have gone back to

in-person school

learning, many

parents have

questions about

who makes

decisions around

quarantine and

isolation, school

closures, and

other COVID-19

related issues. To

help clarify roles and responsibilities, the process is as follows:

The Colorado Department of Public Health and

Environment in partnership with the Colorado Department

of Education came up with guidelines for schools. Tri-

County Health Department then works with school districts

to come up with the best recommendations for the school

and specific situations. Schools and school districts process

public health recommendations and are responsible for

implementation as appropriate for each scenario.

A. We strongly recommend that everyone in a classroom or

cohort stay home and quarantine when a person in that

class/cohort is diagnosed with COVID-19. This is because

illness could continue to circulate within that class/cohort if

the students continue to have contact with each other if

another cohort member gets infected (with or without

symptoms). Keeping people home prevents further exposure

and makes it less likely these individuals will develop

COVID-19.

For more information, please visit: covid19.colorado.gov/

cases-and-outbreaks-child-care-schools. GV

All of these

decisions, at the

state and local level

are made by

experts in health

and education with

the most recent

evidence-based

guidance about

how to manage

COVID-19.

Here are some of the top questions and answers:

Q. Why can’t a negative PCR test be used to release a student or

student athlete from quarantine?

A. A negative test cannot be used to release an individual

from quarantine early because the 14-day quarantine period

is based on the incubation period of COVID-19 (meaning

the time it could for infection to occur after an exposure).

Even if someone has a negative test on one particular day, the

test could be positive anytime thereafter or symptoms could

start up through 14 days of quarantine. Please see additional

guidance from the CDC Quarantine Guidance.

Q. What is a confirmed outbreak at a school?

A. Two or more people from separate households with

confirmed COVID-19 that occurs within 14 days in a single

classroom or cohort (and there are no other common

exposures).

Q. If a classmate in my child’s cohort tests positive for COVID-

19, why does my child have to quarantine for 14 days.

OCTOBER 2020 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 13


GOVERNMENT

HALLOWEEN AND COVID

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention

advises against traditional trick-or-treating this year due to

the coronavirus as these activities can be high-risk for

increasing the spread. However, there are several safer,

alternative ways to participate in Halloween. Just be mindful

the greater the distance, the lower the risk of spreading a

respiratory virus. People that have been exposed to the virus

or tested positive should not participate in any Halloween

activities.

LOWER RISK ACTIVITIES

• Carving or decorating pumpkins with members of your

household and displaying them.

• Carving or decorating pumpkins outside, at a safe

distance, with neighbors or friends.

• Decorating your house, apartment, or living space.

• Doing a Halloween scavenger hunt where children are

given lists of Halloween-themed things to look for while

they walk outdoors from house to house admiring

Halloween decorations at a distance.

• Having a virtual Halloween costume contest.

• Having a Halloween movie night with people you live

with.

• Having a scavenger hunt-style trick-or-treat search with

your household members in or around your home rather

than going house to house.

MODERATE RISK ACTIVITIES

• Participating in one-way trick-or-treating where

individually wrapped goodie bags are lined up for families

to grab and go while continuing to social distance (such as

at the end of a driveway or at the edge of a yard).

• If you are preparing goodie bags, wash your hands with

soap and water for at least 20 seconds before and after

preparing the bags.

• Having a small group, outdoor, open-air costume parade

where people are distanced more than 6 feet apart

• Attending a costume party held outdoors where protective

masks are used and people can remain more than 6 feet apart.

• Going to an open-air, one-way, walk-through haunted

forest where appropriate mask use is enforced, and people

can remain more than 6 feet apart.

• Visiting pumpkin patches or orchards where people use

hand sanitizer before touching pumpkins or picking

apples, wearing masks is encouraged or enforced, and

people are able to maintain social distancing.

• Having an outdoor Halloween movie night with local

family friends with people spaced at least 6 feet apart.

HIGHER RISK ACTIVITIES

• Participating in traditional trick-or-treating where treats

are handed to children who go door to door.

• Having trunk-or-treat where treats are handed out from

trunks of cars lined up in large parking lots.

• Attending crowded costume parties held indoors.

• Going to an indoor haunted house where people may be

crowded together and screaming.

• Going on hayrides or tractor rides with people who are

not in your household.

• Traveling to a rural fall festival that is not in your

community if you live in an area with community spread

of COVID-19. GV

MASKS AND COSTUMES

A costume mask is not a

substitute for a cloth mask. A

costume mask should not be

used unless it is made of two

or more layers of breathable

fabric that covers the mouth

and nose and doesn’t leave

gaps around the face.

Do not wear a costume mask

over a protective cloth mask because it can be dangerous if the

costume mask makes it hard to breathe. Instead, consider

using a Halloween-themed cloth mask.

Tri-County Health Department Halloween and

Trick or Treat Guidance Visit tchd.org

PG. 14 GV NEWSLETTER | OCTOBER 2020


GOVERNMENT

7 CREATIVE TIPS

TO CELEBRATE

HALLOWEEN

GO BIG ON DECORATING

This may well be the year to pull out the

stops decorating in and outside your home,

just for the fun of it. String up some lights.

NO GRAB BOWLS

Rethink the way you pass out candy. Maybe

individually bagging treats and leaving them

on a table on your driveway for children to

take as they walk by.

DANGLE TREATS

Hang candy from the fence for children to

grab as they pass or from a tree near your

front porch.

KEEP IT INDOORS

Fill a Halloween bag with candy, hide in your

house and then turn off the lights so your

children have to search for the goodies in the

dark. Variations on the theme could include a

scavenger hunt in the house or yard, or a set

of clues for older children to decipher.

EERIE, GLOWING ... EGGS

Break out those plastic eggs you use to hide

candy at Easter and decorate them with

scary faces or decals. Fill the eggs with

candy and hide them outside or around the

house. If you stuff them with glow sticks,

you can even turn out the lights or search

the yard at night for eerie, glowing eggs.

MOVIE SCARE-A-THON

Haunted houses are not recommended, but

you can screen Halloween-themed movies

indoors or out if you have a projector and a screen or some other blank

surface. The nice thing about home-based scary movies is you can adjust the

scare-o-meter to fit your family’s tastes (and terror tolerances).

BOO SOMEONE, SWEETLY

Think of “booing” someone as a kind of random act of kindness for

Halloween. Wrap up a (nice) Halloween treat, drop it at a neighbor or

friend’s door, ring the bell and run like crazy. The idea is to spread some

holiday cheer. GV

ARAPAHOE COUNTY

BUSINESS IMPACT

ASSISTANCE GRANT

ROUND 2 PROCESS

NOW OPEN

Arapahoe County is launching a $5 million

grant program targeted to businesses with a

gross annual revenue of 1 million dollars or

less within Arapahoe County to ease the

current economic burden resulting from the

COVID-19 pandemic.

To apply, visit arapahoegov.com.

OCTOBER 2020 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 15


BUSINESS

BUSINESSspotlight

SPICE TRADE BREWING

8775 East Orchard Road, Suite • Orchard Plaza • 720-710-9508 • SpiceTradeBrewing.com

Monday-Thursday 4 p.m.-9 p.m., Friday-Saturday 12 p.m.-10 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m.-9 p.m. • Sunday Brunch 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

During a time where it is hard to get away, why not take

your taste buds on a trip around the world by visiting Spice

Trade Brewery & Kitchen. Spice Trade Brewing opened in

2008 brewing out of the Yak & Yeti Indian restaurant in

Arvada, Colorado. In May 2020, they opened as a standalone

brewery and kitchen in Greenwood Village. Spice Trade

Brewing offers unique beer styles inspired by culinary

ingredients from around the world and a seasonally rotating

menu of globally inspired street food that can be enjoyed as

dine-in or take-out.

The four owners have come together from different places

and backgrounds to do what they are passionate about and

provide only the best for their customers. Head Brewer and

Owner Jeff Tyler made the change from mechanical

engineering to become an award-winning brewer. Chef and

Owner Jason Bray has an extensive history with the culinary

arts and continues to perfect his craft. Manager and Owner

Amy Crowfoot brings her experience from teaching, news

research and business management to the team. Owner Dol

Bhattarai owns and operates four Yak

& Yeti Indian restaurants throughout

Colorado along with other business

ventures.

Greenwood Village caught their eye

while looking for the perfect location

to open their flagship brewery and

kitchen. The Village has much to

offer both residents and visitors, but

the owners of Spice Trade Brewing

noticed that it was lacking the local

breweries found in many other

communities. Spice Trade Brewing

decided that Greenwood Village provided a great opportunity

and after talking with some residents realized their concept of

globally inspired beer and street food would be a welcome

addition to the neighborhood. Spice Trade Brewing brings

not just award-winning beer to the Village, but an awardwinning

chef as well.

continued on page 17

PG. 16 GV NEWSLETTER | OCTOBER 2020


BUSINESS

NEW GV BUSINESSES

FINANCIAL SERVICES

CPRFS, LLC

8400 East Prentice Avenue, Suite 820

303-771-0602

DNash Accounting and

Tax Services Inc.

5445 DTC Parkway, Suite P4

303-486-6875

Evergreen Private Wealth, LLC

7400 East Orchard Road,

Suite 2500N

720-617-2883

HEALTH AND BEAUTY

Bringing Out the Beauty in You

located at Collajio Salon

8745 East Orchard Road

281-891-3807

Elements Massage DTC

8575 East Arapahoe Road,

Suite L

720-990-7010

Luxe Beauty Lounge

5332 DTC Boulevard,

Suite 350

303-619-8697

HEALTH CARE AND

RELATED SERVICES

TMS Solutions

5655 South Yosemite Street,

Suite 201

720-909-8011

Vitality MD

5445 DTC Parkway, Suite 1025

720-536-4394

INFORMATION

TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

Handy Networks, LLC

5350 South Valentia Way

303-414-6910

INSURANCE AGENCY

TriMountain Corporation

8301 East Prentice Avenue,

Suite 215

720-708-4155

RETAIL

Cosmic Tea, LLC

8775 East Orchard Road,

Suite 821

720-502-7732

BUSINESSES UNDER

NEW MANAGEMENT

ENGINEERING FIRM

Lummus Technology, LLC

6380 South Fiddlers Green Circle

832-513-1602

HEALTH AND FITNESS

Row House

7600 Landmark Way, Suite B-201

720-272-0619

RESTAURANT

Great Harvest Bread Company

and Yogurt Shack

5910 South University Boulevard,

Suite A12

303-347-8767

spotlight

continued from page 16

Spice Trade Brewing offers a variety of

drinks and food from simple to

adventurous with something for

everyone. Some of their beer options

are: Spice Lite – an easy drinking

cream ale; Thai Tripel – brewed with

Kaffir lime leaves, lemon grass, ginger

and coriander; Osaka IPA – dry

hopped and brewed with Japanese

Kabosu fruit; and Chai Milk Stout –

brewed with a house blend of Nepalese

chai tea spices.

Their seasonally rotating kitchen

menu includes short rib cheeseburgers,

massaman curry, a seasonal charcuterie

board, and a Korean chicken

sandwich. Their current menu can be

found online at

www.SpiceTradeBrewing.com/dtcmenus/.

Spice Trade Brewing also

offers cocktails, wine, kombucha and

several non-alcoholic beverages. If that

isn’t enough, they have a selection of

apparel and merchandise so you can

show your support for the local

brewery. If you are unable to make it

to the brewery and kitchen, Spice

Trade Brewing Company beer is

available at a number of local liquor

stores as well as on tap at Yak & Yeti

Indian restaurants.

For more information about Spice

Trade Brewing, please visit

www.SpiceTradeBrewing.com or

contact them by phone at

720-710-9508. They are open

Monday through Thursday from

4 p.m. to 9 p.m., Friday and Saturday

from 12 p.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday

from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. with brunch

on Sunday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Spice Trade Brewing is located at

8775 East Orchard Road, Suite 811

in Orchard Plaza at the corner of East

Orchard Road and South Yosemite

Street. If you are looking for a unique

and locally owned option for lunch,

dinner or happy hour, Spice Trade

Brewing Company is the place for

you! GV

OCTOBER 2020 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 17


GENERAL INTEREST

LEAF REMOVAL OPTIONS

As we enter into the fall season, keeping Greenwood

Village clean will continue to be a priority. To assist

with these activities, we ask that you do not place

loose leaves or yard debris in the street as our

sweepers are not equipped to pick up large piles of

leaves. Moreover, this debris can be wind blown or

inappropriately washed into the storm systems and

waterways of the Village. Instead, please look to

other options to dispose of this debris.

• Arrange for your lawn care provider to remove

the leaves when performing your yard service.

• Bag your leaves in compostable paper yard waste

bags and place them out with your weekly trash

pick up. These bags of leaves will end up in the

landfill and paper is preferred over plastic which

will never break down and is bad for the

environment no matter what its destination.

• Republic Services has no limit as to how many bags of

leaves they will pick up, however, keep in mind if some

bags are left at the curb they will be returning once they

have unloaded their truck.

• Ace Hardware Cherry Hills Marketplace at University

Boulevard and Orchard Road has teamed up with the

City of Greenwood Village to provide residents with

FREE compostable paper yard waste bags. Use the

provided coupon or visit www.acelittletoncherryhills.com

to download your free coupon. Each resident will be

eligible for a free pack, while supplies last during the

month of October. For more information, please contact

Ace Hardware Cherry Hills Marketplace at 5910 S.

University, Suite A-17, Greenwood

Village, 720-974-1080.

• Recycle your leaves at Village Greens

Park. Leaves can be dropped off loose

or in bags between October 10 and

December 2, 2020, in the dedicated

area of the north parking lot any day

of the week. This option is

environmentally friendly with staff

spreading and disking into the soil

where native grass cannot be

established adding nutrients, helping

with moisture and also providing a

place for soil-borne microorganisms to

live. It does not impact the landfill and

it is cost effective. No bags are required

and you do not have to wait until your

trash day to dispose of them.

For more information, please contact

Public Works at 303-708-6100. GV

WHY CAN’T I SWEEP MY LEAVES OR GRASS CLIPPINGS INTO THE STREET?

Do not rake or blow leaves, grass or other trash into the street.

The street sweeping equipment is not able to handle branches or

large quantities of leaves and grass and can spread these materials

around the street. Leaves and grass are “natural” but when it rains,

these materials on streets and sidewalks can wash into storm

drains and eventually lead to Village waterways such as streams

and ponds. These materials over fertilize the water and encourage

harmful aquatic plants and algae to thrive, which has a lasting

negative impact on water quality, local ecology and recreational

use of our waterways and is a form of stormwater pollution. Just

like we would ask you to not throw trash in the street, it is the

same for leaves.

PG. 18 GV NEWSLETTER | OCTOBER 2020


ARTS AND RECREATION

RECREATION programs

Register online at

www.greenwoodvillage.com/registration

For more information call the Arts and Recreation Division at 303-486-5773.

FALL BREAK SPORTS

Days: Monday–Thursday, October 12, 13, 14, 15

Time: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Ages: 6-12 years

Fee: $1 per person each day. Pay at the park.

Limit: 40 participants each day

Location: Silo Park, 9300 East Orchard Road

DROP-IN PROGRAM (No need to pre-register)

Join us at Silo Park for miscellaneous games such as soccer, kickball, and

various other recess games.

No equipment is necessary. Bring a friend and come over! Participants

are responsible for bringing their own water bottle and any essentials

(jacket, hat, sunscreen, etc.).

All participants and staff MUST wear a mask. Participants are to bring

their own masks. Sport participants waiting on sidelines must wear

masks and social distance. Masks are not required when actively

participating in a game.

Everyone must still check in with staff

daily.

The program is subject to weather

conditions. Weather Line: 303-486-5770.

Information available at:

www.greenwoodvillage.com/rec or call the

Parks, Trails and Recreation Department

at 303-486-5768 or 303-486-5765.

OCTOBER 2020 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 19


ARTS AND RECREATION

SENIOR ACTIVITIES AT THE

CURTIS CENTER FOR THE ARTS

FOCUS 50+

Mondays, 9 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

HARMONICA

Mondays, 10:45 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

The senior programs Focus 50+ and

Harmonica continue outdoors at Curtis

Park. Participants recently celebrated

Gilda Shapiro’s 92nd birthday. HAPPY

BIRTHDAY GILDA, our harmonica

teacher.

She has begun teaching Harmonica

lessons again. Anyone interested in

playing the harmonica please call

Gilda Shapiro at 720-666-4566.

Our Focus 50+

group is beginning

to grow,

registration for our

Monday Focus

Group is now by

reservation only.

If you are

interested in

joining us please

contact Gina

Oldenburg at

720-227-8685.

Weather

permitting, these

free classes will

meet outside on

the grass. All

seniors welcome!

ART ON THE GREEN

Art on the Green, a safely curated, all Colorado

art fair, was held on Saturday, September 12 at

Curtis Park. Over 1,000 art lovers showed up to

explore 50 artists and their creations. While the

crowd had to be limited due to COVID-19, that

did not stop a hungry crowd from purchasing art

from their favorite artists. The fair featured works

in many mediums including painting, ceramics,

wood and jewelry. The event was such a success,

keep an eye out for a possible repeat next year.

PG. 20 GV NEWSLETTER | OCTOBER 2020


ARTS AND RECREATION

ART programs

Register online at

www.greenwoodvillage.com/art

Curtis Center for the Arts | 2349 East Orchard Road | Greenwood Village, CO 80121 | 303-797-1779

YOUTH ART

PROGRAMS

PEE WEE ART

TAKE-HOME-KITS

Pee Wee Art is a fun hands-on

art program that introduces

preschoolers to the arts and

allows for parents to assist with

their child’s creative process. For

the health and safety of all our

little artists and their families

the Curtis Center for the Arts

will be providing take-homekits

and how-to videos for all

Fall Pee Wee Art projects.

Projects and Dates

October 14 —

Pumpkin Portraits

October 28 —

Happy Haunting

November 4 —

Crepe Paper Canvas Art

November 18 — Pilgrim Hats

Fee: $15 for each kit

Age Requirement:

3 to 5 years old

Instructor: Lauren Brant

ENCAUSTIC FOR TEENS

In this class teens will learn many

encaustic techniques including ghosting,

layering, collage, carving and transferring

images on their pieces.

When: Mondays, November 2

through December 7

Time: 4:30 to 6 p.m.

Fee: $75

Age Requirement: 12 to 16 years old

Instructor: Maggie Stewart

PRINTMAKING FOR KIDS:

RELIEF PRINTS

In this four-week class students will learn

about the art of relief printmaking. Be

prepared to get messy, experiment with

different methods of printmaking and

allow your inner artist to shine through!

When: Tuesdays, November 3

through December 1

Time: 4:30 to 6 p.m.

Fee: $50

Age Requirement: 7 to 12 years old

Instructor: Roese Ramp

POP +

URBAN

ART

FOR

TEENS

Teens will

create art

inspired by pop

culture and

urban art

influences.

When: Thursdays, November 5

through December 3

Time: 4:30 to 6 p.m.

Fee: $75

Age Requirement: 12 to 16 years old

Instructor: Julia Rymer

OBSERVATIONAL

DRAWING FOR KIDS

In this after school program participants

will take a three-dimensional object and

learn how to turn the object into a twodimensional

drawing.

When: Fridays, November 6

through December 4

Time: 4:30 to 6 p.m.

Fee: $50

Age Requirement: 9 to 12 years old

Instructor: Behnaz Ahmadian

Dates may change due to COVID-19.

OCTOBER 2020 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 21


ARTS AND RECREATION

ART programs

Register online at

www.greenwoodvillage.com/art

Curtis Center for the Arts | 2349 East Orchard Road | Greenwood Village, CO 80121 | 303-797-1779

ART CLASSES AT THE CURTIS CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Greenwood Village’s cultural arts center offers a variety of art classes for preschoolers, children, teens and adults. Classes are

instructed by professional artists and staff who strive to provide the best art educational experience for all artistic levels. If you

can’t make a class during the weekday, join us in the evenings or on Saturdays.

All Fall and Winter 2020 classes are now open for registration. View our current and upcoming classes at the Curtis Center for

the Arts by going to www.greenwoodvillage.com/art.

Protocol for Classes: Smaller Class Sizes, Mask Wearing, Social Distancing and individual work spaces to express and create!

For questions or more information about art classes at the Curtis Center call 303-797-1779.

FALL ADULT ART CLASSES

Ages 16 and older with a 10% senior discount

Fee: $200 — all supplies provided

Instructor: Victoria Eubanks

EXPANDING

YOUR

ENCAUSTIC

TECHNIQUES

This is a two-day, jampacked

workshop perfect

for taking your encaustic

skills to the next level.

When: Saturday,

October 17 and

Sunday, October 18

Time: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

ZENDOODLE

Zendoodle is a meditative

scribbling or drawing

process to calm your mind

helping you to become

centered. In this two-day

workshop you will learn

how to draw many

different patterns to create

your own Zendoodle.

When: Saturday,

October 24 and

Sunday, October 25

Time: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Fee: $125

Instructor:

Behnaz Ahmadian

EXPLORING LANDSCAPE PAINTING

This on-going class series is designed to help students

develop a better understanding of fundamental painting

concepts and how they apply to landscape painting.

When: Mondays, November 2 through December 14

Time: 1 to 4 p.m.

Fee: $120

Instructor: Janet Anderson

ABSTRACT

COLORADO

PAINTING

FOR

BEGINNERS

ONLINE

In this online

acrylic painting

class learn how to

create your own

abstract

landscape painting from the comfort of your home.

When: Mondays, November 2 through December 7

Times: 6:30 to 9 p.m.

Fee: $50

Instructor: Christian Dore

FIGURE DRAWING

Learn how to draw the human figure from a live model using

various techniques and artistic approaches.

When: Tuesdays, November 3 through December 15

Time: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Fee: $120

Instructor: Michael Dowling

Dates for classes may change due to COVID-19.

PG. 22 GV NEWSLETTER | OCTOBER 2020


ARTS AND RECREATION

ENCAUSTIC AND SHELLAC

Students will learn the basics of encaustic and experiment

with shellac burning to create a lacy overlay on their work.

When: Tuesdays, November 3 through December 15

Time: 6:30 to 9 p.m.

Fee: $120 — all supplies provided

Instructor: Maggie Stewart

DRAWING AND SKETCHING

Begin or develop your drawing skills through learning

proper techniques.

When: Wednesdays, November 4 through December 16

Times: 1 to 4 p.m.

Fee: $100

Instructor: Rick Brogan

CASUAL

WATERCOLOR —

SPICE IT UP

ONLINE

This new online watercolor

course is loaded with ways

to spice up your paintings.

When: Thursdays,

November 5

through

December 17

Time: 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.

Fee: $50

Instructor: Renee Reese

LANDSCAPE PAINTING WITH OILS

AND PASTELS FROM PHOTOGRAPHS

Learn how to paint landscapes with oils and pastels in the

Alla Prima style.

When: Thursdays, November 5 through December 17

Time: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Fee: $120

Instructor: Cliff Austin

MASTER STUDIES

Course covers the foundational aspects to creating a work of

art and focuses on how to use and apply the visual elements of

art to a work of art.

When: Thursdays, November 5 through December 17

Time: 1 to 4 p.m.

Fee: $120

Instructor: Kevin Weckbach

WATERCOLOR

This class is designed for students who want to improve their

watercolor painting skills.

When: Fridays, November 6 through December 18

Time: 1 to 4 p.m.

Fee: $120

Instructor: Rick Brogan

MIXED MEDIA SCULPTURE

Spend the day creating your own character sculpture out of a

wire form!

When: Saturday, November 7

Time: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Fee: $120 — all supplies provided

Instructor: Maggie Stewart

COLOR THEORY

+ MIXED MEDIA

Explore color and mixed

media in this fun combo

class! This is a processoriented

class in which

students are shown

drawing, watermedia

painting, and collage

techniques, and

encouraged to experiment

with the materials and

express themselves freely.

When: Tuesdays,

November 10

through December 15

Times: 1 to 4 p.m.

Fee: $100

Instructor: Julia Rymer

COLOR MIXING:

UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES

WITH A LIMITED PALETTE

During this one-day workshop Janet Anderson will share her

approach to color mixing with a limited palette, and help you

discover the exciting possibilities!

When: Saturday, November 14

Times: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Fee: $100

Instructor: Janet Anderson

OCTOBER 2020 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 23


6060 South Quebec Street

Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111-4591

PRSRT STD

US POSTAGE

PAID

ENGLEWOOD, CO

PERMIT #799

ARTS AND RECREATION

ART events

GALLERY HOURS

Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

CURTIS CENTER FOR THE ARTS • 2349 EAST ORCHARD ROAD, GREENWOOD VILLAGE, CO 80121 • 303-797-1779

Dates may

change

due to

COVID-19.

PG. 24 GV NEWSLETTER | OCTOBER 2020

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