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Newark Post - University of Delaware Library Institutional Repository

PAGE 2 • NEWARK POST • jUNE 11, 2004

Can we help?

OHices: The paper's offices are

located conveniently in Suite

206, Madeline Crossing, 168

Elkton Rd., Newark, DE

19711 . Office hours are 8:30

a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.

Phone: (302) 737-0724

Facsimile: (302) 737-9019

e-mail: newpost@dca.net

To subscribe: Call 737-0724 or

1-800-220-3311 . To begin a

convenient home-delivery subscription,

simply call.

To place a classified or display

ad: Call 737-0724 or 1-800-

220-3311 .

HE STAFF of the Newark Post is

Teager to assist readers and advertisers.

Reporters, writers, editors and

salespeople can be contacted as listed:

James B. Streit, Jr. is the publisher

of the Newark Post. He sets policies and

manages all departments in the Newark

office. Call him at 737-0724.

Darrel W. Cole is the news editor.

He leads the day-to-day operation of the

newsroom. Call him at 737-0724.

Marty Valanla prepares'the sports

pages of this newspaper. The sports

editor is seldom in the office, however,

he checks in frequently. Leave messages

for Marty at 1-800-220-3311.

Jan Blankenship is the office

manager and editorial assistant who

processes most press releases. She

prepares obituaries and People briefs.

She is assisted by Kathy Burr. Contact

them at 737-0724.

Robin Broomall is a staff reporter.

Reach her at 737-0724.

Phil Toman has been the paper's

arts editor since 1969. Well-known in

the arts community, he writes his column

from his Newark home. Leave

messages for him at 737-0724.

Other contributing writers include

Jack Bartley, Tracy Bachman, Elbert

Chance, Marvin Hummel and Mark Sisk.

Leave messages for them at 737-0724.

Ed Hoffman is the Newark Posts

advertising director and manages the

local sales team. He can be reached at 1-

800-220-3311 .

Jim Gaiofl services automotive

advertising clients in the Newark, Bear,

Glasgow and Routes 40/13 area. Call him

at 1-800-220-3311.

Bally Jo Trexler sells real estate

advertising. She can be reached simply

by calling 1-800-220-3311.

Janllar Evans sells ads in the

downtown Newark area. She can be

reached by calling 1-800-220-3311.

Shelley Evans sells ads in the Route

40 corridor. She can be reached by calling

1-800-220-3311.

Nancy Beaudet develops new advertising

accounts in the eastern Cecil

County-Glasgow area. She can be

reached by calling 1-800-220-33111.

Our circulation manager is Mary

Ferguson. For information regarding

subscriptions, call 1-800-220-3311.

The Newark Post Is published Friday by

Chesapeake Publishing Corporation. News

and local Silks offices are located in

Madeline Crossing, Suite 206, 168 Elkton Rd.,

Newark, DE 19711. AU advertising'and news

are accepted and printed only at the sole discretion

of the publisher. The Newark Post is

a proud member of the Maryland-Delaware·

D. C. Press Association, Suburban Newspapers

of Atnerica, the National Newspaper

Association and the Downtown Newark·

Partnership.

POSTMASTER: Send address

changes to: Newark Post, Suite 206,

168 Elkton Road, Newark, DE

19711. Periodicals postage paid at

Newark, Del., and additional offices.

• Police Blotter is compiled

each week from th'e files of the

Newark Police Department, New

Castle County Police and the

Delaware State Police by the

newspaper staff.

Newark

wo.man held

in identity

thefts

NEW Castle County Police

have arrested Dawn M

Mitchell, 25, of Newark

She is accused of identity theft

and related offenses. ·

On Tuesday, June 1, New

Castle County Police concluded

an investigation. Officer Casey

Bouldin went to a Newark home

to look into a reported bad check

The victim provided police with

several documents with what

appeared to be forged names.

A search warrant was obtained

for Mitchell's residence. Police

said the search yielded numerous

documents containing the names

of several victims. Police believe

the suspect used names to obtain

phone, cable and cellular service,

and to purchase a computer.

Bouldin obtained arrest warrants

for Mitchell and charged

her with identity theft of a person

62 years or older, identity theft

(five counts), theft of services

(five counts), forgery in the second

degree (two counts), theft

(two counts). The investigation

continues, police said.

Officers reported that Mitchell

was interviewed at the Women's

Correctional Institution where

she was being detained on a similar

matter. She received $11,100

secured bail and a court date

pending.

Drug arrests here

New Castle County Police

arrested two people for drug

related offenses in the Kimberton

area. They are accused of selling

· drugs from their home in the

presence of a minor.

On Wednesday, June 2, the

Community Crime Intervention

(CCI) Team concluded an investigation

into drug sales involving

a residence in Carlton Court. A

search warrant was executed in

the 1600 block of Northway

Drive.

Police reported that they located

Cornelius Collins, 24, and

Sharon Bower, 22, inside the residence

along with a 3-year-old

child.

Police said team members discovered

3.36 grams of cocaine,

.18 grams of heroin, 1.29 grams

of marijuana and drug paraphernalia.

Collins and Bower were

taken into custody without incident.

Both were arraigned and

charged with possession with

intent to deliver cocaine, posses-

Arrest

made

in 'Good

Samaritan'

assault

NEWARK Posr ·:· POLICE BLOTTER

sion with intent to deliver heroin,

maintaining a dwelling for keeping

controlled substances, conspiracy

in the second degree, possession

of drug paraphernalia,

possession of marijuana and

unlawfully dealing with a child.

Collins was eommitted to the

Howard R. Young Prison on

$19,500 secured bail. Brower

was committed to the Womens

Correctional Institution on

$29,500 secured bail. The investigation

is ongoing and a court

date pending, police said.

Motorcyclist criticaily

injured in crash

The Delaware State Police is

investigating a crash that critically

injured a 38-year-old woman

from Newark.

On Tuesday, June 1, at

approximately 7:10 p.m., police

ANew York man was arrested

for robbery and conspiracy in

connection with a scam.

Police said that a man faked that his

car was stuck, then proceeded to

punch a Good Samaritan who offered

to help, stealing his cell phone in the

process.

Jason J. Phillip, 21, of Brooklyn,

N.Y., was arrested by Newark police

Monday, June 7, in connection with

the December 2003 attack.

Police said the the victim, a 21year-old

university student, was

walking home near the corner of

Wollastan and Kells avenues when

reported. that a 2000 Harley

Davidson motorcycle was traveling

in the left lane of Rt. 141

southbound in the area of West

Gilpin Avenue. Jill E. Sowry, 38,

of Newark, was operating the

motorcycle. A 1987 Nissan

Pathfinder was traveling in the

left lane of Route 141 northbound.

Janet G. Hinkson, 54, of

Chatham was the operator and

lone occupant of the Nissan,

police said.

The motorcycle rounded the

curve and the operator lost control.

The cycle crossed the double-yellow

center line and struck

the Nissan in the left-side door,

police said. After impact the

operator of the motorcycle was

thrown approximately 10 feet

and landed in the roadway.

Sowry was transported to the

Christiana Hospital. Sowry suffered

chest and head trauma, as

well as two amputated fingers,

Weekly crime report

STATISTICS FOR MAY 23-30, 2004 COMPILED BY NEWARK POLICE DEPARTMENT

INVESTIGATIONS CRIMINAL CHARGES

Z003 Z004 THIS Z003 Z004

PART I OFFENSES TO DATE TO DATE WEEK TO DATE TO DATE

Murder/manslaughter 0 1 0 1 1

Attempted murder 1 0 0 0 0

Kidnap 3 1 0 2 2

Rape 2 8 0 1 26

Unlawful sexual contact 5 5 0 1 4

Robbery 34 27 2 22 24

Aggravated assauk 9 14 0 15 6

Burglary 64 80 7 5 23

Theft 378 412 16 105 107

Auto theft 64 39 2 3 5

Arson 1 6 1 0 2

TOTAL PART I 561 593 28 155 200

PART II OFFENSES

Other assaults 128 176 4 106 159

Receiving stolen property 2 0 0 15 2

Criminal mischief 309 310 22 43 287

Weapons 8 7 0 49 38

Other sex offenses 7 7 0

Alcohol 274 195 4 409 382

Drugs 71 40 133 128

Noise/disorderly premise 229 310 13 132 149

Disorderly conduct 568 397 29 72 77

Trespass 52 67 0 9 24

All other 342 346 35 201 123

TOTAL PART 11 . 1990 1855 109 1169 1372

MISCEWHEOUS

Alarm 582 589 44 0 0

Animal control 287 337 15 19 18

Recovered property 110 131 10 0 0

Service 4312 3820 253 0 0

Suspicious person/vehicle 405 437 26 0 0

TOTAL MISCEllANEOUS 5696 5314 348 19 18

737-0724 • Fax 737-9019

he encountered two subjects whose

vehicle appeared to be stuck in the

snow.

The Good Samaritan loaned the

men his cell phone, when suddenly

one or both suspects punched the student

in the face. They then fled with

the victim's cell phone.

Following a lengthy investigation,

police said they obtained a warrant

for Phillip's airest. He then turned

himself in to police and, after appearing

in Superior Court, was released

on a secured bond.

THIS

WEEK

0

0

0

0

0

THIS WEEK Z003 Z003 TO DATE THIS WEEK Z004 Z004 TO DATE

TOTAL CALLS 586 13289 656 12907

0

0

3

0

0

4

2

0

0

0

0

8

8

10

2

0

0

30

0

3

0

0

0

police said. She was admitted in

critical condition.

Police said Sowry was not

wearing a helmet at the time of

the crash. Hinkson was wearing

a seatbelt. •

Sowry was issued a traffic

citation for failing to maintain a

vehicle in a lane of travel.

All lanes of Rt. 141 north- and

southbound were closed for

approximately 90 minutes.

Traffic was detoured onto the

side access roads of Rt. 141.

Items missing

Residents of a home in the

unit block Cornwall Place told

Newark police on Sunday, May

6, at 4:26 p.m. that someone

entered their residence while they

were away during the weekend.

Police said the residents

returned home to find the front

door unlocked and items missing.

Holes in walls also were discovered.

Police said the missing items

include a DVD players, nine

DVDs, a cordless phone, a digital

camera, a stereo, X Box and

Playstation video games and controllers.

Investigation is continuing,

police said.

Purses disappear

Visitors to a home in the 100

block Tyre Avenue told Newark

police on Sunday, June 6, at 3:24

a.m. that two purses had been

stolen during a party at the residence.

The purses were found on the

home's lawn, minus a digital

camera and credit cards.

Gasoline theft

Employees of the Shell service

station, 804 S. College Ave.,

told Newark police on Saturday,

June 5, at 10:40 p.m. that a

woman had filled her auto with

gas, then drove off without paying

the $23.02 that was due.

Arbour Park theft

Intruders entered a home in

the 700 block Arbour Drive

through a basement window and

escaped with the homeowner's

credit card, Newark police were

told on Saturday, June 5, at 8:38

a.m.

Police reported that the card

See BlOTIER, 17 .....


.•• 1

PAGE 4 • NEWARK POST • jUNE 11, 2004 737-0724 • Fax 737-9019

NOTEPAD

Schools out,

offices open

SCHOOL is officially out

for the summer break for

Christina Schools as of

Thursday, June 10 for students

and teachers.

District offices will begin

their -summer hours on

Monday, June 14 through

Friday, Aug. 13.

Offices will be open

Monday through Thursday, 7

a.m. to 5 p.m. Offices will be

closed Fridays.

All district offices will be

closed Friday, June 11 for the

Day of Mourning for President

Ronald Reagan.

District offers

English classes

In collaboration with the

Western Branch YMCA,

Christina District is offering

English classes to non-English

speaking parents.

Classes will be held twice a

week from July 12 to Aug. 26

for $20.

Morning classes will be

held at Maclary Elementary

School and evening classes at

the YMCA, Kirkwood

Highway.

Register in person at the

YMCA or call Kathy Wessel at

709-9622, ext. 130.

Srumm OF THE WEEK

Monika Chawla, a fourth

grader at Gallaher Elementary

School, was selected by

Principal Pam Waun and

staff as this week's Student

of the Week. Monika

recently won the Asia Price­

Nicole

Cantara

Award for

citizenship.

She is a

high

achiever

but also

takes time

to help others.

She

peer Chawla

coached a

classmate all year long and

volunteers at the Newark

Free Library every Sunday.

Monika is a Girl Scout,

plays the violin and enjoys

soccer, volleyball and karate.

EDUCATION NEWS FOR NEWARK FROM LOCAL SCHOOLS

Auto repairs

no rip off

GHS students second in state competition

By ROBIN BROOMALL •

NEWARK POST STAFF WRITER

IT took more than 90 minutes,

but when the 2004 Crown

Victoria finally turned over,

two Glasgow High School students

felt a sigh of relief. With

only two minutes to spare, Raul

Juarez and Martin Duran quickly

got into the car, pulled out of the

pit and cruised into the judges

circle in the Ford/ AAA Student

Auto Skills Competition held in

Dover.

The tremendous last minute

performance enabled GHS to

capture second place in the statewide

competition and both students

received more than $17,000

in scholarship offers.

Teams in competition were

given vehicles that were purposely

disabled and students had to

diagnose the problem, repair it

and get the vehicle moving. Of

the six schools invited to participate,

including vocational high

schools, only two were able to

get their cars started at the Dover

Downs Raceway in April.

Hodgson Vo-Tech High School in

Glasgow had the first place team.

"It was just a fuse," Duran

said. It was something they had

checked early on. The fuse

Freedom ­

on display

Mural part of worldwide display

By ROBIN BROOMALL

NEWARK POST STAFF WRITER

WHAT does it mean to be an

American? Americans have the

ability to think out of the box,

have that entrepreneurial spirit, according

to students in AnRea Frederick's class.

The eighth graders at Shue/Medill

Middle School captured the essence of that

spirit in a 5 feet by 12 feet long mural that

was recently shipped to California to be

assembled with other murals created by

See MURAL, 12 .....

seemed okay. But it was just in

the wrong spot. They checked

every other possible problem -

electrical, fuel, air intake - before

checking the fuses again. When

they made a simple switch, the

car purred like a kitten.

Carmen Ford on DuPont

Highway cooperated with the

competition, providing a loaner

vehicle for the students to

become familiar with before

going to the competition. They

also got a manual for the vehicle

ahead of time. All the vehicles

had the same problem in competition.

Everyone started out even.

If the teams couldn't drive the

cars, they didn't get judged.

Juarez and Duran are both students

in Jim Oettinger's auto

repair classes, working on technology,

aerodynamics, navigation,

hydraulics and mechanics.

They work on staff and students'

cars in the shop, diagnosing ·and

repairing similar problems they

would find in autos taken to dealerships.

They spent hours everyday

after school preparing for the

competition. They are both

English Second Language students

and had to work hard to

understand the manual.

"For them to do as well as

they did against vo-tech schools

is fantastic," Oettinger said. His

NEWARK POST PHOTO BY ROBIN BROOMALL

With only minutes to spare, two GHS students started their vehicle in

the Ford/AAA Auto Repair competition, winning more than $17,000

in scholarship offers. Martin Duran, left, and Raul Juarez look over

a car in the school shop.

auto repair students learn to do

simple repairs, oil changes, tuneups,

but not at the same level

taught in vo-tech schools.

Even if the students never go

into auto repair as a career, or

never work on their own cars,

they become familiar with repair

problems and can better diagnose

potential problems, Oettinger

said. The two classes average 45

students, including a few girls.

Duran has a Mitsubishi

Eclipse and Juarez has a Mazda

RX7. The class has helped them

save money by doing repairs and

regular maintenance correctly

themselves, they said. They also

work on family and friends' cars.

Winning the competition gave

both students opportunities to

continue their auto training.

Duran graduated June 3 and is

planning on attending Del Tech

or taking classes with Ford Motor

Company near Philadelphia.

Juarez, a junior, plans to

attend Lincoln Tech near

Philadelphia after he graduates

and major in full auto training.

Shue students captured on a mural what it means to them to be an American. The Art Mile

project will travel to countries around the world and eventually be hung in a museum in

another country. Key creators are, left to right, kneeling: Valenina Pilonieta, Jessica Piatt.

Second row: Brin Hutchison, Maria Alvarez-Diaz, David Langley. Back row: Ankit Bhandavi,

Yingbo Wang, Brit'tini Saunders, David Sisson.


www.ncbl.com/post/ juNE 11, 2004 • NEwARK PosT • PAGE 5

NEWARK POST ·:· IN OUR SCHOOLS

Authors at· an early age

First graders at

Keene elementary

get books published

By ROBIN BROOMALL

NEWARK POST STAFF WRITER

How do you get your first

novel accepted by a publisher?

Many writers have struggled

with that question for years. Two

classes of first graders have

already been published and have

their books to prove it.

Classes of Keri Neuman and

Heather Goff at Keene

Elementary School wrote and

illustrated "If You Give a

Kangaroo Cupcake" and "Our

Snowy Day Adventures."

Each student wrote one page

of the story and did their own

illustrations.

When the pages were completed,

the manuscript was sent to

Nationwide Learning Resources

for publishing.

A grant from MBNA supported

the project and allowed each

student to have a personal copy

of his class book.

A Publishing Party was held in

the school's cafeteria for the students

to unveil their books.

Each child also received a customized

tee-shirt with the cover

illustration from their book.

Families were on hand to hear

the books read in public for the

first time.

The project fits into the state

academic standards for reading

and language arts for first grade

by helping the student relate to a

theme or topic and use their creative

thinking to extend the story.

Paper dolls not all ·play

By ROBIN BROOMALL

NEWARK POST STAFF WRITER

SECOND graders at

Downes Elementary

School combined a

little child's play with

geography and state history

this spring.

Students in Fran

Miller's class participated

in an exchange program

with other classes

around the country, sharing

information about

their state.

Each student decorated

a paper doll in clothes

typical of the region.

Many of Downes'

paper dolls were clothed

in beach wear. On the

NEWARK POST PHOTO BY JOHN LLERA

Beaming with pride, first graders, from left, Precious Williams, David Gardenas and Daniel Benz, show

off the pages they wrote and illustrated in "Our Snowy Day Adventures." "I feel good about writing a

book," said Williams. ·

back they recorded information

about the state

flower, bug, size, popula­

. tion and unique facts.

Then they were· each

mailed out to other

schools across the

United States.

As . Miller's class

received a new paper doll

they used their mapping

and geography skills to

locate the source and

learn about that state.

Len: Madeline Shuhart

points to Delaware on

the classroom map. Her

paper doll sported a purple

bikini.

POST PHOTO BY ROBIN BROOMALL

Enrichment Fund presents awards

MORE than 370 students,

teachers, administrators

and family members

attended the Christina

Educational Enrichment Fund

annual awards dinner where students

received more than $11,000

in awards and scholarships.

CEEF recognizes students

who serve as .role models in the

Christina District. Various

awards are presented in citizenship,

community service, academic

achievement anq the

desire to always do their best.

District wide winners are given

the opportunity to attend summer

damp. The high school scholarship

winners receive $1,500 to be

used toward post· secondary education.

The 2004 award winners are:

College Scholarships: Angela

Anacay, David Bowman, Daniel

Scheid and Kathleen Hausen.

Ashley Harper Memorial

Scholarship: Christina Read

State winner

I

Rebekah Kaplan, recent graduate

of Newark High School, is

one of three winners of the

Letters About Literature contest

sponsored by the Delaware

Center for the Book, a program

of the state libraries.

Applicants had to write a letter

to an author explaining how

his or her work changed their

view of the world and themselves.

Asia Price/Nicole Cantara

Memorial Award: Monika

Chawla

Raymond T. Metts Memorial

Award: Katarina Bowman, Lola

Owotomo and Samuel Jacobs

(posthumous).

William B. Keene Writing

Award: Jessica Hickens

Lend-A-Hand Community

Service Award: Justyna

Brzozowski

Charlie B. Friswell Aerospace

Award: Kordel Halter, Kira Lyle,

Anthony Modica, Michael

Potochney, Christian Swann, Ben

Woodruff, David Ard, John

Hannaford, Desiree Hendrix,

Tyler Lee, Shawn Li, Manar l

Salhar, Benjamin Smith, Justin

Wolf and Daniel Zebley.

Thursday

All You Can Eat Shrimp $11.

Friday, Saturday, Sunday

11/ 4lb. Lobster Dinner $15.95

(While Supplies Last)

1/2lb. Steamed Shrimp $5.00

1 Dozen Steamed Clams $5.00

Baked Salmon w /Dill Sauce $14.50

Grilled Fish DuJour-Mkt. Price

Bud Light Pitchers $5.00

(Fri., Sat., Sun: Only) All Day

Food specials begin at SPM

& are not ava1lable for

take-out.

At your Favorite Neighborhood Restaurant!

108 Peoples Plaza 8 Polly Drummond SC

Newark DE 19702 Newark DE 19711

302-834-6661 302-738-7814

mcglynnspub.com

speaker?

Newark Post is always anxious to get

and meet the members of local clubs 4

welcome the opportunity to provide. a

discuss the importance

an entertaining

·· hilarious headlines.

speakers bureau.


www.ncbl.com/post/ JUNE 11, 2004 • NEWARK POST ·• PAGE 7

NEWARK POST ·:· COMMENTARY

Quiet philanthropy, lifetime of service her legacy to Newark

.... UP FRONT, from 1

someone does not comment on

-what a sweet lady she is.

During my eight years on the

board of the Newark Senior

Center, I became aware of her

significant and repeated contributions

to the center's two building

funds.

As honcho of the DNP, I know

that whenever there is a need for

a donation to a worthy downtown

cause, a check from Mrs. Bing

quietly appears (and it's not

always a small one). And until

health issues slowed her down,

she has been a key board member.

I also appreciate the warm

welcome that she offered me and

my family. While others held me

at arms length when the new

newspaper publisher pushed to

become involved in civic affairs,

Mrs. Bing warmly made me feel

at home.

But there's an effort by Mrs.

Bing that few know about. It's a

gift of herself that I will forever

cherish.

T HE

•••

year was 1998. There

was controversy at City

Hall. A first-term councilmember

and her politically

active co-hort were stirring a

political pot that divided the formerly

cooperative council and

had many city employees -

including some top ones - polishing

up their resumes. There also

were politically motivated ethics

charges brought against a veteran

councilmember by his political

opponent.

As this newspaper did before,

during and after the most recent

election, back then we held

steady in our efforts to provide

aggressive, but fair and balanced

coverage of these unusual

goings-on. Then and again during

the recent mayoral election, we

heard criticism from both sides,

which usually indicates we are

doing our job.

A political unknown challenged

a veteran councilmember,

then initiated ethics charges that

clearly were political. The plot

thickened when the challenger

told police he was attacked outside

his home and was told he

was being beaten out of political

revenge. An unbelievable series

of events had become more

astonishing.

Here at the Newark Post, we

simply plugged along, doing our

job as lines were drawn and sides

taken.

There were far more supporters

of our efforts to provide balanced

coverage, something the

daily newspaper seemed to avoid,

but there was a tiny minority of

critics, all of whom were aligned

with the dissident trio of the

councilmember, the activist and

the challenger.

I was on vacation in Maine

when I received a franctic call

from co-workers at the office. A

number of people were circulating

a letter to downtown Newark

businesspeople urging an adver-

1999: Reservoir on agenda

.... PAGES, from 6

Stanton.

But Monday's action by the

board dispelled any notion that

the medical center is ready to

throw in the towel on Omega.

• June 11, 1999

Rental permit

moratorium goes quietly

Almost lost in the intense

efforts to pass a new ordinance to

restrict student rentals was the

moratorium on new rental permits

imposed in February.

City council passed a 60-day

moratorium on issuing rental permits

on Feb. 1 after 49 new permits

were issued in January, six

times as many as in an average

month. The moratorium subsequently

was approved for a second

60-day period while discussions

about rental ordinances

continued in council.

Councilmembers expressed

concern that the city would be

deluged with requests when the

second moratorium expired last

weekend.

According to Newark's

Building Director Junie Mayle,

while there were people seeking

permits at the Building

Department on Tuesday

(Monday was a holiday), there

was not an overwhelming number.

Agenda includes reservoir

Newark City Council will

hold · a public hearing at

Monday's regular council meeting

to discuss possible condemnation

of the Koelig property on

Old Paper Mill Road.

City officials have been negotiating

with' the owners of the site

to purchase the 112 acres of land

for a possible water storage facility.

At the same time, developers

Zecola Builders Inc/Linden Hill

Corporation were seeking

approval from New Castle

County to build 229 homes on

the property.

An appraisal obtained by the

city during the negotiations indicated·

an estimated value of

$7,235,000 for the site. In April,

the city agreed to a purchase

price of $7,950,000 demanded in

writing by the developers for the

land.

iiI shouldn't have

been surprised,

though. It's what she's

done all her life. "

tising boycott of our newspaper.

This critical minority was going

after our lifeblood.

In my book, it's one thing to

voice opposition on subjective

political activities or to criticize

approaches to news coverage, but

it's entirely anotlier to go after

people's jobs. Like all small community

newspapers, the Newark

Post operates on a thin margin

and we can spare no lost advertising.

A successful boycott could

have been devastating.

Mrs. Bing was one of the merchants

who received the boycott

letter. She never called or talked

to me.

But before I had arrived back

from Maine, the 70-plus-year-old

businesswoman had gone up and

down Main Street or called other

business operators. She encouraged

them to support, not boycott

our paper. Mrs. Bing did so not

by taking sides in the political

issues but by pointing out the

unfairness of the approach. Even

though our critics were frequent

customers of her bakery, she

asked other business operators

not to be taken in by the sensational,

vindictive efforts of the

letter signers.

Fast forward. The week after

the boycott letter went out, the

Newark Post tallied more in

advertising sales than it had in

months. The challenger disappeared

from the Newark scene

shortly after money disappeared

from a neighborhood association's

bank account. The dissident

councilmember was tossed

out of office by a level-headed,

now multi-term representative.

City Hall, Newark and the newspaper

weathered the political

storm.

There are many reasons to

honor Mrs. Bing. And I share

with others the same feelings

about her generosity, kindness

and service.

But I will be forever grateful

of her quiet, behind-the-scenes

work to correct what she saw as a

wrong.

I shouldn't have been surprised,

though. It's what she's

done all her life.

• The writer has been a community

journalist for more than

three decades. He and his family

live in Newark.

Think twice before writing check

.... CHANCE, from 6

medical benefits our

Congressman have provided for

themselves far exceed the benefits

available to ordinary citizens.

But who is naive enough to

believe that Congress will ever

vote to reduce the perks its members

receive?

Many people would like to see

the United Nations operate more

effectively. Yet the recent Iraq oil

for food scandal suggests that

international officials are as like-

ly to mismanage or misappropriate

funds as local and national

politicians. Others argue that a

nation with a huge and growing

deficit should give its first priority

to the needs of its own citizens.

Finally, it's apparent that

TREA officials are singing the

same tune they did three years

ago. Respected Congressman,

they claim, are prepared to press

for passage of Notch Victims'

bills presently before the House

and Senate. But a staff member in

the office of one Delaware

Congressman advised me that

HORSES • PONIES • MULES • DONKEYS • BURROS

EQUINE OWNERS

Reminder

these bills have little chance of

success. There are too few survivors

from the 1917-26 era to

constitute a meaningful voting

block and far more urgent

demands are pressing upon the

Congress.

One fact is clear. The proponents

of these diverse projects,

however desirable, are united in

one respect. They want us to pay

for them. Given their controversial

nature, it may be wise to

think twice before we reach for

our checkbooks.

Please complete your DELAWARE EQUINE SURVEY

questionnaire and mail it back by June 18, 2004. If you are an

equine owner and did not receive one or if you need another

copy, please call: The Delaware Department of Agriculture at

(302) 698-4500.

Each report, even if only for one horse, is very important to this

ef(ort to get recognition for the equine community in Delaware.

Time is running short.

Use our convenient e-mail address! newpost@dca.net


PAGE 10 • NEWARK POST • jUNE 11, 2004

• •

versions

THEATRE • EVENTS • EXHIBITS • NIGHTLIFE • MEETINGS

737-0724 • Fax 737-9019

11 sports

SPECIAL OLYMPICS SUMMER GAMES 10

FRIDAY a.m. - 4 p.m. Friday & 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Saturday.

Athletes from across Delaware will compete in six

over two days - aquatics, athletics, bocce,

power lifting, softball and tennis. Nelson Athletic

Complex, University of Delaware, Newark. Info.,

302-831-4653.

SENIOR CENTER DANCE 6:30- 9:30p.m.

Featuring music, dancing, and the sounds of AI

Santoro and the Hi-Liters. The cost is $6 and is cosponsored

by the Newark Lions Club. Evergreens

Room, Newark Senior Center, 200 White Chapel Dr., Newark. Info., 302-

737-2336 ext. 13.

DELAWARE CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL 7:30p.m. Program of Mozart

Divertimento for string trio Debussy Premiere Rapsodie for clarinet and

piano, and Higdon Light refracted for piano quartet and clarinet. Tickets cost

$20 adults; $16 seniors; $10 students; and free for children under 6.

Wilmington Music School, 4101 Washington St., Wilmington. Info., 302-

239-8440.

"HOMETOWN FAVORITES" 10 a.m.- 6 p.m. Mon., Tues. & Fri.; 10 a.m. -

8 p.m. Wed. & Thurs. & 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sat. Through June 30. Exhibit and

sale of watercolors by Kathy Ruck featuring favorite landmarks and historical

sites. You've Been Framed, 172 E. Main St., Newark. Free and open to

the public. Info., 302-366-1403.

EXTREME CREAMWARE Through July 25. This exhibition features

approximately 60 pieces predominantly from the 18th century that display

unusual forms and demonstrate a wide variety of decorations applied to

these everyday wares. Brandywine River Museum, Rt. l, Chadds Ford, Pa.

Info., 610-388-2700.

PRIME HOOK NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. weekends

through December. Refuge is located just off Rt. 16 near Broadkill

Beach. 11978 Turtle Pond Road, Milton. Info., 302-684-8419.

THE LYRICAL LANDSCAPE Weekends through June 27. 1:30 p.m. Hourlong

walks through blooming landscapes that reveal founder Henry. Francis

duPont's secrets of naturalistic garden design and detail. Winterthur,

Kennett Pike. Tickets $20 for adults; $18 for students and seniors; $10 for

ages 2-11. Info., 302-888-4600.

S

12 prestigious

WYNN BRESLIN OPEN STUDIO Noon- 3 p.m ..

mJROAY June 12 & 13. Breslin is an internationally known

award winning artist, who is included in numerous

publications. Her paintings grace the

t--walls of corporate board rooms, public institutions

worldwide. open to the public and free of charge.

Winter Studio, 470 Terrapin Lane, Newark. Info.,

302-731-5738.

YOUTH FISHING TOURNAMENT 10 a.m.- I

p.m. Catch fish, win prizes, and no entry fee.

Contestants must bring their own fishing equipment.

Catch and release will be taught and encouraged. There will be prizes award-

MONTANA

SmlN

KENNm

SQUARE

The wtique cello and guitar duo Montana Skies performs among

thousands of blooming pink roses in Longwood Garden's annual

Rose Arbor Concert on Thursday, June 17 at 7:30p.m. The pair,

from Atlanta, will present a program that includes both traditional

songs and original compositions that are innovative, captivating and

soothing. Tickets are included in general Longwood Gardens admission

of$14 for adults, $6 for ages 16-20,$2 ages 6-15 and free under

age 6. Group rates are also available. For info., 610-388-1000, visit

www.longwoodgardens.org or sign up for the monthly e-newsletter.

ed in three age levels: 4 -7, 8 -11, and 12 -15. Lums Pond, Dog Training

Area, Off of Rt. 896, Newark. Info., 302-739-3440.

CONCERT SERIES 6 p.m. Performance by Swing Samba Soul. Concert is

free to the public. On the lawn at Rockwood Mansion Park, 610 Shipley Rd.,

Wilmington. Info., 302-761-4340.

COMEDY PERFORMANCE 9:30p.m. Comedy show featuring Pat

O'Donnell, Gene Norris, Roy Clark with emcee Steve Golasa. Tickets are

$15 each. Comedy Cabaret, Air Transport Command, 143 N. DuPont Hwy.,

New Castle. Info., 302-652-6873.

HEALTH FAIR 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. This event will feature fun games for children

along with clowns, magicians, fire engines, State Police K -9 group and

more participating. The Fair will highlight education on Alzheimer's disease,

asthma, diabetes, stroke and heart attack risks. Complimentary classes will

be staged on fitness planning, self defense, seatbelt, helmet and sport safety.

Lantana Square Shopping Center. Info., 302-633-4420 or 800-272-3900.

JAZZ 7:30p.m. Performance by The Orrin Evans Trio with vocalist DAWN.

Dawn's influences range from classical to reggae to R&B. Orrin Evans is an

internationally known composer and jazz pianist. Longwood Gardens, Rt. !,­

Kennett square, Pa. Performances are included in general G!lf(lens admission

of $14 for adults, $6 for ages 16-20,$2 ages 6-15 and free under age 6.

Info., 610-388-1000.

CASINO NIGHT 6 p.m. to midnight second Saturdays. Poker and wheel at

Newark Elks #2281, 42 Elks Trail, New Castle. Free admission for players.

Info., 302-328-2281.

REMEMBERING BELLANCA l - 4 p.m. Every Sat. and Sun. through Sept.

5. This exhibit features photographs of the Bellanca Air Hangar, the Bellanca

Corporation, and the personnel that made this famed period of early aviation

history possible. Old Library, 38 ThirdS!., New Castle. Info., 302-322-2794.

MEETINGS

S

ST. ANTHONY'S ITALIAN FESTIVAL Through

13

UNDAY June 20. 5:30- 10:30 p.m. Monday- Friday; 2-

10:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. There will be six

outdoor cafes under tents providing authentic Italian

food and free entertainment from 15 different musical

groups. St. Anthony's Church, 901 N. DuPont

St., Wilmington. Parking at Delaware Ave. & Van

Buren Sts., and 8th & Orange Sts., with shuttle bus

service to and from the festival. Info., 302-421-

3790.

COLLECTffiLE SHOW 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Featuring Sports Cards, NASCAR, Comic books, etc. Admission is $2 and

children 12 and under are free. Aetna Fire Hall, 273 West (across from the

Newark Post Office), Newark. Info., 302-438-0967.

25TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION 9:30 a.m. Worship & 12:30 p.m.

celebration which the community is welcome to attend. Three former pastors

and the current interim, Don Harurnond, and the representative of the

National UCC, will speak about their experience with The New Ark UCC

and what they expect in the years to come. New Ark United Church of

Christ, 300 E. Main St., Newark. Info., 302-737-4544.

DELAWARE CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL 3 p.m. Program of

Beethoven String Quartet in A Major, Op. 18 5 Kenji Bunch

Paraphraseology for violin and marimba Shostakovich String Quartet 4 in D

Major. Tickets cost $20 adults; $16 seniors; $10 students; and free for children

under 6. Copeland Lecture Hall, Winterthur Museum and gardens, Rt.

52, Wilmington. Info., 302-239-8440.

FREE SUNDAY MORNINGS Month of June 9:30a.m. - Noon. Free admission

includes the special exhibition The Kuerner Farm, museum guides

offering information about artwork, free childrens' Discovery Game, and

new annual family memberships at 25 percent off. Brandywine River

Museum, Rt. l, Chadds Ford, Pa. Info., 610-388-2700.

MONDAY

14

JAZZ CONCERT 7 p.m. This performance features

University of Delaware faculty Tom Palmer,

piano and Vernon James, saxophone joined by other

local area musicians. Concerts are free. Loudis

Recital Hall, Amy E. du Pont Music Building,

Amstel Ave. and Orchard Rd., Newark. Info., 302-

831-2577.

JULIANNA BAGGOTT 7 p.m. This local author

of Girl Talk, The Miss America Family, and The

Madam, will give a talk on becoming an author.

Free and open to the public. Newark Free Library,

750 Library Ave., Newark. Info., 302-731-7550.

LINE DANCING 1 p.m. beginner class; and 2 p.m. advanced class every

Monday at Newark Senior Center, 200 White Chapel Dr., Newark. Info.,

302-737-2336. •

See EVENTS, 11 .....

Saturday at the American Legion of

Elkton. No cover, all welcome. Info.,

Tuesdays at Newark Senior Center, White

Chapel Dr., Newark. Free & open to pub-

Listeners and new members welcome.

Info., 302-999-8310.

FAMILY 4 COMMUNITY 1 p.m. second

Fridays. Continuing education to promote

better way of life at County Extension

Office, South Cbapel St, Newark. New

members welcome. Info., 302-738-4419

or302-83J-1239.

STRENGTH TRAINING 9- 10 a.m.

Mondays; 6:45 • 7:45p.m. Tues. and

'Thurs.; 10:15 -11:15 a.m. Wed. and Fri.

at Newark Senior Center, 200 White

Chapel Dr. Info., 302-737-2336.

LYME SUPPORT GROUP 10:30 a.m.

second Saturday of each month at the

Kirkwood Highway Library. Info., 302-

996-9065 or e-mail TLizzy@ snip.net.

RECYCLE ALUMINUM 9 a.m. to noon

second Saturday eacb month at Center for

Creative Arts, offRt. 82, Yorklyn.

Anything except foil. Remove non-metal

portions like glass or chair webbing. Call

for house siding and large pickups at 302-

239-2690 or 302-239-2434.

MEN'S BREAKFAST 7:30a.m. every

Saturday at Greater Grace Church, 30

Blue Hen Dr. $5 donation goes to missions.

Info., 302-738-1530.

KARAOKE 8 p.m.- midnight every

410-398-9720.

NATURE VIDEOS l p.m. every Saturday.

Video and one-hour guided walk for all

ages at Ashland Nature Center. Info.,

239-2334.

• SUNDAY, JUNE 13

BEAR DANCERS Second Sunday. Square

dancing from 2-5 p.m. No partner or

experience needed. Dress comfortably

and bring clean, soft-soled shoes. No

smoking or alcohol. 208 Mariner's Way,

Bear. $6lnfo., 302-838-0493, ext. 5.

• MONDAY, JUNE 14

PARENTS WITHOUT PARTNERS 7:30

p.m. orientation meeting the second

Monday of the month at the Bear Library,

Governor's Square. Info., 302-998-3115,

ext. I.

MHA DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP

7 - 9 p.m. Mondays. Support group sponsored

by Mental Health Association in

Delaware. Free. To protect privacy of

members, meeting locations provided

only with registration at 302-765-9740.

SIMPLY JAZZERCIZE 10:15 a.m

Mondays, 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays, 9 a.m.

Wednesdays at Newark Senior Center,

200 White Chapel Drive. Info., 302-737-

2336 .

CHORUS OF BRANDYWINE 7:30p.m.

Men's barbershop rehearsals at MBNA

Bowman Conference Center, Ogletown.

All welcome. Info., 302-655-SING.

NEWARK ROTARY CLUB 6:15 -7:30

p.m. every Monday at the Holiday Inn,

Route 273. Info., 453-8853.

GUARDIANS' SUPPORT 6 - 8 p.m.

Meeting for grandparents and all those

raising others' children at Children &

Families First, 62 N. Chapel St., Newark.

Information and registration, 302-658-

5177, ext. 260.

NCCo STROKE CLUB noon at the Jewish

Community Center, Talleyville. Info., call

Nancy Traub at 302-324-4444.

SCOTTISH DANCING 7:30p.m. at St.

Thomas Episcopal Church, 276 S.

College Ave., Newark. Info., 302-368-

2318.

• TUESDAY, JUNE 15

CAREGIVER SUPPORT 7 to 9 p.m. third

lie. Info., 302-737-2336.

NARFE 11 a.m. third Tuesday of month.

Newark Chapter of National Association

of Retired Federal Employees meets at

the First State Diner & Restaurant, 1108

S. College Ave. Info., 302-731-1628 or at

302-836-3196.

STAMP GROUP I p.m. first and third

Tuesday of month at Newark Senior

Center, 200 White Chapel Dr. Info., 302-

737-2336.

NEWARK LIONS 6:30p.m. frrst and third

Tuesday of month. Lions meeting with

program at the Holiday Inn, Newark

Rt.273/I-95 . Call Marvin Quinn at 302-

731-1972 .

CANCER SUPPORT GROUP 7 p.m. first

and third Tuesdays at Liberty Baptist

Church, Red Lion Rd., Bear. Info., 302-

838-2060.

NEWARK DELTONES 7:45p.m. every

Tuesday. For men who like to sing at

New Ark United Church of Christ, 300 B.

Main St. Info., call Will at 302-368-3052.

DIVORCECARE 6:30- 8:30p.m. Support

group meeting at Evangelical

Presbyterian Church, 308 Possum Park

Rd., Newark. Info., 302-737-7239.

SWEET ADELINES 7:30-10 p.m. every

Thesday. Singing group meets at MBNA

Bowman Center, Route 4, Newark.

SCRAPBOOKING 7 • 9 p.m. Tuesdays at

Glasgow Reformed Presbyterian Cburcb,

Summit Bridge Road, Glasgow. Nursery,

$2/child. Info., 302-834-GRPC.

MS SUPPORT 4 • 6 p.m. Tuesdays at MS

Society Headquarters, 2 Mill Road,

Wtlrnington. Info., 302-655-5610.

• WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16

CROON'S AND COLITIS FOUNDA·

TION 7:30p.m. third Wednesdays.

Wtlrnington Satellite Group meets at

Christiana Hospital, Room 1100. Info.,

302-764-5117.

BGCCCO MEETING 7 p.m. third

Wednesdays. Bear Glasgow Council of

Civic Organizations meets at Pencader

Grange Hall, Glasgow Avenue/Old Rt.

8%. Info., 302-832-0793.

DIAMOND STATE CROCHETERS 6

p.m. third Wednesdays in the Limestone

Medical Center, Room 005, Limestone

Rd. Info., call Ann at 302-324-8585.

AT HOME MOTHERS CONNECTION

7:30p.m. First and third Wednesdays.

Meeting for moms only at St. Barnabas

Church, Duncan Rd. Info., call Darlene

Regan at 610-274-2165.

See MEETINGS, 11 .....

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