ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008 CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

geelongaustralia.com.au

ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008 CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

WWW.GEELONGAUSTRALIA.COM.AU


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Geelong: coast, country and suburbs is the best place to live through prosperous and cohesive

communities in an exceptional environment.

But what does this really mean to our residents? What is it about our community or the environment

we live in that makes Geelong the best place to live?

Council’s commitment to engaging the community led us to again involving local primary school

children in giving their interpretation of the City’s vision.

An open invitation to primary schools from selected wards resulted in six being selected; Bell Park North

(Cowie ward), Ashby (Brownbill ward), Newcomb Park (Cheetham ward), Ocean Grove (Beangala ward),

Manifold Heights (Kildare ward) and South Geelong (Austin ward). Our vision was put into the hands of

senior students and they were asked to portray it through pictures.

The local community and environment is very important to our children. It is where they live, where

they learn, where they play and most importantly where they begin to build their future.

The artworks throughout this document depict this importance to our children and show the pride

they have in Geelong, and in particular their local community.

We would like to thank the staff and some 400 students for giving their time and for their

enthusiastic participation.

The vision, through their eyes, is why Geelong is the best place to live.

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THE YEAR’S HIGHLIGHTS

Satyam Technology and Learning Centre

Council, in partnership with Deakin University and the Victorian Government

were successful in attracting global IT firm Satyam Computer Services to the

region. This is one of the biggest industry investments in the region for decades

and has the potential to deliver 2,000 new jobs. Construction is expected to

commence in 2009 in the Geelong Technology Precinct at Deakin’s Waurn

Ponds campus.

More information: Page 79 or visit www.geelongaustralia.com.au

Bellarine Aquatic and Sports Centre

Construction commenced on the Bellarine Aquatic and Sports Centre in

February 2008 and is due to open in December 2008. The centre, which is

a long held vision of the Bellarine community, is being built at Ocean Grove,

and is a partnership project involving the City of Greater Geelong and the

Victorian Government.

More information: Page 95 or visit www.geelongaustralia.com.au

Geelong EcoChallenge

As part of Council’s commitment to responding to climate change, EcoChallenge

was launched in May 2008. EcoChallenge is a corporate sustainability program

aimed at reducing the organisation’s own consumption of energy, water and

resources. It challenges our conventional thinking and works towards achieving

our vision of an ‘exceptional environment’.

OUR VISION:

“Geelong: coast, country and

suburbs is the best place to

live through prosperous and

cohesive communities in an

exceptional environment.”

OUR MISSION:

“Working cooperatively to

provide leadership and

services that are effective

and sustainable in meeting

the changing needs of our

communities.”

More information: Page 83 or visit www.geelongaustralia.com.au

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CONTENTS

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

OVERVIEW 2

About Us 3

Our History – from Jillong to Geelong 4

Geelong: Coast, Country and Suburbs –

the Best Place to Live 7

City of Greater Geelong at a Glance 9

Message from the Mayor 11

Message from the Chief Executive Officer 12

Our Councillors 13

Planning and Reporting Framework 20

THE YEAR IN REVIEW 22

A Snapshot of the Year’s Achievements 23

Outstanding Achievements 25

Customer Service Commitments and Achievements 26

Council Funding Priorities 30

Summary of Financial Results for

2007-2008 and Five Year Trends 32

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT 37

Best Value 38

Community Engagement 40

OUR PEOPLE 46

Organisation Structure 47

Values and Behaviours 48

Our Chief Executive Officer 49

Divisional Operational Performance 50

Human Resource Management 56

Staff Profile 58

Employee Excellence Awards 60

Recognition of Service Awards 61

Our Volunteers 62

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE 64

Governance Framework 65

Internal Audit 66

Statutory Information 67

Council Appointments to Committees and Groups 70

PERFORMANCE 71

The Pillars: Highlights and Achievements 72

Health and Wellbeing 74

Economic Development 79

Environment 83

Community Safety and Security 87

Transportation 90

Parks Sport and Leisure 95

Education and Research 100

Arts Culture and Heritage 104

Telecommunications 108

Theme 1: Democracy 110

Theme 2: Best Value 113

2007-2008 Performance Statement 117

Victorian Local Government Indicators 123

STANDARD STATEMENTS AND

ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 125

Understanding the Financial Report and

Financial Statements 126

Standard Statements 128

Annual Financial Report 138

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 191

INDEX 193

GLOSSARY 195

CONTACT COUNCIL 196

1

Waterfront Geelong


OVERVIEW

Welcome to the City of Greater Geelong’s

Annual Report for 2007-2008.

The City of Greater Geelong acknowledges

the Wathaurong as the traditional

custodians of this land.

Playground at Steampacket Gardens

2


ABOUT US

Located some 75 kilometres from the

Melbourne CBD, our municipality is made up

of 12 wards and has a growing population of

over 208,000.

The Annual Report 2007-2008 meets

with our commitment to be transparent in performance

reporting.

Our Council

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

The City of Greater Geelong’s City Plan

2007-2011 is the guiding document for

this Annual Report. City Plan describes

our strategic objectives and key strategies.

Council embarked on an ambitious

program of actions for 2007-2008 aligned

to the nine Pillars of a great city and the

two themes: Democracy and Best Value.

The Annual Report provides an update on

the highlights and achievements

emanating from this program. It also

states our objectives for the future and

lists the challenges ahead.

In 2007-2008 1,625 new residential dwellings were

approved, with total residential dwellings now exceedig

90,000. The city is also a major centre for investment

with over 13,000 businesses and a highly skilled

workforce of over 110,000 people.

The municipality covers 1,245km 2 , comprising country,

coastal and suburban areas. We are surrounded by water,

with Corio and Port Phillip Bays, the Barwon River, lakes,

wetlands and the open sea, beautiful parklands and

wildlife sanctuaries. In close proximity to national and

state parks, Geelong is also readily accessible to the world

renowned coastline of south-west Victoria via the Great

Ocean Road, and edges the multi-award-winning

Waterfront overlooking Corio Bay.

Geelong offers quality living, extensive job and business

opportunities and a wide range of recreational and

cultural events and activities. We are fortunate to have

some of Australia’s best educational facilities and a

comprehensive range of health care and community

services for residents across all age groups. Geelong truly

is the best place to live.

About This Annual Report

This Annual Report details the performance and

achievements of our Council for the period 1 July 2007

to 30 June 2008. The aim is to inform all Council

stakeholders including ratepayers, residents, businesses,

community and interest groups, news media, all levels of

government, Council staff and the wider general

community.

Geelong became a Local Government entity under the

Incorporation of the Town of Geelong Act (an Act of NSW

Parliament) on 12 October 1849.

Victoria's Local Government reform began in 1993

when the State Government introduced legislation to

combine more than 200 small local Councils into 78

larger Councils (now 79). At this time, six local Councils

and part of a seventh (Barrabool) were formed into

one large municipality called the City of Greater Geelong

(18 May 1993).

Since 1993 the structure of our Council has undergone

some significant changes.

Between 1993 and 1995 the City of Greater Geelong

was governed by four Commissioners appointed by the

State. In March 1995 the new City of Greater Geelong

held its first election. 12 Councillors were elected

with each Councillor representing one ward.

In late 1997 the Council was restructured by the State

Government and the 12 ward makeup was changed to

four wards. Subsequent to this, the second Council was

elected in 1998 consisting of nine Councillors.

In March 2001, the Council reverted to its current 12

ward system with 12 Councillors. A further review was

completed by the Victorian Electoral Commission

in May 2008 with the decision to maintain the current

structure, however some ward boundaries have been

modified. The ward boundary changes will take effect

for the General Election to be held in November 2008.

3


OUR HISTORY - FROM JILLONG TO GEELONG

Geelong has a long and proud history dating

back well before white settlement.

The Wathaurong people lived in the Geelong region for

more than 25,000 years before white settlers arrived with

various clans established in the area. White settlement

from the early 1800s had a devastating effect on the

Aboriginal people. Sheep destroyed much of the root

crops which the Wathaurong depended on, and

introduced diseases that cut a swathe through their

people causing birth rates and clan numbers to fall.

The significant level of activity of the Wathaurong people

is evident through approximately 140 archaeological sites

that have been found in the region.

The name Geelong itself comes from the term Jillong.

When the explorers Hume and Hovell arrived in the area

in 1824, they approached the Wathaurong people and

asked for the name of the area. They were informed that

the bay was called Jillong and the land Corio, or at least

this is how they construed the conversation.

The actual meaning of these two words has been subject

of much speculation over the years. There is a belief that

the Europeans had made a mistake in ascribing Corio to

the sea and Geelong to the land, when it should have

been the other way around. The debate goes on!

Following is a short chronological history of Geelong,

from the early 1800s through to today.

1802 - Lieut. John Murray from the Lady Nelson

discovered and explored Corio Bay.

1802 - Commander Matthew Flinders entered Port Phillip

Bay onboard the Investigator and climbed Station

Peak (now known as Flinders Peak at the

You Yangs).

1824 - Explorers Hume and Hovell reached the shore

of Corio Bay (close to the present Duck

Ponds Bridge).

1837 - Capt Foster Fyans arrived at Geelong as Police

Magistrate.

1837 - David Fisher built the first house in Geelong.

1838 - Geelong surveyed.

1838 - Geelong gazetted as a town.

1838 - First land sale held.

1840 - First issue of the “Geelong Advertiser” published.

1849 - Town of Geelong incorporated by special Act of

the New South Wales Legislative Council.

1850 - First meeting of Geelong Town Council held.

1853 - Geelong-Melbourne Railway commenced.

1857 - Post Office built at corner of Ryrie and

Gheringhap Streets.

1858 - Geelong Gas Company incorporated.

1859 - Geelong Yacht Club formed.

1861 - Geelong College founded.

1862 - Geelong- Ballarat railway opened.

1872 - Johnstone Park opened.

1872 - National Wool Museum built.

1877 - Geelong Railway Station building commenced.

1887 - Gordon Institute of Technology opened.

1890 - Cheetham Salt Works established.

1899 - Geelong Electric Syndicate granted consent to

install electric lights and power.

1905 - Harbour Trust for the Geelong Port passed

by Parliament.

1905 - New Racecourse and Agricultural Show

Grounds gazetted.

1908 - Geelong Waterworks and Sewerage Trust formed.

1908 - Geelong’s first car constructed by Humble

and Sons.

1910 - Ratepayer approval secured to develop Market

Square for retailing purposes.

1910 - Geelong declared a city.

1912 - Geelong Electric Tramway Service opened.

1912 - First automatic telephone exchange in

Australia opened at Geelong.

1914 - Geelong Grammar School opened in Corio.

1915 - Geelong High School officially opened.

1915 - Woollen Mills at North Geelong opened.

1917 - New City Hall, Geelong, officially opened.

1924 - Wards at Kitchener Memorial Hospital officially

opened.

1925 - Geelong Football Club won its first VFL Premiership.

1925 - Ford Motor Company commenced operations.

1926 - The ‘Palais’ opened in Moorabool Street.

1926 - Concrete Barwon Bridge officially opened.

1927 - Eastern Beach improvements commenced.

4


1927 - Barwon Heads – Ocean Grove Bridge

opened to traffic.

1929 - Geelong West declared a city.

1930 - Geelong’s first radio station 3GL (now K-Rock)

commenced transmission.

1933 - Apex Club first founded in Geelong.

1933 - Great Ocean Road scheme completed.

1961 - Parking metres introduced.

1965 - Coles opened Geelong’s first supermarket

in the city.

1963 - Alcoa aluminium smelter established.

1974 - Woollen Mills, for so long a feature of the city,

begun to disappear one by one.

1974 - South Barwon declared a city.

2001 - The Four Points by Sheraton Hotel opened on the

Geelong Waterfront.

2002 - Geelong Botanic Gardens opened its 21st Century

Garden extensions.

2004 - Skandia Group announced sponsorship of

Geelong’s Australia Day sailing regatta. Skandia

Geelong Week is now held over five days and is

Australia’s largest keel boat regatta.

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

1934 - T&G Building completed.

1936 - Bulk handling and loading facilities for grain

erected at the port.

1937 - St Mary’s Church completed.

1937 - Pilkington Glass Works and International

Harvester commenced operations.

1944 - Grace McKeller complex secured for housing

the elderly.

1947 - Plan for orderly town planning adopted – a first

for Victoria.

1949 - Newtown declared a city.

1951 - Geelong Football Club won back-to-back

1952 VFL Premierships.

1954 - New suburbs created – East Geelong, Norlane

and Corio.

1954 - Shell Refinery opened.

1954 - Queen Elizabeth II visited Geelong.

1956 - Tramway system scrapped, replaced by diesel

buses – a first for Victoria.

1977 - Geelong Regional Commission established.

1977 - Deakin University established.

1984 - Market Square redevelopment commenced.

1988 - Queen Elizabeth II visited Geelong.

1989 - Municipality of Bellarine became a rural city.

1989 - Collapse of giant financier Farrow Corporation

(Pyramid).

1993 - Amalgamation of six Councils to form the City of

Greater Geelong.

1996 - Deakin University opened new campus on the

Geelong waterfront.

1996 - Port of Geelong Authority privatised.

1998 - Council exhibited a new Greater Geelong

Planning Scheme.

1999 - Waterfront redevelopment project completed

(commenced in 1996).

2000 - $27M revitalisation of Geelong’s Central Activities

Area commenced.

2004 - Jetstar commenced domestic flights from

Avalon Airport.

2005 - Relocation of the Transport Accident Commission

headquarters to Geelong announced.

2007 - His Holiness the Dalai Lama returned to Geelong

after his first visit in 2002.

2007 - Geelong Football Club broke a 44 year drought

winning the 2007 AFL Premiership.

2008 - Deakin University opened their Medical School –

offering the first rural and regional training

program in Victoria.

2008 - Indian IT company Satyam Computer Services

attracted to Geelong, potentially creating 2000

jobs.

2008 - Westfield completed $150M redevelopment of

Bay City Plaza shopping complex.

1959 - Regional Library opened.

5

Source: Walter AL, Chronological Table of Historical Events of Geelong and District 1802-1938 (1939); Houghton, Norman, Geelong – A Short History (2003)


THEN

NOW

Eastern Beach

6


GEELONG: COAST, COUNTRY AND SUBURBS -

THE BEST PLACE TO LIVE

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

7

From the early beginnings to now Geelong

certainly has been through some challenging

times and exciting changes.

Today, our region offers a diverse and exceptional lifestyle.

There are wide expanses of open space and diverse

waterways to enjoy, many kilometres of walking and bike

tracks, cultural experiences, great sporting facilities, world

class major events and fine dining and entertainment.

We have a strong economy with quality education

facilities, a cosmopolitan and vibrant community, and a

sustainable future outlook. Qualities that all contribute to

our city being the best place to live.

But our city isn’t standing still. The landscape is changing

right before our eyes with unprecedented levels of

investment and major construction underway. Our

economy remains strong with the transition from a

reliance on manufacturing as a source of employment

and wealth, to one where knowledge and services are

becoming strong contributors to growth.

Changing Economy

Council’s Economic Development Strategy 2005-2010

encourages the pursuit of industries that will maximise

the region’s competitive advantages, and in doing so

encourage investment and secure employment

opportunities in the future. The strategy recognises that

manufacturing industries such as Textiles, Clothing and

Footwear, Petrochemicals and Utilities are experiencing

declining employment, and identifies the growth sectors

that will drive modern dynamic economies such as

Knowledge, Innovation and Research, Advanced

Manufacturing, Health, Tourism, Food and Horticulture.

The City is emerging as a leader in several of these

dynamic industries, and we are beginning to reap the

benefits.

Despite rising interest rates, increased petrol prices and

severe drought conditions the region’s economy has

continued to perform well. In the past year

unemployment in our region decreased, median house

prices increased, non-residential building activity

increased markedly and a record number of tourists

visited the area. Add to this a number of major

investments and our economy is looking very healthy.

Investor confidence in Geelong continues to be at an

all time high. Projects recently completed include the

Westfield redevelopment, Waurn Ponds Plaza

development, the five-storey Harrison Place office

building, the State’s first Rural and Regional Medical

School at Deakin University’s Waurn Ponds campus and

the new all-weather racetrack at the Geelong Racecourse.

Further examples of investor confidence are the number

of cranes that currently occupy our skyline with many

construction projects in progress. These include the

construction of the Transport Accident Commission

headquarters, the Edgewater development on Geelong’s

Waterfront, Deakin University’s redevelopment of Dennys

Lascelles Wool Store to house its health precinct, Barwon

Health’s new Emergency Department at the Geelong

Hospital, St John of God Hospital expansion, Bellarine

Aquatic and Sports Centre development and the

Pakington Strand construction.

Future developments that will continue to drive our

economy include the Indian ICT Company Satyam

Computer Services Software Development and Learning

Centre at Deakin University’s Waurn Ponds Campus, the

Skilled Stadium refurbishment of the Ross Drew Stand,

the Bayside Tower complex and Mercer Street Silo

development in the Western Wedge precinct, and the

construction of the new Leisurelink Aquatic Centre in

Waurn Ponds.

Tourism continues to grow as an important economic

industry for our region. The establishment of a base for

Qantas off-shoot airline Jetstar at Avalon Airport - only 20

minutes from Geelong - has been a significant asset for

the region. Geelong also has a proven track record in

attracting major national and international events. Our

calendar of events includes the Australian International

Airshow, Skandia Geelong Week, and the Australian

qualifier the the Ironman 70.3 World Championships. In

the coming years we will also host the 2010 UCI Road

Cycling World Championships and the 2009 Australian

Masters Games. These will bring huge economic benefits

to the region.

Investment in innovative and smart industries will drive

Geelong’s future. Fundamental to this is the creation of an

environment to attract and retain dynamic and creative

people to facilitate this investment and generate business

activity.

Community Wellbeing

Community wellbeing is an important issue faced by all

Councils. Council activities play a key role in supporting

community wellbeing and in determining future directions

and priorities to meet community needs. Taking a lead on

key community issues, developing partnership


approaches to address key issues and advocating to State

and Federal Government, organisations and groups to

influence their activities are key roles for Council.

Trends such as changing demographics as the population

ages, risk of social isolation as more people live alone and

emerging chronic health issues including obesity, mental

health and substance abuse are having an impact on all

communities. Building community strength for the

socially disadvantaged through local activities that provide

them with the skills, information and long-term support to

build their capacity is a priority of this Council as is

managing concerns around community safety and

security.

The City has and will continue to address these areas

through the implementation of strategies such as the

Geelong Strategic Health Plan, Municipal Strategic

Statement, Youth Strategy, Geelong Community Safety

Strategy, Municipal Early Years Plan, Disability Action

Plan, and numerous township structure plans. All of these

plans have involved extensive community consultation to

ensure they reflect residents’ needs and aspirations.

Successful community building initiatives in Whittington,

Corio and Norlane, award winning child care and early

learning services, comprehensive home and community

care services and upgraded community facilities have

played a major role in improving the wellbeing of our

community.

These projects and initiatives help encourage social

cohesion, improved health, deliver better educational

outcomes, increase tolerance and reduce crime.

Built and Natural Environment

The impact of climate change is far reaching. It is no

longer just a phenomenon that is occurring in other parts

of the world but in fact happening in our own backyard.

Low rainfall and warmer seasonal weather have had an

adverse effect on the region’s recreation reserves, parks

and gardens and water storage levels.

Greenhouse emissions are a major concern, whilst urban

growth is putting pressure on traffic management and

also on our natural environment.

The City has undertaken many actions to alleviate these

impacts, and will continue to plan for the future through

the implementation of a number of strategies and actions

plans including:

> The Environment Management Strategy 2006-2011,

which addresses issues such as council policy,

programs and planning, education and partnerships,

biodiversity management, sustainable agriculture,

coastal and marine, waterways and wetlands, air

quality, resource use, waste, recycling and reuse and

urban settlements.

> The Sustainable Water Use Policy, which aims at

balancing the need for greater efficiencies in water use

with the service needs of the community. Council is

aiming at a 25 per cent reduction in potable water

consumption by 2015 and 30 per cent by 2030.

> Drought recovery initiatives including the conversion of

major sporting fields to drought tolerant turf, and major

water harvesting initiatives.

> The Greenhouse Reduction Strategy, which sets

minimum reduction targets for Council’s greenhouse

emissions of 30 per cent by 2010 and 60 per cent by

2025.

> The Armstrong Creek Urban Growth Plan, which aims

to become a model of sustainable living where natural

and cultural features are enhanced and community

interaction encouraged.

> The Municipal Strategic Statement, which ensures that

land development and growth within the region

balances the short and long term needs of the

community. This will ensure the growth of Geelong

is managed in a sustainable way.

> Encouraging walking, cycling and use of alternative

modes of transport through the creation of more bike

paths and walking tracks, a Park and Ride service, the

Walking School Bus program and implementing the

Greater Geelong Cycle Strategy. Delivering safe and

accessible linkages within and between townships is

the ultimate aim which in turn will reduce the reliance

on vehicles.

> Working towards a total waste management system

that maximises the recovery of material and minimises

the region's reliance on landfill.

The Future

With the region growing at such a rapid pace it is

important we consider the social, environmental and

economic aspects of every issue and balance short to

medium term interests with the long term, to ensure our

community continues to grow in a sustainable way.

Sustainable communities are places where people want

to live and work, now and in the future. They meet the

diverse needs of existing and future residents, are

sensitive to their environment, and contribute to a high

quality of life. They are safe and inclusive, well planned,

built and run, and offer equality of opportunity and good

services for all.

The City of Greater Geelong is working hard with the

community to ensure we act responsibly and secure the

future for the youth of today and beyond. Council

recognises that for a sustainable future we need to

protect and enhance our built and natural environment,

strengthen our communities and encourage new

investment in sustainable industries.

8


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG AT A GLANCE

Unit 2006-2007 2007-2008

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

STAFF

Annual Equivalent Fulltime (EFT) Staff EFT 1,219 1,236

Full time: 819

Part time: 345

Casual: 72

ECONOMIC

Recurrent Income $M 184.6 203.4

Recurrent Expenditure $M 178.2 193.9

Rates Revenue $M 106.9 115.4

Rates Revenue as a per cent of Recurrent Income per cent 57.9 56.7

Capital Expenditure $M 49.1 52.4

Working Capital Ratio (level of current assets available to meet current liabilities) per cent 113 136

Outstanding Loans Borrowings $M 16.6 14.7

Debt Servicing Ratio per cent 0.37 0.40

No. of Building Permits issued No. 5,022 5,161

Building Activity value $M 761,340 858,369

No. of Tourists visiting the region No. 3,610,000 4,063,000

COMMUNITY

No. of Kms of Footpath Renewed km 12.2 6.7

No. of Kms of Roads Resurfaced km 53.0 51.3

No. of Children in Council run Child Care Centres No. 1,055 1,070

No. of Hours of General Home Care Delivered by Council Hours 120,000 116,812

No. of Meals delivered (Meals on Wheels) by Council No. 147,000 120,489

No. of Dog Registrations No. 33,170 30,616

No. of Cat Registrations No. 12,000 10,414

ENVIRONMENT

Garbage Volumes (Kg/household) kg 388 434

Recycling Volumes (Kg/household) kg 303 338

Green Waste Volumes (Kg/household) kg 203* 294

Council Water Consumption KL 360,480 # 501,452

Mosquito breeding site treatments – no. of days sites treated aerially No. 22 29

Mosquito breeding site treatments – no. ground based treatments No. 321 657

No. of trees planted No. 1,700* 1,388*

9

* Decrease on prior years due to drought conditions.

# Significant drop in water consumption on 2005-2006 levels (1,013,222KL) due to enforced water restrictions and water saving initiatives.


Emily Benstead

South Geelong Primary

School

Age: 11

‘Geelong is a great place to

live because we have the

Barwon River which is a

lovely place to go walking and

bike riding with your family.’

10


MESSAGE FROM THE MAYOR

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

11

Cr. Bruce Harwood

Mayor

Welcome to the City of Greater Geelong

2007-2008 Annual Report, a summary of the

progress we have made in the last financial

year.

Following the election of the current Council in late 2004,

we set our vision, developed a four-year plan and chose

13 priorities that would be our particular focus during this

Council’s term, to build on our considerable competitive

strengths.

On page 30 you will find an update on Council’s 13

priorities and I am pleased with the progress we have

made.

Running a municipality of this size, with its mix of urban,

coastal and rural environments, is challenging. If you add

to that mix the growth pressures on our infrastructure,

you can understand why the issue of planning for growth

has been high on our agenda.

In the last year alone we adopted a revised City of Greater

Geelong Local Planning Policy Framework, with the

Housing Density Strategy, Western Wedge Framework,

Barwon Heads Structure Plan, Lara Structure Plan,

Central Geelong Structure Plan, Osborne House Precinct

Masterplan, Eastern Park and Geelong Botanic Gardens

Strategic Plan, and Geelong Port Structure Plan.

This has given great confidence to developers to invest

in our region.

The imminent completion of stage one and two of the

Ring Road in November 2008 is bound to amplify the

growth pressures and extend them to surrounding

municipalities such as Golden Plains and Surf Coast.

We are working with these Councils and others through

G21, to address such issues.

The State Government has encouraged us to release land

parcels in response to the increased demand for housing

and industrial land, but that cannot happen overnight.

We all want to ensure sustainability, and that means

allocating open space, considering water and waste

options and opportunities for community, cultural and

recreation facilities. It means providing employment zones

and having a seamless public transport system, one that

enables access to the Surf Coast and then across to the

Bellarine. We have also been working very closely with

Barwon Water to ensure we both understand what we

are trying to achieve for the future of this region.

Environmental sustainability has been a key platform

of this Council. In the past year we have signed the

Victorian Local Sustainability Accord, joined the G21

Climate Change Alliance, adopted a Greenhouse

Reduction Strategy and launched the EcoChallenge

initiative for staff.

The movement of people and traffic flows is something

we have grappled with in partnership with the State

Government and statutory bodies such as VicRoads and

V/Line. It is an imperfect science but there is a genuine

effort by us all to get it right.

Importantly the Greater Geelong Cycle Strategy was

released during the year. Cycling is just one solution, and

as it encourages exercise whilst reducing our impact on

the environment, it is a great solution.

Speaking of bikes, this year we were successful in

bidding for the 2010 UCI Road Cycling World

Championships. Geelong is fast becoming the major

events capital of Regional Australia. Our research tells us

that competitors identify Geelong as one of the best

environments to compete in because it is not a capital

city, there is little congestion, the bay and the beach are

attractive and we have the infrastructure to run worldclass

events.

Given that a successful event is one that has the

maximum number of competitors, I’d say we are looking

pretty good!

Events are renowned for the flow-on of economic impact

to other sectors of the economy. Our program of

diversifying economic activity to reduce the reliance on

traditional manufacturing has been ongoing during our

term. Next on the agenda is a conference and exhibition

centre. In 2006-2007 the economic impact of the

conferences we were able to host was $56.5 million, but

there were many we had to turn down because we simply

do not have a space large enough. In 2008-2009, this is

our number one priority.

My thanks to my fellow Councillors, CEO Kay Rundle and

Council staff for their commitment to making Geelong the

best place to live.

Cr Bruce Harwood

Mayor


MESSAGE FROM THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

I remember when I first came to Geelong I was

struck by the number of people I met who felt

so passionate about the places in which they

live and Central Geelong.

It has now been over five years and that passion burns

bright. Time has passed quickly and the challenges of

growth have been many. After yet another successful year

where we ended on a strong financial note, we are in

good stead to meet the challenges of the 2008-2009 year.

Below are some trends that demonstrate the successes:

> Leap in the number of tourists visiting the region.

> Increase in the number of building permits issued.

> Increase in the value of building activity.

Kay Rundle

Chief Executive Officer

> Increase in patronage of our Swim Sport and Leisure

Centres.

In 2007-2008, the average residential ratepayer paid

$2.60 a day for services that ranged from the basics like

roads, parks, footpaths and maternal child health to

supporting events and festivals, youth, community

groups, home care and meals on wheels, leisure and

recreation facilities, the Geelong Art Gallery, libraries and

the National Wool Museum. In fact, we provide over 120

services to the community.

Most importantly in the past 12 months we spent $52

million on our capital works program to create new assets

such as the Legends Plaza. This money was also spent

on ensuring that the priority items from our $1.2 billion

worth of City assets were well maintained and upgraded.

Engaging our community helps us ensure that the

priorities of local people translate into strategy and

decision making. Over the year there were 120

opportunities for the community to actively participate

in the workings of Council.

In May we launched EcoChallenge, an awareness and

training program for staff to reduce our organisation’s

consumption of water, energy and resources. We have

already made considerable progress in cutting water and

energy use, but we need to do more, particularly if we are

to meet the targets set in our Greenhouse Reduction

Strategy, released in December 2007.

I am delighted that progress has been made on the issue

of civic accommodation. We currently have staff spread

over numerous sites, a situation that is costly and

frustrating. Council has the expectation that a state-ofthe-art

building that satisfies triple bottom line principles

of environmental sustainability, community use and

financial prudence will be the end result. In fact, it is

possible that we will be able to meet many of the

greenhouse targets we have set for the year 2020 simply

by how we build it.

In order to continually improve our service delivery to the

community, we spent over one million dollars on training

for staff in the 2007-2008 financial year. This ensures

standards are shared, encourages awareness, increases

knowledge and develops the skills of our staff.

In recognition of some truly wonderful efforts, many

service teams have won awards. One example is the

Annual Report - last year’s equivalent of this

document - which won a silver award at the 2007

Australasian Reporting Awards. A full listing of our awards

can be found on page 25.

One project I am very proud of is the Early Learning

Centre @ Rosewall. Working with Shell and the

Department of Education and Early Childhood

Development, we have reopened this service to provide

a 12-hour a week local education program for three to

four year-olds. The staff involved showed a real

commitment to ensuring that opportunities for early

learning are accessible for local children, and to working

with others in innovative ways to make it happen.

It is just one story in a sea of many that demonstrate

the dedication of staff to the City of Greater Geelong.

My thanks to every single staff member. Thanks also to

the Mayor and Councillors and to all who have partnered

with us. The Geelong region truly is a special place.

Kay Rundle

Chief Executive Officer

12


OUR COUNCILLORS

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Working towards making Geelong the

best place to live has been this Council’s

main aspiration since being elected in

November 2004.

Making informed decisions on all aspects of the

community, environment and economic wellbeing

through strong leadership and planning is of paramount

importance in achieving Council’s vision.

This is the final year of the current Council’s term and

they can be proud of the many achievements that have

seen remarkable development within the municipality.

The Role of Council

Council operates under the Local Government Act 1989

and is elected to provide leadership and good governance

for the municipality and the local community.

Council has a number of roles including:

> Taking into account the diverse needs of the local

community in decision making.

> Providing leadership by establishing strategic objectives

and monitoring their achievements.

> Ensuring that resources are managed in a responsible

and accountable manner.

> Advocating the interests of the local community to

other communities and governments.

> Fostering community cohesion and encouraging active

participation in civic life.

Council Elections

Victorian local government elections are held every

four years.

Councillors are elected by the community and they

represent the overall public interest of the region and their

respective ward. They take part in formulating, adopting

and reviewing the corporate plan, annual budget and

other operational plans, and also make informed

decisions on Council policies and funding requirements.

The Mayor is elected by the 12 Councillors for a one-year

term. The election of Mayor is usually held in December.

At the end of that one-year term, the Mayor may wish to

stand for re-election for a further term or decide to stand

down. The Mayor has several roles including chairing

Council meetings, ensuring that Council decisions are

carried out and representing the City at government, civic

and ceremonial functions.

The next local government elections will be held in

November 2008.

In January 2008, Deakin Ward Councillor Shane Dowling

tendered his resignation after six years as a Councillor. Cr

Dowling made an enormous contribution to the City of

Greater Geelong. A former Mayor, and portfolio holder for

Strategic and Economic Development, Cr Dowling was a

leading contributor in guiding the City to its current era of

prosperity.

A by-election for the Deakin Ward was held in May 2008,

with Councillor Andrew Katos being elected as the new

representative.

Electoral Boundary Review

Currently the City of Greater Geelong is made up of 12

wards, with one Councillor elected to represent each

ward. The Victorian Electoral Commission has completed

its electoral boundary review and recommended to the

Minister for Local Government that the City of Greater

Geelong maintains 12 Councillors to be elected from 12

single-councillor wards, with some modifications to ward

boundaries. The total voters of all electorates is 159,993,

with the average voters per councillor being 13,333, with

a deviation between -7.16 per cent and +8.93 per cent.

13


Port Phillip Bay

Victoria

Corio Bay

Cr Bruce Harwood (Mayor)

Ward: Kardinia

Bass Strait

City of Greater

Geelong

Melbourne

Balliang Creek

Portfolio: Communications, Tourism and Major Events

Elected to Council: February 2003

Local Belmont resident Bruce Harwood was re-elected to

Council in November 2004, having first joined Council

following a by-election for the Kardinia ward in February

2003. Cr Harwood was re-elected Mayor on 3 December

2007 for a second 12-month term.

Ballan Road

1

Little River

He has been a police officer for 25-years and is currently

a Detective, attached to the Geelong Criminal

Investigation Unit.

Moorabool River

Cr Harwood is involved in the following committees:

> Community Arts and Festivals Assessment Committee

> Geelong Major Events

> Committee for Geelong

> G21 - Geelong Regional Alliance

> Audit Advisory Committee (Until May 27, 2008)

> Planning Committee

> Performance Review Committee (CEO)

> Barwon Regional Waste Management Group

> Community Reference Committee Neighbourhood

Renewal - Norlane Corio

Telephone: (03) 5272 4891

Email: mayor@geelongcity.vic.gov.au

1 Windermere

2 Corio

3 Cowie

4 Kildare

5 Brownbill

6 Austin

7 Kardinia

8 Deakin

9 Buckley

10 Cheetham

11 Coryule

12 Beangala

Pettavel Road

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Mount Duneed Road

10

Corio Bay

Port Phillip Bay

11

12

Bass Strait

14


Port Phillip Bay

Port Phillip Bay

Port Phillip Bay

Corio Bay

Corio Bay

Corio Bay

Bass Strait

Bass Strait

Bass Strait

Cr John Mitchell (Deputy Mayor)

Cr Lou Brazier

Cr Peter McMullin

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Ward: Austin

Portfolio: Sport and Recreation, Strategic Development

Elected to Council: November 2004

Cr Mitchell was born and raised in the Austin ward.

He has lived in the area for more than 40 years and is

married with three children. He is employed at V/Line and

has been an active participant in many local sports and

community organisations. He has been awarded life

memberships of the Thomson Football Club, the South

Barwon Swimming Club and the GCA Sharks Swimming

Club.

Cr Mitchell is involved in the following committees:

> Kardinia Park Steering Committee

> Central Geelong City Management Committee

> Geelong Major Events

> Geelong Safety Committee

> Planning Committee

Telephone: 0400 616 147

Email: councillor@geelongcity.vic.gov.au

Ward: Corio

Portfolio: Community Development, Indigenous Affairs

Elected to Council: March 1998 - March 2001,

November 2004

Cr Brazier was born in the U.S.A. and has been a

Geelong resident since 1993. Cr Brazier is a community

development worker and holds positions with numerous

groups and committees in the area. Her passions include

youth, senior citizens, community development and

better services for disadvantaged communities. She holds

several tertiary qualifications in her chosen professional

fields, and has an extensive health and community

services background.

Cr Brazier is involved in the following committes:

> Community Arts and Festivals Assessment Committee

> Windsor Park Steering Committee

> Geelong - East Timor Friendship Committee

> Geelong Regional Library Corporation

(from 11 Sept 2007)

> DW Hope Centre Feasibility Working Group

Telephone: 0402 454 790

Email: councillor@geelongcity.vic.gov.au

Ward: Buckley

Portfolio: Arts, Culture and Heritage, Economic

Development

Elected to Council: November 2004

A resident of Barwon Heads, Cr McMullin is a lawyer and

also has broad civic and business experience, combined

with a longstanding involvement in areas such as

education, social welfare and the arts.

He is currently the Chair of Regional Cities Victoria and

Deputy President of the Museums Board of Victoria.

Cr McMullin is involved in the following committees:

> Armstrong Creek Urban Growth Plan Steering

Committee

> Community Arts and Festivals Assessment Committee

> Geelong Regional Library Corporation

> Geelong Art Gallery

> Cultural Precinct Master Plan Steering Committee

> Planning Committee

> Geelong Heritage Centre

> Geelong Major Events

> Victorian Local Governance Association

Telephone: 0437 351 286

Email: councillor@geelongcity.vic.gov.au

15


Port Phillip Bay

Port Phillip Bay

Port Phillip Bay

Corio Bay

Corio Bay

Corio Bay

Bass Strait

Bass Strait

Bass Strait

Cr Andrew Katos

Cr Jan Farrell

Cr Barbara Abley AM

Ward: Beangala

Ward: Brownbill

Ward: Deakin

Portfolio: Finance

Elected to Council: May 2008

Cr Katos joined Council following a by-election in

May 2008.

Cr Katos is a lifelong resident of Geelong and the father of

a young family. He is passionate about our city and the

region and enjoys the opportunity of working with

residents and business owners to make a positive

contribution to the community.

Cr Katos is a small business owner in Central Geelong.

Cr Katos is involved in the following committees:

> Audit Advisory Committee

Cr Shane Dowling

(Resigned January 2008)

> Armstrong Creek Urban Growth Plan

Steering Committee

Portfolio: Democracy and Governance,

Education and Youth

Elected to Council: November 2004

Cr Farrell is a bookkeeper and small business consultant

and lives in Ocean Grove with her family, having made

the "sea change" from Melbourne over 17 years ago.

Having experienced first-hand the joy of raising a family

on the Bellarine Peninsula, Cr Farrell is keen to preserve

the wonderful character of the area and is passionate

about the unique identity of our wonderful coastal towns.

Cr Farrell is involved in the following committees:

> Audit Advisory Committee

> Geelong Drug Action Plan Committee

> Graffiti Reference Group

> Submissions Review Panel

> Bellarine Multi Arts Facility (Structure to be reviewed)

> Geelong Regional Library Corporation

> Courthouse Arts Youth Centre

> Geelong Safety Committee

> Planning Committee

Portfolio: Infrastructure, Parks and Gardens

Elected to Council: March 2001

Cr Abley moved to Geelong as a teenager and holds

several tertiary qualifications in her chosen professional

fields. She has an extensive health and community

services background. Cr Abley is a current member of

significant community groups and Boards of

Management including United Way Geelong

(Chairperson) and the Barwon Health Foundation.

Cr Abley was recognised in the 2007 Queens Birthday

Honours List with an Order of Australia Medal for service

to Local Government and Regional Development.

Cr Abley is involved in the following committees:

> Audit Advisory Committee

> Disability Street Access Advisory Committee

> Municipal Emergency Management

Planning Committee

> Planning Committee

> Geelong Major Events

> Barwon Regional Waste Management Group

> Performance Review Committee (CEO)

Telephone: 0407 042 856

Email: councillor@geelongcity.vic.gov.au

> Performance Review Committee (CEO)

> Municipal Association of Victoria

Telephone: 0437 103 035

Email: councillor@geelongcity.vic.gov.au

Telephone: 0419 358 223

Email: councillor@geelongcity.vic.gov.au

16


Port Phillip Bay

Port Phillip Bay

Port Phillip Bay

Corio Bay

Corio Bay

Corio Bay

Bass Strait

Bass Strait

Bass Strait

Cr David Saunderson

Cr Tom O’Connor

Cr Rod Macdonald

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Ward: Cowie

Portfolio: Multicultural Affairs

Elected to Council: March 2001

Cr Saunderson has always lived in Geelong’s northern

suburbs and has previously worked as a journalist and as

an Electorate Officer. His main aim for Council is to

deliver top quality services that meet communities'

expectations as well as working to improve the

community consultation processes.

Cr Saunderson is involved in the following committees:

> Planning Committee

> DW Hope Centre Feasibility Working Group

Telephone: 0409 809 860

Email: councillor@geelongcity.vic.gov.au

Ward: Coryule

Portfolio: Environment and Waste Management

Elected to Council: November 2004

Cr O’Connor is a past member of the Drysdale Football

Club as player, committee member and junior coach and

past president of both the Bellarine Recreation Aquatic

Community Centre project and Boroughcouttas Masters

Swimming Club based in Portarlington. Cr O'Connor is

passionate about the environment, youth and developing

opportunities for the community.

Cr O’Connor is involved in the following committees:

> Bellarine Rail Trail Advisory Committee

> Disability Advisory Committee

> Geelong Region Stormwater Reuse Project - Indented

Head Pilot Study

> Water Taskforce

> Barwon Regional Waste Management Group

> Planning Committee

> Association of Bayside Municipalities

Telephone: 0439 303 537

Ward: Cheetham

Portfolio: Planning, Economic Development, Strategic

Development

Elected to Council: November 2004

Cr Macdonald has lived within the Cheetham ward area

for over 15 years and now operates a small business in

Newcomb, having previously served with the Royal

Australian Air Force. He is active in the local community

and understands the issues affecting his ward.

Cr Macdonald is a strong advocate for residents and is

working to ensure their concerns and aspirations are

communicated to council.

Cr Macdonald is involved in the following committees:

> Bellarine Rail Trail Advisory Committee

> Planning Committee

> Water Taskforce

> Geelong Regional Library Corporation

> Community Renewal Committee - Whittington

Telephone: 0458 509 994

Email: councillor@geelongcity.vic.gov.au

Email: councillor@geelongcity.vic.gov.au

17


Port Phillip Bay

Port Phillip Bay

Corio Bay

Corio Bay

Bass Strait

Bass Strait

Cr Tony Ansett

Ward: Windermere

Portfolio: Historical Restoration, Rural and

Regional Affairs

Elected to Council: March 2001

Cr Ansett grew up in the area and was educated at Corio

Technical School. He has had a career specialising in

sales and marketing. “Fixing the basics and taking more

pride" has been high on Cr Ansett's agenda during his

term in Council and he describes himself as a "down to

earth family man" representing all ages with their issues

and concerns.

Cr Ansett is involved in the following committees:

> Community Arts and Festivals Assessment Committee

> Graffiti Reference Group

> Water Taskforce

> Beckley Park Committee

> Community Reference Committee Neighbourhood

Renewal - Norlane / Corio

> Lara (Secondary School) Local Proposal Committee

Subsequent Stage

Cr Dr Srechko ‘Stretch’ Kontelj OAM

Ward: Kildare

Portfolio: Major Projects

Elected to Council: March 1998

First elected in 1998, Cr Kontelj is in his third term on

Council. Cr Kontelj was born and educated in Geelong

and currently lives in Newtown. He has a long history

of community involvement, particularly in supporting

ethnic communities for which he was awarded an OAM

in the Queen's Birthday Honours List in 2001. In 2003

he was awarded the Centenary Medal for services to

Local Government. He holds Degrees from Monash and

Deakin University and in 1999 was awarded Deakin

University Law School’s first Doctorate in Juridical

Science.

Cr Kontelj is involved in the following committees:

• Planning Committee

• Water Taskforce

• Western Heights School Local Proposal

Telephone: 0419 327 303

Email: councillor@geelongcity.vic.gov.au

> Geelong Regional Library Corporation

(until 11 Sept 2007)

Telephone: (03) 5272 4893

Email: councillor@geelongcity.vic.gov.au

For a list of current councillor appointments to committees and groups not acknowledged here, see page 70.

18


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Council Meetings

Council meets on the second and fourth Tuesday of

each month. Any changes to this cycle or any additional

Special Meetings are publicised through the media.

Meetings are open to the public, and at the start of

ordinary meetings question time gives any member

of the community the opportunity to ask a question

on any Council-related matter.

Most meetings are held in the Council Chamber at City

Hall at 7.00pm, however on a quarterly basis Council

Meetings are held at venues around the municipality.

This encourages greater access to the Councillors and the

operations of Council. During the 12 months to June

2008 Council Meetings have been held at the following

locations:

> Buckley Ward, Grovedale Community Centre,

28 August 2007.

> Beangala Ward, St Leonards Memorial Hall,

26 February 2008.

> Kardinia Ward, Belmont Bowls Club,

27 May 2008.

Council Meeting Attendance

July 2007 - June 2008

A total of 22 Ordinary and one Special Council Meetings

were held during the period July 2007 to June 2008.

The attendance record of Councillors is set out in the

table below.

Name Ordinary Special Total

Cr Abley 21 1 22

Cr Ansett 20 1 21

Cr Brazier 18 1 19

Cr Dowling (Resigned 29 January) 10 1 11

Cr Farrell 22 1 23

Cr Harwood 22 1 23

Cr Kontelj 19 1 20

Cr Macdonald 19 1 20

Cr McMullin 21 1 22

Cr Mitchell 22 1 23

Cr O’Connor 20 1 21

Cr Saunderson 16 - 16

Cr Katos (Elected 13 May) 4 - 4

19


PLANNING AND REPORTING FRAMEWORK

How we Plan

Council’s Vision and Mission statement guide

the strategic direction for the City of Greater

Geelong. Our planning process ensures all

Council actions and resources are directed

towards achieving these outcomes.

Our rolling four-year City Plan is a vital part of this

framework. Through community consultation and

research, Councillors and staff have identified long term

objectives and strategic priorities to ensure the Geelong

region will be the best place to live both now, and into the

future. This plan is reviewed annually with actions for the

coming year determined, and budgets allocated.

Cascading from City Plan is a series of annual department

business plans. These plans detail how each functional

area will contribute to achieving City Plan and department

objectives in the coming year. Each employee is then

allocated a work plan outlining their tasks and

responsibilities.

This ensures accountability is built in at each level of the

planning framework and that all actions carried out across

the organisation are aligned to, and consistent with,

Council’s strategic objectives.


Executive

Scorecard, Quarterly

Council Reports,

and Annual Report

on organisation’s

performance

Managers

progress report on

Business Plan Status,

and Department

Scorecard






Community

Vision Mission


City Plan (4Years)


Annual Budget




Annual Department Business Plans

Staff member work plans/tasks

Corporate Values

> Integrity

> Responsibility

> Innovation

> Respect


Corporate Behaviours

including customer service

commitments, mindsets

and OHS standards

Performance measurement and reporting




Individual staff member

performance management and annual

performance appraisal

20


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

21

Council staff reviewing the new Leisurelink Aquatic Centre development

How we Review and Report

Performance

Continually monitoring performance against set objectives

is pivotal to our success. It allows us to assess how we

are performing and identify potential issues or

opportunities for improvement. This continuous

improvement process helps enable us to deliver the

best possible outcomes for the community.

Monthly Reporting

Department Managers report monthly to their General

Manager and Chief Executive Officer on their

department’s progress, through the Council’s

Performance Management System.

Quarterly Reporting

A quarterly progress report is presented to Council on the

organisation’s achievements against City Plan annual

actions. This report ensures the community is regularly

updated on the progress of all initiatives contained within

City Plan.

Annual Report

The Annual Report details the past 12 months

performance against the objectives, strategic priorities

and annual actions outlined in City Plan. It is structured

around the nine Pillars of a ‘great city’, and two Themes

required for the organisation to effectively operate. It also

provides detailed financial statements, and the range

of statutory information required under the Local

Government Act 1989.

Performance Appraisal System

Each employee is annually appraised on their

performance in carrying out their work plan tasks over the

previous 12 months. The review is strongly focused on

how the employee reflects Council’s values and corporate

behaviours. Future tasks, goals and aspirations are also

discussed, along with potential learning and development

opportunities.


THE YEAR

IN REVIEW

At Council we pride ourselves on providing

the best quality services. Over the last 12

months this has been exemplified by the

many outstanding achievements and

acknowledgements the city has been

recognised for.

Council's Learn to Swim Program

22


A SNAPSHOT OF THE YEAR’S ACHIEVEMENTS

This year has seen many milestones and events that council and the community can be proud of. Here is a snapshot of these achievements that

help to illustrate why our region is the best place to live.

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

23

July 2007

> The Central Geelong Structure Plan is adopted, which

will guide land use and development for Central

Geelong over the next 20 years.

> The John Hansen Memorial Skate Park development

at Leopold completed.

> The Barwon Heads structure plan is made available

for public comment, and attracts more than 870

submissions over the four-week period.

> The Central Geelong Parking Precinct Plan is adopted,

to ensure that development within the City provides the

most effective distribution of parking spaces.

August 2007

> After a two-year review of the Municipal Strategic

Statement, Council adopts the new City of Greater

Geelong Local Planning Policy Framework, which

defines a collective vision for future land use and

development within the municipality.

> Customer Service delivery to our residents takes a step

forward with the launch of online requests for service,

building applications and enquires, and the paying of

accounts.

> A new water recycling facility at Elcho Park opens,

which will treat and use stormwater to irrigate the

Council-owned golf course

> 34 years after its original opening, the new look

Balyang Sanctuary is officially re-opened after

extensive redevelopment works.

> Council endorses the G21 Geelong Region Plan, a long

term plan for the sustainable future of the region.

September 2007

> The City of Greater Geelong’s Youth Strategy 2007-

2011 is launched, with many actions to be undertaken

in the coming 12 months.

> The $800,000 major refurbishment of Queens Park

Sports Pavilion is completed, ensuring it will continue

to cater to the community’s needs into the future.

> The Newcomb Library re-opens, complete with cutting

edge inventory technology, after a nine month re-build

and refit of the service.

> Geelong is named as the host city for the 2010 UCI

Road Cycling World Championship, a major coup for

our events expertise.

> Civil works commence on the $30 million Leisurelink

facility which is expected to be completed in summer

2009-2010.

October 2007

> Cats fans turn out en masse to honour the Geelong

Football Club at a street parade and presentation,

after winning the 2007 AFL Premiership.

> The new children’s activity area in Sparrow Park

Geelong West is opened.

> Council adopts the Osborne House Precinct Master

Plan, which paves the way for a marine-industry

cluster to service the recreational boating industry.

> The $1.5 million Barwon Heads Streetscape

redevelopment is completed, improving access for

pedestrians and creating a fresh new look for the

main street, Hitchcock Ave.

> The 2007 Victorian Seniors Festival Geelong is held

over the month, attracting more than 8,100

participants to the 72 events.

November 2007

> St Leonards celebrates its 150th anniversary with a

community festival, including the unveiling of a street

sculpture commissioned to reflect the natural and

cultural influences that have shaped the town.

> The revised Geelong Liquor Accord is launched, with a

key action being the installation of ID scanners within

Geelong’s major late-night entertainment venues.

> In a world first, wetlands in Geelong and the Japanese

city of Nagoya are linked through web cams, allowing

people to watch in real time the summer and winter

habitats of birds that migrate between the two cities.

> Geelong Otway Tourism wins the Meetings and

Business Tourism Award for the second year in a row,

and the Visitor Information and Services Award at the

2007 Melbourne Airport Victorian Tourism Awards.

> The City of Greater Geelong is ranked the number one

Council for customer service in the July-September

quarter by an independent benchmarking organisation.

December 2007

> The East West traffic improvements throughout the city

continue, with the completion of the Mercer, Malop

and Gheringhap St intersection.

> Council resolves to transfer land at the DW Hope

Centre to Diversitat, for the development of a

multi-purpose community hub for the northern

suburbs.


The City of Greater Geelong commits to reduce its

greenhouse gas emissions by 30 per cent by 2010,

and 60 per cent by 2025, through the implementation

of the Greehouse Reduction Strategy.

> The Old Post Office becomes a ‘youth hub’ with the

new-look Clockwork Young People’s Health Service

opening its doors, alongside Batforce, Diversitat,

Time for Youth, CASA and Council’s Youth

Development Unit.

> Memorial Park, Leopold’s main sports ovals have a

secure future following the completion of an irrigation

project that captures and stores industrial and

residential stormwater run off for use on the sports

grounds.

January 2008

> The Eastern Park and Geelong Botanic Gardens

Strategic Plan is adopted, providing a 50 year vision

and a 20 year implementation plan, with actions to

commence in the 2008-2009 financial year.

> Cr Shane Dowling resigns from his role as Councillor

of the Deakin Ward, after six years of service.

> The City of Greater Geelong’s five aquatic centres save

over 30 million litres of water over the summer through

the introduction of a number of water saving initiatives.

February 2008

> Newcomb and District Sports Club open their new

netball pavilion at Grinter Reserve, following a

$430,000 development which includes change rooms,

new showers and toilets, and a kitchenette.

> The completion of a community space in St Leonards

provides residents with a venue to meet and access a

range of services.

> Mayor Bruce Harwood joins State and Federal

Members of Parliament at a local ceremony to mark

the apology to the stolen generations.

> The Ocean Grove Soccer Grounds are re-opened

following their redevelopment and the installation

of temporary club rooms.

March 2008

> Council adopts the Greater Geelong Cycle Strategy,

which contains a number of recommendations and

actions aimed at fostering bicycle use in Geelong.

> Geelong announced as the location for the Hollywood

big budget film ‘Knowing’ starring Nicholas Cage.

> Whittington FlameFest held involving numerous

activities including a lantern parade.

April 2008

> Youth week kicks off with a range of skate, art and

musical activities held throughout the municipality,

along with the inaugural Impetus Youth Awards

ceremony.

> Council adopts a Gaming Policy to avoid

concentrations of machines in areas of economic

or social disadvantage.

> Global IT firm Satyam announces it will locate its

Australian operation at Deakin University’s Waurn

Ponds campus. This is one of the biggest industry

investments in the Geelong region for decades.

May 2008

> The Deakin ward by-election is held with Cr Andrew

Katos elected as the new Councillor for the ward.

> The City receives $24.5 million in State funding under

the Geelong Transit City Project to provide critical

infrastructure for the Western Wedge development.

> 80 hectares of industrial land at Heales Rd is offered

for sale by Expression of Interest, which will lead to

major investment and employment opportunities for

the region.

> Works commence on the $1.3 million Youth Activities

Area on the Waterfront.

> Expressions of Interest for the Haymarket car park site

are called for - a key step in the development of one of

Council’s top funding priorities.

> The corporate sustainability program EcoChallenge is

launched, with the aim of reducing the organisations

own consumption of energy, water and resources.

June 2008

> Council adopts the Aldershot Reserve Master Plan to

ensure the planned development of the area for the

next 10 years.

> The Belcher Fountain restoration project is launched

with the lighting of the gas lamp, more than 30 years

after it last burned.

> Council adopts the Domestic Animal (Dogs and Cats)

Management Plan to promote responsible pet

ownership, after considering more than 900 public

submissions.

> Work commences on the restoration of the historic

seawalls at Eastern Beach, which are 320 metres in

length and constructed in 1928-1929.

> The first artwork from the innovative Connecting

Identities project is unveiled, a sneak preview of what

will be on offer at the Memory Bank exhibition in July

2008.

24


OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2007-2008 the City of Greater Geelong received the following acknowledgements and awards for excellence and innovation in the delivery

of a range of services and projects.

Award Category Service Award

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

International

ESRI International Special Award in GIS Technology Adoption Information Technology Department

2007 Australasian Reporting Awards Silver Award for distinguished achievement in reporting City of Greater Geelong Annual Report 2006-2007

National

2007 Meeting and Events Industry Award Convention Bureau/Tourist Organisation – Finalist Geelong Otway Tourism

2007 Meeting and Events Industry Award Commendation - Environmental Contribution Geelong Otway Tourism

National Heart Foundation Local Government Award Programs that Promote Healthy Weight Healthy Beginnings Strategy (Family Services)

2007 Parks and Leisure Australia Planning Awards Winner - Regional Sports and Recreation Planning G21 Regional Sports Development Plan and Sport and Recreation /

Regional Infrastructure Strategy

Planning Institute of Australia – Planning Excellence Awards 2007 Commendation - Local Government Award Structure Plan Framework model and Bellarine Peninsula Strategic

Planning Program

Qantas Australian Tourism Awards 2007 Winner - Meetings and Business Tourism Geelong Otway Tourism

State

CFA Community Safety Award Winner Breamlea Fire Management Plan

2007 Melbourne Airport Victorian Tourism Awards Winner - Meeting and Business Tourism Geelong Otway Tourism

2007 Melbourne Airport Victorian Tourism Awards Winner - Visitor Information and Services Geelong Otway Tourism (The Geelong Visitor Information Centres)

2007 Melbourne Airport Victorian Tourism Awards Finalist – Specialised Tourism Services Geelong Otway Tourism (The Geelong Visitor Information Centres)

Office Of Disability Bar None Awards Certificate of Recognition - Service to the Community Robert Macleod – Potato Shed

2007 Victorian State Government Awards Finalist - Communities that are becoming more child Portarlington Early Years Network

and family friendly

2007 Victorian Crime and Violence Prevention Awards Gold Award for Excellence and Innovation in Crime Prevention Central Geelong Safety Program

Victorian Coastal Awards for Excellence 2008 Finalist - Coastal Planning Coastal Planning Program

Victorian Heart Foundation Local Government Award Programs that Promote Healthy Weight Healthy Beginnings Strategy (Family Services)

Regional

Alcoa Access Awards Community Inclusion Award Don’t Be a Couch Potato Project (Potato Shed)

Geelong Advertiser Business Excellence Awards 2007 Winner - Powercor Government Funded Award City Learning and Care Centres

Geelong Advertiser Business Excellence Awards 2007 Finalist - Attractions, Events and Services Award The Arena

Geelong Advertiser Business Excellence Awards 2007 Finalist - Powercor Government Funded Award City of Greater Geelong Customer Service Team

Regional Achievement and Community Awards Winner - Young People's Community Involvement Award Crash Course Productions

25


CUSTOMER SERVICE COMMITMENTS

AND ACHIEVEMENTS

With increasing community expectations of

Council to deliver timely and proficient

services and advice, customer service plays

a pivotal role across the whole organisation.

From Customer Service Centres, Leisure Facilities and

Child Care Centres to Local Laws officers and our road

maintenance crews, the commitment to providing

exceptional service is a high priority for the City.

In 2004 Council developed a set of customer service

commitments with the goal of improving our relationship

with our customers.

These commitments detail how we will deliver excellence

in customer service consistently across all parts of the

organisation. Indicators to measure our performance

against each commitment have been developed to ensure

we fulfill our commitments. The 21 commitments are:

Responsiveness

> We will respond to telephone messages within one

working day.

> We will respond to telephone calls within five rings.

> Correspondence received by mail and email will be

responded to within 10 working days. Planning and

other statutory correspondence will be responded to

in accordance with legislative requirements.

> We will meet corporate standards with all

correspondence.

> We will identify ourselves by name when responding

to phone or face-to-face enquires.

> We will make all reasonable efforts to supply all our

services in a timely manner with priority assistance to

customers affected by a public safety issue.

> Customer Requests for Service will be actioned within

defined service timelines.

> We will provide a method of follow-up for

Customer Requests.

Access

> Our Customer Service Line will be available for public

safety issues 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

> We will provide information that is current and

in plain language.

> We will offer a variety of payment methods.

> We will be available for contact by phone, on-line,

in writing and in person.

> We will assist visiting customers within five minutes.

Knowledge and Attitude

> We will ensure information provided is up to date.

> We will pro-actively explain processes and take

personal responsibility.

> We will act in a manner which is respectful to

the public.

Fair Treatment

> We will balance individual needs with the direction

of Council and resources available to achieve best

community outcomes.

> If we are unable to meet customer expectations we

will explain why.

> We will communicate and make available our

privacy policy.

Feedback

> We will encourage customer feedback and view it

as an opportunity to improve.

> We will measure our performance on a regular basis

to constantly improve our service.

26


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Customer Service Performance

2007-2008

In order to measure performance against our Customer

Service Commitments and identify opportunities for

continued improvement, the City of Greater Geelong

engaged Customer Service Benchmarking Australia to

conduct independent mystery shopping research

throughout 2007-2008.

The Customer Service benchmarking research is carried

out bi-monthly on the Customer Contact Centre, and

quarterly on all other Council contact centres and

face-to-face contact points. Each call/visit is marked on

40 assessment areas including connection time, greeting,

accuracy of information and inquiry resolution.

Comparisons of results are made between departments,

between previous periods results, as well as against

equivalent surveys undertaken on more than 150

Councils across Australia. The independent organisation

also identifies areas for improvement each period.

In the past 12 months, the City of Greater Geelong

has consistently achieved results above the industry

benchmark in many areas. This indicates the Customer

Service Commitments have gone a long way in

developing a culture built on listening, understanding

and proactively responding to internal and external

customer needs.

The following graphs represent a summary of the

organisations face-to-face and telephone customer

service performance over the past 12 months.

2007-2008 Face-to-Face Performance Summary

120

100

80

60

40

20

0

Wait time

(Seconds)

Greeting

quality

Enquiry

resolution

Acceptable

manner

2007-2008 Telephone Performance Summary

100

90

80

70

60

50

40

44

85

38

89 88 91

84

87 86 88

76

98

92

73

70

81

Council Industry Average

City of Greater Geelong

78

91

89

77 76

30

20

16

10

Council Industry Average

0

Connect time

(Seconds)

Greeting

Getting

through

Best

practice

Enquiry Communication

resolution

Service

delivery

City of Greater Geelong

27


Requests for Service

In addition to reviewing independent research on

Customer Service performance, the City of Greater

Geelong monitors several customer service commitments

through internal channels. This includes the percentage

of ‘Requests for Service’ which are completed within the

designated timeframe. Requests for service come from

the community and can be for a range of services, from

missed bin collections, animal complaints, tree

maintenance to potholes or damage to amenities.

The adjacent graph represents this measure over the past

four years. It shows that in 2007-2008 67 per cent of

requests were completed within the designated

timeframe. This has remained consistent over the past

four years despite a 28 per cent increase in requests

during this time.

While we acknowledge that requests will increase each

year, our challenge is to work towards a 100 per cent

completion rate within the timeframe.

80,000

75,541

100%

68,276

69,833

90%

80%

60,000

59,021

70%

60%

40,000

50%

40%

30%

20,000

20%

10%

0 0

2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008

No. of Requests for Service

% completed in timeframe

100%

Response to correspondence within timeframe

The City has also committed to responding to

correspondence received by mail and email within

10 working days. The adjacent graph shows that since

the Customer Service Commitments have been

implemented and become a focus for all staff,

performance has improved by 14 per cent.

80%

60%

40%

63

57

68

77

20%

0

Jan-June

2005*

2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008

% Correspondence responded to within timeframe

*Data collection only commenced January 2005 so this figure is for 6 months data only.

28


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Angus Urquhart

Manifold Heights

Primary School

Age: 11

‘I chose Limeburners Bay

because I think it is one of

the best views in Geelong and

it will be there for a long time

to come.’

29


COUNCIL FUNDING PRIORITIES

Council has identified 13 key projects for the municipality, each of which has particular strategic importance for the future of the Geelong region.

These priorities represent Council’s long term ambitions for the municipality. They do not replace or take precedence over the core functions of Council. An update on each of these priorities

for the year ending 30 June 2008 is detailed below.

The Projects Project Description Status Update

View of Geelong

FUNDED

Council resolved to assist the Geelong Gallery’s campaign to purchase the

historical Colonial painting View of Geelong by Eugene von Guerard, 1856.

COMPLETED

In July 2006 the View of Geelong headed home thanks to the extraordinary

enthusiasm shown for the painting by the Geelong community.

East West Traffic

FUNDED

The implementation of a range of traffic measures will target improved

conditions for vehicular access to the central activities area and through

traffic across the central Geelong area.

IMPROVEMENT

WORKS

CONTINUING

This project has been fully funded and seven sites have been completed, with

another three in progress. The remaining sites are expected to commence and

be completed within the 2008-2009 year.

Sites completed in 2007-2008 include:

> Mercer St / Gheringhap St / Malop St intersection.

> Malop St / Fitzroy St intersection.

> Latrobe Tce clearway.

Works have commenced at the following sites:

> Ryrie St / Sydney Pde / Swanston St intersection - works expected to be

completed by mid-July 2008.

> Garden St / Portarlington Rd intersection - works expected to be

completed early in 2008-2009.

Conference Centre

The proposal is to construct a 1,200 seat conference facility with exhibition

space and ancillary features such as meeting rooms, catering facilities and

associated administration space. This development is likely to be co-located

with a 4-5 Star Hotel.

BUSINESS CASE

DEVELOPMENT

A feasibility study has identified potential sites, developed conceptual layout

plans and examined potential capital cost, with a recommendation that the

centre be located close to the Waterfront.

Geelong Otway Tourism won the 2007 Australian Tourism Award for Meetings

and Business Tourism for the third time, highlighting the enormous potential and

economic benefit an asset of this kind could bring to the region.

Leisurelink Aquatic

Facility

FUNDED

Due to significant population growth in the South Geelong region and due to

asset deterioration Council resolved to replace the Leisurelink Aquatic

Centre. The new aquatic centre will provide for a replacement of all existing

facilities and also provide for additional facilities.

UNDER

CONSTRUCTION

Civil works on the $30 million facility commenced in September 2007, and is

expected to open in 2010. This is an exciting joint project between the City of

Greater Geelong and the State Government and is the biggest sports and leisure

project ever undertaken by Council. The centre will provide 21st Century

entertainment, recreation and fitness facilities for families.

Western Wedge

Infrastructure

The overall goal of the Western Wedge planning framework is to create a

diverse mix of residential, commercial, educational and recreational

developments that combine to create a vibrant hub in what has previously

been an under-utilised area. This area has unique development potential

given its ideal location next to the bay, the central business district and the

Geelong railway station.

IN PROGRESS

The vision for the Western Wedge has now been incorporated into the local

planning scheme, and master plans are underway or complete for three of the

key precincts (Cultural, Station and Inner Wedge). Detailed design of capital

improvement works will commence in 2008-2009.

30


The Projects Project Description Status Update

Cultural Precinct

PARTLY

FUNDED

To investigate options for the redevelopment of Geelong’s key cultural

facilities, including the Geelong Performing Arts Centre, the Geelong Gallery,

the Geelong Library, the Geelong Heritage Centre and the Courthouse Youth

Arts Centre.

IN PROGRESS

The City partnered with the State Government to fund a Master Plan which

proposes a redevelopment of the Cultural Precinct. $7.9 million was allocated in

the 2008-2009 State Budget for the design and upgrade of the Courthouse

Youth Arts Centre and for the development of detailed design and business cases

for the proposed expansion of the Geelong Regional Library, Performing Arts

Centre and the Heritage Centre.

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Osborne Precinct

Haymarket Site

Development

Bellarine Aquatic

and Sports Centre

Yarra Street Pier

Civic Accommodation

FUNDED

To identify a long term appropriate use for the property that is in keeping

with community expectations. Ongoing community access and that the

Mansion part of the property remains in Council ownership are important

conditions of the proposal.

This project provides for a mixed development of commercial accommodation

and public parking at the Haymarket Car Park in Myers Street.

The development of an aquatic centre on the Bellarine Peninsula has long

been a top priority for peninsula residents. The project has secured State

Government funding of $2.5 million.

The project is the proposed construction of a public pier at the end of Yarra

Street, Fisherman’s Basin redevelopment and expansion of marina berths.

The objective of this project is to consolidate the current seven separate

Council offices to provide one central location for Council’s administrative

and civic functions, creating efficiencies for both Council staff and the

community.

IMPLEMENTATION

STRATEGY BEING

DEVELOPED

IN PROGRESS

UNDER

CONSTRUCTION

PLANNING STAGE

PLANNING STAGE

The Osborne Precinct Master Plan was adopted by Council in October 2007 and

planning and legal processes are now underway to develop an implementation

strategy, which will include identifying a preferred developer.

This will see Osborne House form the nucleus of a major development featuring

a marine centre of excellence and tourism facilities including a boutique hotel.

This project has the potential to create another major tourism and business draw

card for the Geelong region, and has generated great interest from the marine

industry.

A design for the preferred built form for the site has been completed, and

Expressions of Interest have been called for. It is expected a preferred developer

will be selected in September 2008.

When developed it will have sufficient on-site public car parking spaces available

for at least 300 cars.

Construction of the Bellarine Aquatic Centre commenced on the Ocean Grove site

in February 2008. Works are progressing well and the centre is expected to open

in December 2008 and will offer a range of facilities to cater for all ages and

abilities.

Stakeholder consultation on the project has been undertaken, with further

investigations and engineering design work with Parks Victoria continuing.

The site for Council Civic accommodation has been purchased within the

Western Wedge, between Mercer and Gheringhap Streets. In 2008-2009 the

detailed requirements for a projected six Green Star rated building and

appropriate co-located facilities will commence.

DW Hope Centre

FUNDED

The intention is to construct a multipurpose Arts and Cultural facility at the

DW Hope Centre. This will provide a base for Diversitat as well as provide

a centre for use by a wide range of ethnic communities throughout Geelong.

IN PROGRESS

In December 2007 Council resolved to transfer land at the DW Hope Centre to

Diversitat for the development of the Northern Community Hub. The

development is estimated to cost $2.75 million, with the Federal Government

committing $1.5 million and the State Government $1.0 million.

Construction is expected to commence in 2008-2009.

Mineral Springs Spa

This project proposes to build an iconic Mineral Springs Bathhouse within

the Waterfront precinct of Geelong. The Mineral Spring at Eastern Beach

represents a little known though highly unique physical and social resource

to the city.

CONCEPT DESIGN

CONSULTATION

A site specific concept design has been completed for the Eastern Beach site that

incorporates the requirements of the Eastern Park and Geelong Botanic Gardens

Strategic Plan.

Further design work and studies on the environmental impacts and traffic

implications will take place in 2008-2009.

31


SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL RESULTS

FOR 2007-2008 AND FIVE YEAR TRENDS

The following information presents financial

results for 2007-2008. More detail is contained

in the Standard Statements and Annual

Financial Report starting on page 125.

The break up of recurrent income and expenditure as shown

details where Council receives its funds and how those funds

are spent. In 2007-2008 Council received 54 per cent of its

recurrent income from rates. Council provides a diverse range

of services with employee costs representing 37 per cent of

Council’s recurrent expenditure.

2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008

$M $M $M $M $M

Recurrent Income

Rates 83.5 88.5 97.8 106.9 115.4

Government Grants 29.0 30.9 31.3 31.9 35.0

Fees and Charges 37.7 39.6 40.6 44.3 50.9

Interest 1.2 1.3 0.7 1.5 2.1

Total 151.4 160.3 170.4 184.6 203.4

Recurrent Expenses

Employee Benefits 55.2 61.8 65.6 69.1 73.1

General Works 51.7 54.0 56.3 60.3 67.8

Administration 9.0 9.1 10.8 10.0 11.8

Utilities 4.8 4.8 4.8 4.3 4.7

Depreciation 27.6 29.0 32.2 34.5 36.5

Total 148.3 158.7 169.7 178.2 193.9

Recurrent Result

Surplus (Deficit) 3.1 1.6 0.7 6.4 9.5

32


% 0

1 2

3 4 5

6 7

Financial Results

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Recurrent Result

The 2007-2008 recurrent result of $9.5M is Council’s

operating result excluding capital or one off items.

The 2007-2008 recurrent result represents 4.7 per cent

of Council’s annual turnover and was achieved with

regular operational review and tight cost controls across

the organisation. Council budgets for a low or breakeven

recurrent result to ensure efficient use of rates, grant and

fee income in providing services to the community.

The recurrent result includes $3.1M relating to

incomplete discretionary projects that will be completed

in 2008-2009. Further explanation of actual and budget

results is provided in the Standard Statements on pages

129-130.

Net Result

The 2007-2008 net result was $27.4M.

The non recurrent income items included income for

capital projects of $8.4M, cash contributions from

developers of $1.3M, assets received from developers

of $13.0M. Over the past five years the Net Result has

continued to be impacted by high levels of building and

subdivision activity, providing Council with assets

transferred from developers. The level of capital income

includes $2.7M relating to Leisurelink and Bellarine

Aquatic and Sports Centre.

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

$0.7M

$1.6M

$3.1M

2003-2004 $M 0

1 2

3 $3.1M 4 5

6 7 8 9 10

2004-2005

$1.6M

2005-2006

$0.7M

2006-2007

$6.4M

2007-2008

$9.5M

$M 0

1 2

3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10

2003-2004

$38.8M

2004-2005

$15.3M

2005-2006

$20.9M

2006-2007

$40.5M

2007-2008

$27.4M

2003-2004 $M 0

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 $38.8M 45 50

2004-2005

$15.3M

2005-2006

$20.9M

2006-2007

$40.5M

2007-2008

$27.4M

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

$M 0

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

$12.5M

$15.9M

$15.9M

$16.6M

$14.7M

$6.4M

$9.5M

2003-2004 $M 0

5 10

15 $15.9M 20 25

30 35

2004-2005

$12.5M

2005-2006

$15.9M

2006-2007

$16.6M

2007-2008

$14.7M

$M 0

5 10

15 20 25

30 35

2003-2004

2004-2005

4.76%

6.02%

33

2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

4.40%

4.83%

5.08%


Loans

Council took out a loan of $3.1M in June 2008 to fund

capital works (specifically the Bellarine Aquatic and

Sports Centre). This loan was approved by the Australian

Loan Council and was included in the 2007-2008

Budget assumptions. An additional loan of $6.5M

for the Leisurelink facility was deferred.

Debt Commitment

The Debt Commitment ratio shows the percentage

of rates required to pay back principal and interest

on Council loans. Council’s ratio shows that a low

percentage of rates is used in loan servicing and after

taking out the new loan, Council continues to have the

capacity to meet its debt repayments.

Cash and Investments

The closing cash balance at the end of 2007-2008 has

decreased to $30.3M as a result of deferring the loan

of $6.5M, however this was offset by the lower than

expected capital expenditure. The cash balance covers

Council’s Long Service leave obligation of $10.7M and

provides funds to complete the carry over capital works

in the future.

Working Capital Ratio

The working capital ratio has improved in 2007-2008

due to the increase in the closing debtor balances.

Council continues to have a strong working capital

ratio and capacity to borrow as required for future

capital works.

2004-2005

2003-2004

$12.5M

$15.9M

2005-2006

2004-2005

$12.5M

$15.9M

2006-2007

$16.6M

2005-2006

$15.9M

2003-2004

2007-2008

$14.7M$15.9M

2006-2007

$16.6M

2004-2005

$12.5M

2007-2008

2005-2006 $M

2003-2004

0

5 10

$14.7M

15 $15.9M

20 25

30 35

2006-2007

2004-2005 $M 0

5 10 $12.5M 15 $16.6M 20 25

30 35

2007-2008

2005-2006

$14.7M$15.9M

2006-2007

$16.6M

$M 0

5 10

15 20

2007-2008

$14.7M

25

30 35

$M 0

5 10

15 20 25

30 35

2003-2004

6.02%

2004-2005

4.76%

2003-2004

6.02%

2005-2006

4.40%

2004-2005

4.76%

2006-2007

4.83%

2005-2006

4.40%

2003-2004

2007-2008

5.08%

6.02%

2006-2007

4.83%

2004-2005

4.76%

2007-2008

2005-2006 % 0

1 2

3 4

2003-2004

4.40%

5 5.08% 6 7

6.02%

2006-2007

2004-2005 % 0

1 2

3 4 4.76% 4.83% 5

6 7

2007-2008

2005-2006

4.40% 5.08%

2006-2007

4.83%

% 0

1 2

3 4 5

6 7

2007-2008

5.08%

% 0

1 2

3 4 5

6 7

2003-2004

$26.1M

2004-2005

2003-2004

$13.1M

$26.1M

2005-2006

2004-2005

$13.1M

$25.8M

2006-2007

$31.9M

2005-2006

$25.8M

2003-2004

2007-2008

$26.1M $30.3M

2006-2007

$31.9M

2004-2005

$13.1M

2007-2008

2005-2006

2003-2004

$M 0

5 10

15 20 25 $25.8M $26.1M

30

$30.3M

35

2006-2007

2004-2005 $M 0

5 10 $13.1M 15 20 25

30 $31.9M 35

2007-2008

2005-2006

$25.8M $30.3M

2006-2007

$31.9M

$M 0

2007-2008

5 10

15 20 25

30

$30.3M

35

$M 0

5 10

15 20 25

30 35

2003-2004

$1.16

2004-2005

2003-2004

$0.68

$1.16

2005-2006

2004-2005

$0.68

$1.04

2006-2007

$1.13

2005-2006

$1.04

2003-2004

2007-2008

$1.16 $1.36

2006-2007

$1.13

2004-2005

$0.68

2007-2008

$1.36

2005-2006

2003-2004

0 0.5 1 $1.04$1.16

1.5 2

2.5

$ of current assets per $ of current liability

2006-2007

2004-2005 0 0.5 $0.68 1 $1.13

1.5 2

2.5

$ 2007-2008

2005-2006 of current assets per $ of current liability

$1.04 $1.36

2006-2007

$1.13

0 0.5 1

1.5

2007-2008

$1.36

$ 2003-2004 of current assets per $ of current liability

$35.5M

2

2.5

2004-2005 0 0.5 1

1.5 2

$61.5M 2.5

2003-2004

$35.5M

$ 2005-2006 of current assets per $ of current liability

$38.9M

2004-2005

$61.5M

2006-2007

$49.1M

2005-2006

$38.9M

2003-2004

2007-2008

$35.5M

$52.4M

34


2006-2007

2007-2008

$1.13

$1.36

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Assets

Council has an extensive capital works program to renew,

upgrade and provide new assets to ensure the

continuation and improvement of services provided to

the community. Council spent $52.4M on capital

works in 2007-2008. This included:

• Road replacement and construction $11.1M

• Plant and vehicles $4.7M

• Bellarine Aquatic and Sports Centre $2.7M

• Drainage replacement and construction $2.6M

• Footpath replacement and construction $1.5M

• Land purchases $1.3M

• Corio Landfill rehabilitation $0.6M

• Leisurelink replacement $3.1M

• Drysdale Landfill Cell $1.0M

• Barwon Heads Streetscape $0.8M

• Kardinia Park Legends Boulevard $0.4M

• Geelong West Library Upgrade $0.7M

• Parking Meters Upgrade $0.6M

• North Shore Pavilion Upgrade $0.4M

Council's capital expenditure was high in 2004-2005

due to the development of Skilled Stadium.

0 0.5 1

1.5 2

2.5

$ of current assets per $ of current liability

Capital Program

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

0

Capital Expenditure $M

10 20

30 40 50

60 70

Infrastructure Maintenance and Renewal

$35.5M

$38.9M

$49.1M

$52.4M

$61.5M

2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008

$M $M $M $M $M

Parks and Road Maintenance 20.0 21.3 22.6 20.8 23.6

Road and Footpath Works 8.8 10.4 9.0 10.6 10.3

Building Maintenance 2.9 3.0 2.8 2.9 3.4

Recreation Infrastructure 1.1 2.0 2.2 2.3 2.7

Community Infrastructure 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3

Total 33.1 36.9 36.8 36.9 40.3

Council budgets maintenance and renewal expenditure to maintain its assets in line with the priorities identified in its

asset management plans. Expenditure on Parks and Roads routine maintenance returned to 2005-2006 levels.

Expenditure in 2006-2007 was reduced due to maintenance grading program on unsealed roads and delays in

renovation programs in parks and reserves due to water restrictions.

35


Victorian Local Government Indicators Summary

The following indicators provide data for comparisons with other Councils and opportunities to assess our own performance and initiate improvements in our service delivery and relationships

with the community, businesses and government. A detailed version can be found on pages 123-124.

Indicator 2006-2007 2007-2008 Comment

Average Rates and Charges per Assessment $1,080 $1,156 Increase is in line with population and housing growth and the budgeted rates increases.

Average Rates and Charges per Residential Assessment $936 $976 Increase is in line with population and housing growth and the budgeted rates increases.

Average Liability per Assessment $559 $555 Remained constant due to drawdown of new loan and final repayment of $18M loan.

Operating Result per Assessment $411 $275 Decreased due to reduced asset recognition from revaluations.

Average Operating Expenditure per Assessment $1,856 $2,000 Increased due to increased payments for employee services and increased

expenditure on materials and services.

Community Satisfaction Rating for Overall Performance of Council (Indexed mean) 58 60 Remains consistent with previous year.

Average Capital Expenditure per Assessment $498 $526 Increase due to the commencement and/or completion of a number of large projects

including the Leisurelink facility, Bellarine Aquatic and Sports Centre and

Legends Boulevarde.

Renewal Gap on all Assets $0.48 per $1 $0.44 per $1 Renewal expenditure decreased by $0.8M in 2007-2008. As a percentage of total capital

expenditure, renewal expenditure decreased from 33.6 per cent to 29.7 per cent in 2007-

2008 due to the mix of projects and the level of expenditure on upgrade and new projects.

Renewal and Maintenance Gap $0.66 per $1 $0.65 per $1 The Capital Renewal and Maintenance Gap indicates that expenditure has remained

constant from year to year. Council will continue to address the level of maintenance and

renewal in line with its Asset Management Plans.

Advocacy and Community Representation on Key Local Issues (Indexed mean) 60 61 Remains consistent with previous year.

Engagement in Decision Making on Key Local Issues (Indexed mean) 54 56 Remains consistent with previous year, however significant improvement on

2005-2006 results.

36


CONTINUOUS

IMPROVEMENT

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Active participation in the community is

one of the key roles of Council.

Having a community focus and actively

engaging the community in current and

future issues are key drivers to improving

council services. By focusing on our

residents and visitors, services will offer

value for money and meet local needs.

Community engagement therefore helps

the organisation ensure that the priorities

of local people translate into strategy and

decision making.

37

Pako Festa, 2008


BEST VALUE

Council’s Best Value Policy is to cement a

continuous improvement culture across the

organisation beyond purely complying with

the Best Value legislation. The specific

outcomes of Best Value will guide Council

decisions regarding the future direction of

Council services.

Addressing the Best Value Principles

> Reports quarterly to the community on the progress

of City Plan actions.

> Sets annual business plans at a department level to

address actions and seek improvement opportunities

with the community’s best interest in mind. These

business plans also include audit and risk

management actions.

> Has developed executive and department scorecards

in order to measure performance against targets.

The Best Value Principles are part of the Local

Government Act 1989. They are:

(a) All services must meet quality and cost standards.

(b) All services must be responsive to the needs of the

community.

(c) A service must be accessible to those members of the

community for whom the service intended.

(d) A Council must achieve continuous improvement in

the provision of services for its community.

(e) A Council must develop a program of regular

consultation with its community in relation to the services

it provides.

> Undertakes an annual review of performance

measures and targets at corporate and department

level.

> Conducts a rigorous financial reporting process.

> Has seven customer service centres spread across the

municipality providing easy access for all residents,

and delivers services from numerous locations around

the region.

> Engages Customer Service Benchmarking Australia to

conduct independent mystery shopping research in

order to measure performance against the Customer

Service Commitments and identify opportunities for

continued improvement.

(f) A Council must report regularly to its community on

its achievements in relation to the principles above.

Council is proactive in addressing the Best Value

Principles in that it:

> Voluntarily participates in the statewide Local

Government Annual Community Satisfaction Survey.

Continuous improvement opportunities are identified

from the survey results.

> Consults regularly with the community on projects,

services, events and issues that effect the community.

> Produces an annual report to inform all stakeholders

including ratepayers, residents, businesses, community

and interest groups, news media, all levels of

government, Council staff and the wider general

community, and reflects our commitment to

performance reporting.

> Conducts annual performance reviews with all staff to

set work plans and identify training and development

opportunities.

> Provides internal and external training and

development opportunities to bring staff up to date

with systems and processes, and also to upskill our

workforce.

Council's Customer Service Call Centre

38


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Josh Clark

Manifold Heights

Primary School

Age: 11

‘Geelong is the best place to

live because you can always

go to the You Yangs for a good

old BBQ.’

39


COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

The main purpose of engaging the community

is to improve our services and ensure that the

priorities of residents translate into Council’s

strategies and decision making.

By engaging our community we are providing them with

the opportunity to provide feedback on issues that are

important to them. Fundamental principles of effective

engagement are that we listen to what we are told, we

use what we have been told as part of our decision

making processes, we give feedback to participants and

provide evidence on how the results of the engagement

have been used.

Why Consult?

Effective consultation provides benefits for the Council,

our communities and our other stakeholders.

It helps us to:

> Understand the varying needs of our community

and stakeholders.

> Improve our planning processes.

> Better prioritise and deliver services in a more efficient

manner, which address the changing needs of the

community.

> Become aware of problems and issues early, giving us

a chance to put things right before they escalate.

> Foster working partnerships between our community,

stakeholders and Council.

> Symbolise our commitment to being open and

accountable.

> Strengthen our communities by supporting and

encouraging active participation in decision making.

For this to work in an effective manner it requires full

commitment from the Council, the community and

stakeholders consulted with.

How have we improved?

The City of Greater Geelong has undertaken significant

steps to strengthen our capacity to undertake effective

community consultation. We now have in place a well

structured consultation framework, policy and procedure,

and a new in-house purpose built consultation database.

This has provided us with the foundation for our

community engagement process, however we realise

there are areas we can improve on. Our focus for this

improvement includes:

> Advocating a consistent approach to consultation

throughout the organisation.

> Reducing duplication and tackling consultation

overload.

> Engaging the hard-to-reach groups within the

community.

> Utilising our internet technology.

> Where feasible, coordinating our consultations with

other agencies and stakeholders who are seeking

similar outcomes.

Consulting our staff

Staff are also given the opportunity to give feedback on

topics that are important to them, and at the same time

providing suggestions that will improve the organisations

efficiency.

Staff have been consulted in the last 12 months

on topics such as the Staff Rewards and Recognition

Program, Performance Management, Dataworks

(Document Management System), Occupational

Health and Safety and CONSULT (Council’s in-house

consultation database).

In 2009 the third Employee Opinion Survey will be held

seeking staff perceptions in a number of areas including

Communications, Recognition and Morale and other

employment issues. The action plan from the 2006

Employee Opinion Survey continues to be implemented

across the organisation with employee health and

wellbeing a key focus.

40


Community Consultation

2007-2008

Throughout 2007-2008 the City conducted over 120

consultation events, allowing community members the

opportunity to provide input into a broad range of

projects, services, priorities and issues of both local

and municipal-wide importance.

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

One such example was the consultation on the Domestic

Animal (Dogs and Cats) Management Plan. Initially the

consultation period was to close late 2007 but as a result

of community feedback the City moved the closing date

for submissions out to February 2008. By accomodating

this request dog owners had greater opportunity to

participate and a total of 904 submissions were

subsequently received.

During the year many consultations involved multiple

events and different methods including focus groups,

telephone, door-knock and postal surveys, submissions,

public meetings and working groups. It’s important for us

to know the views of our community and we appreciate

the effort made in taking part in these activities.

The following is a list of projects consulted on during

2007-2008.

41 Local Laws officer offering advice to community members

41


Consultation events 2007-2008

Department Project Project Objective

Aged and Disability Services Client services To seek feedback on the services provided to Aged and Disability Services clients by Council.

Victorian Seniors' Festival Geelong 2007

To seek feedback on details such as reasons for participation or non-participation, information received about the

festival activities, and preferred information source.

Arts and Culture Potato Shed Morning Showtime program evaluation To seek feedback regarding this program.

Potato Shed Master Plan

Potato Shed theatre program

To seek input into the development of a master plan for the Potato Shed.

To seek feedback from patrons regarding the program of theatre events.

Capital Projects Rosewall kindergarten playground design To seek input from parents regarding playground design.

Corio and Moorabool Pony Club shed

Maintenance of Grovedale and Ocean Grove

soccer fields

Ocean Grove Skate Park

Richmond Reserve renovations and extension

To inform local residents and seek objections to building proposed shed.

To inform local residents of plan to carry out maintenance and irrigation works to soccer fields in Grovedale

and Ocean Grove.

To provide the opportunity to make submissions on the building of a skate park with connecting pathways, shade

shelter and drinking fountain at Shell Road Reserve.

To seek input from community members on the proposed renovations and extension works.

Central Geelong and Waterfront Melbourne Victory Soccer To determine public perception, level of awareness and issues of importance for visitors and

spectators of the event.

Geelong Farmers' Markets 2007

Central Geelong visitors' perception 2007

Central Geelong Marketing

Carousel visitors

To seek feedback from event patrons regarding awareness, attendance, expenditure and potential

areas for improvement of the market.

To seek input and feedback from visitors' regarding the perceptions of Central Geelong, its services,

facilities and environment.

To seek input from members of Central Geelong Marketing regarding the committee's roles and responsibilities,

terms of reference and performance levels.

To assess numbers of visitors to the Carousel.

City Development Geelong Eastern Boundary Review To seek public comment on the draft review report.

Community Development Strategic footpath design in Leopold To understand Leopold residents' walking habits and parts of the community that are most important to them.

To seek feedback on the draft design concepts.

Barwon Heads Skate Park

BMX dirt jumps, Rosewall

Whittington Community Renewal/Action

Grovedale Community Centre redevelopment

Whittington Men's Shed

To seek input and feedback into the location and design of a skate park in Barwon Heads.

To seek ideas and input from young people regarding the development of dirt jumps at Connections Park, Rosewall.

To confirm community aspirations for change in Whittington and to establish community priorities.

To form the incorporated association for the Grovedale Community Centre.

To establish interest in the development of a Men's Shed in Whittington and to seek initial ideas for a model.

42


Department Project Project Objective

Community Development (cont’d) Whittington Pride To promote and garner support of this group working on improvements to open spaces and community safety.

Whittington Festival To engage residents in the developing, organisation, planning and staging of the festival in 2008.

Leopold Community Hub development

Northern Bellarine Peninsula Walkability project

Whittington transport

To seek feedback on the draft concept designs for the Leopold community hub (open space).

To seek input and feedback from older residents in Portarlington, St Leonards and Indented Head to assist in the

design of consistent traffic management strategies, to promote walkability in these communities; and to add to

common measures used to address walkability across the Council.

To gain a better understanding of the barriers to mobility experienced by residents in Whittington.

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Whittington FlameFest evaluation

To seek feedback about the event to assist in forming the future direction for the festival.

Corporate Strategy and Property Services City Plan 2008-2012 To seek public submission to the draft City Plan 2008-2012 document.

Local Government Annual Community

Satisfaction Survey

To measure community satisfaction of residents with Council services and facilities.

Engineering Services Review of the Road Management Plan To seek feedback on the draft Road Management Plan and various intervals in its development.

Travel Smart - parents

Travel Smart - principals

Hughes Street, Bell Post Hill upgrade

Bridge Street and Western Gully main drain

catchments drainage/flood study

Woolscour Lane and Horseshoe Bend Road,

Marshall rail crossing closure

To investigate the reasons preventing parents sending their children to school by walking or cycling.

To explore issues of parking and traffic management around schools, and how Council can work with schools better.

To seek feedback on the proposed Hughes Street footpath, car park and lighting upgrade.

To seek public submissions regarding this draft report.

To seek comment regarding Council's intention to permanently close Woolscour Lane at the railway crossing north of

of Horseshoe Bend Road, Marshall.

Environment and Natural Resources Limeburners Bay Management Plan To provide information on the draft management plan and to seek feedback regarding it.

Family Services City Learning and Care accreditation - Ariston To evaluate the current practices and standard of care within the centre to ensure continual improvement as well

as accreditation.

City Learning and Care accreditation - Belmont

To evaluate the current practices and standard of care within the centre to ensure continual improvement as well

as creditation.

Family Day Care accreditation

Northern Suburbs Early Years forum

Eastern Suburbs Early Years forum

Kindergarten information night

To evaluate the current practices and standard of care of Council's Family Day Care service to ensure continual

improvement as well as accreditation.

To identify local issues and strategies to strengthen support for children and families in the northern suburbs

(including Corio, Norlane and North Shore).

To identify local issues and strategies to strengthen support for children and families in the eastern suburbs

including Breakwater, East Geelong, Moolap, Newcomb, St Albans Park, Thomson and Whittington.

To provide parents with the opportunity to view the kindergarten program and facilities, and discuss any aspects

with staff.

43


Department Project Project Objective

Family Services (cont’d) Toy libraries To seek feedback from management committees about operational issues of Council's toy libraries, including

memberships, facilities, support required and potential areas for improvement.

Toy libraries

Northern suburbs vacation care

To seek feedback from parents regarding operational issues including demand for services, accessing libraries,

operational issues and potential areas for improvement.

To assess the feasibility of a vacation care service in the northern suburbs.

Finance Budget 2008-2009 To seek public submission on the draft Budget 2008-2009.

Health and Local Laws Domestic Animal (Dogs and Cats) To inform the community and seek feedback regarding the draft plan.

Management Plan

Mosquito Management Program

To seek feedback and opinions on the Mosquito Management Program for the 2007-2008 season.

Infrastructure Operations Community Emergency Risk Management To seek public submissions on the reviewed CERM plan.

(CERM) review

Major Project Development Central Geelong Urban Design Guidelines To seek submissions regarding the draft guidelines.

Marketing and Administration Feedback from a range of Geelong and To measure public perception, awareness and to identify any issues or improvement opportunities with these events.

region events

Geelong Major Events sponsorship recipients

Community Update

To seek feedback on the level of service provided by Council during the funding period.

To examine community awareness of and views on this publication in terms of function, format and content.

Planning Strategy and Economic Development Point Lonsdale Structure Plan To seek community input into identifying the key issues, vision setting and providing opportunity for comments on

the draft document.

Drysdale and Clifton Springs Structure Plan

West Fyans - Fyans Street Structure Plan

Geelong Port Structure Plan

Barwon Heads Structure Plan

Greater Geelong Planning Scheme Amendment

C129 (Municipal Strategic Statement, local

planning policies and associated zones

and overlays)

Geelong Region information communication

technology (ICT) opportunity study

Drysdale business town centre

To seek community input into identifying the key issues, vision setting and providing opportunity for comments on

the draft document.

To seek community input into identifying the key issues, vision setting and providing opportunity for comments on

the draft document.

To provide information on the Geelong Port Structure Plan and to seek feedback on the draft.

To provide information on the Barwon Heads Structure Plan and seek public submissions on the draft.

To provide information on the review of these documents and to seek public submissions.

To seek input from Geelong businesses to assist in the development of an ICT cluster for G21 region.

To seek input from business owners on the development of the Drysdale and Clifton Springs Structure Plan.

44


Department Project Project Objective

Sport and Recreation Geelong Cricket Club training facility To seek submissions from stakeholders into the proposed naming of the Geelong Cricket Club training facility.

Eastern Park and Geelong Botanic Gardens

Strategic Plan

Greater Geelong Cycle Strategy

Aldershot Reserve Landscape Plan

Elderslie Reserve Master Plan

To provide information regarding the strategic plan and to seek feedback from community members.

To provide information regarding the Cycle Strategy and to seek feedback from community members.

To assist in guiding the development and drafting of a landscape plan. Follow up information regarding the draft plan

and revised draft plan and seeking further feedback regarding both these documents.

To inform of developments to date and receive feedback and further input to use in development of the

Master Plan. To seek feedback regarding the final draft.

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Lara Recreation study

Ground inspections

Water reuse initiatives

Sports and community club development

To seek feedback from local residents regarding the kinds of sports they like to participate in.

In partnership with sporting clubs, to monitor the condition and safety of sporting grounds throughout

the municipality.

In partnership with sporting clubs, to assess and monitor water reuse initiatives at grounds throughout

the municipality.

Working with clubs to assist with development through grants.

Urban Design Barwon Heads Hitchcock Avenue streetscape To provide information to residents and other stakeholders during the streetscape works.

redevelopment

45


OUR PEOPLE

The knowledge, skills, innovation, and

commitment of Council staff are our most

valuable assets and have been the driving

force behind our many achievements.

The following section outlines our

organisation structure, achievement

highlights for each division, and the key

achievements in human resource

management over the past 12 months.

Council's works crew in action

46


ORGANISATION STRUCTURE

The City’s management structure is comprised of executive management and a senior management group.

Executive management is comprised of the Chief Executive Officer and six general managers who oversee policy, strategic direction and overall management of the organisation.

The organisation’s structure consists of 25 departments, each of which are responsible for the day to day operations and strategic management.

COUNCILLORS

COMMUNITY

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

General Manager

Corporate Services

Stephen Griffin

Anthony Smith

(resigned June 08)

Manager Marketing

and Administration

Jeff Wall

Manager Corporate

Strategy and Property

Services

Lindsay Allan

Manager Financial

Services

Mike Kelly

Research and Policy

Advisor to the CEO

Fiona Dunbar

General Manager

City Services

Peter Reeve

Manager Engineering

Services

David Hannah

Manager Environment

and Natural Resources

Bernie Cotter

Manager Infrastructure

Operations

Darren Martin

General Manager

Community Services

Irene McGinnigle

Manager Aged and

Disability Services

Karen Pritchard

Manager Arts and

Culture

Di Shaw

Manager Community

Development

Paul Jamieson

Chief Executive Officer

Kay Rundle

General Manager

Major Projects

Stephen Wright

Manager Central

Geelong and Waterfront

Steve Bentley

Manager Tourism

Roger Grant

Manager Urban Design

Felix Hemingway

Manager Internal Audit

and Ombudsman’s Office

John Brown

General Manager

Development Sustainability

Kate Sullivan

Manager City

Development

Joanne Van Slageren

Manager Planning

Strategy and Economic

Development

Terry Demeo

Manager Health and

Local Laws

Gen Hindman

General Manager

Community Infrastructure

and Recreation

Dean Frost

Manager Sport

and Recreation

Paul Jane

Manager Capital Projects

Mark Gallon

Manager Leisure Services

Malcolm Kuhn

Manager Organisation

Development

Howard Oorloff

Manager Parks and

Support Services

Brendan Gaudion

Manager Family

Services

Robert Were

Manager Information

Technology

Andrew Downie

47

Manager

Customer Service

Tim McDonald


VALUES AND BEHAVIOURS

The City of Greater Geelong aims to foster a

culture that embraces a consistent set of

behaviours that reflect what we all truly value.

These values define what is expected of all employees

to achieve outstanding success when working at the

City of Greater Geelong.

Integrity

We will:

> Act on our commitments.

> Be open, transparent, ethical and honest in our actions.

> Share information.

Responsibility

We will:

> Be accountable for our decisions and everything we do.

Innovation

We will:

> Look for and implement better ways of doing things.

> Be open to learning.

> Be responsive to the changing needs of the community.

Respect

We will:

> Listen and seek to understand the views of others.

> Be considerate and courteous.

> Recognise everyone’s contribution and value

a job well done.

> Build positive relationships.

> Take pride in the job we are doing.

> Be loyal and support our work colleagues

and organisation.

> Take responsibility for problem solving.

Council works crew member

48


OUR CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

49

Kay Rundle

Chief Executive Officer

B.Soc.Work

G.Dip.Computing

G Dip.Bus.M.Bus

Kay Rundle commenced as Chief Executive

Officer with the City of Greater Geelong on

17 March 2003 and is the first female to be

appointed to this position at the City.

Kay started her working life as a social worker, completed

a degree in computing, followed by a Masters in

Business. She has worked in Local Government for over

25 years in eight different Councils. Kay's first experience

in management was as Manager - Community Support

Services with the Shire of Flinders in 1988. After a

variety of management roles, Kay became the CEO at

Maribyrnong City Council in 1999. She recently was

awarded the statewide SACS Award for Leadership in

Local Government.

Kay was the first elected president of Local Government

Professionals, an organisation formed to provide local

government staff with opportunities for professional

development. She is also a member of the State

Government's Barwon South West Region Regional

Management Forum, Regional Cities Victoria and the

Municipal Association of Victoria's Community Care

Partnerships Working Party. Kay is also a member of the

Gordon TAFE Board.

Providing advice to Council, ensuring the organisation

has the capacity to deliver the outcomes and decisions

of Council and relating to a wide variety of external

parties are very important aspects of her role. Kay is also

responsible for the day-to-day management of Council

operations in accordance with the Local Government Act,

City Plan and all legal, statutory and commercial

requirements.

Kay has overseen many achievements in her five years

with the City and in September 2007, Council extended

her contract for another five years. Kay is committed to

addressing the challenges that our rapidly growing

municipality will present in the coming years and will

continue to deliver on Council's vision for Geelong to be

the best place to live.


DIVISIONAL OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE

Corporate Services

Stephen Griffin

General Manager

B. Applied Science

Dip Ed

G Dip Local Government Management

MBM

Anthony Smith

General Manager (resigned)

G.Dip Accounting

B.of Bus. (Administration)

On 6 June 2008 Anthony Smith left his position as General Manager of Corporate

Services. Anthony made a terrific contribution during his two and half years at the City.

Stephen Griffin joined the Executive Management Team on 14 July 2008. Stephen is

responsible for the provision of efficient and effective support systems that strengthen

the strategic and operational business requirements of the City of Greater Geelong.

Stephen’s Message:

“Having recently joined the division as General Manager in July, I have been

impressed with the commitment and achievements that have been made across the

Corporate Services area. The challenges ahead will be both demanding and exciting

and the Corporate Services team is well placed to meet these challenges”.

Functions provided:

> Corporate Strategy > Customer Service

> Information Technology > Organisation Development

> Marketing and Administration > Property Services

(incl. Major Events)

> Financial Services

Division’s EFT Staff: 158

Revenue ($000): $139,254

Expenditure ($000): $ 29,196

Assets ($000): $129,096

Achievements:

> Geelong awarded the 2010 UCI World Road Cycling Championships road race.

> Electoral representation review completed by Victorian Electoral Commission.

Current structure will remain however Ward Boundaries have been modified.

> Organisation Development introduce “OD Informer” newsletter and

Employee Induction DVD.

> Successfully implemented online request for service and payments.

> 2008 Municipal Revaluation Project completed.

> 2006-2007 Annual Report receives silver award at the Australasian Reporting Awards.

> Lease Management, CONSULT (repository for all consultation activity) and

Corporate Project Management Reporting systems installed.

> Successful major event calendar including Skandia Geelong Week, Australian Formula

1 Superboats, Jayco Bay Cycling Classic, AFL Grand Final Day Live Site and the

Geelong Football Club 2007 AFL Premiers Street Parade.

> Council ranked amongst the best for Customer Service out of 150 Councils

benchmarked.

50


City Services

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Peter Reeve

General Manager

Dip CE

Municipal Engineering Certificate

FIE Aust

Peter Reeve joined the Executive Management Team on 13 September 2004. Peter

is responsible for both the planning and operational elements of City Services. He

ensures the City’s services and infrastructure assets are maintained in the areas of

waste, street cleaning, traffic engineering, drains, roads, footpaths, corporate fleet,

parks and our environment and natural resources.

Peter’s Message:

“The staff at City Services continue to provide and maintain excellent services for our

community and visitors alike with an ever increasing emphasis on environmental

considerations. The rapid growth of the City provides us with considerable challenges

all of which we are capable of responding to in a positive way”.

Division’s EFT Staff: 368

Revenue ($000): $ 28,666

Expenditure ($000): $ 86,889

Assets ($000): $ 930,439

Functions provided:

> Engineering Services > Parks and Support Services

> Environment and Natural Resources > Waste Services

> Infrastructure Operations

Achievements:

> East West Traffic improvement works progressed with a further three sites

completed and two sites nearing completion.

> Moolap drainage and flood warning project completed.

> 51 kilometres of roads resurfaced and seven kilometres of footpaths renewed.

> All sporting reserves remained open for both summer and winter sports due to

careful management by Parks staff.

> Motor vehicle policy changes with environmental focus and greenhouse

reduction initiatives.

> Launch of the Geelong EcoChallenge corporate sustainability program aimed at

reducing the organisation’s own consumption of energy, water and resources.

> Adoption of the Greenhouse Reduction Strategy.

> Implementation of Bellarine TravelSmart project results in increased instances

of walking and cycling to school in six Bellarine schools by an average of

20 per cent.

> Developed Influenza Pandemic Plan which is now being used as a template by

the Department of Human Services.

51


Development Sustainability

Kate Sullivan

General Manager

B.Applied Science in Planning

G.Cert. Performance Management

Kate Sullivan joined the Executive Management Team on 10 August 2005. Kate is

responsible for the City Development, Health and Local Laws and Planning Strategy

and Economic Development departments. One of the key responsibilities of the

division is to responsibly manage land use and development within the municipality.

Kate’s Message:

“The Development Sustainability Division has delivered some major projects during

2007-2008, completing some key strategic pieces of work commenced in the last

two-three years. This work included a significant review of the Municipal Strategic

Statement, the Structure Plan Project which resulted in the development and

adoption of six structure plans, the adoption of Armstrong Creek Urban Growth

Plan and the development and adoption of the Domestic Animal Management Plan.

Along with the strategic work, the Division continued to deliver effective services

for planning, building, health, parking and animal management.”

Functions provided:

> City Development > Health and Local Laws

> Economic Development > Planning Strategy

Achievements:

> Council adopted the Armstrong Creek Urban Growth Plan Framework in May

2008 and has recommended its approval by the Minister for Planning.

> Barwon Heads and Geelong Port Structure Plans completed.

> Housing Diversity Strategy completed.

> Heales Road Industrial Estate Framework Plan adopted by Council, and

expressions of interest sought.

> Exhibition and completion of panel hearings for Municipal Strategic Statement

and local planning review amendment.

> Domestic Animal (Dogs and Cats) Management Plan adopted by Council.

> Four major planning scheme amendments approved which will result in 1,500

residential lots being released in Lara, Fyansford, Portarlington and Leopold.

> Parking Ticket Machine Replacement Program rolled out.

> Waste Water Management Plan developed.

Division’s EFT Staff : 144

Revenue ($000): $ 17,682

Expenditure ($000): $ 16,580

Assets ($000): $ 46,916

52


Major Projects

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Stephen Wright

General Manager

Dip CE

Municipal Engineering Certificate

G.Dip Bus.

GAICD

Stephen Wright joined the Executive Management Team on 21 July 2003. Stephen

is responsible for the supervision and implementation of major projects and the

development and management of Central Geelong and the Waterfront. He oversees

the Western Wedge development, as well as Tourism and Urban Design.

Stephen’s Message:

“The last year has seen the completion of a number of enhancements to

infrastructure throughout the municipality such as Hitchcock Avenue in Barwon

Heads. The Legends Plaza in Kardinia Park is an example of public art being used

to provide cultural diversity and recognise personal achievements. Projects

developed in conjunction with other agencies such as the Cultural Precinct and

Transit Cities have also progressed significantly over the past 12 months. These

two projects are poised to deliver some exciting improvements to life in Geelong

in the future.”

Division’s EFT Staff: 40

Revenue ($000): $ 2,525

Expenditure ($000): $ 6,814

Functions provided:

> Central Geelong and Waterfront Management

> Major Projects Development > Urban Design

> Tourism > Western Wedge Facilitation

Achievements:

> Geelong Otway Tourism won the 2007 Australian Tourism Award for Meetings

and Business Tourism for the third time.

> Development of a new strategic plan for Tourism 2007-2010.

> The City won a Gold Award at the 2007 Victorian Crime and Violence

Prevention Awards.

> Draft Urban Design Guidelines developed for Central Geelong.

> Osborne House Precinct Master Plan adopted by Council.

> Amendment C124 was approved which provides new planning controls to

encourage development in the Western Wedge precinct.

> Geelong Sports Legends Plaza completed and officially opened in

September 2007.

> Hitchcock Avenue (Barwon Heads) and East Geelong streetscape

projects completed.

> Successful Central Geelong events and activities held during the year included

the Central Geelong Farmers Market, Christmas in Central Geelong, Little Malop

Street Night Market, Melbourne Cup Sidewalk Sales and Arts in the Park.

Assets ($000): $ 74,772

53


Community Services

Irene McGinnigle

General Manager

Dip. Lib

BA

G.Dip Management

G.Dip Soc Science

Irene McGinnigle joined the Executive Management Team on 4 August 2003.

Irene is responsible for departments which ensure the health and wellbeing of the

community. Departments under her supervision provide cultural and community

programs and services to the diverse community.

Irene’s Message:

“So much of the work we do in Community Services has a better result because of

community involvement. This ranges from the 350 volunteers who delivered meals

on wheels, to the young people in Norlane who planned and managed the Skating

and Art (SKAART) Festival, to the 500 parents and children involved in the Pram

Stroll along the Waterfront. This is what makes Geelong such a great place to live”!

Division’s EFT Staff: 395

Revenue ($000): $ 22,932

Expenditure ($000): $ 40,075

Assets ($000): $ 112,306

Functions provided:

> Aged and Disability Services > Family Services

> Arts and Culture > Community Development

Achievements:

> Youth Strategy 2007-2011 launched.

> Whittington Community Renewal Project implementation including the

successful running of the Community Festival (Flamefest 2008).

> Management of the Portarlington community building initiative.

> City Learning and Care team won the 2007 Geelong Business Excellence Award

in the Government Funded category for the second year running.

> Establishment of Linking Schools and Early Years Project in partnership with

Best Start and Centre for Community Child Health.

> Home care offices established in Senior Citizen Centres, strengthening

relationships between clubs and staff.

> Introduction of Pocket PC Technology to provide Community Care staff with

electronic rosters, care plans and contacts, streamlining administration

processes.

> Geelong Cultural Precinct Master Plan developed. $7.9 million from State

Government allocated to stage one of the project.

> $146,497 allocated to 24 arts projects and seven events under the Community

Arts and Community Festivals Grant Programs.

> 128 community groups receive just over $241,000 under the Councillor

Community Grants Program.

54


Community Infrastructure and Recreation

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Dean Frost

General Manager

B.App. Sci (Human Movt)

G.Dip.Bus Admin

MBA

Dean Frost joined the Executive Management Team on 29 October 2007. Dean is

responsible for the management of Council’s capital works program (Community

Infrastructure) and the management of a broad range of recreation and leisure

services and open space assets. Key projects include the development of the

Bellarine Aquatic and Sports Centre and the Leisurelink Aquatic Centre.

Dean’s Message:

“Council continues to place a strong emphasis on the importance of recreation and

community facilities in enhancing the Geelong lifestyle. Council’s strategic approach

to responding to the drought via planting of drought tolerant grasses and innovative

water re-use and water saving initiatives has us well placed to respond to climate

change”.

Division’s EFT Staff: 128

Revenue ($000): $ 15,766

Expenditure ($000): $ 19,872

Functions provided:

> Sport and Recreation Services and Facilities

> Capital Projects Management

> Leisure Services and Facilities

Achievements:

> Conversion of playing fields to drought tolerant turf saving 16 million litres

of potable water.

> Water saving measures implemented at the City’s aquatic centres saving

32 million litres of potable water.

> Construction commenced on the Bellarine Aquatic and Sports Centre.

> Leisurelink Aquatic Centre detail design finalised and completion of civil works.

> Growth in Learn to Swim program with 11,000 term enrolments. Also

120 Learn to Swim scholarships funded and delivered across the region.

> Eastern Park and Geelong Botanic Gardens Strategic Plan adopted by Council.

> Greater Geelong Cycle Strategy adopted by Council.

> Multitude of events held at the Arena in 2007-2008 including basketball,

concerts, trade fairs and holiday programs.

> Recreation facility upgrades including Queens Park Pavilion, Barwon Heads

Village Park tennis courts, Belmont Football and Netball Club change rooms

and Goldsworthy Athletics Facility terrace construction.

Assets ($000): $ 74,089

55


HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Staff are our most valuable asset.

It is their contribution that achieves the

organisation’s goals and objectives, and we

strive to foster a dynamic environment that

enables each employee to fulfil their

potential.

The City seeks to be an employer of choice through its

many strategies and programs that address individuals’

career aspirations and personal wellbeing, while at the

same time creating a productive, healthy, customerfocused

and enjoyable workplace.

A range of employee related initiatives were undertaken in

the past 12 months to improve recruitment and retention

and further develop our organisation’s capability to thrive

in the future. Some of these included:

Employee Induction DVD

All new employees now receive an Induction DVD

with their New Employee Handbook, to complement

Council’s induction program. The DVD showcases a

number of Council employees and services to provide

new employees with a greater understanding of the

organisation.

Induction Program

This program was redesigned during the year and now

includes a half-day introductory and familiarisation

session on the organisation. This session also covers

OHS, risk management and fraud awareness procedures.

Job specific induction sessions are conducted

independent of this program.

Equal Opportunity

Council is committed to equal opportunity in the

workplace and has policies and procedures in place to

ensure that all staff members are treated fairly and

decisions are based on merit.

Following a review of the Harassment and Bullying

Prevention Policy, Council commenced conducting skill

based learning sessions for all staff in preventing

discrimination, harassment and bullying in the workplace.

This training is aimed at creating a working environment

that actively discourages unwanted behaviour, and

enables managers and supervisors to handle issues and

queries that may arise effectively and expediently.

Approximately 85 per cent of employees have undertaken

this training in the past two years.

Employee Assistance Program

The Employee Assistance Program is a confidential,

short-term focused counselling service offered to any

employee and their family who are experiencing

difficulties that affect their wellbeing, work performance,

or enjoyment in the workplace, as well as issues and

concerns of a personal nature. Throughout 2007-2008,

121 people were assisted through this program.

Well for Life Program

The aim of the Well for Life Program is to make healthy

living a priority for all staff, with a range of activities that

encourage employees to participate in wellbeing programs

and initiatives. This will then contribute to a healthier and

happier workforce, resulting in improved productivity,

service levels to the community, and retention.

Examples of the range of activities offered in the last year

include flu vaccinations, massage offers, support to staff

to participate in corporate sporting events and a quarterly

newsletter with health and wellbeing tips.

Learning and Development

The City of Greater Geelong is committed to providing

all employees with equal access to occupational and

personal development and learning opportunities. This

not only assists them in achieving their career potential,

but also promotes the development of a workforce which

has the knowledge, skills and potential necessary for the

effective and efficient functioning of the organisation. This

is increasingly important in a time where recruitment and

retention of skilled staff continues to be a challenge.

Over one million dollars was spent on training and

development in 2007-2008, with more than 1,100

opportunities taken up by staff (this excludes OHS

training).

OD Informer Online Newsletter

During 2007, Organisation Development introduced the

‘OD Informer’ - an online newsletter designed to keep

managers and coordinators up to date on the latest

human resource information and advice to assist in

managing their staff.

56


Bereavement Support Fund

Occupational Health and Safety

Health and Safety Plans

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

The City of Greater Geelong has established a

Bereavement Support Fund for the sole purpose of

assisting our employees’ families and beneficiaries in

the event of an employee’s death. Staff members can

volunteer to make ongoing or one-off contributions to

the fund.

Interlink

As part of the internal communications strategy the

bi-monthly staff newsletter, Interlink is circulated to all

employees. This includes a message from the Chief

Executive Officer addressing recent activities and

organisational goals and directions.

The purpose of Interlink is to strengthen staff

connectedness and facilitate the sharing of information,

ensuring effective internal two-way communication within

the City of Greater Geelong.

Councillor Weekly Update

The Councillor Weekly Update was introduced in late

2007, and is a weekly email communication comprising

information from each division on key issues, decisions,

project updates or matters that Councillors

and Council staff should be aware of.

Council is committed to ensuring that work is undertaken

in a way that ensures the continued health and safety

of all employees, contractors and the public.

This is achieved through the use of procedures,

guidelines and OHS management tools contained in

a safety management system known as CitySafe.

During 2007-2008, Council implemented a number

of programs and initiatives to address specific issues

including:

> Providing innovative scenario based OHS training to

all Community Care Workers.

> Providing all employees with easy to use pocket size

OHS hazard reporting booklets.

> Initiating a two-year CitySafe compliance

audit program.

> Developing and implementing improved safe systems

of work to meet the requirements of the 2007

construction OHS regulations.

> Auditing contractor activities to ensure continued

adherence to Council’s OHS standards and

requirements.

> In 2007-2008 Council held corporate Occupational

Health and Safety training sessions, with 662

participants attending (equating to 2,547 hours).

These statistics do not include the many job-specific

health and safety training that is carried out by

individual departments.

Each department within the City of Greater Geelong is

required to have a department-specific Health and Safety

Plan. These are an integral part of the organisation’s OHS

planning process. The continued improvement and

implementation of health and safety plans for all

departments ensures that hazards associated with daily

tasks are identified and appropriate control measures are

put in place to address them.

Committees Review

The City’s Occupational Health and Safety Committees

continue to meet regularly. The committees, in

conjunction with the trained Health and Safety

Representatives, ensure effective OHS communication

across the organisation. The City conducts regular

information sessions and discussion forums during the

year for its elected Health and Safety Representatives.

During 2007-2008 Council undertook a detailed review

of its committee and representative structure to ensure it

continues to align with the organisational structure.

57


STAFF PROFILE

As at June 30, 2008 the City of Greater Geelong employed 2,095 people, which is equivalent to 1,236 effective full time staff (EFT).

This makes the City one of the largest employers in the region

Staff turnover during 2007-2008 was 14.6 per cent, which was a small reduction on the previous years figure of 15.1 per cent.

Annual Effective Full Time * Staff by Year

Percentage of EFT by Employment Type

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

1,093

1,169

1,200

1,219

1,236

In order to deliver the broad range of services provided by

council, flexible employment arrangements are required.

This provides benefits for the community and our staff.

The distribution between these employment types is

shown below.

0 1000

1050 1100 1150 1200 1250

Number EFT

* Effective Full Time Staff = 38hrs per week

Total Headcount by Year

Annual headcount includes short-term and casual employees such as pool lifeguards, school holiday

program staff and school crossing supervisors.

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

0 1000

1250 1500 1750 2000 2250

Number of staff

1,873

2,107

2,056

2,067

2,095

Full time 66.2%

Part time 28.0%

Casual 5.8%

58


Gender Composition by Management Level (Total headcount)

Indicates the split between males and females in the various levels of employment within the City.

Executive

Managers

43%

57%

Department

20%

Managers 80%

Co-ordinators

35%

65%

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Age (Years)

65 & over

Other

Female

Male

35%

Staff numbers by Age Spread (Total headcount)

The age spread of Council’s staff is consistent with Australia’s ageing workforce trend.

This presents challenges in retaining and recruiting sufficient staff, as increasing numbers of our employees

move towards the retirement phase of their lives.

Council is continuing to address this issue through initiatives such as Jobs for Young People, Work Experience

Placements, succession planning, flexible working arrangements, family friendly policies, and learning and

development opportunities.

15-24

25-34

35-44

45-54

55-64

86

234

328

380

65%

456

611

0 100

200 300 400 500 600

Number of staff

59

Councillor Support Team


EMPLOYEE EXCELLENCE AWARDS

This program is designed to reward and recognise exceptional performance in customer service, health and safety/risk management, innovation

and business improvement or corporate behaviour.

During 2007-2008, 13 employees were recognised for their exceptional performance in one of those areas:

Month Name Position Department

July 2007 Stephen Parker Recreation Project Development Officer Swim, Sport and Leisure

August 2007 Jenny Zeinstra Property Leasing Officer Corporate Strategy and Property Services

September 2007 Frank Howard/Brian Happ Coordinator Facilities Maintenance/Leisure Services Corporate Strategy and Property

Facilities Maintenance Coordinator

Services/Leisure Services

October 2007 Leonie Dillon Rosewall Best Start Project Community Facilitator Family Services

November 2007 Bruno Preiato Parking and Animal Information Officer Health and Local Laws

Dec 2007 / Jan 2008 Hilary Robinson Maternal Child Health Nurse Family Services

February 2008 Greg Meade/Leon Websdale Team Leader Health & Amenities/Planning Investigations Officer Health and Local Laws/ City Development

March 2008 Joan Bai IT Applications Administrator Information Technology

April 2008 Danielle Hughes Youth Development Officer Community Development

May 2008 Alex Joseph Coordinator Construction and Partnerships Capital Projects

June 2008 Harvey Witcombe School Crossing Supervisor Health and Local Laws

60


RECOGNITION OF SERVICE AWARDS

Recognition of Service awards acknowledge the efforts and contributions of staff over 10, 20 and 30 year periods during 2007.

Currently at Council we have 423 staff who have completed over 10 years of service, 142 who have completed over 20 years of service, 17 who have completed 30 years of service

and one employee who has completed over 40 years of service.

The loyalty of staff that have completed service milestones this year are listed in the table below. They are a valuable asset to the organisation, as is the contribution they have made

to the community of Geelong.

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

30 Years

Michael Finn Roger Harrison Peter Bohling Deborah Elea

20 Years

Gregory (Ted) Thirlwell John Bryce Maureen Ryan Julie Davey Henry Manzl

James Foran Louise Robinson Margaret Newman Victoria Stanford Norma Innes

David Skurrie Margaret Murphy Cheryl Craven Sandra Smith Roslyn Ash

Peter Berry Maria Vinken Rhonda Fraim Linda Prosser Kevin O'Hara

Andrew McInnes Jeanette Brady Margaret Gaitanis Suzanne Baker Carol Fisher

Adrian Cobb Neilma Marshall Mark Dittloff Milan Osolnik Richard Gordon

10 Years

Fiona Dunbar Ned Turcinov Robert Jones Shane Holliday Christine Foord

Marion Raftery Diane Johns Lila Ann Dempsey Helen Watson Belinda Lewis

Bud Chapell Karen Best Janet Blyton Darren Baensch Veronica Chamley

Neil Dickenson Mary Menzies Judith Ollis Christian Thorley Sarah Kushonda

Shane Poulter Maree Deans Marion Scott Lakshman Weerakkody Monique Abbott

Cameron Littlehales Ann King Gail O'Beirne Cheryl Hopwood Margaret Sirca

Shayne Fisher Joanne Riches Jeanette Speers Brett Ricchini Julia Filep

Bryan Wille Barbara Heine Heather Muir Heather McCawley Linda Bond

Geoffrey Cooper Carolyn Hurley Michele Kayler-Thomson Anthony Boseley Rebecca Balm

Joseph Schembri Rene Malesza Julie Lynch Julie Grech Jennifer Wadey

Noelene Pappin

61


OUR VOLUNTEERS

Volunteering is integral to the operations of

the City of Greater Geelong and makes an

invaluable contribution to our community.

Council depends on over 700 volunteers who

offer their time to deliver essential services to

the community.

Volunteers offer their commitment, support and

experience to assist community members and visitors to

Geelong - they form a vital part of the Greater Geelong

community. Our Volunteers are present at the following

locations:

The Geelong Heritage Centre

The Geelong Heritage centre holds Victoria's largest

regional archive and historical resources. The Heritage

Centre has approximately 15 dedicated volunteers who

assist with indexing and project-based assignments

working with newspapers, maps and plans, photographs

and archival records.

Meals on Wheels

Meals on Wheels volunteers deliver meals to the City of

Greater Geelong Aged and Disability Services clients. The

Food Service provided by Aged and Disability Services is

designed to provide nutritionally balanced meals to the

aged and people with disabilities to assist in maintaining

their independence in their own homes. The Meals on

Wheels program has more than 350 committed

volunteers. Many have been long serving volunteers for

more than 20 years with a few involved for over 30 years!

The volunteers deliver 120,000 hot and cold meals per

year to people assessed as nutritionally at risk.

They deliver from seven centres across Geelong and the

Bellarine Peninsula. As well as the meals program, the

volunteers provide important social contact and their visits

help the City to monitor the health and wellbeing of the

clients.

National Wool Museum

The National Wool Museum was established to showcase

our rich wool heritage from early settlement to present

day. It is Australia's only comprehensive museum of wool.

The museum has more than 80 keen volunteers.

The volunteers assist in a variety of ways in the museum

by conducting guided tours, welcoming patrons to the

museum, assisting in the gift shop along with loom,

spinning and knitting demonstrations.

Walking School Bus

Our Walking School Bus volunteers are based across the

municipality from the Bellarine Peninsula to our northern

suburbs. They provide a valuable resource to our

community and its schools. The program continues to

grow and whilst its primary aim is to improve safety for

children it is apparent the Walking School Bus is

delivering health, environmental and social benefits as

well. It also improves children's knowledge of their

neighbourhood and facilitates the development of

independence.

Major and Community Events

Our region hosts many major and community events

throughout the year and volunteers are a very important

part of the success of all our events. Volunteers staff

information kiosks and promote our city at events such

as Skandia Geelong Week, the National Triathlon

Championships and the Geelong Show. Volunteers

also provide invaluable assistance in running community

events such as the World’s Greatest Pram Stroll, the Pako

Festa and numerous community and arts festivals.

Youth Events and Activities

Volunteers are integral to ensuring the smooth running of

the Youth Development Unit’s many events and activities

for young people. Volunteers also sit on committees

which organise youth events and help plan youth

infrastructure projects.

62


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Geelong Otway Tourism

Geelong Otway Tourism has 130 enthusiastic volunteers

who are the first point of contact for more than 190,000

annual visitors to the four Visitor Information Centres in

Geelong. Volunteers provide a first point of face-to-face

and phone contact for enquires to the centres. Along with

this, the volunteers promote our region by staffing stands

at major events and conferences and compiling

information packs. The volunteers are also active in

promoting Geelong and the region at events such as the

Melbourne Show, leisure and holiday expos such as the

Caravan and Camping Show and the Home and Leisure

Show, along with answering over 20,000 telephone calls

per year.

In order to further improve the operation of our Volunteer

Network, Council continues to conduct information

sharing forums featuring guest presenters for our

volunteer coordinators who ensure the smooth running of

all of the City’s volunteer programs. Formally recognising

the work of our volunteers continues to be important to

the City with events such as a recognition ceremony and

morning tea during National Volunteers’ Week. Internet

information on volunteering at Council has been updated

and improved, and we continue to work on strengthening

our relationships with contacts in the broader Geelong

volunteering network.

For more information on volunteering with the City

of Greater Geelong, please contact Organisation

Development on (03) 5272 5272 or refer to:

www.geelongaustralia.com.au.

63

Visitor Information Centre volunteers


CORPORATE

GOVERNANCE

To enhance community confidence in the

democratic process of Local Government,

the City of Greater Geelong maintains an

open and accountable governance

framework.

City Hall, Geelong

64


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

QQ

QQ

QQ

GOVERNANCE

FRAMEWORK

The framework established by the City aims to support the

achievement of Council’s objectives in an open and

transparent manner.

Community

Council

CEO

65

Council and

Committees

Structures

Organisational Framework

Management

Structure

> Establishment of Committees

> Audit Committee Policy

> Terms of Reference

(Council and Committees)

> New Member Inductions

(Council and Committees)

> Effective Meetings and Quality Records

(Council and Committees)

> Self Evaluation

(Council and Committees)

Q

Internal Audit

Management

Standards

> Policies

> Delegations

> Code of Conduct

> Communication of

Standards

> Risk Management

- Management

Support

- Risk Management

Policy

> Strategic Planning

> Budgeting

> Financial, Social

and Environment

> Communication

> Internal Control

> Occupational Health

and Safety

> Human Resources

> Information

Technology

Q

Corporate

Objectives

Functions

Q

Q Q

Manage,

Monitor and

Review Risks

> Establish the

Context

> Identification

> Analysis

> Assessment

> Treatment

> Monitoring

and Review

of risks

Governance and Control

Accountability Framework

Control, Monitoring, Review

and Compliance

Internal

Reporting

> Internal Audit

> Council

Q

Monitoring

Review and

Compliance

> Executive Management Committee

> Audit Committee

> Risk Management Committee

> Local Law and Legislation

Committee

> Occupational Health and Safety

Committee

> New Ventures

> Grant Management

> Compliance

External

Accountability

External

Reporting

> External Audit

> Financial

Stewardship

> Performance

Reporting

> Corporate

Governance

and

Disclosure

> Management

Representation

Disclosure


INTERNAL AUDIT

The internal audit function is an independent,

objective assurance and consulting activity

designed to add value and improve the

City’s operations.

It assists the Council to achieve its objectives by bringing

a systematic, structured approach in recommending

improvement to the control environment, risk

management and governance processes.

Audit Achievements

In 2007-2008 Council completed in excess of 85 per

cent of a comprehensive risk based internal audit plan.

The role also provides policy and procedure advice to the

Executive and actively manages Council’s Fraud policy

and awareness programs. There is ongoing participation

in Information Technology system developments and

maintenance and their associated security.

Audit Advisory Committee

The City of Greater Geelong formed the Audit Advisory

Committee according to Section 86 of the Local

Government Act 1989. The Audit Advisory Committee

plays a key role in assisting the City to fulfil their

governance responsibilities, ethical practices and

accountability requirements. The Committee’s corporate

governance responsibilities includes financial

management, occupational health and safety, public

liability, property and other insurance matters, risk and

project management and overseeing of the internal and

external audit functions of the City. The Committee

comprises six members, which is made up of three

Councillors and three external professionals.

The present Audit Advisory Committee is:

Chairperson:

> Mayor, Cr Bruce Harwood (resigned from position of

Chairperson in May 2008. New appointment to be

made in early 2008-2009).

Members :

> Cr Barbara Abley.

> Cr Jan Farrell.

> Mr Michael Dowling (Principal of Dowling Corporate

Consulting Pty Ltd, fellow of the Institute of Chartered

Accountants).

> Mr Peter O’Callaghan (Principal of Wyndarra

Consultative specialising in risk management and

internal audit) Resigned at February 2008 meeting.

The new appointment Mr Peter Bollen (Former CEO

Surf Coast Shire) commences in August 2008.

> Ms Linda MacRae (Principal of Local Solutions Pty

Ltd specialising in financial and local government

management).

The Audit Advisory Committee meets quarterly

and reports to Council.

Waste management crew using safe work practices

66


STATUTORY INFORMATION

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Information Privacy

The City of Greater Geelong is committed to protecting

people's right to privacy and the responsible and fair

handling of personal information, consistent with the

Information Privacy Act, 2000 and Health Records

Act 2001.

Council has in place a policy that sets out the

requirements for the management and handling of

personal information. The policy is a public document

available on request or on Council’s web site. During the

year ending 30 June 2008 no formal complaints were

received.

Freedom of Information

The Freedom of Information (FOI) Act gives the

community the right to access information in the

possession of Council.

Importantly, it provides access to information about the

operation of Council, particularly the rules and practices

which affect members of the public in their dealings with

Council.

This general right of access to information is limited

only by exceptions and exemptions, which have been

prescribed to protect essential public interests and the

private or business affairs of people about whom

information is held by Council.

In keeping with the spirit of the legislation, Councils are

expected to, as far as possible, facilitate and promote the

disclosure of information promptly and at the lowest

reasonable cost.

In the period from 1 July 2007 to 30 June 2008, the

City of Greater Geelong received a total of 23 Freedom

of Information requests and of those, 13 were granted

full or part access, for one no documents existed, five

were either withdrawn or dealt with outside FOI and two

were denied access. At the end of the financial year two

applications were still being processed.

Whistleblower Legislation

The Whistleblowers Protection Act 2001 commenced on

1 January 2002. The main purposes of the Act are to:

> Encourage and facilitate disclosures of improper

conduct by public officers and public bodies.

> Protect persons making those disclosures.

> Provide for matters disclosed to be properly

investigated and dealt with.

Council has established procedures to protect people who

make disclosures from any reprisals as a result of that

disclosure. Council will also afford natural justice to any

person who is the subject of the disclosure. Copies of

Council Whistleblower Protection procedures are available

upon request.

During the year to 30 June 2008, Council did not receive

any complaints or reports or allegations of improper

conduct or detrimental action pursuant to the provisions

of section 104 of the Whistleblowers Protection Act.

Documents available for public inspection

Under the Local Government Act there is certain

information Councils are required to make available to

the public on request. That information is as follows:

> Details of current allowances fixed for the Mayor and

Councillors under Section 74 of the Act.

> Details of senior officers’ total salary packages for the

current financial year and the two previous years

including the gross salary, the amount of the Council

or employer contribution to superannuation, the value

of any motor vehicle provided by the Council and the

total value of any other benefits and allowances

provided by the Council.

> Details of overseas or interstate travel, with the

exception of interstate travel to a neighbouring

municipality, undertaken in an official capacity by

Councillors or any member of Council staff in the

previous 12 months, including the names of the

Councillors or members of Council staff and the date,

destination, purpose and total cost of the overseas or

interstate travel.

> Names of Council officers who were required to submit

a return of interest during the financial year and the

dates the returns were submitted.

> Names of Councillors who submitted returns of interest

during the financial year and the dates the returns

were submitted.

> Agendas for and minutes of ordinary and special

meetings held in the previous 12 months kept under

Section 93 of the Act, except where such minutes

relate to parts of meetings which have been closed to

members of the public under Section 89 of the Act.

> A list of all special committees established by Council

and the purpose for which each committee was

established.

> A list of all special committees established by the

Council which were abolished or ceased to function

during the financial year.

67


Minutes of meetings of special committees established

under Section 86 of the Act and held in the previous

12 months except where such minutes relate to parts

of meetings which have been closed to members of the

public under Section 89 of the Act.

> Applications for enrolment on the voters’ roll under

Sections 12 and 13 of the Act for the immediate past

roll and the next roll being prepared.

> Register of delegations kept under Section 87,

88 and 98 of the Act.

> Submissions received under Section 223 of the Act

during the previous 12 months.

> Agreements to establish regional libraries under

Section 196 of the Act.

> Details of all property, finance and operating leases

involving land, buildings, plant, computer equipment

and vehicles entered into by the Council as lessor or

lessee that includes the name of the other party to the

lease and the terms and the value of the lease.

> Register of authorised officers appointed under

Section 224 of the Act.

> A list of donations and grants made by the Council

during the financial year, including the names of

persons or bodies in receipt of a donation or grant

and the amount of each donation or grant.

> A list of the names of the organisations of which the

Council was a member during the financial year and

details of all membership fees and other amounts and

services provided during that year to each organisation

by the Council.

> A list of contracts valued at $100,000 or more which

the Council entered into during the financial year

without first engaging in a competitive process and

which are not contracts referred to in section 186(5)

of the Act.

National Competition Policy Compliance

In 2007-2008 the City of Greater Geelong complied

with the requirements of the National Competition Policy,

Competitive Neutrality and Trade Practices Act Legislation.

Council is required to demonstrate ongoing compliance

and provide certification by 30 September annually.

Local Laws

At 30 June 2008 the following Local Laws remain

current:

General Local Law 2005

This law regulates activities of people and provides

standards and conditions for specified activities to protect

people in, or the environment of, the municipal district.

An amending Local Law adopted in November 2006

extended the Local Law to include noise from vehicles,

anti-social behaviour in public places, control of the sale

of spray cans and camping in cars.

No.11 - Local Law Revision

(Revocation of Local Law No. 5 – Library)

The objective of this law is to revoke Local Law No.5,

which has been rendered obsolete.

No. 12 - Council Meeting Procedures Local Law

This law relates to meetings of the City of Greater Geelong

Council and special committees. The objectives include:

> To provide for peace, order and good government, and

ensure that Council’s decisions are made in the best

interests of the people of the City of Greater Geelong.

> To provide for the administration of Council’s powers

and functions.

> To regulate and control the election of Mayor and

Acting Mayor.

> To promote and encourage community participation.

Risk Management

Council’s Risk Management Policy and Corporate Risk

Management Strategy was reviewed and updated to

provide strategic direction to June 2011.

Council’s risk register continues to be reviewed on a six

monthly basis to ensure it is reflective of the activities and

associated risks of all Council departments.

A range of actions were developed to enhance the

management of risk at strategic and operational levels.

The strategy provides for regular monitoring, review and

reporting on the status of Council’s risks.

The City placed in the top ten of Victorian Council’s for

our insurer’s annual public Liability and Property

Insurance Assessment, scoring 91 per cent, improving

from last year’s score of 86 per cent. The state wide

average for the year was 74 per cent. The continued

improvement in results demonstrates that the City has

in place a sound risk management framework and risk

register.

Contractor Management

Each year the City of Greater Geelong engages a large

number of contractors to assist with the delivery of a

range of major projects and Council services. The city

has implemented a Contractor OHS Management process

to ensure works are undertaken in a way that does not

pose undue risks to contractors, their employees and

the public.

The process requires the contractor to meet a number of

legislative and corporate health and safety requirements

prior to commencing at any site. It also incorporates

onsite audits conducted by a City of Greater Geelong

representative, to ensure the contractor is fulfilling their

OHS obligations, and provide feedback on areas that

require improvement.

> Campaign Donation returns lodged under Section

62 of the Act by candidates for election.

68


Asset Management

Activities for 2007-2008 included:

Citizenship

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

The City’s infrastructure consists of networks of local

roads, footpaths, bridges, drains, parks and gardens and

civic and community buildings. Council creates, holds,

maintains and renews these assets on behalf of the

community. Infrastructure contributes to the City’s

transportation and recreational goals as well as

providing civic amenity.

The City’s Asset Management effort is considerable,

using a large proportion of Council’s financial and other

resources. It integrates with Council’s corporate, financial

business, budgetary, operational, human resources and

information technology plans.

Strategic Asset Management recognises the enduring

nature of infrastructure assets and ensures that the

community’s long-term investment can be realised over

its lifecycle. Asset management decisions are formed by

evaluation of alternative means of service provision, full

life cycle costing, and performance measurement and

monitoring. Such work enables Council to determine

appropriate infrastructure to be provided and the level

at which assets need to be maintained.

The phases of an asset’s life cycle are:

> Acquisition, involving the specification of asset type

and the timing, financing and means of procurement.

> Operation and maintenance, requiring performance

levels, operating and maintenance schedules to be

specified.

> Development of 3-year renewal programs for

pavements, road surfaces, footpaths and bus shelters.

> Condition assessment of engineering networks

including:

> Sealed roads, using state-of-the-art digital video

technology,

> Footpaths,

> Kerbs and Channel.

> Administration and revision of the City’s Municipal

Road Management Plan as required by the Road

Management Act 2004, including routine and

reactive inspections.

> Administration of the City’s infrastructure data

including input of $8.6 million worth of subdivisional

assets into the Hansen asset register.

> Upgrade of the City’s asset management software.

Asset management will continue to evolve and mature.

The City will strive to be at the forefront of asset

management through participation in the MAV’s “Step

Programme”. This initiative provides guidance to Victorian

councils on their asset management effort.

From the 2007-2008 review, the areas identified

for improvement were:

> Defining levels of service for infrastructure-based

services.

Acquiring Australian Citizenship enables people to

participate fully in our inclusive society, realise aspirations

and achieve their full potential, regardless of their race,

background, gender, religion, language or place of birth.

In the 12 months to 30 June 2008, the City hosted

twelve major ceremonies and several private ceremonies.

Certificates of Australian Citizenship were presented by

the Mayor of the City to 608 residents of Geelong, many

of whom shared the occasion with the support of relatives

and friends. A special ceremony was also conducted on

the Geelong Waterfront as part of celebrations to mark

Australia Day (26 January).

> Renewal, rehabilitation and replacement schedules

to be specified.

> Validating current and future levels of services

with the community.

These are priority actions for the City’s 2008-2009 Asset

Management Improvement Program.

69


COUNCIL APPOINTMENTS TO

COMMITTEES AND GROUPS

In addition to the list of current Councillor appointments to committees and groups on pages 14-18, the following is a list of those not

acknowledged previously.

Committee/Group Representative 2006-2007

Internal Governance - Advisory Committee to Council

Disability Street Access Advisory Committee

Cr Abley

Cr Harwood (substitute)

Kardinia Park Steering Committee

Cr Mitchell

Cr Abley (substitute)

Submissions Review Panel

Cr Farrell

(plus any two Councillors)

Windsor Park Steering Committee

Cr Brazier

Cr Saunderson (substitute)

Development Hearing Panel

Internal Governance – Council Committees of Management

Geelong - East Timor Friendship Committee

any Councillor

Cr Brazier

Cr Abley (substitute)

External Governance – Statutory Entities

Incorporated Association (Membership)

Municipal Association of Victoria

Cr Farrell

Cr McMullin (substitute)

Committee for Geelong

Mayor

Chief Executive Officer

Note: Where a Councillor is listed as a substitute, this Councillor attends in place of representative

70


PERFORMANCE

The following section reports on our

performance against City Plan 2007-2011

actions and strategies, as well as

highlighting accomplishments for 2007-2008.

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

71

Skilled Stadium, home of the Geelong Football Club


THE PILLARS: HIGHLIGHTS

AND ACHIEVEMENTS

The City has identified the elements that

enable Council to respond to the changing

needs of the community and to ensure the

continued development of the region.

These elements are the nine Pillars of a ‘great city’

and the two Themes required for the organisation to

effectively operate.

Based on research and community consultation, a set of

objectives and outcomes was set for each of the Pillars

and Themes. Measures and targets were then set for each

outcome to ensure we are making progress, and to help

establish the future focus and actions of Council.

This section of the Annual Report details the highlights

and achievements across our pillars and themes, as well

as the future directions and remaining challenges.

Geelong Botanic Gardens

72


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Taya Barnett

Newcomb Park

Primary School

Age: 10

‘Geelong is a great place to

live because it has lots of

historical and interesting

places like the rotunda at

Johnstone Park which has

been around for many years.

So come and enjoy Geelong

like I do and I’m sure you will

too.’

73


HEALTH AND WELLBEING

Objective

To have an integrated approach to improving

the health, wellbeing and social capital of the

community.

Highlights

The City of Greater Geelong won a national award from

the Heart Foundation for its Healthy Beginnings Strategy

aimed at improving the health and wellbeing of children.

The strategy is a package of 11 complementary programs

and initiatives to improve the level of children's physical

activity and nutrition throughout Geelong. Programs

include the Start Right Eat Right Program, Romp and

Chomp Project, Geelong Kids Go For Your Life Project,

Learn to Swim Scholarship Program and Structured

Active Play in Early Childhood Project.

Geelong was a sea of blue and white on the first

Wednesday in October 2007 as tens of thousands

of fans turned out to honour the 2007 AFL Premiers,

the Geelong Football Club. The City of Greater Geelong

hosted a motorcade of the premiership players and team

officials before captain Tom Harley was presented with

the key to the city on stage at Johnstone Park. City staff

and contractors worked many hours to ensure that not

only the parade but also the Grand Final Day Live Site

and Supporters Day celebrations at Skilled Stadium went

off without a hitch. These post match celebrations raised

community spirit and connectedness for months after the

event.

Achievements

The new Youth Strategy 2007-2011 was launched in

September 2007. The Youth Strategy 2007-2011 will

play a fundamental role in ensuring the needs of the

region’s 41,000 young people are met. It aims to help

young people thrive and realise their potential in their

own community. The strategy identifies a range of actions

to be implemented within the following six areas: Places

and spaces; Advocacy; Youth participation; Programs

and events; Communication; and Capacity building.

Implementation of the Youth Strategy has commenced

with some of the initiatives carried out over the last 12

months including:

> City of Greater Geelong Impetus2008 Youth Awards.

> YouthCan website redevelopment.

> Place based youth activities held across the

municipality.

> Purchase of new portable skate ramps.

> YouthCan van refurbishment.

> Facilitation of events such as Youth Week, SKAART

(Skate and Art) and Get on Board.

The Whittington Community Renewal Project is a clear

example of what can be achieved when we form

cross-government, organisation and community

partnerships. In the past 12 months Council has

supported the project in the following ways:

> Conducted community engagement activities to

increase social connectedness.

> Developed the Community Gate Project.

> Held the Whittington Community Festival

(Flamefest).

> Conducted regular school holiday programs.

> Supported the development of an editorial committee

and publication of the Whittington Voice newsletter.

> Constructed Whittington Link barbeque and completed

tree planting.

> Formed a youth advisory committee.

In October 2007 over 8,000 people attended events held

during the 2007 Victorian Seniors Festival Geelong.

The festival comprised 72 events including performances

by the Melbourne Welsh Male Voice Choir, the Geelong

Senior Citizens' Super Vet Cycling Handicap, a workshop

on writing life stories or family histories, and an

information session on how to become a volunteer.

During the year the Grovedale Community Centre

received a major renovation and was established

as a Neighbourhood House, bringing the number of

Neighbourhood Houses in the municipality to 11.

Other community facilities to receive upgrades were St

Leonards community facility, Ruthven Street Playgroup

and the Ocean Grove Community Hall.

Future Directions

The development of the Youth Activities Area at the

Waterfront will provide the region’s young people with a

dedicated area for a wide range of sport and recreation

activities and events. The $1.3 million facility will include

skateable surfaces, half-court basketball, stages and

multi-purpose outdoor spaces. The unique aspect about

this facility is that young people will be heavily involved in

the management and maintenance, as well as organising

youth events to be held there.

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CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

The Wathaurong Children’s Health Centre will be built

alongside the recently completed Wathaurong

Multi-Purpose Indigenous Health Centre. This is a joint

partnership between the Wathaurong Aboriginal

Co-operative, City of Greater Geelong and the State and

Federal Governments. When completed, this facility will

respond to a recognised area of indigenous disadvantage

and will allow for specialised service provision to local

Aboriginal children.

Challenges

Addressing the changing health needs of children and

families and promoting healthy eating to mitigate effects

of obesity is a priority of the City of Greater Geelong.

The City will continue negotiating with the State

Government to provide funding for the Active-Play and

Healthy Eating Programs which are an important factor

in meeting the health needs of children.

The movement of the Baby Boomer cohort into older

age (55 and over) will see the regions ageing population

increase by 17 per cent by 2015. This will put increased

demands on related services and infrastructure. It is

important that these issues continue to be addressed

to meet the future needs of the community.

Did you know...

8,530 individual children were provided with

a Maternal Child Health Service at one of

council’s MCH centres in 2007-2008.

75

Newcomb Maternal Child Health Centre


Health and Wellbeing - Outcomes

Outcome Measure Target Source Target Achieved Comment

Physical Health Life Expectancy Department of Human Services website ✓ It should be noted that there is a

significant time lag between the

collection of, and reporting of data.

However the CoGG trend from

1997-2005 is in line with Vic

Region (increasing).

Years of life lost due to ill health (DALYs)

Department of Human Services website (i ) Data is not reported at Local

Government level.

Healthy Environment Disease notifications - disease rate per Not exceed Vic rate CoGG Health and Local Laws Blood Borne: ✓ Geelong had a lower incidence rate

100,00 population Enteric: ✓ for all the reported disease

Other infections notifiable: ✓ categories except Sexually

Sexually transmitted: ✕ transmitted, which was 3.7

Vaccine preventable: ✓

above the Victorian rate.

Vector borne: ✓

Zoonoses: ✓

Imm unisation coverage To exceed Vic rate CoGG Community Child Health Officer ✓ CoGG rates were higher than

Victorian Average in all 3 age

cohorts.

Life Stages Support Child health assessments (rates of Department of Human Services ✓ Significant improvement on

participation at 3.5 years)

2006-2007 result.

Preventable hospital admission for Below state and Department of Human Services (i) Data is not reported at Local

residents aged 70+ regional levels Government level.

Community satisfaction with health and


Annual Local Government Community Result has remained consistent

human services Satisfaction Survey over past three years.

Connected and % of residents involved in volunteering Department for Victorian Communities ✓ Survey is only run every second year

Engaged Communities Indicators of Community Strength so result is based on 2006 – 2007.

% of residents who are a member of an Department for Victorian Communities Survey is only run every second year

organised group Indicators of Community Strength so result is based on 2006 – 2007.

% of residents who have attended a Achieve >50% Department for Victorian Communities ✕ Survey is only run every second year

community event Indicators of Community Strength so result is based on 2006 – 2007.

Key

() = maintain, () = increase, () = decrease, (✓) = target achieved, (✕) = target not achieved, (i ) = no new data available

76


Delivering on our Commitments: 2007-2008 Annual Business Plan Action Update

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Pillar : Health and Wellbeing

Physical Health

Donation to United Way to assist various welfare agencies

Improve disability access to buildings across the municipality

Kids Go For Your Life Program - healthy eating and physical activity behaviours with

local childhood services

Healthy Environment

Saleyards building upgrade addressing environmental health legislation

Status

Streetscape Works: Hughes St (Bell Park) and Beaford Ave (Bell Post Hill) shopping strips >

Streetscape Works: Shannon Avenue Shopping Centre


Streetscape Works: Hitchcock Avenue, Barwon Heads


Streetscape Works: Portarlington / Drysdale beautification program


Mosquito control activities including helicopter application


Life Stages Support

School Holiday Programs incl Leopold/Ocean Grove/Belmont/Newtown

Develop the Maternal and Child Health Service Capital Infrastructure Development Plan >

Barwon Inclusion Support Agency - Providing support to child care services to promote the

inclusion of all children including those with additional needs into eligible Commonwealth

funded approved childcare

Grants to assist Senior Citizens month activities

Cloverdale Community Centre Upgrade - design >

Sponsorship of Youth Administration Young Achievers Award


Lara Youth Centre - program development for young people


Support the Youthcan Van - Info Deli Team


Youth Activities:Waterfront Program >

Youth Activities:Ocean Grove/Drysdale Programs


Youth Activities:General


Life Education Van donation


Contribution to Community Market and Carols by Candlelight at Windsor Park


Playground under surfacing program









Life Stages Support (cont’d)

Community Facilities Upgrade: Ruthven Street Playgroup Upgrade

Community Facilities Upgrade: Corio Kindergarten heating

Community Facilities Upgrade: St Leonards community facility

Community Facilities Upgrade: Belmont Senior Citizens Centre - air conditioning

Community Facilities Upgrade: Fyans Park Kindergarten upgrade >

Community Facilities Upgrade: Normanby Street Pre School


Community Facilities Upgrade: Ocean Grove Community Hall - access improvements ✓

Community Facilities Upgrade: Belmont City Learning and Care refurbishment, Norlane

West Kindergarten fencing

Community Facilities Upgrade - Centenary Hall (air conditioning) / Geelong West Town Hall

improvements / South Barwon Civic Centre improvements >

Playground development program: Kingston Estate


Playground development program


Playgroup and parent support group activities targeted to disadvantaged groups and families

Family Relationship Service Partnership program - providing support to separated parents

Implement Leopold youth activities (Leopold Youth Action Team - The Outfit)


Contribution to 2007 Youth Awareness Day


Contribution towards production of Piercing Truth quarterly magazine - produced by and

for young people

Outreach preparation for parenting and Indigenous Innovations programs

Youth Participation and Access Program

Connected and Engaged Community

Community infrastructure planning for Developer Contribution Plans >

Redevelopment of Connections Park Corio - includes playground and path renewal >

Conduct Community Building events (Grovedale Community Centre)

Portarlington Community Building Initiative >

Community Renewal: Whittington Renewal Project >










Key to status symbols (✓)Completed / Achieved () Completed for 2007-2008/repeated annually (>) In progress - To be completed in 2008-2009 (❖) On hold will determine future action

77


Tamie Baljak

Bell Park North

Primary School

Age: 11

‘I drew a picture of Barwon

River bike path because of

the beautiful landscape and

gorgeous wildlife. I went for

a bike education class with

school and loved it!’

78


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Objective

Achievements

Future Directions

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

To enhance the community’s prosperity by

developing Geelong’s competitive strengths.

Highlights

Council, in partnership with Deakin University and the

State Government was successful in attracting global IT

firm Satyam Computer Services to the region. This is

one of the biggest industry investments in the region for

decades and has the potential to deliver 2,000 new jobs.

Geelong has recognised strengths in a number of

knowledge based industries and this coup will give

considerable impetus to the firms already established in

the region. The City’s economic development strategy

recognises that innovative and smart industries will be

the key drivers in Geelong’s future economy. This venture

is confirmation of how Geelong’s economic profile is

diversifying and its skills base expanding.

In September 2007 it was announced that Geelong and

Melbourne had won the right to host the 2010 UCI Road

Cycling World Championships. Geelong will be the venue

for the road racing events and the time trials will be

staged in Melbourne. This will be the first time the event

has been held in the Southern Hemisphere. This has

been part of the City's major events strategy for some time

and for it to now be reality is very exciting, and a ringing

endorsement of Geelong's major events expertise.

In 2010 we can expect tens of thousands of visitors to

come to the Geelong region and television coverage of the

racing will reach an audience of several hundred million

people.

Geelong Otway Tourism won the 2007 Australian

Tourism Award for Meetings and Business Tourism.

This is the third time they have won this prestigious

award and this success shows the current economic

benefit and the potential this industry has in boosting the

local economy.

The Heales Road Industrial Estate Framework Plan was

adopted by Council in July 2007. Demand for high

quality industrial land has outstripped supply and this

new plan will permit a wider range, and a greater number

of industries. It will ensure the Heales Road Estate

maximises its very large economic potential. In May

2008 Expressions of Interest for the first land release

were sought.

During the year the Central Geelong Structure Plan was

adopted by Council. The structure plan will guide land

use and development for Central Geelong for the next 20

years with a key focus being to create clear links between

Central Geelong, the Waterfront and Geelong Railway

Station for people to walk or cycle. The Geelong Port

Structure Plan, also adopted in 2007, contains

guidelines to encourage development, and ensure the

economic benefit is maximised for future generations.

Adopted in October 2007, the Osborne House Precinct

Master Plan provides for a significant injection to the

local economy through marine based industry and

facilitates a sustainable use for the precinct’s heritage

buildings. The development of this precinct will provide

hundreds of jobs both directly and indirectly in other

related sectors.

The Minister for Planning's approval for Planning

Amendment C124 paves the way for some exciting new

private sector developments in the Western Wedge area

of central Geelong. The vision for the Western Wedge

aims to encourage new intensive development to locate

around the Geelong Railway Station, to take advantage of

the precinct's accessibility to public transport and

proximity

to Corio Bay and the Geelong city centre.

Development worth more than $120 million has

commenced in the Western Wedge area with the

Transport Accident Commission headquarters expected

to be completed early in 2009. The Edgewater

development on the Waterfront is well underway, as is

the redevelopment of the Dennys Lascelles Wool Store

to house Deakin University’s Health Precinct. A landmark

15 storey building is also planned and will provide a great

boost for this developing part of the City.

Our region’s economy will be boosted as Geelong’s major

events calendar continues to expand. The Waterfront and

Geelong will be abuzz with activity with the recent

announcement that Geelong would host the Victorian

round of the 2009 Triathlon Australia Challenge Series.

Events added to the calendar for next year also include

the Australian Masters Games, 2009 Australian

International Airshow and the Australasian Supercross

Championship to be held at Skilled Stadium.

79


Jayco Bay Cycling Classic, Eastern Beach

Challenges

Our ageing workforce coupled with the unprecedented

business growth we are experiencing means some locally

based businesses are finding it a challenge to find skilled

workers to fill vacancies. To combat this regional skills

shortage, the City is taking part in the State Government’s

Global Skills for Provincial Victoria Program 2008-2010,

which is designed to assist regional business growth by

attracting skilled workers to fill positions. This program

will support us in attracting a larger share of skilled

migrants arriving in Australia while at the same time

continuing our job creation programs aimed at local

young people.

The sufficient availability of industrial and employment

land that caters to ‘new economy’ industries such as

advanced manufacturing and assembly and logistics is a

high priority for Council as it continues to attract attention

from these emerging industry sectors.

80


Economic Development - Outcomes

Outcome Measure Target Source Target Achieved Comment

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Employment Opportunities Unemployment rate Maintain difference between Geelong Economic Indicators ✓

Geelong and Victoria

Bulletin (DEWR) June Quarter

Figures

Average weekly advertised job Geelong Economic Indicators ✓

vacancies - Geelong Advertiser

Bulletin

New Industry Number of major investment CoGG Economic Development - (i)

enquiries

EDU Invest Database Summary

Number of non domestic/non Pulse Building Intelligence Report ✕ Target not achieved due to record

residential building permits - Building Commission Victoria numbers of permits issued in

2006-2007.

Community satisfaction with Trend toward highest score in Annual Local Government

economic development LGA Group 3 Community Satisfaction Survey

Tourism Average takings ($) per room 3% increase per annum after ABS Survey of Tourist

night occupied CPI adjustment Accommodation

Key

Off peak average takings per 5% increase per annum ABS Survey of Tourist

room night occupied after CPI adjustment Accommodation

() = maintain, () = increase, () = decrease, (✓) = target achieved, (✕) = target not achieved, (i ) = no new data available

Did you know...

In 2007-2008 5,039 building permits were issued,

with a total value of $850 million.

81


Delivering on our Commitments: 2007-2008

Annual Business Plan Action Update

Pillar : Economic Development

Status

Industry Support

Sponsor Geelong Business Excellence Program


Grants to support investment attraction


Geelong Food Industry Cluster Project >

Geelong Small Business Training Program - workshops and training grants


New Industry

Contribution to Committee for Geelong


Seafood and Aqua-culture investment project


Mineral Springs Bath House - design


Yarra Street powerline relocation - Westfield Shopping Centre redevelopment


Yarra Street Pier / Fishermans Basin redevelopment - technical and statutory

planning investigations >

Central Geelong: Looking Forward project - transforming our towns to achieve

vibrant cohesive communities >

Haymarket Site Development >

Tourism

Relocation of the Visitor Information Centre >

Provide for tourist information and administrative support centres within the Geelong region

Continue to bid for new events delegate boosting programs and increasing yield activity

Manage Central Geelong activities programs and Farmers Market


Support Chiba Geelong Day promotion


Attraction of Today Show to Geelong >

Contribution to Major Events in Geelong


Australian Masters Games 2009 - part sponsorship


Key to status symbols

(✓)Completed / Achieved (>) In progress - To be completed in 2008-2009

() Completed for 2007-2008/repeated annually

(❖) On hold will determine future action

Sanitarium Weet-Bix TRY-athlon, Eastern Beach

82


ENVIRONMENT

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Objective

To enhance, conserve and sustain the

diverse natural and built environment.

Highlights

Council adopted its Greenhouse Reduction Strategy in

December 2007. This strategy sets a minimum 30 per

cent greenhouse gas emission reduction target for 2010,

and a 60 per cent reduction goal for 2025. In committing

to these targets the City is making a serious commitment

to reducing greenhouse emissions across its many areas

of operation. The City's Greenhouse Reduction Strategy

was carried out as part of the Cities for Climate Protection

Program - an international initiative of which the City of

Greater Geelong is a member. The strategy recommends

the City works towards reducing its emissions while also

planning for the potential impacts of climate change.

As part of Council’s commitment to responding to climate

change, EcoChallenge was launched in May 2008.

EcoChallenge is a corporate sustainability program aimed

at reducing the organisation’s own consumption of

energy, water and resources. The EcoChallenge

challenges our conventional thinking, pushes our

environmental performance and looks at raising our

standards of awareness and knowledge. It is an example

of how the City is working to achieve Council’s vision of

an ‘exceptional environment’ for the Geelong region.

Achievements

In 2007 the City’s five major aquatic centres saved a total

of 32 million litres of water through the introduction of a

variety of water saving measures. This is the equivalent

to the annual average water consumption of 150

households. Key savings were achieved via the

installation of backwash water reuse systems at most

of the aquatic centres, the introduction of pool blankets,

installation of low flow shower heads, proactive leakage

maintenance and the promotion of water conservation

messages.

Other water saving initiatives conducted during the year

include the Memorial Park (Leopold) water harvesting

project. It is believed to be the first time in Australia that

a sporting complex of this size has been irrigated

exclusively using industrial and residential stormwater

run-off. Also a new water recycling facility at Elcho Park

Golf Course has the potential to save 12 to 15 million

litres of water per year. Water from utility infrastructure

pits is treated then reused to irrigate the golf course.

A number of plans to ensure sustainable growth were

adopted including the Central Geelong Structure Plan,

Barwon Heads Structure Plan, Housing Diversity Strategy

and the Lara Structure Plan.

In a world first, wetlands in Geelong and the Japanese

city of Nagoya were linked through a set of internet

cameras. A web camera in each location relays live

coverage of the wetlands allowing people to watch in real

time the summer and winter habitats of birds that migrate

between Geelong and Nagoya. The agreement between

our cities is an important step towards ensuring the

wetlands habitats at both ends of these birds' migration

route are protected and enhanced.

Future Directions

Council adopted the Armstrong Creek Urban Growth

Plan Framework in May 2008 and has recommended its

approval by the Minister for Planning. Armstrong Creek is

the designated growth area in the Geelong Region, and

has been recognised for this purpose since the 1980s.

The time has now come to commence the detailed

planning for this. The growth area will take around

25-years to fully develop, and will realise a population

in the order of 55,000 to be accommodated in 22,000

households. The first step in the planning process is to

provide the policy framework and statutory basis for the

Armstrong Creek Urban Growth Plan in the Greater

Geelong Planning Scheme, to facilitate the

implementation and realisation of the Urban Growth Plan,

and to identify and protect existing conditions and

environmentally sensitive areas. The City has undertaken

significant work on infrastructure planning with relevant

agencies during 2007-2008. This will inform the next

detailed level of planning as we move to precinct

structure planning for identified precincts.

83


Implementing the Local Action Plan contained within

the Greenhouse Response 2008-2011 together with the

actions contained within the Environment Management

Strategy will play a pivotal role in the way Council and

Geelong reduces its greenhouse gas emissions and

protects and enhances its natural environment.

Drought proofing our region remains high on Council’s

agenda and 2008-2009 will see a number of water

re-use projects take place including the Elcho Park Golf

Course/Barwon Prison Recycled Water Pipeline

development. The conversion of major sporting fields

to drought tolerant grasses will also continue, adding

to those completed since the program commenced in

2006.

Challenges

Community awareness about environmental issues

such as global climate change is higher than ever

before. There is also an increasing expectation that local

government demonstrates leadership in reducing

environmental impacts. The EcoChallenge is Council’s

commitment to reducing the organisation’s impact on

the environment.

The goal to develop a total waste management system

that maximises the recovery of material and minimises

the region's reliance on landfill will soon be a reality.

Community education will be paramount to the success

of this system.

Balancing the need for urban development with

protecting and enhancing the natural environment will

continue to be a challenge in a period of increasing

population growth. Extensive work completed on a

number of strategies and structure plans will guide

Council’s direction in managing these demands.

Balyang Sanctuary

84


Environment – Outcomes

Outcome Measure Target Source Target Achieved Comment

Biodiversity Management % cover of local indigenous 20% increase from 2000 to 2010 City of Greater Geelong (i) Annual revegetation programs

vegetation Biodiversity Strategy continue.

Environmental weeds on council 50% reduction from 2000 to 2010 City of Greater Geelong (i) Works will continue on managing

managed conservation reserves Biodiversity Strategy weeds in conservation reserves.

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Water and Air Quality Index of stream condition - Increase % of good and excellent Victorian Rivers Index of Stream (i) Only reported every five years – next

Barwon River Basin ratings Condition report 2009.

Beach Water Quality 0 days enterococci >500/100ml EPA Beach Water Quality Report ✓ There were no days this financial

year where enterococci exceeded

500/100ml in our bay waters.

Air quality


EPA Air Quality Index for the

Geelong Region

Sustainable Development Building approvals meeting 100% City Development - CoGG ✓

5 star rating

Waste, Recycling and Recycling and waste collection Recycling Infrastructure Services -CoGG Recycling ✓

Resource Use volumes (kg/household) Green Waste Green Waste ✓

Garbage

Garbage ✕

25% reduction in Councils potable (750,000 kilolitres by 2015) Property Services - CoGG ✓ Usage is trending downwards

water consumption by 2015

however consumption continues to

be abnormally low due to stage 4

water restrictions.

Key

() = maintain, () = increase, () = decrease, (✓) = target achieved, (✕) = target not achieved, (i ) = no new data available

85


Delivering on our Commitments: 2007-2008 Annual Business Plan Action Update

Pillar : Environment

Status

Waste Recycling and Resource Use

Water Saving Initiatives: Memorial Park (Leopold) water harvesting


Water Saving Initiatives: Water leaks and efficient cleaning


Water Saving Initiatives: Backwash recycle system - Waterworld >

Water Saving Initiatives: Waste water/stormwater reuse at Kardinia Park


Water reuse waste management and renewable energy annual conference


Supply mobile bins to new properties


Construction of Drysdale Landfill Cell Four >

Tree removal program


Oval renovation program


Drought recovery at Waterworld and Kardinia Aquatic Centre >

Conversion of five major sporting fields to drought tolerant grasses


Steampacket Gardens Sustainable Turf replacement


Contribution to Barwon Region Waste Management Group


Biodiversity Management

Balyang Sanctuary redevelopment


Improve Councils environmental reserves


Avalon Boat Ramp upgrade >

Implementation of the Geelong Region Wetlands Project


Conduct weed control program


Undertake and maintain coastal reserves and infrastructure within the municipal boundary

Contribute to community groups working on Council parks


Maintain conservation reserves within the municipality


Implement Barwon River Land Use and Open Space Corridor Plan >

Water and Air Quality

Stormwater quality management plan implementation


Geelong healthy waterways program


Ramblers Rd drainage improvement program - addressing environmental concerns


Implement Sustainable Water Use Plan: Elcho Park >

Implement Sustainable Water Use Plan: Queens Park


Stormwater quality management - education design and research


Upgrade of all automatic irrigation systems as per new legislation


Sustainable Development

Municipal Strategic Statement Review Project >

Armstrong Creek Urban Growth Plan >

Development of Planning Strategies including Bypass Study >

Did you know...

The conversion of 10 of the City’s key

sporting grounds to drought tolerant

grasses saved 16 million litres of water

in 2007-2008.

Key to status symbols

(✓)Completed / Achieved (>) In progress - To be completed in 2008-2009

() Completed for 2007-2008/repeated annually

(❖) On hold will determine future action

86


COMMUNITY SAFETY AND SECURITY

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Objective

To create a sense of security throughout

the community.

Highlights

Recent amendments to the Domestic (Feral and

Nuisance) Animals Act 1994 has resulted in Council

developing the Domestic Animal (Dogs and Cats)

Management Plan. Adopted in June 2008, the plan

addresses three key areas; responsible pet ownership,

dogs in public places and leadership. The plan was

subject to significant community consultation and

following 904 submissions a management plan was

developed to balance the needs of the community while

promoting responsible pet ownership. The guiding

principles that underpin the actions are:

> The belief that pets contribute to our quality of life.

> A requirement to balance the needs of those who own

pets and those who do not.

> To value responsible pet ownership.

> Proactive animal management and education.

> Ensuring the environment is protected from the

negative impacts of dogs and cats.

> To work in partnership with others.

> Council playing a leadership role in animal

management.

The revised 2007 Liquor Accord was launched in

November following extensive work by the City of Greater

Geelong, the Geelong Nightlife and Bar Association,

Victoria Police and the Department of Criminology at

Deakin University. The first Liquor Accord was signed by

licensees in 1991 and aimed at reducing risks to the

public in and around licensed premises. It has been

revised several times since then to take into account

changing trends and public attitudes and has played an

important part in improving safety in the city area. The

revised Accord includes the introduction of the Night

Watch radio program, ID scanners at certain prominent

entertainment venues and the introduction of self-audit

checklists for venues signing up to the Accord.

Achievements

A Gold Award won by the City at the 2007 Victorian

Crime and Violence Prevention Awards was a tribute to an

excellent partnership between Council, Victoria Police,

Deakin University, Central Geelong traders and the

Geelong Nightlife Association. The award taken out by the

Central Geelong Safety Program was recognition of the

intensive work that had been done in reducing anti-social

behaviour in Central Geelong.

The City’s Learn to Swim program achieved record

numbers during 2007-2008 with over 11,000 term

enrolments. With classes available from six months of

age, children and adults learn water safety and survival

skills and develop stoke techniques in a fun and

progressive learning environment. The City also funded

and delivered 120 Learn to Swim scholarships across the

region.

The City was one of only two councils in Victoria to

complete a draft Influenza Pandemic Plan. The key

aspects of the plan are about ensuring business

continuity, effective communications to the community,

and supporting agencies as part of emergency

management planning. The City’s plan is now being used

as a template by the Department of Human Services.

Future Directions

The Domestic Animal (Dogs and Cats) Management

Plan implementation kicks off in 2008-2009 with several

actions scheduled in year one of the plan. Community

awareness and education on responsible pet ownership

and dogs in public places will be the main areas of focus.

Year two of the plan will see the introduction of cat

confinement between sunset and sunrise across the

municipality.

Central Geelong Safety remains a priority for this Council

with further security upgrades scheduled for the precinct.

Safety camera upgrades and lighting improvements will

continue and a 24-hour access public toilet will also be

installed in the precinct.

With the region currently under water restrictions imposed

by Barwon Water, greywater recycling in gardens is

becoming common practice amongst households.

Greywater in some cases may contain bacteria and

chemicals so it is important that it is used in a safe

manner. Council will assist the community by

implementing Waste Water Management strategies

that safeguard residential gardens in a safe manner.

87


Challenges

Drought conditions in the region will continue to increase

the risk of bushfires so it is important that safety plans are

strictly adhered to. The Breamlea Fire Management Plan

is an example of the City, residents and the Country Fire

Authority working together to form a plan that sets out

bushfire prevention measures as well as strategies to

reduce the impact of a bushfire. Council needs to

continue promoting bushfire awareness and prevention

measures while at the same time taking into account

environmental needs.

Community safety and policing is an important issue and

Council will continue to advocate on behalf of the

community to make the municipality safe for residents

and visitors.

Did you know...

The City of Greater Geelong has

30,616 registered dogs and 10,414

registered cats which is the largest

registered database in the state.

Council Local Laws officers at work

88


Community Safety and Security - Outcomes

Outcome Measure Target Source Target Achieved Comment

Safe Community Crime rate per 100,000 Not exceed Victorian rate Victoria Police Provisional Crime ✓ Victorian Rate 7,185 offences per

population Statistics 100,000, Geelong 6,204 per

100,000 people.

Emergency Management Municipal Emergency Updated annually Annual Municipal Emergency ✓ Plan updated in October 2007.

Management Plan is updated

Plan

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Delivering on our Commitments: 2007-2008 Annual Business Plan Action Update

Pillar : Community Safety and Security

Safe Community

Status

St Leonards Lake safety improvements >

Supervision for school crossings


Contribution to Life Saving


East Geelong Food Services centre driveway construction to improve safety for volunteers ✓

Ritchie Boulevard lighting improvements


Central Geelong safety lighting improvements and camera upgrade >

Safestart program for children in 0-8 age group focusing on preventing unintentional child

injury initiatives

Emergency Management

Emergency management and response program

Contribution to Emergency Management program

Emergency maintenance (unplanned) on Council facilities

Safe Built Environment

Toilet block upgrades


Central Geelong public toilets >

Central Geelong footpath cleaning


Street Lighting






Key to status symbols

(✓)Completed / Achieved (>) In progress - To be completed in 2008-2009

() Completed for 2007-2008/repeated annually

(❖) On hold will determine future action

89


TRANSPORTATION

Objective

To enhance and improve the region’s local,

public and freight transport systems and

infrastructure.

Highlights

Improvement works at the Mercer, Malop and Gheringhap

Street intersection were completed during the year. Works

at the intersection were part of Council's wider East-West

Traffic Strategy, aimed at improving the flow of vehicles,

cyclists and pedestrians. One of the very important

benefits of the new signalised intersection (replacing the

previous roundabout) is the much-improved levels of

pedestrian safety that it has brought to this busy part of

Central Geelong. Other sites completed during the year

include Malop and Fitzroy Street intersection and the

Latrobe Tce clearway. Works that have commenced

during the year and due for completion early in

2008-2009 include the Ryrie Street, Sydney Parade

and Swanston Street intersection and the Garden Street

and Portarlington Road intersection.

Extensive consultation with cyclists and other road and

trail users was carried out during the preparation of the

Greater Geelong Cycle Strategy. Adopted by Council in

March 2008, the strategy will provide Council with

guidance on expanding Geelong’s on and off road cycle

network, improving bicycle facilities, enhancing cyclist

education and delivering promotions that encourage

people to cycle as a means of transport, recreation and

sport. Some of the major recommendations of the strategy

include:

> Building better links between paths, improving signage

and developing safe crossing points.

> Education programs aimed at schools and workplaces

to encourage greater use of bicycles for daily

commuting.

> The construction of an amalgamated home of cycling

containing a criterium circuit for road racing and

training, plus a mountain bike trail and BMX facilities.

The adoption of the Greater Geelong Cycle Strategy is very

timely given the upcoming 2010 World Road Cycling

Championships being held in Geelong. It also gives more

impetus to our to bid to establish Geelong as a major

cycling city. Implementation of this strategy will

commence in 2008-2009.

Achievements

The Central Geelong Parking Precinct Plan was adopted

by Council following consideration of public submissions

and comments received through consultation. The plan

applies to the whole of Central Geelong including the

Waterfront and will ensure the most effective distribution

of parking spaces. The plan also enables the City to

collect funds from developers in lieu of them providing the

prescribed amount of parking at their development site.

This revenue would then be used by the City to develop

public car parking infrastructure, ensuring the best

possible use of available parking spaces.

A new project called TravelSmart was launched in July

2007. Jointly funded by the City of Greater Geelong and

the Department of Infrastructure, it is aimed at increasing

the number of children who walk or ride to school. Thirty

years ago 70 per cent of children walked or rode their

bikes to school. Just one generation later only 30 per cent

of primary school children walk or ride to school. There

are six primary schools from the Bellarine Peninsula

involved in the TravelSmart program: Drysdale, Clifton

Springs, Barwon Heads, Leopold as well as Our Lady Star

of the Sea and Surfside - both in Ocean Grove. This

project has seen walking and cycling to school increase

by 20 per cent at these schools.

The Walking School Bus program saw two more schools

added bringing the total to ten participating schools with

70 fully trained volunteers.

Future Directions

The Leopold Strategic Footpath Network will improve the

amenity of Leopold and will mean more footpaths that

link community facilities. This will also play a big part in

improving access for people with disabilities. The project

design involved a great deal of community consultation,

with works due to commence in 2008-2009.

A new link from the Geelong Railway Station to Mercer

Street will be created after Council received State

Government funding for the Geelong Transit City project.

Street improvements through to the new Transport

Accident Commission headquarters will also be funded.

The $24.5 million in State funding to be spread over four

years will also further assist development of Geelong’s

Western Wedge precinct.

90


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Challenges

Improvements to the Geelong bus services have been

minimal since 1980. Due to population growth and our

expanding suburbs, routes in Geelong have grown over

the years, and they meander around rather than having

a trunk-line approach. G21, the Public Transport Users'

Association, bus companies, disability groups, the City

of Greater Geelong, Surf Coast and Golden Plains

councils have all been included in discussions with the

State Government to improve the public transport

system. The challenge is not only to upgrade services

in the Geelong area, but to also ensure connections

between the timetables for rail and public bus transport

are integrated.

Managing traffic flow through the city during peak times

is also a priority of Council and along with the East West

Traffic improvements, further Park and Ride services will

be investigated in an effort to ease traffic and parking

congestion in the city.

91 Park and Ride bus service


Transportation - Outcomes

Outcome Measure Target Source Target Achieved Comment

Road and Footpath Network Community satisfaction with local Local Government Community Result has remained consistent over

roads and footpaths Satisfaction Survey past three years.

Road traffic fatalities and injuries VicRoads CrashStats ✕ Serious injuries There was a 50% decrease in

✓ Fatalities fatalities on our roads, however

a 13% increase in serious injuries.

Bicycle Network Total kms of off road bicycle tracks Engineering Services - CoGG ✓

Key

() = maintain, () = increase, () = decrease, (✓) = target achieved, (✕) = target not achieved, (i ) = no new data available

Did you know...

The Magic Meter Elves gave away 64,308 minutes of free

parking in Central Geelong over the 2007 Christmas period.

This equates to nearly $2,000 in free parking!

92


Delivering on our Commitments: 2007-2008 Annual Business Plan Action Update

Pillar : Transportation

Status

Local Public Transport

Provision of new bus shelters in Portarlington and Drysdale


Central Geelong Park and Ride shuttle service


Summer Circuit bus service


Bus Stop upgrades (Disabled Discrimination Act compliance)


Road and Footpath Network

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Light fleet program

Heavy and dedicated plant replacement

Construct and design local roads including Federal Roads Program and Vic Roads funded works

Major traffic work construction

Implement Central Geelong Parking Strategy actions including changed parking arrangements

and additional lighting and signage

Ocean Grove Traffic Study improvements

Road Network - Conduct condition rating for seals and pavements

Develop traffic plans across the city

Road Safety program

Footpath renewal program

Kerb and Channel renewal program

Drainage design and construction program

Conduct major culvert guardrail replacement / implementation program

Special Rates and Charges to carry out roads footpaths and drainage works

East West traffic improvement works

Car Park Construction at 9 Belmont Street, and Belmont Bowling Club

Leopold Strategic Footpaths - design

Point Henry traffic and landscape improvements

Bicycle Network

Bicycle infrastructure recurrent program maintenance




















Did you know...

There are 3,950 off-street and 5,400 on

street car park spaces in Central Geelong.

Key to status symbols

(✓)Completed / Achieved (>) In progress - To be completed in 2008-2009

() Completed for 2007-2008/repeated annually

(❖) On hold will determine future action

93


Bellarine Rail Trail

94


PARKS SPORT AND LEISURE

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Objective

To improve quality of life by providing

opportunities for physical activity and

open space for reflection, relaxation, social

interaction and the experiences of nature.

Highlights

The first 14 inductees into the Geelong Sports Legends

Plaza were unveiled in September 2007 at an official

opening ceremony, featuring family members of many

of the sports legends. The Legends Plaza comprises a

series of two metre tall displays featuring an image of

each sports legend and a brief summary of their best

known achievements. Located at Kardinia Park, the

spiritual home of sport achievement in Geelong, the

Plaza honours sporting achievements and acknowledges

the positive influence sport has on people’s lives. The

Legends Plaza not only represents our rich sporting

history, but stands as an inspiration to current and future

athletes from across our region to strive to achieve

success in their chosen field.

Construction commenced on the Bellarine Aquatic and

Sports Centre in February 2008 and is due to open in

December 2008. The centre, being built at Ocean Grove,

is a partnership project involving the City of Greater

Geelong which is contributing $5.5 million and the State

Government which is providing $2.5 million. The Centre

is a long-held vision of the Bellarine community and will

cater to all ages and abilities. It will include facilities such

as an eight-lane 25 metre pool, program pool space for

all levels of Learn to Swim, water play facilities, outdoor

recreation space, provision for some warm water exercise

and a disabled/family change area.

Achievements

In January 2008, Council endorsed the Eastern Park

and Geelong Botanic Gardens Strategic Plan and

recommended the start of implementation. The Strategic

Plan provides a 50 year vision for the park and a 20 year

implementation plan. The Plan has been developed in

three stages:

> Stage one - Heritage Conservation Assessment:

identifies heritage elements.

> Stage two - The Master Plan: 32 actions for

improvements.

> Stage three - The Management Plan: addresses

key management issues.

The Plan will achieve the aim of enhancing the Park

while protecting the much admired heritage and natural

elements. Future projects include a boardwalk to link

Eastern Beach with Eastern Park and the Geelong

Botanic Gardens, a sculpture park, amphitheatre for

outdoor events, an educational facility, and transforming

the Walter Conservatory into a restaurant, café and

function space.

During the year several sporting facilities and reserves

received upgrades. The Queens Park sports reserve

upgrade was completed with the pavilion receiving a

major refurbishment, Newcomb and District Sports Club

new netball pavilion was completed, the Barwon Heads

Village Park tennis court and playground upgrade were

finished and the new Ocean Grove soccer grounds were

officially opened.

The rejuvenation of Sparrow Park has seen the

development of a new learn to skate area, new

tricycle/scooter track and a new playground for older

children amongst the exciting new additions to the

popular park. Outdoor power was also installed allowing

for the Geelong West Brass Band to perform recitals in

the park. Local residents were actively involved in the

upgrade and people of all ages will benefit from the

works.

The new Corio Community Park was also opened during

the year. The once underutilised space has become a

place of vibrancy, pride and activity that is accessible to

people of all ages, cultural backgrounds and abilities. This

partnership project in the northern suburbs has seen the

installation of a playground for young children, barbeque

area, rotunda, walking tracks and a community arts

space. Further works are planned for a playground for

older children, bollards, new garden beds and extra

fencing. Corio Community Park is a family-friendly place

designed for everyone to access leisure and recreational

activities.

95


Future Directions

Main construction works are soon to commence on the

$30 million Leisurelink Aquatic Centre. This is the

biggest sports and leisure project ever undertaken by

Council and the end result will be a spectacular gym

and aquatic centre that caters to all ages and abilities.

A 50-metre indoor pool (legacy from the 2007 FINA

World Swimming Championships), spacious gym and

aerobics complex and theme park style waterslides are

among the key features of the new Leisurelink. It will

cater for the growing communities in the South Barwon

area and allow for expansion of the Leisurelink

membership base and learn to swim programs. This is

an exciting joint project between the City of Greater

Geelong and the State Government. The new Leisurelink

is expected to open in summer 2009-2010.

The home of the Geelong Football Club, Skilled Stadium

will receive a $30 million upgrade commencing at the

end of the 2008 AFL season. Council will contribute

$2 million to the project that will see the redevelopment

of the Ross Drew Stand and the Past Players Stand.

The project will create an additional 3,000 seats,

increasing capacity of Skilled Stadium to 30,000.

There will be state-of-the-art training, gymnasium and

rehabilitation facilities, more spectator facilities for people

with a disability, expanded corporate entertainment

facilities, improved administration premises and new

turf maintenance facilities.

Challenges

One of the legacies of amalgamation in the mid nineties

was a large network of community and recreation

facilities, many of which were due for upgrading. In a

municipality of our size, upgrading our numerous

recreation reserves and facilities is a never-ending task,

but we have made great strides in recent years. With new

facilities such as the Bellarine Aquatic and Sports Centre

and Leisurelink Aquatic Centre under construction, it is

also important we continue to upgrade our existing sport,

recreation and aquatic facilities, as these are important

community assets.

Periods of drought and water restrictions will continue to

pose challenges for Council when it comes to preserving

sporting grounds, reserves, parks and gardens.

Maintaining service levels and minimising the impact on

various leisure facilities will be a priority for Council in

continuing to improve quality of life by providing

opportunities for physical activity, relaxation and social

interaction.

Did you know...

Council’s Leisure centres have

over 9,400 members.

Geelong Sports Legends Plaza, Kardinia Park

96


Parks, Sport and Leisure – Outcomes

Outcome Measure Target Source Target Achieved Comment

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Healthy Lifestyle Levels of sport and physical activity Exceed Victorian Rate Exercise Recreation and Sport (i) Survey no longer run.

Survey (ERASS) - Sport and

Recreation Victoria

Community satisfaction with Annual Local Government

recreational facilities

Community Satisfaction Survey

Active and Vibrant Public Community satisfaction with the Annual Local Government

Spaces appearance of public areas Community Satisfaction Survey

Community satisfaction with level Integrated Open Space Services - (i) Survey no longer run.

of maintenance in parks

Park User Satisfaction Survey

Community satisfaction with Integrated Open Space Services - (i) Survey no longer run.

managing parks and reserves

Park User Satisfaction Survey

Strong Sport and Recreation % of residents who participate in DVC Indicators of Community ✓ Survey is only run every second year

Networks organised sport Strength so achievement based on

2006-2007 results.

Key

() = maintain, () = increase, () = decrease, (✓) = target achieved, (✕) = target not achieved, (i ) = no new data available

Did you know...

Council supports more than 560 community, sport and

recreation clubs and organisations, and over 60 sport and

recreation pavilions and clubhouses.

97


Delivering on our Commitments: 2007-2008 Annual Business Plan Action Update

Pillar : Parks Sports and Leisure

Status

Pillar : Parks Sports and Leisure

Status

Healthy Lifestyle

Leisurelink Aquatic Centre replacement facility >

Facility maintenance - aquatic centres OHS


Bellarine Aquatic and Sports Centre - construction >

Gymnasium equipment replacement program >

Lara Pool change room upgrade >

Cyclical and programmed maintenance


Major facility maintenance - aquatic centres


Bellarine Rail Trail infrastructure development improvements and landscaping >

Grants from Sport and Recreation Victoria to fund minor facility upgrades


Hovell Creek Walking Trail - continuation to Serendip


Implement recommendations from the Walking Study >

Sport and Recreation Victoria Country Football and Netball grant program for facility

development

Newcomb Walk design and construction

Waterworld gymnasium expansion >

Office space redevelopment at the Arena


Active and Vibrant Public Spaces

Contribution to Equine Development signage >

Implement elements of the Whittington Link Landscape Plan


Skate Ramp replacement


Moorpanyal Park


Contribution towards Geelong Lawn Tennis Clubs indoor tennis project


Richmond Crescent facility upgrade contribution >

Contribution towards East Geelong Primary School soccer goals purchase


Contribution towards East Geelong Croquet Club upgrade works


Contribution towards Eastern Park Bowls Club shade structures and improvements


Contribution towards Drysdale Primary School change facilities


Contribution towards Bell Park Sports Club irrigation works


Geelong Baseball Centre improvement works


Geelong Hockey Pitch replacement/upgrade


Floodlight Core Program


Windsor Park - drainage works




Active and Vibrant Public Spaces

Skilled Stadium - Brownlow Stand lift upgrade

Flinders Peak Facilities upgrade (Rugby Club)

Goldsworthy Athletics facility terrace construction

St Marys Football Club change rooms - design

Friers Reserve Sports Pavilion - planning and design of new change facilities

Kardinia Park shade shelter and barbeque facilities

Lara Baseball - training nets, lighting, change rooms and toilet block

BMX track at Chirnside Park >

Corio and Moorabool Pony Club clubrooms >

Bell Post Hill (Myers Reserve) lighting


Surfside Tennis - lighting >

Highton Reserve Landscape Plan implementation >

Collendina Reserve Sports Pavilion >

Temporary changerooms at Shell Road Reserve Ocean Grove


East Belmont Football and Netball Club change rooms


King Lloyd Reserve facility improvements >

Elderslie Reserve Landscape Plan implementation >

Herne Hill Reserve (St Josephs Football Club) lighting


Herne Hill Reserve (St Josephs Football Club) boundary fence replacement


Leopold Cricket Club practice wicket safety netting >

Memorial Park Pavilion works - design


St Albans Reserve lighting


Barwon Heads Community Arts Garden toilet installation >

Lake Lorne Pony Club jumps construction


Ground renovation program


Recreation Reserve car park re-sheeting


Grovedale Reserve soccer fields - lighting, beautification works, new pavilion design and

car park sealing >

Sparrow Park Masterplan implementation >

Corio Community Park

Thomson Reserve facilities >









Key to status symbols (✓)Completed / Achieved () Completed for 2007-2008/repeated annually (>) In progress - To be completed in 2008-2009 (❖) On hold will determine future action

98


Geelong Special Play Space, Eastern Park

Active and Vibrant Public Spaces (cont'd)

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Western Oval netball change facilities >

Barwon Heads Village Park


Drysdale Reserve facility works >

Queens Park Sporting Pavilion


North Geelong Football and Netball Club Pavilion >

Bakers Oval


North Shore Sports Club pavilion and change rooms


Eastern Beach retaining wall reconstruction >

Eastern Beach childrens pool detailed construction plans >

Rebuild Eastern Beach dive tower >

Elcho Park Golf Club first hole pro shop and club room upgrade


Relocate Geelong Motocross Club from Breakwater Road >

Contribution towards St Leonards Yacht Club viewing deck construction


Strong Sport and Recreation Networks

Contribution to Barwon Sports Academy


Open Space Networks Study and Acquisitions Plan - purchase of land in Lara


Geelong Cricket Association contribution for ground maintenance


Sponsor local recreation programs


Community Sports Forum in Portarlington


Key to status symbols

(✓)Completed / Achieved (>) In progress - To be completed in 2008-2009

() Completed for 2007-2008/repeated annually (❖) On hold will determine future action

Did you know...

The City of Greater Geelong

has 279 Playgrounds.

99


EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

Objective

To support and enhance the City’s position

and reputation as a leading centre for

education, training and research.

Highlights

On the 27 September 2007 the Newcomb Library

reopened after being totally rebuilt and refitted. The

library is the first in the Geelong Regional Library

network to introduce Radio Frequency Identification

(RFID). This cutting edge technology is a new way of

keeping inventory and circulating the library collections.

It improves services to members by allowing them to

check-out their own items, giving staff more time to

attend to customers' needs. Other new features include

increased audio-visual collections, an audible

scanner/reader to help members of the community with

vision impairment or low literacy, a baby play panel and

children's furniture in the children's area, Playstation3

and Xbox for young people, and increased access to

information technology including the internet and word

processing facilities.

The Newcomb Library had been a central part of the local

community for 26 years, providing library collections and

services such as story-times and holiday programs. We

anticipate growth in activity at the library as more and

more people discover all the new and wonderful

resources and facilities on offer.

Council re-opened the Early Learning Centre @ Rosewall

(formerly known as Rosewall Kindergarten) at the

beginning of the school year following its closure by the

previous licensee early in 2007. The Centre provides an

education program for 12 hours per week over two days

for three and four year-old children. In addition a

nutritious lunch is provided for each child thanks to the

kind sponsorship of Shell. It is vital that children in the

Rosewall area have access to high quality kindergarten

programs in their local community. This has been made

possible with the support from the State Department of

Education and Early Childhood Development and Shell.

Achievements

The children at Belmont City Learning and Care now

have great new play areas to enjoy thanks to the recent

upgrade. The renovations completed in March also

included improvements to the bathroom and laundry.

Normanby Street Pre-School also had a minor

refurbishment with the kitchen, office and storage

cupboards receiving an upgrade.

The opening of the Deakin Medical School in Geelong

is a fitting tribute to the quality of teaching and research

undertaken at the university. Council formerly supported

Deakin’s bid to achieve the first regional medical school

and this now confirms its place as one of the most

important institutions in the Geelong region. It is

estimated that the new medical centre will increase

the output of the regional educational sector by almost

20 per cent.

Future Directions

Great care is being taken to protect the original features

during the upgrading of the historic Geelong West

Library. Once complete this important community asset

will again take its place as one of Geelong West’s

significant buildings while at the same time bringing the

library into the 21st Century both for the borrowers and

the library staff. A key feature of the development will be

the incorporation of the existing Geelong West Customer

Service Centre into the new complex. The complete

refurbishment due to be completed in September 2009

will also include improved disability access and greater

community computer facilities.

The Lara Library and the Belmont Library are also

scheduled to have upgrades commence in the next 12

months.

A joint project between Council, Western Heights College

and the Department of Education and Early Childhood

Development will see a world class school and

community facility developed in Vines Road. The

proposal involves the consolidation of Western Heights

College’s existing three campuses alongside a new

community building where the Vines Road Community

Centre and Vines Road Senior Citizens activities will

operate. The key feature of the combined facility will be

the ability of local residents to share in the use of many of

the new facilities including the library, sports facilities and

performing arts centre.

100


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Challenges

A feasibility study on the establishment of a centralised

biotechnology laboratory in Geelong has found that

demand for laboratory space was growing and there were

significant job increases in the bio-sciences field.

The study, commissioned by the City on behalf of the

BioGeelong network, found that although it is difficult

to define the level of demand for such a facility at the

moment, the concept of a BioGeelong Central Laboratory

is worth pursuing in the future. The challenge now is for

the local biotechnology sector, through the BioGeelong

network, to build its profile with a view to attracting

investment.

The region’s education levels are lower than the average

for Victoria and Australia in all but the trades. Skills gap

analysis also shows significant gaps in current industry

needs. The G21 Lifelong Learning Pillar is pursuing a

number of actions to better engage the community in

formal and informal learning including education and

training for marginalised industry sectors, reskilling and

youth unemployment initiatives.

Did you know...

The Geelong region has 71 primary

schools, 24 secondary schools across

30 locations, and 49 kindergartens.

101

City Learning and Care, Ariston House


Education and Research – Outcomes

Outcome Measure Target Source Target Achieved Comment

Lifelong Learning Total post secondary enrolments CoGG Economic Development - Deakin University : ✓

(Deakin University, The Gordon Economic Indicators Bulletin Gordon Tafe: ✓

Institute of Tafe)

Total number of library visits Annual Survey of Victorian Public ✕ The libraries experienced a

Libraries

decline in visits by 4.2%, however

this was expected due to closure

of three libraries for between 3-9

months.

Skill and Industry Alignment Trainees and Apprenticeships Office of Training and Tertiary ✓

Education, Department of

Education and Training Victoria

Key

() = maintain, () = increase, () = decrease, (✓) = target achieved, (✕) = target not achieved, (i ) = no new data available

Delivering on our Commitments: 2007-2008 Annual Business Plan Action Update

Pillar : Education and Research

Status

Lifelong Learning

Contribution to Geelong Kindergarten Association


Portarlington PS - Home Reading Library


Vines Road Community Centre redevelopment in conjunction with Education Department >

Design development for library upgrades >

Chilwell Library - consultation, planning and design of upgrade >

Education Programs - Catholic Regional College and Bellarine Secondary College


Contribution to Neighbourhood Houses activities


Geelong Regional Library contribution


Newcomb Library upgrade


Geelong West Library upgrade >

Best Start Program - improving the health, development and wellbeing of children from

before birth through transition to school


Skill and Industry alignment

Development of Geelong Biotechnology cluster >

Key to status symbols

(✓)Completed / Achieved (>) In progress - To be completed in 2008-2009

() Completed for 2007-2008/repeated annually (❖) On hold will determine future action

102


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

103 Buckley Falls


ARTS CULTURE AND HERITAGE

Objective

To promote vibrant, diverse and innovative

arts and cultural experiences for the

community, including the celebration

of our heritage.

Highlights

The Geelong Cultural Precinct received $7.9 million from

the State Government to fund stage one of this exciting

project. The precinct includes the city’s key cultural

facilities, namely the Geelong Performing Arts Centre

(GPAC), the Geelong Gallery, the Geelong Library, the

Geelong Heritage Centre and the Courthouse Youth Arts

Centre. The State Government partnered with the City in

developing a master plan to identify the best ways of

redeveloping the precinct. The objective is to have a

higher level of street activity in the precinct, upgrade

the library so that it is a modern facility, to see GPAC

expanded with a range of studio and performing spaces

that are more flexible, and to really invigorate the

Courthouse.

The funding will be split over two years with $2 million in

2008-2009 for the design of the Courthouse Youth Arts

Centre. It will also fund the detailed design and business

cases for the Geelong Performing Arts Centre, the Geelong

Library and the Geelong Heritage Centre. $5.9 million

has been allocated in 2009-2010 for the Courthouse

Youth Arts Centre upgrade.

The fully restored Belcher Fountain has been installed at

the newly redeveloped intersection of Mercer, Malop and

Gheringhap Streets. The historic fountain, first installed at

the intersection in 1884, was moved into Johnstone Park

in 1927, to make way for Geelong's tramways service.

When the trams stopped in the early 1950s the fountain

went back onto the plantation in the middle of the

intersection, but eventually it fell into disrepair.

The position in which the fountain has been installed is

very close to the position it occupied in 1884, and makes

an impressive feature of this iconic Geelong intersection.

Achievements

The Community Arts and Community Festivals Grants

Programs are City of Greater Geelong initiatives which

aim to encourage and strengthen the initiation,

development and delivery of festivals, arts projects and

programs to increase participation in arts and cultural

activity across the municipality. In February 2008 a

special ceremony was held at City Hall to present

cheques to the successful applicants. 24 arts projects

were funded, receiving a total of $98,997 and seven

events were funded receiving a total of $47,500.

The St Leonards community celebrated its 150th

anniversary in 2007 with several major community

based projects including a street sculpture, history book

and a community festival. The sculpture titled Coles

Journey draws on many of the natural and cultural

influences that have shaped St Leonards, and the

publication of a history book is a fabulous way of marking

this important milestone. In total the City of Greater

Geelong contributed $29,600 to the St Leonards 150th

celebrations. The St Leonards Progress Association and

the Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-operative did an

outstanding job to commemorate this important milestone

in the town’s history.

Council was joined by State and Federal Members of

Parliament to mark the historic apology to the stolen

generations with a local ceremony in February 2008.

The City of Greater Geelong has taken the lead on

indigenous reconciliation having acknowledged Aboriginal

disadvantage and injustice back in 1997. The ceremony

was a way for the people of Geelong to demonstrate their

ongoing commitment to the values of equality, respect

and dignity, which are the birthright of all members of

our community.

104


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Future Directions

Connecting Identities is a three-year project which is a

component of the national project Generations. The City

of Greater Geelong is one of just five local governments

Australia-wide to be participating in the Generations

project in which each council addresses a key issue

through the arts. As the three elements of Connecting

Identities unfold over the coming two years, many people

will be involved through the sharing of stories, memories,

music and artwork. There will also be a journey across

the municipality to rediscover the memories embedded in

the landscape. The three elements to the project are:

> Memory Bank – a collection of people’s stories in

digital and other forms.

> Mouth to Mountain – a journey spanning 24 hours

that will take place in May 2009. The journey will

connect communities across the municipality from the

mouth of the Barwon River to the top of the You Yangs.

> M2M in Concert – an event to bring together the songs

from Mouth to Mountain, aerial photography and film

from the 24-hour journey in celebration of Geelong

communities.

The Newtown Heritage Study Review 2008 is underway.

This review is taking place in response to identified gaps

in the previous study that took place in 1991, the

removal of significant buildings in the area and also due

to community support for the review to be undertaken.

To date the review has identified 11 heritage precinct

areas and 30 individual properties. This significant study

will be finalised in late 2008. Late in 2007 Council

adopted the Belmont Heritage Amendment which applied

a heritage overlay to 109 significant heritage places.

Challenges

Appreciation and celebration of the heritage of the region

and the diverse cultures that influence its development

is an essential element of a thriving region. This

understanding helps to build harmonious and culturally

rich communities. Nurturing the region’s creative

capability and reputation is important as is exploring

opportunities for artists. Events such as the ShootOut

24-hour Filmmaking Festival, the Pako Festa, regional

celebrations and food and wine events all help

to create an image of a region that is vibrant, creative and

diverse. Efforts should continue to increase the volume

and value of such events.

Did you know...

The Geelong Heritage Centre has 1,200 metres

of shelved archives and 30kms of microfilm dating

back to 1838!

105


Arts, Culture and Heritage – Outcomes

Outcome Measure Target Source Target Achieved Comment

Active and Vibrant Arts and Visitation rates to major cultural CoGG Arts and Culture ✓

Cultural Community

venues in Geelong (GPAC, Potato

Shed, Geelong Gallery, Costa Hall)

Number of arts opportunities CoGG Arts and Culture ✓

advertised in Arts Bulletin

Registration of Arts and Cultural CoGG Arts and Culture ✕ A small decline was experienced

organisations in Arts Directory

this year.

Heritage Protection Maintain number of significant CoGG City Development

heritage places, and number of

places subject to Heritage Overlay

Strategic Planning

Active management of heritage CoGG Arts and Culture Significant collections include

collections Maritime Centre at Osborne House,

furniture at Customs House in

Brougham Street, National Wool

Museum and the Geelong Heritage

Centre.

Visitation rates of Heritage CoGG Arts and Culture ✕

Collections (National Wool Museum,

Geelong Heritage Centre, Geelong

Maritime Museum, Ford Discovery

Centre)

Key

() = maintain, () = increase, () = decrease, (✓) = target achieved, (✕) = target not achieved, (i ) = no new data available

106


Delivering on our Commitments: 2007-2008 Annual Business

Plan Action Update

Pillar : Arts Culture and Heritage Status

Heritage Protection

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

National Wool Museum collection significance assessment >

Lara Heritage Festival donation


St Leonards commemorative artwork for 150th anniversary celebrations


Osborne Precinct - planning and feasibility study


Active and Vibrant Arts and Culture Community

Skate and Art project (SKAART) contribution


Geelong Art Gallery contribution


Geelong Maritime Museum contribution


Grants to support Community Arts


Support the Courthouse Youth Art Centre


Grants to support Community Festivals


Potato Shed facility renewal and public address system


Potato Shed Masterplan development >

Key to status symbols

(✓)Completed / Achieved (>) In progress - To be completed in 2008-2009

() Completed for 2007-2008/repeated annually (❖) On hold will determine future action

107

Osborne House


TELECOMMUNICATIONS

Objective

To promote the development of a network

of telecommunications to maximise liveability

and prosperity.

Highlights

The rollout of Pocket PCs to over 300 home carers has

allowed the Aged and Disability team to improve the

delivery of their services, by increasing scheduling

efficiency and reducing administration tasks. The Team

Leaders can now review and evaluate the demands on

their teams and therefore provide better Customer Service

to clients. The reduction in administration tasks within

the office has allowed more time to be spent on

improving carers' schedules. The systems also provide

better quality of information upon which planning can be

done. Significant time savings have been made in several

departments due to streamlining of information flowing

between them.

Council’s PABX (internal telephone system) was replaced

with the Voice Over Internet Protocol communication

system during the year. The replacement of the ageing

system will be extremely beneficial with improvements to

communications across all areas of Council. The

conversion from three digit extensions to four digit will

take place in 2008-2009.

Achievements

A Community Directory was developed and launched for

internal use on Council’s Intranet. It has been regularly

used by Council staff with approximately 8,000 hits each

month. Community Directory will provide residents and

the general public access to a listing and contact details

of a range of groups, associations, services, clubs and

organisations within the City of Greater Geelong.

The directory will be launched onto the Geelong Australia

website in September 2008.

During the year the online community profiling and

population forecasting website (hosted by ID Consulting)

received an upgrade to include data from the 2006

Census and our own urban development strategies, up to

2031. The website provides data in simple, clear tables

and charts with concise factual commentary. Information

can be found on drivers of population change in Greater

Geelong and its suburbs and changes in population,

dwellings, age structures and households.

Future Directions

The City will implement a new range of online services

and a dramatically improved council website in late

2008. Council is seeking to conform to best practice web

standards with a simple customer interface that enables

efficiency improvements for our customers.

Enhancements include increases in online payment

facilities and transactions, greater availability of online

forms, enhanced search capabilities and an easily

accessible A-Z list of council services.

The City is embarking on the development of 3D visual

capability for use in community, engineering, strategic

and statutory planning. The project will produce a limited

3D capacity across all residential areas allowing for area,

height and distance analysis, and a fully rendered 3D

model of a five km 2 area surrounding Central Geelong and

the Western Wedge precinct. This model will be a vital

communication tool for future development in the CBD

area.

Challenges

There is a need to improve the Information

Communication Technology (ICT) capability, education

and ability of businesses across the region. The G21

Telecommunications Needs Assessment has commenced

to tackle this issue by developing initiatives to market and

promote ICT use and systems within both the business

and community sectors of the G21 region.

A comprehensive and extensive telecommunications

environment exists in the Geelong region with

a significant number of facilities-based licensed

communications carriers competing for business. Council

will continue to work closely with telecommunication

carriers to ensure that local businesses enjoy the latest

technology available at the most competitive rates.

108


Telecommunications Outcomes

Outcome Measure Target Source Target Achieved Comment

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

109

Telecommunications Access % broadband customers Spend/Demand - ✓

Telecommunications in Regional

and Rural Victoria. Barwon South

Western Region - Multimedia

Victoria

Unmet demand for broadband Regional and Rural Victoria ✓ Geelong continues to be one of the

Telecommunication Spend

best connected regional cities in the

Demand - South Western Region -

country (Based on 2006 Regional

Multimedia Victoria

Telecommunications Spend and

Demand Reports).

e-Business % of all receipted Council bills End of Financial Year Internal and ✓

paid electronically

External Receipting

Number of page views on the CoGG - I.T department ✓ Page views increased by over

Geelong Australia website

441,000 this financial year, to a

total of more than 6.2 million.

Key

() = maintain, () = increase, () = decrease, (✓) = target achieved, (✕) = target not achieved, (i ) = no new data available

Delivering on our Commitments: 2007-2008 Annual Business Plan Action Update

Pillar : Telecommunications Status

e-Business

Upgrade of Community Profile and Population Forecast data

Oracle Financials upgrade to version 11510

Information Technology equipment acquisition program

Information Technology asset replacement program

Telecommunication Access

Councils PABX replacement

Key to status symbols

(✓)Completed / Achieved (>) In progress - To be completed in 2008-2009

() Completed for 2007-2008/repeated annually

(❖) On hold will determine future action






Did you know...

In 2007-2008, 37.5% of all receipted Council bills

were paid over the telephone or on the internet.


THEME 1: DEMOCRACY

Objective

To provide strategic leadership and foster

participation to achieve the long-term vision

and aspirations of our community.

Highlights

The Councillor Community Grants Program has seen just

over $241,000 distributed amongst 128 community

groups. The program is offered to facilitate community

projects and activities undertaken by incorporated

not-for-profit organisations and groups within the City

of Greater Geelong. This funding has been provided to

a wide variety of community groups and organisations

including preschools, sporting clubs, service clubs and

community associations. Through the Councillor

Community Grants Program, Council has been able to

help deliver a diverse range of projects and events that

benefit the Geelong community.

Throughout 2007-2008 the City conducted over 120

consultation events, allowing community members the

opportunity to provide input into a broad range of

projects, services, priorities and issues of both local and

municipal-wide importance. Some of the main

consultations that took place this year were in regard to

the Domestic Animal Management Plan, Greater Geelong

Cycle Strategy, Eastern Park and Geelong Botanic

Gardens Strategic Plan and the Armstrong Creek Urban

Growth Plan.

Achievements

G21 (Geelong Regional Alliance) is an alliance of five

Councils (Greater Geelong, Surf Coast, Colac Otway,

Golden Plains and Queenscliffe) and more than 150

participating local organisations working together towards

a common vision: "making the Geelong Region Australia's

most desirable destination for living, visiting and investing

- renowned for its vibrant, cohesive community,

exceptional physical environment and vigorous economy”.

The G21 Geelong Region Plan – A Sustainable Growth

Strategy was endorsed by Council in August prior to its

launch in September 2007. The Plan identifies and

addresses the challenges we will face in the areas of

environment, land planning, community strength and the

economy. It provides a platform for the entire Geelong

region to speak with one voice to all levels of government.

It also provides a forum to discuss ‘big picture’ regional

issues across interest groups and municipalities.

An electoral representation review of Greater Geelong

City Council conducted by the Victorian Electoral

Commission (VEC) was completed during May 2008.

By notice in the Victoria Government Gazette of 12 June

2008 the Minister for Local Government, Richard Wynne

implemented an Electoral Structure of 12 Councillors

elected from 12 single-Councillor wards. While the

electoral system remains the same, Ward boundaries

have been modified. Current Wards will continue for the

remainder of the term of office. New wards will take effect

for the purpose of the general election to be held in

November 2008 and thereafter.

For the second year running Council embarked on an

exercise with seven local primary schools. Dubbed the

“Best Place to Live School Art Project”, senior students

from South Geelong, Ashby, Manifold Heights, Ocean

Grove, Newcomb Park, Bell Park North and Whittington

primary schools were asked to portray our vision through

pictures. Selected pieces of artwork have appeared in City

Plan 2008-2012 and in the Annual Report 2007-2008.

All the artwork was displayed over a five-week period at

the Carousel on the Waterfront and also at City Hall, and

was well received by the community.

Future Directions

A council is elected to provide leadership for the good

governance of the municipal district and the local

community. The next General Election for the City of

Greater Geelong will be held in November 2008, at

which all Councillor positions will be decided for a

four-year term.

Challenges

Our research shows that the community has an increased

expectation to be consulted on Council activities,

planning, facilities and services. Our commitment to

engaging and consulting with the community, including

the hard to reach groups, needs to remain high on the

agenda in order to achieve the long-term vision and

aspiration of our community.

110


Democracy – Outcomes

Outcome Measure Target Source Target Achieved Comment

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Community Involvement Community satisfaction with Annual Local Government

and Representation community engagement Community Satisfaction Survey

Community satisfaction with Annual Local Government

Council’s advocacy and community

representation on key local issues

Community Satisfaction Survey

% of people who voted in the 80% during an election year Victorian Electoral Commission (i) Election will be held in November

Council election 2008.

Governance Number of audit qualifications Nil CoGG Risk Management ✓

Key

Government and Risk Management 80% CoGG Risk Management - (i) This is scheduled to be completed in

Self-Assessment score Government and Risk the 2008-2009 financial year.

Management Self Assessment

Checklist

() = maintain, () = increase, () = decrease, (✓) = target achieved, (✕) = target not achieved, (i ) = no new data available

Did you know...

In 2007-2008, 608 persons were conferred

with Australian Citizenship at ceremonies held

within the municipality.

111


Delivering on our Commitments: 2007-2008 Annual

Business Plan Action Update

Pillar : Democracy Status

Community Involvement and Representation

Community Survey

G21 Strategic Alliance contribution

Wandana Heights - land purchase for community purposes

Community Grant Program

Governance

Annual Report production

City Plan production

Public Information about Council Services

Ward Boundaries review

Conduct Council Meetings (in areas outside of City Hall)










Key to status symbols

(✓)Completed / Achieved (>) In progress - To be completed in 2008-2009

() Completed for 2007-2008/repeated annually

(❖) On hold will determine future action

Customer Service Centre at City Hall

112


THEME 2: BEST VALUE

Objective

Achievements

Future Directions

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

To effectively deliver a range of

sustainable services that meet the

needs of the community.

Highlights

In order to measure Customer Service performance and

identify opportunities for continued improvement, the City

of Greater Geelong engaged Customer Service

Benchmarking Australia to conduct independent mystery

shopping research throughout 2007-2008. In the past

12 months, the City of Greater Geelong has consistently

achieved results above the industry benchmark in many

areas, placing us amongst the best of the 150 Councils

evaluated Australia wide. The results indicate our

Customer Service Commitments have gone a long way in

developing a culture built on listening, understanding and

pro-actively responding to internal and external customer

needs.

The City’s Centre Based Long Day Care department

recently conducted Occupational Health and Safety Audits

in conjunction with Work Safe Victoria. The excellent

results have led to this children’s services project being

used as a benchmark for industry standards. The City

also scored very well in the recent Civic Mutual Plus

Public Liability Insurance Audit with a rating of 91 per

cent, demonstrating the City’s commitment to risk

management.

Providing staff with training and development

opportunities is very important for their future growth and

also for the continuous improvement of Council

operations. In 2007-2008 more than 1,700 training and

development opportunities were undertaken, on topics

such as Occupational Health and Safety, Bullying and

Harassment, traineeships, recognised qualification

courses and many other department and job-specific

training courses. An example of a department taking part

in specified training was our Local Laws officers

participating in tourism training. As these officers spend a

lot of time in the public eye, they are now able to provide

broader levels of service to tourists and residents during

their day to day operations.

The installation of a Corporate Project Management

Reporting System will provide project managers with one

tool that allows them to plan all stages of a project and

report against staged milestones. With so many projects

underway or planned to commence, this will greatly assist

Council with keeping track of progress on all projects and

improve project management as a whole.

Council’s commitment to performance accountability and

reporting transparency has continued with the stage two

roll out of the Performance Management Reporting

processes. Department plans and scorecards have

provided managers with a snapshot of their department’s

progress toward meeting objectives, and has also assisted

them with future department planning.

The City will introduce an online employee self service

system which will allow staff to perform the following

human resource functions using Council’s intranet:

> View and change personal and contact details.

> View current leave balances and view leave history.

It will also include access to online leave requests,

pending leave requests and current bookings.

> View payslip information, eliminating the need to

provide pay advice in hard copy form to those

employees with access to a computer.

Council will hold its third Employee Opinion Survey in

2009. The survey seeks to obtain information on

employee perceptions on a wide range of organisational

issues including organisational values, job satisfaction,

motivational factors and to provide employees with the

chance to identify opportunities for improvement.

The internal Management and Leadership program will

continue to grow. The existing 360 Degree program has

aided in establishing training and developmental

programs to enhance strengths and bridge skills gaps.

The next phase will involve the establishment of a

succession program which will entail the further

development and training of our co-ordinators,

particularly in the people skills areas of Emotional

Intelligence. An Emerging Leaders' program is also

planned, where future 'leaders' of the City are identified,

trained and developed over an 18-month period.

113


Challenges

The objective to provide a suitable central location for

Council’s administrative and civic functions has been

partly met with the purchase of land in the Western

Wedge. The next step will be to commission a scoping

study to investigate the consolidation of its administrative

offices into one location in regard to financial viability and

benefits such as greater efficiency, better service delivery

and improved environmental outcomes.

Recruitment and retention of staff will continue to be

a challenge for Council. We will address these issues

through methods such as training and development,

family friendly organisation policies, our Well For Life

program and our Reward and Recognition program.

Providing staff with a work-life balance while maintaining

service requirements will also be an important factor in

workforce management as our working population ages.

Did you know...

Council manages more than 460 leases in Council

owned buildings, and is the Committee of

Management for a further 114 properties in the

municipality.

Geelong Gallery

114


Best Value – Outcomes

Outcome Measure Target Source Target Achieved Comment

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Customer Service Community satisfaction with Annual Local Government ✓ There was a significant improvement

customer contact Community Satisfaction Survey in this measure in 2007-2008.

% of requests for service fulfilled CoGG RFS (request for service) Service level maintained despite an

within standard time

8% increase in requests compared

to 2006-2007.

% of correspondence fulfilled Corporate Records - Dataworks ✓

within 10 working days

% of calls answered within 5 rings Call Centre Manager Software ✓ 88% of calls were answered within

the required timeframe, which is

12% higher than the industry

average.

Workforce Management Employee satisfaction rate CoGG Employee Opinion Survey (i) The next employee opinion survey

will take place in 2009.

Staff absenteeism (% of hours paid) CoGG Empower Staff absenteeism has remained

consistent between 2.4% - 2.8% for

the past five years.

Financial Management Net debt Actual result favourable to budget. CoGG Financial Services ✓

Average rate increase (including % Increase to be less than or CoGG Financial Services ✓

Waste and Municipal charge) equal to Vic average Municipal Association of Victoria

% of net capital budget on new 30% CoGG Financial Services ✓

assets

% of net capital budget on 40% CoGG Financial Services ✕

upgrading assets

% of net capital budget on on 40% CoGG Financial Services ✕

asset replacement

Actual infrastructure maintenance 80% CoGG Financial Services ✓

to required infrastructure

maintenance

Key

() = maintain, () = increase, () = decrease, (✓) = target achieved, (✕) = target not achieved, (i ) = no new data available

115


Best Value – Outcomes (Cont’d)

Outcome Measure Target Source Target Achieved Comment

Risk Management Lost time injury frequency rate CoGG Risk Management

(number of lost time injuries

per hours worked)

% of treatment plans on schedule 80% CoGG Risk Management ✓

Continuous Improvement Overall community satisfaction Annual Local Government

Community Satisfaction Survey

Overall corporate services survey Internal Services Customer (i) Survey scheduled to be completed

result Satisfaction Survey by December 2008.

Key

() = maintain, () = increase, () = decrease, (✓) = target achieved, (✕) = target not achieved, (i ) = no new data available

Delivering on our Commitments: 2007-2008 Annual Business Plan Action Update

Pillar : Best Value Status

Customer Service

Customer Service audit of service standards


Workforce Management

Working with Childrens Check (WWC) - adherence to new legislation


Civic accommodation - purchase of land in Western Wedge precinct


Financial Management

2008 General Rate Revaluation / Supplementaries Valuations ✓

Risk Management

Council building roof safety access program


Customs House lift and ramp installation >

Council building fire protection upgrades


City Hall Fire Services upgrade stage 3


Continuous Improvement

Provide comprehensive training across the organisation


CorVu Corporate Project Management Reporting installation


Key to status symbols

(✓)Completed / Achieved (>) In progress - To be completed in 2008-2009

() Completed for 2007-2008/repeated annually (❖) On hold will determine future action

116


2007-2008 PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

PILLARS - Key Strategic Activity

Target Measure Status Comments

Pillar 1. Health and Wellbeing: Complete year one of Whittington Community Renewal Project

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Whittington Community

Renewal Project – Year one

of three year project

Completion of year one

implementation actions in

Whittington Community

Renewal Plan by June 30,

2008.

Year one actions

completed. Project

continues in

2008-2009.

Pillar 2. Economic Development: Develop a concept design for a Mineral Springs Bath House at Eastern Beach

Detailed design of Mineral

Springs Bath House at Eastern

Beach

Development of designs of

Mineral Springs Bath House

by 30 June, 2008.

Design phase

completed.

Pillar 3. Environment: Install a backwash recycle system at Waterworld aquatic centre

Installation of backwash recycle

system at Waterworld aquatic

centre

Complete installation of

backwash recycle system at

Waterworld aquatic centre by

30 June, 2008.

Project nearing

completion.

Expected to be fully

operational in early

August 2008.

Pillar 4. Community Safety and Security: Upgrade Central Geelong safety cameras

Central Geelong safety camera

upgrade

Complete upgrade of Central

Geelong safety cameras by 30

June, 2008.

Project to be

completed early in

2008-2009. Funds

to carry over.

Council activities have included:

> Community engagement activities to increase social connectedness.

> Community Gate Project.

> Whittington Community Festival held.

> Regular school holiday programs conducted.

> Supporting the development of an editorial committee and publication of the Whittington Voice newsletter.

> Whittington Link barbeque constructed and tree planting completed.

> Youth advisory committee formed and meeting regularly.

The concept design for a Regional Destination Spa was completed. The next step in this project is to take the building concept

design to public consultation. Further investigation is also required on the environmental implications such as energy

consumption, regulated drawing of mineral water resource and sea water, management and disposal of seawater and traffic

and car parking.

This project when completed will return approximately 80 per cent of the backwash water to the pool at better

quality than tap water.

Holding tanks, underground pipes and services have all been installed. Backwash tank has been modified and the plant room

has been constructed. Awaiting delivery on the reverse osmosis component which when delivered will only take a week to

install, completing the project.

The project when complete will provide more cameras and improve the reliability of images.

To date, Council has committed to purchase three new cameras to be installed at three new locations. Quotes for the supply and

installation of fibre optic cable are due back at the end of July 2008.

117


PILLARS - Key Strategic Activity

Target Measure Status Comments

Pillar 5. Transportation: Continue East/West Traffic improvement works

Continue East/West Traffic

Improvement works. Works

listed for 2007-2008 are:

> Mercer St / Gheringhap St /

Malop St intersection

> Ryrie St / Sydney Pde /

Swanston St intersection

> Garden St / Portarlington Rd

intersection

> Gheringhap St / Ryrie St

intersection

> Latrobe Tce clearway

East/West Traffic improvement

works listed for 2007-2008

financial year to be completed

by 30 June, 2008.

Of the five actions

listed, two have

been completed,

two will be

completed in July

2008 and one is

yet to commence.

Unspent funds to

be carried over into

2008-2009.

Progress on 2007-2008 listed works:

> Mercer St / Gheringhap St / Malop St intersection has been completed with the roundabout replaced by traffic signals.

The restored Belcher Fountain has also been installed at the intersection.

> Ryrie St / Sydney Pde / Swanston St intersection works commenced in April and is expected to be completed

by mid-July 2008.

> Garden St / Portarlington Rd intersection works are in progress and due to be completed early in 2008-2009.

> Gheringhap St / Ryrie St intersection works have been deferred to 2008-2009.

> Latrobe Tce clearway has been completed.

> Malop St / Fitzroy St intersection works were brought forward to 2007-2008 (originally programmed to be completed

in 2008-2009) and was completed in November 2007.

Pillar 6. Parks, Sport and Leisure: Goldsworthy Athletics Reserve terrace construction

Goldsworthy Athletics Facility

terrace construction

Complete construction of

terrace at Goldsworthy Athletics

Facility by 30 June, 2008.

Project completed.

Spectator terracing at Goldsworthy Athletics Reserve was completed.

Pillar 7. Education and Research: Complete design and consultation and commence construction of the Vines Road Community Centre development

Vines Road Community Centre

development (in conjunction

with the Education Department)

Complete design, consultation

and commence construction of

Vines Road Community Centre

by 30 June, 2008.

Design and

consultation

completed.

Construction yet to

commence.

The outcome for the community of the Vines Road Community Centre redevelopment will be a new school complex which

incorporates a wide range of community services and recreation facilities including a rebuilt community centre / senior citizens

centre, netball courts, oval, library and a performing arts centre.

The concept designs have been completed and consultation has taken place. Negotiations on agreements are continuing and

once completed land will be sold, tender advertised and construction will commence under the management of the Department

of Education and Early Childhood Development.

Pillar 8. Arts, Culture and Heritage: Conduct Community Arts Grant Program

Community Arts Grant Program

Provide grants for community

arts groups and activities during

2007-2008 as per budget.

2007-2008

program

completed.

30 groups applied for a grant under the Community Arts Grant Program with 24 groups successful in receiving grants totalling

$98,997. A grant ceremony was held in February 2008 to provide an opportunity to showcase the community projects as well

as a networking opportunity for community groups.

Pillar 9. Telecommunications: Replace Council’s ageing internal telephone system with Voice Over Internet Protocol communication system

Council’s internal telephone

system (PABX) replacement

with Voice Over Internet

Protocol communication system

Replace Council’s internal

telephone system (PABX) with

Voice Over Internet Protocol

communication system by 30

June, 2008.

2007-2008 project

actions completed.

All infrastructure has been installed and software has been upgraded and is in production. The extension of the system to make

it hybrid and provide Voice Over IP capability has been installed and is operational. The four digit extension changeover has

been scheduled to be completed in 2008-2009.

118


THEMES - Key Strategic Activity

Target Measure Status Comments

Theme 1. Democracy: Conduct the Councillor Community Grant Program

Councillor Community Grant

Program

Allocate Councillor grants to

community groups during

2007-2008 as per budget.

2007-2008

program

completed.

128 community groups were successful in gaining grants totalling $241,085 under the Councillor Community Grants Program.

Theme 2. Best Value: Install the CorVu Corporate Project Management Reporting System

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

CorVu Corporate Project

Management Reporting system

installation

Install CorVu Corporate Project

Management Reporting system

by 30 June, 2008.

Project completed.

The aim of the project is to be able to report on projects from concept stage through to project completion.

The project concept, proposal and charter stages have been completed and implemented as per the project plan.

Post implementation review and reporting have been scheduled to be completed in 2008-2009.

119


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

COUNCIL APPROVAL OF THE PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

120


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

INDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORT

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

121


Kazuki Izumitani

Ocean Grove

Primary School

Age: 12

‘I think that the Geelong

area is the best place to be

because of the view of the

sea especially off the Barwon

Heads Bridge at night.’

122


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

VICTORIAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT INDICATORS

The listed financial indicators are requested by the Department of Victorian Communities from each Council in Victoria to provide a comparison of financial performance across Councils.

Overall Council's financial indicators show a sound financial position and a continuing requirement to ensure asset renewal and maintenance is completed in line with the priorities

identified in the Asset Management plans.

Indicators 2006-2007 Results 2007-2008 Results

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

1. Average Rates and Charges per Assessment

Total Rates and charges net billed $106,482,000 $1,080.27 $115,360,000 $1,156.93

Number of assess ments budget 98,570 per assessment 99,712 per assessment

Councils rates per assessment have increased in line with the population and housing growth and the budgeted rates increases.

2. Average Rates and Charges per Residential Assessment

Rates and charges declared for residential and garbage and municipal charge excluding vacant land $80,137,610 $935.96 $85,032,094 $976.64

Number of residential assessments budget 85,621 per residential 87,066 per residential

assessment

assessment

Councils rates per residential assessment have increased in line with the population and housing growth and the budgeted rates increases.

3. Average Liability per Assessment

Total liabilities $55,129,000 $559.29 $55,332,000 $554.92

Number of assessments budget 98,570 per assessment 99,712 per assessment

Liabilities per assessment has remained constant due to the new loan of $3.12M taken out in 2007-2008 and the final repayments of the $18M loan.

4. Operating Result per Assessment

Net Surplus $40,485,000 $410.72 $27,399,000 $274.78

Number of assessments budget 98,570 per assessment 99,712 per assessment

The operating result per assessment has decreased due to reduced asset recognition from revaluations.

5. Average Operating Expenditure per Assessment

Operating Expenditure $182,974,000 $1,856.28 $199,426,000 $2000.02

Number of assessments budget 98,570 per assessment 99,712 per assessment

The average operating expenditure per assessment has increased because of the increased payments to employees and increased expenditure on materials and services.

6. Community Satisfaction Rating for Overall Performance of Council

Result from the Annual Community Satisfaction Survey for Local Governments (Indexed mean) 58 60

Remains consistent with previous year, however significant improvement on 2005-2006 results.

123


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

VICTORIAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT INDICATORS (cont’d)

Indicators 2006-2007 Results 2007-2008 Results

7. Average Capital Expenditure per Assessment

Capital Expenditure $49,067,386 $497.79 $52,441,476 $525.93

Number of assessments budget 98,570 per assessment 99,712 per assessment

Capital Expenditure per assessment has increased in 2007-2008 due to the commencement and/or completion of a number of large projects during the year including the Leisurelink facility, Bellarine Aquatic and

Sports Centre and the Legends Boulevarde.

8. Renewal Gap on all assets

Capital renewal $16,463,000 For each $1 of asset $15,598,000 For each $1 of asset

consumption Council

consumption Council

Average Annual Asset Consumption $34,279,000 spends $0.48 $35,560,000 spends $0.44

on renewal

on renewal

Renewal expenditure decreased from $16.4M in 2006-2007 to $15.6M in 2007-2008. As a percentage of total capital expenditure, renewal expenditure decreased from 33.6% to 29.7% in 2007-2008 due to the

mix of projects and the level of expenditure on upgrade and new projects.

9. Renewal and Maintenance Gap

Capital Renewal and Maintenance $52,155,841 For each $1 of asset $52,904,739 For each $1 of asset

consumption and

consumption and

Average Annual Asset Consumption plus Planned Maintenance $79,494,360 planned maintenance $82,360,424 planned maintenance

Council spends $0.66 Council spends $0.65

on renewal and

on renewal and

maintenance

maintenance

The Capital Renewal and Maintenance Gap indicates that expenditure has remained constant from year to year . Council will continue to address the level of maintenance and renewal in line with its Asset

Management Plans.

10. Advocacy and Community Representation on Key Local Issues

Result from the Annual Community Satisfaction Survey for Local Governments (indexed mean) 60 61

Remains consistent with previous year.

11. Engagement in Decision Making on Key Local Issues

Result from the Annual Community Satisfaction Survey for Local Governments (indexed mean) 54 56

Remains consistent with previous year, however significant improvement on 2005-2006 results.

124


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

STANDARD

STATEMENTS

AND ANNUAL

FINANCIAL

REPORT

125 Waterfront Geelong


UNDERSTANDING THE FINANCIAL REPORT

AND FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Council’s Financial Report, Standard Statements and

Performance Statement are prepared in accordance with

the Australian Accounting Standards, the Local

Government Act 1989 and the Auditor General’s

model accounts.

The Financial Report, Standard Statements and

Performance Statement are audited by the Auditor

General Victoria’s agent and are approved in principle by

both the Council’s Audit Advisory Committee and by

Council. The reports are then forwarded to the Auditor

General’s Office for finalisation and provision of

independent opinions for the Financial Report and

Standard Statements combined and also for the

Performance Statement.

Standard Statements

The Standard Statements compare the actual result for

the financial year to the Annual Budget as originally

adopted and provide explanations for any major

variances.

There are four Standard Statements which are prepared

using the same accounting basis as the Financial

Statements.

> Standard Income Statement

This statement highlights the recurrent surplus which

excludes distortions of capital income and asset

recognition and provides a result that reflects how

Council uses rates and regular income to meet

recurrent expenditure.

> Standard Balance Sheet

This statement also mirrors the statement made according

to Accounting Standards in the Annual Financial Report.

> Standard Cash Flow Statement

This statement mirrors the statement made according to

Accounting Standards in the Annual Financial Report.

> Standard Statement of Capital Works

This statement provides detail of capital expenditure by

asset type and distinguishes renewal, upgrade and new

capital expenditure.

Financial Statements

The financial statements consist of four financial reports,

explanatory notes supporting the reports and

endorsement from the Council and the Victorian

Auditor General.

The four financial reports are:

> Income Statement

> Balance Sheet

> Statement of Changes in Equity

> Cash Flow Statement

The explanatory notes detail Council’s accounting

policies and the make up of the values contained in

the statements.

Income Statement

The Income Statement measures Council’s performance

over the year.

It lists the sources of the Council’s revenue under various

income headings and the expenses incurred in running

the Council during the year. The expenses relate only to

the ‘Operations’ and do not include the cost associated

with the purchase or the building of assets. Expenses

do include an item for depreciation which is the value

of the assets used up during the year.

Balance Sheet

The Balance Sheet shows the assets Council owns and

what it owes (liabilities) as at 30 June 2008.

The bottom line of the Balance Sheet is Net Assets which

is the net worth of the Council which has been built up

over many years.

The assets and liabilities are separated into Current and

Non-Current. Current refers to assets or liabilities that will

fall due within the next 12 months (except Long Service

Leave refer note 1(j) within the Notes to the accounts).

Statement of Changes in Equity

The Statement of Changes in Equity summarises the

change in value of Total Ratepayers Equity. The value of

equity can only change as a result of:

> The profit or loss from operations described as surplus

or deficit in the income statement.

> The use of monies from Council’s Reserves.

> A change in the value of non-current assets resulting

from a revaluation of these assets.

126


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Cash Flow Statement

The Statement of Cash Flows summarises Council’s cash

payments and receipts for the year and the level of cash

at the end of the financial year.

Cash in this statement refers to Bank Deposits and

investments capable of being quickly converted to cash.

Council’s cash arises from, and is used in, three main

areas:

> Cash Flows from Operating Activities – summarises all

income and expenses relating to Council operations,

including service delivery and maintenance.

> Cash Flows from Investing Activities – relates to capital

works payments recorded as assets in the Balance

Sheet as well as receipts for the sale of assets.

> Cash Flows from Financing Activities – represents

repayments of and receipts from loans.

Notes to the Accounts

The Notes to the Accounts are an informative section of

the report and enable the reader to understand the basis

on which the values shown in the accounts are

established. The notes also advise if there has been any

change to the Accounting Standards, Policy or Legislation

that has impacted on the preparation of the standards.

Within the four Financial Statements, there is a “Note”

column to indicate which Note the reader can refer to for

additional information. This is particularly useful where

there has been a significant change from the previous

year’s comparative figure.

Statements by the Principal Accounting

Officer, CEO and Councillors

The Financial Statements, Standard Statements and the

Performance Statement require certification under the

Local Government Act 1989. The certifications are made

by a combination of the Principal Accounting Officer, the

Chief Executive Officer and two Councillors, on behalf of

the Council, as a written undertaking to the Statements

being correct and not misleading.

Auditor General’s Report

This document provides a written undertaking of the

accuracy, fairness and completeness of the accounts.

The audit report from the Auditor General provides an

independent view of the statements and advises the

reader if there are any issues of concern.

127


Standard Statements

Basis of preparation of Standard

Statements

Council is required to prepare and include audited

Standard Statements within its Annual Report. A Standard

Income Statement, a Standard Balance Sheet, a Standard

Cash Flow Statement, and a Standard Statement of

Capital Works is required, together with explanatory

notes.

These statements and supporting notes form a special

purpose financial report prepared to meet the

requirements of the Local Government Act 1989 and

Local Government (Finance and Reporting) Regulations

2004.

The statements were prepared on accounting bases that

are consistent with those used for the General Purpose

Financial Statements, but are also prepared to the same

level of detail and format as the regular quarterly reporting

to Council. The statements are consistent with the

reporting format in the 2007-2008 Strategic Resource

Plan and the 2007-2008 Budget.

The budget figures included in the Statements are those

adopted by Council on 26 June 2007.

The Standard Income Statement highlights the recurrent

result which is the result of the day to day transactions

within Council's control. Council actively manages the

incomes and expenditures that make up this result to

ensure that the municipality receives the best value

service possible within the incomes available. The nonrecurrent

incomes and expenditures are one off activities

or items outside of Council's operating activities that have

contributed both in cash and non cash terms.

The Standard Cashflow Statement and the Standard

Balance Sheet are consistent with both the format in the

annual accounts and the quarterly management report.

The Standard Statement of Capital Works is consistent

with the format reported in the 2007-2008 Budget.

The Standard Statements are not a substitute for the

General Purpose Financial Statements, which are

included in the Annual Report. They have not been

prepared in accordance with all Australian Accounting

Standards or other authoritative professional

pronouncements.

The Standard Statements compare Council’s financial

plan, expressed through its budget, with actual

performance. Council has provided an explanation of

material variances. These explanations including

contributory factors are provided with respect to each of

the main categories reported in the Standard Statements.

128


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG STANDARD STATEMENTS

STANDARD INCOME STATEMENT AS AT 30 JUNE 2008

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

2007-2008 2007-2008

Actual Budget Variance

$000 $000 $000

RECURRENT INCOME

Rates and Charges 115,382 114,634 748

Government Grants 34,987 31,563 3,424

User Charges 37,498 32,231 5,267

Other Fees and Charges 13,422 12,498 924

Interest Investments 2,132 1,026 1,106

TOTAL RECURRENT INCOME 203,421 191,952 11,469

RECURRENT EXPENDITURE

Employee Related

Salaries 66,038 74,050 8,012

Workcover/Superannuation 7,058 1,897 (5,161)

73,096 75,947 2,851

Goods and Services

General Works - Materials 5,080 5,463 383

General Works - Plant/Equipment/Vehicle Costs 5,824 4,589 (1,235)

General Works - External Services 56,893 49,222 (7,671)

Administration 7,719 7,229 (490)

Professional Services 4,132 3,979 (153)

Utilities 4,708 5,428 720

Depreciation 35,560 35,955 395

Landfill Provision 940 510 (430)

(Gain)/Loss on Sale of Plant and Equipment (7) 81 88

TOTAL RECURRENT EXPENDITURE 193,945 188,403 (5,542)

RECURRENT SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) 9,476 3,549 5,927

NON-RECURRENT INCOME

Investments in Associates 1,005 - 1,005

Subdivision - Asset Recognition 13,008 16,500 (3,492)

Capital Grants and Income 8,419 9,425 (1,006)

Developer Contributions 1,327 1,920 (593)

Gain/(Loss) on Sale of Property (356) 2,913 (3,269)

TOTAL NON-RECURRENT INCOME 23,403 30,758 (7,355)

NON-RECURRENT EXPENDITURE

Costs expensed from work in progress 2,086 - (2,086)

Disposal of Infrastructure 3,394 2,000 (1,394)

TOTAL NON-RECURRENT EXPENDITURE 5,480 2,000 (3,480)

NON-RECURRENT SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) 17,923 28,758 (10,835)

NET SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) 27,399 32,307 (4,908)

129


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG STANDARD STATEMENTS

NOTES TO STANDARD INCOME STATEMENT

The Recurrent Surplus for 2007-2008 of $9.5M was

$5.9M favourable to budget which was offset by Non-

Recurrent activity.

Recurrent Income of $203.4M was $11.5M favourable

to budget mainly due to:

> High landfill volumes $4.9M favourable offset by EPA

costs (see below).

> Grants commission receipts $0.9M favourable.

> Increased reinstatements for other utilities $0.4M

favourable.

> Various unbudgeted state grants $2.2M favourable.

> Car Parking Fees and Fines $1.3M favourable.

> Rates generation $0.7M favourable.

> Other income including interest $1.1M favourable

to budget.

Recurrent Expenditure of $193.9M was $5.5M

unfavourable to budget mainly due to:

> EPA costs associated with landfill activity $4.3M

unfavourable.

> Insurance premium was $0.3M favourable to budget.

> Employee expenses $2.9M favourable offset by

supplementary labour $2.4M unfavourable.

> Utilities were $0.7M favourable to budget including

savings due to restricted water usage equivalent to

$0.5M.

> Interest costs $0.4M favourable to budget due to

deferral of loan take up and sum reduced to $3.1M.

> Other expenses $1.6M unfavourable to budget.

The Non-Recurrent Result was $10.8M unfavourable to

budget. This was due to unfavourable Asset recognition

$3.5M, unfavourable Capital Income $1.0M, mainly due

to Special Rates and Charges Schemes, unfavourable

Developer Contributions $0.6M and unfavourable Gain

on Sale of Property $3.3M. Income recognised as

Investment in Associates was $1.0m favourable. Finally

there was higher than budgeted disposals of infrastructure

assets $1.4M unfavourable and costs expensed from

Capital Work in Progress of $2.1M unfavourable.

> Contractors $0.6M favourable however plant hire etc

$1.0m unfavourable.

> Emergency maintenance $0.5M unfavourable.

> Administration costs including doubtful debts and

computer costs $0.9M unfavourable.

> Consultants $0.3M favourable.

130


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG STANDARD STATEMENTS

STANDARD BALANCE SHEET AS AT 30 JUNE 2008

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

2007-2008 2007-2008

Actual Budget Variance

$000 $000 $000

CURRENT ASSETS

Cash and Investments 30,266 18,440 11,826

Receivables 13,714 7,923 5,791

Prepayments 74 71 3

Inventories 873 389 484

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS 44,927 26,823 18,104

CURRENT LIABILITIES

Payables 13,711 14,470 759

Loans 2,211 3,034 823

Refundable Deposits 1,352 1,182 (170)

Employee Benefits 15,449 13,655 (1,794)

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES 32,723 32,341 (382)

NET CURRENT ASSETS 12,204 (5,518) 17,722

NON-CURRENT ASSETS

Property Plant and Equipment 1,314,305 1,292,257 22,048

Investments 6,765 4,958 1,807

Receivables 776 1,885 (1,109)

TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS 1,321,846 1,299,100 22,746

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

Developer Contributions 129 - (129)

Loans 12,519 18,036 5,517

Employee Benefits 2,896 3,053 157

Landfill Provision 6,220 5,569 (651)

TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES 21,764 26,658 4,894

NET ASSETS 1,312,286 1,266,924 45,362

REPRESENTED BY:

RATEPAYER EQUITY

Accumulated Surplus 825,063 854,250 (29,187)

Asset Revaluation Reserve 454,688 405,107 49,581

Reserves 32,535 7,567 24,968

TOTAL RATEPAYER EQUITY 1,312,286 1,266,924 45,362

131


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG STANDARD STATEMENTS

NOTES TO STANDARD BALANCE SHEET

The Balance Sheet highlights that Council has a very

strong asset position with over $1.3 billion worth of

assets which are used to provide services to the

community.

Variances to Budget

The major variance to budget is the increase in noncurrent

assets of $22.7M. The main factors were:

> Difference in Budgeted Property Plant and Equipment

at 1-07-2007 compared to Actual Property Plant and

Equipment at 1-07-2007 (ie. difference is the

underspend in capital in the 2006-2007 year).

> The effect of the revaluation of Council Owned Land

and Buildings $50.0M.

Current assets were $18.1M favourable to budget with

an increase in cash due to lower than budgeted capital

expenditure and a higher than budgeted 1 July 2007

cash position. Receivables were also higher due to

invoices being raised for grants in relation to the two

aquatic centres.

Non-current liabilities were $4.9M under budget mainly

due to the deferral of loan amounts associated with the

Leisurelink Replacement facility.

132


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG STANDARD STATEMENTS

STANDARD CASH FLOW STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

2007-2008 2007-2008

Actual Budget Variance

$000 $000 $000

Inflows / Inflows / Inflows /

(Outflows) (Outflows) (Outflows)

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Cash Flows from Operating Activities

Receipts

General Rates 116,780 114,449 2,331

Fees and Charges 48,125 47,545 580

Investment Income 2,132 1,026 1,106

GST Recoveries on Operating Transactions 7,157 5,464 1,693

Government Grants 35,709 33,233 2,476

209,903 201,717 8,186

Payments

Employee Costs (71,545) (74,739) 3,194

General Works / Utilities / Disbursements (85,011) (73,424) (11,587)

Administration / Professional Services (11,930) (10,791) (1,139)

Interest Expense (905) (1,301) 396

(169,391) (160,255) (9,136)

Net Cash Inflow from Operating Activities before Capital Income 40,512 41,462 (950)

Cash Flows from Investing Activities

Payments for Land and Buildings, Plant and Equipment and Infrastructure Assets (52,441) (69,707) 17,266

Capital Income 8,419 9,425 (1,006)

Proceeds from Sale of Land and Buildings 500 5,424 (4,924)

Proceeds from Sale of Plant and Equipment 1,732 1,783 (51)

Developer Cash Contribution 1,456 1,920 (464)

Net Cash Outflow from Investing Activities (40,334) (51,155) 10,821

Cash Flows from Financing Activities

Repayment of Borrowings (4,967) (5,138) 171

Proceeds from New Loans 3,125 9,625 (6,500)

Net Cash Outflow from Financial Activities (1,842) 4,487 (6,329)

Net Increase (Decrease) in Cash Held (1,664) (5,206) 3,542

Cash at the Beginning of the Financial Year 31,930 23,646 8,284

Cash at the End of the Financial Period 30,266 18,440 11,826

133


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG STANDARD STATEMENTS

NOTES TO STANDARD CASH FLOW STATEMENT

Council's cash position at the end of the year is $30.3M.

This will provide funds to complete projects carried over

from 2007-2008 and working capital to ensure service

provision continues in 2008-2009.

Variances to Budget

The net cash flow from operating activities of $40.5M

was $1.0M unfavourable to budget.

Operating receipts were $8.1M favourable to budget with

additional fees and charges for services provided, grants

and rates. Operating Expenditure was $9.1M

unfavourable due to increased payments for materials and

services and increased supplementary labour costs. This

was partially offset by lower employee costs and reduced

interest expense due to the deferral of the loan relating to

Leisurelink Aquatic Facility.

The Operating Activity Net Cash Inflow was effected by

income charged but not yet receipted $3.6M.

Cash flows from investing activities were $10.8M

favourable to budget.

Capital expenditure was $17.3M favourable to budget.

Incompleted works are reassessed and most of the works

not completed will be included in the carried over works

to be completed next year.

Capital income was $1.0M unfavourable to budget

mainly due to special rates and charges schemes not

commenced ($1.6M).

Outflows from financing activities were $6.3M

unfavourable due the deferral of the drawdown of the

$6.5m loan.

134


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG STANDARD STATEMENTS

STANDARD STATEMENT OF CAPITAL WORKS AS AT 30 JUNE 2008

Project Category Asset Renewals Asset Upgrades New Assets Gross Expenditure Income Net Cost

$000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000

Budget Actual Budget Actual Budget Actual Budget Actual Budget Actual Budget Actual

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Infrastructure Leisure 935 888 6,315 5,765 15,150 9,680 22,400 16,333 4,142 4,498 18,258 11,835

Roads 5,043 6,418 2,677 2,406 2,263 2,317 9,983 11,141 3,111 2,552 6,872 8,588

Fleet 4,682 4,697 - - - - 4,682 4,697 - - 4,682 4,697

Buildings - 5 2,902 4,523 2,146 485 5,048 5,013 24 322 5,024 4,691

Drainage 435 537 - - 2,000 2,066 2,435 2,603 - 55 2,435 2,548

Computer Equipment 2,305 877 123 257 300 259 2,728 1,393 50 78 2,678 1,315

Streetscapes - - 200 1,062 30 137 230 1,199 - 206 230 993

Footpaths 1,450 1,472 - - 100 75 1,550 1,547 - - 1,550 1,547

Miscellaneous - - 132 134 2,518 2,217 2,650 2,351 - 228 2,650 2,123

Kerb and Channel 600 616 - - - - 600 616 - - 600 616

Land - - - - 3,610 1,293 3,610 1,293 - - 3,610 1,293

Waste Collection - - - - 1,270 1,791 1,270 1,791 - - 1,270 1,791

Plant and Equipment 60 88 41 45 - 647 101 780 - 36 101 744

Special Rates and Charges Program - - - - 3,550 1,684 3,550 1,684 2,000 444 1,550 1,240

TOTAL 15,510 15,598 12,390 14,192 32,937 22,651 60,837 52,441 9,327 8,419 51,510 44,021

Reconciliation

Construction 85 - 85 - - -

Design 12 - 12 - - -

Carry over from 2006-2007 12,773 - - - 12,773 -

Carry over to 2008-2009 (4,000) - - - (4,000) -

TOTAL 8,870 - 97 - 8,773 -

CAPITAL WORKS TOTAL 69,707 52,441 9,424 8,419 60,283 44,021

135


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG STANDARD STATEMENTS

NOTES TO STANDARD STATEMENT OF CAPITAL WORKS

Council has an extensive capital works program to renew,

upgrade and provide new assets to ensure the continuation

and improvement of services provided to the community.

Council spent $52.4M on capital works in 2007-2008.

This included :

$M

Road replacement and construction 11.1

Plant and vehicles 4.7

Leisurelink Aquatic Centre replacement 3.1

Bellarine Aquatic and Sports Centre 2.7

Drainage replacement and construction 2.6

Footpath replacement and construction 1.5

Land Purchases 1.3

Drysdale Landfill Cell 1.0

Barwon Heads Streetscape 0.8

Geelong West Library upgrade 0.7

Corio Landfill rehabilitation 0.6

Variances to Budget

Capital expenditure was $17.3M favourable to budget.

The major projects still to be completed are Leisurelink

Aquatic Facility $9.9M, Bellarine Aquatic and Sports

Centre $2.6M, Vines Rd redevelopment $1.8M,

Waterfront timber decking $1.2M, fit out of Customs

House $1.2M, Eastern Beach Seawalls $1.0M and

Central Region Youth Precinct $0.9M.

Capital income was ($1.0M) unfavourable to budget.

Main unfavourable variances included Special Rates and

Charges ($1.6M) and Bellarine Aquatic and Sports Centre

($0.5M). These were offset by favourable variances for

Buildings $0.3M, Streetscapes $0.2M and Miscellaneous

$0.6M.

Council has $29.2M worth of works that have not been

completed in 2007-2008 but will be carried forward to

be completed in future years. This is made up of $17.3M

underspent in 2007-2008, plus $4M budgeted carry

over, $8.2M additional carry over from 2006-2007 and

authorised changes to 2007-2008 Budget of ($0.4M).

Parking Meters upgrade 0.6

North Shore Pavilion upgrade 0.4

Kardinia Park Legends Boulevard 0.4

136


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG STANDARD STATEMENTS

COUNCIL APPROVAL OF THE STANDARDS STATEMENTS

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

137


ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT CONTENTS

FINANCIAL REPORT Note Page

Financial Statements

Income Statement 139

Balance Sheet 140

Statement of Changes in Equity 141

Cash Flow Statement 142

Notes to Financial Statements

Introduction 143

Significant Accounting Policies 1 143

Rates and Charges 2 148

Fees and Charges 3 149

Grants 4 150

Capital Income 5 151

Employee Benefits 6 152

Materials and Services 7 152

Provisions Expense 8 152

Bad and Doubtful Debts 9 152

Depreciation and other Write Downs 10 153

Gain / (Loss) on Disposal of Assets 11 153

Previously Unrecognised Assets 12 153

Investments in Associates 13 154

Contributions - Non Monetary Assets 14 155

Net Asset Revaluation Increment 15 155

Cash and Cash Equivalents 16 156

Trade and Other Receivables 17 156

Financial Assets 18 156

Note

Page

Other Assets 19 157

Inventories 20 157

Property, Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment 21 157

Trade and Other Payables 22 164

Refundable Deposits 23 164

Employee Benefits 24 164

Interest Bearing Loans and Borrowings 25 166

Landfill Provision 26 166

Other Liabilities 27 166

Reserves 28 167

Reconciliation of Cash Flows from Operating

Activities to Surplus (Deficit) 29 169

Reconciliation of Cash and Cash Equivalents 30 169

Financing Arrangements 31 169

Superannuation 32 170

Commitments 33 172

Operating Leases 34 173

Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets 35 174

Financial Instruments 36 175

Events Occurring after Balance Date 37 180

Related Party Transactions 38 180

Revenue, expenses and assets by functions/activities 39 182

Financial Ratios (Performance indicators) 40 184

Capital Expenditure 41 186

Pending Accounting Standards 42 187

Auditors Remuneration 43 187

Certification of the Financial Report 188

138


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

INCOME STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

Note 2008 2007

$000 $000

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Revenue

Rates and Charges 2 115,382 106,874

Fees and Charges 3 50,792 44,345

Grants - Operating 4 34,987 31,939

Capital Income 5 9,875 7,363

Interest Income 2,132 1,484

Total Revenue 213,168 192,005

Expenses

Employee Benefits 6 73,096 69,127

Materials and Services 7 69,885 61,121

Administration 5,850 5,553

Professional Services 4,132 2,913

Utilities 4,708 4,280

Provision for Landfill 8 940 219

Bad and Doubtful Debts 9 971 677

Depreciation and other Write Downs 10 38,954 38,209

Financing Costs 897 832

Total Expenses 199,433 182,931

Net gain(loss) on disposal of property, infrastructure, plant and equipment 11 (349) 537

Previously Unrecognised Assets 12 857 8,534

Investments in Associates 13 1,005 454

Contributions - Non Monetary Assets 14 12,151 14,079

Net Asset Revaluation Increment 15 - 7,807

Surplus for the Year 27,399 40,485

The above income statement should be read with the accompanying notes

139


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

BALANCE SHEET AS AT 30 JUNE 2008

Note 2008 2007

$000 $000

Assets

Current Assets

Cash and Cash Equivalents 16 (301) 1,857

Trade and Other Receivables 17 13,714 6,986

Financial Assets 18 31,412 30,864

Other Assets 19 74 64

Inventories 20 873 689

Total Current Assets 45,772 40,460

Non-Current Assets

Trade and Other Receivables 17 776 1,977

Investments in Associates 13 6,765 5,560

Property, Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment 21 1,314,305 1,242,008

Total Non-Current Assets 1,321,846 1,249,545

Total Assets 1,367,618 1,290,005

Liabilities

Current Liabilities

Trade and Other Payables 22 13,711 13,662

Refundable Deposits 23 1,352 1,461

Employee Benefits 24 15,449 13,977

Interest Bearing Loans and Borrowings 25 3,056 6,788

Total Current Liabilities 33,568 35,888

Non-Current Liabilities

Employee Benefits 24 2,896 2,808

Interest Bearing Loans and Borrowings 25 12,519 10,575

Landfill Provision 26 6,220 5,858

Other Liabilities 27 129 -

Total Non-Current Liabilities 21,764 19,241

Total Liabilities 55,332 55,129

Net Assets 1,312,286 1,234,876

Equity

Accumulated Surplus 825,063 804,183

Reserves 28 487,223 430,693

Total Equity 1,312,286 1,234,876

The above balance sheet should be read with the accompanying notes

140


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

Asset

Accumulated Revaluation Other

Total Surplus Reserve Reserves

2008 2008 2008 2008

2008 Note $000 $000 $000 $000

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Balance at beginning of the financial year 1,234,876 804,183 404,677 26,016

Surplus (deficit) for the year 27,399 27,399 - -

Net asset revaluation increment (decrement) 28 (a) 50,011 - 50,011 -

Transfers to other reserves 28 (b) - (31,327) - 31,327

Transfers from other reserves 28 (b) - 24,808 - (24,808)

Balance at end of the financial year 1,312,286 825,063 454,688 32,535

Asset

Accumulated Revaluation Other

Total Surplus Reserve Reserves

2007 2007 2007 2007

2007 $000 $000 $000 $000

Balance at beginning of the financial year 1,185,000 762,653 395,286 27,061

Surplus (deficit) for the year 40,485 40,485 - -

Net asset revaluation increment (decrement) 28 (a) 9,391 - 9,391 -

Transfers to other reserves 28 (b) - (23,908) - 23,908

Transfers from other reserves 28 (b) - 24,953 - (24,953)

Balance at end of the financial year 1,234,876 804,183 404,677 26,016

The above statement of changes in equity should be read with the accompanying notes

141


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

CASH FLOW STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

2008 2007

Inflows/

Inflows/

(Outflows)

(Outflows)

Note $000 $000

Cash flows from operating activities

Rates 116,780 108,341

User charges and fines (inclusive of GST) 48,125 46,854

Grants (inclusive of GST) 35,709 32,922

Interest 2,132 1,484

Net GST refund/payment 7,157 5,324

Payments to suppliers (inclusive of GST) (96,941) (82,441)

Payments to employees (including redundancies) (71,545) (68,087)

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities 29 41,417 44,397

Cash flows from investing activities

Payments for property, infrastructure, plant and equipment (52,441) (49,067)

Proceeds from sale of property, infrastructure, plant and equipment 11 2,232 3,651

Capital Income 5 9,875 7,363

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities (40,334) (38,053)

Cash flows from financing activities

Finance costs (905) (840)

Proceeds from interest bearing loans 3,125 5,000

Repayment of interest bearing loans (4,967) (4,333)

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities (2,747) (173)

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents (1,664) 6,171

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial year 31,930 25,759

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year 30 30,266 31,930

Financing Arrangements 31

Restrictions on Cash Assets 18

The above cash flow statement should be read with the accompanying notes

142


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

143

Introduction

(a) The City of Greater Geelong was established under the

City of Greater Geelong Act 1993 on 18 May 1993,

and is a body corporate. The Council's main office is

located at 30 Gheringhap Street Geelong.

(b) The purpose of the Council is to:

> Provide for the peace, order and good government of

its municipal district.

> To promote the social, economic and environmental

viability and sustainability of the municipal district.

> To ensure that resources are used efficiently and

effectively and services are provided in accordance

with the Best Value Principles to best meet the needs

of the local community.

> To improve the overall quality of life of people in the

local community.

> To promote appropriate business and employment

opportunities.

> To ensure that services and facilities provided by the

Council are accessible and equitable.

> To ensure the equitable imposition of rates and

charges.

> To ensure transparency and accountability in Council

decision making.

This financial report is a general purpose financial report

that consists of an Income Statement, Balance Sheet,

Statement of Changes in Equity, Cash Flow Statement,

and notes accompanying these financial statements. The

general purpose financial report complies with Australian

Accounting Standards, other authoritative

pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards

Board, the Local Government Act 1989, and the Local

Government (Finance and Reporting) Regulations 2004.

1 Significant Accounting Policies

(a) Basis of accounting

This financial report has been prepared on the accrual

and going concern basis.

This financial report has been prepared under the

historical cost convention, except certain non current

assets which are revalued to fair value in accordance with

Council policy. Details of asset valuations are set out in

the relevant notes.

Unless otherwise stated, all accounting policies are

consistent with those applied in the prior year. Where

appropriate, comparative figures have been amended to

accord with current presentation, and disclosure has been

made of any material changes to comparatives.

All entities controlled by Council that have material assets

or liabilities, such as Special Committees of Management,

have been included in this financial report. All

transactions between these entities and the Council

have been eliminated in full.

(b) Revenue recognition

Rates and grants

Rates and grants are recognised as revenues when the

Council obtains control over the assets comprising these

receipts.

Control over assets acquired from rates is obtained at the

commencement of the rating year as it is an enforceable

debt linked to the rateable property or, where earlier, upon

receipt of the rates.

Uncollected rates are recognised as receivables after

provision for amounts considered to be at risk.

Control over granted assets is normally obtained upon

their receipt (or acquittal) or upon earlier notification that

a grant has been secured, and are valued at their fair

value at the date of transfer.

Income is recognised when the Council obtains control of

the contribution or the right to receive the contribution, it

is probable that the economic benefits comprising the

contribution will flow to the Council and the amount of

the contribution can be measured reliably.

Where grants recognised as revenues during the financial

year were obtained on condition that they be expended in

a particular manner or used over a particular period and

those conditions were undischarged at balance date, the

unused grant or contribution is disclosed in note 4. The

note also discloses the amount of unused grant from prior

years that was expended on Council’s operations during

the current year.

A liability is recognised in respect of revenue that is

reciprocal in nature to the extent that the requisite service

has not been provided at balance date.

Fees and Charges

User fees and fines (including parking fees and fines) are

recognised as revenue when the service has been

provided, the payment is received, or when the penalty

has been applied, whichever first occurs.

A provision for doubtful debts is recognised when

collection in full is no longer probable.

Sale of Property, Plant and Equipment

The profit or loss on sale of an asset is determined when

control of the asset has irrevocably passed to the buyer.


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

1 Significant Accounting Policies (cont’d)

(b) Revenue recognition (cont’d)

Interest Income

Interest is recognised as revenue on a proportional basis

when the payment is due, the value of the payment is

notified, or the payment is received, whichever first

occurs.

(c) Depreciation and amortisation of non-current assets

All non current assets having limited useful lives are

systematically depreciated over their useful lives to the

Council in a manner which reflects consumption of the

service potential in those assets. Estimates of remaining

useful lives and residual values are made on a regular

basis with major asset classes reassessed annually.

Depreciation rates and methods are reviewed annually.

Where infrastructure assets have separate identifiable

components that are subject to regular replacement, these

components are assigned distinct useful lives and residual

values and a separate depreciation rate is determined for

each component.

Road earthworks are not depreciated because they have

an indefinite useful life.

Depreciation is provided on a straight line basis using a

range of rates which are reviewed annually.

Major depreciation periods used are listed and are

consistent with the prior year:

Buildings

Plant and Equipment

Heavy Plant and Equipment,

Commercial Vehicles

Furniture and Fittings

Personal Computers

Computer Equipment

Software

Light Motor Vehicles

Infrastructure

Spray Seal

Asphalt Seal

Pavement

Drainage

Kerbs and Channel

Footpaths and Bike paths

Recreation

(d) Repairs and maintenance

Period

20-100 years

10 years

10 years

3 years

4-5 years

4 years

6.67 years

12 years

25 years

80 years

100 years

60 years

50 years

7-80 years

Routine maintenance, repair costs, and minor renewal

costs are expensed as incurred. Where the repair relates

to the replacement of a component of an asset and the

cost exceeds the capitalisation threshold the cost is

capitalised and depreciated. The carrying value of the

replaced asset is expensed.

(e) Borrowing costs

Borrowing costs are recognised as an expense in the

period in which they are incurred.

Borrowing costs include interest on bank overdrafts,

interest on borrowings, and finance lease charges.

(f) Recognition and measurement of assets

Acquisition

The purchase method of accounting is used for all

acquisitions of assets, being the fair value of assets

provided as consideration at the date of acquisition

plus any incidental costs attributable to the acquisition.

Non-monetary assets received in the form of grants or

donations or gifted assets are recognised as assets and

revenues at their fair value at the date of receipt.

Where assets are constructed by Council, cost includes all

materials used in construction, direct labour, borrowing

costs incurred during construction, and an appropriate

share of directly attributable variable and fixed overheads.

Fair value is the amount for which the asset could be

exchanged between knowledgeable willing parties in an

arm's length transaction. Where there is no market,

depreciated replacement value approximates fair value.

In accordance with Council's Asset Accounting Policy, the

threshold applied when recognising assets within an

applicable asset class is $1,000 and is consistent with

the prior year.

144


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

1 Significant Accounting Policies (cont’d)

(f) Recognition and measurement of assets (cont’d)

Revaluation

Subsequent to the initial recognition of assets, noncurrent

physical assets, other than Plant and Equipment,

Recreation and Infrastructure Other, are measured at their

fair value, being the amount for which the assets could be

exchanged between knowledgeable willing parties in an

arms length transaction. At balance date, the Council

reviewed the carrying value of the individual classes of

assets measured at fair value to ensure that each asset

materially approximated its fair value. Where the carrying

value materially differed from the fair value at balance

date the class of asset was revalued.

Council has a revaluation timetable for all assets held at

fair value. The valuation is performed either by

experienced Council officers or independent experts.

Where the assets are revalued, the revaluation increments

are credited directly to the asset revaluation reserve,

except to the extent that an increment reverses a prior

year decrement for that class of asset that had been

recognised as an expense, in which case the increment is

recognised as revenue up to the amount of the expense.

Revaluation decrements are recognised as an expense

except where prior increments are included in the asset

revaluation reserve for that class of asset, in which case

the decrement is taken to the reserve to the extent of the

remaining increments. Within the same class of assets,

revaluation increments and decrements within the year

are offset.

Kerb and Channel, Footpaths / Bike paths and Roads

Other were revalued as at 1-10-2006. Drainage assets

were revalued as at 1-7-2005. Assessments showed no

material difference between actual value and carrying

value as at 30 June 2008.

Land and Buildings were revalued as at 1-1-2008 in line

with the municipal valuation. The asset values increased

$50.0M, there was a write off to the Income Statement of

$0.7M for assets disposed and an increase to the Asset

Revaluation Reserve of $50.0M.

Asset Revaluation

Roads Seal

Road Pavement

Kerb and Channel

Footpaths and Bike paths

Roads Other

Land and Buildings

Drainage

Cycles

5 years

5 years

5 years

5 years

5 years

2 years

6 years

Road Seals and Road Pavements were revalued as at

1-11-2004. Assessment showed no material differences

between actual value and carrying value as at 30 June

2008.

Leasehold improvements

Leasehold improvements are recognised at cost and are

amortised over the unexpired period of the lease or the

estimated useful life of the improvement, whichever is the

shorter.

Land under roads

The Council has elected not to recognise land under roads

as an asset in accordance with AASB 1045 Land under

Roads, which extends the requirement to recognise and

measure land under roads as an asset of Council until 1

July 2008.

(g) Cash and cash equivalents

For the purposes of the cash flow statement, cash and

cash equivalents include cash on hand, deposits at call,

and other highly liquid investments with original

maturities of three months or less, net of outstanding

bank overdrafts.

(h) Investments

Managed funds are valued at fair value, being market

value, at balance date. Bank deposits and Term deposits

are measured at cost. Interest revenues are recognised as

they accrue. Any unrealised gains and losses on holdings

at balance date are recognised as either a revenue or

expense.

(i) Accounting for investments in associates

Council's investment in associates is accounted for by the

equity method as the Council has the ability to influence

rather than control the operations of the entities. The

investment is initially recorded at the cost of acquisition

and adjusted thereafter for post-acquisition changes in

the Council's share of the net assets of the entities. The

Council's share of the financial result of the entities is

recognised in the income statement.

The Council has an interest in the Geelong Regional

Library Corporation, the Regional Kitchen Pty Ltd and

RFK Pty Ltd (trading as Community Chef). They are

recorded as non current investments with Council's share

of net assets being recognised.

145


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

1 Significant Accounting Policies (cont’d)

(j) Employee benefits

Wages and salaries

Liabilities for wages and salaries and rostered days off

are recognised and measured as the amount unpaid at

balance date and include appropriate on-costs such

as workers compensation and payroll costs.

Annual leave

Annual leave entitlements are accrued on a pro rata basis

in respect of services provided by employees up to

balance date. Annual Leave expected to be paid within

12 months is measured at nominal value based on the

amount, including appropriate on-costs, expected to be

paid when settled. Annual leave expected to be paid later

that one year has been measured at the present value of

the estimated future cash outflows to be made for these

accrued entitlements. Commonwealth bond rates are

used for discounting future cash flows.

Long service leave

Long service leave entitlements payable are assessed at

balance date having regard to expected employee

remuneration rates on settlement, employment related oncosts

and other factors including accumulated years of

employment, on settlement, and experience of employee

departure per year of service. Long service leave expected

to be paid within 12 months is measured at nominal

value based on the amount expected to be paid when

settled. Long service leave expected to be paid later than

one year has been measured at the present value of the

estimated future cash outflows to be made for these

accrued entitlements. Commonwealth bond rates are

used for discounting future cash flows.

Classification of employee benefits

An employee benefit liability is classified as a current

liability if the Council does not have an unconditional

right to defer settlement of the liability for at least 12

months after the end of the period. This would include

all annual leave and unconditional long service leave

entitlements.

Superannuation

The superannuation expense for the reporting year is the

amount of the statutory contribution the Council makes to

the superannuation plan which provides benefits to its

employees together with any movements

(favourable/unfavourable) in the position of any defined

benefits schemes. Details of these arrangements are

recorded in note 32.

(k) Leases

Finance leases

Leases of assets where substantially all the risks and

benefits incidental to ownership of the asset, but not

the legal ownership, are transferred to the Council are

classified as finance leases. Council holds no finance

leases at balance date.

Operating leases

Lease payments for operating leases are recognised as an

expense in the years in which they are incurred as this

reflects the pattern of benefits derived by the Council.

(l) Refundable Deposits

Amounts received as tender deposits, sundry deposits,

street crossing deposits, hall bonds, and other amounts

controlled by Council which have to be paid back, are

included in the amount disclosed as Refundable Deposits

within current liabilities.

(m) Allocation between current and non-current

In the determination of whether an asset or liability is

current or non-current, consideration is given to the time

when each asset or liability is expected to be settled. The

asset or liability is classified as current if it is expected to

be settled within the next twelve months, being the

Council's operational cycle, or if the Council does not

have an unconditional right to defer settlement of a

liability for at least 12 months after the reporting date.

(n) Web site costs

Costs in relation to websites are charged as an expense in

the period in which they are incurred.

(o) Goods and Services Tax (GST)

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the

amount of GST, except where the amount of GST incurred

is not recoverable from the Australian Tax Office. In these

circumstances the GST is recognised as part of the cost of

acquisition of the asset or as part of an item of the

expense. Receivables and payables in the balance sheet

are shown inclusive of GST.

Cash flows are presented in the cash flow statement on a

gross basis, except for the GST component of investing

and financing activities, which are disclosed as operating

cash flows.

146


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

1 Significant Accounting Policies (cont’d)

(p) Impairment of assets

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

At each reporting date, the Council reviews the carrying

value of its assets to determine whether there is any

indication that these assets have been impaired. If such

an indication exists, the recoverable amount of the asset,

being the higher of the asset's fair value less costs to sell

and value in use, is compared to the asset's carrying

value. Any excess of the asset's carrying value over its

recoverable amount is expensed to the income statement.

(q) Rounding

Unless otherwise stated, amounts in the financial report

have been rounded to the nearest thousand dollars.

(r) Non-current assets held for sale

A non-current asset held for sale is measured at the lower

of its carrying amount and fair value less costs to sell.

(s) Financial Guarantees

Financial guarantee contracts are recognised as a liability

at the time the guarantee is issued. The liability is

initially measured at fair value, and if there is a material

increase in the likelihood that the guarantee may have to

be exercised, at the higher of the amount determined in

accordance with AASB 137 Provisions, Contingent

Liabilities and Contingent Assets and the amount initially

recognised less cumulative amortisation, where

appropriate. In the determination of fair value,

consideration is given to factors including the probability

of default by the guaranteed party and the likely loss to

Council in the event of default.

147


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

2 Rates and Charges

Council uses Capital Improved Values as the basis of valuation of all properties within the municipal district. The Capital Improved Value of

a property is the total market value of the land plus buildings and other improvements.

2008 2007

$000 $000

The valuation base used to calculate general rates for 2007-2008 was $29.977 million (2006-2007 $29.188 million).

Residential 62,482 58,407

Commercial 11,131 10,530

Industrial 5,848 5,587

Petroleum Production Land 2,653 2,521

Aluminium Production Land 917 872

Automobile Manufacture Land 518 493

Vacant Land 4,179 4,060

Farm/Rural 3,103 1,338

Cultural and Recreation 142 153

Mixed Use 267 238

Late Licence Premises 591 563

Garbage Charge 16,283 15,362

Municipal Charge 7,268 6,750

115,382 106,874

The date of the last general revaluation of land for rating purposes within the municipal district was 1 January 2006, and the valuation first applied to the rating

period commencing 1 July 2006.

A new general revaluation has been conducted as at 1 January 2008, and the valuation will be first applied in the rating year commencing 1 July 2008.

148


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

3 Fees and Charges

2008 2007

$000 $000

Recreation 8,344 9,005

Commercial Waste Collection and Waste Disposal 11,588 7,220

Local Laws and Traffic 5,802 4,854

Subdivisions and Development 4,364 3,771

Car Parking 5,801 5,176

Family and Children’s Services 3,032 3,094

Rental and Leasing 3,202 3,077

Aged Services 2,465 2,450

Road Works 1,371 1,378

National Wool Museum 548 599

Risk Management 16 35

Parks 1,016 912

Revenue and Valuations 926 600

Central Geelong City Management 1,101 555

Environment 294 722

Other 289 232

Waterfront 237 251

Marketing / Major Events 152 120

Historical Records 87 97

Arts and Culture 131 107

Planning 26 90

50,792 44,345

149


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

4 Grants

2008 2007

$000 $000

Grants were received in respect of the following:

Commonwealth Government

Grants Commission 16,690 15,591

Family and Children 3,256 3,044

Roads to Recovery 1,422 1,311

Major Projects - 667

Aged Services 1,322 1,229

Govt Funded Traineeships 133 -

Youth 212 183

Emergency Response - 66

Recreation and Open Space 50 45

Infrastructure Management 14 41

Fleet 120 116

Other Grants 6 55

Cultural Development 45 -

23,270 22,348

State Government

Aged Services 8,230 7,194

Family and Children 2,799 1,936

Community Development 933 350

Economic Development 417 455

Infrastructure Management 58 300

School Crossing 414 414

Open Space Planning and Development 170 292

Youth 392 391

Environment and Planning 729 217

Urban Design - 70

Roads 742 340

Community Safety 100 -

Govt Funded Traineeships 5 164

Emergency Response - Flood / Fire 21 22

Recreation Sport and Leisure 2,627 458

Major Events 13 21

Recycling 16 40

Health Services 64 56

Central Geelong/Waterfront 710 -

Parking and Traffic Management 492 321

Strategic Implementation - 275

Other Grants 25 28

Total 18,957 13,344

Total Grants 42,227 35,692

Recurrent 34,987 31,939

Non-recurrent / Capital (Note 5) 7,240 3,753

Total 42,227 35,692

150


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

4 Grants (cont’d)

Conditions on Grants

2008 2007

$000 $000

Grants received during the year that were obtained on condition that they be expended in a specified manner but had not occurred at balance date:

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Family and Children Family Day Care and Out of Schools Program 147 240

Youth - Best Start Program - -

Recreation Sport and Leisure 253 2

Community Development - 100

Aged - Rural Access and Home Modifications - 50

400 392

Grants which were received in prior years and were expended during the current year in the manner specified by the grantor were:

Rec Sport and Leisure 2 -

Family and Child 240 228

Community Development 100 -

Youth - Best Start Program - 43

Major Events - Commonwealth Games - 36

Aged Services 50 28

Waste Management - Recycling Pilot - 35

392 370

Net increase (decrease) in restricted assets resulting from grant revenues for the year: 8 22

5 Capital Income

Grants (Note 4) 7,240 3,753

Developer Cash Contributions 1,456 1,623

Contributions to Council Assets 857 2,218

Special Rates 322 (231)

9,875 7,363

In accordance with legislation, developer’s contributions must be expended for particular purposes so Council has transferred them to

a Reserve until expended.

151


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

6 Employee Benefits

2008 2007

$000 $000

Wages and Salaries 59,198 55,489

Long Service Leave 1,842 1,720

Annual Leave 4,963 4,625

Superannuation 5,567 5,248

Workcover 1,524 1,674

Redundancy 2 371

73,096 69,127

7 Materials and Services

Contractors 24,630 21,890

Levies 10,952 7,705

Materials 5,080 4,975

Plant/Equipment/Vehicle Costs 5,824 6,298

Supplementary Labour 4,146 3,172

Maintenance - Buildings and Emergency 3,569 3,043

Contributions - Recurrent 3,809 3,374

Other 11,875 10,664

69,885 61,121

8 Provisions Expense

An estimate of the costs to rehabilitate the Corio Landfill site, has been included in the accounts. It is expected Corio Landfill site operations

and rehabilitation will be completed by 2010.

Landfill Provision - Finance Charge 445 461

Increase/(Decrease) in the discounted amount arising because of the time and effect of any change in the discount rate, or the revision of future cost estimates. 495 (242)

940 219

9 Bad and Doubtful Debts

Infringement Debtors 887 718

Sundry Debtors 84 (41)

971 677

152


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

10 Depreciation and other Write Downs

2008 2007

$000 $000

Buildings 5,021 4,638

Plant and Equipment 5,180 4,948

Infrastructure 25,359 24,693

35,560 34,279

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Book Value of Assets Replaced 3,394 3,930

3,394 3,930

Total 38,954 38,209

11 Gain / (Loss) on Disposal of Assets

Proceeds from Sale of Land and Buildings 500 1,867

Less : Book Value of Assets Sold or transferred for nil consideration 856 1,287

(356) 580

Proceeds from Sale of Plant 1,732 1,784

Less : Book Value of Assets Sold 1,725 1,827

7 (43)

Net gain (Loss) on Disposal (349) 537

12 Previously Unrecognised Assets

In 2007-2008 Council recognised $0.9M of Drainage Assets. 857 8,534

153


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

13 Investments in Associates

Investments in associates accounted for by the equity method are:

> Geelong Regional Library Corporation

> RFK Pty Ltd

> Regional Kitchen Pty Ltd

i) Equity in Geelong Regional Library Corporation

Principle Activity is to provide Library Services to member municipalities. Council holds 85.68% of equity in the corporation. Council has four directors on the Board of seven. Council

has the ability to influence the Library rather than control its operations.

2008 2007

$000 $000

Council's Share of Accumulated Surplus

Council's share of accumulated surplus as at beginning of financial year 2,225 1,771

Share of operating surplus (loss) 452 454

Council's share of accumulated surplus at end of financial year 2,677 2,225

Movement of Carrying Value of Investment

Carrying value of investment at start of year 5,560 5,108

Share of operating surplus for year 452 454

Carrying value of investment at end of year 6,012 5,562

ii) Equity in RFK Pty. Ltd.

Trading as Community Chef, City of Greater Geelong shareholding 10.4%

Council's Share of Accumulated Surplus

Council's share of accumulated surplus as at beginning of financial year - -

Share of operating surplus (loss) 14 -

Council's share of accumulated surplus at end of financial year 14 -

Movement of Carrying Value of Investment

Carrying value of investment at start of year - -

Share of operating surplus for year 14 -

Carrying value of investment at end of year 14 -

154


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

13 Investments in Associates (cont’d)

iii) Equity in Regional Kitchen Pty. Ltd.

City of Greater Geelong Shareholding 8.9%

2008 2007

$000 $000

Council's Share of Equity Contribution

Council's share of equity contribution at beginning of financial year - -

Council's share of equity contribution made during the year 200 -

Council's share of equity contribution at end of financial year 200 -

Council's Share of Accumulated Surplus

Council's share of accumulated surplus as at beginning of financial year - -

Share of operating surplus (loss) 539 -

Council's share of accumulated surplus at end of financial year 539 -

Movement of Carrying Value of Investment

Carrying value of investment at start of year - -

Share of operating surplus for year 539 -

Share of equity contribution for year 200 -

Carrying value of investment at end of year 739 -

14 Contributions - Non Monetary Assets

Infrastructure assets such as roads, drainage and footpaths created by developers become part of the Council's assets when titles are issued to

the Developer for individual lots. These assets have been received in kind and do not reflect a cash outlay by Council. Council also received land

from developers as part of their required 5% contribution of Public Open Space.

Infrastructure 8,080 10,687

Land 4,071 3,392

12,151 14,079

15 Net Asset Revaluation Increment

Reversal of previous devaluation of footpaths and kerbing through income statement in prior periods. - 7,807

- 7,807

155


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

16 Cash and Cash Equivalents

2008 2007

$000 $000

Cash on hand 52 36

Cash at bank (470) 1,712

Bank bills 117 109

(301) 1,857

17 Trade and Other Receivables

Current

Rates Receivables 1,676 638

Less Provision for Doubtful Debts (353) (332)

Other Debtors 13,636 7,590

Less Provision for Doubtful Debts (1,245) (910)

13,714 6,986

Non-current

Deferred Debtors 776 1,977

Less Provision for Doubtful Debts - -

776 1,977

Total 14,490 8,963

18 Financial Assets

Current

Investments (Note 1h) 31,412 30,864

Council's investments are held at various financial institutions, and represented by:

Unrestricted 18,964 19,385

Subject to external restrictions 12,448 11,479

31,412 30,864

Council has financial assets that are subject to restrictions. Restrictions have been imposed by regulations or other external requirements on the following:

Long Service Leave 10,696 9,626

Refundable Deposits 1,352 1,461

Unexpended Grants 400 392

12,448 11,479

Restricted asset for Long Service Leave is based on the Local Government (Long Service Leave) Regulations 2002 and does not necessarily equate

to the long service leave liability disclosed in note 24 due to a different basis of calculation prescribed by the regulation.

Council has Statutory Reserves of $1.0M ($2.37M in 2007) which are commitments that Council will include in its future budgets and are included

in the unrestricted cash amount.

156


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

2008 2007

$000 $000

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

19 Other Assets

Prepaid Expenses 74 64

74 64

20 Inventories

Stores and Materials at Cost 873 689

873 689

21 Property, Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment

Summary

at cost 260,829 230,665

Less accumulated depreciation 69,937 59,100

190,892 171,565

at fair value as at 1 January 2008 539,885 -

Less accumulated depreciation 2,562 -

537,323 -

at fair value as at 1 October 2006 391,443 392,324

Less accumulated depreciation 218,963 213,075

172,480 179,249

at fair value as at 1 January 2006 - 478,550

Less accumulated depreciation - 5,980

- 472,570

at fair value as at 1 July 2005 269,254 266,002

Less accumulated depreciation 75,655 72,972

193,599 193,030

at fair value as at 1 November 2004 423,956 424,435

Less accumulated depreciation 203,945 198,841

220,011 225,594

Total 1,314,305 1,242,008

157


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

21 Property, Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment (cont’d)

2008 2007

$000 $000

(a) Property

Land

at cost 1,945 3,140

at fair value as at 1 January 2006 - 358,914

at fair value as at 1 January 2008 406,009 -

Total Land 407,954 362,054

Buildings

at cost 5,974 11,730

Less accumulated depreciation

30 112

5,944 11,618

at fair value as at 1 January 2008 133,876 -

Less accumulated depreciation 2,562 -

131,314 -

at fair value as at 1 January 2006 - 119,636

Less accumulated depreciation - 5,980

- 113,656

Total Buildings 137,258 125,274

Total Property 545,212 487,328

Land and Buildings were revalued as at 1-01-2008 by Robert Tot A.A.P.I C.P.V. Member No.3523 using fair value. The valuation of buildings is at fair

value, being market value for non specialised buildings, and current replacement cost less accumulated depreciation at the date of valuation for

specialised buildings.

(b) Plant and Equipment

Plant and Equipment

at cost 46,467 43,646

Less accumulated depreciation 29,228 26,226

17,239 17,420

Leasehold Improvements

at cost 766 658

Less accumulated depreciation 254 136

512 522

Light Vehicles

at cost 6,790 6,550

Less accumulated depreciation 1,831 1,649

4,959 4,901

Total Plant and Equipment 22,710 22,843

158


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

2008 2007

$000 $000

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

21 Property, Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment (cont’d)

(c) Infrastructure

Road Pavement

at cost 9,820 7,113

Less accumulated depreciation 182 85

9,638 7,028

at fair value as at 1 November 2004 370,133 370,506

Less accumulated depreciation 163,345 159,791

206,788 210,715

Total Road Pavement 216,426 217,743

Road Seal

at cost 13,685 10,623

Less accumulated depreciation 913 457

12,772 10,166

at fair value as at 1 November 2004 53,823 53,929

Less accumulated depreciation 40,600 39,050

13,223 14,879

Total Road Seal 25,995 25,045

Roads Other

at cost 7,686 3,229

Less accumulated depreciation 64 10

7,622 3,219

at fair value as at 1 October 2006 86,274 87,583

Less accumulated depreciation 43,409 41,791

42,865 45,792

Total Roads Other 50,487 49,011

Footpaths and Bike paths

at cost 6,760 3,311

Less accumulated depreciation 100 17

6,660 3,294

at fair value as at 1 October 2006 141,926 142,496

Less accumulated depreciation 86,120 84,416

55,806 58,080

Total Footpaths and Bike paths 62,466 61,374

159


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

21 Property, Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment (cont’d)

(c) Infrastructure (cont’d)

2008 2007

$000 $000

Kerb and Channel

at cost 3,841 2,323

Less accumulated depreciation 55 10

3,786 2,313

at fair value as at 1 October 2006 163,243 162,245

Less accumulated depreciation 89,434 86,868

73,809 75,377

Total Kerb and Channel 77,595 77,690

Drainage

at cost 12,010 7,411

Less accumulated depreciation 146 60

11,864 7,351

at fair value as at 1 July 2005 269,254 266,002

Less accumulated depreciation 75,655 72,972

193,599 193,030

Total Drainage 205,463 200,381

Recreation

at cost 70,416 65,991

Less accumulated depreciation 11,978 8,783

58,438 57,208

Total Recreation 58,438 57,208

Infrastructure Other

at cost 47,607 45,565

Less accumulated depreciation 25,156 21,555

22,451 24,010

Total Infrastructure Other 22,451 24,010

Total Infrastructure 719,321 712,462

Road Seals and Road Pavements were revalued as at 1-11-2004 by Council officers, at fair value based on depreciated replacement cost.

Roads Other, Footpaths, Bike paths, Kerb and Channel are valued at fair value as at 1-10-2006 by Council officers using depreciated replacement cost.

Drainage assets have been revalued as at 1-07-2005 by Council officers at fair value using depreciated replacement cost.

160


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

2008 2007

$000 $000

21 Property, Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment (cont’d)

(d) Works in progress

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Buildings

at cost 10,319 2,882

Plant and Equipment

at cost 407 120

Infrastructure

at cost 16,336 16,373

Total Works in progress 27,062 19,375

Total Property, Plant and Equipment and Infrastructure 1,314,305 1,242,008

161


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

21 Property, Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment (cont’d)

Revaluation

Balance at WDV of increments

beginning of Acquisition Depreciation disposals (decrements) Balance at end of

financial year of assets (note 10) (note 11) (note 28) Transfers financial year

2008 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000

Property

Land 362,054 5,772 - (578) 40,561 145 407,954

Buildings 125,274 5,891 (5,021) (278) 9,450 1,942 137,258

Total Property 487,328 11,663 (5,021) (856) 50,011 2,087 545,212

Plant and Equipment

Plant and Equipment 17,420 4,437 (4,134) (647) - 163 17,239

Leasehold Improvements 522 108 (118) - - - 512

Light Vehicles 4,901 2,064 (928) (1,078) - - 4,959

Total Plant and Equipment 22,843 6,609 (5,180) (1,725) - 163 22,710

Infrastructure

Road Pavement 217,743 4,458 (4,931) (964) - 120 216,426

Road Seal 25,045 3,472 (2,973) (241) - 692 25,995

Road Other 49,011 3,855 (2,005) (1,035) - 661 50,487

Footpaths and Bike paths 61,374 3,972 (2,920) (350) - 390 62,466

Kerb and Channel 77,690 2,625 (2,712) (174) - 166 77,595

Drainage 200,381 5,087 (2,770) (465) - 3,230 205,463

Infrastructure Other 24,010 1,244 (3,601) (159) - 957 22,451

Recreation 57,208 2,849 (3,447) (6) - 1,834 58,438

Total Infrastructure 712,462 27,562 (25,359) (3,394) - 8,050 719,321

Works in progress

Buildings 2,882 7,754 - - - (317) 10,319

Plant and Equipment 120 308 - - - (21) 407

Infrastructure 16,373 10,911 - - - (10,948) 16,336

Total Works in progress 19,375 18,973 - - - (11,286) 27,062

Total Property, Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment 1,242,008 64,807 (35,560) (5,975) 50,011 (986) 1,314,305

162


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

21 Property, Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment (cont’d)

Revaluation

Balance at WDV of increments

beginning of Acquisition Depreciation disposals (decrements) Balance at end of

financial year of assets (note 10) (note 11) (note 28) Transfers financial year

2007 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Property

Land 353,843 8,521 - (406) - 96 362,054

Buildings 122,822 5,329 (4,638) (881) (112) 2,754 125,274

Total Property 476,665 13,850 (4,638) (1,287) (112) 2,850 487,328

Plant and Equipment

Plant and Equipment 17,967 3,770 (3,934) (639) - 256 17,420

Leasehold Improvements - 105 (102) - - 519 522

Light Vehicles 4,852 2,149 (912) (1,188) - - 4,901

Total Plant and Equipment 22,819 6,024 (4,948) (1,827) - 775 22,843

Infrastructure

Road Pavement 217,736 4,705 (4,882) (804) - 988 217,743

Road Seal 23,674 4,321 (2,942) (381) - 373 25,045

Road Other 40,042 4,864 (1,790) (1,107) 5,108 1,894 49,011

Footpaths and Bike paths 44,727 6,861 (2,616) (183) 11,876 709 61,374

Kerb and Channel 76,942 2,907 (2,643) (112) 325 271 77,690

Drainage 196,138 6,361 (2,707) (465) - 1,054 200,381

Infrastructure Other 25,156 2,098 (3,798) - - 554 24,010

Recreation 55,869 4,758 (3,315) (878) - 774 57,208

Total Infrastructure 680,284 36,875 (24,693) (3,930) 17,309 6,617 712,462

Works in progress

Buildings 2,743 2,613 - - - (2,474) 2,882

Plant and Equipment 634 95 - - - (609) 120

Infrastructure 13,308 11,030 - - - (7,965) 16,373

Total Works in progress 16,685 13,738 - - - (11,048) 19,375

Total Property, Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment 1,196,453 70,487 (34,279) (7,044) 17,197 (806) 1,242,008

163


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

2008 2007

$000 $000

22 Trade and Other Payables

Trade Creditors 11,974 12,216

Loan Interest Accrued 43 50

Prepaid Memberships for Leisure Facilities 988 906

Unearned Income 706 490

13,711 13,662

23 Refundable Deposits

Refundable Deposits 1,352 1,461

1,352 1,461

These deposits are maintenance bonds, landscaping bonds, relocation deposits, open space works levies, and contract deposits.

24 Employee Benefits

Other Annual Leave Long Service Leave

2008 $000 $000 $000

Balance at beginning of the financial year 840 5,667 10,278

Additional provisions 1,143 5,106 2,249

Amounts used (840) (4,782) (1,316)

Balance at the end of the financial year 1,143 5,991 11,211

2007

Balance at beginning of the financial year 1,006 5,341 9,398

Additional provisions 840 4,546 2,118

Amounts used (1,006) (4,220) (1,238)

Balance at the end of the financial year 840 5,667 10,278

164


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

2008 2007

$000 $000

24 Employee Benefits (cont’d)

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

(i) Current

Annual leave 5,991 5,667

Long service leave 8,315 7,470

Other 1,143 840

15,449 13,977

Current Long Service Leave has been determined as the amount employees are entitled to at balance date. Based on past history,

it is estimated that approximately $1M will be paid out in Long Service Leave in 2008-2009.

(ii) Non-current

Long service leave 2,896 2,808

2,896 2,808

Aggregate carrying amount of employee benefits:

Current 15,449 13,977

Non-current 2,896 2,808

18,345 16,785

The following assumptions were adopted in measuring the present value of long service leave and retiring gratuity:

Weighted average increase in employee costs 4.50% 4.50%

Weighted average discount rates 6.45% 6.36%

Weighted average settlement period 10 10

(i) Current

All annual leave and the long service leave entitlements representing 10 or more years of continuous service

Short-term employee benefits that fall due within 12 months after the end of the period measured at nominal value 8,133 7,507

Other long-term employee benefits that do not fall due within 12 months after the end of the period measured at present value 7,316 6,470

15,449 13,977

(ii) Non-current

Long service leave representing less than 10 years of continuous service measured at present value 2,896 2,808

165


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

25 Interest Bearing Loans and Borrowings

Current

Bank overdraft (Unpresented Cheques) 845 791

Borrowings - secured 1,181 4,967

Other Loans - Unsecured (These are non interest bearing loans) 1,030 1,030

3,056 6,788

Non-current

Borrowings - secured 12,519 10,575

Total 15,575 17,363

The maturity profile for Council's borrowings is:

Not later than one year 3,056 6,788

Later than one year and not later than five years 5,626 4,306

Later than five years 6,893 6,269

15,575 17,363

Finance leases

Council has no finance leases at balance date

26 Landfill Provision

Corio Landfill Rehabilitation Provision

Non-current 6,220 5,858

Balance at beginning of the financial year 5,858 6,830

Amounts used (578) (1,191)

Increase/(decrease) in the discounted amount arising because of time and the effect of any change in the discount rate, or the revision of future cost estimates. 940 219

Balance at the end of the financial year 6,220 5,858

27 Other Liabilities

Developer Contributions - Sec 173 Agreement Wandana Heights 129 -

166


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

28 Reserves

(a) Asset revaluation Reserve

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Balance at

Balance at

begining of

end of

reporting Increment reporting

period (decrement) period

$000 $000 $000

2008

Land and Buildings 299,109 50,011 349,120

Infrastructure

Sealed and Unsealed Roads 18,905 - 18,905

Roads Other 15,390 - 15,390

Footpath and Bike paths 4,395 - 4,395

Drainage 66,878 - 66,878

105,568 - 105,568

Total Asset Revaluation Reserve 404,677 50,011 454,688

2007

Land and Buildings 299,222 (113) 299,109

Infrastructure

Sealed and Unsealed Roads 18,905 - 18,905

Roads Other 10,281 5,109 15,390

Footpath and Bike paths - 4,395 4,395

Drainage 66,878 - 66,878

96,064 9,504 105,568

Total Asset Revaluation Reserve 395,286 9,391 404,677

The Asset Revaluation Reserve records the increase and any subsequent decrease in the value of assets held at fair value.

167


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

2008 2007

$000 $000

28 Reserves (cont’d)

(b) Other Reserves

Statutory Reserves

Council maintains three Statutory reserves to record funds collected from developers under the Planning and Environment Act, Subdivisions Act and

Local Government Act. Council identifies, as part of the budget process, capital works relevant to these reserves and records the capital expenditure

as settlement of the obligations created in collecting the levies. The outstanding balance at year end is listed below. The movement to and from reserves

are shown in the Statement of Changes in Equity.

Car Parking Reserve 42 337

Public Open Space Reserve 834 1,191

Main Drainage Reserve 136 841

Total Statutory Reserves 1,012 2,369

Discretionary Reserves

Council maintains a Deferred Works Reserve to record the estimated amount of Capital Expenditure that is expected to

complete the capital projects that were approved in the previous year's budget, but had not been completed at year end.

Council maintains an Asset Development Reserve to record funds provided to Council for development of coastal infrastructure.

Council has an Asset Redevelopment Reserve to record funds provided to Council to reinstate decking around the Carousel as required.

The outstanding balances of the reserves are listed below. The movements to and from reserves are shown in the Statement of Changes in Equity.

Deferred Works Reserve 30,000 22,115

Asset Development Reserve 332 332

Asset Redevelopment Reserve 1,191 1,200

Total Discretionary Reserves 31,523 23,647

168


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

29 Reconciliation of Cash Flows from Operating Activities to Surplus (Deficit)

2008 2007

$000 $000

Surplus for the Year 27,399 40,485

Depreciation and Infrastructure write-off 38,954 38,209

(Profit)Loss on disposal of property, infrastructure, plant and equipment 349 (537)

Capital Income (9,875) (7,363)

Equity Share in Geelong Library Surplus (1,205) (454)

Assets received in Kind (12,151) (14,079)

Assets previously Unrecognised (857) (8,534)

Gain on Revaluation - (7,807)

Capitalised Salaries Expensed 64 -

Finance Costs 905 840

Change in assets and liabilities:

(Increase)/Decrease in Trade and Other Receivables (5,526) 155

(Increase)/Decrease in Prepayments (10) -

(Increase)/Decrease in Inventories (184) (48)

Increase/(Decrease) in Trade and Other Payables 178 1,186

Increase/(Decrease) in Refundable Deposits (109) 279

(Decrease)/Increase in Employee Benefits 1,559 1,040

Increase/(Decrease) in Landfill Provisions 940 219

(Decrease)/Increase in Work in Progress 986 806

Net cash provided by/(used in) operating activities 41,417 44,397

30 Reconciliation of Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents (note 16) (301) 1,857

Cash and Investments (note 18) 31,412 30,864

Less bank overdraft (note 25) (845) (791)

30,266 31,930

31 Financing Arrangements

Bank overdraft 5,000 5,000

Used Facilities - Overdraft (845) (791)

Loans 14,730 16,572

Used facilities - Loans (14,730) (16,572)

Unused facilities 4,155 4,209

169


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

32 Superannuation

Post-employment Benefit

Council makes employer superannuation contributions in respect of its employees to the Local Authorities Superannuation Fund (the Fund). Obligations for making contributions are

recognised as an expense in profit or loss when they are due. The Fund has two categories of membership, each of which is funded differently.

The Fund's accumulation category, Vision Super Saver, receives both employer and employee contributions on a progressive basis. Employer contributions are normally based on a fixed

percentage of employee earnings (9% required under Superannuation Guarantee Legislation). No further liability accrues to the employer as the superannuation benefits accruing to employees

are represented by their share of the net assets of the Fund. From 1 July 2008 employers are required to pay superannuation guarantee contributions based on Ordinary Time

Earnings (OTE) which may put upward pressure on contribution levels.

The Fund's Defined Benefit Plan is a multi-employer sponsored plan. As the Fund's assets and liabilities are pooled and are not allocated by employer, the Actuary is unable to allocate

benefit liabilities, assets and costs between employers. As provided under Paragraph 32 (b) of AASB 119, Council does not use defined benefit accounting for these contributions.

Council makes employer contributions to the defined benefit category of the Fund at rates determined by the Trustee on the advice of the Fund's Actuary. On the basis of the results of the

most recent full actuarial

investigation conducted by the Fund's actuary as at 31 December 2005, the Trustee has determined that the current funding arrangements are adequate for the expected Defined Benefit

Plan liabilities. Council makes the

following contributions:-

> 9.25% of members' salaries (same as previous year);

> the difference between resignation and retrenchment benefits paid to any retrenched employees (same as previous year);

The Fund's liability for accrued benefits was determined in the 30 June 2007 actuarial investigation pursuant to the requirements of Australian Accounting Standard AAS25 as follows:

30-06-2007

$000

Net Market Value of Assets 4,102,154

Accrued Benefits (per accounting standards) 3,923,436

Difference between Assets and Accrued Benefits 178,718

Vested Benefits 3,572,589

170


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

32 Superannuation (cont’d)

The Accrued Benefits liability has been determined by the Actuary at 30 June 2007 outside of the full actuarial review which is normally undertaken

every three years and most recently performed as at 31 December 2007. This liability is calculated to satisfy the requirements of AAS 25 and is not

reflected in the audited financial statements of the Fund at 30 June 2007.

2008 2007

$000 $000

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

The financial assumptions used to calculate the Accrued Benefits for the defined benefit category of the Fund were:

Net Investment Return - 8.0% p.a.

Salary Inflation - 5.5% p.a.

Price Inflation - 3.0% p.a.

Defined Benefit Plans

Employer contributions to Local Authorities Superannuation Fund (Vision Super) 1,528 1,442

Employer contributions to other institutions - -

1,528 1,442

Employer contributions payable to Local Authorities Superannuation Fund (Vision Super) at reporting date - -

Employer contributions payable to other institutions - -

- -

Accumulation Funds

Employer contributions to Local Authorities Superannuation Fund (Vision Super) 3,835 3,708

Employer contributions to other institutions 204 98

4,039 3,806

Employer contributions payable to Local Authorities Superannuation Fund (Vision Super) at reporting date 30 137

Employer contributions payable to other institutions 2 -

32 137

171


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

33 Commitments

The Council has entered into the following commitments due:

Later than 2

Later than 1 year

years and not

Not later than and not later than later than 5 Later than 5

1 year 2 years years years Total

$000 $000 $000 $000 $000

2008

Operating

Immunisation services 312 324 - - 636

Building maintenance 659 135 148 - 942

Consultancies 957 113 - - 1,070

Cleaning contracts for Council buildings 600 297 303 - 1,200

Other 211 4 - - 215

Home maintenance services 65 - - - 65

Total 2,804 873 451 4,128

Capital

Building and Other Structures 16,627 - - - 16,627

Total 16,627 - - - 16,627

2007

Operating

Immunisation services 300 312 324 - 936

Building maintenance 308 150 254 - 712

Consultancies 292 133 133 - 558

Cleaning contracts for Council buildings 630 - - - 630

Other 574 70 4 - 648

Home maintenance services 43 43 - - 86

Total 2,147 708 715 3,570

Capital

Building and Other Structures 16,548 - - - 16,548

Total 16,548 - - - 16,548

In addition to the above commitments Council has entered into a number of contracts for operating expenditure based on schedule of rates. The value of the contractual commitments

cannot be accurately determined as they depend on the level of services provided to Council.

172


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

34 Operating Leases

(a) Operating Lease Commitments

At the reporting date, the Council had the following obligations under non-cancellable operating leases for the lease of equipment and land and

buildings for use within Council's activities (these obligations are not recognised as liabilities):

2008 2007

$000 $000

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Not later than one year 1,413 1,084

Later than one year and not later than five years 2,257 1,992

Later than five years 1 32

3,671 3,108

(b) Operating Lease Receivables

The Council has entered into commercial property leases on its property, consisting of surplus freehold complexes.

These properties held under operating leases have remaining non-cancellable leases terms of between 1 and 40 years.

Future Minimum rentals received under non-cancellable operating leases are as follows:

Not later than one year 3,319 2,399

Later than one year and not later than five years 8,229 6,150

Later than five years 4,773 5,565

16,321 14,114

173


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

35 Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

Contingent Liabilities

(a) Council acknowledges a future obligation for rehabilitation, after care and future contamination liability for its two landfill sites in accordance with the requirements set out by the Environment

Protection Authority. Apart from the rehabilitation of Corio landfill that has been provided for, this liability cannot be readily quantified. The Capital Works and Operating budgets

include ongoing works at the sites in future years.

(b) The City of Greater Geelong is the guarantor for a number of community organisation loans.

Outstanding

Original

Guarantee

Guarantee 30-06-2008

Community Groups $000 $000

Barwon Heads Bowling Club Inc. 70 47

Bell Park Sports and Recreation Club 120 48

Geelong and East Belmont Baseball Club 70 24

Bell Post Hill Sports and Recreation Club 130 120

Geelong Hockey Association 150 150

Total 540 389

(c) All matters from previous years not listed here have been settled.

(d) There are no other material contingent liabilities at the date of this report.

Contingent Assets

In the course of creating new subdivisions developers construct infrastructure assets which are vested with Council when Council issues a Statement of Compliance. These assets are

bought to account as revenue (Contributions - Non Monetary Assets) and capitalised.

At reporting date, developers had commenced construction of assets that will eventually be transferred to the Council subject to Council issuing a Statement of Compliance.

Council cannot reliably measure the value of the assets involved prior to completion.

174


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

36 Financial Instruments

(a) Accounting Policy, terms and conditions

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Recognised financial instruments Note Accounting Policy Terms and Conditions

Financial Assets

Cash and cash equivalents 16 Cash on hand is valued at face value. Cash on Hand is managed according to normal expenditure approval procedures.

Interest is recognised as it accrues. Funds returned fixed interest rate of between 6.19% and 7.38% (5.70% to 6.15%

in 2006-2007)

Bank Bills

Bills are redeemed for purchase price plus interest at maturity. Bills are held for

periods between 30 to 60 days. Interest ranged between 6.40% to 8.04%.

Term Deposits Term deposits return fixed interest rates of between 6.83% and 8.14%.

Term Deposits are held for periods of 30, 60 or 90 days.

Other Financial Assets 18 Units in Trust Withdrawals are at call 24 to 48 hours notice. These investments attract floating

interest rates of between 1.95% and 8.11% net of fees payable.

Trade and other receivables 17 Receivables are carried at nominal amounts due less any General and deferred debtors are unsecured and interest free. Credit terms are

provision for doubtful debts. A provision for doubtful debts usually 30 days.

is recognised when collection in full is no longer probable.

Collectability of overdue accounts is assessed on an ongoing

basis.

Financial Liabilities

Bank overdraft 25 The Council's bank account is closely monitored to ensure that Council has a $5M overdraft facility. It is secured by a mortgage over Council's

cash invested is maximised. The overdraft reflects unpresented general rates and is repayable on demand, interest rate, when the overdraft is

cheques at balance day.

used, is < 11%pa.

Trade and other payables 22 Liabilities are recognised for expenses incurred to balance date Creditors are unsecured, not subject to interest charges and are normally settled

and payable in the next financial year, whether invoices have within 30 days of invoice receipt.

been received or not.

Interest-bearing loans and borrowings Secured loans are carried at the principle amount outstanding. Loans are secured over the general rates of the Council. The interest rate for each

- Secured Loans 25 Loans are subject to borrowing limits imposed by the State loan is fixed for the period of the loan. Council took out a loan of $7M in May

Government under the Loan Council approval arrangements. 2006, repayable over 10 years at 6.4%. Council took out a loan of $5M in June

Interest is charged as an expense as it accrues.

2007, repayable over 10 years at 6.97%. Council took out a loan of $3.125 M

in June 2008, repayable over 10 years at 8.573%.

- Unsecured Loans 25 Unsecured loans are carried at the principle amount Unsecured loans comprise of two interest free loans from the Department of

outstanding.

Planning and Development to fund the purchase of the former Geelong Post Office

and former Geelong Gaol.

175


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

36 Financial Instruments (cont’d)

(b) Interest Rate Risk

The exposure to interest rate risk and the effective interest rates of financial assets and financial liabilities, both recognised and unrecognised, at balance date are as follows:

Fixed interest maturing in:

Floating Over 1 to 5 More than Non-interest

Interest rate 1 year or less years 5 years bearing Total

$000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000

2008

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents (470) 117 - - 52 (301)

Other financial assets 31,412 - - - - 31,412

Trade and other receivables - - - - 11,683 11,683

Total financial assets 30,942 117 - - 11,735 42,794

Weighted average interest rate 6.88% 7.11%

Financial liabilities

Bank overdraft 845 - - - - 845

Trade and other payables - - - - 15,063 15,063

Secured loans - 1,181 5,626 6,893 - 13,700

Unsecured loans - - - - 1,030 1,030

Total financial liabilities 845 1,181 5,626 6,893 16,093 30,638

Weighted average interest rate 10.40% 6.96% 6.98% 7.19%

Net financial assets (liabilities) 30,097 (1,064) (5,626) (6,893) (4,358) 12,156

2007

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 1,712 109 - - 36 1,857

Other financial assets 30,864 - - - - 30,864

Trade and other receivables - - - - 7,748 7,748

Total financial assets 32,576 109 - - 7,784 40,469

Weighted average interest rate 6.40% 6.16%

Financial liabilities

Bank overdraft 791 - - - - 791

Trade and other payables - - - - 15,123 15,123

Secured loans - 4,967 4,306 6,269 - 15,542

Unsecured loans - - - - 1,030 1,030

Total financial liabilities 791 4,967 4,306 6,269 16,153 32,486

Weighted average interest rate 9.75% 6.32% 6.62% 6.66%

Net financial assets (liabilities) 31,785 (4,858) (4,306) (6,269) (8,369) 7,983

176


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

36 Financial Instruments (cont’d)

(c) Net Fair Values

The aggregate net fair values of financial assets and financial liabilities, both recognised and unrecognised, at balance date are as follows:

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Total carrying amount as per

Aggregate net fair

Balance Sheet

value

2008 2007 2008 2007

Financial Instuments $000 $000 $000 $000

Financial assets

Cash at Bank (470) 1,712 (470) 1,712

Cash on Hand 52 36 52 36

Bank Bills 117 109 117 109

Other Financial Assets 31,412 30,864 31,412 30,864

Other Debtors 11,683 7,748 11,683 7,748

Total financial assets 42,794 40,469 42,794 40,469

Financial liabilities

Bank Overdraft 845 791 845 791

Trade and Other Creditors 15,063 15,123 15,063 15,123

Secured Loans 13,700 15,542 13,318 15,174

Unsecured Loans 1,030 1,030 1,030 1,030

Total financial liabilities 30,638 32,486 30,256 32,118

The carrying value for cash at bank and on hand, other debtors, units in trust, deposits at call, bank bills, cash and overdraft, creditors and unsecured loans approximates the fair value

because of their short term to

maturity. Long term Other Debtors also approximates net fair value. The net fair value of secured loans at fixed interest rates has been measured by discounting contracted future cash

flows by prevailing market interest rates.

(d) Credit Risk

The maximum exposure to credit risk at balance date in relation to each class of asset is represented by the carrying amount of these assts as indicated in the Balance Sheet.

(e) Risks and Mitigation

The risks associated with our main financial instruments and our policies for minimising these risks are detailed below.

Market Risk

Market risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of our financial instruments will fluctuate because of changes in market prices. The Council's exposures to market risk are primarily

through interest rate risk with only insignificant exposure to other price risks and no exposure to foreign currency risk. Components of market risk to which we are exposed are discussed

below.

177


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

36 Financial Instruments (cont’d)

(e) Risks and Mitigation (cont’d)

Interest Rate Risk

Interest rate risk refers to the risk that the fair value of a financial instrument or cash flows associated with the instrument will fluctuate due to changes in market interest rates. Interest

rate risk arises from interest bearing financial assets and liabilities that we use. Non derivative interest bearing assets are predominantly short term liquid assets. Our interest rate liability

risk arises primarily from long term loans and borrowings at fixed rates which exposes us to fair value interest rate risk.

Our loan borrowings are sourced from major Australian banks by a tender or quoting process. Overdrafts are arranged with major Australian banks. We manage interest rate risk on

our net debt portfolio by:

> ensuring access to diverse sources of funding;

> reducing risks of refinancing by managing in accordance with target maturity profiles; and

> setting prudential limits on interest repayments as a percentage of rate revenue.

We manage the interest rate exposure on our net debt portfolio by appropriate budgeting strategies and obtaining approval for borrowings from the Australian Loan Council each year.

Investment of surplus funds is made with appropriate financial institutions under the Local Government Act 1989. We manage interest rate risk by adopting an investment policy

that ensures:

> conformity with State and Federal regulations and standards,

> adequate safety,

> appropriate liquidity,

> diversification by credit rating, financial institution and investment product,

> monitoring of return on investment,

> benchmarking of returns and comparison with budget.

Maturity will be staggered to provide for interest rate variations and to minimise risk.

Credit Risk

Credit risk is the risk that a contracting entity will not complete its obligations under a financial instrument and cause us to make a financial loss. We have exposure to credit risk on

all financial assets included in our balance sheet. To help manage this risk:

> we have a policy for establishing our credit limits for the entities that we deal with;

> we may require collateral where appropriate; and

> we only invest surplus funds with financial institutions which have a recognised credit rating specified in our investment policy.

Trade and other receivables consist of a large number of customers, spread across the consumer, business and government sectors. We do not have any significant credit risk exposure

to a single customer or groups of customers. Ongoing credit evaluation is performed on the financial condition of our customers and, where appropriate, an allowance for doubtful debts is

raised.

We may also be subject to credit risk for transactions which are not included in the balance sheet, such as when we provide a guarantee for another party. Details of our contingent

liabilities are disclosed in note 35.

178


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

36 Financial Instruments (cont’d)

(e) Risks and Mitigation (cont’d)

Liquidity Risk

Liquidity risk includes the risk that, as a result of our operational liquidity requirements:

> we will not have sufficient funds to settle a transaction on the date:

> we will be forced to sell financial assets at a value which is less than what they are worth; or

> we may be unable to settle or recover financial assets at all.

To help reduce these risks we:

> have a liquidity policy which targets a minimum and average level of cash and cash equivalents to be maintained;

> have readily accessible standby facilities and other funding arrangements in place;

> have a liquidity portfolio structure that requires surplus funds to be invested within the various bands of liquid instruments;

> monitor budget to actual performance on a regular basis; and

> set limits on borrowings relating to the percentage of loans to rate revenue and percentage of loan principal repayments to rate revenue.

The Council's exposure to liquidity risk is deemed insignificant based on prior periods' data and current assessment of risk.

(f) Sensitivity disclosure analysis

Taking into account past performance, future expectations, economic forecasts, and management's knowledge and experience of the financial markets, the Council believes the following

movements are 'reasonably possible' over the next 12 months (Base rates are sourced from the Federal Bank of Australia):

> A parallel shift of +1% and -1% in market interest rates (AUD) from year-end rates of 9%.

The table below discloses the impact on net operating result and equity for each category of financial instruments held by the Council at year-end, if the above movements were to occur.

30 June 2008 Interest Rate Risk

-1%

+1%

Carrying Amount Result Equity Result Equity

$000 $000 $000 $000 $000

Financial assets

Cash and Cash Equivalents (301) 3 3 (3) (3)

Other Financial Assets 31,412 (314) (314) 314 314

Trade and Other Receivables 14,490 (145) (145) 145 145

179

Financial Liabilities

Interest Bearing Loans and Liabilities 14,730 (147) (147) 147 147

Payables 13,711 (137) (137) 137 137


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

37 Events Occurring after Balance Date

No matter or circumstances has arisen since the end of the financial period to 30 June 2008 that has significantly affected or may significantly affect the operations of the Council.

38 Related party transactions

(i) Responsible Persons

Names of persons holding the position of a Responsible Person at the Council at any time during 2007-2008 are:

Councillors

Elected 17 March 2001: Elected 22 February 2002: Elected 25 November 2003: Elected 3 May 2008

Cr Barbara Abley Cr Bruce Harwood (Mayor) Cr Peter McMullin Cr Andrew Katos

Cr Tony Ansett

Cr Lou Brazier

Cr Shane Dowling

Cr Jan Farrell

(resigned 29th January 2008)

Cr Rod Macdonald

Cr Srechko Kontelj

Cr John Mitchell

Cr David Saunderson

Cr Tom O'Connor

Chief Executive Officer

Kay Rundle

(ii) Remuneration of Responsible Persons

The number of Responsible Officers, whose total remuneration from Council and any related entities fall within the following bands:

2008 2007

No.

No.

$1 - $10,000 2 -

$10,001 - $20,000 5 7

$20,001 - $30,000 5 3

$30,001 - $40,000 - 1

$40,001 - $50,000 - 1

$50,001 - $60,000 1 -

$270,001 - $280,000 - 1

$330,001 - $340,000 1 -

14 13

$000 $000

Total Remuneration for the reporting year

for Responsible Persons included above

amounted to: 617 548

180


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

38 Related party transactions (cont’d)

(iii) Senior Officers Remuneration

A Senior Officer other than a Responsible Person, is an officer of Council who has management responsibilities and reports directly to the Chief Executive Officer or whose total annual remuneration

exceeds $100,000.

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

The Senior Officers of the City of Greater Geelong who reported directly to the Chief Executive Officer during the year were:

Anthony Smith - General Manager Corporate Services - resigned 30 May 2008

Irene McGinnigle - General Manager Community Services

Peter Reeve - General Manager City Services

Stephen Wright - General Manager Major Projects

Dean Frost - General Manager Community Infrastructure and Recreation - commenced 25 October 2007

Kate Sullivan - General Manager Development Sustainability

The number of Senior Officers of Council whose total remuneration exceeds $100,000 including any superannuation benefits from the Council and any related entity falls within

the following bands:

2008 2007

No.

No.

$100,001 - $110,000 7 7

$110,001 - $120,000 9 4

$120,001 - $130,000 12 8

$130,001 - $140,000 4 6

$140,001 - $150,000 2 -

$170,001 - $180,000 - 2

$180,001 - $190,000 6 3

$230,001 - $240,000 - 1

$300,001 - $310,000 - 1

40 32

(iv) No retirement Benefits were paid to Senior Officers in 2007-2008 ($246,258 during 2006-2007).

(v) No loans have been made, guaranteed or secured by the Council to a Responsible Person / Senior Officer of the Council during the reporting period.

(vi) Other Transactions

$000 $000

Total Remuneration for the reporting year

for Responsible Persons included above

amounted to: 5,224 4,446

181

The Council has entered into transactions with Responsible Persons, Senior Officers and Related parties within normal customer or employee relationships on terms and conditions no

more favourable than those available in similar arm's length transactions. There were no significant transactions with Responsible Persons or Senior Officers.


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

39 Revenue, expenses and assets by functions/activities

2008 2007

$000 $000

Revenue

Rates 115,832 106,874

Grants Commission 16,690 15,591

Corporate Services 6,732 6,961

City Services 28,666 37,391

Community Services 22,932 -

Community Infrastructure and Recreation 15,766 38,052

Major Projects 2,525 2,369

Development Sustainability 17,682 16,221

Total Revenue 226,825 223,459

Expenditure

Corporate Services 29,196 25,042

City Services 86,889 80,777

Community Services 40,075 -

Community Infrastructure and Recreation 19,872 55,684

Major Projects 6,814 5,489

Development Sustainability 16,580 15,982

Total Expenditure 199,426 182,974

Net Result 27,399 40,485

Assets Attributed to Functional Activities

Corporate Services - Current Assets 45,771 40,465

- Other Assets 83,325 71,166

City Services - Other Assets 930,439 899,190

Community Infrastructure and Recreation - Other Assets 74,089 165,169

Community Services - Other Assets 112,306 -

Major Projects - Other Assets 74,772 70,331

Development Sustainability - Other Assets 46,916 43,684

Total Assets Attributed to Functional Activities 1,367,618 1,290,005

Total assets shown above reconciles with the amounts shown for assets in the Balance Sheet as follows:

Current Assets 45,772 40,460

Non-Current Assets 1,321,846 1,249,545

1,367,618 1,290,005

182


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

39 Revenue, expenses and assets by functions/activities (cont’d)

Functions

The components of functions and activities relating to Council programs are as follows:

> Rates: General rates, interest on rates, supplementary rates, garbage charges and municipal charges.

> Grants Commission: General purpose grant untied for any specific purpose.

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

> Corporate Services: General administrative operations and Governance including the Chief Executive Division.

> City Services: Design, Construction, Parks, Works, Botanical Gardens, Plant and Engineering, Environment and Natural Resources.

> Development Sustainability: Economic Development, Public Safety, Law and Order, Planning and Building Control.

> Community Services: Aged Services, Library Services, Family Services and Community Development.

> Community Infrastructure and Recreation: Recreation Sport and Leisure Services.

> Major Projects: Tourism, Urban Design, Western Wedge, Waterfront Management and Central Activities area.

Note that further description of functions is contained within the review of annual activities for each division in the Annual Report.

183


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

40 Financial ratios - Performance indicators

(a) Debt servicing ratio (to identify the capacity of Council to service its outstanding debt)

2008 2007 2006

$000 (%) $000 (%) $000 (%)

Debt servicing costs 897 = 0.40% 832 = 0.37% 714 = 0.37%

Total revenue 226,825 223,459 194,278

Debt servicing costs refer to the payment of interest on loan borrowings and bank overdraft.

The ratio expresses the amount of interest paid as a percentage of Council's total revenue.

(b) Debt commitment ratio (to identify Council's debt redemption strategy)

Debt servicing & redemption costs 5,864 = 5.08% 5,165 = 4.83% 4,215 = 4.76%

Rate revenue 115,382 106,874 88,506

The strategy involves the payment of loan principal and interest.

The ratio expresses the percentage of rate revenue utilised to pay interest and redeem debt principal.

(c) Revenue ratio (to identify Council's dependence on non-rate income)

Rate revenue 115,382 = 50.87% 106,874 = 47.83% 88,506 = 44.85%

Total revenue 226,825 223,459 197,352

The level of Council's reliance on rate revenue is determined by assessing rate revenue as a proportion of the total revenue of Council.

184


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

40 Financial ratios - Performance indicators (cont’d)

(d) Debt Exposure Ratio (to identify Council's exposure to debt)

2008 2007 2006

$000 (%) $000 (%) $000 (%)

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Total indebtedness 42,884 = 6.82% 43,650 = 7.79% 37,129 = 7.44%

Total realisable assets 629,084 560,504 499,011

For the purposes of the calculation of financial ratios, realisable assets are those assets which can be sold and which are not subject to any restriction on realisation or use.

Infrastructure assets, restricted assets and investments in associates are excluded from total assets when calculating Council's realisable assets.

This ratio enables assessment of Council's solvency and exposure to debt. Total liabilities are compared to total realisable assets which are all Council's assets and are not subject to any restriction and are able to be

realised. The ratio expresses indebtedness as a percentage of realisable assets.

(e) Working Capital Ratio (to assess Council's ability to meet current commitments)

Current assets 45,772 = 136.36% 40,460 = 112.74% 21,146 = 68.18%

Current liabilities 33,568 35,888 31,015

The ratio expresses the level of current assets the Council has available to meet its current liabilities. Previous years ratios have been amended to reflect Long Service Leave relating to service over 10 years as current

rather than the expected annual payments as current.

(f) Adjusted Working Capital Ratio (to assess Council's ability to meet current commitments)

Current assets 45,772 = 174.35% 40,460 = 138.47% 21,146 = 84.19%

Current liabilities 26,253 29,218 25,116

The ratio expresses the level of current assets the Council has available to meet its current liabilities.

Current liabilities have been reduced to reflect the long service leave that is shown as a current liability because Council does not have an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for at least twelve months

after the reporting date, but is not likely to fall due within 12 months after the end of the period.

185


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

41 Capital expenditure

2008 2007

Note $000 $000

Capital expenditure areas

Infrastructure Leisure 16,333 13,545

Roads 11,141 9,071

Fleet 4,697 4,308

Buildings 5,013 4,184

Drains 2,603 5,163

Computer Equipment 1,393 1,294

Streetscapes 1,199 2,743

Footpaths 1,547 1,490

Other 2,351 62

Kerb and Channel 616 618

Land 1,293 2,821

Waste Collection 1,791 1,366

Plant and Equipment 780 767

Special Rates and Charges Program 1,684 1,635

Total capital works 52,441 49,067

Represented by:

Renewal (a) 15,598 16,463

Upgrade (b) 14,192 16,434

New assets 22,651 16,170

Total capital works 52,441 49,067

Property, infrastructure, plant and equipment movement

The movement between the previous year and the current year in property, infrastructure, plant and equipment as shown in the

Balance Sheet links to the net of the following items:

Total capital works 52,441 49,067

Expensed from Work in Progress 21 (986) (806)

Landfill expensed to provision 26 (578) (1,191)

Asset revaluation movement 28 50,011 9,391

Depreciation and Other Write Downs 10 (38,954) (38,209)

Written down value of assets sold 11 (2,581) (3,114)

Recognition of Infrastructure 13,009 30,417

Capitalised Salaries Expensed (64) -

Net movement in property, plant and equipment 21 72,298 45,555

186


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2008

41 Capital expenditure (cont’d)

(a) Renewal

Expenditure on an existing asset which returns the service potential or the life of the asset up to that which it had originally. It is periodically required expenditure, relatively large (material)

in value compared with the value of the components or sub-components of the asset being renewed. As it reinstates existing service potential, it has no impact on revenue, but may

reduce future operating and maintenance expenditure if completed at the optimum time.

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

(b) Upgrade

Expenditure which enhances an existing asset to provide a higher level of service or expenditure that will increase the life of the asset beyond that which it had originally. Upgrade expenditure

is discretionary and often does not result in additional revenue unless direct user charges apply. It will increase operating and maintenance expenditure in the future because of the

increase in the Council’s asset base.

42 Pending Accounting Standards

The following Australian Accounting Standards have been issued or amended and are applicable to the Council but are not yet effective. They have not been adopted in preparation

of the financial statements at reporting date.

Application Application

date of

date for

AASB amendment Standard affected Outline of amendment standard Council

AASB 1004 Contributions AAS 27 Financial Reporting by Local Governments As this Standard broadly reproduces the requirements relating to contributions 01-Jul-2008 01-Jul-2008

contained in AAS 27, there will be no direct impact on the financial report.

AASB 1051 Land Under Roads AAS 27 Financial Reporting by Local Governments In respect to land under roads acquired before 30 June 2008; allows a Council to elect 01-Jul-2008 01-Jul-2008

to recognise or not to recognise an asset; requires any adjustment upon recognition

to be made against accumulated surplus; requires a Council to disclose its accounting

policy; allows a Council to elect to adopt the fair value or a previous revaluation;

requires any above elections to be made effective as at 1 July 2008. Requires that

land under roads acquired after 30 June 2008 is accounted for in accordance with AASB 116.

AASB 1052 Disaggregated AAS 27 Financial Reporting by Local Governments As this Standard broadly reproduces the requirements relating to disaggregated 01-Jul-2008 01-Jul-2008

Disclosures

disclosures contained in AAS 27, there will be no direct impact on the financial report.

AASB 2007-9 Amendments to AAS 27 Financial Reporting by Local Governments As this Standard broadly reproduces the requirements relating to certain relevant 01-Jul-2008 01-Jul-2008

Australian Accounting Standards Amendments to AASB 3, AASB 5, AASB 8 requirements contained in AAS 27, there will be no direct impact

arising from the review AASB 101, AASB 114, AASB 116, on the financial report

of AAS's 27, 29 and 31 AASB 127, AASB 137

2008 2007

$000 $000

43 Auditors Remuneration

Fee to Conduct External Audit - Auditor General 68 66

68 66

187


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

COUNCIL APPROVAL OF THE FINANCIAL REPORT

188


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

INDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORT OF THE FINANCIAL REPORT AND STANDARD STATEMENTS

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

189


Tiarnee Cornwill

South Geelong

Primary School

‘Geelong is the best place to

live because we have

beautiful Botanic Gardens.

I go there with my family and

I love the flowers. It is

relaxing there.’

190


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

Are you interested in what happened around

the Geelong region in the last financial year?

The following are just some of the events and

activities that took place.

July 2007

5 – 8 Splash!dance Festival,

Geelong Performing Arts Centre

17 Missy Higgins in Concert, The Arena

22 Hyundai A League Pre Season Cup,

Melbourne Victory versus Newcastle Jets,

Skilled Stadium

25 Geelong Advertiser Business Excellence

Awards, Kardinia Heights Centre

29 Workplace Big Day Out,

Leisuretime Centre

22 July – 2 August

Alcoa Celebrate All Abilities Festival,

Geelong

August 2007

12 Vietnam Veteran’s Remembrance Day,

Osborne Park

17 Victoria Police Pipe and Show Bands,

The Geelong Arena

19 Bellarine Rail Trail Fun Run,

Geelong to Queenscliff

27 Smart Geelong Research and Learning Expo,

Geelong

September 2007

13 - 14 Roadsafe Young Drivers Conference,

Geelong

21 - 23 Shoot Out Geelong 24 Hour Filmmaking

Festival, Central Geelong and Waterfront

Geelong

24 - 26 Victorian Teachers Games,

Various locations in Geelong

28 - 30 U15 Australian Badminton Tournament,

Leisuretime Centre

29 Grand Final Day Live Site,

Skilled Stadium

October 2007

1 - 31 Geelong Senior’s Festival, Geelong

3 2007 AFL Premier’s Street Parade, Geelong

13 Alcoa Australian Corporate Head of the River,

Barwon River

17 Ride to Work Day, Johnstone Park Geelong

18 – 21 The Royal Geelong Show,

Geelong Showgrounds

20 - 28 Children’s Week Geelong, Various locations

24 PETstock Geelong Cup, Geelong Racecourse

28 World’s Greatest Pram Stroll,

Waterfront Geelong and Portarlington

November 2007

3 St Leonards Community and Arts Festival,

St Leonards

10 – 11 Waterwise Gardening Expo, Eastern Park

18 SKAART Festival Three, Windsor Park Norlane

24 Bostock Russian Cup Volleyball Tournament

(National Event), Leisuretime Centre

December 2007

1 Air Radiators Denis Walter Carols by the Bay,

Eastern Beach Reserve, Geelong

2 – 7 National Schools Basketball Tournament,

The Geelong Arena

2 Ron Clarke Classic, John Landy Field, Geelong

7 Gala Day Parade and Family Fun Day,

Central Geelong and Johnstone Park

24 Carols by Candlelight, Johnstone Park

January 2008

1 ANZ Family Fun Day on the Waterfront,

Geelong Waterfront

3 – 5 Jayco Bay Cycling Classic,

Eastern Beach and Portarlington

6 Amy’s Ride, Eastern Park

12 Portarlington Mussel Festival, Portarlington

25 – 28 Skandia Geelong Week, Waterfront Geelong

26 Australia Day Celebrations, Rippleside Park

February 2008

2 – 3 WH Pincott Barwon Regatta,

Barwon River, Geelong

3 Gatorade Triathlon Series, Portarlington

3 – 4 Toast to the Coast, Bellarine Peninsula

191


7 Cat Empire in Concert, The Geelong Arena

8 - 10 Having a Say Conference, Geelong

10 Snap Ironman 70.3 Geelong,

Eastern Beach Reserve

16 Watpac Inter Dominion Qualifying Heats,

Beckley Park

17 Sanitarium Weet-Bix Kids TRY-athlon,

Eastern Beach Reserve

20 Inaugural Community Arts and Community

Festivals Grants Award Night,

City Hall Geelong

21 – 22 The Geelong Tour (Cycling), Portarlington

23 Pako Festa, Geelong West

23 – 24 Relay for Life, Beckley Park Corio

March 2008

1 – 2 Sykes Racing Head of the Schoolgirls Regatta,

Barwon River

2 Clean up Australia Day, Various locations

3 UCI Womens World Cup, Waterfront Geelong

8 – 10 Whyte, Just and Moore Wooden Boat Festival,

Royal Geelong Yacht Club

9 Arts in the Park, Johnstone Park Geelong

9 18th Annual Bellarine Agricultural Show,

Portarlington

14 - 16 Lara Heritage Festival,

Lara Sporting Club ovals

15 Dogs’ Day Out, Belmont

16 Geelong Highland Gathering, Queens Park

11 - 16 Barwon Heads Festival of the Sea,

Barwon River Foreshore

20 Whittington Flame Fest, Whittington Link

21 - 24 39th Jaguar National Rally, Geelong

25 – 30 Bounce Geelong,

Central Geelong and Waterfront Geelong

31 March – 6 April

National Youth Week, Various locations

April 2008

4 Geelong Summit, City Hall Geelong

5 Stampede (Country Music Festival),

Eastern Park Geelong

6 ‘Get on Board’ Beach Day,

Ocean Grove Main Beach

10 Impetus Geelong Youth Awards,

City Hall Geelong

17 – 19 Alcoa Poppykettle Festival, Johnstone Park

and Geelong Performing Arts Centre

25 ANZAC Day March and Dawn Services

Various locations in Geelong

25 – 27 Australian F1 Superboat Grand Prix,

Corio Bay, Geelong

27 Bellarine Rail Trail Fun Day, Drysdale

27 Bellarine Skate Series Grand Final,

Point Lonsdale

May 2008

3 – 4 Enterprize Pirate Weekend, Steampacket Jetty

17 Geelong Dancesport Classic,

South Barwon Civic Centre Belmont

18 RSPCA Million Paws Walk, Eastern Park

25 Wool Expo, Waterfront Geelong

28 2008-2012 City Plan and Annual Budget

Breakfast Launch, City Hall Geelong

June 2008

2 - 6 World Environment Day (a week of activities),

Various locations

6 – 9 National Celtic Festival,

Township of Portarlington

8 - 9 Victorian Racquetball Championships,

Leisuretime Centre

14 Spud Fest, Potato Shed, Drysdale

192


INDEX

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

193

A

Page

Arts, Culture and Heritage Pillar 104

Annual Financial Report 138

Armstrong Creek 83

Asset Management 69

Audit Advisory Committee 66

Auditor General’s Reports; Financial Report and Standard Statements 189

Auditor General’s Reports; Performance Statement 121

Awards – Outstanding achievements 25

B

Bellarine Aquatic Centre

ii,31,95

Belcher Fountain 104

Best Place to Live School Artwork Program i, 110

Best Value 38,113

C

Calendar of Events 191

Central Geelong Parking Precinct Plan 90

Chief Executive Officer 49

Chief Executive Officer’s Message 12

Citizenship 69

City of Greater Geelong at a Glance 9

City Services (Division) 51

Civic Accommodation 31

Community Services (Division) 54

Community Consultations 2007-2008 41-45

Community Engagement 40

Community Infrastructure and Recreation (Division) 55

Community Safety and Security Pillar 87

Conference Centre 30

Contact Council 196

Continuous Improvement 37

Corporate Services (Division) 50

Council appointments to Committees and Groups 14-18,70

Council Elections 13

Council Funding Priorities 30

Council Meetings 19

Councillors 13

Cultural Precinct 31,104

Customer Service Commitments and Achievements 26

D

Democracy Theme 110

Development Sustainability (Division) 52

Documents Available for Public Inspection 67

Domestic Animal (Dogs and Cats) Management Plan 41,87

DW Hope Centre 31

E

Early Learning Centre @ Rosewall 12,100

Eastern Park and Geelong Botanic Gardens Strategic Plan 95

East West Traffic 30,90

Economic Development Pillar 79

Education and Research Pillar 100

Employee Excellence Awards 60

Environment Pillar 83

Equal Employment Opportunity 56

F

Freedom of Information Act 67

G

G21 Geelong Region Alliance 110

Geelong EcoChallenge

ii,83

Geelong Sports Legends Plaza 95

Glossary 195

Greater Geelong Cycling Strategy 90

Greenhouse Reduction Strategy 83

Governance Framework 65

H

Haymarket Site Development 31

Health and Wellbeing Pillar 74

Healthy Beginnings Strategy 74

Heales Road Industrial Estate Framework Plan 79

History of Geelong 4

Human Resource Management 56


I

Internal Audit 66

L

Learning and Development 56

Leisurelink Aquatic Centre 30,96

Local Laws 68

M

Major Projects (Division) 53

Mayor 14

Mayor’s Message 11

Mineral Springs Spa 31

N

National Competition Policy Compliance 68

Newcomb Library 100

O

Occupational Health and Safety 57

Organisation Structure 47

Osborne Precinct 31

P

Parks, Sport and Leisure Pillar 95

Performance Statement 2007-2008 117

Planning and Reporting Framework 20

R

Risk Management Program 68

S

Satyam Computer Services

ii,79

Service Milestones 61

Staff Profile 58

Standard Statements 128-137

Statutory Information 67

Summary of Financial Results 32-35

T

Telecommunications Pillar 108

Transportation Pillar 90

V

Victorian Local Government Indicators 36,123

Vision and Mission

ii

Values and Behaviours 48

Volunteers 62

W

Walking School Bus Program 62,90

Ward Map 14

Western Wedge Infrastructure 30,79

Whistleblower Legislation 67

Whittington Community Renewal 74

Y

Yarra Street Pier 31

Youth Strategy 2007-2011 74

194


GLOSSARY

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

2007-2008 Annual Business Plan

The business plan the City will pursue over a 12 month period to achieve the objectives

and strategies in the City Plan.

Asset

Property owned by the City.

Best Value

The review of all services provided by Council to ensure they meet the quality and cost

standards and the needs of the community. LGA s208A – s208G.

Capital Projects

Projects that result in the creation or improvement of an asset.

City Plan

The Council Plan that sets out the objectives and strategies the City will strive to achieve

over a four-year period.

CoGG

City of Greater Geelong

Councillors

Elected representatives of Council who serve a four year term.

EFT

Effective Full-time Employment – 1 EFT is equivalent to one person working 38 hours

per week.

Financial Year

This document reports on the financial year from 1 July 2007 to 30 June 2008.

G21 – Geelong Region Alliance

A regional alliance of municipalities, business and organisations to plan for the future

development in the Geelong Region.

Governance

Administration of the City’s compliance with the LGA.

Infrastructure

Long term assets / structures that provide services to the community.

Internal Audit

An independent appraisal function which examines and evaluates the City of Greater

Geelong’s financial, management and internal control systems.

LGA

Local Government Act 1989.

Local Laws

Those laws under the jurisdiction of the Council and enforced by City Staff and/or Victoria

Police.

Non-capital projects

A discretionary project that does not result in the creation of an asset.

Objective

Key to be achieved. City Plan objectives are over a four year period.

Ordinary Council Meeting

Regular scheduled Council Meetings held twice a month.

Outcome

A result of actions focused on objectives

Performance Indicators

Measures used to monitor the performance of the city in achieving its objectives in the

2007-2011 City Plan.

Pillars

Platform for the alignment of objectives and priorities relating to development of the city

in the City Plan 2007-2011.

Portfolio

A specific area of responsibility allocated to each Councillor.

Service Review

See Best Value.

Special Council Meeting

Those Council Meetings held for special purposes and in addition to the twice monthly

ordinary Council Meetings.

Strategy

A plan to implement the long-term objectives of the organisation. See City Plan.

Targets and Measures

Target – level of performance to be achieved.

Measure – method of determining if the outcome has been achieved.

Themes

Platform for the alignment of objectives and priorities relating to the operational aspects

of the City in the City Plan.

Triple Bottom Line

Method used to ensure that economic, social and environmental factors are taken

equally into consideration when measuring the success of an objective.

Victorian Local Government Indicators

Results from the community Satisfaction survey conducted by the Department for Victorian

Communities and Local Governments

Ward

Defined electoral area to which a representative is elected as Councillor.

195


CONTACT COUNCIL

Many of the City’s services and projects are listed in this

Annual Report but if you need further assistance or information

on a service or facility not listed, simply contact us

via one of the following easy ways:

Web

www.geelongaustralia.com.au

Telephone

Pick up the phone between 8am and 5pm weekdays to

call us on (+ 61 3) 5272 5272.

Post

Write to us at:

City of Greater Geelong

PO Box 104

Geelong 3220 Australia

Fax

Send us a fax on (+ 61 3) 5272 4277.

Email

Get online and drop us an email at

contactus@geelongcity.vic.gov.au

Mayor and Councillors

Email them at

mayor@geelongcity.vic.gov.au and

councillor@geelongcity.vic.gov.au

OR phone them on (+ 61 3) 5272 4893.

In Person

You can always visit us at any one of our six conveniently

located Customer Service Centres:

Geelong

City Hall, 30 Gheringhap Street, 131 Myers St

Geelong West

153A Pakington Street

Belmont

Library, 163 High Street

Corio

Corio Shopping Centre

Drysdale

18- 20 Hancock Street

Ocean Grove

Cnr The Avenue and Presidents Avenue

196


CITY OF GREATER GEELONG ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

197 Corio Bay


This Annual Report is printed

on Monza Recycled

Monza Recycled contains 55%

recycled fibre (25% post consumer

and 30% per consumer) and 45%

elemental chlorine free pulp. All virgin

pulp is derived from well-managed

forests and it is manufactured by an

ISO 14001 certified mill.

Design by Dzign Diezel Group

COG 11198


ANNUAL REPORT 2007-2008

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

PO BOX 104

GEELONG 3220 AUSTRALIA

GENERAL ENQUIRIES

03 5272 5272

www.geelongaustralia.com.au

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