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TOTAL NET PAID CIRCULATION EXCEEDS 23,000<br />

<strong>Modern</strong><br />

Theatre<br />

DRIVE-IN<br />

Presents<br />

OPERATION


LEO'S IN STITCHES<br />

OVER CLARK GABLE's<br />

NEW PICTURE!<br />

is pi<br />

Every Preview was so uproarious that we unhesitatingly<br />

say it is Gable's biggest audience sensation<br />

since "It Happened One Night." (And Loretta was<br />

never betta!)<br />

America is hungry for a riotous comedy,<br />

preferably a romantic one. This has everything!<br />

•bx<br />

»me


REMEMBER<br />

FHIS<br />

PROPHECY!<br />

Ne predict that<br />

ts ROARING<br />

iVorld Premiere<br />

engagement<br />

]t Loew's State<br />

vhich has just<br />

>egun will start<br />

1 box-office<br />

:areer to top<br />

ihe biggest<br />

:omedies of<br />

ilm history 1<br />

'h.<br />

KEY TO THE CITY<br />

w,TH<br />

MARILYN MAXWELL- FRANK MORGAN<br />

JAMES GLEASON • LEWIS STONE • RAYMOND WALBURN<br />

Screen Play by ROBERT RILEY CRUTCHER • Based on a Story by ALBERT BEICH<br />

Directed by GEORGE SIDNEY • Produced by Z.WAYNE GRIFFIN<br />

A METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURE<br />

Help AX THE TAX!<br />

THAILEH! PROTEST CARDS<br />

IN LOBBYl<br />

LETS FIGHTI


^%CmMEHl<br />

V^^nq ma<br />

,'**<br />

-^j<br />

?rf^^<br />

n-**^


FEBRUARY 13<br />

ALBANY<br />

Worner Screening<br />

Room<br />

79 N. Peorl SI. • 12:30 P.M.<br />

ATLANTA<br />

20th Century-Fox Screening Room<br />

197 Walton St. N.W. • 2t30 P.M.<br />

BOSTON<br />

RKG Screening Room<br />

122 Arlington SI. • 2:30 P.M.<br />

BUFFALO<br />

Poromount Screening Room<br />

W Franklin St. • 2:00 P.M.<br />

CHARLOTTE<br />

20th Century-Fox Screening Room<br />

asr*<<br />

-SS^.?5<br />

rHom<br />

URM/Cfl4fl<br />

DIRECTED BY<br />

IWICH/IEL<br />

mm<br />

PRODUCED BY<br />

JERRY<br />

W/\LD<br />

SCREEN PLAY BY CARL FOREMAN AND EDMUND H. NORTH<br />

FROM THE NOVEL BY DOROTHY BAKER • MUSICAL DIRECTION BY RAY HEINDORF<br />

'(--f -t<br />

^ A., J<br />

308 S. Church St. • 2:00 P.M.<br />

CHICAGO<br />

Worner Screening<br />

Room<br />

1307 So. Wobosh Ave. • 1:30 P.MJ<br />

CINCINNATI<br />

RKG Polace Th. Screening Room<br />

Poloce Th. BIdg. E. 6th<br />

CLEVELAND<br />

Warner Screening<br />

2300 Payne Ave.<br />

DALLAS<br />

Room<br />

• 8:00 P.M.<br />

• 8:30 P.M.<br />

20th Century-Fox Screening Room<br />

1803 Wood St. • 2:00 P.M.<br />

DENVER<br />

Poromount Screening Room<br />

2100 Stout St. • 2:00 P.M.<br />

DES MOINES<br />

PoramounI Screening Room<br />

1125 High St. • 12:45 P.M.<br />

DETROIT<br />

Film<br />

Exchange Building<br />

2310 Casi Ave.<br />

• 2:00 P.M.<br />

INDIANAPOLIS<br />

Universal Screening Room<br />

517 No. Illinois St. • TOO P.M.<br />

JACKSONVILLE<br />

Florida Theatre BIdg. Sc. Rm.<br />

128 E. Forsyth St. • 2:30 P.M.<br />

KANSAS CITY<br />

20th Century-Fox Screening<br />

Room<br />

1720 Wyandotte St. • 1;30 P.M.<br />

LOS ANGELES<br />

Room<br />

Warner Screening<br />

2025 S. Vermont Ave. • 2:00 P.M.<br />

MEMPHIS<br />

20th Cenlury-Fox Screening Room<br />

151 Vance Ave. • 2:00 P.M.<br />

MILWAUKEE<br />

Warner Theotrc Screening Room<br />

212 W, Wisconsin Ave. • 2:00 P.I<br />

MINNEAPOLIS<br />

Warner Screening Room<br />

1000 Currie Ave. • 2 00 P.M.<br />

NEW HAVEN<br />

Warner Theotre Projection Room<br />

70 College SI. • 200 P.M.<br />

NEW ORLEANS<br />

20th Century-Fox Screening Room<br />

200 S. Liberty St. • 8:00 P.M.<br />

NEW YORK<br />

Home Office<br />

321 W. 44lh St. 2:30 P.M.<br />

OKLAHOMA<br />

20lh Centucy-Fo« Screening Room<br />

10 North lee St. • 1:30 P.M.<br />

OMAHA<br />

20lh Century-Fox Screening Room<br />

1502 Dovenport St. • 1:00 P.M.<br />

PHILADELPHIA<br />

Warner Screening Roon<br />

230 No. 13th SI, • 2:30 PM.<br />

PITTSBURGH<br />

20lh Century-Foi Screening Room<br />

1715 Blvd. of Allies • 1 30 P.M.<br />

PORTLAND<br />

Jewel Box Screening Ro<br />

1947 N.W Kearney St. • 2:00 P.M.<br />

|<br />

SALT LAKE<br />

20th Century-Fox Screening Room<br />

216 EosI Isl Soulh • 2 00 P.M.<br />

SAN FRANCISCO<br />

Republic PicI, Screening Room<br />

221 Golden Cole Ave. 1:30 P.M.<br />

SEATTLE<br />

Jewel Box Screening Room<br />

2318 Second Ave. 1030 A.M.<br />

ST.<br />

LOUIS<br />

Srenco Screening<br />

Room<br />

3143 Olive SI. 1:00 P.M.<br />

WASHINGTON<br />

Worner Theatre Building<br />

I3thS£Sls. H.W.<br />

• 10:30 A.M.<br />

:AT H,-,VE YOU DONE<br />

TODAY TO HELP KILL<br />

THE FEDERAL MOVIE TAX?


THE NATIONAL FILM WEEKLY<br />

POBLISHED IN<br />

NINE SECTIONAL EDITIONS<br />

BEN SHLYEN<br />

Editor-in-Chief and Publisher<br />

lAMES M. lERAULD Editor<br />

NATHAN COHEN Executive Editor<br />

JESSE SHLYEN Managing Editor<br />

IVAN SPEAR..._ Western Editor<br />

KENNETH HUDNALL..Equipment Editor<br />

RAYMOND LEVY General Manager<br />

Published Every Saturday by<br />

ASSOCIATED PUBLICATIONS<br />

Ediloria! Ollices: 9 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20,<br />

N. Y. Raymond Levy, General Manager; lames M.<br />

Jerauld, Editor; Chester Friedman, Editor Showmandiser<br />

Section; A. J. Stocker, Eastern Representative.<br />

Telephone Columbus 5-6370. Cable address:<br />

"BOXOFFICE, New York.-<br />

Central Offices: Editorial—624 South Michigan Ave.,<br />

Chicago 5, 111. Jonas Perlberg. Telephone WEBster<br />

9-4745. Advertising— 1478 Pure Oil Bldg., 35 East<br />

Wacker Drive, Chicago 1, 111. Ewing Hutchison and<br />

E. E. Yeck. Telephone ANDover 3-3042.<br />

Western Offices: Editorial and Film Advertising— 6404<br />

Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. Ivan Spear,<br />

manager. Telephone GLadstone 1186. Equipment<br />

and Non-Film Advertising—672 South LaFoyette Park<br />

Place, Los Angeles, Calif. Bob Wettstein, manager.<br />

Telephone DUnkirk S-2286.<br />

Washington Offices: 6417 Dahlonega Road, Alan Herbert,<br />

Manager. Telephone, Wisconsin 3271. Filmrow:<br />

932 New Jersey, N. W. Sara Young.<br />

London Offices: 26A, Redcliffe Mews, Kensington,<br />

S. W. 10. John Sullivan, Manager. Telephone<br />

FREmantle 8906.<br />

Publication Offices: 825 Van Brunt Blvd., Kansas City<br />

1, Mo. Nathan Cohen, Executive Editor; Jesse Shiyen,<br />

Managing Editor; Morris Schlozman, Business Manager.<br />

J. Herbert Roush, Manager Advertising Sales<br />

and Service. Telephone CHestnut 7777-78.<br />

Other Publications; BOXOFFICE BAROMETER, published<br />

in November as a section of BOXOFFICE;<br />

THE MODERN THEATRE, published monthly as a<br />

seclion of BOXOFFICE.<br />

ALBANY—21-23 Walter Ave., M. Berrigan<br />

ATLANTA— 163 Walton, N. W., P. H. Savin<br />

BIRMINGHAM—The News, Eddie Badger<br />

BOSTON—Frances W. Harding, Ub. 2-9305.<br />

CHARLOTTE—216 W. 4th, Pauline Griffith.<br />

CINClNNATI-4029 Reading Rd., Lillian Lazarus<br />

CLEVELAND—Elsie Loeb, Fairmount 0046.<br />

DENVER-1645 Lafayette, Jack Rose, TA 6517.<br />

DES MOINES—Register & Tribune Bldg., Russ Schoch<br />

DETROIT-1009 Fox Theatre Bldg., H. F. Reves<br />

Telephones: WOodward 2-1100; Night, UN-4-0219<br />

HARTFORD- 109 Westborne, Allen Widem<br />

HARRISBURG, PA —Mechanicsburg, Lois Fegan<br />

INDIANAPOLIS—Rt. 8, Box 770, Howard M Rudeaux<br />

MIAMI— 66 S. Hibiscus Island, Mrs. Manton E Harwood,<br />

2952 Merrick Rd., Elizabeth Sudlow<br />

MEMPHIS—707 Spring St., Null Adams, Tel. 48-5462<br />

MILWAUKEE—3057 No. Murray Ave., John E Hubel<br />

WO 2-0457.<br />

MINNEAPOLIS—29 Washington Ave. So Les Rees<br />

NEW HAVEN—42 Church St., Gertrude Lander<br />

NEWARK, N. J.—207 Sumner, Sara Carleton<br />

NEW ORLEANS—Alberta Schindler, 218 So. Uberty<br />

OKLAHOMA CITY—216 Terminal Bldg.,<br />

Polly Trindle<br />

OMAHA—Omaha World-Herald Bldg., Lou Gerdes<br />

PHILADELPHIA—5363 Berks St., Norman Shigon<br />

PlTTSBURGH-86 Van Braam St., R. F. Klingensm.th<br />

PORTLAND, ORE.—Editorial: Edward Cogan Norlonia<br />

Hotel, Ilth and Stark. Advertising: Mel Hickman,<br />

907 Terminal Sales Bldg., ATwater 4107<br />

PROVIDENCE—310 Howard Bldg., G. Fred Aiken,<br />

ST. LOUIS—5149 Rosa, David Barrett, FL-3727<br />

SALT LAKE CITY-Deseret News, Howard Pearson<br />

SAN ANT0N10-2I1 Cadwalder St., L. J. B. Ketner'<br />

SAN FRANCISCO—Editorial: Gail Lipman 25 Tayior<br />

^"'^'2- Advertising:<br />

5',;r'^'''^^'?y<br />

Jerry Nowell, 1003<br />

T.W.A. Bldg., 240 Stockton St., YUkon 6-2522.<br />

SEATTLE-923 N. 84th St., WiUard Elsey<br />

TOLEDO— 4330 Willys Pkwy., Anna Kline, LA 7176.<br />

IN CANADA<br />

CALGARY—The Albertan, Wm. Campbell<br />

MONTREAL— 4330 Wilson Ave., N. D. G Roy Carmichael.<br />

Walnut 5519.<br />

ST. JOHN— 116 Prince Edward St., Wm. J. McNulty<br />

TORONTO-R. R. No. 1, York Mills, Milton Galbraith.<br />

VANCOUVER-411 Lyric Theatre Bldg., Jack Droy<br />

'^'"""^<br />

X;S,\S2t^-5^^<br />

Highway, Alec Merriman<br />

WINNIPEG—The Tribune, Ben Lepkin.<br />

Member Audit Bitreau of CiRctrLAiioNS<br />

NOW OR NEVER<br />

•y\ri' T NO time since the war has the motion picture<br />

industry been engaged in such an allout effort as that for<br />

which it is being mobilized to bring about repeal of the federal<br />

admission tax. Exhibitors, distributors, producers, studio personnel<br />

and all employes connected with the business are being<br />

summoned into action, with the knowledge that failure in<br />

this battle means more than just the loss that would here be<br />

encountered. It goes beyond—to the fight that must be waged<br />

against state and municipal levies on admissions that impend<br />

and against other discriminatory taxation and legislation which<br />

are constant threats.<br />

There is no assurance that, if the industry is unsuccessful<br />

in removing the restraint that has been placed upon it by the<br />

federal tax, state and local governments will refrain from making<br />

similar imposts. Proof of this lies in the fact that several<br />

such attempts have been made and that a number of such levies<br />

already exist, piled on top of the federal tax. Anyone who<br />

feels that he might as well go on paying the federal government,<br />

for otherwise he'll just be trcmsferring payment to state<br />

or local coffers, needs to be forewarned that such an attitude<br />

can result in a double, or triple, impost—federal, state cmd<br />

municipal!<br />

However, if the taxmakers are given a taste of the real<br />

"hell" this industry can stir up in its federal tax fight, the<br />

chances for defeating the local measures—when and IF they<br />

come up—are very much bettered. If the industry proves in<br />

this "test" of its strength—for that is what it amounts to—that<br />

it wields great power and influence with the public, it will put,<br />

not only taxmakers cmd legislators, but many other of its adversaries<br />

back on their heels.<br />

The taxation and legislation committee of the Council of<br />

Motion Picture Organizations has been hard at work. It has<br />

provided material aids as well as ideas for each exhibitor to<br />

bring into local play. And, as Abrcmi F. Myers, chairmcm of<br />

the committee, so well told the gathering of theatre advertising<br />

executives at the 20th Century-Fox merchandising conference,<br />

all of the ingenuity, all of the enterprise, all of the vigor cmd<br />

excitement of showmanship must be rallied to this cause in marshaling<br />

public opinion against the taxing of theatre admissions.<br />

Again, doing the job right and doing it thoroughly<br />

NOW, will redound to the industry's benefit—cmd to the public's—for<br />

a long time to come.<br />

It has been wisely advocated that the public be clearly informed<br />

that the saving of the admission tax will be passed on<br />

to them. Not only vrill this be a factor in enlisting the enthusiastic<br />

support of theatre patrons in this campaign, but it should<br />

also make an impression on congressmen.<br />

Further, the aid of local businessmen ccm be obtained<br />

by pointing out that the admission tax is invasive of their interests;<br />

that it cuts into the spending money of their customers.<br />

In the smaller towns, especially, every merchcmt knows the<br />

trade value of the motion picture theatre. It should not be<br />

Entered as Second Class matter at Post Office, Kansas City, Mo<br />

Sectional Edition, $3.00 per year; National Edition, $7.50<br />

Vol'. 56 No. 14<br />

FEBRUARY 4, 1950


J-kt lUnlu ei lluyylclloH, lylclu.xe


WARTIME TAX REPEAL IS URGED<br />

BY 51 INDUSTRIAL EXECUTIVES<br />

Johnston and Distributor<br />

Heads Join in Signing<br />

Washington Post Ad<br />

NEW YORK—The coordinated national<br />

campaign of many industries for repeal of<br />

the wartime excise taxes reached a new high<br />

during the week with a full-page newspaper<br />

advertisement which, placed in the Washington<br />

Post, could not fail to be read by Congress<br />

and the administration. This industry<br />

was represented prominently among the<br />

signers of the National Committee for the<br />

Repeal of Wartime Excise Taxes sponsoring<br />

the advertisement. They were Eric Johnston,<br />

president of the Motion Picture Ass'n of<br />

America; Leonard H. Goldenson, president,<br />

United Paramount Theatres; Nicholas M.<br />

Schenck, president, Loew's, Inc.; Spyros P.<br />

Skouras, president, 20th Century-Fox, and<br />

Harry M. Warner, president, Warner Bros.<br />

Johnston is a vice-chairman of the committee.<br />

REOPENS A CAMPAIGN<br />

The advertisement reopened a newspaper<br />

advertising campaign begun last fall which<br />

included a full-page ad in the Washington<br />

Post and New York Times published "in the<br />

interest of American business and labor" by<br />

a large number of industrial organizations,<br />

including MPAA and TOA. It followed a<br />

meeting of retail organizations at the Waldorf-Astoria<br />

hotel, in which this industry participated,<br />

called by the American Retail<br />

Federation. Individual industries then followed<br />

with similar ads in their trade publications.<br />

HARRY S. TRIMAN<br />

PRESIDENT<br />

WASHINGTON, D.C<br />

IF YOU WANT<br />

TO GO TO<br />

THE MOVIES<br />

MORE OFTEN, WRITE TODAY!<br />

Why should there be any tax on movies?<br />

l( you and all the fans in America ACT<br />

NOW you'll see ACTION in Washington.<br />

Write the President NOW!<br />

Si Scadler, advertising manager of<br />

MGM, has produced an ad which is to be<br />

used in full-page size in all fan magazines<br />

as part of the campaign against<br />

the admission tax.<br />

TAX COLLECTOR<br />

Every theatre cashier also works for<br />

Uncle Sam, so Kay Bickell, cashier at<br />

Loew's State, New York, points up the<br />

fact by wearing a cap in line with<br />

Loew's suggestion to all exhibitors that<br />

they have their cashiers do likewise, to<br />

emphasize the campaign for admissions<br />

tax repeal.<br />

The latest ad, which probably will be repeated<br />

in more newspapers, was titled "A<br />

Petition to the Congress of the United States<br />

from 51 executives in American industry." It<br />

read:<br />

"The wartime excise taxes were passed as<br />

wartime controls in 1941. 1942, 1943. They<br />

served their purpose well. But the war is<br />

over. It has been over for more than four<br />

years. Everyone agrees today that wartime<br />

excise taxes are unfair in peacetime. They<br />

are discriminatory. They penalize selected<br />

industries, the men and women who work in<br />

them, the pubUc which needs and buys their<br />

products. They have created serious unemployment<br />

in certain industries and communities.<br />

They prevent fair and free competition.<br />

"Everyone agrees with this statement of the<br />

President in his tax message: 'There is need<br />

to reduce taxes which burden consumption<br />

and handicap particular businesses . . . Some<br />

(excise taxes) are depressing certain lines of<br />

business. Some burden consumption and fall<br />

with particular weight on low income groups.<br />

Still others add to the cost of Uving by increasing<br />

business costs.' And—this statement<br />

is just and statesmanlike.<br />

"We beUeve that the same sound reasoning<br />

applies not only to the seven industries for<br />

which the President recommended some relief,<br />

but applies with equal force and equal<br />

justice to all of the wartime excise tax<br />

levies of 1941, 1942, 1943 (not including tobacco,<br />

gasoline and alcoholic beverages which<br />

present problems of their own) on all of the<br />

27 industries affected.<br />

"These excise taxes were justified during<br />

wartime. They are unjust and discriminatory<br />

during peacetime. To repeal some of them<br />

now and allow others to remain is only to<br />

alter the shape of the discrimination.<br />

"We support the President in his concern<br />

for a balanced budget and debt reduction at<br />

high employment, and we are convinced, after<br />

careful study, that wartime excise taxes are<br />

today a dangerous obstacle to the achievement<br />

of these goals. This is a matter of<br />

simple arithmetic.<br />

"1. How much revenue would the federal<br />

government lose if the wartime excise<br />

taxes of 1941. 1942, 1943 (excluding those<br />

on tobacco, gasoline and alcoholic beverages)<br />

were entirely repealed? The net<br />

loss will not exceed $1,500,000,000; it may<br />

well be less.<br />

"2. Can the federal government safely<br />

accept such a reduction of revenue? The<br />

budget now includes $1,920,000,000 to make<br />

loans and purchase certain assets, many<br />

of which are already guaranteed by government<br />

agencies. Guaranteed mortgages<br />

and loans are a major part of this item.<br />

This $1,920,000,000 is not an expense; it<br />

is a recoverable asset. (See page U17 of<br />

the federal budget just published.)<br />

"3. This sum alone is greater than the<br />

maximum net loss of all wartime excise<br />

taxes of 1941, 1942, 1943 (excluding the<br />

three exceptions mentioned above.)<br />

CITE CONSUMER PROTEST<br />

"American consumers have already registered<br />

their protest against these wartime<br />

levies. They have done so by drastically cutting<br />

their spending in most of the 27 industries<br />

affected. They are waiting for their<br />

Congress to act. Every passing week adds to<br />

the cutback in buying, in production, in unemployment.<br />

Every passing week adds to the<br />

crisis.<br />

"This committee has been organized for<br />

the sole purpose of presenting a just petition<br />

for the redress of a serious grievance. We<br />

ask justice for the public which pays these<br />

unfair taxes. Justice for those of our employes<br />

who have been taxed onto the relief<br />

rolls through no fault of their own. Justice<br />

A Petition to<br />

The Congress of<br />

the United States<br />

from SI Executives in American Industry<br />

Page Advertisement in Washington Post.<br />

BOXOFFICE :: February 4, 1950 J.


- Co.;<br />

—<br />

for communities disrupted by unemployment.<br />

And justice for the men and women who have<br />

invested in our companies. In this spirit, we<br />

—active heads and executives of our businesses,<br />

Democrats and RepubUcans alike<br />

solemnly exercise the American right of petition.<br />

We appeal to the conscience and the<br />

reason of Congress.<br />

"Repeal the wartime excise taxes of 1941,<br />

1942, 1943 (less the three exceptions).<br />

"Repeal these taxes completely.<br />

"Repeal these taxes now."<br />

OTHER EXECUTIVES ARE LISTED<br />

Other executives signing the ad were:<br />

Frank McConnell Mayfield, president, Scruggs-<br />

Vandervoort-Bamey Co.; Arde Bulova, chairman oi<br />

the board, Bulova Watch Co.; Louis Rulhenburg.<br />

chairman of the board, Serve!, Inc.; H. Leigh Whitelaw,<br />

managing director. Gas Appliance Mfg. Ass'n;<br />

lames J, Newman, vice-president, B. F. Goodrich<br />

I. Carlton Bagnall sr., executive vice-president,<br />

Swank, Inc.; Lester Baker, treasurer. Dayton Rubber<br />

Co.; Robert F. Bensinger, president, Brunswick-<br />

Balke-CoUender Co.; John M. Biggins, vice-president<br />

and treasurer, Elgin National Watch Co.; H. C.<br />

Blakeslee, vice-president and general manager, Cary<br />

Corp.; Harold Bozell, president, General Telephone<br />

Co.; Henry P. Bristol, president, Bristol-Myers Co.;<br />

Thomas A. Buckley, president, Buxton Co.<br />

Also, I H. Carmichael, president, Capitol Airlines;<br />

John S. Coleman, president. Burroughs Adding Machine<br />

Co.; John CoUyer, president, B. F. Goodrich<br />

Co.; Robert Driscoll, vice-president, Greyhound- Corp.;<br />

Samuel B. Edison, vice-president, Edison Bros. Stores;<br />

Albert J, Feldman, A. Hollander & Son; Marion B.<br />

Folsom, treasurer, Edstman Kodak Co.; John A. Fry,<br />

president, Detroit-Michigan Stove Co.; Julius Green,<br />

president. Julius Green Fur Co. C- R. Harding, president,<br />

Pullman Co.; Lyle C. Ha -vey, president, Affiliated<br />

Gas Equipment Corp.; J. V. Heffernan, vicepresident,<br />

Radio Corp. of Ame<br />

Heyman,<br />

president, Oscar Heyman & Bros.; Stanley H. Hobson,<br />

president, George D. Roper Corp.; R. J. Irish,<br />

executive administrator, A. O. Smith Corp.; Stanley<br />

Klein, president, Mendel-Drucker, Inc.<br />

Also, R. A. Lum.pkin, president, Illinois Consolidated<br />

Telephone Co.; L. R. Mendelson, president,<br />

Kotstream Heater Co.; John H. Moore, president, John<br />

Hudson Moore, Inc.; Dan J. O'Brien, president, Commodore<br />

Perry hotel, Toledo; George F. Parton, president.<br />

Standard Safe Deposit Co.; Brock Pemberton,<br />

president. League of New York Theatres; Wdrren<br />

Lee Pierson, chairman of the board, Transcontinental<br />


—<br />

CENSORSHIP THREATS RISE<br />

AS LEGISLATURES CONVENE<br />

First New Bills Also Seek<br />

To Regulate Drive-Ins,<br />

Enact New Taxes<br />

WASHINGTON—On both state and local<br />

legislative fronts, exhibitors during January<br />

fought censorship threats, taxation,<br />

and drive-in theatre regulations.<br />

Censorship bills were in the limelight in<br />

Massachusetts, New York and Kentucky,<br />

but there was no strong campaign to stimulate<br />

their enactment. One municipality<br />

Irwin, Pa., passed an amusement tax and a<br />

movement was under way in Kentucky to<br />

vote in a tax on drive-in theatres.<br />

NEW YORK GETS DRIVE-IN BILL<br />

Most drastic of the drive-in regulatory proposals<br />

was offered in the New York state<br />

legislature. An assemblyman introduced an<br />

act which would prohibit drive-ins in cities<br />

over 250,000 population on the theory that<br />

outdoor theatres allegedly create traffic hazards<br />

and contribute to juvenile delinquency.<br />

Meanwhile, Herman Levy, general counsel<br />

for Theatre Owners of America, told exhibitors<br />

to take their fight against oppressive<br />

state and local taxes to the courts. He told<br />

TOA members, in a bulletin issued this week,<br />

that the local or state government body must<br />

prove it has the power to impose the tax and<br />

further that the tax is not arbitrary, confiscatory,<br />

unreasonable or discriminatory.<br />

Levy based his finding on the outcome of<br />

a 10 per cent gross admissions tax imposed<br />

by the city of St. Petersburg, Fla., in addition<br />

to the regular theatre license tax. Exhibitors<br />

won their case in the local trial court<br />

on the ground of unconstitutionality, and got<br />

an injunction on collections. The state supreme<br />

court upheld the ruling, finding that<br />

even if taxing powers had existed, which it<br />

denied, nevertheless "the amount imposed is<br />

unreasonable, confiscatory and void."<br />

The court was impressed by the complaint<br />

that, based on the previous year's gross receipts,<br />

the exhibitors would be required to<br />

pay a tax of approximately $94,000, or an increase<br />

of about 12,000 per cent. It was also<br />

said that the sum would be in excess of the<br />

net income of at least five of the theatre<br />

plaintiffs.<br />

CITE GEORGIA CASE<br />

Levy also referred to the recent case of<br />

Publlx-Lucas against the city of Brunswick,<br />

Ga., in which the state supreme court ruled<br />

that a city "occupation tax" In fact was a<br />

second license tax. The court said the industry<br />

has come of age and should not be<br />

subject to excessive regulation, and that no<br />

attempts should be made to tax it on the<br />

basis of itinerant shows over which the municipality<br />

has "broad regulatory power."<br />

In Sparta, 111., voters killed a 122-year-old<br />

ban on Sunday amusements In a special election.<br />

The victory for Sunday performances<br />

was pretty much the result of a campaign by<br />

the younger element and newcomers to the<br />

community. As a result of the ballot, C. H.<br />

Wells, manager of the Grand Theatre, said a<br />

new and larger theatre will be built soon for<br />

the town.<br />

Januarys Legislative Developments<br />

CENSORSHIP<br />

Hearings were held in Boston on two<br />

state censorship bills, to which exhibitor<br />

associations objected. One of the bills<br />

provides for a censorship commission to<br />

be composed of the commissioner of public<br />

safety, the commissioner of police, a<br />

priest, a rabbi and a minister to pass on<br />

all motion pictures as well as comic books<br />

and other publications offered to minors.<br />

The second bill provides for a state board<br />

of five supervisors with a paid chairman<br />

at $5,000 a year. This board would have<br />

the power to ban a motion picture if a<br />

group of five or more citizens makes a<br />

complaint against the morals of a film<br />

and the charge is upheld.<br />

The Kentucky legislature receives a bill<br />

to establish state censorship similar to<br />

legislation unsuccessfully submitted at<br />

the 1948 session.<br />

Georgia's legislature received a bill to<br />

create a state censorship board with authority<br />

to review every feature, short and<br />

stage play offered in the state. The bill<br />

proposes a three-man board to be named<br />

by the governor—a chairman at $7,500 a<br />

year and two directors to be paid so much<br />

for each movie reviewed. The bill also<br />

calls for a reviewing fee for both films<br />

and stage shows as well as a license fee<br />

to show.<br />

DRIVE-IN THEATRES<br />

A bill taxing drive-in theatres on the<br />

NCA Meeting Archbishop<br />

On Threat of Boycott<br />

MINNEAPOLIS—North Central AUied has<br />

appointed S. D. Kane, George Granstrom and<br />

Don Riley, all Catholics, to meet with Archbishop<br />

John Gregory Murray regarding a<br />

directive issued by him which in effect calls<br />

diocese Catholics to boycott theatres showing<br />

other than films classified as A pictures<br />

by the Legion of Decency.<br />

Kane, who is executive director of North<br />

Central Allied, declares that a serious situation<br />

has been created by an unusually large<br />

loss of Catholic patronage. It is impossible<br />

to keep theatres open without showing some<br />

films which have been classified as B pictures<br />

by the Legion of Decency. In other<br />

dioceses, Kane asserts, the ban applies to<br />

films rather than theatres. The archbishop<br />

will be asked by theatres discriminated<br />

against why stores selling objectionable literature<br />

are not boycotted.<br />

At a special meeting called by North Central<br />

Allied. Twin city independent exhibitors<br />

discussed plans to help boxoffice grosses by<br />

a campaign to improve public relations. Theatre<br />

owners will meet shortly to determine<br />

what action, if any, should be taken regarding<br />

Will Jones, Tribune columnist and film<br />

commentator, whose caustic comments on<br />

films, including "Battleground," have been<br />

hurting grosses in this area.<br />

basis of 20 cents per car annually was introduced<br />

in the Kentucky legislature.<br />

Theatres now pay on the basis of 20 cents<br />

a seat. At present drive-ins pay only a<br />

state 3 per cent amusement tax.<br />

Judge Harry M. Fisher of circuit court<br />

in Chicago held invalid an ordinance<br />

which banned outdoor theatres within the<br />

city limits. The court held that while the<br />

city had the power to zone business out<br />

of certain areas, it could not enact a<br />

blanket ordinance to ban a type of business<br />

from the city.<br />

In New York, the state legislature this<br />

week received a bill which would prohibit<br />

the construction of drive-ln theatres within<br />

the city limits of cities with a population<br />

of 250,000 or more.<br />

TAXATION<br />

In Irwin, Pa., the city council approved<br />

a 10 per cent tax on admissions to finance<br />

mandatory salary increases for school<br />

employes.<br />

16MM FILMS<br />

The city council held that laws covering<br />

fire hazards and sanitary regulations<br />

are adequate to prevent showing of 16mm<br />

motion pictures in dangerous buildings.<br />

The decision was reached as a result of an<br />

effort by union projectionists backed by<br />

many exhibitors to restrict showings of<br />

16mm films in bars, hotels and other<br />

places not regulation theatres.<br />

Ellis Arnall Wants to Bring<br />

Industry Story to Capital<br />

NEW YORK—To prevent "foreign strangulation"<br />

of American films, Ellis Arnall, SIMPP<br />

president, will invite all segments of the industry,<br />

including labor, to arrange meetings<br />

with President Truman, the secretary of<br />

state and the secretary of commerce and tell<br />

them about the "mortal blows being directed"<br />

against American product.<br />

Arnall said the situation is worsening rapidly<br />

throughout the world, with one coimtry<br />

after another going in for permits, licenses,<br />

quotas and monetary regulations, and that<br />

the independent producers are the hardest<br />

hit. He wired Eric Johnston, MPAA president,<br />

his invitation after a meeting of the<br />

SIMPP distribution committee Thursday (2)<br />

which approved the action.<br />

Drive Giving Exhibitors<br />

Chance to Meet Patrons<br />

WASHINGTON—A. F. Myers, who is heading<br />

the Industry's tax reduction drive, said<br />

Friday (3) the campaign is now countrywide<br />

and that exhibitors are reaping " a substantial<br />

extra dividend" in the new comradeship<br />

with their customers. Exhibitors would do<br />

well, he said, if they remained in their lobbies<br />

while the petitions are being signed "and<br />

made friends with their customers."<br />

10 BOXOFFICE :: February 4. 1950


Goldwyn Is No Final<br />

Authority: Pinanski<br />

NEW YORK—Samuel Pinanski, president<br />

of the Theatre Owners of America, replying<br />

ward Small Productions for the reissue rights<br />

to seven features.<br />

"Brewster's Millions," starring Dennis<br />

O'Keefe and June Havoc, will be reissued<br />

May 1, 1950. The deal covers 35min rights in<br />

the U.S. and Canada and 16mm rights for the<br />

entire world. The other six features are for<br />

worldwide 16mm rights only. They are: "I<br />

Cover the Waterfront," "Red Salute," "Palooka,"<br />

"Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round,"<br />

"Let 'Em Have It" and "The Melody Lingers<br />

On."<br />

Jacques Kopfstein. executive vice-president<br />

of Astor, has sold the United Kingdom rights<br />

to all seven features to Ariston Films, Ltd.,<br />

London.<br />

MR. SKOURAS SPEAKS OUT FOR HONEST ADVERTISING<br />

20th -Fox Hikes Output;<br />

36 to 40 Features in '5/<br />

NEW YORK—More releases and a $6,000,-<br />

000 studio enlargement program to lift the<br />

1951 output to a total running between 36<br />

and 40 features at a cost of $60,000,000 are<br />

planned by 20th Century-Fox, according to<br />

Spyros P. Skouras, president.<br />

The 1950 schedule calls for between 30<br />

and 36 top features at an estimated cost of<br />

about $55,000,000.<br />

Skouras made this announcement Friday<br />

(27) on the third and closing day of the<br />

merchandising conference arranged by<br />

Charles Einfeld, vice-president in charge of<br />

advertising, publicity and exploitation. It was<br />

one of the highlights of the gathering which<br />

was attended by 75 publicity and advertising<br />

men and women and theatre executives from<br />

to a charge of lax exhibitor promotion by<br />

Samuel Goldwyn, said the producer is "hardly<br />

justified in constituting himself the final<br />

authority and critic on all phases of our<br />

business." He also criticized the timing of<br />

Goldwyn's attack as coming at a time when<br />

good public relations are badly needed. He<br />

said that, even if "soundly grounded," it is<br />

a disservice to the industry "which has provided<br />

theatres in which to play his product,<br />

resulting in a handsome livelihood for him."<br />

"The charge that exhibitors are remiss in<br />

not properly promoting feature pictures discloses<br />

an amazing lack of an intimate knowledge<br />

of existing conditions in the industry,"<br />

Pinanski said. "For nearly three years, exhibitors<br />

have individually and collectively<br />

gone all out to sell the public on the excellence<br />

of motion pictures.<br />

"TOA alone has spent many thousands of<br />

dollars selling the motion picture as an in-<br />

all parts of the country.<br />

stitution and individual pictures because of<br />

their individual quality. This effort has been<br />

aimed at correcting many public impressions<br />

FOR FRANKNESS AND HONESTY<br />

In addition, Skouras declared emphatically<br />

attributable not to exhibitors but to producers.<br />

that his company Intends to go in for frank-<br />

Generally, Hollywood producers have ness and honesty in the advertising of all<br />

manifested an appreciation of the efforts of pictures.<br />

exhibitors.<br />

"I am a fervent believer in good advertising<br />

"Goldwyn is hardly justified in constituting<br />

for the benefit of our exhibitors<br />

himself the final authority and critic through the tradepress," he said. "Charlie<br />

on all phases of our business. In the present Einfeld's junior geniuses have created for<br />

instance, the specific object of his ire seems their trade ads a little man with whom the<br />

to be a circuit on the west coast (Fox West industry is now familiar. This little man<br />

Coast Theatres) which has not seen fit apparently<br />

greets the trade almost every day in some<br />

to give him terms and conditions he new antic. He is a fine ambassador for us<br />

requests in his negotiations with that circuit<br />

in improving our relations with our cus-<br />

for the sale of his product.<br />

tomers.<br />

"It is regrettable that Goldwyn should use "Now, I want to announce that I am offering<br />

a prize to the man or woman in this<br />

a dispute over business terms with one exhibitor<br />

as a basis for a broadside attack on room who finds the best name for this little<br />

exhibitors as a whole. The existence of such man. This prize may be a penny or a nickel<br />

controversies tend to make his complaints or something else, but I am going to ask<br />

somewhat less than objective."<br />

you to appoint a committee to supervise this<br />

Pinanski said exhibitors will weigh the contest. Meanwhile, let this nameless little<br />

charges very carefully.<br />

character, whose paternity is in doubt, be a<br />

"It may appear to them as singular, however,"<br />

cheerful reminder to you that 20th Centuryonly<br />

he said, "that a producer responsible Fox is doing its utmost to stand pre-eminent<br />

for an occasional picture should find by virtue of its product, its personnel in<br />

grounds for acute discontent with his customers,<br />

while those producers who provide enlightened policies in every one of its de-<br />

home office and studio, and its up-to-date<br />

product in such quantity as to keep theatre<br />

doors open all year round seem to be quite<br />

satisfied with their customer relationship."<br />

partments."<br />

NO BOMBASTIC MATERIAL<br />

At this point Skouras became more serious<br />

Astor Gets Reissue Rights<br />

and said: "It is my purpose that he will<br />

also be a symbol of truthful advertising.<br />

To Edward Small Films<br />

"Just as we intend to treat each individual<br />

picture as a new and fresh adventure<br />

NEW YORK—R. M. Savini, president of<br />

Astor Pictures, has closed a deal with Ed-<br />

in exploitation, we propose to report the<br />

content of this picture to the public for<br />

exactly what it is.<br />

"It is going to be a policy of 20th Century-Fox<br />

to advertise a war picture as a<br />

war picture, a social drama as a social drama,<br />

and so on, and not to try to gild the lily.<br />

"We are going to refrain from bombastic<br />

material in our ads. No matter what magnificent<br />

pictures are produced by Mr. Zanuck,<br />

ON THE COVER: A scene at<br />

the merchandising<br />

conference of lop advertising directors<br />

called by 20th Century-Fox with Spyros<br />

Skouras, the company president, addressing<br />

the participants on Fox plans for new product<br />

and advertising.<br />

1950 BUSINESS<br />

WILL BE GOO0<br />

FORTHdSE<br />

WHO MAKE IT<br />

SrVKOS SKOURAS<br />

". . . It is going to be the policy of 20th<br />

Century-Fox to advertise a war picture<br />

as a war picture, a social drama as a<br />

social drama, and so 07i, and not to try<br />

to gild the lily."<br />

or Mr. DeMille, or Mr. Schary, or anyone else,<br />

they will not get the patronage they deserve,<br />

if the theatregoer and the world is<br />

not informed about them honestly and forthrightly."<br />

Skouras also made a plea for full support<br />

of the Council of Motion Picture Organizations.<br />

"In this new organization," he said, "we<br />

have brought together all elements and adjuncts<br />

of our profession for the first time<br />

and we have served notice that we will no<br />

longer allow ourselves to be maligned or unjustly<br />

ridiculed.<br />

"Through COMPO we have served notice<br />

that we intend to fight for our industry and<br />

defend ourselves at every crossroads of this<br />

country, at the door of every theatre, and<br />

all the way to the halls of Congress.<br />

"We have resolved that no longer shall<br />

careless critics attack the fine citizens and<br />

great artists who are in the majority in Hollywood;<br />

we intend to resist those who sneer<br />

at the very name of this community.<br />

"We have a far-flung fighting program.<br />

You, my friends, are the people who are<br />

going to take the brunt of this fight, with<br />

the backing of the home offices, the producers'<br />

association, the exhibitors' organizations,<br />

and. in an important overall way,<br />

from COMPO.<br />

"These groups will give you every constructive<br />

assistance in demonstrating that the<br />

motion picture industry has come of age<br />

and will not fail the trust of free America.<br />

We shall rally the large and devoted motion<br />

picture audience to our side in defence<br />

of the best medium of entertainment and<br />

information."<br />

BOXOFFICE :: February 4, 1950<br />

11


fOM IMcfidlfif<br />

IVIUMM lUNDlfi/ijy<br />

M<br />

2L"'- M«V MERRILL<br />

f^oyceLandis. Joyce MacKe<br />

"zie-Leif<br />

Directed by<br />

EricKson<br />

CUUDEBINYON<br />

Screen Play Oy CUUOE BimoN Fram Ihe Book •The Oocto,<br />

Produced by FRED KOHLMAR<br />

'""fee<br />

Faces'- Hy I<br />

MOTHER DIDN'T TELL I<br />

20th Century-Fox selected "Mother Didn't Tell Me" for a $7500, sho\<br />

manship contest because the exploitation and promotional possibi<br />

. . and are rea<br />

ties are limited only by the ingenuity of the showman .<br />

ily adaptable to all sorts of situations, large, small and in-betwee<br />

Store Promotions and Tie-up Ads Your local departme<br />

store, drug, 5&10, notions and specialty shops are literally a gold mli<br />

for tie-ups keyed to the theme "Mother Didn't Tell Me I'd look better<br />

Lipstick."<br />

ubiicity and contests<br />

:<br />

First arrange special scree<br />

_igs for womei^^l5^8!!BH^8BBPB^ffolumnists, family counsel©)<br />

feature writers. The picture is loaded with substantial material for o<br />

page articles on marital relations, etiquette, human relations, mother-i<br />

law problems, etc.<br />

The Inquiring Reporter stunt is a cinch with such questions<br />

"Should a Mother tell her daughter Everything?" Newspaper contet<br />

can be promoted along the lines of "Most Embarrassing Experience<br />

under the heading "What I wish My Mother Had Told Me"


2iid<br />

Ill<br />

PRIZE<br />

$350<br />

3rd PRIZES?<br />

or two week all -expenses paid vacation for two<br />

at Walter Jacob's Vacation Wonderland, The<br />

Lord Tarleton Hotel, Pike, New Hampshire<br />

fSEM^h^<br />

Open to any theatre that plays "Mother Didn't<br />

Tell Me" between February 25 and May 4, 1950.<br />

I<br />

I<br />

IN THE BVBNT OP A TIB, DUPUCATB PRIZES VflU BB AWARDED<br />

ii<br />

i<br />

i<br />

^^^^_^^^^_^^^^_^^^^^^_^^^^_^^_^^^^^_^ Organizational and School promotion: any types of women's organizations are deeply<br />

* concerned with the problems posed by the picture. FTA, discussion, literary and child guidance groups<br />

can be approached. Hire a local child psychologist to speak before all such groups as well as high school<br />

and college assemblies on the subject "Mother Didn't Tell Me". Such a speech can be a real public<br />

service on the part of the theatre and should not be commercialized beyond the title of the speech,<br />

"Mother Didn't Tell Me."<br />

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^<br />

Doctors and nurses speak<br />

_ le course of the day. Arrange<br />

special advanced showings for key doctors and nurses.<br />

Thcv will create wonderful word-of-mouth for you.<br />

treet Ballvho Hire four teen-age boys. Paint<br />

a black eye on each and have them parade around<br />

town carrying the sign "MOTHER DIDN'T TELL<br />

ME". We guarantee this one will cause plenty of<br />

mirthful comment. The title lends itself for sniping<br />

and stencilling. It'll be picked up by the local teen-<br />

I<br />

i<br />

MEET YOUR JUDGES!<br />

Mrs. RHEBA SCHWARTZ<br />

Exhibitor, Capilol I'healre, Dover, Delaware<br />

MR. TED R. GAMBLE<br />

Member of the Executive Committee of Theatre Otvners of America<br />

Mr. trueman rembusch<br />

President, Associated Theatre Otvners of Indiana, Inc.<br />

SEE NE)iJ PAGE<br />

FOR OFFICIAL<br />

CONTEST RULES


350<br />

100<br />

. .<br />

OFFICIAL<br />

RULES<br />

BMlidiTllWIli<br />

SHOWMANSHIP CONTEST<br />

Sponsored by Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation<br />

CONTEST OPEN TO;<br />

Any manager and/or advertising manager of a theatre in<br />

the United States or Canada who opens or plays the<br />

Twentieth Century-Fox feature picture MOTHER<br />

DIDN'T TELL ME, starring Dorothy McGuire and William<br />

Lundigan, during the period of February 24, 1950 to<br />

May 7, 1950 inclusive. Judges of this contest and members<br />

of their families are excluded.<br />

ENTRY DATE:<br />

All entries must be postmarked on or before Midnight May<br />

21, 1950.<br />

THE JUDGING:<br />

Judging will be based upon the best and most productive<br />

advertising, exploitation and publicity campaigns for<br />

MOTHER DIDN'T TELL ME.<br />

In judging winners, consideration will be given to the nature<br />

of the run, the class of house, its location and business produced,<br />

in order to permit equal competition between small<br />

town theatres, neighborhood houses and downtown deluxe<br />

theatres.<br />

A total of 134 prizes totalling $7500 will be given to winning<br />

contestants.<br />

First Prize<br />

Second Prize .<br />

Third Prize<br />

Fourth Prize<br />

Next ten prizes .<br />

Next twenty prizes<br />

$500 U. S. Savings Bond<br />

U. S. Savings Bond<br />

250 U. S. Savings Bond<br />

150 U. S. Savings Bond<br />

U. S. Savings Bonds each<br />

75 U. S. Savings Bonds each<br />

Next fifty prizes 50 U. S. Savings Bonds each<br />

, Next fifty prizes 25 U. S. Savings Bonds each<br />

*-<br />

.V<br />

HOW TO ENTER:<br />

(1) Submit a written summary of the advertising, exploitation<br />

and publicity campaign you stage for your engagement<br />

of MOTHER DIDN'T TELL ME, documented with newspaper<br />

tear sheets, photos and any other specimens.<br />

This summary may be in any form you elect, whether letter,<br />

memo, scrapbook, folder, etc., and may be of any length or<br />

dimension. However judging will be done solely on the basis<br />

of the factors outlined in these Rules. Elaborateness of<br />

campaign books or of presentations will have no bearing<br />

whatsoever on the decision of the judges.<br />

(2) This summary must in all instances include the following<br />

specific information, in addition to an outline of the<br />

campaign activities themselves:<br />

a. size of theatre (seats)<br />

b. population and type of community<br />

c. run given MOTHER DIDN'T TELL ME<br />

d. percentage or normal business .<br />

e. receipt for engagement (optional)<br />

(3) Send your summary by first class mail to:<br />

"MOTHER DIDN'T TELL ME" CAMPAIGN<br />

COMMITTEE<br />

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.<br />

444 West 56th Street<br />

New York 19, N. Y.<br />

JUDGING COMMITTEE:<br />

The committee of judges will select the best entries. Their<br />

decision will be final and the winners will be notified by telephone<br />

or telegraph. Entrants agree that all summaries submitted<br />

in the contest are the property of Twentieth Century-<br />

Fox Film Corporation and that the same and/or material or<br />

ideas therein contained may be freely copied or otherwise<br />

used by or through said corporation.<br />

In case of a tie, duplicate prizes will be awarded. This contest<br />

is subject to federal, state and local regulations.


.<br />

CRITIC IN P. R. JOB<br />

CHICAGO—Sam Lesner, film critic ol<br />

the Chicago Daily News, is one critic who<br />

believes in boosting motion pictures—and<br />

he has undertaken a voluntary public relations<br />

project for the industry with a weekly<br />

forum on "What's Right With the Movies."<br />

Lesner started his series of forums last<br />

week by speaking to more than 250 persons<br />

in Oak Park, a suburb. His talk demonstrated<br />

that film patrons are eager to discuss<br />

their motion picture entertainment<br />

and a forum which was originally scheduled<br />

for an hour lasted more than twice<br />

that long. Exhibitors cooperated with Lesner<br />

by making passes available to those<br />

who attended.<br />

The critic discussed the best pictures<br />

playing currently in Chicago and made<br />

recommendations for various types of filmgoers.<br />

He urged patrons to be as choosy<br />

in picking their motion pictures as they do<br />

their clothes, so that the pictures they do<br />

see will be more likely to please and entertain<br />

them. He also stressed the importance<br />

of care in selecting film for children, so<br />

that the industry will be encouraged in<br />

making pictures which will be of special<br />

interest to the younger fans.<br />

Lesner plans to conduct his series of<br />

voluntary talks throughout the city. In the<br />

accompanying photograph he is shown<br />

second from the right handing out passes<br />

at the Oak Park meeting.<br />

Warners Sell Five Ohio<br />

Theatres to Chakeres<br />

SPRINGFIELD, OHIO—Warner Bros. Pictures,<br />

Inc., has sold five theatres and a piece<br />

of real estate here to the Springfield Theatre<br />

Co., headed by Phil Chakeres. The theatres<br />

are the Regent. State, Majestic. Fairbanks<br />

and Ohio. The Regent and Ohio have been<br />

operated under lease from Gus Sun, head of<br />

the Gus Sun Booking Co., Inc.<br />

The Springfield Theatre Co. was founded<br />

22 years ago. Michael H. Chakeres is a director.<br />

The transfer had been under discussion for<br />

some time.<br />

Oklahoma City Now Leads<br />

In Ned Depinet Drive<br />

NEW YORK—The RKO Oklahoma City<br />

branch, managed by R. B. Williams, took<br />

the lead at the end of the fourth week in<br />

the 1950 Ned Depinet drive. Charlotte, managed<br />

by R. F. Branon, dropped to second<br />

place, and Denver, managed by J. C. Emerson,<br />

finished third. Memphis, managed by<br />

R. V. Reagin, was fourth, displacing Chicago,<br />

managed by Sam Gorellck, which dropped to<br />

fifth.<br />

BOXOFHCE :<br />

Expect Warner, 20th-Fox<br />

To Sign Decrees Soon<br />

NEW YORK—When the three-judge statutory<br />

court hands down its decree in the<br />

antitrust case there may be only one theatre-owning<br />

defendant—Loew's, Inc.<br />

Warner Bros, and 20th Century-Fox are<br />

continuing negotiations for consent decrees,<br />

with an agreement in sight for the former.<br />

It is expected that a Warner decree will be<br />

signed in late February or early March.<br />

Some progress has been made in negotiations<br />

for a 20th Century-Fox consent decree,<br />

but it has not been officially admitted<br />

that these negotiations have taken place. In<br />

fact, on two occasions 20th-Fox spokesmen<br />

have insisted they were not seeking an agreement<br />

outside of court. Of late, however,<br />

James P. Byrnes, former secretary of state<br />

and former Supreme Court justice, has been<br />

spending most of his time on the case as<br />

one of the 20th-Fox counsel.<br />

Spyros P. Skouras, 20th-Fox president,<br />

confirmed that talks were in progress when<br />

he announced early in the week that he had<br />

postponed a Far East trip scheduled to start<br />

in mid-February so that he could take part<br />

in discussions of the company's theatre divorcement<br />

problems.<br />

Judge Augustus Hand indicated at the last<br />

court hearing that he and his associates<br />

were disposed to hand down a separate decision<br />

for the three non-theatre owning defendants—Universal,<br />

United Artists and Columbia.<br />

Because this decree would be confined<br />

largely to trade practices it is possible<br />

that it may be completed first. Few<br />

controversial points are involved.<br />

Exhibitors in a Protest<br />

Over Reported Decree<br />

LOS ANGELES—A roar of protest wa;;<br />

forthcoming from the Independent Theatre:<br />

Owners of Southern California and Arizona<br />

when it took cognizance of reports emanating<br />

from the east that the Department of<br />

Justice had decided to approve a consent<br />

decree on behalf of 20th Century-Fox under<br />

terms of which Charles P. Skouras would b(!<br />

permitted to remain in control of National<br />

Theatres and its subsidiaries, while Spyros<br />

Skouras would continue as 20th Century-<br />

Fox's president.<br />

In a telegram to Howard McGrath, U.S.<br />

attorney-general, and Herbert Bergson, assistant<br />

attorney-general in charge of the<br />

anti-trust division, Fred A. Weller, the ITO';;<br />

general counsel and executive secretary, informed<br />

that the reported decision "is a severe<br />

shock to independent theatre owners . . .<br />

and if put into effect will go far toward-s<br />

nullifying the beneficial effects of the great<br />

and constructive court decisions in U.S. vs.<br />

Paramount."<br />

McGrath and Bergson were urged to give<br />

the matter their "earnest reconsideration"<br />

and conduct further investigations in territories<br />

where NT subsidiaries operate.<br />

"No theatre chain in the entire country,"<br />

Weller's missive charged, "has been built and<br />

operated on a more ruthless, predatory and<br />

monopolistic basis."<br />

The ITO executive added that it is difficult<br />

to see how the Justice department can<br />

"justify continuing control of Fox theatres<br />

in the hands of those who participated in<br />

flagrant violations of the antitrust laws and<br />

who engineered what the U.S. Supreme Court<br />

has so clearly condemned as a program of<br />

monopoly and restraints of trade ."<br />

.<br />

Commenting upon the ITO action, Weller<br />

contended it would be a "grim joke" upon<br />

independent operators if the only "divorcement"<br />

which results in the case of 20th<br />

Century-Fox and the NT circuit is limited<br />

to a change in corporate and stock structure.<br />

He declared that NT's subsidiary in<br />

this area, Fox West Coast, will "continue to<br />

dominate exhibition ... in much the same<br />

old way." and charged that the termination<br />

of pools and partnerships "will not greatly<br />

aid independent theatres in competing<br />

against FWC ... Its buying power will still<br />

be overwhelming and there is no reason to<br />

believe that its practices and tactics will<br />

change in such a way as to make existence<br />

any easier for the small independent exhibitor."<br />

FCC Delays Hearing<br />

On Major Licenses<br />

WASHINGTON—The Federal Communications<br />

Commission announced this week the<br />

postponement until April 24 of its hearing on<br />

a uniform policy for the weighing of records<br />

with regard to antitrust and other federal<br />

laws in considering applications for broadcast<br />

and TV licenses. Briefs are to be accepted<br />

until April 10.<br />

The delay was anticipated, since the original<br />

announcement of the hearing came out<br />

only a week ago. calling for briefs by next<br />

Monday, with the actual hearing to get under<br />

way a week later. More time was asked by<br />

20th Century-Fox, Loew's and a number of<br />

other interested parties.<br />

The question of how much weight should<br />

be given the Supreme's Court's ruling of May<br />

1948 in the Paramount case when considering<br />

applications by defendants in that case<br />

among those to be settled by the outcome<br />

is<br />

of this proceeding. Thus the prospects for<br />

development in home video or even theatre<br />

video by major film distributors may be very<br />

much at stake.<br />

FCC Is Reported Read'y<br />

To Allow Phonevision Test<br />

WASHINGTON—The Federal Communications<br />

Commission is reported ready to permit<br />

a test of pay-as-you-look television. The<br />

commission shortly will announce a reversal<br />

of its decision of last year to turn down the<br />

Zenith Radio Co. bid to test PhonevUion in<br />

some 300 Chicago homes.<br />

The system is advanced by Zenith as one<br />

which will make it po.ssible for video programming<br />

to include far more expensive presentations<br />

than the present advertising-sponsored<br />

programming. With the public in effect<br />

paying admissions. Zenith forecasts, it would<br />

be possible to present first run films in the<br />

home, top dramatic and musical features.<br />

: February 4, 1950 15


"<br />

4 SSfoTWSSj^SE^<br />

AND 20th LEAS<br />

"^fksAaMjBjb tio ^


12 O'CLOCK HIGH<br />

was not eligible<br />

as it is a<br />

1950 release.<br />

IS WITH THE FIRST<br />

2Q[ e**aifiji^ 4c /^/<br />

CENTURY-FOX


"<br />

MPAA Okays COMPO;<br />

Clarifies Contributions<br />

NEW YORK—The Motion Picture Ass'n of<br />

America has become a charter member of<br />

the Council of Motion Picture Organizations.<br />

Action was taken unanimously at a meeting<br />

of the board of directors Tuesday (31 ) . Ratification<br />

followed the pattern of the formal<br />

resolution provided all participating units<br />

after the Washington meeting.<br />

The matter of contributions to COMPO,<br />

which has caused deferral of ratification by<br />

the Theatre Owners of America and the<br />

Society of Independent Motion Picture Producers,<br />

was brought up by Ned E. Depinet,<br />

RKO president, who is a strong supporter of<br />

the new organization. At his suggestion the<br />

directors inserted an additional paragraph<br />

clarifying the method of matching an exhibitor's<br />

voliuitary contribution, based on 10 cents<br />

per $100 of film rental.<br />

The December Washington meeting had<br />

provided that "each such contribution of 10<br />

cents per $100 of feature picture rentals actually<br />

collected by distributors from exhibitors<br />

is to be matched by an identical voluntary<br />

contribution by the producer-distributor of<br />

each feature picture included in the billings.<br />

Ellis Arnall, president of SIMPP, had raised<br />

the point that producers alone were not covered<br />

and wanted to know what will be a producer's<br />

share, if any, of the distributor's cost<br />

of maintaining COMPO.<br />

DECISION IS UNANIMOUS<br />

On Depinet's recommendation, the MPAA<br />

board voted unanimously that "in the event<br />

an independent producer has a distribution<br />

contract with a member of this association<br />

for domestic distribution of a feature picture,<br />

then the voluntary contribution by the producer-distributor,<br />

upon agreement by the independent<br />

producer, shall be deducted from<br />

the total sum which is to be divided between<br />

the producer and the distributor prior to<br />

the division, so that the producer and distributor<br />

shall each pay their pro rata share<br />

of such voluntary contribution."<br />

Asked after the meeting to comment, Depinet<br />

said:<br />

"It is very simple. If RKO has a contract<br />

with an independent producer under the terms<br />

of which 70 per cent of the rentals from the<br />

picture go to the producer and 30 per cent<br />

to the distributor, then the producer would<br />

pay 7 cents and the distributor 3 cents of<br />

every dime to match exhibitor contributions<br />

to COMPO."<br />

Arnall was not in New York at the time of<br />

the meeting and could not be reached immediately<br />

for comment.<br />

"I am highly pleased but not surprised,"<br />

Depinet said, "that my fellow members of<br />

the MPAA board took this step unanimously<br />

and wholeheartedly today, for in addition to<br />

agreeing to match the exhibitors' voluntary<br />

contribution, the vote meant that the member<br />

companies of MPAA were willing to assist in<br />

every practical way in making the Council<br />

of Motion Picture Organizations a useful vehicle<br />

for allout industry cooperation."<br />

MPAA ratification of COMPO followed similar<br />

action by the Metropolitan Motion Picture<br />

Theatres Ass'n, the Motion Picture Industry<br />

Council and the Pacific Coast Conference<br />

of Independent Theatre Owners and<br />

Five COMPO Objectives<br />

Are Named by Depinet<br />

NEW YORK—Five objectives of<br />

COMPO were given by Ned E. Depinet,<br />

RKO president, in his address at the<br />

20th Century-Fox merchandising meeting.<br />

He listed the following objectives:<br />

1. To achieve better public relations.<br />

2. To increase theatre patronage.<br />

3. To improve our internal relations,<br />

particularly among the more than 280,000<br />

persons who are working in every division<br />

of our industry.<br />

4. To prevent unfair legislation and oppose<br />

discriminatory taxation.<br />

5. To obtain research guidance.<br />

the tradepress publishers group. After the<br />

meeting it was said that quick action by<br />

ITOA and Variety International is expected.<br />

The board of National Allied is scheduled to<br />

meet in Washington in about a week. Special<br />

meetings of TOA and SIMPP will be necessary<br />

in view of their postponement of ratification<br />

at recent meetings.<br />

Board of Review Begins<br />

Sale of New Magazine<br />

NEW YORK—The National Board of<br />

Review<br />

began distribution during the week of<br />

the first issue of its new monthly magazine,<br />

Films in Review, a pocket-sized publication<br />

selling for 35 cents. It is advertised as neither<br />

a trade, fan nor aesthetes' magazine but one<br />

which will stress the "problems and achievement<br />

of film output in the U.S. and throughout<br />

the world, both as entertainment and<br />

education." John B. Turner, a member of the<br />

board for ten years, is editor.<br />

The first issue contained articles by William<br />

Wyler, William Wellman and John Huston,<br />

directors; the best films of 1949, film<br />

production in India, progress in the French<br />

film industry, a sketch of Preston Sturges,<br />

director, and articles and book reviews by<br />

Terry Ramsaye, Quincy Howe and others.<br />

Ticket Sales Fluctuate;<br />

Trend in '49 Is Down<br />

NEW YORK—Theatre attendance during<br />

December 1949 was about 11 per cent under<br />

the December 1948 total, according to figures<br />

compiled by Audience Research, Inc. The research<br />

organization estimates a total sale<br />

of 52,500,000 tickets for last December, compared<br />

with 59,200,000 in December 1948.<br />

The third quarter of 1949 was better than<br />

the third quarter of 1948 by 400,000 tickets.<br />

Tlie 1949 total was 66,800,000 and the 1948<br />

total was 66,400,000.<br />

According to the survey, attendance fluctuated<br />

more in 1949 than in 1948. The first<br />

quarter was 10 per cent below the same quarter<br />

for 1948. The second quarter was 15 per<br />

cent behind the same period for 1948.<br />

Eagle Lion Looks Up;<br />

Financing Is Easier<br />

HOLLYWOOD—Financing for independent<br />

production is becoming available from heretofore<br />

uninterested banking sources, it was<br />

revealed by William C. MacMillen jr., vicepresident<br />

in charge of Eagle Lion operations,<br />

who—along with William Heineman, EL<br />

sales head, was in Hollywood to huddle with<br />

filmmakers on current and upcoming product.<br />

Meeting with the film capital tradepress,<br />

MacMillen said that his company had been<br />

successful in securing first money for production<br />

from the Fidelity bank, Philadelphia,<br />

and the First National bank of Detroit,<br />

two ultraconservative financial institutions<br />

neither of which, up to this time, had<br />

ever made a loan to bankroll production.<br />

The EIL executive saw in such situation the<br />

possibility of independent producers opening<br />

up a vast new source of financing and<br />

a resultant mitigation of the financing woes<br />

which have confronted them during the past<br />

few seasons.<br />

AN OPTIMISTIC PICTURE<br />

Heineman and MacMillen painted an optimistic<br />

picture of EL's current status and<br />

its prospects for the future. The former<br />

declared that the company's gross collections<br />

for the first half of 1950 would be anywhere<br />

from 20 to 50 per cent above the<br />

same period of last year.<br />

To expedite financing for independent producers<br />

whose deals are approved. EL now<br />

has a revolving fund of $1,000,000, which<br />

was set up by eastern financiers and New<br />

York brokerage houses. Filmmakers can<br />

draw up to 60 per cent of their necessary<br />

budgets from this pool, the EL toppers explained.<br />

To obtain such backing, however, producers<br />

seeking an EL release must obtain<br />

company approval as concerns script, budget<br />

and casting, MacMillen emphasized. The<br />

packages are scrutinized by Heineman and<br />

N. Peter Rathvon, whose Motion Picture<br />

Capital Corp. is a major source of so-called<br />

"second money" financial support for independents<br />

distributing through EL.<br />

69 FILMS FOR SEASON<br />

MacMillen and Heineman informed that<br />

EL's 1949-50 releasing slate will comprise<br />

69 pictures, of which 12 will come from<br />

J. Arthur Rank's British picturemaking unit.<br />

Of the remainder, 30 will be supplied by<br />

Producer Jack Schwarz and the rest by various<br />

independent sources.<br />

EL itself is supplying the first money, and<br />

personnel of the company from executives<br />

on down through secretarial help is contributing<br />

the balance of the budget, for the<br />

upcoming "The Jackie Robinson Story," film<br />

biography of and starring the famed Negro<br />

athlete, which will be produced by Mort<br />

Briskin.<br />

Jos. Schenck to Arbitrate<br />

In Korda-Selznick Case<br />

NEW YORK—Sir Alexander Korda has<br />

withdrawn his suit against David O. Selznick<br />

seeking to restrain the latter from distributing<br />

Korda's "The Third Man" in the U.S.<br />

and both parties have agreed to submit to<br />

arbitration with Joseph M. Schenck, 20th<br />

Century-Fox studio executive, acting as arbitrator.<br />

18 BOXOFFICE :: February 4, 1950


Olii^*<br />

I H^^^^^^Si J SETS Iff<br />

Quits' te!'''''^*«App.<br />

;"^*f!jl?BSs>Sv:,.<br />

450* Exploitation-Wise Exhibitor!!<br />

knowing that<br />

Eagle Lion's<br />

mmm<br />

Charles<br />

Bickford as CardJRal MinilszMty<br />

one of the most widely-publicized<br />

and easily-exploited<br />

ctures in years, have booked it<br />

pre-release in order to be<br />

e FIRST to take advantage of the big campaign Eagle Lion<br />

planning to get this picture off to a ROCKET START!<br />

I to press time,<br />

bre pouring in dally! edV« Seivietvc<br />

begins with<br />

The campaign<br />

^ttAt^'J^^tern^<br />

mim<br />

Hi.


'<br />

In the Ohio region, Stations<br />

WLW, Cincinnati; WIBC,<br />

Indianapolis; WHAS, Louisvil<br />

WSPD, Toledo; WTAM, Cleveland,<br />

and WCHS, Charleston, W.Va.,<br />

are sponsoring an intensive<br />

schedule of events designed to<br />

keep the title GUILTY OF TREASON<br />

before the millions who live,<br />

trade and go to the movies in<br />

"The Heart of the Nation/'<br />

A STRONG RADIO CAMPAIGN-<br />

Ar^o*-<br />

CO"'<br />

• • •<br />

.i*^-*"<br />

,1»»«>"<br />

eot«<br />

,,o-.o»''<br />

^'SivH AV*oW°^' v*«-**<br />

too'^'<br />

The 27 stations of the Yankee<br />

Network are sponsoring<br />

similar programs for<br />

industrial New England -and<br />

eastern New York -providing<br />

coverage of the most<br />

thickly-populated region<br />

in the nation!<br />

full<br />

"Success seems assured through advertising, exploiti<br />

and publicity campaign, which has just gotten under(<br />

'<br />

by Eagle Lion . . ." -^Showmen's Trade Rci


INTINUES WITH POWERFUL NEWSPAPER SUPPORT<br />

74 of the most influential<br />

newspapers will keep<br />

pounding the big news<br />

via half and full-page<br />

regional ads -stories,<br />

^<br />

v^<br />

layouts, pictures!<br />

BRIDGEPORT, Conn., Post Telegram, Sunday<br />

Post<br />

• HARTFORD, Conn., Courant,<br />

Sunday Courant, Times • NEW HAVEN,<br />

Conn., Journal Courier, Register, Sunday<br />

Register • STAMFORD, Conn., Advocate<br />

WATERBURY, Conn., Republican &<br />

American, Republican & American (E &<br />

Su) • INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., Star & News,<br />

News Star, Times, Sunday Times • LOUIS-<br />

VILLE, Ky., Courier Journal Times, Sunday<br />

Courier Journal • BOSTON, Mass., Christian<br />

Science Monitor (Atlantic Edition),<br />

Globe, Sunday Globe, Herald Traveler,<br />

Sunday Herald, Post, Sunday Post, Record<br />

American, Advertiser • BROCKTON, Mass.,<br />

Enterprise & Times •LOWELL, Mass., Sun,<br />

Sunday Sun, Telegram • LYNN, Mass.<br />

Item, Telegram News, Sunday Telegram<br />

News • NEW BEDFORD, Mass., Standard<br />

Times, Sunday Standard Times -SPRING-<br />

FIELD, Mass., Union News, Republican<br />

WORCESTER, Mass., Telegram Gazette &<br />

Post, Sunday Telegram • CONCORD, N. H.,<br />

Monitor & New Hampshire Patriot<br />

KEENE, N. H., Sentinel • MANCHESTER,<br />

N. H., New Hampshire Union, Manchester<br />

Leader, New Hampshire Sunday News<br />

PORTSMOUTH, N. H., Portsmouth Herald<br />

CINCINNATI, Ohio, Enquirer, Sunday Enquirer,<br />

Post, Times Star • COLUMBUS,<br />

Ohio, Citizen, Sunday Citizen, Dispatch,<br />

Sunday Dispatch, Ohio State Journal,<br />

Star • CLEVELAND, Ohio, News, Plain<br />

Dealer, Sunday Plain Dealer, Press •DAY-<br />

TON, Ohio, News Jourqal Herald, Sunday<br />

News • TOLEDO, Ohio, Blade & Times,<br />

Sunday Blade • PAWTUCKET, R.I., Pawtucket<br />

Times, Journal Bulletin, Sunday<br />

• Journal Bulletin BURLINGTON. Vt., Free<br />

News, Sunday News • RUTLAND,<br />

Press,<br />

Herald •CHARLESTON, W.Va. Gazette,<br />

Vt.,<br />

the many foreign language newspapers — vitally<br />

interested in the story behind "GUILTY OF TREASON"<br />

— promise all-out co-operation publicity-wise! This<br />

will<br />

be backed with a PAID advertising campaign.<br />

Mail, Sunday Mail.<br />

."<br />

\n outstanding box-office attraction . .<br />

—Pete Harrison<br />

"A great patronage response by a prinned public is indicated<br />

... it is easy to figure on a wide-spread alerted<br />

attendance . . ." — Film Daily


KEY CITIES WHICH<br />

HAVE BOOKED<br />

"GUILTY OF<br />

TREASON"<br />

TO DATE...<br />

Space does not<br />

permit full list of<br />

locked bookings<br />

up to press time!<br />

Strand<br />

Troy<br />

ALBANY AREA<br />

Albany<br />

Pilgri<br />

Mayfli<br />

Esauir<br />

BOSTON AREA<br />

Sitand<br />

Union Squa<br />

Strand<br />

Metropolito<br />

Troy<br />

Boston<br />

Boston<br />

Boston<br />

Bangor<br />

Lowell<br />

w Bedford<br />

Plttsfield<br />

Portland<br />

Providence<br />

Scringfield<br />

Art<br />

Springfield<br />

Warner Worcester<br />

BUFFALO AREA<br />

20th Century Buffo<br />

Jefferson Aubu<br />

Strand<br />

Bingtiomt(<br />

Regent<br />

Elmi<br />

Winter Cordon Jomestov<br />

CINCINNATI AREA<br />

Albee<br />

Cincinno<br />

Cincinnati<br />

Chorleston<br />

Columbus<br />

Dayton<br />

Lexington<br />

Newark<br />

Portsmouth<br />

Springfield<br />

CLEVELAND AREA<br />

pre-release campaign is in ADDITION<br />

to the intensive nation-wide drive Eagle Lion<br />

is conducting through every conceivable<br />

outlet to let the nation know that GUILTY OF<br />

TREASON is BIG, IMPORTANT and — above<br />

all — exciting and dramatic ENTERTAINMENT!<br />

Out of its searing expose of sadistic brutality<br />

and the humiliation of men and women . . .<br />

comes another motion picture that you'll<br />

remember for years!<br />

INDIANAPOLIS AREA<br />

Indiana Indionopolis<br />

NEW HAVEN AREA<br />

College<br />

New Hover<br />

A JACK WRATHER-ROBERT GOLDEN Production starring<br />

PAUL KELLY • BONITA GRANVILLE • RICHARD DERR<br />

and CHARLES BICKFORD as<br />

Cardinal Mindszenty<br />

Screenplay by Emmet Lavery . Directed by FELIX FEIST • An Eagle Lion Films Release


U Loss Is Decreased<br />

For '49 Fiscal Year<br />

NEW YORK—Universal Pictures Co., Inc.,<br />

had a loss of $1,125,851 for the fiscal year<br />

ending Oct 29. 1949. a considerable drop from<br />

the loss of $3,162,812 for the preceding fiscal<br />

year. Tlie latter figure was after a credit<br />

to income in 1948 of $1,240,000 with respect<br />

to an estimated reduction in prior years'<br />

federal taxes on income under carry-back<br />

provisions of the internal revenue code—net<br />

of federal taxes on the 1948 income of certain<br />

subsidiaries.<br />

The income from operations for the 1949<br />

fiscal year was $56,738,335. compared to $57.-<br />

989.307 for the 1948 fiscal year. Amortization<br />

of film costs and royalties for 1949 was<br />

$39,547,382. compared to $42,739,166 for 1948.<br />

The loss per share of common stock outstanding<br />

at yearend after dividends on<br />

preferred stock was $1.45. compared to $3.59<br />

per share for 1948. The shares of common<br />

stock outstanding at the yearend remained<br />

at 960.498. the same as for 1948.<br />

Current and working assets for 1949 were<br />

$35,315,438. compared to $40,830,070 for 1948.<br />

Current liabihties for 1949 were $10,078,846.<br />

compared to $7,932,933 for 1948. Net working<br />

capital for 1949 was $25,236,592 compared<br />

to $32,897,077 for 1948. a decrease<br />

which was due to bank loans paid, sinking<br />

fund debentures and cumulative preferred<br />

stock purchased and dividends declared during<br />

the 1949 fiscal year.<br />

The studio effected economies during 1949<br />

which are reflected in the cost of films produced<br />

and currently being produced, according<br />

to N. J. Blumberg. president. The<br />

films produced during the two years prior<br />

to the 1949 fiscal year were of high negative<br />

cost, the amortization of which continued<br />

to be substantial during 1949. However,<br />

the write-off of these expensive pictures<br />

will have been completed by the end<br />

of the first quarter of the 1950 fiscal year,<br />

Blumberg said.<br />

It is significant that the total of unremittable<br />

funds at the end of the 1949 fiscal<br />

year, translated into dollars at current rates<br />

of exchange, would be approximately $3,000,-<br />

000, Blumberg said. Under the Anglo-American<br />

film agreement, the dollar value of a<br />

substantial portion of Universal's United<br />

Kingdom receipts was unremittable. However,<br />

with the cooperation of the company's<br />

British associates. Universal has been able<br />

to realize on these unremittable funds, according<br />

to Blumberg.<br />

John Taintor Foote Dies<br />

HOLLYWOOD—Death claimed John Taintor<br />

Foote. 69. playwright and scenarist, who<br />

had been in Hollywood since 1938. His last<br />

chore was on "The Great Dan Patch." produced<br />

for United Artists release by W. R.<br />

Frank. Foote is survived by his wife and<br />

two sons.<br />

Among his screenplay credits were "The<br />

Mark of Zorro." "Kentucky" and "The Story<br />

of Seabiscuit."<br />

Over 50 % Republic Lineup Ready<br />

HOLLYWOOD—With the windup of "Hills<br />

of Oklahoma." western starring Rex Allen,<br />

Republic has completed more than half of its<br />

1949-50 program. The slate calls for 57 pictures,<br />

of which 29 have now been finished.<br />

'Blonde Dynamite Opens<br />

New Jim Mote Theatre<br />

Adele Jergens displays, among other things, a fondness for ready cash in this<br />

scene from "Blonde Dynamite," newest in Monogram's "Bowery Boys" series, which<br />

will be premiered February 12 at the Friendship Theatre in Sterling, Okla. Miss<br />

Jergens' %dmiring companions, left to right: David Goreey, Buddy Gorman, Billy<br />

Benedict, Leo Goreey.<br />

HOLLYWOOD—All of the glitter and<br />

glamor that customarily surrounds a Hollywood<br />

premiere will be in evidence when on<br />

February 12 the long-delayed formal opening<br />

of the Friendship Theatre in Sterling, Okla.,<br />

will be staged with the premiere of "Blonde<br />

Dynamite," newest entry in Monogram's<br />

"Bowery Boys" series.<br />

Members of the "Bowery Boys" troupe including<br />

Leo Goreey, Huntz Hall and Billy<br />

Benedict, will make personal appearances on<br />

the stage of the new showcase, as will<br />

Adele<br />

Jergens, glamorous leading lady who has the<br />

title role in the picture. Benedict will make<br />

the junket as a replacement for Gabriel Dell,<br />

who had been set for the personal appearance<br />

but was forced to withdraw because of<br />

a conflicting commitment. Producer Jan<br />

Grippo. who makes the "Bowery Boys" series<br />

fof Monogram, also plans to attend.<br />

Thus will be recorded another chapter in<br />

the lieart-warming saga of the Friendship<br />

Theatre, operated by Jim Mote. The showcase<br />

was constructed as a replacement for<br />

Motes Gem Theatre when the latter house<br />

went up in flames late in 1948. Mote had<br />

carried no insurance and feared the holocaust<br />

had put him permanently out of action.<br />

Major Companies Reverse Position<br />

And Will Back Academy Awards<br />

NEW YORK—Resumption of financial<br />

support of the "Oscar" awards of the Academy<br />

of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was<br />

voted by the presidents of member companies<br />

of MPAA at a board of directors<br />

meeting Tuesday (31). A statement afterwards<br />

said that the decision was readied<br />

"on recommendation of Hollywood studio<br />

executives" and applied to "this year's"<br />

awards. While no sum was mentioned. Hollywood<br />

sources said it is $75,000. and that<br />

is believed to be correct. The next Oscar<br />

its plans for the 1949-50 presentations. Its<br />

board of governors met January 27 in Hollywood<br />

and heard Fred Metzler, its treasurer,<br />

say he had asked MPAA to reverse its position.<br />

Late last fall the academy said it<br />

had accepted an offer to use free of charge<br />

the large RKO Pantages Theatre for the<br />

presentations. The year before, after withdrawal<br />

of company financial support, it used<br />

the limited seating capacity of the Academy<br />

Awards Theatre.<br />

The decision to renew support of Oscar<br />

awards wasn't commented on officially by<br />

presentations occur March 23.<br />

The reversed stand of the companies ends MPAA, only a one-sentence statement being<br />

a controversy started late in March 1949 issued after the meeting. Other sources said<br />

when MGM. Paramount. RKO. 20th Century- that Hollywood pressure had been intense,<br />

Fox and Warner Bros., in statements signed one argument being the great publicity value<br />

by the presidents, said financial .support to the whole industry of the awards. On that<br />

would not be continued in order to "remove basis alone, COMPO. when fully organized<br />

any suspicion of company influence." They and operating under full steam, could have<br />

said they would continue financial support gone into the matter.<br />

of the "original functions" of the academy One company official said there had been<br />

in technical fields, but "no longer provide abuses which he thought would now be corrected.<br />

Among them was the switching of<br />

for the ceremonies attending the annual<br />

awards of Oscars by deficit contributions." playdates so pictures would be shown in Hollywood<br />

theatres in time to qualify for nomi-<br />

They also said they had notified Jean Hersholt,<br />

academy president, of their decision nation for an award. The honesty of the<br />

Dec. 16. 1948.<br />

awards, this man said, has never been questioned.<br />

The academy i.s now expected to announce<br />

BOXOFFICE : : February 4, 1950 23


.<br />

fHctt OKCC S(^^C«tt4'<br />

Tax Campaign<br />

JF THE film industry can put on campaigns<br />

that admittedly sold more government<br />

bonds than any other factor, if<br />

it can be the prime stimulant for Red<br />

Cross, March of Dimes and other important<br />

national campaigns, there is every reason<br />

to believe that it can convince theatre<br />

patrons they are the victims of unjust discrimination<br />

when they dish out 20 per cent<br />

on every ticket they buy.<br />

Down in Washington some congressmen<br />

say they can't see any reason why moviegoers<br />

should not pay these taxes. Governor<br />

Dewey takes the same position in<br />

Now York where he is making political<br />

caiiital out of the situation. The governor<br />

wants no taxes on fur coats, jewelry, luggage<br />

and other items in the so-called luxury<br />

classification. He makes no mention<br />

of ticket taxes.<br />

The prime purpose of the industry campaign<br />

is to convince all these political<br />

leaders, including Piesident Truman, that<br />

a large proportion of the wartime excise<br />

levies is coming out of the pockets of people<br />

who can least afford to pay and that exhibition<br />

is small business—very small in<br />

a large proportion of theatres.<br />

Tabulations of the present attitudes of<br />

all senators and representatives are being<br />

made by Abram F. Myers.<br />

The demand for anti-tax petitions from<br />

exhibitors is already enormous and another<br />

printing is planned.<br />

When the full impact of public sentiment<br />

begins to make itself felt some politicians<br />

who now think of the film business<br />

as a source of enormous profits may stop<br />

to ponder the fact that millions of their<br />

constituents have become convinced they<br />

are being imposed upon.<br />

Drive-In Legal Problems<br />

BIUL, introduced in<br />

J^ the Kentucky senate<br />

to impose a 20-cent annual tax per<br />

seat on drive-in theatres poses a problem,<br />

as the oldtime writers used to say. It may<br />

be one of a number of legal complications<br />

which can arise.<br />

In the first place, how many seats are<br />

there in a drive-in? The total changes<br />

from hour to hour, unlike the fixed seats<br />

in a closed theatre which are already taxed<br />

in Kentucky. Even a count of cars won't<br />

prove anything. An old two-seater might<br />

have accommodations for four people and<br />

a new one of the same might be called a<br />

six-sea ter.<br />

Drlve-in operators are prepared to fight<br />

this tax on the ground that an automobile<br />

owner pays a number of taxes before he<br />

can enter a drive-in, including admission<br />

taxes. This being the case, why. they ask,<br />

should a drive-in be called to pay a tax<br />

that it not applied to a parking lot? Both<br />

have already paid license fees before they<br />

open.<br />

Another legal angle that has arisen in<br />

several places is the question of liability<br />

for car damage. If a man bumps another<br />

car or scrapes a fender of another car on<br />

-By JAMES M. JERAULD<br />

drive-in property, who pays—the drive-in<br />

operator or the car owner?<br />

At first glance the problem seems trivial,<br />

but collusion between two car owners in<br />

the dark could cost a drive-in owner a<br />

lot of money, if court precedents should<br />

become fixed. Thus far, drive-in owners<br />

have been able to convince car operators<br />

that whatever damage they do to each<br />

other is their problem.<br />

Cooling System Problems<br />

[TSE of city water in theatre cooling systems<br />

is bringing on a series of restrictions<br />

in scattered municipalities where<br />

water shortages occur or where officials<br />

claim sewers are being overloaded.<br />

"Municipal water systems, from the<br />

source to the sewage plants, are burdened<br />

by air-conditioning installations," says a<br />

bulletin of the American Municipal Ass'n.<br />

"The most common way of regulating this<br />

use of water is to restrict the discharge<br />

into sewers."<br />

The association did some research by<br />

sending letters to city officials.<br />

Some of its findings were: "In New<br />

York, water must be metered if the minimum<br />

rate of use exceeds one-half a gallon<br />

per minute, and air-conditioning systems<br />

must be equipped with a water-conservins<br />

unit, such as a re-circulating device or a<br />

water-cooling tower, if the water use exceeds<br />

an annual average of five gallons per<br />

minute. Elmira, N. Y., forbids the installation<br />

of air-conditioning equipment unless<br />

a means of water disposal other than discharge<br />

into the city sewers is provided.<br />

Other cities regulating water use for air<br />

conditioning include Rochester, Richmond,<br />

Reno, Sacramento, Oklahoma City, Davenport<br />

and Colorado Springs."<br />

There are a number of others not included<br />

in this survey.<br />

This is one of the theatre operating problems<br />

that can be prepared for in advance.<br />

Optimism Spotlighted<br />

^WO news headlines on consecutive days,<br />

Wednesday i25i and Thursday (26),<br />

served to spotlight the spirit of optimism<br />

now prevailing among distribution executives—a<br />

direct contrast to the mood in<br />

early 1949.<br />

The first was a combination of the<br />

statements of Spyros P. Skouras, Al Lichtman,<br />

Andy W. Smith jr. and Charles Einfeld<br />

at the 20th Sentury-Fox merchandising<br />

conference in which they made<br />

known that the company had achieved a<br />

new sales peak. The second was the annual<br />

financial statement of Loew's, Inc., which<br />

showed a net profit for the fiscal year<br />

ending Aug. 31, 1949, of $1,652,649 after all<br />

charges. This topped the previous year by<br />

$631,493.<br />

Seidelman Back in N.Y.<br />

NEW YORK—Sam Seidelman, general foreign<br />

manager of Eagle Lion, has returned<br />

to the home office, following a three-week<br />

inspection trip to London, Paris and Switzerland<br />

for the company.<br />

Lawrence J. McGinley<br />

To Film Classics Post<br />

NEW YORK—Lawrence J. McGinley, recently<br />

sales manager of Prestige Pictures,<br />

Universal subsidiary<br />

distributing J. Arthur<br />

Rank product, has<br />

been named supervisor<br />

of Film Classics' newly<br />

created department<br />

of special films by B. G.<br />

Kranze, vice-president<br />

in charge of sales. Mc-<br />

Ginley will have direct<br />

supervision of a group<br />

of films that will require<br />

special outlets.<br />

McGinley was associated<br />

with Universal<br />

L. J. McGinley<br />

for 22 years and, prior to his Prestige post,<br />

was branch manager of the Seattle and Indianapolis<br />

exchanges. He had worked with<br />

Kranze. who was at one time assistant general<br />

sales manager of the J. Arthur Rank<br />

product.<br />

Fred Meyers Named<br />

Alcorn Sales Head<br />

NEW YORK—Fred Meyers, former eastern<br />

division sales manager<br />

for Universal-International,<br />

has been<br />

named as general<br />

sales manager of R. W.<br />

.'\lcorn Productions,<br />

Inc., by Ronnie Alcorn.<br />

head of the company.<br />

Meyers was with<br />

U-I for ten years and<br />

before that was national<br />

circuit film<br />

buyer for RKO Theatres.<br />

His first task<br />

Fred Meyers will be selling "Johnny<br />

Holiday" which will be released by United<br />

Artists March 1.<br />

RKO Postpones Tradeshow<br />

NEW YORK—The RKO exhibitor tradeshowings<br />

of "Stromboli," the Ingrid Bergman<br />

starring film, have been postponed from<br />

February 7 to February 14.<br />

Theatre Burglars Take<br />

8x10 Section of Screen<br />

Paoli, Ind. — The Strand Theatre was<br />

burglarized recently and the usual damage<br />

was done. The loot apparently was<br />

confined to a small amount of silver and<br />

petty cash. But. the payoff came the following<br />

evening when the curtain went up<br />

for the regular performance to reveal that<br />

an 8xlO-foot section was missing from the<br />

screen.<br />

After the showing of the newsreel, Joe<br />

Brauer, manager, offered to refund admissions.<br />

Most of the patrons remained<br />

seated and the screen was repainted temporarily<br />

with bed sheets. The show went<br />

on. With the aid of long-distance service<br />

and air express a new screen was installed<br />

for the Thursday show. But the<br />

$64 question was the whereabouts of the<br />

stolen section of screen.<br />

24 BOXOFFICE :: February 4, 1950


14,320 theatres have played M-G-M's Technicolor cartoon<br />

'MAKE MINE FREEDOM ' and it's still going strong.<br />

M-G-M's Technicolor cartoon ''MEET KING JOE" has barely<br />

begun, but it has already played 8,115 theatres — and it's<br />

headed for a record number of bookings!<br />

NOW COMES M-G-M's TECHNICOLOR CARTOON<br />

WHY PLAY LEAP FROG?<br />

There's a sound reason why American theatre owners are booking<br />

these unusual short subjects.<br />

"WHY PLAY LEAP FROG?" packs<br />

into one reel a lot of hearty laughs, to begin with, and that spells<br />

entertainment. But more than that, it's the most wonderful kind of<br />

tonic for Mr. and Mrs. Average Citizen and their kids because in<br />

simplest way it<br />

how all of us working together can make our democracy a finer<br />

the<br />

explains how our wages affect the prices we pay and<br />

thing for all. Showmen tell us that patrons actually compliment<br />

managers for showing these films. You'll be glad to include "WHY<br />

PLAY LEAP FROG.'^" in your program because when all the laughs<br />

are over the folks will say, "I'm glad I saw that picture!"<br />

BROTHERHOOD FOR PEACE AND FREEDOM


—<br />

: "Adventures<br />

Industry's Teaching Films<br />

Doing Public Relations Job<br />

One of the MPAA's little-known projects is providing<br />

shorts and excerpts from fine pictures to schools and<br />

civic groups to help educate Americans, young and old<br />

By ALAN HERBERT<br />

WASHINGTON—Although it has received<br />

little attention from the industry press in<br />

recent years, one of the outstanding jobs in<br />

public relations for the entire motion picture<br />

industry is being done by Teaching Film Custodians.<br />

No doubt, a good many readers are<br />

wondering at this point who Teaching Film<br />

Custodians are.<br />

TFC is a non-profit operation affiliated<br />

with the Motion Picture Ass'n of America<br />

since it was foi-med 12 years ago. Its function<br />

is to provide theatrical film in 16mm<br />

versions for schools, civic groups and others<br />

who are becoming increasingly aware of the<br />

genuine educational value of much of what<br />

issues from Hollywood in the form of entertainment<br />

films.<br />

The bulk of the library of some 400 titles<br />

is composed of one or two-reel shorts put out<br />

for programming in the nation's theatres. In<br />

addition to these. TFC has prepared three<br />

or four-reel excerpted versions of about four<br />

dozen outstanding features, designed to point<br />

up the historical, social or scientific interest<br />

of the films.<br />

Head of the operation since its organization<br />

has been Roger Albright, formerly with<br />

the board of education of the Methodist<br />

church. Recently this correspondent quizzed<br />

Albright in an effort to determine "What has<br />

been the chief contribution of TFC in making<br />

easier the job of the commercial exhibitor in<br />

his community?"<br />

"PHE night before. Albright pointed out, he<br />

had addressed a Parent-Teacher Ass'n<br />

meeting near Washington. "When we started<br />

functioning a dozen years ago I used to have<br />

to spend most of my time defending Hollywood<br />

whenever I went before such a meeting,"<br />

he recalled.<br />

"I think the most dramatic indication of<br />

what we have accomplished by our sincere<br />

effort to help in the cause of education has<br />

been the change of attitude of the entire<br />

educational world. Last night was typical.<br />

Instead of having to defend Hollywood<br />

against a long list of charges that it was giving<br />

young people false values, I listened to<br />

several complaints against comic books and<br />

television programs and was then permitted<br />

to go into a constructive discussion of visual<br />

education."<br />

Educators today are genuinely interested<br />

in each new Hollywood offering, Albright observed,<br />

because they are now aware that a<br />

tremendous portion of the commercial output<br />

of Hollywood is of great classroom value. The<br />

result is that they are beginning to feel a<br />

community of interest and to look upon the<br />

motion picture industry as an ally rather than<br />

a corrupting enemy.<br />

He recalled that when last year the National<br />

Education Ass'n had prepared an overall<br />

report on the effect of mass entertainment<br />

media on youth, a prepublication draft of the<br />

section dealing with films had been sent him<br />

for study and comment. A dozen years ago,<br />

he was sure, the report would have been<br />

issued without having been studied by anyone<br />

reading from a<br />

film industry viewpoint,<br />

and would<br />

doubtless have lambasted<br />

Hollywood. But<br />

this time Albright<br />

went over the copy and<br />

made several suggestions<br />

which both improved<br />

the factual<br />

value of the report<br />

and resulted in kinder<br />

Roger<br />

Albright<br />

His suggestions were accepted.<br />

treatment of the film<br />

industry.<br />

TFC is self-supporting, and usually turns<br />

in a small surplus. The surpluses are turned<br />

over to various colleges and universities to<br />

finance research projects in the visual education<br />

field. Not a cent of its income is<br />

from admissions, however.<br />

The TFC reels are distributed through some<br />

700 non-profit film libraries—usually public<br />

school or university libraries. These libraries<br />

pay $30 per reel for a three-year rental, or<br />

$40 for ten years, and in turn collect small<br />

fees from the schools or other groups that<br />

screen the films. All renters are required to<br />

pledge that no admission fee will be charged<br />

and the proof that this pledge is observed is<br />

seen in the fact that protests from exhibitors<br />

are almost never received.<br />

An important result of the TFC operation<br />

has been the boxoffice aid to quality pictures<br />

resulting from educational interest. Not only<br />

has the degree of harassment by "crank"<br />

complaints at the local level fallen off sharply<br />

as a result of the new friendship between<br />

educators and the industry, but there is a<br />

growing emphasis in schools upon what Albright<br />

refers to as "photoplay appreciation."<br />

More and more, teachers are recommending<br />

to their pupils that certain films should be<br />

seen for the light they tlirow on a period in<br />

history, an aspect of social relations, some<br />

scientific subject, or music or literature.<br />

Work is currently in progress on a condensed<br />

version of "How Green Was My Valley"<br />

for use by CIO unions. Other short versions<br />

may be undertaken for union use, opening<br />

up an entire new avenue for tile strengthening<br />

of friendship to the industry.<br />

The records are not sufficiently exact to<br />

show how^ frequently these films are seen, but<br />

TFC is able to point to thousands of screenings<br />

annually for some of the titles. Among<br />

the most popular are these: "Give Me Liberty"<br />

(historical!; "A Criminal Is Born" (juvenile<br />

delinquency): "What Is China?" (geogra-<br />

tlTHILE it has been TFC practice not to release<br />

in its 16mm versions any films still<br />

enjoying commercial bookings in quantity,<br />

steps are being taken now to increase the<br />

teacher interest of films currently in the theatres.<br />

In some cases, special supplementary phy •<br />

teaching material and literature are sent out<br />

to the schools for use with films which lead-<br />

Principals<br />

Recommend<br />

Motion Picture Courses<br />

PHILADELPHIA—The National Ass'n<br />

of Secondary School F*rincipals has recommended<br />

a motion picture appreciation<br />

course in all the secondary schools of the<br />

U.S. The recommendation came after a<br />

committee reported to the organization<br />

that "the motion picture is undoubtedly<br />

one of the principal sources from which<br />

the children of high school age draw their<br />

heroes, beliefs, values, ambitions and social<br />

standards.<br />

"In an probability," the committee report<br />

continued, "no other agency, except<br />

the home, the school and the church, has<br />

a greater responsibility to youth and to<br />

society."<br />

The film industry works under a code,<br />

which, the educators said, is highly desirable.<br />

They recommended that the industry<br />

enforce full compliance with the<br />

code in spirit as well as in letter.<br />

Radio was warned that much of its er><br />

tertainment tends to be at a somewhat<br />

puerile level, but it was commended for<br />

having a large benevolent attitude toward<br />

youth. Giveaway programs were criticized<br />

as promoting dependence upon<br />

luck rather than striving to improve individual<br />

talents.<br />

The committee included both private<br />

and public school representatives.<br />

ing educators have found to be valuable for<br />

teaching purposes.<br />

A teachers' journal in the field of history<br />

and social studies has recently proposed that<br />

it review and promote from the standpoint of<br />

classroom value a feature each month, beginning<br />

with "Prince of Foxes." Such reviewing<br />

offers limitless possibilities for increasing<br />

juvenile attendance and, indirectly, adult<br />

attendance.<br />

Selection of tiie film would be by the journal,<br />

which is in line with TFC policy. Each<br />

title of the entire list has been chosen by<br />

recognized educational authorities, rather<br />

than by Albright or some member of his staff.<br />

In addition to school authorities, the TFC<br />

offerings are available also to industrial firms,<br />

labor unions and others interested in noncommercial<br />

use of 16mm films in visual education.<br />

The vast bulk of the bookings are iB<br />

childhood education, but Standard Oil of<br />

California now has 14 prints, for Instance,<br />

of "Land of Liberty," a review of United<br />

States history made up originally for the New<br />

York and San Francisco World's Pairs. Its<br />

employes see this film. DuPont also shows<br />

this film to its employes.<br />

of Huckleberry Finn" and<br />

"Tale of Two Cities" (literature), and "The<br />

Story of Dr. Carver" (sociological).<br />

26 BOXOFFICE :: February 4, 1950


Don't Try to Outsmart Your Patrons<br />

Best Advice to Small Town Exhibitor Is<br />

to Become Part of the Community<br />

By HARLAND RANKIN<br />

•THERE'S been a lot of talk lately about the<br />

public relations aspects of the small town<br />

operation, but it all boils down to the premise<br />

that the small town theatre has a definite<br />

place in the community and to win the respect<br />

of the community must become a part<br />

of it.<br />

When we opened our theatre in Tilbm-y. Ont.,<br />

we soon found out something very basic : You<br />

have to play ball with the townsfolk and don't<br />

try to outsmart your patrons. It could not<br />

be a case of "taking them today and gone<br />

tomorrow." You have to live with them. They<br />

are your neighbors as well as your customers.<br />

Although we live in Chatham and had to<br />

drive 17 miles to Tilbury, we made it a point<br />

to contact the home folks and to learn their<br />

likes and dislikes and their community as<br />

well as personal interests.<br />

A BENEFIT SHOW HELPS<br />

It wasn't long after we opened the theatre<br />

that a young chap fell off a barn and broke<br />

an arm. We saw to it that there was a benefit<br />

performance at the theatre, and enough<br />

money was raised to pay the doctor bills.<br />

This was an event that made us realize the<br />

importance of the theatre as a point of service<br />

in the small community.<br />

Not long afterwards a farmer's house<br />

burned to the ground and with it all his belongings.<br />

He had a large family and we<br />

thought it would be a nice gesture to have a<br />

show for him. We got some of the people<br />

from the church and community groups to<br />

join us and we were able to put on quite a<br />

performance and raise a substantial sum of<br />

money.<br />

We soon learned about the town's annual<br />

field day, a big event in the community. We<br />

let it be known that immediately following<br />

the affair, every boy or girl who participated<br />

would be a guest at the theatre. We opened<br />

the doors at 4 p.m. and had a capacity house<br />

until 6 o'clock. We had the principals of the<br />

schools and the athletes on the stage and, all<br />

in all, it was a gala affair. This won us a<br />

lot of friends.<br />

NEED TO CONSOLIDATE GAINS<br />

Then, to consolidate the goodwill gained<br />

through these events, we developed a good<br />

many other community projects, for both<br />

young and old. We organized a birthday club<br />

and got a local merchant to sponsor it. Now,<br />

the day before each child in the district has<br />

a birthday, we send the youngster a pass to<br />

the theatre. Of course, one can't rest on the<br />

laurels of a single goodwill project. The<br />

participation in community life must be constant.<br />

Before the first Christmas in Tilbury,<br />

we got in touch with one of the civic clubs<br />

and cooperated in staging a canned goods<br />

show. Then we helped fill the baskets the<br />

club always sends to the needy on Christmas<br />

day.<br />

Each year we get the local merchants to<br />

join in a beauty queen competition, to pick<br />

the town beauty for competition in an event<br />

held in a neighboring community. It is quite<br />

an affair, this picking of Miss Tilbury. We<br />

are always careful not to have any local<br />

judges. We import them from neighboring<br />

Harland Rankin (left). Ontario exhibitor,<br />

who is author of the article on this<br />

page, is an ardent boatsinan in addition<br />

to his many other extracurricular activities.<br />

He is shown here receiving the<br />

Erieau Yacht Club trophy at a presentation<br />

ceremony from the commodore of<br />

the club.<br />

towns, to eliminate any possibility that disappointment<br />

on the part of losers or their<br />

friends may be translated into resentment<br />

toward the theatre management. You have<br />

to watch that in small towns.<br />

The theatre got behind the development of<br />

a local band, and this writer took over the<br />

directing when no other director was available.<br />

Then, as an incentive, we had the band<br />

play in front of the theatre followed by a<br />

free show for the musicians.<br />

The schools in any town offer a wonderful<br />

opportunity to build goodwill. We found the<br />

schools appreciate cooperation on the part of<br />

theatre people. For example, we got in touch<br />

with the principal of each school and asked<br />

him to provide us with the name of the boy or<br />

girl in each room who headed the class for<br />

the month. We followed this by sending the<br />

youngsters letters of congratulations, and inviting<br />

them to attend the theatre as our guest.<br />

We also organized a boys' junior police<br />

squad, to help in directing traffic near the<br />

schools, and the boys were our guests at the<br />

theatre. We also organized a safety club and<br />

conducted an essay contest in conjunction<br />

with the club. We got the local newspaper<br />

to judge the entries, and the three best compositions<br />

were published. Then we made the<br />

award presentations from the stage of the<br />

theatre.<br />

Presentations on the stage of the theatre<br />

are very popular. A local girl who made the<br />

headlines by saving a child's life at a summer<br />

resort was presented with a medal from<br />

our stage. We had persuaded the mayor to<br />

make the award, after the theatre had bought<br />

the medal.<br />

On Mother's day, mothers receive a ro.se<br />

as they enter the theatre, the gift of a local<br />

florist. Special drawings are also made for<br />

boxes of candy. Before and after the showing<br />

of the films, we play special Mother's day<br />

records over the public address .system. We<br />

found these little additions so successful that<br />

we took on Father's day and gave away<br />

tobacco and cigarets in drawings from the<br />

stage.<br />

Came Halloween and we decided to do<br />

.something about curtailing vandalism. We<br />

got in touch with the Lions club and introduced<br />

a costume party at the theatre. The<br />

Lions shared expenses with the theatre and<br />

both community and theatre benefited. It<br />

has been a successful affair each year since.<br />

It was our privilege to help organize Rotary<br />

in Tilbury and on Charter Night all visiting<br />

Rotarians who brought their wives were<br />

guests at the theatre. Since then, the club<br />

has sponsored what it calls "A Theatre<br />

Night With Rotary." We book one of the best<br />

pictures for the occasion. Rotarians go all<br />

out to sell tickets and each year manage to<br />

raise all funds necessary to carry on their<br />

work with crippled children, without going to<br />

the public directly for contributions. It has<br />

been an easy way for them to raise money,<br />

and has won us a lot of goodwill. Not only<br />

have we assisted them in raising this fund,<br />

but we have made an effort to get them<br />

industry speakers for their luncheon meetings.<br />

This they have appreciated very much,<br />

and at the same time enabled us to get the<br />

industry's story to the public.<br />

L.-VBOR GROUPS COOPERATE<br />

With labor becoming an important factor<br />

in community life, we have on many occasions<br />

tiu-ned the theatre over for Sunday<br />

morning union meetings.<br />

We also found out that it sometimes pays<br />

to lose an immediate financial gain to win<br />

the goodwill of the home folk. For : onie<br />

time we ran midnight shows. The policy<br />

gave us an opportunity to play off some of<br />

the smaller pictures and consequently to get<br />

A product earlier. Although this turned out<br />

to be beneficial to us, it wasn't so good for<br />

the community. It created extra nighttime<br />

traffic becau.se people started racing their<br />

cars after the shows, necessitated extra<br />

policemen, and brought us a good many letters<br />

of complaint. So we cut out the midnight<br />

shows, feeling that this was the best way out<br />

of the situation. We think the overall situation<br />

has been better for us than if we had<br />

continued the policy of the late performances.<br />

At least those who had been losing<br />

sleep becau.se of racing motorists were grateful.<br />

AID TO LOCAL AFFAIRS<br />

We run slides on local affair.5 on our screen,<br />

but we charge for it now whereas it used to<br />

be free. We found that some people abused<br />

the privilege and we decided to make a charge<br />

of $1 per slide. The hometown folks appreciate<br />

the availability of the screen no less<br />

and abuses are eliminated. However, when<br />

it comes to civic events of general interest<br />

we always plug them without cost.<br />

This year we hope to cooperate with the<br />

Board of Trade in spon.soring a Tilbury<br />

Week, and making a major event out of it.<br />

We hope to bring in a movie star and broadcast<br />

from the stage of the theatre. This is<br />

still in the form of a small town dream but<br />

dreams do come true.<br />

These are som.e of the goodwill-building<br />

activities and experiences which we want to<br />

pass on to other small town exhibitors.<br />

BOXOFFICE : : February 4, 1950 27


THIS IS<br />

1<br />

In<br />

its<br />

OUTLAW<br />

more<br />

picture relea


FEBRUARY TIES JANUARY LINEUP<br />

WITH 38 PRODUCTIONS TO ROLL<br />

HOLLYWOOD—Consistent, if not spectacular,<br />

is the productional pace being established<br />

as the film colony enters the second<br />

month of 1950.<br />

Blueprinted for camera work during February<br />

were 38 subjects, exactly the same<br />

number as were on the January docket, and<br />

considerable of increase over the most dismal<br />

tally chalked up during 1949, the 25-picture<br />

total carded during December.<br />

Of further encouragement was the consensus<br />

opinion of studio representatives that<br />

March may see a healthy upswing in picture-making<br />

tempo, since camera activity in<br />

February is being kept more or less under<br />

wraps. This situation, a yearly development,<br />

stems from a tax imposed on negative footage<br />

by the state of California, the levy being<br />

collected on all such footage within the state<br />

boundaries as of March 1.<br />

Of the 38-picture total listed for the month,<br />

27 are newcomers to the lineup, the remaining<br />

11 being carryovers from previously announced<br />

starting dates. By studios, the record<br />

looks like this:<br />

Columbia<br />

Equaling the pace projected for January,<br />

this studio has five subjects poised and<br />

awaiting the go signal for the current period,<br />

three of them newcomers to the lineup, the<br />

remaining pair carryovers from earlier starting<br />

dates. Mickey Flooney will have the title<br />

role and Terry Moore the feminine lead in<br />

"Freddie the Great." a comedy on Producer<br />

Rudolph Flothow's agenda, in which Rooney<br />

portrays an amateur magician whose magic<br />

acts get him into a series of complications.<br />

Early in the month, however, no director had<br />

been assigned. Likewise minus a director's<br />

services were "Prowl Car." with which Hunt<br />

Stromberg makes his bow as a Columbia<br />

producer, and "Isle of Samoa." The Stromberg<br />

entry, to star Larry Parks, is cops-androbbers<br />

fare about a young radio patrol car<br />

officer involved in breaking up a gang war.<br />

"Samoa," which Wallace MacDonald will pro-<br />

Scheduled for release through this company,<br />

and going before the cameras late in<br />

January, is "The Sun Sets at Dawn." being<br />

co-produced by Paul Sloan and Helen Rathvon,<br />

with Sloan doubling as director. The<br />

melodrama revolves around a youth condemned<br />

to the electric chair, with the action<br />

all taking place within the span of an hour.<br />

Monogram Starts Work<br />

On '<strong>Modern</strong> Marriage'<br />

Although as concerns budget, star<br />

names and other evidences of productional<br />

opulence it cannot measure up to many<br />

of the film ventures listed for camera<br />

work during the month by other studios.<br />

Monogram's "A <strong>Modern</strong> Marriage" rates<br />

more than passing attention when the<br />

significance attached to its story hne is<br />

considered.<br />

For it exemplifies the screen's constantly<br />

increasing tendency to explore the<br />

sociological and psychological facets of<br />

modern life, as typified by such recent<br />

entries as Film Classics' "Not Wanted"—<br />

a story of unwed mothers—and Pilmakers'<br />

upcoming project for RKO Radio,<br />

"Nobody's Safe,", which deals with rape.<br />

The Monogram feature, to be produced<br />

by David Diamond, concerns itself with<br />

the problems arising from a young wife's<br />

frigidity in marriage. Based on a case history<br />

in the files of the American Institute<br />

of Family Relations, it will carry a foreword<br />

by Dr. Paul Popenoe, director of the<br />

institute, describing the girl in question<br />

as one so possessed by her mother that<br />

she cannot be possessed by her husband.<br />

The cast includes Margaret Field, Robert<br />

Clarke and Nana Bryant, and Paul<br />

Landres will be the megaphonist.<br />

Cast toppers are Sally Parr and Philip<br />

Shawn, screen newcomers.<br />

Independent<br />

, duce as a Jon Hall starrer, has—as its title<br />

indicates—a South Seas locale. In the holdover<br />

category are "The Fuller Brush Girl"<br />

and "Firefighters." The former co-stars Lucille<br />

Ball and Eddie Albert. Lucille portraying<br />

a door-to-door saleswoman. Eddie a<br />

timid steamship company clerk who becomes<br />

involved in a series of escapades with her.<br />

The S. Sylvan Simon production will be<br />

megged by Lloyd Bacon. "Firefighters." a<br />

Milton Feldman production, was minus a director<br />

and cast as the month began. It is a<br />

character study of a group of men working<br />

in a fire station, dealing with their conflicts<br />

and problems.<br />

Eagle Lion<br />

Lippert<br />

As his first starring vehicle since he recently<br />

secured a release from his term contract<br />

at MGM. "Van Heflin is the topliner<br />

in "Cost of Living," a suspense drama being<br />

readied under the banner of Horizon Pictures.<br />

This company is headed by Sam<br />

Spiegel and Director John Huston, but the<br />

latter is not undertaking the megging chores<br />

on the Heflin vehicle, which will be piloted<br />

by Joseph Losey. Although Horizon has a<br />

two-picture releasing commitment with Columbia<br />

("We Were Strangers" was the first<br />

to be delivered under that agreement) "Cost<br />

of Living" is not earmarked for Columbia<br />

distribution. The story concerns the illicit<br />

romance of a young wife and an all-night<br />

disk jockey, the murder of her husband, the<br />

lovers' flight from the law and their ultimate<br />

capture.<br />

Although no cast had been set for any<br />

of the vehicles as the month began,<br />

this production-distribution firm planned<br />

February starts for three subjects, a notch<br />

higher than last month, when two films were<br />

poised for the green light. With its story<br />

line in the hush-hush category, "None Came<br />

Back" was being readied by Producer-Director<br />

Kurt Neumann: It is described as an<br />

adventure-fantasy, but beyond that point no<br />

information as to its plot content was available.<br />

A musical with a film colony background.<br />

"Hollywood Holiday." will be coproduced<br />

by Murray Lerner and Jack Leewood,<br />

the latter making his entry into the<br />

ranks of production after more than two<br />

years as the company's advertising-publicity<br />

director. It will be megged by Paul Landres.<br />

In the holdover classification is "Highway<br />

Patrol." melodrama about the state highway<br />

police, being prepared for production by Barney<br />

Sarecky. with Sam Newfield directing.<br />

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer<br />

After a lengthy absence from screen activity,<br />

Lana Turner was slated to step before<br />

the cameras this month as the star of<br />

"A Life of Her Own." one of two starting<br />

subjects in the lair of Leo the Lion. To be<br />

produced by Voldemar Vetluguin. and with<br />

George Cukor at the megaphone, the Turner<br />

tophner is adapted from a novel by<br />

Rebecca West and will have Ann Dvorak and<br />

Louis Calhern in other leading roles. Lana<br />

is cast as a chorine who becomes the girl<br />

friend of a business tycoon, a liaison which<br />

results in a romantic triangle. Also on the<br />

docket, and a holdover from a previously<br />

announced starting date, is "To Please a<br />

Lady," co-starring Clark Gable and Barbara<br />

Stanwyck. Gable is cast as a daring race<br />

driver who risks his life on the thundering<br />

speedways: Miss Stanwyck is a newspaper<br />

columnist whose barbed words precipitate<br />

a feud that ends at the altar. Clarence Brown<br />

has the dual chores of producer and director.<br />

Monogram<br />

Among a total of five subjects docketed<br />

for starts during the period, one— "A <strong>Modern</strong><br />

Marriage"—looms, by reason of its subject<br />

matter, as probably the most provocative<br />

screen enterprise to be undertaken currently<br />

by an studio. Consequently it is discussed<br />

in detail in a box elsewhere on this<br />

page. One other, an untitled western toplining<br />

Whip Wilson, got under way in January's<br />

closing days, but since it had not been<br />

tabulated among January's starting subjects,<br />

is reckoned as a part of the studio's February<br />

output. It is being produced and directed<br />

by Wallace W. Fox. The remaining<br />

three entries are all of the "series" variety.<br />

Latest in the "Joe Palooka" saga is "Humphrey<br />

Takes a Chance." a Hal E. Chester<br />

production toplining Joe Kirkwood. Leon<br />

Errol and Robert Coogan. but to which no<br />

director had been assigned as the month<br />

began. Likewise sans megaphonist was "High<br />

Stakes," newest in the "Bowery Boys" group,<br />

featuring Leo Gorcey. Huntz Hall and Gabriel<br />

Dell and to be produced by Jan Grippo. In<br />

this one the "Bowery Boys" smash a gambling<br />

racket. Third in the "Latham Family"<br />

series will be "Henry Does It Again," with<br />

Rayvnond Walburn repeating in the title role.<br />

Peter Scully producing and Jean Yarbrough<br />

at the directorial helm.<br />

Paramount<br />

FYom Independent Producer Hal Wallis will<br />

30 BOXOFFICE :: February 4, 1950


come one of the two scheduled starting<br />

vehicles on tlie Maratlion street lot, wliile<br />

the studio itself sponsors the other. The<br />

Wallis opus, "No Escape," will team Burt<br />

Lancaster and Don DeFore. and has a bigtime<br />

gambling theme backgrounded against<br />

Chicago and Las Vegas, with Lancaster, as<br />

the chief of operations, eventually being regenerated.<br />

Early in the month a director<br />

had not yet been selected. Also nearing the<br />

sound stages, as a holdover from last month,<br />

is "Montana Rides," Technicolor sagebrusher<br />

adapted from the western novel by Max<br />

Brand, with Alan Ladd in the starring role.<br />

Mel Epstein produces and Leslie Fenton<br />

directs the yarn, which has a background of<br />

Texas and Mexico in the 1860s.<br />

RKO Radio<br />

Contributions from independent producers<br />

will comprise two of the four features lined<br />

up for camera work this month by the<br />

Howard Hughes company. Both, incidentally,<br />

are holdovers. Pilmakers, the unit headed<br />

by Ida Lupino and Collier Yoimg, will<br />

gun "Nobody's Safe." with Actress Lupino<br />

assuming the megging chore. She will not,<br />

however, be a member of the cast, which,<br />

as the month began, had not been rounded<br />

up. It is described as a semidocumentary<br />

about the effects of rape, psychologically and<br />

sociologically, upon a young girl. The other<br />

independent contribution is "The Story of a<br />

Divorce," a Jack Skirball-Bruce Manning<br />

production, toplining Bette Davis, and to be<br />

directed by Curtis Bernhardt. It is the story<br />

of a wife who, realizing her marriage is<br />

breaking up. reviews the past and discovers<br />

her own weaknesses are responsible. Costarring<br />

Victor Mature and William Bendlx,<br />

"Alias Mike Fury" will roll under the productional<br />

guidance of Warren Duff, with Ted<br />

Tetzlaff directing. Bendix portrays a ruthless<br />

gang leader and Mature an underworld<br />

habitue who fails to appreciate the value of<br />

American citizenship until faced with the<br />

probability of losing it through deportation<br />

because of his criminal record. In the copsand-robbers<br />

vein is "Bunco Squad," uncast<br />

early in the period, and slated for production,<br />

by Lewis J. Rachmil. Herbert I. Leeds<br />

will dil-ect the opus, which is concerned with<br />

the activities of a big-city police department.<br />

Republic<br />

By all odds the busiest actor on this<br />

valley lot is Allan "Rocky" Lane, who rode<br />

thataway late in January in "Salt Lake<br />

Raiders" and is scheduled to topline "Covered<br />

Wagon Raid" some time this month as<br />

the fourth and fifth, respectively, in a projected<br />

series of eight Lane starrers for the<br />

1949-50 season. Both are under the productional<br />

guidance of Gordon Kay: "Salt<br />

Lake Raiders" was being directed by Fred<br />

Brannon, but a megaphonist had not. at<br />

this writing, been assigned "Covered Wagon<br />

Raid." A comedy-drama is "Dark Violence,"<br />

initial production for the company by William<br />

T. Lackey, to be directed by George<br />

Blair but uncast early in the month. Its<br />

central character is a small-town gal who<br />

befriends a gangster on the lam and inherits<br />

his fortune when he dies. Complications<br />

ensue when the mobster's henchmen<br />

and a small-town gang clash in trying to<br />

lay their hands on the money. Another In<br />

the women-in-prison cycle. "Prisoners in<br />

Petticoats," is up for production by Lou<br />

Brock, but it, too, lacked a cast.<br />

WARNERS HONORED—For "fostering racial and religious goodwill," Harry M.<br />

and Jack L. Warner, president and executive producer, respectively, for Warner<br />

Bros., were presented the Judge Harry A. Hollzer Memorial award by 320 major<br />

Jewish organizations in the Los Angeles area. Left to right: Mendel Silberberg,<br />

who made the presentations; Jack L. Warner, Harry M. Warner, Judge Isaac Pacht.<br />

20th Century-Fox<br />

Already the creator of a lengthy list of<br />

musicals in which the lives, loves and assorted<br />

vagaries of those tunesmiths whose<br />

native habitat is quaintly termed Tin Pan<br />

Alley are traced, the Westwood studio will<br />

put another one in the works with the<br />

launching this month of "I'll Get By." It<br />

will be in Technicolor—practically standard<br />

equipment for such enterprises—with June<br />

Haver. William Lundigan and Dennis Day<br />

sharing the toplines. The William Perlberg<br />

production will be directed by Richard Sale,<br />

who also wrote the original and collaborated<br />

on the screenplay with Mary Loos. Tentatively<br />

slated for February starts are two<br />

others—"Jackpot" and "Night Without<br />

Sleep"—but. as the month got under way.<br />

neither could boast cast. "Jackpot." a Sam<br />

Engel production, is based on John Mc-<br />

Nulty's New Yorker short story satirizing<br />

the radio giveaway craze. A Robert Bassler<br />

production, "Night Without Sleep" will be<br />

megged by Edmund Goulding, with the action<br />

taking place within a 24-hour span, showing<br />

how the life of one man is affected<br />

through his meeting with three different<br />

women.<br />

United Artists<br />

Having secured a two-picture releasing<br />

deal through this distribution company,<br />

Gloria Films, the newly organized independent<br />

headed by Writer-Producer I. G.<br />

Goldsmith, will tee off with "Three Husbands."<br />

a romantic comedy-drama for which<br />

Emlyn Williams is being imported from<br />

England to topline with Louise Erickson and<br />

Vanessa Brown. As concerns both title and<br />

subject matter, the offering appears to be<br />

in the same general vein as was a 20th Century-Fox<br />

release of last season, "A Letter<br />

to Three Wives." In this instance a man<br />

dies and leaves letters to three husbands,<br />

intimating he has had an affair with each<br />

of their wives. Irving Reis will direct.<br />

Universal-International<br />

Rolling along in fine style, this valley lot<br />

is undertaking a four-picture starting schedule<br />

for the month. The slate leads off with<br />

"Louisa." a domestic comedy which Robert<br />

Arthur produces and Al Hall directs, and<br />

toplining Ronald Reagan. Ruth Hussey,<br />

Spring Byington and Charles Coburn. It<br />

concerns a young married couple and what<br />

happens to their lives when the husband's<br />

widowed mother becomes involved in a romantic<br />

triangle. Also in comedy vein is<br />

"Ma and Pa Kettle Back Home." third in<br />

the "Kettle" series, with Marjorie Main and<br />

Percy Kilbride again co-starring. Edward<br />

Sedgwick will direct the Leonard Goldstein<br />

production. Carryovers from previously announced<br />

starting dates are "Winchester .73"<br />

and "Panther's Moon." The former, co-starring<br />

James Stewart and Shelley Winters, will<br />

be directed for Producer Aaron Rosenberg<br />

by Anthony Mann. It's a historical western<br />

dealing with the important part played by<br />

the historic Winchester repeating rifle in<br />

pioneer days. "Panther's Moon." a postwar<br />

story of international espionage laid in Italy<br />

and Switzerland, co-stars Marta Toren and<br />

Howard Duff, with George Sherman at the<br />

megaphone and Ralph Dietrich producing.<br />

Warner Bros.<br />

stepping up its pace over January, when<br />

two films were scheduled for camera work,<br />

this Burbank film foundry lists three starting<br />

subjects for the current period. A Technicolor<br />

western. "Sugarfoot," will be megged<br />

by Edwin L. Marin and produced by Saul<br />

Elkins. with Randolph Scott. Patricia Neal<br />

and Raymond Massey In the topKnes.<br />

Adapted from a novel by Clarence Budington<br />

Kelland, the yarn concerns a southern aristocrat<br />

who, after the Civil War, heads west<br />

and is humanized by the rigors of frontier<br />

life. Ring Lardner's classic baseball comedy.<br />

"Elmer the Great," is also on Elkins"<br />

productional agenda as a remake of the<br />

First National opus filmed in 1933 with<br />

Joe E. Brown in the starring role. For the<br />

new version, as the month got under way,<br />

no cast had been chosen. Jack Carson, originally<br />

set to star, having bowed out of his<br />

contract with the studio. Richard Bare will<br />

be the director. The other starter, a holdover,<br />

is "Lightning Strikes Twice," first<br />

American starring vehicle for Richard Todd,<br />

the young Irish actor who rose to prominence<br />

via "The Hasty Heart." King Vidor<br />

megs the Henry Blanke production, in which<br />

Todd portrays a man acquitted of the murder<br />

of his wife, but who does not find complete<br />

exoneration in the eyes of his friends<br />

until he ferrets out the real slayer. Cast<br />

in Todd's support are Mercedes McCambridge<br />

and Ruth Roman.<br />

BOXOFTICE : : February 4, 1950<br />

31


BROTHERHOOD WEEK—Februory 19-26, Brotherhood—for Peoce ond Freedom. Beheve it! Live it! Support it!


'<br />

The Same Paramount<br />

Selling That Made<br />

"Dear Ruth'a Sensation!<br />

Intensive use of<br />

radio at point-of-sale got<br />

spectacular results with "Dear Ruth" and<br />

will be repeated, p/its, for this new hit with<br />

the same stars. Wonderful ad campaign, too!<br />

Typical is 2 -color ad on opposite page now<br />

in 11 magazines read by 18 million fans!<br />

Be sure that yon play<br />

Dear ^V^f e'<br />

^<br />

on the Washington's Birthday holiday, because,<br />

as Boxoffice says, "It's one hundred<br />

percent entertainment ... as good, if not<br />

better than its predecessor, 'Dear Ruth'!"<br />

— truer today than ever, with great dramas Hke Cecil B.<br />

DeMille's Masterpiece, "Samson and Delilah,"<br />

William Wyler's "The Heiress," Hal Wallis' "Thelma<br />

Jordon"— and great comedies like "The Great Lover"<br />

and now "Dear Wife"!


HEW SCREENING DATES!<br />

RKO RADIO PICTURES, inc.<br />

TRADE SHOWINGS OF<br />

STROMBOLI<br />

ALBANY, Fox Screening Room, 1052 Broadway,<br />

Tues., February 14, 8:00 P.M.<br />

ATLANTA, RKO Screening Room, 195 luckie Si.,<br />

N.W., tues., February 14, 2:30 P.M.<br />

BOSTON, RKO Screening Room, I 22-28 Arlington<br />

St.. Tues., February 14, 10:30 A.M.<br />

BUFFALO, Mo. Pic. Operators Screening Room,<br />

498 Pearl St., Tues., February 14, 2:30 P.m!<br />

CHARLOTTE, Fox Screening Room, 308 S. Church<br />

St., Tues., February 14, 2:00 P.M.<br />

CHICAGO, RKO Screening Room, 1300 So.<br />

Wobosh Ave., Tues., February 14, 2:00 P.M.<br />

CINCINNATI, RKO Screening Room, 12 East<br />

6th St., Tues.. February 14, 8:00 P.M.<br />

CLEVELAND, Fox Screening Room, 2219 Payne<br />

Ave., Tues., February 14, 2:30 P.M.<br />

DALLAS, Paramount Screening Room, 412 South<br />

HorwootJ St., Tues., February 14, 1:30 P.M.<br />

DENVER, Paramount Screening<br />

St., Tues., February 14, 2:00 P.M.<br />

Room, 2 100 Stout<br />

OES MOINES, Fox Screening Room, 'l300 High<br />

St., Tues., February 14, 1:00 P.M.<br />

DETROIT, Blumenthol's Screening Room, 2310<br />

Cass Ave., Tues., February 14, 2:30 P.M.<br />

INDIANAPOLIS, Universal Screening Room, 517<br />

N. Illinois St., Tues., February 14, hOo'p.M.<br />

KANSAS CITY, Paramount Screening Room, 1800<br />

Wyandotte St., Tues., Februory 14, 2:00 P.M.<br />

LOS ANGELES, RKO Screening Room, 1980 So.<br />

Vermont Ave., Tues., Februory 14, 2^30 P.M<br />

MEMPHIS, Fox Screening Room, 151 Vance<br />

Ave., Tues., February 14, 2.00 P.M.<br />

MILW/AUKEE, Worner Screening Room, 212 W.<br />

Wisconsin Ave., Tues., February 14,2.'00 P.M.<br />

MINNEAPOLIS, Fox Screening Room, 1015 Currie<br />

Ave., Tues., February 14, 2:30 P.M.<br />

NEW HAVEN, Fox Screening Room, 40 Whiting<br />

St., Tues., February 14, 2:00 P.M.<br />

NEW ORLEANS, Fox Screening Room, 200 S.<br />

Liberty St., Tues., February 14, 10:30 A.M.<br />

NEW YORK, Normondie Theatre, 53rd St. &<br />

Pork Ave., Tues., February 14, 10:30 A.M.<br />

OKLAHOMA CITY, Fox Screening Room, 10<br />

North lee St., Tues., February 14, 10:30 A.M.<br />

OMAHA, Fox Screening Room, 1502 Dovenpoil<br />

St., Tues., February 14, 1:00 P.M.<br />

PHILADELPHIA, RKO Screening Room, 250 N.<br />

13th St., Tues., Februory 14, 2:3o'p.M.<br />

PITTSBURGH, RKO Screening Room, 1809-13<br />

Blvd. of Allies, Tues., Februory 1 4, 1 :30 P.M.<br />

PORTLAND, Stor Screening Room, 925 N.W<br />

19th Ave., Tues., Februory 14, 2:30 P.M.<br />

ST. LOUIS, RKO Screening Room, 3143 Olive<br />

St., Tues., February 14, 1:00 P.M.<br />

SALT LAKE CITY, Fox Screening Room, 216 E.<br />

1st St. South, Tues., February 14, 1:30 P.M.<br />

SAN FRANCISCO, RKO Screening Room, 251<br />

Hyde St., Tues., Februory 14, 2:30 P.M.<br />

SEATTLE, Jewel Box Screening Room, 2318<br />

2nd Ave., Tues., February 14, 2:30 P.M.<br />

SIOUX FALLS, Hollywood Theatre, 212 North<br />

Philips Ave.. Tues., Februory 14, 10:00 A.M<br />

WASHINGTON, Fox Screening Room, 932 New<br />

Jersey Ave.. Tues., Februory 14, 10:30 A.M.<br />

34<br />

fi/a^Aut^toH'<br />

^HE FACT THAT THE admissions tax yielded<br />

ten million dollars less last year than in<br />

1948 is important—but far more important in<br />

terms of the battle to repeal the tax is that,<br />

there are a thousand or more additional boxoffices<br />

from which the collection was made.<br />

The overall drop was from $385 to $375 million<br />

for admissions, with motion picture admissions<br />

accounting for from 70 to 80 per<br />

cent of the total.<br />

To the average congressman this doesn't<br />

look too good, but neither does it appear to<br />

support the complaints of exhibitors that<br />

their business is suffering from the boxoffice<br />

tax. A ten-million dollar difference is something<br />

to think about—but it doesn't look like<br />

catastrophe.<br />

The picture is different, though, when it is<br />

made clear that a drop of ten million dollars<br />

in the tax means a drop of at least 50 millions<br />

in business—and that while business is off<br />

that much there are a thousand or more additional<br />

ticket windows through which that<br />

business passes.<br />

In other words, not only is the pie a whole<br />

lot smaller, but it's got to be cut into a whole<br />

lot more pieces.<br />

THE CAMPAIGN FOR REPEAL of the excise<br />

taxes is in high gear, with the Council<br />

of Motion Picture Organizations drive about<br />

to get under way now. It is fortunate that<br />

the COMPO plans were set before the presidential<br />

tax message was issued, because it is<br />

vital that not a day be lost now. By failing<br />

to recommend reduction of the admissions<br />

tax, President Truman has made it simpler<br />

for members of Congress to turn their backs<br />

on the industry battle.<br />

It is encouraging that such key men as<br />

Chairman Walter George of the senate finance<br />

committee still think the admissions<br />

tax should be reduced just as much as the<br />

other excises. We are told by one extremely<br />

friendly senator who has been buttonholing<br />

members of the finance committee that the<br />

support for the industry position on that<br />

committee is surprisingly strong. But he<br />

warns that it will weaken fast unless supported<br />

by a powerful grassroots campaign.<br />

And he adds that no matter how strong<br />

the disposition to cut the admissions tax.<br />

final determination is going to be made on<br />

the strength of the nation's financial prospects.<br />

In other words, no matter how much<br />

sympathy there is toward the industry campaign,<br />

the determining factor will ultimately<br />

be the cash figures involved.<br />

PLENTY OF INTEREST is manifested in<br />

the campaign by Frank Boucher, manager of<br />

the mushrooming Kogod-Burka circuit here,<br />

for authorization to use National Screen<br />

Service trailers to advertise the billings of<br />

the KB houses on a nightly commercial television<br />

program here. Thus far only UA has<br />

okayed the move, with the other Washington<br />

managers having refused to permit the airing<br />

of their trailers.<br />

Boucher says he will carry the battle to<br />

New York once he is through with the various<br />

tasks attendant upon the opening of the circuit's<br />

latest new theatre—the 970-seat Flower,<br />

^efiont<br />

By ALAN HERBERT<br />

U.S. Ticket Tax Take<br />

For 1949 Below 1948<br />

WASHINGTON — Treasury figures<br />

released<br />

this week show that the federal admissions<br />

tax yielded about ten million<br />

dollars less last year than in the 1948<br />

calendar year. Totals were $375,768,505.<br />

compared with $385,129,104. These figures<br />

are 12-month totals based on business<br />

done from December 1 of the previous<br />

year through November 30.<br />

The December collection was $33,513.-<br />

950. compared with a December 1948 total<br />

of $37,927,133. November 1949 collection<br />

had been $34,306,573.<br />

which is the last word in neighborhood theatres.<br />

The Flower is the only local suburban<br />

house with staggered seating, and only the<br />

second with pushback seats—the other being<br />

KB's Naylor. It will be managed by Howard<br />

Hutton. an alumnus of the Schine chain.<br />

If Boucher does work it out with the distributors<br />

so that he can use their trailers,<br />

patrons of the Flower may be able to see what<br />

is being offered in the chain's other theatres.<br />

The lounge will have a television set.<br />

SPEAKING OF TELEVISION, both Loews<br />

and 20th Century-Fox have asked a 60-day<br />

delay in the hearings called by the Federal<br />

Communications Commission to determine<br />

whether it should take into account when<br />

determining license qualifications such things<br />

as previous antitrust law violations. At stake<br />

is the right of the major film companies and<br />

some circuits such as Schine to participate in<br />

broadcasting and video, even though it Is certain<br />

that whatever comes out of the hearings<br />

the commission will seek to foUow a policy<br />

of treating each application on its own merits.<br />

The hearing was announced only last week.<br />

with less than three weeks notice. It was set<br />

to begin February 13. but a delay is likely.<br />

Another War Documentary<br />

To Be Filmed by MGM<br />

HOLL'YWOOD—As a successor to its current<br />

World War II release, "Battleground,"<br />

which glorified the record of the 101st airborne<br />

division at the Battle of the Bulge,<br />

MGM is blueprinting "Go for Broke" as a<br />

documentary storj' of the 442nd regimental<br />

combat team, formed of all American-<br />

Japanese except for a sprinkling of officers.<br />

"Go for Broke" — popular Nisei slang for<br />

"shoot the works"—will be authored and directed<br />

by Robert Pirosh, who WTOte and was<br />

associate producer on "Battleground." It is<br />

scheduled for camera work next fall. Production<br />

will have full U. S. army cooperation.<br />

The 442nd. all volunteers, had an unexcelled<br />

war record, winning eight unit citations,<br />

one medal of honor, 3,660 Purple Hearts<br />

and 3,915 individual awards in the bitterest<br />

fighting from Anzio to the German surrender<br />

in Italy.<br />

BOXOFFICE :: February 4. 1950


Theatre<br />

Construction,<br />

Openings and Sales<br />

CONSTRUCTION:<br />

Cloy Center, Kas.—Five-acre tract on Route 24<br />

purchased by Ken Ehret and Gordon Erickson for<br />

construction of 325-car drive-in,<br />

Demopolis, Ala.—Webb Bros, begcfn construction<br />

of 300-car drive-in<br />

Hazlehurst,<br />

on<br />

Ga.—Jeff<br />

highway<br />

Davis<br />

80.<br />

Thecftre opened by<br />

Stein circuit,<br />

Hugoton, Kas.—Ten-acre site purchased- by Russell<br />

Harris for construction of drive-in.<br />

Miami, Fla.—Work begun on 150-car drive-in at<br />

Morthwest Seventh avenue and 87lh street for George<br />

Wilby.<br />

Mixineapolis, Minn.—900-seat Central to be built by<br />

Donald Shanedling and associates.<br />

Porterville, Calif.—Verne Sch-^in building 700-car,<br />

$65,000 drive-in,<br />

Portsmouth. N. H.—Permit granted E. M, Loew<br />

and Larry Laskey to construct 864-car drive-in on<br />

Route 1.<br />

San Antonio, Tex.—John Carson, John Santikos,<br />

Louis Santikos. Olmos Amusement Co., building newsuburban<br />

theatre.<br />

Son Antonio, Tex.—Lcmdsman-Richter Enterprises<br />

plan to construct 800-car Rigsby Drive-In.<br />

Tuscumbia. Ala.—Work resumed on $250,000, 950-<br />

seat theatre ior Muscle Shoals Theatres.<br />

OPENINGS:<br />

Berwick, La.— St, Mary Drive-In, 350 cars, S40,00n,<br />

opened by Southeastern Theatres.<br />

Devine, Tex. — 300-car Medina Valley Drive-In<br />

opened on Highw^cy 81.<br />

Paul, Ida.— Mr- and Mrs. Arvis Edmondson opened<br />

'100-seat ArVon.<br />

Pelahaichie. Miss.—Rickey opened.<br />

Premont, Tex.—R. N. Smith Theatres, Inc., opened<br />

oOO-secrt Rig<br />

Tampa, Fla.—Fun-Lan, 650 cars, opened by P. J.<br />

Sones and S T. Wilson,<br />

Tarrentum, Pa.—Manos Theatre reopened by Manos<br />

circuit after $200,000 renovation job.<br />

Winter Haven, Fla.—330-car drive-in opened by<br />

Talgar circuit.<br />

SALES:<br />

Brawley, Calif.—J. R<br />

Eureka from Ben Ameda<br />

McDonough purchased<br />

Brighton. Ala.—Fox to J. P Corbetl by Mr. and<br />

Mrs I. Lewis Philips.<br />

Colipotria. Calif.—Ben Ameda sold Calipatria to<br />

I R. McDonough.<br />

Chapmonville. W. Va.—Harold McCIoud purchased<br />

Rex Irom C, D Hager.<br />

Daly City, Calif.— Edward Albin purchased Crest<br />

from Ray Knight.<br />

Falfurrias, Tex.—Van Chamberlain purchased Star<br />

Dri<br />

Hawkins. Tex.—Roy DeVinney sold Hawk to B. B.<br />

Spurlock.<br />

Hueytown, Ala.—Howard A. Sadler bought Princess<br />

Irom Harry Willoughby.<br />

Now Boston, 111.—New Boston purchased by Harold<br />

McMeen and Kenneth Bergren.<br />

Kre'isler Picked to Help<br />

Sell Foreign Films Here<br />

NEW YORK—B. Bernard Kreisler, who ha.s<br />

been a student of the European film industry<br />

for several years, has<br />

been made executive<br />

director of the new<br />

Motion Picture Ass'n<br />

of America advisory<br />

unit for foreign films<br />

and will work with<br />

John G. McCarthy.<br />

MPAA vice - president<br />

in charge of international<br />

affairs.<br />

The unit will provide<br />

information for<br />

B. Bernard Kreisler foreign - language producers<br />

and distributors<br />

on U.S. customs, taxation, state censorship,<br />

importation and storage of prints under<br />

bond and the production code. It will<br />

supply free screening service, arrange for the<br />

reception here of foreign producers and distributors<br />

and supply them with lists of likely<br />

outlets for their films, including analyses of<br />

the potentialities of different markets.<br />

A committee will be formed to consist of<br />

the presidents of the U.S. international companies<br />

and representatives from Italy, France.<br />

Mexico. Argentina, Sweden and Spain. It is<br />

expected that India and Germany will be<br />

added later to the committee, but its services<br />

will be made available immediately to<br />

all foreign producers.<br />

No special effort in behalf of Great Britain<br />

is being made at the outset, McCarthy said<br />

Tuesday (31), because that country has no<br />

foreign-language difficulty here and because<br />

it already has representation here through<br />

Universal - International and Eagle Lion.<br />

MPAA will pay the expenses of foreign producers'<br />

representatives coming here for aid.<br />

The first, who was unidentified, may arrive<br />

in about two weeks.<br />

Kreisler is well known in the industry. He<br />

is a graduate of the Harvard School of Business<br />

Administration and has been associated<br />

Rank's Children's Films Go Over in<br />

PHILADELPHIA—The J. Arthur Rank<br />

pictures made especially for the juvenile<br />

market caught on with Philadelphia<br />

youngsters who saw them at the experimental<br />

programs offered at the Hollywood<br />

Theatre here. Local sponsors saw in them<br />

an opportunity to develop a special type<br />

of motion picture for the young filmgoer<br />

which will be attractive to the yoimgsters<br />

and acceptable to adult groups urging<br />

better children's programs.<br />

The program at the Hollywood Theatre,<br />

owned by Melvin Fox, consisted of four<br />

subjects. The first, "Bush Christmas,"<br />

was a 69-minute film produced in Australia.<br />

The stoi-y concerns the search for<br />

horse thieves by a group of children, with<br />

the culprits captured by the youngsters<br />

with the aid of their parents. The second<br />

subject was a seven-minute black and<br />

white cartoon, "Robin A. Robins." Third<br />

on the program was an 18-minute film,<br />

produced in Canada, entitled "The Boy<br />

Who Stopped Niagara," and the story<br />

concerned the search for a boy who had<br />

removed an important key and thereby<br />

had turned off the power derived from<br />

Niagara's power projects. The final subject<br />

was a nine-minute scientific short,<br />

made in England, entitled "Who, What<br />

and Why?"<br />

Mrs. Victor Frank, chairman of the<br />

women's committee of the Philadelphia<br />

Forum which sponsored the showing, said<br />

adult groups throughout the country<br />

should begin a movement to obtain this<br />

type of film entertainment for American<br />

children. "These pictures," she said, "are<br />

entertaining and beneficial to youngsters.<br />

The stories presented situations with<br />

which the children could identify themselves.<br />

The primary actors were children<br />

and the action on the screen captured<br />

their Imagination."<br />

with the American Arbitration Ass'n, Trans-<br />

Lux Theatres, Academy of Motion Picture<br />

Arts and Sciences, the code board, Universal-<br />

International and United Artists. He recently<br />

completed a 20-month, 17-country survey of<br />

foreign film conditions for Harvard.<br />

McCarthy said that he and Eric Johnston,<br />

MPAA president, had found foreign producers<br />

unhappy over the U.S. market, believing<br />

themselves excluded, and that because of an<br />

identity of interest the fair and sensible<br />

thing to do is to help them. He also saw<br />

"larger economic i.ssues involved" such as the<br />

great need of debtor nations for American<br />

dollars. He said that they were not to be<br />

guaranteed any increase in dollar earnings<br />

here, as that would depend on the acceptability<br />

of their product and their skill at marketing<br />

it after having been supplied with<br />

necessary information. A pamphlet in several<br />

languages will be issued shortly. The State<br />

department and foreign legations have informally<br />

expressed enthusiasm.<br />

The matter has been taken up informally<br />

with the Society of Independent Motion Picture<br />

Producers with the hope of getting the<br />

support of that organization. No independent<br />

distributors of foreign films here have protested,<br />

McCarthy said, and MPAA expects<br />

to work closely with them.<br />

The free screening service will include<br />

showings in the projection rooms of MPAA<br />

distributor members with the expectation that<br />

important executives of those companies will<br />

sit in. McCarthy said he has already approached<br />

the Ti-easury department regarding<br />

possible adjustments in the 30 per cent<br />

general import tax to ease the burden on<br />

foreign films. When the new advisory unit<br />

gets under real headway, a staff will be added<br />

as needed.<br />

Kreisler said he has severed all connection<br />

with International Film Associates, which he<br />

recently organized, and all other business<br />

ties, and will devote his entire time to his<br />

new job.<br />

U. S. Debut<br />

Mrs. Fiank said that special attention<br />

was paid to reactions and behavior of the<br />

children. Behavior, she said, was excellent.<br />

"Tlie children did not wiggle or make<br />

any noise. They did not even leave their<br />

seats to go to the bathroom. Tliat's how<br />

the pictures held their interest."<br />

Jack Smith, manager of the Hollywood<br />

Theatre, said "the reception demonstrates<br />

that there is plenty of room for this type<br />

of film. The youngsters seemed to love<br />

the stuff, and since the product was appealing<br />

to youngsters from the age group<br />

four and up, exhibitors looking to build<br />

children's audiences should welcome this<br />

kind of product," he said.<br />

A preview of the films was presented for<br />

officials of women's clubs, recreational<br />

leaders, principals and teachers from public<br />

and private schools. The subjects were<br />

released by the Rank organization<br />

through the Philadelphia branch of U-I.<br />

BOXOFFICE : : February 4, 1950 35


1<br />

"FRANCIS is one of the<br />

most delightful comedies<br />

I've ever seen. Only<br />

two actors could've<br />

played the part . . .<br />

Francis and Jack Benny<br />

...and I'm glad the one<br />

with the talent got the<br />

part."<br />

FRED ALLEN<br />

Radio and screen star<br />

'Don't miss FRANCIS! It<br />

has more laughs than a<br />

dozen ordinary comedies."<br />

EVE ARDEN<br />

CBS and screen star<br />

'FRANCIS is a riotous picture.<br />

I was in happy<br />

hysterics all the way<br />

through."<br />

LUCILLE BALL<br />

CBS and scratn tiar<br />

'We have never gotten<br />

more laughs out of a<br />

movie either collectively<br />

or separately and we<br />

have laughed a lot in<br />

our time."<br />

EDGAR BERGEN &<br />

CHARLIE McCarthy<br />

"For the first time in my<br />

life I agree with Fred<br />

Allen . . . FRANCIS is a<br />

hysterically funny pic-<br />

JACK BENNY<br />

CBS star<br />

laughter is our business<br />

so take it from us . . .<br />

FRANCIS is a comedy<br />

that's really funny."<br />

BURNS and ALLEN<br />

CSS sfars<br />

'FRANCIS will<br />

probably<br />

set a laugh record. I<br />

haven't laughed so<br />

much in years."<br />

JOAN DAVIS<br />

CBS and screen star<br />

'FRANCIS is the funniest<br />

character I've seen on<br />

the screen."<br />

JIMMY DURANTE<br />

NBC star<br />

'FRANCIS, the talking<br />

mule, reminds me a lot<br />

of blind dates I've had,<br />

except he's a little better<br />

looking and a lot more<br />

entertaining."<br />

ETHEL MERMAN<br />

Broadway star<br />

'FRANCIS is<br />

I<br />

one picture<br />

recommend most<br />

highly. Mules will<br />

love<br />

it. (And people, too.)"<br />

GROUCHO MARX<br />

CSS and screen star


OMEDY EXPERTS<br />

WAN/MOUS<br />

N LAUGHING THE<br />

PRAISES OFfrancf8<br />

'FRANCIS is so funny he<br />

is giving the comedians<br />

something to worry<br />

about—lucky for me he<br />

can't dance — or can<br />

he?"<br />

RAY BOLGER<br />

Musr'co/ Comedy tta-<br />

'FRANCIS, the talking<br />

donkey, is full of laughs.<br />

This is one donkey even<br />

the Republicans will enjoy<br />

seeing."<br />

BOBBY CLARK<br />

A


. . Gene<br />

. . The<br />

. . . With<br />

^<br />

By<br />

. . Paramount<br />

. . Spring<br />

—<br />

^olUfWWid ^eftont<br />

From Two Studios<br />

Since, by Hollywood custom, two projected<br />

film ventures on the same topic<br />

usually constitute the nucleus of a cycle,<br />

there is evidence that such a cycle is in<br />

the making and embracing the not-sogentle<br />

art of bullfighting.<br />

With Producer-Director Robert Rossen<br />

scheduling an early start, on location in<br />

Mexico, for "The Brave Bulls." which he<br />

is making for Columbia release. MGM also<br />

has become matador conscious. Leo has<br />

acquired "Montes. the Matador." a short<br />

story oy Frank Harris, and will film it in<br />

Technicolor as a Jack Cummings production,<br />

with Ricardo Montalban in the<br />

title<br />

role.<br />

It will be a change of pace for Montalban.<br />

currently portraying a pugilist in<br />

the studio's "Right Cross." Filming is<br />

scheduled to begin later this year.<br />

IVAN SPEAR<br />

for Autry for Columbia release . . .<br />

"Island<br />

in the Sky." novel about the air transport<br />

command by Ernest K. Gann. was acquired<br />

by Robert Stillman Productions, with Gann<br />

booked to collaborate with Seton I. Miller<br />

on the screenplay. It is based on an actual<br />

wartime incident when a transport was<br />

wrecked in uncharted Canadian wastes and<br />

the survivors were rescued by the ATC.<br />

King Vidor to Be Honored<br />

At Venice Film Festival<br />

When the 11th annual Venice Film Festival<br />

gets under way in Italy next summer,<br />

on hand as an interested<br />

observer will be<br />

Megaphonist King Vidor.<br />

who has been no-<br />

. . .<br />

tified that three of his<br />

films will be screened<br />

MGM's Inside Straight'<br />

because of their selection<br />

as "among the<br />

Deals With Gold Rush<br />

most significant and<br />

California's lusty gold rush days will be<br />

valid from the artistic<br />

given screen treatment by MGM in "Inside<br />

viewpoint" to be made<br />

Straight." being scripted by Guy Trosper and<br />

in industry history.<br />

to be produced by Richard Goldstone . . .<br />

They are "The Crowd."<br />

Hal Wallis booked Hal Walker to direct "My<br />

which Vidor directed<br />

Friend Irma Goes West." which he is making<br />

for Paramount release . . . RKO Radio<br />

in 1928: "Hallelujah," King Vidor<br />

1930. and "Our Daily Bread." 193'4. Vidor. handed Stanley Rubin a new writer-producer<br />

ticket, with "The Man He Found" as<br />

currently directing "Lightning Strikes Twice"<br />

Universal-International,<br />

for Warners, will leave for Europe after completing<br />

his first assignment<br />

reactivating its production plans for<br />

that opus and will remain there for<br />

the festival.<br />

"Song of Norway." signed Harry Tugend to<br />

script and produce the Technicolor musical<br />

Philip Yordan and Daniel Puchs<br />

Six Story Sales for Week;<br />

assigned to the screenplay. Samuel Goldwyn's<br />

first 1950 production will be "Billion<br />

Lippert, U-I Pair Each<br />

With Lippert Productions and Universal- Dollar Baby" ticketed Leslie<br />

.<br />

International each accounting for two purchases,<br />

the story market held to a steady "Montana Rides" ... Sol C. Siegel was handed<br />

Fenton to pilot its Technicolor w-estern.<br />

pace during the period, a total of six sales the production reins, and Rose Franken and<br />

having been recorded. Into the Lippert vaults William Brown Meloney the scrivening chores,<br />

went "Okinawa," an original by Jack Gold, on 20th Century-Fox's "No Wedding Ring."<br />

who is also a member of the company's publicity<br />

department, and a sagebrusher, "The<br />

To Use Episodic Method<br />

Bandit Queen." by Ken Bohn . U-1<br />

purchases were "The Desert Hawk" and In 'Queen for a Day'<br />

"Fiddle-Foot." The former, by Aubrey Wisberg<br />

Employment of the episodic technique<br />

and Jack Pollexfen. is an adventure<br />

used in the past in such offerings as "If I<br />

story set in the Arabian desert; the latter,<br />

Had a Million" and. more recently, by the<br />

by Harold Shumate, a comedy laid in the<br />

J. Arthur Rank Organization in "Quartet."<br />

old west . Autry Productions picked<br />

will mark the manufacture of "Queen for a<br />

up "The Mad Sheriff of Sanchez." a historical<br />

story of early California by Jack<br />

Day." to be produced by Robert Stillman for<br />

United Artists release and based on the<br />

Evans, and will film it as a starring subject<br />

radio show of that name.<br />

Stillman will incorporate four short stories<br />

into the feature—the first to be acquired<br />

being "High Diver." by John Ashworth. In<br />

Two Bullfighting Films<br />

addition to the four basic dramatic episodes.<br />

"Queen for a Day" will present six or seven<br />

vignettes based upon actual happenings at<br />

the broadcasts.<br />

Seton I. Miller, a Stillman partner, is doing<br />

the screen treatment and will be the associate<br />

producer.<br />

Wendell Corey to Co-Star<br />

In Lana Turner Feature<br />

Wendell Corey has been borrowed from<br />

Producer Hal Wallis by MGM to co-star with<br />

Lana Turner in "A Life of Her Own" . . .<br />

Scott-Brown Productions (Actor Randolph<br />

Scott and Producer Harry Joe Brown) booked<br />

Rod Cameron and Wayne Morris for the<br />

toplines in "Lost Stage Valley." Technicolor<br />

western which they will make for Columbia<br />

release. It will be an acting holiday for<br />

Scott, who won't appear in it . . . Raymond<br />

Massey joined the cast of Warners' "Sugarfoot"<br />

. . . Borrowed from Hal Roach for two<br />

pictures, William Bendix will co-star first<br />

Jane Russell to Enact<br />

Self in RKO Subject<br />

Capitalizing on her world renown as a<br />

glamor gal and marking the first time<br />

that any star has portrayed herself in<br />

a motion picture based on her own<br />

career. RKO Radio has scheduled "The<br />

Jane Russell Story" as a forthcoming<br />

celluloid entry in the vein first exploited<br />

by Columbia with "The Jolson Story"<br />

although in that one. of course. Jolson<br />

appeared only as a voice and Larry Parks<br />

essayed the role on the screen.<br />

As managing director of production<br />

Howard Hughes is planning to mount the<br />

opus as "the biggest" yet to be undertaken<br />

by RKO Radio since he assumed<br />

control of the company.<br />

Also added to the RKO lineup was<br />

"Tlie Miami Story." to be written and<br />

produced as a package by Jay Dratler.<br />

industry veteran whose last affiliation<br />

was with Warners. In the cops-and-robbers<br />

category, it involves a girl who<br />

thinks her husband has been framed on<br />

a robbery charge by a detective who is<br />

her former sweetheart; as its title indicates,<br />

the action transpires largely in<br />

Miami.<br />

with Victor Mature in RKO Radio's "Alias<br />

Mike Fury" .<br />

Byington draws the<br />

title role in "Louisa" at Universal-International.<br />

Added to the roster of Columbia producers—and<br />

one of the industry's few femme<br />

filmmakers—was Joan Harrison, onetime<br />

associate of Alfred Hitchcock.<br />

Two MGM Films Concern<br />

Indianapolis Speed-way<br />

MGM is fast becoming a western affiliate<br />

of the Indianapolis speedway. In addition<br />

to its Clark Gable starrer. "To Please a<br />

Lady." slated for camera work this month,<br />

Leo has projected a second subject dealing<br />

with the automobile racing dodge.<br />

To be produced by Jack Cummings, the<br />

new one is "Excuse My Dust," a romantic<br />

comedy backgrounded in the early days of<br />

speed and was written by George Wells.<br />

Ah-eady in release, of course, is "The Big<br />

Wheel." another saga of the speedways,<br />

which was produced as a Mickey Rooney<br />

starrer by Harry Popkin. Sam Stiefel and<br />

Jack Dempsey. and which is being distributed<br />

by United Artists.<br />

Republic to Reactivate<br />

'Hit Parade' Musical<br />

It has been three years since Republic<br />

turned out one of its "Hit Parade" musicals<br />

—the last such offering having been manufactured<br />

back in 1947. Now the series has<br />

been reactivated with the assignment of John<br />

H. Auer to produce and direct "Hit Parade<br />

of 1950." tentatively geared for a March<br />

camera start. Utilizing an original story by<br />

Lawrence Kimble and Aubrey Wisberg, "Mike<br />

Was a Lady," as the plot line, the tunefilm<br />

is being scripted by Betty Reinhard.<br />

The film will be Republic's fourth in the<br />

"Hit Parade" niche—early entries having<br />

been made in 1941, 1943 and, as noted above,<br />

1947.<br />

38<br />

BOXOFFICE<br />

:: February 4, 1950


CHESTER FRIEDMAN<br />

EDITOR<br />

HUGH E. FRAZE<br />

Associate Editor<br />

SECTION<br />

PRACTICAL IDEAS FOR SELLING SEATS BY PRACTICAL SHOWMEN<br />

J4Jf.J4.ouded<br />

Recently we observed in this column<br />

that a pessimist is an exhibitor<br />

who looks at his theatre and says,<br />

"It's half empty," while an optimist<br />

would say, "It's half full." As<br />

an observer and as a realist, we<br />

would Uke to add, "Half empty or<br />

half full, it's still only half."<br />

There's a picture titled "12 O'Clock<br />

High" that tells a story of the 918th<br />

group of the Eighth air force. It also<br />

delivers a wonderful gospel: give a<br />

man good leadership, teach him<br />

what to do and how to do it, give<br />

him an organization he can be proud<br />

of—and you provide him with the<br />

incentive he needs to put his heart,<br />

soul and back into his job.<br />

There was a time when everyone<br />

connected with the motion picture<br />

industry, particularly theatremen,<br />

felt exactly that way about their vocation.<br />

It inspired everyone to a<br />

24-hour-a-day effort. It gave everyone<br />

assurance that here was the<br />

greatest business, the greatest leadership,<br />

the greatest opportunity and<br />

the best organization of its kind in<br />

the world. It was a privilege to be<br />

associated with the industry. Working<br />

a 16 or 18-hour a day schedule<br />

with no day off, no vacation, had its<br />

spiritual recompense.<br />

After the '29 crash, regimentation<br />

began to undermine the esprit de<br />

corps of those earlier years. A rigid<br />

budget frequently prevented a manager<br />

from selling an attraction as<br />

experience dictated. Standardized<br />

methods of operation took a deadly<br />

toll on the incentive which had inspired<br />

managers to do things for the<br />

sheer love of doing them.<br />

It took a war to get team spirit<br />

permeating this industry again.<br />

Every bit of manpower was organized<br />

into a unified effort. Victory<br />

was important and everyone played<br />

hard, for keeps. Selflessness, for a<br />

time, was supreme.<br />

With the end of the war, team<br />

spirit again dissolved. Today there<br />

are many "half houses." And despite<br />

the many pleas for vigorous<br />

showmanship, intercircuit "drives"<br />

are becoming increasingly necessary<br />

because inspirational incentive may<br />

be lacking.<br />

The "half houses" are neither by<br />

I Continued on page 42)<br />

Grand Movie Ball Tops<br />

Busy Anniversary Week<br />

The 19th anniversary celebration of the<br />

opening of the Regal Cinema, Beckenham,<br />

Kent, England, was made the occasion for a<br />

special program and promotion by Manager<br />

F. A. Barker. A schedule of events with appeal<br />

to patrons of all tastes and ages was<br />

set up by Barker, who received excellent cooperation<br />

from the local press In bringing<br />

each event to the attention of the public.<br />

Barker contacted the Beckenham Choral<br />

society and the Royce Academy of Music and<br />

Dancing, and arranged for a stage presentation<br />

of the Youth of Beckenham for one<br />

night. A concert by the Beckenham orchestra<br />

attracted additional patronage on another<br />

night during the anniversary week. Units of<br />

the Sea Cadet corps and the Girls Naval<br />

Training corps also participated in the celebration.<br />

Still another night was devoted to an exhibition<br />

of champion players of the district<br />

Table Tennis league. On the same evening,<br />

Reginald New, a popular organist, presented<br />

a concert for Regal patrons.<br />

Each activity led up to the highlight of the<br />

week, a Grand Film Star ball on the final<br />

night. Five motion picture stars made personal<br />

appearances through the intercession<br />

of C. J. Latta, managing director of Associated<br />

British Picture Corp.. and D. J. Goodlatte<br />

of Associated British Cinemas. Ltd. At<br />

the star ball, the guests were received by the<br />

mayor and his wife of Beckenham on the<br />

theatre stage, following a special birthday<br />

dinner at the Regal restaurant.<br />

Additional publicity was received by virtue<br />

of the fact that Barker invited old people<br />

from the SOS society's home in Beckenham<br />

to an afternoon theatre performance and to<br />

tea afterwards.<br />

Special film shows were arranged for children,<br />

and each event was covered by newspaper<br />

stories and art in county and district<br />

publications. Tlieatre promotion included a<br />

display of streamers advertising the various<br />

events, panels throughout the foyer, special<br />

linen banners, the sale of anniversai-y programs<br />

and film ball tickets, slides on the<br />

screen and personal announcements from the<br />

stage each night for a week in advance.<br />

Window cards were placed in strategic location.s.<br />

The outer theatre was decorated<br />

with festooned colored lights promoted from<br />

the electricity board at no charge. Bunting<br />

and flags including large Union Jack stars<br />

and stripes etc.. were borrowed from the local<br />

council for additional flash out front. A<br />

neighborhood florist decorated the vestibule,<br />

restaurant and orchestra pit each day with<br />

fresh cut flowers and plants in return for a<br />

credit card.<br />

A Beckenham caterer provided a huge anniversary<br />

cake, topped by a confectionery display<br />

of the theatre in miniature. Placed in<br />

the lobby, a sign nearby announced that the<br />

cake would be presented to the children's<br />

ward of Beckenham hospital.<br />

Cooperation from merchants was obtained<br />

in publicizing the anniversary presentation,<br />

and extra business resulted.<br />

BOXOFFICE Showrmandiser Feb. 4, 1950 —33— 39


LL<br />

lillliiPillilPB""'''''^^<br />

FOR THE LOVE OF MIKi<br />

i-t<br />

A GREAT<br />

BOOK BECOMES<br />

A GREATER<br />

^<br />

PICTURE!<br />

7/<br />

'rt<br />

in<br />

DICK POWELL EVELYN KEYES<br />

MRS. MIKE"with J. M. KERRIGAN -ANGELA CLARKE<br />

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER SAMUEL BISCHOFF • PRODUCER EDWARD GROSS<br />

DIRECTED BY LOUIS KING • Screenploy by Alfred Lewis Levitt and DeWitt Bodeen<br />

Based on the novel by Benedict and Nancy Freedman<br />

PRESENTED BY NASSOUR STUDIO IN ASSOCIATION WITH HUNTINGTON HARTFORD


^^)WHArBUSIMeSS!<br />

^/ -^>. ^?<br />

IN PITTSBURGH, BUFFALO ,<br />

SAN FRANCISCO, BALTIMORE,<br />

DAYTON, AKRON, SEATTLE -<br />

WHEREVER THIS GREAT PIC-<br />

TURE IS<br />

PLAYING-OPENING<br />

DAY BUSINESS EQUALS OR<br />

TOPS ANYTHING UNITED<br />

ARTISTS HAS RELEASED<br />

IN YEARS!<br />

.<br />

-^...^....^^^^^^^^^^^^^<br />

m<br />

m^<br />

In Vancouver, despite worst snowfall in<br />

history, the picture established two house<br />

records and in three other Canadian<br />

engagements, doubled average grosses!<br />

[Masterful -no other description can suffice!," says Boxoffice, and masterful, too, is the business thru UAl


IP<br />

FOR THE LOVE OF MIKi<br />

1^'^<br />

A GREAT<br />

BOOK BECOMES<br />

A GREATER<br />

PICTURE!<br />

yi\'><br />

4<br />

^^-<br />

EVELYN KEYES<br />

in"MRS. MIKE"with J. M. KERRIGAN • ANGELA CLARKE<br />

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER SAMUEL BISCHOFF • PRODUCER EDWARD GROSS<br />

DIRECTED BY LOUIS KING Screenplay by Alfred Lewis Levitt and DeWitt Bodeen<br />

Based on the novel by Benedict and Nancy Freedman<br />

PRESENTED BY NASSOUR STUDIO IN ASSOCIATION WITH HUNTINGTON HARTFORD<br />

DICK POWELL<br />

, -i)<br />

-/'i


k^)WHMr eusiMessil<br />

IN PITTSBURGH, BUFFALO .<br />

SAN FRANCISCO. BALTIMORE,<br />

SEATTLE -<br />

DAYTON, AKRON ,<br />

WHEREVER THIS GREAT PIC-<br />

PLAYING-OPENING<br />

TURE IS<br />

DAY BUSINESS EQUALS OR<br />

TOPS ANYTHING UNITED<br />

ARTISTS HAS RELEASED<br />

IN YEARS!<br />

,<br />

k^^M<br />

In Vancouver, despite worst snowfall in<br />

history, the picture established two house<br />

records and in three other Canadian<br />

engagements, doubled average grosses!<br />

lasterful-no other description can suffice!," says Boxoffice, and masterful, too, is the business thru UA!


Studio Technicians<br />

Put 'Woman Hiding'<br />

In the Limelight<br />

Theatre Collects Dolls<br />

At Shrine-Aided Show<br />

A special Christmas show at the Centui-y<br />

Theatre. Hamilton, Ont., provided almost<br />

1,000 underprivileged youngsters with dolls.<br />

Mel JoUey, manager, persuaded the Shriners<br />

to sponsor the show at which admission was<br />

a doll. The dolls were turned over to the<br />

Red Feather services for distribution.<br />

JoUey put up ten theatre gift books as<br />

prizes for the best dolls contributed. The<br />

Shriners mailed notices to members urging<br />

that they get behind the promotion. Many<br />

did by inserting notices in their newspaper<br />

ads. The newspapers and radio commentators<br />

were generous with publicity.<br />

Flash Lobby Display<br />

John Payne Engineers<br />

Hometown Publicity<br />

At 'China' Premiere<br />

Sheet ballyhoo for "Woman in Hiding" in<br />

Buffalo had wroman riding transit lines with a<br />

traveling bag, suitably lettered with theatre<br />

copy.<br />

Hollywood personalities who appear behind<br />

the production scenes took part in an intensive<br />

promotion developed for the world<br />

premiere of "Woman in Hiding" at the<br />

Lafayette Theatre in Buffalo. The campaign<br />

was carried out by the publicity department<br />

of Universal-International, with on-the-scene<br />

assistance from Bill Brereton, ad-publicity<br />

manager of the Lafayette.<br />

The trio of Hollywood technicians—Bud<br />

Westmore, makeup and hairdressing expert;<br />

Joan St. Oegger, hair stylist, and Yvonne<br />

Wood, fashion designer—were featured in a<br />

fashion show at the Oppenheim Collins department<br />

store two weeks prior to the opening<br />

of "Woman in Hiding." The store used<br />

large newspaper ads and displayed special<br />

window cards playing up the appearance of<br />

the experts from Hollywood. More than 500<br />

women attended the fashion show, making<br />

newspaper headlines the day before opening.<br />

The trio appeared on several Buffalo radio<br />

programs, and each was interviewed by the<br />

newspapers. Station WEBR conducted a<br />

"Woman in Hiding" mystery voice contest.<br />

In this connection, the station used a transcription<br />

of the voice of Peggy Dow who<br />

makes her debut as a screen actress in the<br />

picture. Guest tickets to the Lafayette were<br />

awarded the contest winners.<br />

Station WBEN tied in with the national<br />

hookup via the Wildroot Cream Oil program<br />

featuring Sam Spade and Howard Duff,<br />

the latter co-starred in "Woman in Hiding."<br />

The station supplied posters for distribution<br />

in drug stores and barber shops<br />

and at the theatre, tieing in the Sam Spade<br />

program with the picture playdates.<br />

For street ballyhoo, Brereton engaged a<br />

girl to travel around the city on the surface<br />

transit lines, carrying a suitcase lettered<br />

with copy to the effect that she was the<br />

"Woman in Hiding" and could be seen at<br />

the Lafayette Theatre.<br />

Costs Ten Shillings<br />

At a cost of less than ten shillings, a novel<br />

display piece created by K. P. Kelsall, manager<br />

of the Palladium Cinema, Oldham, England,<br />

did a fine selling job for "It's Magic."<br />

A background was created against the entire<br />

main wall from crepe paper. A large<br />

music scale was reproduced from tubing. Cutouts<br />

of various instruments, borrowed from a<br />

shopkeeper, were displayed against the scale.<br />

At both sides, large music notes were placed<br />

in various positions. The notes were flittered<br />

with metallics and had color heads of the<br />

stars in the picture in the center. Across the<br />

top, another music scale was fronted by cutout<br />

letters in metallics spelling out the title.<br />

A speaker concealed behind the center of<br />

the display played records of song hits heard<br />

in the film production and added considerable<br />

attraction to the display. The leading<br />

record shop exhibited posters and signs plugging<br />

the dates and plugged nimabers from the<br />

picture. Windows were also promoted via a<br />

tieup with the distillers of a popular wine.<br />

0^ '.^\iir^,isimu^^:.}^'',^.s^ssmim%


Top Schinemen Exploit<br />

Local 7wo Jima Slants<br />

Schine circuit theatremen pulled all stops<br />

to exploit "Sands of Iwo Jima" in New York<br />

upstate communities. At Little Falls, Nick<br />

Kauffman, manager of the Rialto, injected<br />

local interest in the campaign by tieups with<br />

patriotic and civic groups, and engaged the<br />

cooperation of local recruiting officers.<br />

A former usher of the Rialto serving as<br />

a reserve fighter pilot and two of his buddies<br />

used part of their flying time to ballyhoo<br />

the picture with combat maneuvers over<br />

the town on Saturday before opening. Local<br />

radio stations used the marine corps angle<br />

to play up the flag-raising sequence depicted<br />

in the film production, around a special program<br />

of martial music including the marine<br />

hymn.<br />

PATRIOTIC POSTERS USEFUL<br />

Patriotic organizations throughout the<br />

community displayed posters with theatre<br />

copy, and members and officers were contacted<br />

via personal letters to inform them<br />

of the pla.ydates. School authorities made<br />

bulletin boards available for special art posters.<br />

A coloring contest, with prizes promoted<br />

from local merchants, was used to<br />

stimulate kid interest, viath awards made<br />

for the best entries on Saturday before<br />

opening.<br />

Marine personnel visited editors of the<br />

local papers, both daily and weekly, providing<br />

the basis for colorful stories published<br />

along with full credits for the theatre playdates.<br />

PTA groups, mothers clubs. Scout<br />

organizations and the YMCA and YWCA<br />

all tied in thiough personal contacts and<br />

posters displayed at organization headquarters.<br />

Window promotions ran the full gamut<br />

from music to guns, all tied in with the<br />

opening.<br />

At the Paramount in Syracuse, Manager<br />

Dick Feldman screened "Sands of Iwo Jima"<br />

for all marines in the area, prospective<br />

enlistees in the reserve, newspaper and radio<br />

representatives and executives with the Veterans<br />

administration. Marine corps A-boards<br />

throughout the Syracuse area were sniped<br />

with copy plugging the Paramount playdates.<br />

The mayor of Syracuse issued a proclamation<br />

on Marine month, and every local<br />

radio station came through with allout plugs<br />

for both the marine recruiting drive and the<br />

picture, all gratis.<br />

GUARD DELIVERS PRINT<br />

The print of the picture was delivered to<br />

the theatre on opening day by a color guard<br />

with motorcycle escort. Newspaper photographers<br />

were on hand to cover the fanfare.<br />

Prominent store windows were given<br />

over to displays of marine accoutrements.<br />

The marine hymn was used as the basis<br />

for obtaining window displays with music<br />

shops and getting free plugs from disk jockeys<br />

on all local radio stations. The marines<br />

provided a display of medals for the theatre<br />

lobby, a Red Cross mobile unit used by<br />

the blood bank was parked in front of the<br />

theatre opening day, and window cards were<br />

distributed to all pubhc and branch libraries,<br />

book shops and book counters of<br />

department stores.<br />

For street ballyhoo, two marine trucks were<br />

converted into perambulating billboards. A<br />

coloring contest was set up throughout the<br />

school system. As a final touch to the campaign,<br />

two Japanese flags captured on Iwo<br />

Jima were placed above the marquee opening<br />

day of the picture, and several marine<br />

heroes of Iwo Jima and Tarawa were introduced<br />

to the opening day audience on the<br />

Paramount stage.<br />

George Pugh, manager of the Rialto Theatre,<br />

Glens Falls, conducted another effective<br />

campaign which was launched at a luncheon<br />

meeting with the ranking marine officer in<br />

the area and Ed Frink of radio station<br />

WGLN, a former marine. Through Prink,<br />

an ABC network program featuring John<br />

Wayne as guest star which was broadcast on<br />

January 17 had live spot plugs for the Rialto<br />

showing of "Sands of Iwo Jima" at the beginning<br />

and end of the program. The following<br />

day, three Marine heroes of Iwo Jima<br />

were honor guests at a Kiwanis luncheon<br />

for the purpose of making a special pitch<br />

for the picture.<br />

A photograph of the mayor of Glens Falls<br />

signing an Iwo Jima day proclamation was<br />

taken by newspaper photographers and run<br />

in late editions of the paper. In connection<br />

with the vaudeville show on January 20,<br />

Major Button of the marine corps made a<br />

personal appearance on the stage and provided<br />

a strong plug for the picture to a<br />

capacity audience.<br />

MARINE WEAPONS DISPLAYED<br />

Marine equipment was exhibited in front<br />

of the theatre in advance and during the<br />

current showing of the picture. On opening<br />

night, holders of the Silver Cross, Gold Star<br />

Mothers and disabled veterans of the marines<br />

living in Glens Falls were introduced<br />

from the stage. The theatre front was converted<br />

into a sensational flash through an<br />

unusual centerpiece. A real flag was mounted<br />

into a cutout of four marines with arms<br />

upstretched, while a concealed motor raised<br />

it up and down. A coloring contest promoted<br />

in cooperation with the local school<br />

system also helped to focus attention on the<br />

picture booking.<br />

At Oneonta, N. Y., Norman Prager, manager<br />

of the Oneonta Theatre, arranged a<br />

lobby display of marine corps equipment, a<br />

recruiting booth and a six-sheet cutout with<br />

a real flag substituted for the illustration.<br />

The flag was animated by an electric fan.<br />

Before the trailer was screened, the show<br />

was stopped while a recording of the marine<br />

hymn was played over the public address<br />

system. Opening day was proclaimed<br />

as Iwo Jima day, and a full-page cooperative<br />

ad was set as a salute to the marines, coincident<br />

with the proclamation. All marine<br />

recruiting programs on local radio stations<br />

carried transcriptions of interview records<br />

with marines who had served in the Iwo<br />

Jima campaign.<br />

A strategically located window in the shopping<br />

section of town was promoted for a<br />

display of Japanese souvenirs, and all business<br />

firms in the downtown area displayed<br />

window cards saluting the man of Oneonta<br />

who had served at Iwo Jima.<br />

His Week's Ad Budget<br />

Used on 'Stable' With<br />

Excellent Effect<br />

To focus extra attention on "Come to the<br />

Stable," Bob O'Regan, owner-manager of the<br />

Twin Theatre, Waynesville, Ohio, devoted his<br />

entire week's newspaper space to plugging<br />

this one attraction. This unusual method of<br />

presentation compensated for itself. Large<br />

crowds were attracted to "Stable" booking,<br />

and they learned of the other midweek bookings<br />

by trailers and the usual lobby displays.<br />

To further hypo interest, O'Regan mailed<br />

post cards to all religious leaders and organizations<br />

in the area.<br />

O'Regan uses 2,500 monthly calendar cards<br />

which are mailed to all rural areas. The cards<br />

are consecutively numbered and each month<br />

25 lucky-number holders are awarded passes.<br />

O'Regan reports that when he took over the<br />

Twin Theatre two years ago, a small plain<br />

card listed the month's attractions. He decided<br />

on using a larger card on the theory<br />

that it was more of an eye-catcher and would<br />

provide him with an opportunity to use mats<br />

on top attractions. He also introduced on the<br />

card advertising space for merchants which<br />

not only defrays the entire cost but wins<br />

goodwill because the businessmen find it effective.<br />

The calendar cards have been used<br />

by schools, the local ball club, etc., in addition<br />

to merchants.<br />

A recent innovation which is proving successful<br />

in attracting extra business to the<br />

theatre is a family weekly ticket. These tickets<br />

must be purchased in advance, and for<br />

$2.50 every member of the immediate family<br />

is entitled to attend every show at the Twin<br />

Theatre during the succeeding week.<br />

$50 Stork Derby Prize<br />

Promotes 'And Baby'<br />

A Stork derby promoted by Ed Pyne, manager<br />

of the RKO 105th Street Theatre^ Cleveland,<br />

and sponsored by a neighborhood merchant,<br />

stimulated wide publicity for "And<br />

Baby Makes Three." The merchant provided<br />

a prize of $50 to the first couple to become<br />

the parents of triplets during the showing of<br />

the picture at the 105th Street Theatre.<br />

The announcements were advertised in newspapers,<br />

at the theatre and on the sponsor's<br />

premises for a week in advance.<br />

With competition increasing from neighborhood<br />

theatres which offer free parking<br />

facilities to patrons, P>Tie recently consummated<br />

a deal with a nearby parking lot tD<br />

provide space for theatre patrons at reduced<br />

rates. A ticket stub bearing the current<br />

date is accepted by the lot as proper<br />

evidence. In return for the courtesy, the<br />

theatre announces the deal through a 40x60<br />

display which serves as a co-op advertisement<br />

for the parking lot.<br />

Creates Boxoifice 'Rib'<br />

Lou Puhrmann, manager of the Arcade in<br />

Cambridge, Md., created an attractive display<br />

on "Adam's Rib." Directly over the<br />

boxoffice, large cutout heads of Katharine<br />

Hepburn and Spencer Tracy were displayed,<br />

with their hands holding a real part of pants<br />

between them. Copy read, "Who wears the<br />

pants in your family?"<br />

44 -38— BOXOFFICE Showmandiser Feb. 4, 1950


1<br />

wi<br />

EVER W/»»! ^ k^<br />

Remember<br />

These Famous<br />

"^d^-And The<br />

Crowds Who<br />

•oved Them!<br />

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'^"°l(^e UTILE RASC&t^.<br />

rt$ TODAY/


Courtesy, Service, Enterfainment,<br />

Key Wometco Drive for Business<br />

Business may be off a trifle, according to<br />

Col. Mitchell Wolfson, co-owner with Sidney<br />

Meyer of the Wometco circuit in Florida,<br />

but there is no reason for Wometco employes<br />

not to provide patrons with the utmost<br />

in service, courtesy and consideration.<br />

Wolfson recently addressed managers of<br />

the circuit through a letter explaining that<br />

the Wometco enterprise was built on a foundation<br />

of courtesy and cordiality. Courtesy,<br />

service and entertainment will be the slogan<br />

for rebuilding business and attracting new<br />

patronage to the Miami theatres.<br />

With Arthur Price, exploitation director for<br />

the circuit's subsequent run theatres,<br />

spearheading the drive, managers are busy<br />

lining up extensive campaigns and promotions<br />

aimed at building grosses.<br />

Gene Race, manager of the Cameo Theatre,<br />

Miami Beach, developed an idea that<br />

created plenty of attention for his booking<br />

of "Miss Grant Takes Richmond" and helped<br />

to cement good relations with local high<br />

school students.<br />

Race had 3,000 cards imprinted with consecutive<br />

numbers in sets for boys and girls.<br />

These were distributed to students with instructions<br />

for them to wear them and try<br />

to find someone of the opposite sex with<br />

the corresponding number. Couples who succeeded<br />

in pairing the matching numbers<br />

were treated to free eats at a hamburger<br />

specialty shop and a free show at the Cameo.<br />

The cards included complete details of the<br />

tieup with mention of the picture playdates,<br />

providing Race with 3,000 walking advertisements<br />

for his show. The restaurant<br />

shared the cost of the cards and supplied<br />

Girl Mimics Jolson<br />

A La Larry Parks<br />

Harold Bignall, assistant manager of the<br />

Sterling (III.) Theatre, carried out an idea<br />

suggested by projectionist Earl Keiser, which<br />

stimulated boxoffice receipts on "Jolson Sings<br />

Again." Bignall had a young woman appear<br />

on stage prior to the running of the "Jolson"<br />

trailer, mimicking facial and body<br />

movements in accompaniment to Jolson records.<br />

The woman was made up in blackface,<br />

her pantomime closely following the songs<br />

as they were amplified over the house public<br />

address system. Between songs, the playdates<br />

were plugged over a microphone hookup.<br />

The stunt was well received by the<br />

audience.<br />

Bignall also arranged a loudspeaker unit<br />

on the marquee canopy so that people passing<br />

the vicinity could hear records and spot<br />

plugs of picture tunes and playdates.<br />

Promotes 'Jima' Co-Op<br />

Stanley Blackburn, manager of the Orpheum<br />

Theatre, Omaha, promoted a fullpage<br />

newspaper ad in the Omaha World<br />

Herald on "Sands of Iwo Jima." Rank's, an<br />

army-navy store, featured the ad in connection<br />

with a special sale.<br />

the food to W'inners as its share of the tieup.<br />

P>rice completed a tieup for the Cameo<br />

Theatre which resulted in the outright sale<br />

of 1,000 tickets to the Pood Fair, a leading<br />

market in the community. The store purchased<br />

the tickets for a showing of "Christopher<br />

Columbus" and distributed them to<br />

children who accompanied their parents on<br />

a shopping trip to the store. The youngsters<br />

had to present a color sketch of a<br />

scene from the picture which had been previously<br />

distributed via a printed herald,<br />

According to Price, the 1,000 kids were accompanied<br />

by their parents accounting for<br />

additional revenue.<br />

Harvey Fleischman, district manager for<br />

the Wometco suburban theatres, directed<br />

managers under his supervision to use a<br />

reminder stunt for "Pinky." Theatre doormen<br />

distributed pieces of string as patrons<br />

entered the lobby. A trailer was flashed<br />

on the screen advising people in the audience<br />

to tie the string around their fingers<br />

to remind them of the "Pinky" playdates.<br />

Fleischman conducts exploitation meetings<br />

each week with managers taking over the<br />

chairmanship on a rotation basis. At a recent<br />

meeting called for the purpose of discussing<br />

campaigns for "Prince of Foxes"<br />

many suggestions were adopted.<br />

Some of the ideas to be incorporated Into<br />

the campaigns: albums with stills and captions<br />

for lobby use, bookmarks for distribution<br />

at schools and libraries; displays of<br />

fencing weapons, etc., manager's personal<br />

endorsement letters and street ballyhoos consisting<br />

of mounted riders dressed in medieval<br />

armor.<br />

Newspaper Sponsors<br />

Contest on 'Forsyte'<br />

Builds 'Savage' Front<br />

Fred Lentz, manager of the Athena Theatre<br />

in Athens, Ohio, used an attractive atmospheric<br />

front to exploit "I Married a Savage."<br />

A banner was constructed across the front<br />

featuring an art display and large cutout<br />

title. Side pieces featured cutouts and stills.<br />

Admiral Distributor<br />

And WMPS Assist<br />

'Port' at Memphis<br />

The outstanding promotion arranged by<br />

James McCarthy, manager of the Warner<br />

Theatre in Memphis, in behalf of "Port of<br />

New York," was a two-way tieup with radio<br />

station WMPS and the local Admiral radio<br />

distributor. The station conducted a twoweek<br />

contest for the best answers to the<br />

question, "What was your most exciting moment?"<br />

with Admiral furnishing radios as<br />

prizes. The contest resulted in dozens of<br />

air plugs daily. Elaborate still displays and<br />

credit cards were set with every Admiral outlet<br />

in town.<br />

Additional radio promotion included announcements<br />

during the Sugar Bowl football<br />

game, and plugs on every local station<br />

for a full week prior to opening. Newspaper<br />

cooperation was excellent, with special features<br />

in addition to art and story breaks<br />

on the amusement pages.<br />

Two hundred cards were suitably spotted<br />

around town, with copy :"The Port of Memphis<br />

salutes 'Port of New York.' See, etc."<br />

A fine window display in the local Braniff<br />

Airlines office featured stills and a card<br />

reading, "A Braniff ticket can speed you<br />

to the 'Port of New York,' etc."<br />

Over 5,000 "wanted" heralds were distributed<br />

prior to opening, and a special front<br />

was built for current use, with blowups of<br />

action stills from the pictm-e, and the title<br />

spread across an overhead panel.<br />

Window Tieups in England C<br />

Assist 'Fountainhead'<br />

Two department store window displays in<br />

Lewisham, England, exploited "The Fountainhead"<br />

for A. A. Owen, manager of the Prince<br />

of Wales Cinema. One of the windows tied<br />

in with the Jane Powell dress shop, the other<br />

was set with a doll's house. The latter was<br />

an important tieup since the doll's house, a<br />

hospital for toys, had figured in a press article<br />

and had been photographed by Pathe<br />

News. Curious persons who came to see the<br />

shop had an opportunity to look over the display<br />

plugging "The Fountainhead" at the<br />

Pi'ince of Wales.<br />

Owen tied up with Blindell's toy shop for<br />

F. S. Falkenburg, manager of the Alabama<br />

Theatre in Birmingham, and Emery Austin,<br />

exploiteer for MGM, promoted a newspaper<br />

contest on "That Forsyte Woman" which<br />

received wide local publicity. The Birmingham<br />

News sponsored the contest and publicized<br />

it daily, both in advance and current. a display on games which helped "Any Number<br />

Can Play."<br />

The contest was open to persons who saw<br />

"That Forsyte Woman" at the Alabama A front-page picture and story in the<br />

Theatre. Contestants were required to write Lewisham Journal and Borough News commended<br />

Owen recently for collecting toys for<br />

a letter in 50 words or less, giving their opinion<br />

of "That Forsyte Woman." A plane trip needy children prior to the holiday season.<br />

to Hollywood was promoted for the winner, Owen's appeal to patrons of the theatre was<br />

reservations at a Hollywood hotel, a visit to accompanied by a display of a Christmas<br />

the MGM studios and a sight-seeing tour of tree in the theatre lobby as a collection<br />

Hollywood.<br />

point. The tree was presented to the children<br />

at Lewisham hospital by the mayoress.<br />

Lily May Caldwell, critic for the Birmingham<br />

News, accompanied the winner to Hollywood,<br />

covering the complete trip, which received<br />

additional publicity in the columns of<br />

Bookings on Page One<br />

the newspaper.<br />

Bill Shelton, manager of the Loulsburg<br />

(N.C.) Theatre, has his entire week's attractions<br />

listed on the front page of the Franklin<br />

News, county weekly, through a cooperative<br />

tieup with the publisher. Once each week<br />

the publisher receives a pair of passes, in return<br />

for which the theatre listings are published<br />

every week under a special heading,<br />

"On the Screen." Tlie paper has a circulation<br />

of 2,000 and reaches most of the families<br />

throughout the Louisburg district.<br />

46 —40— BOXOFFICE Showmandiser Feb. 4, 1950


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Come to one of the world's greatest convention<br />

cities! Enjoy the New Orleans<br />

Carnival Spirit for four gala days! The<br />

loco! committee is setting up a program<br />

of entertainment that will top all previous<br />

W^<br />

conventions of the men who make up<br />

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^»^- .^^^<br />

^e^rtofS^oK/BuSmss<br />

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Newspaper Features<br />

Twin Contest Which<br />

Showman Set Up<br />

A newspaper contest developed around a<br />

human interest angle netted front-page publicity<br />

and art spreads for three months in<br />

the West Memphis News for Bruce Young,<br />

manager of the Crittenden Theatre, West<br />

Memphis, Ark.<br />

Young decided that there must be quite a<br />

number of twins in and around the community.<br />

He contacted the editor of the West<br />

Memphis News, sold him on the human interest<br />

angle, obtained his full cooperation and<br />

launched an enterprise to make the citizens<br />

of the community aware of all the twins<br />

in the area.<br />

The local photographer agreed to take pictures<br />

of all the twins who registered. From<br />

the photographs, newspaper cuts were made<br />

and each week the paper ran a large cut<br />

of the Twins of the Week. At the same time,<br />

Young used a short trailer picturing the<br />

Twins of the Week. Interest in the contest<br />

grew to a point where everyone in town<br />

watched the paper, and entries poured in<br />

from town and county. Local merchants<br />

donated prizes so that every entrant received<br />

a free gift.<br />

As a final climax. Young and the newspaper<br />

will have a party for all twins in the<br />

area, at which time motion pictures will be<br />

taken of the group for exhibition on the<br />

Crittenden screen.<br />

TV and Radio Broadcast<br />

Ballyhoo 'Iwo Jima'<br />

Local publicity developed around veterans<br />

of the Iwo Jima campaign exploited "Sands<br />

of Iwo Jima" for Warren Butler, manager<br />

of the Lyric Theatre, Salt Lake City. Butler<br />

invited 70 veterans of the campaign to be<br />

guests on opening night with their wives.<br />

They were seated in a reserved seat section.<br />

The invitation was widely publicized by the<br />

press and radio commentators.<br />

A five-minute television broadcast was<br />

promoted over KDYL-TV featuring two<br />

brothers, both marines, who met on Iwo Jima<br />

while looking for each other's grave marker.<br />

The brothers were also starred on a 15-<br />

mlnute radio show from the stage of the<br />

Lyric on opening night.<br />

An advance lobby display and special outside<br />

front was created for the current showing.<br />

Bus cards and bum.per strips on taxis<br />

and privately owned vehicles also helped.<br />

Street Broadcast Plugs<br />

Midnight Spook Show<br />

Elmer DeWitt, manager of the Valentine,<br />

Defiance, Ohio, received help from the announcer<br />

of the WONW Man on the Street<br />

program in exploiting a midnight spook show.<br />

During a special broadcast, the announcer<br />

wore a Frankenstein mask which completely<br />

covered his head and face. Persons were<br />

interviewed in this fashion and a few passes<br />

for interviewees squared the deal. The show<br />

was mentioned several times during the<br />

broadcast. An usher, bandaged from head<br />

to foot like a mummy, stood by during the<br />

broadcast with a sign plugging the dates.<br />

Here's Easter Answer<br />

For What's Cooking?<br />

Theatre managers looking for a good<br />

£aster promotion caji take a tip from a<br />

tieup arranged by Warner Bros, with<br />

the toy department of Macy's in New<br />

York.<br />

By special arrangement with the distributor,<br />

the store will feature Bugs<br />

Bunny in person from March 18 to April<br />

15. Bugs will be impersonated by an<br />

actor in a special bunny costume. Children<br />

visiting the store prior to the<br />

Easter holiday will be presented to Bugs<br />

Bunny and have their photographs<br />

taken with him, similar to the Santa<br />

promotions around Christmas time.<br />

Macy's is devoting a considerable<br />

portion of its sales campaign on<br />

Easter toys towards the promotion of<br />

commercial products utilizing various<br />

Warner Bros. ca


'<br />

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Film<br />

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Year Books<br />

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The YEAR BOOK Contains:<br />

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'Personnel of companies .<br />

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Over 1000 Pages<br />

groups . in Television<br />

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distributors . manufacturers, products<br />

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list of film exchanges, managers names . carriers<br />

... A list of more than 22,000 motion pictures<br />

released since 1915, together with release date and review<br />

dates . of players, producers, directors, photographers,<br />

film editors, writers, and art directors released<br />

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with Film Daily review date . released since 1920 .<br />

World-wide statistics of importance to the entire industry.<br />

AND 1,001<br />

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spot value to exhibitors and distributors. News presented<br />

in the same brief, readable, interpretive, interesting style which<br />

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Contractor saves penalty of $500<br />

- by investing $3.84 in Air Express<br />

Time clause in housing project paving contract stood good chance of being invoked<br />

when equipment broke down at 5 p.m. So 10-lb. carton of replacement parts was<br />

Air Jixpressed from 1200 miles away. Delivered in just 8 hours. The Air Express<br />

charge was only S3.8 t~and contractor completed job on time<br />

$3.84 Is small indeed, since it covers<br />

door-to-door service. Anytime delivery,<br />

7 days a week. Makes the world's fastest<br />

shipping service the most convenient.<br />

Air Express goes by Scheduled Airlines;<br />

extra dependability, experienced handling.<br />

Shipments keep moving. Regular<br />

use keeps any business moving.<br />

Only Air Express gives you all these advantages<br />

World's fastest shipping service.<br />

Special door-to-door service at no extra cost.<br />

One-carrier responsibility all the way.<br />

1150 cities served direct by air; air-rail to 22,000 oflF-airline offices.<br />

Experienced Air Express has handled over 25 million shipments.<br />

Because of these advantages, regular use of Air Express pays. It's your best air<br />

shipping buy. For fastest shipping action, phone Air Express Division, Railway<br />

l!-xpress Agency. (Many low commodity rates in eflFect. Investigate )<br />

Baltimore Air Waves<br />

Filled With Music<br />

For 'On the Town'<br />

Extensive radio promotion, local tleups and<br />

ballyhoo were used for "On the Tovm" by<br />

Jack Sidney, publicity manager for the Century<br />

Theatre, Baltimore. Sidney connected<br />

for free plugs via spots and contests on the<br />

Musical Clock program. Afternoon Carousel,<br />

Nocturne and the Friendly Neighbor programs,<br />

all aired on WCAO. The station also<br />

used the Ann Miller interview transcription<br />

the day before opening and an interview<br />

recording of Gene Kelly and Vera-Ellen on<br />

opening day.<br />

Station WITH provided gratis plugs on its<br />

Wake Up, Baltimore and Hall of Hits shows.<br />

The Morning in Maryland program over<br />

WFBR used daily spots on a three-hour<br />

morning show in advance and currently.<br />

Station WBMD used spot announcements<br />

and contests on the Mickey Fox show and<br />

Happy Johnny show, with frequent mention<br />

of the picture playdates.<br />

The Baltimore Evening Sun, Sunday Sun,<br />

Sunday American and News Post provided<br />

advance and current art breaks to create<br />

advance interest in the film dates. Readers<br />

were also promoted in the Jewish Times, the<br />

Art and the Home News.<br />

A large electrically lighted cutout display<br />

was used three weeks in advance in the theatre<br />

lobby, and attractive display boards<br />

covered the transoms over the outer doors<br />

exiting from the Century Theatre.<br />

Sidney tied up with the Baltimore News<br />

Co. via the Screen Stories magazine<br />

front cover of the January issue which pictures<br />

the stars of "On the Town." Fifteen<br />

trucks making daily deliveries in the city and<br />

suburbs were bannered with signs tieing in<br />

the magazine cover with the theatre playdates.<br />

The news company also distributed<br />

200 window cards at newsstands and railroad<br />

and bus stations.<br />

A special throwaway herald was imprinted<br />

for distribution, the entire cost underwritten<br />

by a merchant ad. Ten thousand of these<br />

heralds were put out during the week prior<br />

to opening. Two thousand table tents saturated<br />

bars and restaurants in the downtown<br />

area of Baltimore.<br />

THE<br />

MOST NOVING<br />

DHHNH ON THE<br />

f<br />

SCHEEN TOHBYr^<br />

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Rates include pick-up and delivery door<br />

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A service of<br />

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50<br />

—44— BOXOFFICE Showmandiser Feb. 4, 1950


ik<br />

Experts Exchange Ideas on Showmanship<br />

20fh-Fox Parley on Film Selling Attended by Top Theatre Ad-Publicity Directors<br />

Some of the country's top theatre advertising and publicity<br />

directors attended the second merchandising conference<br />

of its kind calle'd by 20th Century-Fox in New York<br />

lost week. The experts heard 20th-Fox executives discuss<br />

film selling problems. Executives of other distributor companies<br />

and several exhibitor leaders also took part in the<br />

discussions. Two Canadian circuits were represented.<br />

Scenes at the meeting are reproduced on this page.<br />

Left to right: Larry Graburn, Odeon Theatres, Canada; James R. Nairn,<br />

Famous Players Canadian; Sam Glasier, 20th-Fox, Canada; J. Knox<br />

Strachan, Warner Theatres, Ohio; Everett Callow, Warner Theatres,<br />

Philadelphia. At right Norris Hadaway, Wilby-Kincey Theatres.<br />

Greensboro, N. C, Emit Bernstecker, Paramount Wilby Theatres, Atlanta;<br />

Emmett Rogers, Tivoli Theatre, Chattanooga.<br />

E. E. Whilaker, Georgia Theatres, Atlanta, Harry Ballance, 20th-Fox,<br />

Atlanta; Tommy Read, Lucas and Jenkins, Atlanta; Paul Wilson, 20th-<br />

Fox, Atlanta; J. C, Hunter, Talbot Theatres, Tulsa. At right, Nick<br />

Matsoukas, Skouras Theatres, New York; Edgar Goth, Fabian circuit,<br />

HornsDurg, Pa. Walter Higgins, Prudential Theatres, New York; Paul<br />

Levi, American Theatres, Boston; Horry Browning, New England<br />

Theatres, Boston, Lou Brown, Loew's Theatres, New Haven; Phil Engel,<br />

20th-Fox, Boston; Jonas Rosenfeld, 20th-Fox, New York.<br />

lohn Mahon, Penn Paramount TheaL-es, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; Roger Rice,<br />

Video Theatres, Oklahoma City; Harry Mandel, RKO Theatres, New<br />

York; Ernie Em.erling, Loew's Theatre, New York; Seymour Morri.


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'<br />

Tom Thumb Wedding Stimulates<br />

Theatre Goodwill and Revenue<br />

Any off night can be converted into a<br />

boxoffice bonanza and at the same time put<br />

the theatre's participation in community affairs<br />

in the limelight, according to Delmar<br />

Sherrill. assistant manager of the Playhouse<br />

Theatres, Statesville, N. C. He also<br />

handles the advertising and publicity chores<br />

for Statesville Theatre Corp., headed by<br />

Fuller Sams.<br />

There is no doubt that Sherrill's promotion<br />

comes under the heading of public relations<br />

since it engaged students from three<br />

grade schools in the community, helped to<br />

refurbish their library record fund and attracted<br />

1,600 parents to the 1,000-seat Playhouse<br />

via advance sale of tickets.<br />

The stunt itself was a Tom Thumb stage<br />

wedding. It was staged with all the pageantry,<br />

dignity and decorum, of a real wedding,<br />

with teachers serving as advisers. About<br />

135 first and second grade pupils participated<br />

in the elaborate proceedings. Boys<br />

were dressed in tuxedos, the girls in formal<br />

attire. A vested choir from the Avery Sherrill<br />

school, more than 50 voices and two<br />

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The advance sale of tickets was handled<br />

m^^<br />

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Chair supplies. Everything for theatre chairs.<br />

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Used chairs, guaranteed good. Advise quantity<br />

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Chair Parts: We furnish most any part you require.<br />

Send sample for price, hrackets, backs<br />

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Several thousand used opera chairs now In<br />

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Many years In the seating business is your<br />

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54 —48— BOXOFFICE Showmandiser Feb. 4, 1950


: February<br />

TOA Group to<br />

Meet<br />

On COMPO, Taxes<br />

NEW YORK—Further discussion of the<br />

attitude of the Theatre Owners of America<br />

toward COMPO will take place March<br />

1 and 2 at a meeting of the executive<br />

committee to be held at the Astor hotel.<br />

Recently the committee delayed approval<br />

pending further discussion of the method<br />

on financing. There has been some objection<br />

from regional units to the proposed<br />

10-cent assessment on each $100 of<br />

film rentals. The executive committee can<br />

make recommendations to regional units.<br />

A final draft of a suggested code of fair<br />

trade practices also will be presented for<br />

discussion.<br />

Gael Sullivan, executive director, will<br />

report upon his recent conferences in<br />

Washington on hearings to be held before<br />

the house ways and means committee.<br />

TOA representatives will appear at these<br />

hearings to present their arguments for<br />

elimination of the 20 per cent ticket tax.<br />

Two other topics scheduled for discussion<br />

will be a budget for theatre television<br />

headings before the FCC and the<br />

selection of a city for the next TOA annual<br />

convention.<br />

Jersey Thealre Group<br />

Joins Tax Campaign<br />

NEW YORK—Every theatre in New Jersey<br />

will show the antitax trailer and there will<br />

be a committee in each of the 14 congressional<br />

districts to contact congressmen for<br />

the purpose of pointing out the discriminatory<br />

nature of the ticket tax. This was decided<br />

upon at a meeting of the Federation<br />

of New Jersey Theatre Owners held Tuesday<br />

(311 in Newark.<br />

The federation was formed about two years<br />

ago to weld ITOA, Allied of New Jersey. TOA<br />

of New Jersey and unaffiliated theatres into<br />

a statewide unit to combat adverse legislation.<br />

All theatres will also show one-sheets<br />

and will have petition cards and other material<br />

to be furnished by COMPO.<br />

The following chairmen have been appointed<br />

for the various congressional districts:<br />

First, Joe Varbalow and sam Frank; second.<br />

Bill Hunt, Frank Waxman and A. Vani:<br />

third, Pete Gage: fourth, Ed Saiderman and<br />

Frank Hildinger: fifth, Ed Lachman and Pete<br />

Gage: sixth, Irving DoUinger and Don Jacocks;<br />

seventh, Frank Fowler and Joe Lefkowitz:<br />

eighth. Maury Miller and Gary<br />

Voorman: ninth, Maury Stahl and Tony Williams;<br />

tenth. Harold Wiedenhorn and Walter<br />

Jacobs, eleventh, Jerome Kridel and Murray<br />

Scharf; tw^elfth, George Gold, Lito Hill and<br />

Sam Engelman, thirteenth, Ed Batlan and<br />

Jack Fields, and fourteenth, Al Margolies<br />

and Jim Kolbeck.<br />

Present at the Newark meeting were Maury<br />

Miller, president of TOA of New Jersey:<br />

George Gold, Allied of New Jersey: Morton<br />

Sunshine, ITOA; Pete Gage, Walter Reade<br />

Theatres: Frank Damis and Harry Goldberg,<br />

Warner Bros, theatres; Harold Blumenthal.<br />

Fabian Theatres, and William Phillip.s.<br />

Loew's, Inc.<br />

BOXOFTICE ;<br />

MMPTA Pledges to Pass<br />

Any Tax Cut to Patrons<br />

NEW YORK—Owners of both Broadway<br />

downtown theatres and neighborhood theatres<br />

said Monday (30i that if the federal admissions<br />

tax is repealed they will pass on the<br />

saving to their patrons. They went on record<br />

at a meeting of the Metropolitan Motion Picture<br />

Theatres Ass'n, which completed plans<br />

to use trailers calling attention to the unfairness<br />

of the tax and asking patrons to write<br />

their representatives in Congress pleas for<br />

repeal, which, it was estimated, would save<br />

New York patrons $37,200,000 annually.<br />

Emanual Frisch. owner of theatres in<br />

Brooklyn and Queens and chairman of the<br />

MMPTA federal tax committee, said the entertainment<br />

dollar of patrons is limited and<br />

that the tax is "slowly pricing the necessity<br />

of relaxation and entertainment out of the<br />

lives of people of low income groups, the<br />

majority of whom have always looked to<br />

motion pictures as their main source of entertainment."<br />

Among those attending the meeting were<br />

Leo Brecher. Oscar A. Doob. Russell V. E>owning.<br />

Harry Goldberg. Sol A. Schwartz. Harold<br />

Klein. Morton Sunshine. Samuel Rcsen. Edward<br />

Rugoff, Fred J, Schwartz. Leslie<br />

Schwartz, Jack Mclnerney, Solomon M.<br />

Strau.sberg, Louis M. Weber, Vernon Hammer,<br />

Peter Fink, Walter Higgins and D. John<br />

Phillips.<br />

The photo shows, front row, left to right:<br />

Leo Brecher, president of MMPTA and<br />

Brecher Theatres: James Mclnerney. United<br />

Paramount Theatres; Emanuel Frisch. Randforce<br />

Theatres: Oscar A. Doob. Loew's Theatres;<br />

Carl Rigrod. Donahue & Coe Advertising<br />

Agency; Louis M. Weber. Skouras Theatres,<br />

and Fred J. Schwartz. Centmy Theatres.<br />

Rear: Peter Pink, City Entertainment<br />

Corp.; D. John Phillips, executive director of<br />

MMPTA; Harry Goldberg, Warner Theatres;<br />

Sam Ro.sen, Fabian Theatres: Leslie Schwartz,<br />

Century Theatres; Walter Higgins, Prudential<br />

Theatres: Morton Sunshine, executive director<br />

of ITOA; Harold Klein, J. J. Theatres; Ernest<br />

Emerling, Loew's Theatres; Solomon M.<br />

Strausberg. Interboro Theatres: O. R. Mc-<br />

Mahon. RKO Theatres; Edw-ard N. Rugoff.<br />

Rugoff and Becker, and James F. Gould<br />

(partially hidden i. Radio City Music Hall.<br />

Ned Depinet Makes Spirited Plea<br />

For Support of COMPO Program<br />

NEW YORK—Ned E.<br />

Depinet. RKO president,<br />

delivered a spirited plea for support<br />

of the Council of Motion Picture Organizations<br />

public relations program and its antitax<br />

campaign at the closing session of the<br />

20th Century-Fox merchandising conference.<br />

He also defended the proposal to collect<br />

one-tenth of one per cent on film rentals<br />

from exhibitors and similar amounts from<br />

distributors as a "painless" means of financing<br />

the new movement.<br />

"The new .spirit permeating our industry<br />

today reminds me of the unity with which<br />

we worked during the war." he said. "The<br />

accomplishments of the War Activities Committee,<br />

in which all of you ladies and gentlemen<br />

played a conspicuous role, are a matter<br />

of history; they are a great satisfaction<br />

to us all, but there's no valid reason to wait<br />

for a war or some other national calamity<br />

to bring about a coalition of worthy purposes.<br />

There's no rea,son why we can't do<br />

it now, and all the time, and that's why all<br />

elements are joining in COMPO."<br />

Depinet said the industry is still faced with<br />

many grave readjustments, legal and financial<br />

problems.<br />

"Not the least of these is public indifference<br />

or open hostility to the motion picture<br />

and its people." he said. "No one group<br />

can be charged with responsibility, and no<br />

one can escape the evil fruits of the situation.<br />

All of us, distributors, exhibitors, advertisers<br />

and publicists, suppliers, producers,<br />

actors, writers, technicians and Investors,<br />

live off the sale of little pieces of cardboard,<br />

into which have been compre.s.sed all our<br />

labors, hopes and ambitions, called theatre<br />

tickets. When they fail to sell, we all suffer.<br />

We all have a stake in progress and an<br />

equal share in failure."<br />

Depinet asserted that public relations are<br />

the problem of every individual in the industry.<br />

4. 1950 N 55


. . Richard<br />

. . Robert<br />

. . Mervyn<br />

. . Sam<br />

. . William<br />

. . Hugh<br />

. .<br />

. . Cy<br />

. . Bob<br />

. .<br />

. .<br />

: February<br />

BROADWAY<br />

.<br />

.<br />

f^harles Skouras, president of Fox West<br />

Coast Theatres, left for Los Angeles<br />

S. H. Fabian, president of Fabian Theatres,<br />

is vacationing in Florida P.<br />

Rodgers, MGM vice-president and general<br />

sales manager, will return Monday from a<br />

.<br />

holiday at Miami Beach Owen,<br />

Paramount division manager, held sales<br />

meetings at the Boston and New Haven<br />

branches. Phil Isaacs, his assistant, returned<br />

to New York following the Boston<br />

meet.<br />

William Thomas came in with a print of<br />

the latest Pine-Thomas production, "The<br />

Lawless," which he screened for A. W.<br />

Schwalberg, sales head, and other Paramount<br />

executives<br />

. LeRoy, who<br />

will direct "Quo Vadis" for MGM in Italy<br />

in May, sailed for England where he will<br />

confer with Ben Goetz, who is in charge<br />

of tests for some of the leading characters.<br />

Also to England went Virginia Mayo and<br />

husband, Michael O'Shea; Mary Garden,<br />

former opera star, who appeared in silent<br />

films, and Zinka Milanov . . . Victor Saville,<br />

another director for MGM, left for London<br />

by airplane January 28.<br />

to Florida for vacations. They were to return<br />

in time for "The Guilty Bystander"<br />

cocktail party Monday (6i ... WiUiam B.<br />

Zoellner, head of the MGM reprint and<br />

short subject sales, got back from a threeweek<br />

tour of exchanges<br />

. . . Joel Bezahler,<br />

MGM home office sales executive, returned<br />

from Chicago where he conferred with Burtus<br />

Bishop jr., midwestern sales manager,<br />

1950<br />

James R. Grainger, Republic vice-president,<br />

left for a visit to Boston<br />

Kirby, Warner Bros, southern<br />

. . .<br />

division<br />

John<br />

sales<br />

manager, went to Atlanta February 1 and<br />

will proceed to Charlotte before returning<br />

to New York . . . Lew Kerner, executive<br />

talent director for Samuel Goldwyn, is in<br />

Manhattan to cover theatres, night clubs<br />

and vaudeville<br />

program<br />

in search of players for the<br />

Sid Weiner,<br />

of pictures . . .<br />

formerly with Globe Films in charge of<br />

sales, is now associated with Films International<br />

of America.<br />

Edward Schnitzer, eastern and Canadian<br />

sales manager for United Artists, is on a<br />

tour of exchanges that will take him to<br />

Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Detroit, Washington<br />

and Philadelphia<br />

. Horowitz, Chicago<br />

district manager for Motion Picture<br />

Sales, is in New York for conferences with<br />

Neil Agnew and Charles L. Casanave on<br />

the forthcoming "Volcano."<br />

Donald O'Connor, Yvonne DeCarlo, Patricia<br />

Medina, Lois Andrews, Jackie Coogan<br />

and the group of U-I e.xecuttves and newspaper<br />

men who toured U.S. occupied Germany<br />

for showings of "Francis," returned<br />

on the special plane<br />

Ethel Barrymore,<br />

Francis<br />

MGM star<br />

Chariot . . .<br />

who has been<br />

showseeing in Manhattan for two weeks,<br />

returned to the west coast (3).<br />

Denise Darcel, who has been appearing<br />

in various cities in connection with "Battleground,"<br />

wound up her tour in Boston<br />

and returned to New York . Hope<br />

and wife were at the Waldorf-Astoria a<br />

few days before leaving for Washington .<br />

Ben Washer, film publicist, has opened a<br />

.<br />

.<br />

New York office in the RKO building<br />

Budd Rogers, vice-president of Realart, and<br />

wife celebrated their 30th wedding anniversary<br />

Margie Harte, secretary<br />

January 27 . . . in the Eagle Lion print department,<br />

has announced her engagement to Richard<br />

V. Long Eichman, advertising and<br />

publicity director of Astor Pictures, became<br />

a daddy of an eight-pound baby boy.<br />

.<br />

Alfred Crown, foreign sales manager for<br />

Samuel Goldwyn Productions, returned from Ferguson Given Luncheon<br />

a two-week trip to England, France and Germany<br />

.<br />

Carlson, who has been By Fellow MGM Workers<br />

filming "King Solomon's Mines" for MGM NEW YORK—William R. Ferguson, exploitation<br />

head of MGM, was given a farewell<br />

in Nairobi, South Africa, returned by plane<br />

February 1, accompanied by Robert Surtees luncheon Monday (30) at the Astor hotel<br />

of the production unit . . . Alfred Junge, following his retirement from the company<br />

who will be art director on MGM's "Ivanhoe," after 30 years. Howard Dietz, MGM vicepresident,<br />

flew to Hollywood after arriving from London<br />

presided.<br />

to confer with studio executives on the Guests were Joseph R. Vogel, Charles C.<br />

British filming.<br />

Moskowitz, J. Robert Rubin, Charles M. Reagan,<br />

Sam Seidelman, Edward M. Saunders, Oscar A. Doob,<br />

general foreign manager Ernest Emerling, Silas F. Seadler, John<br />

for Eagle Lion, returned from London by Joseph, Herb Crooker, Tom Gerety, Mel Heymann.<br />

plane<br />

Lippert<br />

L. Lippert, president of<br />

H. M. Mike Simons and Dan<br />

Richey,<br />

Rex Carlton,<br />

Terrell. The latter was named successor to<br />

Productions, came in . . .<br />

president of Laurel Films, left for Ber-<br />

Ferguson recently.<br />

muda and Joseph Lerner, vice-president, went<br />

Richard Walsh to Serve<br />

On Heart Committee<br />

NEW YORK—Richard P. Walsh, international<br />

president of lATSE, will serve as a<br />

member of the national labor committee of<br />

the 1950 campaign of the American Heart<br />

Committee. The $6,000,000 fund-raising drive<br />

will take place during the month of February.<br />

To facilitate labor's support in this<br />

drive, Secretary Maurice J. Tobin, chairman<br />

of the national labor committee of the 1950<br />

campaign, has designated Ralph Wright, assistant<br />

secretary of labor, as his aide.<br />

Edward Schnitzer, UA,<br />

Heart Attack Victim<br />

New York—Edward M. Schnitzer, eastern<br />

and Canadian sales manager for<br />

United Artists, died of a heart attack<br />

Thursday as he boarded a train in Grand<br />

Central station. He was about to leave<br />

on a vacation trip with Vitalis L. Chalis,<br />

a member of the UA board. Schnitzer<br />

was a veteran of 30 years in the film<br />

business and was widely known in the<br />

industry. He was 56 years old.<br />

Brotherhood Awards<br />

Presented to Three<br />

NEW YORK—Barney Balaban, president<br />

of Paramount Pictures; George Murphy,<br />

MGM actor and president of Screen Actors<br />

Guild, and Maxwell Anderson, playwright,<br />

were presented 1950 Brotherhood awards of<br />

the National Conference of Christians and<br />

Jews at a luncheon meeting at the Waldorf-<br />

Astoria hotel February 2. The awards are<br />

presented annually to individuals identified<br />

with the motion picture industry and the<br />

theatre who have helped the cause of building<br />

goodwill and understanding among Protestants,<br />

Catholics and Jews.<br />

Louis Nizer. film attorney, presided at the<br />

luncheon which was attended by 1,000 men<br />

and women of the industry. Nizer first introduced<br />

Madeleine Carroll, New York chairman<br />

of Brotherhood Week who made the presentation<br />

to Murphy, who said he accepted the<br />

award for "all the people in show business."<br />

J. Robert Rubin, vice-president of Loew's,<br />

Inc., general chairman of the Amusement<br />

division of the NCCJ, gave the award to<br />

Anderson. Former Secretary of the Navy<br />

John L. Sullivan, general chairman of Brotherhood<br />

Week, presented the award to Balaban<br />

and noted the latter's contribution to the success<br />

of the Freedom Train.<br />

Ted R. Gamble, national chairman of the<br />

Brotherhood Week committee for the amusement<br />

industry, also spoke.<br />

Others on the dais included:<br />

lack Ahcoate, Leon J Bamberger, Robert Benjamin<br />

Leo Brecher, John Chapman, Dr. Everett R Clinchy<br />

Robert W Coyne, Thomas R, Dash, Howard Dietz<br />

Leopold Friedman, Ned E Depinet, WiUiam German<br />

WiUiam Hawkins, Will H. Hays, Jhmes M. Jerauld<br />

Karry M. Kalmine, Maurice Kann, Malcolm Kingsberg<br />

lock Lawrence, Charles E. Lewis, Robert Mochrie<br />

Charles C. Moskowitz, John J. O'Connor, Edmund<br />

Reek, Herman Rcbbins. Abe Schneider, A. W. Schwalberg,<br />

Fred Schwartz, C J. ScoUard. Sam Sham, Ben<br />

Shiyen, George Skouras, Spyros P. Skouras, Nate B.<br />

Spiiigold, Morion Sunshine, Joseph Vogel, Mo Wax,<br />

Kurt Weil and Max E Youngstein.<br />

Sears and Peskay Aiding<br />

Heart Fund Campaign<br />

NEW YORK—Gradwell L. Sears, president<br />

of United Artists, and Edward J. Peskay, representative<br />

of Harry M. Popkin, producer,<br />

will be honorary chairmen of the Mark Hellinger<br />

Memorial Night Sundays, February 8,<br />

at the Mark Hellinger Theatre. Proceeds go<br />

to the New York heart fund campaign, of<br />

which Mrs. Arthur "Bugs" Baer is general<br />

chairman for 1950.<br />

Popkin's "Champagne for Caesar," co-starring<br />

Ronald Colman and Celeste Holm, will<br />

be the feature attraction for the affair. It<br />

will be a special pre-release showing.<br />

Ed Sullivan is chairman of the entertainment<br />

division for the heart fund campaign.<br />

'Barricade' Release Set<br />

NEW YORK — "Barricade," Warner Bros,<br />

feature starring Raymond Massey, Claude<br />

Rains, Dane Clark, Robert Douglas and Ruth<br />

Roman, is set for national distribution the<br />

week of April 1,<br />

National Board to Confer<br />

NEW YORK—The National Board of Review<br />

of Motion Pictures will hold its annual<br />

conference March 23, 24 at the Hotel McAlpin.<br />

It will mark the 41st anniversary of the<br />

board.<br />

56 BOXOFFICE<br />

:<br />

4, 1950


: February<br />

More PCA Latitude,<br />

Says Wayne Griffin<br />

NEW YORK—Tlie Production Code administration,<br />

lieaded by Josepli Breen. is getting<br />

more cooperative with producers and<br />

Z. WAYNE GRIFFIN<br />

is keeping abreast of the times "by widening<br />

its scope and giving us as much latitude<br />

as possible," according to Z. Wayne<br />

Griffin, director of "Key to the City" for<br />

MGM release. Griffin mentioned his own<br />

film and MGM's "Adam's Rib" and "I Was<br />

a Male War Bride" for 20th Century-Fox<br />

as three pictures containing scenes or dialog<br />

which might have been cut out a few<br />

years ago.<br />

Griffin, who dii'ected his first film. "Family<br />

Honeymoon." for Universal-International<br />

only a year ago, made his second. "Key to<br />

City." under a package deal with MGM.<br />

He now has three properties ready for filming<br />

and hopes to close a multiple-package<br />

deal with some studio for their filming during<br />

the next year. The stories are: "The<br />

Big Moose," "Genius in the House" and "The<br />

Iron Butterfly," all of which are owned by<br />

Griffin Productions of which he is the sole<br />

owner.<br />

"Family Honeymoon" is expected to show<br />

a $600,000 profit for U-I and himself, according<br />

to Griffin. Previously. Griffin had<br />

been a radio producer for 15 years and only<br />

entered the picture business after several<br />

producers had turned down "Family Honeymoon"<br />

and he decided to produce it himself.<br />

Griffin is in New York to attend the<br />

opening of "Key to the City" at Loew's State<br />

and to see new Broadway shows with Mrs.<br />

Griffin. He will return to the coast February<br />

9 to start preparations for filming<br />

"The Big Moose."<br />

Wayne Griifin Plays Host<br />

To Gotham Area Mayors<br />

NEW YORK—The unsung "locality mayors"<br />

of New York City, headed by Vincent R.<br />

Impellitteri. acting in the ab.sence of Mayor<br />

O'Dwyer. were guests of Z. Wayne Griffin.<br />

producer of "Key to the City" at an evening<br />

performance of the picture at Loew's State<br />

Theatre February 1.<br />

Among those who attended were Louis<br />

Zeltner. chief mayor; Sammy Fuchs, the<br />

Bowery; David Katz, Coney Island; Abe Goldstein.<br />

Broadway; Jack Sohn. Brownsville;<br />

Daniel O'Rourke, Park Row; Stanley Sienicki.<br />

Grand Street, and William Ray, Canarsie.<br />

The idea to have an informal convention of<br />

"locality mayors" was inspired by the mayor s<br />

convention in the picture.<br />

MPAA TV Committee Told<br />

Appearance Notices Due<br />

NEW YORK—Member companies of the<br />

Motion Picture Ass'n of America must file<br />

appearance notices with the Federal Communications<br />

commission before February 27<br />

u they want to participate in future commission<br />

hearings on large-screen theatre television.<br />

This was brought out at a meetin;?<br />

of the MPAA television committee Tuesday<br />

(311. which reviewed the history of events<br />

leading up to the hearings. Edward Cheyfitz,<br />

assistant to Eric Johnston, MPAA president,<br />

presided.<br />

Six-Day Vaudeville Bill<br />

Starts at RKO Alhambra<br />

NEW YORK—RKO brought<br />

popular-price<br />

vaudeville back to the Alhambra Theatre,<br />

126 street on Seventh avenue. Friday (3) in<br />

combination with a film. "The Gal Who TooP:<br />

the West." The program will remain througli<br />

February 11. Except for the RKO Palace iri<br />

Times Square, which has been playing i,<br />

weekly combination film and vaudeville program<br />

since last spring, there are no othei'<br />

full weeks of variety programs in New York.<br />

If the Alhambra experiment is successful, thi;<br />

city's vaudeville may be expanded, according<br />

to RKO Theatres officials.<br />

Lux Film Appoints Levine<br />

NEW YORK—Philip Levine has been appointed<br />

New York sales representative of the<br />

Lux Film Distributing Corp. by Bernard Jacon.<br />

vice-president. Levine formerly was<br />

manager and operator of the Burke Theatre<br />

in the Bronx and comes to Lux Film from<br />

Warner Bros. New York exchange.<br />

Films of Nations Moves<br />

NEW YORK—Films of the Nations, Inc.,<br />

has moved to new and larger quarters at 62<br />

West 45th St.<br />

NO PERFORATIONS: 20% More Light and Better Vision<br />

CYCLWAMIC<br />

Custom Screen<br />

Plan New TV Antenna<br />

On the Empire State<br />

NEW YORK—A new, multiple-use television<br />

tower will be built on top of the Empire<br />

State Bldg., tallest building in the w^orld,<br />

for the use of all New York television broadcasting<br />

stations, stretching the skyline 199<br />

feet farther into the sky. The building management<br />

and the National Broadca.sting Co.,<br />

which for 18 years has had exclusive rights<br />

to use the structure for radio and television<br />

broadcasting, closed the agreement January<br />

23.<br />

The American Broadcasting Co. is to begin<br />

immediate removal of its WJZ-TV transmitter<br />

from the Hotel Pierre to the Empire<br />

State, using at the start a temporary antenna.<br />

WPIX. Daily News outlet, and WABD, Du<br />

Mont station, are expected to follow suit, resulting<br />

in all New York television stations operating<br />

from the same location. Engineers<br />

said that will mean much clearer images will<br />

go out, whether in black and white or color.<br />

If approval is obtained from the Federal<br />

Communications commission, the broadcasters<br />

will increase their wattage to gain more<br />

distance.<br />

The Empire State will finance and build<br />

the tower. Construction and installation are<br />

expected to take a year. Dr. Frank G. Kear<br />

of Washington will be the designer. He said<br />

that transmission of multiple signals from<br />

the same tower will be new in commercial<br />

television but is practical. Two stations, each<br />

with its own tower, now use the Chicago<br />

Municipal Opera Bldg., and all Los Angeles<br />

television transmitters are on Mount Wilson.<br />

Kear said that in addition to signals of the<br />

four television stations, there probably will<br />

be FM signals from the Empire State tower<br />

from NBC and ABC. The present height<br />

of the building is 1,250 feet.<br />

Grace Rosenfield Leaves<br />

Roach After 18 Years<br />

NEW YORK—Grace Rosenfield. eastern<br />

sales representative for Hal Roach, has resigned<br />

after an 18-year association w'ith the<br />

company. She was the only woman sales<br />

representative for a Hollywood producer in<br />

the industry.<br />

After a vacation she plans to start her own<br />

company, representing independent producers<br />

on a worldwide basis in both sales and<br />

promotion. Before joining Roach, Miss Rosenfield<br />

was with Henry Gin.sberg, vice-president<br />

of Paramoiuit Pictures Corp.<br />

FOR CAPACITY BUSINESS<br />

HOSTESS<br />

A L U M I N U M W A R E<br />

"The year's most outstanding premium deal"<br />

METRO PREMIUM COMPANY<br />

334 W. 44th St. COIumt)us 51-1952 New York<br />

St. 257 No. 13th RITcnhouse 6-7994 Philadelohi.1. Pa.<br />

Magic Screen<br />

of the Future<br />

-NOW!<br />

'Patent opptled for<br />

Installed<br />

INTERBORO'S PARSONS THEATRE<br />

Queens, N Y.<br />

By JOE HORNSTEIN, Inc.<br />

630 Ninth A»e. Tiie.itre Enuiimiefit Specialists New York City<br />

at<br />

BOXOFFICE<br />

:<br />

4, 1950 57


Monogram Meetings<br />

Held in Two Cities<br />

NEW YORK—Morey Goldstein. Monogram<br />

Allied Artists general sales manager, presided<br />

at two regional meetings<br />

for branch managers,<br />

the first at the<br />

Warwick hotel, New<br />

York, January 28, 29.<br />

and the second at the<br />

Hotel Muehlebach,<br />

Kansas City, February<br />

4. 5. Steve Broidy, president,<br />

and Harold<br />

Mirisch. vice-president,<br />

attended both meetings<br />

to talk about current<br />

and future production<br />

Morey Goldstein plans.<br />

Goldstein discussed the selling policy and<br />

plans for "Blue Grass of Kentucky," current<br />

Cinecolor release, and three other color<br />

pictures which will follow. They are; "Young<br />

Daniel Boone." "Hiawatha" and "County<br />

Fair." "Blue Grass" has been set for a March<br />

8 opening in the Cincinnati and Indianapolis<br />

territories, with dates booked in Cincinnati,<br />

Dayton, Columbus, Louisville and Indianapolis.<br />

He also talked on current sales<br />

and liquidation.<br />

Others from the home office who attended<br />

the New York meeting were:<br />

Edward Morey, vice-president; L. E. "Nicky" Goldhammer,<br />

easterri sales manager; Jimmy Prichard,<br />

Complete Sound Systems<br />

Mom6mauAUTy..yir<br />

COSTS CiSS<br />

No cquipmenl oflfers more in value for<br />

such Inw cost. Complete .sound systems<br />

are available for theatres of every<br />

size, shape and seating capacity. They<br />

consist of a two-way horn system, pair<br />

of soundheads, and either single or<br />

dual channel amplitiers.<br />

STAR CINEMA SUPPLY COMPANY<br />

441 West 50lh Street,<br />

New York 19, New York<br />

Complete Theatre Equipment & Supplies<br />

southern sales manager; Lloyd Lind, John Dervin and<br />

Harry Goldstein,<br />

Branch managers present were:<br />

Horry Berkson, Buffalo; Nate Dickmon, Albany; Abe<br />

Werner, Pittsburgh; Jack Safer, Washington; Ben<br />

Abrams, Boston; Harlan Starr, Detroit; Mill Gurian,<br />

Cincinnati; Johnny Pavone. Nevir Haven; Nate Schultz<br />

Cleveland; Maxv/ell Gillis, Philadelphia: Nate Furst,<br />

New York; Jimmy Hobbs, Atlanta; Hal Jordan. Charlotte;<br />

Bailey Prichard, Memphis, and Henry Glover<br />

New Orleans<br />

Bert Stearn. head of Cooperative Theatres<br />

in Pittsburgh, was an invited guest speaker<br />

at the New York meeting and stressed the<br />

importance of the series of group pictiares<br />

made by Monogram and how much aid they<br />

were to "the so-called nervous A pictures.'<br />

Goldstein elaborated on Broidy's recent statements<br />

in the tradepress with regard to the<br />

necessity for improving the prices generally<br />

paid for second features. He pointed out that<br />

increased rentals for such product would<br />

react to the benefit of the exhibitor, in that<br />

the increases would encourage Monogram to<br />

continue to improve the quality of its cofeatures.<br />

Broidy and Mirisch, en route to the coast,<br />

stopped off for the Kansas City meeting. Harold<br />

Wirthwein, western sales manager, also<br />

attended the Kansas City meet and branch<br />

men present were:<br />

Ben Eisenberg, Chicago; Irving Mandel, Chicago;<br />

Sol Francis, Omaha; George Tail, Des Moines- C J<br />

Duer. Denver; Don Tibbs, Salt Lake City; W. K.<br />

Embleton, Indianapolis; Irving Marks, Minneapolis-<br />

Edmund Cruea, Portland; Ralph Abbett, Seattle-<br />

M, I, E, McCarthy, Los Angeles; Jim Myers San<br />

Francisco; C. W, Trampe and Oliver Trampe' Milwaukee;<br />

Howard Stubbins, Los Angeles; Mel Hulling,<br />

San Francisco; M. Schweitzer, St. Louis; T, r'<br />

Thompson, Kansas City, and M. Lipsner, Oklahoma<br />

City,<br />

New York Critics Award<br />

Scrolls to 1949 Winners<br />

NEW YORK—The New York Film Critics<br />

presented their 1949 awards to winners at a<br />

reception Sunday 1 5 ) in the Rainbow room ol<br />

the RCA building, Rockefeller Center. Broderick<br />

Crawford, chosen as best actor for hii:<br />

role in "All the King's Men" (Col), and Olivia<br />

DeHavilland. chosen as best actress for her<br />

portrayal of "The Heiress" tParai, her second<br />

consecutive Film Critics award, accepted their<br />

scrolls and Crawford also accepted one for<br />

Robert Rossen, who wrote, directed and produced<br />

"All the King's Men."<br />

Neither Carol Reed, best director for "The<br />

Fallen Idol," nor Vittorio de Sica. producerdirector<br />

of "The Bicycle Thief," best foreignlanguage<br />

film, were on hand to accept their<br />

scrolls. Reed's will be forwarded to David O.<br />

Selznick, who released "Idol," and Dr. Aldo<br />

Mazio. Italian consul-general, accepted the<br />

scroll for de Sica.<br />

RCA Ups G. L. McKenna<br />

CAMDEN, N. J.—George L. McKenna has<br />

been appointed assistant to W. W. Watts,<br />

vice-president in charge of the RCA engineering<br />

products department. McKenna had<br />

been manager of the industrial products section<br />

prior to his promotion and was with<br />

Booz, Allen & Hamilton before joining RCA.<br />

He is also a parttime lecturer on industry<br />

at the Wharton school of the University of<br />

Pennsylvania.<br />

To Direct 'Prowl Car'<br />

Producer Hunt Stromberg has slated Gordon<br />

Douglas to direct "Prowl Car" for Columbia.<br />

Shea Managers End<br />

Meeting at Lunch<br />

NEW YORK—Managers of theatres of M.<br />

A. Shea Theatrical Enterprises, usually known<br />

as the Shea circuit, wound up a two-day convention<br />

at the Hotel Astor Wednesday (1)<br />

which was attended by sales executives of all<br />

the major companies and many of the equipment<br />

companies with home offices here.<br />

E. C. GRAINGER TOASTMASTER<br />

E. C. Grainger, president, was toastmaster.<br />

In spite of the fact that the circuit takes in<br />

towns in upstate New York, northern Massachusetts,<br />

New Hampshire, western Pennsylvania<br />

and 13 cities in Ohio, it is a closely<br />

knit organization in which all the managers<br />

know each other as well as the principal executives.<br />

Grainger visits every house five or<br />

six times a year and talks with each manager<br />

two or three times a week. He mentioned<br />

during the course of the lunch that all but<br />

one of the managers have been with the<br />

company since before M. A. Shea died.<br />

Seated on the dais were : James R, Grainger,<br />

executive vice-president of Republic: Morton<br />

G. Thalhimer; George Goett, who books the<br />

stage shows; Gerald J. Shea, purchasing<br />

agent and secretary of the company; Edward<br />

C. Raftery, director and treasurer;<br />

Arthur Driscoll, and W. E. Barry, controller.<br />

Goett recently celebrated his 25th anniversary<br />

with the company and is about to<br />

observe his 79th birthday. He said he entered<br />

the business in 1904 and could remember<br />

when there were no theatres north of<br />

Fourteenth street.<br />

LIST OF THOSE PRESENT<br />

Problems dealing with the general operation of<br />

theatres came in for •<br />

thorough discussion at the<br />

annual meeting which started Tuesday (31) and<br />

continued through Thursday (2), with E. C. Grainger,<br />

president and general manager, presiding. The New<br />

York office was represented by G. J, Shea, R. E.<br />

Smith, C, J. Lawler, W. E, Barry, George Goett A J<br />

Grainger and W. E, Shea.<br />

City managers attending were: Dan Gilhula Jamestown,<br />

N. Y,; Vincent Choate, Bradford, Pa',; J. V.<br />

Minton, Erie, Pa.; Armand Pepin, McKees Rocks, Pa.-<br />

lohn D, Walsh, Pittsburgh; E, J. Fahey, Manchester,<br />

N. H.; F. D. Scribner, Nashua. N. H.; Dale McCoy<br />

Amherst, Mass.; B. L. Hickey, Greenfield, Mass.-<br />

Jack Baumgardt, Westlield, Mass.; R, W. Rhodes<br />

Akron, Ohio; Dale Tysinger. Ashtabula, Ohio; F. L.<br />

Bowers, Cambridge, Ohio; Bob Cannon, Conneaut,<br />

Ohio; Thomas Turley, Dover, Ohio; Bob Limbaugh,<br />

Geneva, Ohio; Fred Lahrmer, Lancaster, Ohio- Durward<br />

Duty, Marietta. Ohio; William Gillam, Newark,<br />

Ohio; Harold Synder. New Philadelphia, Ohio; J. W.<br />

Hynes, Youngstown, Ohio; J. W. Scanlan and E J<br />

Hiehle, Zanesville, Ohio, Frank V. King, field representative,<br />

also attended.<br />

About 175 persons attended a<br />

day at the (1) Hotel Astor<br />

luncheon<br />

following a<br />

Wednes-<br />

cocktail<br />

party. Among them were E, C. Raftery, Arthur Driscoll,<br />

M, J. Callahan, Charles M. Reagan, Andy W.<br />

Smith jr., A, W. Schwalberg, E, K, OShea, Louis<br />

Weinberg, Arthur Greenblatt, Bernard Krantz. James<br />

Mulvey, Robert Mochrie. Nat Levy, Benjamin Kalmenson,<br />

Maurice Goldstein, R. Grainger, J.<br />

Scully, A. Heineman, William A J.<br />

William<br />

O'Keefe,<br />

J.<br />

Bert<br />

Sanford jr., Bernard Scholtz, William F. Rodgers,<br />

S, Dembow, Charles L, Casonove<br />

C. Perkins, George<br />

and Neil Agnew.<br />

'Never Fear' Will Open<br />

In Chicago February 10<br />

NEW YORK—"Never Pear," Pilmakers<br />

production for Eagle Lion release, will open<br />

in Chicago at the United Artists Theatre<br />

February 10, according to WiUiam J. Heineman,<br />

vice-president in charge of distribution.<br />

Leon Brandt, advertising-publicity- exploitation<br />

director, has named Charles A.<br />

Moses to head an exploitation team in the<br />

area. Keefe Brasselle and Sally Forrest, the<br />

stars, will make personal appearances.<br />

58 BOXOFFICE :: February 4, 1950


.<br />

. . Several<br />

. . James<br />

. . The<br />

. . . Kathleen<br />

. . Harry<br />

'High' and Stage Bill<br />

Pace N.Y. With 125<br />

NEW YORK — Two new films, "Twelve<br />

—<br />

Two War Films Do Top<br />

Philadelphia Gross<br />

PHILADELPHIA—First run situations did<br />

normal business with pictures with a war<br />

slant enjoying top grosses. "Sands of Iwo<br />

Jlma" opened at the Stanley with 210 per<br />

cent while "Battleground" went into its second<br />

week at the Boyd with 160. The musical.<br />

"On the Town," went into its fourth and last<br />

week at the Randolph.<br />

Aldine—Malaya (MGM), 4lh wk S7<br />

Boyd—Battleground (MGM). 2nd wk. 160<br />

Earle-South Sea Sinner (U-I) 90<br />

Fox-Whirlpool (;Olh-Fox) 85<br />

Goldman—Thelma Jordon (Para). 2nd wk 110<br />

Karllon—The Red Shoes (EL) 110<br />

Maslbaurr.—The Hasty Heart (WB) 100<br />

Randolph— On the Tovra (MGM), 4th wk 115<br />

Stanley—Sands of Iwo lima (Rep) 210<br />

Stanton—Davy Crockett, Indian Scout (UA); The<br />

Great Dan Patch (UA) 50<br />

'Dear Wife' Grosses 140<br />

To Lead Philadelphia<br />

PHILADELPHIA—First run situations drew<br />

only average business. This is the seasonal<br />

situation in which grosses decline from the<br />

first of the year. "Dear Wife" at the Goldman<br />

paced newcomers with 140 per cent.<br />

"Battleground" at the Boyd was steady in<br />

its<br />

third week with 130 per cent.<br />

Aldine—BorderUne (U-I) 78<br />

Boyd—Battleground (MGM), 3rd wk __ _ 130<br />

Earle—Brule Force (U-I): KUIers (U-I) 80<br />

Fox—Whirlpool i20-h Fox), 2nd wk 90<br />

Goldman—Dear Wiie (Pora) 140<br />

Karllon—The Red Shoes (EL), 2nd wk. of 2nd run.. 105<br />

Mastbaum—The Hasty Heart (WB), 2nd wk 75<br />

Randolph— East Side, West Side (MGM), 2nd wk...l0O<br />

Stanley—Sands of Iwo lima (Rep), 2nd wk 110<br />

Slanlon—Ambush (MGM) 105<br />

PHILADELPHIA<br />

nt an annual meeting of Allied Theatre<br />

Owners of Eastern Pennsylvania, results<br />

of a questionnaire circulated among 400<br />

exhibitors in the Philadelphia area were<br />

disclosed. The theatremen voted 20th-Fox<br />

.<br />

O'clock High" and "The Man on the Eiffel<br />

Tower." had strong opening weeks while the<br />

majority of longer-run pictures went along<br />

to mild business along Broadway. The<br />

product most valuable,<br />

other<br />

and Fox as the company<br />

new film. "Backfire." was disappointing in<br />

with the fairest sales policy. Columbia<br />

its<br />

first and only week at the Globe.<br />

was voted "the most difficult company to<br />

"Samson and Delilah," in its sixth week deal with" with Paramount a runnerup for<br />

at the Rivoli, was among the few holdovers this "honor."<br />

which continued to strong grosses although Bill Holland, winner of the 1949 500-mile<br />

"Anibush." in its second week at the Capitol, Indianapolis Speedway race lost the first<br />

and "Tight Little Island." in its fifth week round of his $250,000 damage suit against<br />

at the tiny Trans-Lux Madison Avenue, did the producers of "The Big Wheel." Federal<br />

moderately well. The final weeks of "All the Judge James P. McGranery refused to halt<br />

King's Men," "East Side, West Side" and showings of the film until the case is decided.<br />

"Thelma Jordon" were off considerably.<br />

Holland contends that his reputation<br />

The six American-made features out of a has been damaged by the defendants who<br />

total of U films that opened during the week allegedly make it appear in the picture that<br />

were "The Third Man," "Key to the City." Holland won the race because of the breakdown<br />

of the car driven by the hero (Mickey<br />

"Dear Wife." "Montana," "Port of New York"<br />

and "Girls' School."<br />

(Average Is 100)<br />

Astor—Battleground (MGM), 12th wk 95<br />

Rooney )<br />

Everett Callow, southwest publicity executive,<br />

has been appointed regional chair-<br />

Bijou—The Red Shoes (EL), 67th wk. of two-a-day 90<br />

Capilol—Ambush (MGM). plus stage show. 2nd<br />

wk 105<br />

man of publicity for local observance of<br />

Criterion—The Man on the Eiffel Tower (RKO) 120 Brotherhood week . amateur contestants<br />

turned over their awards to Bill<br />

Globe—Backfire (WB) 95<br />

Gotham—Monkey Business (Para). Horsefeathers<br />

(Para), reissues, 6th wk 85 Kanefsky, manager of the Ambassador Theatre,<br />

for the March of Dimes . Ford<br />

Loews Stale—East Side. West Side (MGM). 6th<br />

wk 60<br />

Mayiair—Sands of Iwo ]h I (Rep), 5lh wk<br />

Motor Co. previewed its new color documentary<br />

film, "The Human Bridge," before<br />

Paramount—Thelma Jordo (Parcr), plus stage<br />

show, 2nd wk<br />

Palace—Blue Grass of Kentucky (Mc 3), plu 175 civic and business leaders at the Warwick<br />

hotel Wednesday (1) . . . William<br />

"<br />

vaudeville 100<br />

Radio City Music Hall—My Foolish Heart (RKO),<br />

plus stage show, 2nd wk Goldman Theatres, Inc., has leased a store<br />

102<br />

Rivoli—Somson and Delilah (Para). 6th wk 115 in the Karlton Theatre to Lloyd and Haig<br />

Roxy—Twelve O'clock High (20th-Fox), plus stage<br />

for a men's shoe store.<br />

show 125<br />

Strand—The Hasty Heart (WB), plus stage show.<br />

2nd wk _ 100 "Prince of Foxes" opened in 18 situations<br />

Trans-Lux Madison Avenue Tight little Islond Wednesday il). The theatres were the Band<br />

(EL), 5th wk 105<br />

Victoria-All the King's Men (Col), 12th wk<br />

Box, Benson, Broadway. Carman. Pern Rock,<br />

60<br />

Girard, Glenside, Iris, Lane, Liberty, Logan,<br />

Ogontz, Oxford, Roosevelt, Roxy, State, Sub-<br />

. . . Harold<br />

urban and Tower , Edwards, star<br />

of "Home of the Brave," was a guest Wednesday<br />

at an open house program in the Fellowship<br />

Commission building<br />

Saltz and Bill Doyle. U-I salesmen, have<br />

traded territories, Saltz taking over Jersey<br />

and Delaware while Doyle will handle upstate<br />

Pennsylvania.<br />

Capital Film Exchange now is releasing<br />

a series of nine "Cisco Kid" pictures. Southwest<br />

theatres have already booked the film<br />

. . . Paramount Decorating Co. is remodeling<br />

Max Goodman's Ellicott Theatre in Ellicott<br />

City . . . Jack L. Goldman. BOXOFFICE<br />

booker, was in Miami on vacation. Esther<br />

Bass, stenographer, took over Goldman's<br />

booking duties during his absence.<br />

. . .<br />

Screen<br />

American Film Co. has obtained distributing<br />

rights to "Wings of Glory"<br />

Guild executives attended a screening of<br />

"Baron of Arizona" in New York. Harry<br />

Brillman, office manager: Arthur Hyman<br />

Sherman, salesmen, and Jack Engel,<br />

and Moe<br />

branch manager, saw the film . . . William<br />

J. Mansell, WB branch manager, was on<br />

sick leave . . . Robert Smeltzer, WB division<br />

manager, visited the local office . . .<br />

WB is lining up bookings for its Bill Mansell<br />

drive March 12-18.<br />

Herb GiUis, former Monogram salesman,<br />

has been appointed Paramount sales manager<br />

... Sid Barbett resigned as UA salesman<br />

... J. J. Berger, former Paramount<br />

sales manager, has been appointed UA salesman<br />

for the Scranton area . . . Bill Solomon<br />

has resigned as salesman for Price Premiums<br />

. . . Ro.se Shapiro. EL biller. will sing<br />

on the Fame and Fortune television show<br />

Thursday (9).<br />

. . . The<br />

.<br />

The Star Theatre in Elmer. N. J., opened<br />

The father of<br />

its doors<br />

Bessie<br />

Saturday<br />

Wittenberg.<br />

(4i . . .<br />

NSS clerk, died recently<br />

O'Hara. NSS branch manager's<br />

secretary, has become engaged<br />

French film "Gigi" will be distributed<br />

through Principal Films in the Philadelphia<br />

area Berman. EL branch manager,<br />

has returned to work following a recent<br />

operation.<br />

Jap Prison Camp Picture<br />

To Open February 20<br />

NEW YORK—"Three Came Home." 20th<br />

Century-Fox Japanese prison camp semidocumentary,<br />

will open February 20 at the<br />

Astor Theatre. The house will be closed during<br />

the day to prepare for the evening affair.<br />

Parts of the film were shot in Borneo. It was<br />

produced by Nunnally John.son. directed by<br />

Jean Negulesco. stars Claudelte Colbert and<br />

presents Patric Knowles. Florence Desmond<br />

and Sessue Hayakawa as supporting players.<br />

Noel Coward to Premiere<br />

NEW YORK— Noel Coward will<br />

attend the<br />

world film premiere of his production. "Thi;<br />

Astoni.shed Heart," February 13 at the Park<br />

Avenue Theatre. The performance will be<br />

a benefit for the Mary MacArthur memorial<br />

fund for the National Foundation for Infantile<br />

Paralysis and was arranged by Coward<br />

with Helen Hayes, chairman of the memorial<br />

fund.<br />

FOMACK .<br />

does<br />

only ONE thing<br />

and does it well<br />

SPECJAl TRAILERS<br />

Let tt« mak. your next trailer<br />

vL ... QUICK ».r»i«an


. . Diane<br />

. . Lew<br />

. . Anthony<br />

. . Ann<br />

. . Mrs.<br />

. . The<br />

. . The<br />

. . Jack<br />

. . Pat<br />

. . Irving<br />

ALBANY<br />

. . William<br />

. . . Ray<br />

Mate Dickman, Monogram manager, and Bob<br />

Adler, head booker, attended a weekend<br />

regional meeting in New York .<br />

C. Smalley of Smalley Theatres. Cooperstown,<br />

was vacationing in Miami . 20th-<br />

Fox exchange has a new clock with blue<br />

hands and figures on a white background,<br />

exploiting "Twelve O'clock High"<br />

Smith. Warner manager, is serving as secretary<br />

of the area committee in the drive to<br />

repeal the 20 per cent federal admission tax.<br />

Theatre collections for the March of Dimes<br />

campaign were taken January 25-31 at Benton's<br />

Capitol in Ballston Spa . recent<br />

$1,000,000 Brink's robbery in Boston<br />

.<br />

gives new interest to the Realart reissue of<br />

"The Armored Car." The film was booked<br />

with "The Ghost Catchers" for a Leland<br />

date this week . . Dr. Sigmund Spaeth,<br />

in a Schenectady broadcast, criticized the<br />

barbershop singing scenes in "In the Good<br />

Old Summertime." Spaeth said that four<br />

male voices are all that belong in barbershopping,<br />

while the producing company put<br />

Judy Garland in front of the singers and<br />

an orchestra behind them . Arthur<br />

Newman, wife of the Republic manager, was<br />

to enter Albany hospital for a gland operation.<br />

Mark Freeland arranged exploitation for<br />

United Artists' "Davy Crockett. Indian<br />

Scout" at the Ritz. The picture had one of<br />

the biggest openings at the Warner house<br />

in recent months according to Oscar Perrin.<br />

manager . Grofsik. assistant sales<br />

manager for General Register Corp.. Long<br />

Island City, was here to promote Automaticket<br />

equipment for drive-ins. George<br />

Hare, who had covered this territory, now is<br />

traveling the southern section of the country.<br />

Jack Kimball, new salesman for Redrum<br />

Fabrics, visited Filmrow. He succeeded George<br />

Redfield. who is now in the Boston offices<br />

of the company . Minozzi. who<br />

managed the Colonial ten years ago for the<br />

Berinstein estate, renewed Filmrow acquaintances.<br />

He now is in the monument business<br />

here . Dobbs is new secretary at the<br />

Monogram exchange . Bonana. secretary<br />

to Jack McGrath of Albany Theatre<br />

Supply Co.. was absent from her desk for a<br />

week because of illness.<br />

Milt Schosberg, former manager of Fabian's<br />

Grand, wrote a local friend that<br />

weather conditions had been favorable for<br />

construction of his drive-in on the East<br />

Lincoln highway at Coatesville. Pa., and that<br />

he expected to open it early in April. Schosberg<br />

worked for the Schine circuit in Ohio<br />

and upstate New York and for Paramount-<br />

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Now installing new machines throughout large<br />

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ALBANY THEATRE SUPPLY CO.<br />

1046 Broadway 5-5055 Albany, N. Y.<br />

DRIVE-IN THEATRE<br />

"Men" and "Ladies" Rest Room Liohts $6.75 eath<br />

DRIVE-IN THEATRE MFG. CO. kIII^,'c>Tm.<br />

Publix before joining the Fabian organization<br />

The Knickerbocker News printed<br />

. . . a two-column picture of Colleen Bechard.<br />

secretary to Alex Sayles. Palace manager,<br />

viewing the annual prize-winning pictures in<br />

a national snapshot contest. Tliey were on<br />

display in the Palace lobby until January 29.<br />

"The Red Danube" and "Johnny Eager,"<br />

a reissue, did nice business during a nineday<br />

engagement at the Grand, according to<br />

Paul Wallen, manager .<br />

Kaufman<br />

was here working on "Guilty of Treason."<br />

which will open at the Strand February 8.<br />

Dr. Luther Grant plans to operate the<br />

Mountain Drive-In at Loch Sheldrake in the<br />

Catskill mountains for another year, it was<br />

reported here. Earlier reports were that he<br />

wanted to sell the property. The ozoner. built<br />

at a cost of $170,000. was opened last June.<br />

Dr. Grant is a lung specialist in Liberty . . .<br />

The Ritz put two men on the street in pirate<br />

attire to distribute keys for a "treasm-e box"<br />

in the jewelry department of the Fern Furniture<br />

Co.. as promotion for "The Pirates of<br />

Capri." The men distributed 10.000 keys, six<br />

of which opened the box and made the holders<br />

eligible for wrist watches and other prizes<br />

valued at $400. Manager Oscar Perrin and<br />

Jerry Atkin. Warner exploiteer. arranged the<br />

stunt.<br />

Sandy Miller, manager of the Menands<br />

Drive-In and son of Joe Miller, partner in<br />

the ozoner and a Realart salesman, was vacationing<br />

in Los Angeles . Patterson,<br />

manager of the Leland. left to visit his<br />

brother in Marietta, Ohio, where the latter<br />

is dean of Marietta college. Larry Alexander,<br />

assistant manager and son of Harry Alexander,<br />

local Eagle Lion manager, was to have<br />

charge during Patterson's absence.<br />

. . .<br />

Warners' Ritz ran "Devil in the Flesh"<br />

February 1-7. its first foreign-language picture<br />

Sam<br />

since "Paisan" last spring Rosenblatt of the Grand and Strand. Watervliet.<br />

visited Filmrow. Joe Riley of the Holly.<br />

Watervliet. also was in town . Fried,<br />

president of Tristate Automatic Candy Corp..<br />

Buffalo, and his wife have been on a vacation<br />

in South America.<br />

.<br />

. . . Sylvan<br />

Sam Resnick, active lay member of the<br />

Variety Club, will leave soon for South<br />

America . . Dr. Irving Kaskel. another<br />

Variety Club member, recently returned from<br />

a vacation in Miami. He saw Neil Hellman<br />

and Mrs. Hellman while there<br />

Leff. who operates three theatres in Utica.<br />

reported that business was from five to ten<br />

per cent under the level of a year ago. The<br />

employment picture has brightened in Utica.<br />

but textile mills still are running considerably<br />

below normal, Leff said.<br />

Clark in MGM Story Post<br />

NEW YORK—Olin H. Clark,<br />

eastern story<br />

editor of MGM for the past eight years, will<br />

take charge of the eastern scenario department<br />

following the recent resignation of Mrs.<br />

Carol Brandt, to become effective July 15.<br />

Clark will work with Kenneth MacKenna.<br />

executive in charge of the story department<br />

at the studio.<br />

There is no time to lose! Act today on<br />

repeal of the amusement tax!<br />

BEST OF MONTH—E.<br />

PhiUp Willcox<br />

presents the Parents' Magazine award for<br />

the best picture for the month to (Right)<br />

Howard Dietz. MGM vice-president and<br />

director of advertising, publicity and exploitation.<br />

The picture was "Stars in My<br />

Crown."<br />

INCORPORATIONS<br />

— ALBANY —<br />

Mirsteel Films: To conduct business in New<br />

York: capital stock, 200 shares, no par.<br />

Rugoff & Becker Management Corp.:<br />

Amusement for the public in Kings county;<br />

$20,000, $100 par.<br />

Gainsborough Associates: Radio, television<br />

shows and motion pictures in New York;<br />

200 shares, no par.<br />

Hudson Valley Drive-In Enterprises: To<br />

conduct business in Newbui'gh; 200 shares, no<br />

par: Thomas Tulve, 24 Spring St.. and Adolph<br />

Knaust, R. R. 1. Newburgh: Louis Brander,<br />

120 Walsh Ave.. New Windsor.<br />

Luna Park Drive-In Theatre: To operate m<br />

Kings county: 600 shares. 500 preferred. $1<br />

par and 100 conunon. no par.<br />

Cisco Kid Pictures: Cincinnati, Ohio, recorded<br />

papers that its New York offices are<br />

at 120 Broadway: John L. Sinn, vice-president:<br />

250 shares, no par.<br />

Morton Productions: Motion pictures and<br />

stage plays in New York; $5,000, $25 par.<br />

Mergram Theatre Corp.: To do business in<br />

New York: $20,000, $1 par; Hej'bert Schrank,<br />

320 W. 90th St.; Susanne Foley. 114-20 203:-d<br />

Ave.. St. Albans; Helen Cohen. 159-07 Hillside<br />

Ave., Jamaica.<br />

Main Amusement Corp.: Buffalo, dissolved.<br />

50th Street Amusement Center: New York,<br />

dissolved.<br />

Saliiva Drive-In Theatre Corp.: Buffalo;<br />

200 shares, no pai".<br />

Adastra, Inc.: Records, motion pictures and<br />

radio productions in New York; 100 shares,<br />

no par.<br />

Gladys Glad. Inc.: Motion picture business<br />

in New York; 200 shares, no par.<br />

Buffalo Amusement Operators Ass'n, Inc.,<br />

dissolved.<br />

The Republic picture formerly called<br />

"Faces in the Sun" has been changed to "My<br />

Sister's Destiny."<br />

60 BOXOFFICE ;; February 4. 1950


IL.<br />

. . Mrs.<br />

. . The<br />

. . The<br />

. . Frances<br />

. . The<br />

. . Tying<br />

"<br />

Solons Consider Bill<br />

torney associated with Harry Lamont in several<br />

drive-ins, who said he believed that "it<br />

behooves all drive-in operators to see to it<br />

that this bill is not passed."<br />

"They should use their influence and persuasive<br />

powers to prevent enactment," Sumberg<br />

said. "The bill sets a bad precedent."<br />

Sumberg challenged the statement that<br />

drive-ins create traffic hazards pointing out<br />

that operators usually "clear their site with<br />

the state traffic commission."<br />

"The charge of contributing to juvenile delinquency<br />

has no foundation in my opinion,"<br />

he added. "About 80 per cent of our trade<br />

is family. And the Lamont organization has<br />

received letters of commendation from sheriffs<br />

in counties where we operate."<br />

Ellis Arnall to Recommend<br />

SIMPP Approve COMPO<br />

NEW YORK—EUis Arnall, SIMPP president<br />

of the Society of Independent Motion<br />

Picture Producers, will recommend to the 25<br />

members of the organization that they ratify<br />

COMPO. but he thinks that the financial<br />

contributions expected of 21 of them who<br />

have no distributing connections with MPAA<br />

member companies, calls for further clarification.<br />

He praised the clarifying paragraph<br />

supplied by Ned E. Depinet, RKO president,<br />

earlier in the week, but pointed out that<br />

Depinet and the MPAA directors which accepted<br />

it could speak only for MPAA. United<br />

Artists, which handles independent product,<br />

is not a member of MPAA, and there are<br />

other distributors not affiliated with MPAA<br />

handling independent product.<br />

Arnall said the SIMPP executive committee<br />

is being apprised of all developments, and<br />

that the members will be polled for their<br />

decision on COMPO. "It is my belief that<br />

COMPO offers the industry unlimited possibilities<br />

as an instrument to promote its welfare<br />

and continued success," he said.<br />

'Francis' Radio Plugs<br />

Heard on 3 Programs<br />

NEW YORK—"Francis," Universal-International<br />

February release, received three network<br />

radio plugs in one evening January 29<br />

when Walter Winchell. Louella Parsons and<br />

"Chance of a Lifetime" each called attention<br />

to the film.<br />

The ABC audience heard Winchell carry<br />

Fred Allen's comment on his 272 stations<br />

while Miss Parsons, who followed on the same<br />

272 stations, told about the showing before<br />

the U.S. forces in Germany. "Chance of a<br />

Lifetime," heard on 203 ABC .stations, started<br />

a six-week promotion on "Francis."<br />

NEWARK<br />

gernic Silverman, manager of the Branford.<br />

ran an extensive campaign to exploit<br />

Warners' "The Hasty Heart." Besides lobby<br />

displays, sidewalk stencils were used. A<br />

plane at the Newark airport publicized the<br />

attraction. Throwaways and heralds helped,<br />

as well as cards on taxicabs and posters in<br />

local shop windows ... A. J. Rettig, owner<br />

of the Ormont, East Orange, has been spending<br />

weekends in Connecticut. The Ormont<br />

To Outlaw Drive-ins<br />

ALBANY—A bill to prohibit future erection<br />

of drive-ins in cities of 250,000 population<br />

or more was introduced in the New York<br />

legislature Wednesday (1 ) by Assemblyman<br />

Alfred A. Lama. Brooklyn. The measure<br />

would affect New York. Buffalo and Rochester.<br />

Lama was quoted as saying that drive-ins<br />

cause traffic hazards, citing conditions before<br />

and after performances in Long Island. will run "The Red Shoes."<br />

He also charged that drive-ins contribute to<br />

juvenile delinquency.<br />

Introduction of the measure brought an<br />

immediate reply from Lewis A. Sumberg. at-<br />

Jo-seph Geller, manager of the Castle in<br />

Irvington. tied in with the Irvington Herald<br />

in sponsoring a coloring contest on chief<br />

Big Tree in conjunction with "She Wore a<br />

Yellow Ribbon." Schools were contacted.<br />

The Major music store ran displays of sheet<br />

music. EIntries were mailed or delivered to<br />

the theatre, and 12 sets of passes were<br />

awarded to winners . Castle ran a<br />

special kiddy matinee co-featuring the two<br />

Tarzan films which were produced in<br />

Guatemala.<br />

Michael Mulkerns, formerly connected with<br />

the Empire Theatre, has been substituting<br />

for Harry Hadfield, electrician at the Castle<br />

and Sanford in Irvington, during the latter's<br />

. illness Helen Borst is new Empire<br />

relief cashier, replacing Eleanor DriscoU,<br />

The Castle tied in with<br />

who resigined . . .<br />

the Irvington public library on "That Forsyte<br />

Woman," using a book display . . . James<br />

DiPalo, assistant at the Regent, arranged<br />

lobby displays of stills on "Tokyo Joe."<br />

"Prison Without Bars" and "City Without<br />

Men."<br />

H. Andrew Garofalo, manager of the Regent,<br />

visited eight schools in his vicinity to<br />

speak on "Coming Pictures at Theatres."<br />

Garofalo has been using a musical number<br />

at the end of each film. He finds these<br />

intermissions have improved the candy<br />

stand business . . . Robert Ostron, assistant<br />

at the Hudson in Kearny, and his wife became<br />

parents of a baby girl.<br />

Bernie Edelstein, manager of the Hud.son<br />

in Kearny, and Virginia Aaron. New Jersey<br />

booker for MGM. were married recently.<br />

Having returned from a southern trip, they<br />

are making their home temporarily in New<br />

York . Stanley and the Mayfair have<br />

National Allied<br />

Meeting<br />

Of Board Set Feb. 9, 10,<br />

WASHINGTON — Election of officers,<br />

action on participation in COMPO and<br />

discu.ssions of competitive bidding experience<br />

and po.ssible commercial arbitration<br />

of exhibitor-distributor disputes head<br />

the list of some 30 matters on the agenda<br />

for the meeting of the National Allied<br />

board of directors here Thursday and Friday<br />

of next week. In addition, there will<br />

be special reports on video by Trueman<br />

Rembu.sch and Sidney Samuel.son on outdoor<br />

theatres.<br />

Chairman A. P. Myers said it can freely<br />

be predicted that a number of matters on<br />

the agenda will have to be carried over to<br />

the spring meeting, but he would not<br />

specify which.<br />

. . Thomas<br />

arranged a Porky Pig wrist watch giveaway<br />

for children to run in March .<br />

Cantillo. manager of the Mayfair, and Orazio<br />

Palmisano, his assistant, arranged a tiein<br />

on "Song of Surrender," giving away four<br />

Caruso record albums.<br />

Hank Brenwasser, manager of the Regent<br />

Theatre in Kearny, has been appointed<br />

chairman for the March of Dimes campaign<br />

Jack Barrett, manager of the<br />

there . . .<br />

Wellmont in Montclair, tied in w'ith local<br />

music stores on "Song of Surrender." The<br />

shops used displays of sheet music.<br />

.<br />

claii- . . .<br />

.<br />

.<br />

The Regent in Kearny has discontinued<br />

matinees Randall is new relief<br />

manager at the Bellevue. Upper Mont-<br />

The Grove in Irvington received<br />

a good respon.se on "Triumph der Liebe,<br />

German film with English subtitles, co-featured<br />

with a Swiss production on Alpine<br />

mountain climbing. The Grove has an excellent<br />

lineup of German pictures, which are<br />

continuing in popularity in with<br />

the million-dollar robbery in Boston. William<br />

Waldron. manager of the Franklin in<br />

Nutley. co-featured George Raft in "I Stole<br />

a Million" with "The Bank Dick" starring<br />

W. C. Fields Franklin distributed<br />

heralds on "The Heiress." The theatre is<br />

planning an extensive campaign on "Hamlet,"<br />

due in March.<br />

'II Trovatore' to Open<br />

At CineMet February 8<br />

NEW YORK—"U Ti-ovatore." new Italian<br />

film based on the Verdi opera and distributed<br />

in the U.S. by Globe Films, will open at the<br />

Little CineMet Theatre February 8. Enzo<br />

Ma.scherini. who made his debut with the<br />

Metropolitan Opera this .season, has the featured<br />

role. The film has English titles and a<br />

special commentary.<br />

Another opera film. "Pagliacci," distributed<br />

in the U. S. by Motion Picture Sales Corp..<br />

will open at the Little Carnegie some time in<br />

February following the run of the current<br />

"The Titan. Story of Michelangelo." The<br />

picture stars Tito Gobbi, who sings the dual<br />

role of Tonio. the clown, and Silvio, the lover,<br />

in Leoncavallo's opera.<br />

Stars. Society Leaders<br />

At 'Third Man' Opening<br />

NEW YORK—Film stars and .society leaders<br />

attended the American opening of Carol<br />

Reed's "The Third Man" at the Victoria<br />

Theatre February 1 for the benefit of the<br />

Lighthouse of the New York Ass'n for the<br />

Blind. The event was sold out several days<br />

before the opening and many society dinners<br />

preceded the opening.<br />

'Port of New York' Day<br />

Observed February 2<br />

NEW YORK— February 2 was "Port of New<br />

York" day by proclamation of Acting Mayor<br />

Vincent R. Impellitteri. It also was the opening<br />

day of Eagle Lion's "Port of New York"<br />

at the Globe Theatre.<br />

\Vhat have YOU done today to help secure<br />

repeal of the unfair amusement tax?<br />

BOXOFFICE :: February 4. 19.50 61


UN Advisory Council<br />

Praises Hollywood<br />

WASHINGTON—Resounding praise for the<br />

adult level of Hollywood thinking and achievement<br />

is penned by Librarian of Congress<br />

Luther H. Evans in the current issue of the<br />

National Council News. This is a newsletter<br />

from the membership of the National Advisory<br />

Council on American Participation in<br />

UNESCO, the United Nations educational and<br />

cultural organization.<br />

Dr. Evans was a visitor in Hollywood in<br />

December, traveling as a representative of<br />

the council. As a result of his trip he suggested<br />

that Hollywood be accorded increased<br />

membership on the council roster.<br />

He wrote that he found Hollywood's best<br />

talent "surprisingly well oriented to the problems<br />

which we wanted to discuss with them<br />

and very receptive to concrete suggestions as<br />

to ways in which the motion picture industry<br />

could play a greater role in the work for<br />

peace."<br />

He spoke also of "the many instances in<br />

which the motion picture industry had already<br />

made a significant contribution to the<br />

elimination of prejudices and misunderstandings<br />

among nationality and other groups."<br />

Evans suggested that in the interest of<br />

world betterment "any feature film should be<br />

considered before it is actually produced in<br />

the light of whether the impact which it<br />

would deliver upon the public of this country<br />

and of other countries would be an impact<br />

which left a result conducive to the strengthening<br />

or to the weakening of the forces working<br />

for a peaceful world."<br />

He had high praise for the work of Myrna<br />

Loy, who has served as a volunteer liaison<br />

officer between the industry and the council.<br />

Goldwyn-Disney Import<br />

Request Up to Army<br />

NEW YORK—The grant of individual Japanese<br />

import licenses to Samuel Goldwyn and<br />

Walt Disney rests with Gen. Douglas Mac-<br />

Arthur's headquarters in Tokyo and top army<br />

brass in Washington, which have the matter<br />

under consideration.<br />

No attempt will be made by the Motion<br />

Picture Export Ass'n, which has a Japanese<br />

distribution understanding with the army, to<br />

influence the military men either for or<br />

against the grant, MPEA members said during<br />

the week, but Goldwyn and Disney may<br />

have to break down a possible unwillingness<br />

to open the door to the inconvenience of separate<br />

import agreements.<br />

If the two independent producers are successful<br />

in their request, they will get a share<br />

of the $1,600,000 convertibility fund allowed<br />

by the U.S. government on a maximum of 104<br />

films a year. Robert J. Rubin, SIMPP general<br />

counsel, said he knew of no late developments.<br />

John Jones in New Post<br />

As WB Mexican Manager<br />

NEW YORK—Wolfe Cohen, Warner Bros.<br />

International president, has promoted John<br />

Jones, Havana manager, to the post of manager<br />

for Mexico, with headquarters in Mexico<br />

City. He will be supervised by Armando Trucios.<br />

Pacific division manager. Peter Colli,<br />

Caribbean division manager, is filling in at<br />

the Havana office pending a new appointment.<br />

MPEA Reports Successful<br />

Films Showing Abroad<br />

NEW YORK—Top grossing films in Austria<br />

during January are reported by the<br />

Motion Picture Export Ass'n which, despite<br />

the good business done in that country, has<br />

started a 12-week sales drive. The leading<br />

films in Vienna were "San Antonio" (WBi,<br />

"Snake Pit," "Miracle on 34th Street," "That<br />

Night in Rio" and "Western Union" (20th-<br />

Fox), "Can't Help Sinning" (U-I) and "Panhandle"<br />

iMono-AAi.<br />

In Bulgaria, the state censor board has<br />

approved "Song of Love" (MGM), and "The<br />

Seventh Cross" (MGM), approved several<br />

months ago, was scheduled to open in Sofia.<br />

The three outstanding films in that city<br />

in 1949 were "Life of Emile Zola" and "Adventures<br />

of Mark Twain" (WB) and "Men<br />

in Her Life" (Col).<br />

In Poland all MPEA films currently in<br />

first run releases are doing excellent business,<br />

but "All Baba and the 40 Thieves"<br />

(U-I) is doing better than any of them by<br />

50 per cent, according to Jean Birkhahn,<br />

supervisor of the MPEA-Film Polski contract,<br />

now in New York. In Lodz the film<br />

was rounding out its third consecutive month.<br />

In Japan, the leaders in different cities<br />

were "Paleface" (Para), "Tarzan's New<br />

York Adventure" (MGM), "Notorious" (RKO)<br />

and "Wistful Widow of Wagon Gap" (U-I).<br />

The MPEA report was the first issued<br />

since it ended operations in Germany and<br />

Indonesia.<br />

Westinghouse TV Output<br />

To Expand 75 Per Cent<br />

NEW YORK—Westinghouse Electric Corp.<br />

television output for 1950 will exceed that of<br />

1949 by 75 per cent through additional manufacturing<br />

facilities at its Sunbury, Pa., plant,<br />

according to F. M. Sloan, home radio division<br />

manager. He forecast that the industry will<br />

make more than 3,500,000 receivers during<br />

the year, and that 24.000,000 families will be<br />

served by 98 stations by the end of the year.<br />

He said prices of sets have been reduced almost<br />

50 per cent in the last five years, but<br />

that such drastic reductions cannot be expected<br />

in the future.<br />

National Theatres Heads<br />

To Meet in Los Angeles<br />

LOS ANGELES — Divisional presidents,<br />

executives and district managers of National<br />

Theatres will gather here February 14 through<br />

17 for their first meeting of 1950, with President<br />

Charles P. Skouras of NT and Fox<br />

West Coast conducting the sessions.<br />

To be reviewed are operations during 1949,<br />

while plans for the current year will be discussed<br />

and the product outlook evaluated.<br />

Attending will be representatives of FWC.<br />

Evergreen, Fox Intermountain and Fox Midwest.<br />

MGM Radio Adds Outlets<br />

NEW YORK—MGM Radio Attractions<br />

added 36 stations to its subscriber list in<br />

January, bringing the total in Canada and<br />

the United States to over 150. Three of the<br />

stations added to its radio transcription .service<br />

are 50,000 watt outlets: WBAL, Baltimore,<br />

Md.: KABC. San Antonio, Tex., and KRMG.<br />

Tulsa, Okla.<br />

MPIC 1950 Program<br />

Likely This Week<br />

HOLL^YWOOD—Final details of its<br />

program were expected to be set at<br />

1950<br />

midweek<br />

meeting of the Motion Picture Industry<br />

Council after it received a unanimous vote tof<br />

confidence for continuation through the year<br />

by the nine guild, union and producer organizations<br />

which make up its membership.<br />

The MPIC, dedicated to improving the industry's<br />

overall public relations, has been in<br />

existence for ten months.<br />

Approval of its 1949 accomplishments and<br />

its plans for 1950 were forthcoming from the<br />

Ass'n of Motion Picture Producers, Hollywood<br />

AFL Film Council. Independent Motion<br />

Picture Producers Ass'n, Independent Office<br />

Workers, Screen Actors. Directors and Writers<br />

guilds. Society of Independent Motion Picture<br />

Producers and Society of Motion Picture Art<br />

Directors.<br />

Chairman Ronald Reagan presided over the<br />

February 1 session. MPIC policies are expected<br />

to include strong support of the Council<br />

of Motion Picture Organizations and continued<br />

building of intraindustry relations.<br />

CBS Schedules Election<br />

Coverage From Britain<br />

NEW YORK—CBS will cover the national<br />

elections in Britain on radio and television,<br />

starting with the pre-election campaign Saturday<br />

(4) and scheduling more than 70 broadcasts,<br />

including the election returns on February<br />

23. Wells Church, editor in chief of<br />

CBS News, will head the staff being sent to<br />

London. He will be assisted by Howard K.<br />

Smith. Bill Downs. Winston Burdett, Paul<br />

Niven and Edward R. Murrow. The preliminary<br />

broadcasts will cover various sections<br />

in England. Scotland and Wales and will<br />

include campaign speeches by Churchill and<br />

Atlee.<br />

President of Indonesia<br />

Sees Paramount Reel<br />

NEW YORK—President Sukarno of Indonesia<br />

viewed an air-shipped print of Paramount<br />

British News on January 7 in Djkarta.<br />

capital city, reporting on the recent ceremonies<br />

transferring sovereignty in Holland.<br />

The Paramount film was the first newsreel<br />

on the transfer to reach Djkarta. The main<br />

hall of the presidential palace was converted<br />

into a projection room for the screening.<br />

The president also saw Cecil B. DeMille's<br />

"The Story of Dr. Wassell" at his special request.<br />

He told Paramount representatives he<br />

was deeply interested in Hollywood films and<br />

hopes to have weekly screenings at the palace.<br />

Paramount Opens Office<br />

In U.S. of Indonesia<br />

NEW YORK—Paramount Films of Indonesia,<br />

Inc., has been established in Batavia<br />

following the creation of the U. S. of Indonesia.<br />

The new company, an arm of Paramount<br />

International Films, will serve a territory<br />

of 70,000,000 people. It will be under the<br />

supervision of Paramount International's far<br />

eastern division.<br />

What have YOU done today to help secure<br />

repeal of the unfair amusement tax?<br />

'<br />

62 BOXOFFICE February 4. 1950


NEWS AND VIEWS THE PRODUCTION CENTER<br />

(Hollywood Office—Suite 219 at 6404 Hollywood Blvd.: Ivan Spear, Western Manager)<br />

Few Filmdom Notables<br />

Receive Tele Awards<br />

were in<br />

HOLLYWOOD—Film personalities<br />

the minority as recipients of kudos when the<br />

Academy of Television Arts and Sciences held<br />

its second annual awards banquet.<br />

Milton Berle, whose last appearance in a<br />

theatrical film was Warners' "Always Leave<br />

Them Laughing," was adjudged the top kinescope<br />

personality and also won an award for<br />

the best kinescope show, while Ed Wynn, not<br />

active in films since the '30s, snagged top<br />

honors as best live personality and best live<br />

show.<br />

Irving Brecher, radio, screen and TV<br />

writer-producer, won the award for the best<br />

video film show. "The Life of Riley." Brecher<br />

made a theatrical film version of the program<br />

for U-I last year.<br />

The Academy also passed out awards for<br />

the best children's show, "Time for Beany";<br />

the best commercials, Lucky Strike; best public<br />

service presentation, screening of "Crusade<br />

in Europe" by the ABC network, and best<br />

station achievement, Paramount's KTLA.<br />

Formation of Pollock, Rogers and Raisbeck<br />

Productions as a new TV unit has been completed<br />

by Max Pollock, film and radio attorney;<br />

Roger Rogers, stage producer, and Robert<br />

Raisbeck, radio producer-director. The<br />

new outfit has obtained TV rights to some<br />

2,000 plays, stories and musicals and will<br />

create and produce package deals for advertising<br />

agencies and sponsors.<br />

Francis Lederer. veteran stage and screen<br />

star, will be in charge of the drama directorial<br />

staff and a dramatic stock company<br />

has been formed with Jane Darwell, Michael<br />

Whalen, Helen Parrish, Lyle Talbot, Clifton<br />

Young and Lederer as the nucleus.<br />

Nassours Sue Don Crisp<br />

For Cancelled Note<br />

HOLLYWOOD—Declaratory relief is sought<br />

in a superior court action filed by William<br />

and Edward Nassour, independent producers<br />

and owners of the Nassour studios, against<br />

Donald Crisp, veteran actor and production<br />

executive. The Nassours allege that early in<br />

1949 Crisp entered into an agreement with<br />

the studio corporation, under which he<br />

advanced $150,000 in return for certain capital<br />

stock. In October of last year, the plaintiffs<br />

allege, another agreement was executed<br />

under which the Nassours sold to Crisp a<br />

20 per cent interest in their Abbott and Costello<br />

comedy, "Africa Screams," in return<br />

for a cancellation of the $150,000 loan and the<br />

return of his stock in the studio.<br />

Deferred Payment Ruling<br />

Interpretations Differ<br />

HOLLYWOOD—Some industry observers<br />

viewed the conviction of two independent<br />

filmmakers on the grounds they violated a<br />

section of the California state labor code as<br />

a blow to unaffiliated producers, since it<br />

strikes at the rather general financial practice<br />

of "deferred payment" agreements with<br />

craftsmen employed in such picture-making<br />

projects.<br />

The ruling, handed down in Beverly Hills<br />

justice court, was against Producer Seymour<br />

Nebenzal and his son Harold in an action<br />

brought against them by Milton Carter, an<br />

assistant director. Judge Henry H. Draeger<br />

found the Nebenzals guilty of violating section<br />

204 of the state labor code, which provides<br />

that all wages earned by any person<br />

in any employment are due and payable<br />

twice each calendar month.<br />

The Nebenzals had been cited by the state<br />

labor commission on Carter's complaint that<br />

he was hired in March 1949 as an assistant<br />

director at $350 weekly. He claimed that the<br />

pact called for him to be paid $50 weekly in<br />

cash for four and one-half weeks, with the<br />

balance to be deferred until either June 1.<br />

1949, or until the picture started, whichever<br />

came first. When production began, he said,<br />

all deferred portions of his salary were to be<br />

paid in a lump sum and he was to begin<br />

drawing his $350 a week. Carter charged,<br />

however, that his deferred salary of $1,800<br />

was never paid and that the Nebenzals offered<br />

him only $164. The picture never<br />

reached the cameras.<br />

Tlie Nebenzals have been granted a 40-day<br />

postponement, until March 8, before a sentence<br />

and probation hearing is called. The<br />

elder Nebenzal told the court that the "deferred<br />

payment" technique is accepted procedure<br />

among independents and contended<br />

that without some such system it would have<br />

been "impossible" to have made many pictures<br />

now released. At the March 8 hearing<br />

the Nebenzals promised to bring records from<br />

other producers and studios to demonstrate<br />

that the practice of deferring wages is wide-<br />

.spread.<br />

Some other sources close to the independent<br />

production scene tended, however, to minimize<br />

the effects of Judge Draeger's ruling<br />

against the Nebenzals. These persons, in<br />

places of authority but insisting that they<br />

remain anonymous, contended that the whole<br />

question of deferred payments hinged upon<br />

minimum wage scales: that, provided such<br />

minimum salaries were forthcoming in cash<br />

at tlie intervals .specified in section 204, there<br />

could be no question as to the legality of<br />

deferring the balance of such wages in the<br />

event an over-scale rate had been agreed<br />

upon.<br />

For example, a director whose minimum<br />

wage might be $400 weekly and who might<br />

be signed by an independent producer at a<br />

salary of $1,500 weekly, could be paid the<br />

$400 minimum, with the balance of $1,100<br />

deferred.<br />

"In effect," one observed said, "such employes—whether<br />

directors, actors, writers or<br />

what—have made an investment in the projest<br />

on which they are working. It is an openand-shut<br />

business deal."<br />

This industry representative pointed out<br />

further that, in his opinion, as concerns the<br />

Nebenzal case it cannot be considered typical<br />

since "few independent producers carry the<br />

deferred payment technique down into the<br />

ranks of a.ssistant directors and other craftsmen<br />

whose wage scales are comparatively<br />

low."<br />

The heaviest deferments, he declared,<br />

lie in the "multi-thousand-dollar brackets."<br />

Hence, he added, the Nebenzal ruling "puts<br />

nobody in jeopardy."<br />

Carl Krueger Will Film<br />

All-Star Football Game<br />

HOLLYWOOD—Producer Carl Krueger has<br />

set a deal with the Chicago Tribune, which<br />

sponsors the event, wliereby Krueger will<br />

film "All-Star Game." a picturization of the<br />

yearly football tilt between professional and<br />

college grid stars. The fracas is held annually<br />

in the Windy city.<br />

A screen treatment is being developed by<br />

Dick Hyland, Los Angeles Times sports writer<br />

and former college football star. No release<br />

has been established.<br />

Krueger's last film project, "The Golden<br />

Gloves Story," has been set for Eagle Lion<br />

distribution and will be given its world premiere<br />

in Chicago March 16.<br />

First U.S. Debut Slated<br />

For British Picture<br />

HOLLYWOOD—The world premiere of<br />

"The Astonished Heart" at the Park Avenue<br />

Theatre in New York February 13 will mark<br />

the first time In Anglo-American film history<br />

that a major British picture will be seen<br />

in the U.S. before being shown In England.<br />

BOXOFFICE<br />

: : February 4, 1950 63


-<br />

STUDIO PERSONNEUTIES<br />

Barnstormers<br />

Paramount<br />

BOB HOPE was to emcee at both the testimonial<br />

dinner given in honor of Vice-President and Mrs.<br />

Alben Barkley and the annual White House correspondents'<br />

dinner, which were to be held in<br />

Washington February 3, 4, respectively. Prior to<br />

his Washington stints Hope was to appear in Durham,<br />

N. C, and New York.<br />

Blurbers<br />

Independent<br />

Joining the Carl Post publicity office as an associate<br />

and manager of the Hollywood office was OZZIE<br />

GAINES, femme drumbeater from New York.<br />

Lippert<br />

The WILLIAM KESTER agency has been retained<br />

to handle the national advertising campaign on<br />

"The Baron of Arizona."<br />

SRO<br />

MILT WATT and BEN WESTLAND hove been added<br />

to the flacking staff by Les Kaufman, recently appointed<br />

publicity-advertising director.<br />

Cleffers<br />

Columbia<br />

MISCHA BAKALEINIKOFF was assigned to compose<br />

musical scores for four films: "David Harding,<br />

Counterspy"; "Captive Girl"; "State<br />

and "Beyond the Purple Hills."<br />

Penitentiary,"<br />

Metro<br />

RUDOPH KOPP was assigned to prepare and direct<br />

the musical score for the Pete Smith short, "Wrong<br />

Son."<br />

Paramount<br />

Composing the scores for "September Affair" and<br />

"The Furies," respectively, are VICTOR YOUNG and<br />

FRANZ WAXMAN.<br />

Set to write three songs for the Hal Wallis production,<br />

"My Friend Irma Goes West," was the<br />

team of JAY LIVINGSTON and RAY EVANS. TROY<br />

SANDERS was assigned to serve as musical adviser<br />

for the film.<br />

REO Radio<br />

Producer Samuel Goldwyn signed HUGO FRIED-<br />

HOFER to write the score for "The Edge of Doom."<br />

TROF wnll be the Jerry Wald production, "Storm<br />

Warning."<br />

DAVID BUTTOLPH was assigned to write the<br />

musical score for "Pretty Baby."<br />

Signed to do the musical score for "Bright Leaf"<br />

was VICTOR YOUNG.<br />

Loanouts<br />

Metro<br />

WENDELL COREY was loaned by Hal Wallis<br />

Warners<br />

=''"* 'or musical director<br />

„J^^' DANIELE AMFITHEA-<br />

Productions<br />

to ploy the male lead in the Lana Turner<br />

starrer, "A Life of Her Own."<br />

RKO Radio<br />

V/ILLIAM BENDIX was borrowed from Hal Roach<br />

on a two-picture deal and was assigned the chief<br />

heavy role in "Alias Mike Fury." Ted Tetzlaff directs<br />

for Producer Warren Duff<br />

Meggers<br />

Metro<br />

^''"^^"^ "R.S.V.P." was GOTTFRIED<br />

ReInHARDt'"<br />

Set to direct the Esther Williams vehicle, "Pagan<br />

Love Song," was ROBERT ALTON.<br />

Assigned to produce his own original story, "The<br />

Teen-Age Version," was CAREY WILSON.<br />

Paramount<br />

Producer Hal Wallis signed HAL WALKER to meg<br />

My Friend Irma Goes West."<br />

In an assignment switch Producer JOSEPH SIS-<br />

TROM was set for "Nor All for Tears" while RICH-<br />

ARD MAIBAUM takes over the production chores lor<br />

Dear Mom."<br />

LESLIE FENTON has been signed to direct the<br />

Alan Ladd topliner, "Montana," for Producer Mel<br />

Epstein.<br />

Republic<br />

Director R. G. SPRINGSTEEN had his option lifted<br />

for another year.<br />

ALAN DWAN was handed the producer-director<br />

assignment on "My Sister's Destiny."<br />

Set to produce and direct "State Police Patrol"<br />

were STEPHEN AUER and PHIL FORD, respectively.<br />

Universal-International<br />

JOSEPH PEVNEY's first directorial chore for the<br />

studio will be "Yangtse Pirates," to be produced<br />

by Ted Richmond.<br />

Warners<br />

Director EDWIN L. MARIN was inked to a contract<br />

calling for two films annually and the right to do<br />

one outside picture a year.<br />

Options<br />

Columbia<br />

Inked to star in the Scott-Brown production, "Lost<br />

Stage Valley," were ROD CAMERON and WAYNE<br />

MORRIS.<br />

Eagle Lion<br />

Signed for "The Sun Sets at Dawn" was LOR-<br />

RAINE LORRIMER.<br />

Independent<br />

LUDWIG DONATH was signed for Horizon Productions'<br />

Van Heflin vehicle, "The Cost of Living," to<br />

be directed by Joseph Losey for Producer Sam<br />

Spiegel.<br />

Metro<br />

SALLY COOPER, daughter o! actress GLADYS<br />

COOPER, will make her screen debut in the Lana<br />

Turner vehicle, "A Life of Her Own," to be directed<br />

by George Cukor for Producer Voldemar Vetluguin.<br />

SPENCER TRACY was set to star in "Yankees in<br />

Te.xas" for Producer Pandro S. Berman.<br />

MAURICE IAEA, of the Padua Hills players, wan<br />

slated for the Gary Grant vehicle, "Crisis." Richard<br />

Brooks directs for Producer Arthur Freed.<br />

Monogram<br />

Castings for "Jiggs and Maggie Out West" indude<br />

JIMMY AUBREY, PAT GOLDIN, TOM KENNEDY,<br />

BOYD STOCKMAN, RILEY HILL, DICK RYAN and<br />

SAILOR VINCENT. William Beaudine directs and<br />

Barney Gerard produces the Joe Yule and Renin<br />

Riano vehicle.<br />

Cast in the Whip Wilson starrer, "Guns Roar in<br />

Rockhill," were ANDY CLYDE, RENO BROWNE,<br />

SARAH PADDEN, BILL KENNEDY, STEVE CLARK and<br />

FRANK McCARROLL.<br />

RKO Radio<br />

Set for "Sons of the Musketeers" was DEAM<br />

CETRULO. Also signed for the Cornel Wilde-Maureen<br />

O'Hara starrer was FRED KOHLER JR.<br />

Republic<br />

Actor JOHN CARROLL was inked to a new nonexclusive<br />

contract calling for three pictures plui<br />

options for two more.<br />

Inked for the femme lead in the Allan "Rocky"<br />

Lane western, "Salt Lake Raiders," was MARTHA<br />

HYER. Others signed for the film, which Fred<br />

Brannon megs for Producer Gordon Kay, are<br />

MYRON HEALEY, BYRON FOULGER, ROY BAR-<br />

CROFT and CLIFTON YOUNG.<br />

20th Century-Fox<br />

Studio lifted its option on the services of actress<br />

ANNE BAXTER.<br />

Actress KATHLEEN HUGHES was reoptioned for<br />

another year.<br />

Studio exercised its option on the services of actor<br />

WILLIAM LUNDIGAN for another year.<br />

United Artists<br />

Producer I. G. Goldsmith inked HOWARD DaSILVA<br />

for "Three Husbands," to be directed by Irving Reis.<br />

Universal-International<br />

GEORGE MURPHY, University of Southern Calilornia<br />

football star, was set for "Peggy." SHIRLEE<br />

ALLARD, GERALDINE KNAPP, ANN ROBIN and<br />

HELENE ANGUS also were signed. Frederick da<br />

Cordova directs. Inked for a supporting role was<br />

MARJORIE BENNETT.<br />

SPRING BYINGTON was signed for the title role<br />

in Producer Robert Arthur's "Louisa."<br />

Warners<br />

RANDOLPH SCOTT and PATRICIA NEAL were sel<br />

for the topline roles in Producer Soul Elkins' "Sugar<br />

foot," to be directed by Edwin L. Marin. Alsc<br />

signed were HOPE LANDIN, ARTHUR HUNNICUTT<br />

HUGH SANDERS and RAYMOND MASSEY. S Z<br />

"CUDDLES" SAKALL was assigned to the film.<br />

Assigned to a leading role with Richard Todd,<br />

Ruth Roman and Mercedes McCombridge in "Lightning<br />

Strikes Twice" was ZACHARY SCOTT. RHYS<br />

WILLIAMS was inked for a character role. King<br />

Vidor directs for Producer Henry Blanke.<br />

Cast for "Pretty Baby" were HUGH CHARLES,<br />

JOE REVLIN and ED CLARK.<br />

STEVE COCHRAN was assigned to star with Gaby<br />

Andre in the Bryan Foy productic<br />

to be directed by Andrew Stone.<br />

Scripters<br />

Columbia<br />

HAROLD GREENE has been assigned the scrivenin-i<br />

chores on "Isle of Samoa," forthcoming Jon Hail<br />

starrer, and "David Harding's Secret Mission,"<br />

sequel to "David Harding, Counterspy," now in<br />

production. Wallace MacDonald will produce both<br />

subjects.<br />

Metro<br />

GUY TROSPER was assigned to script "Insid.j<br />

Straight," to be produced by Richard Goldstone.<br />

HOWARD EMMETT ROGERS was inked to collaborate<br />

with GERALD FAIRLEE on the script of<br />

"Calling Bulldog Drummond."<br />

Paramount<br />

Producer Hal Wallis assigned CY HOWARD to<br />

screenplay "That's My Boy" as a Dean Martin and<br />

Jorry Lewis vehicle.<br />

RKO Radio<br />

STANLEY RUBIN was inked to a new producerwriter<br />

contract, with his first assignment under the<br />

dual pact to be "The Man He Found."<br />

PHILIP YORDAN and DANIEL FUCHS were inked<br />

to screenplay the Dana Andrews, Farley Granger<br />

and Joan Evans starrer, "Billion<br />

for Producer Samuel Goldwyn.<br />

Dollar Baby,"<br />

Producer Samuel Goldwyn signed MILTON KRIMS<br />

to screenplay "Christmas Present" from a novel by<br />

Margaret Cousins.<br />

20th Century-Fox<br />

CHARLES O'NEAL was assigned to screenplay tho<br />

Kenneth Roberts novel, "Lydia Bailey," for Producer<br />

Sol Siegel.<br />

Set to screenplay the Vera Caspary novel, "No<br />

Wedding Ring," for Producer Sol C. Siegel were<br />

ROSE FRANKEN and WILLIAM BROWN MELONEY.<br />

Story Buys<br />

Columbia<br />

"The Nice Mrs. Cary," romantic-comedy by Mar"<br />

McCarthy, was acquired and will be produced by<br />

William Dozier.<br />

Acquired by Gene Autry Productions was "The<br />

Mad Sheriff of Sanchez," historical yarn by Jack<br />

Evans.<br />

Independent<br />

Producer Joe Kaufman purchased the Frank Stock<br />

Ion short story, "The Lady and the Tiger," from<br />

Roy Del Ruth Productions.<br />

Lippert<br />

Purchased was "Okinawa," an original screenplay<br />

by Jack Gold.<br />

Metro<br />

Purchased and assigned to William H. Wright for<br />

production was "Darling, I'm Stuck," original comedy<br />

by Ruth Brooks Flippen, who will<br />

play.<br />

do the screen-<br />

Purchased was the Frank Harris short story,<br />

"Monies, the Matador." Ricardo Montalban will<br />

star in the bullfight film, which Jack Cummings<br />

produce.<br />

will<br />

Placed on William H. Wright's production slate<br />

was "The Loco Motive," original by mystery writers<br />

Craig Rice and Stuart Palmer. William Bowers is<br />

screenplaying the property.<br />

RKO Radio<br />

"No Place Called Home," original by William R.<br />

Cox and William R. Lipman, was purchased and<br />

scheduled as a John Wayne starring western.<br />

United Artists<br />

"Island in the Sky," a novel authored by Ernest<br />

K, Gann about the air transport command, was purchased<br />

by Robert Stillman Productions. Gann will<br />

screenplay his novel in collaboratk)n with Seton I.<br />

Miller.<br />

Universal-International<br />

Purchased were "The Desert Hawk," adventure<br />

tale by Aubrey Wisberg and Jack PoUexfen, and<br />

"Fiddle-Foot," comedy by Harold Shumate.<br />

Technically<br />

Columbia<br />

VINCENT FARRAR was set as cameraman for the<br />

Vera Vague two-reeler, "Nurses Versus Hearses."<br />

HENRY BATISTA was set as film editor on "David<br />

Harding, Counterspy."<br />

Eagle Lion<br />

JOE NADEL will serve both as associate producer<br />

and production manager on Producer Mori Briskin's<br />

"The Jackie Robinson Story."<br />

Independent<br />

Toy Gornett and Bert Friedlob signed former ski<br />

(Continued on following page)<br />

64<br />

BOXOFFICE :: February 4, 1950


—<br />

Studios Join Campaign<br />

For U,S, Tax Repeal<br />

HOLLYWOOD—Following the announcement<br />

from New York that major producers<br />

will contribute space in tradepapers and<br />

other media in the industry's antitax campaign,<br />

major studios here have joined the<br />

fight with the disclosure that the studio publicity<br />

directors' committee of the Ass'n of<br />

Motion Picture Producers is drawing up plans<br />

to assist in the drive.<br />

The publicists' group will coordinate its<br />

efforts with those of its New York counterpart,<br />

the MPAA advertising and publicity<br />

directors' committee, which last week organized<br />

to channel vigorous antitax activities.<br />

Locally, the publicists' radio-television subcommittee<br />

will be enlisted and the major<br />

studio publicity departments will use all<br />

available channels to carry the campaign to<br />

the public.<br />

Filming Unit to Havana<br />

To Shoot 'Visa' Scenes<br />

HOLLYWOOD—A unit headed by Director<br />

Joseph Lewis will leave for Havana next<br />

month, following completion of shooting on<br />

the picture at the MOM studios in Culver<br />

City, for location work on the Sam Marx<br />

production "Visa." The crew will headquarter<br />

at the Noticario Nacional studios in the<br />

Cuban city.<br />

Accompanying Lewis will be Cinematographer<br />

Paul Vogel, actor Steven Geray and<br />

other crew members.<br />

Personnelities<br />

(Continued from preceding page)<br />

champion STEVE STANFORD as technical adviser lor<br />

"Torch in the Wind," a Thor production-<br />

Metro<br />

HAFES JEE, Indian actor-producer, will serve as<br />

technical adviser for "Kim."<br />

Monogram<br />

Crev^ for "A <strong>Modern</strong> Marriage" includes: WES-<br />

LEY BARRY, assistant; WILLIAM SICKNER, camera;<br />

TOM LAMBERT, mixer, and PHIL KAHN, cutter.<br />

Technicians assigned to "Guns Roar in Rockhill"<br />

are HARRY O. JONES, assisldnt: HARRY NEUMANN,<br />

camera; JOHN KEAN, mixer, and JOHN C. FULLER,<br />

cutter.<br />

Paramount<br />

Assignments for the Hal Wallis production, "My<br />

Friend Irma Goes West," include CHICO DAY, assistant<br />

to Director Hal Walker; RICHARD BLAYDON,<br />

unit production manager, and HENRY BUMSTEAD,<br />

art director. Signed as director of photography was<br />

LEE GARMES.<br />

20th Century-Fox<br />

EDWARD J. SNYDER'S option as head ol the<br />

process department was lilted.<br />

Warners<br />

Assigned as director of photography for "Sugarfoot"<br />

was WILFRED M. CLINE. Assigned as assistant<br />

to Director Edwin L. Marin on the film was<br />

DON PAGE.<br />

Set as film editor on "Lightning Strikes Twice" was<br />

THOMAS REILLY.<br />

Title Changes<br />

Eagle Lion<br />

"Deadfall" (LeMay-Templelon) to HIGH LONE-<br />

SOME.<br />

Republic<br />

"Faces in the Sun" to MY SISTER'S DESTINY.<br />

Paramount<br />

"The Lie" to NO MAN OF HER OWN.<br />

llC ^^^ '" ^° remotely related a document<br />

^^ '^'^^ President's<br />

lit!<br />

tax message to Congress<br />

there is evidence that the motion<br />

picture industry's public relations consistently<br />

have two strikes against them and that<br />

Cinemania and its denizens are always available<br />

as handy whipping boys.<br />

Mr. Ti'uman attacked certain commercial<br />

practices which he indicted as devices to circumvent<br />

existing income tax laws. Among<br />

them was a comparatively new productional<br />

modus operandi through which producers,<br />

directors, stars, etc., incorporate companies<br />

for the purpose of making just one picture<br />

and, allegedly, with the .sole object of having<br />

profits— if any—from such films fall into<br />

the classification of capital gains rather than<br />

earned income, which latter is subject to s.<br />

much higher tax.<br />

Whether or not that is the case—and il;<br />

probably is in many setups—it is entirel3'<br />

legal and understandable. What's more, thci<br />

practice is not limited to the film business.<br />

There are scores of other fields—even unto<br />

the nation's great universities—where tho<br />

same or comparable procedure is regularly<br />

employed.<br />

Yet, rare indeed was the radio commentatoi*<br />

or newspaper reporter who, in analyzing Mr.<br />

Truman's requests for revised taxation, did<br />

not highlight that part of his message which<br />

touched upon the aforementioned facet of<br />

filmmaking. Which widespread emphasis,<br />

with many a snide connotation of purposeful<br />

tax evasion, certainly did nothing to improve<br />

Hollywood's tattered public relations.<br />

There's nothing much that can be done<br />

about it. It's just another example of Hollywood's<br />

over-fed publicity chickens coming<br />

home to roost; just another demonstration<br />

that those who live by the space-snatching<br />

sword must be prepared occasionally to be<br />

-slashed by the same weapon.<br />

So long as filmdom's great and near-great,<br />

and that avid gentry to which they entrust<br />

their public relations, constantly scramble<br />

for space and air time in which to beat<br />

the drums about their romances, their marriages,<br />

their parenthood, their foibles and<br />

their vagaries, it is most natural that the<br />

le.ss admirable phases of their personal and<br />

business lives must be subjected to the same<br />

widespread limelighting.<br />

A case in kind was the recent press preview<br />

of MGM's "Key to the City" at Hollywood's<br />

Egyptian Theatre. In an obvious effort<br />

to make capital of the avalanche of publicity<br />

which attended Clark Gable's marriage.<br />

Leo's studio publicity department broadcast<br />

to the public, through every available news<br />

and gossip outlet, that Gable and his wife<br />

could be seen by those fans fortunate enough<br />

to be at the Egyptian on the night that the<br />

feature was scheduled for a preview. Resultantly.<br />

the theatre and its contiguous territory<br />

was a shambles: and to add to the<br />

all-is-confusion atmosphere of tho event.<br />

Publicity Chieftain Howard Strickling and<br />

his rover boys endowed the occasion with<br />

klieg lights, blaring bands, scantily-clad usherettes<br />

and many of the other accouterments<br />

of a hoopla premiere. Not overlooked were<br />

the glamor boys and girls, the agents, the<br />

relatives, stooges and other members of the<br />

genuflecting, "me-too" fringe. In fact,<br />

there were so many of them that the reviewers<br />

had to battle to get desirable seats,<br />

and resultantly some of them walked out on<br />

the clambake without seeing the picture.<br />

Possibly all of the excitement and tumult<br />

could have been considered wise exploitation<br />

on behalf of the picture had the event been<br />

a premiere open to the public. But this was<br />

announced to the film reviewers as a "press<br />

preview." It wound up as anything else but.<br />

In toto. the madhouse evening, regardless of<br />

how it scored in the exploitation column,<br />

came a woeful cropper as concerns Leo's press<br />

relations.<br />

Fortunately for Strickling and staff, the<br />

Gable starrer is sufficiently excellent, entertainment-wise,<br />

to transcend the disgruntlement<br />

which their mismanagement engendered,<br />

although it is entirely possible that<br />

some of the irked celluloid appraisers will<br />

not be as lavish in their praise of the offering<br />

as they might have been had they not<br />

been pushed around.<br />

P. S. At press time, it had not been determined<br />

whether or not any fan had seen<br />

Gable and frau.<br />

STOP-THE-PRESS DEPARTMENT<br />

(Samuel Goldwyn Division)<br />

Advises elegant Al Vaughan. "the photograph<br />

of Farley Granger's mother that is<br />

used in Samuel Goldwyn's 'The Edge of<br />

Doom' is really Farley Granger's mother."<br />

Came Thursday morning and Praise Pundit<br />

Perry Lieber wished he was dead—or in<br />

Stromboli. The picture by the same name,<br />

which had been accorded an extraordinary<br />

amount of doubtfully-valuable prerelease<br />

publicit.v—because of Ingrid and her loves<br />

had become a reviewing football. First, one<br />

of the press associations caught the opus at<br />

a sneak preview in Long Beach and syndicated<br />

a coast-to-coast review—far from favorable—thereon.<br />

Irked by such gun-jumping, a<br />

Hollywood daily tradepaper, which happened<br />

to have had a representative at the sneak,<br />

violated tradepaper- producer agreements and<br />

printed its review of the picture—again, far<br />

from laudatory—long before RKO Radio was<br />

even thinking about showing the feature at<br />

a scheduled press preview.<br />

What now, li'l Lieber?<br />

All of Which happened to Praise Pundit<br />

Perry just as he returned from a business<br />

trip to Boston, in which city he was a visitor<br />

at the time of the sensational $1,500,000<br />

robbery. Lieber's alibi: He wouldn't have<br />

needed a Halloween mask. And. besides.<br />

Arch Reeve's opinion of himself as a gin<br />

player makes him almost as soft a touch.<br />

BOXOFFICE : : February 4. 1950 65


—<br />

AoHcCoit ^c^kont<br />

n FTER MANY MONTHS of negotiation the<br />

Ass'n of Cine Technicians has served<br />

notice on the producers that it will not be<br />

included in a new wages agreement that the<br />

British Film Producers Ass'n has been trying<br />

to arrange. For months the producers'<br />

representatives have been working out an<br />

agreement which will remove many of the<br />

present anomalies and which will obviate<br />

By JOHN SULLIVAN<br />

technical staff are likely to be overlooked<br />

in wage discussions on craft grades and unskilled<br />

labor.<br />

There may be some truth in their reasoning.<br />

It is a fact, though, that ACT has<br />

always been difficult to include in any joint<br />

trade body. As an organization it has always<br />

been over -conscious of the fact that it is<br />

the smallest of the unions working in the<br />

industry but is, also, the key one since its<br />

members might be described as the brains<br />

of the industry rather than the hands—the<br />

directors, cameramen, sound technicians, art<br />

directors, etc. This argument may be a sound<br />

the necessity of three separate agreements<br />

with the three unions in the film industry<br />

ACT, the National Ass'n of Theatrical and<br />

Kine Employes (which looks after makeup,<br />

wardrobe and craft grades) and the Electrical<br />

Trades Union, which represents the one but the fact remains that ACT'S actions<br />

electricians. To this end a body was formed in withdrawing from their joint wage agreement<br />

called the Joint Industrial Council and on<br />

cannot fail to have a bad effect on labor<br />

this served the nominees of each union and relations.<br />

of the producers. A draft agreement had<br />

been prepared which covered all grades WITH THE BOXOFFICE just recovering<br />

working in the industry, technicians, craftsmen<br />

from the bad slump caused by last summer's<br />

and electricians, but at the last moment hot weather, exhibitors are now facing an-<br />

ACT called a general meeting of its members<br />

other three bad weeks. Between now and<br />

and a resolution was passed that the the end of February the country will be<br />

technicians would refuse to be included in suffering from general election fever and<br />

this agreement.<br />

with political meetings taking place every<br />

ACT'S members include what might be night in every district in Britain receipts<br />

described as strictly film technicians, in will dive again. Some cinemas are making<br />

other words men and women who could not arrangements to stay open until 2 a. m. on<br />

find employment in the trade outside of the night of the poll to flash results.<br />

the film industry. NATKE members, plasterers,<br />

Among the prospective MPs are 22 men<br />

carpenters, etc., could easily find em-<br />

and women with some associations in the<br />

ployment if every studio closed and the electricians<br />

film industry, 18 of whom are standing as<br />

of ETU could also be absorbed into Labor candidates and four as Conservatives.<br />

other unions. ACT, therefore, claims that a Among the new candidates is Sidney Lewis,<br />

joint agreement with the other two unions director of public relations with the Associated<br />

will affect the professional status of the technician<br />

British Cinemas circuit, who is stand-<br />

and that the high wages paid to senior ing as Labor candidate for S. E. Leicester,<br />

Film Directors Win<br />

Pay Hike, Guild Shop<br />

HOLLYWOOD — Culminating<br />

many<br />

months of negotiation, a new eight-year<br />

bargaining agreement has been reached by<br />

the Screen Directors Guild and major producers,<br />

replacing a pact which expired in<br />

May 1948. At a general meeting, SDG members<br />

approved the new contract, which gives<br />

the organization a 100 per cent guild shop,<br />

an increase in minimum salaries of 21 per<br />

cent, and better consideration in the matter<br />

of advertising credits.<br />

Minimum wages are boosted from $347.50<br />

to $420 weekly on freelance, week-to-week or<br />

contract deals, while a $500 weekly minimum<br />

is established on single-picture contracts involving<br />

a picture budgeted at $200,000 or more.<br />

The new ticket, yet to be officially approved<br />

by major producer representatives,<br />

has provisions for arbitration and conciliation<br />

of disputes and sets up option periods of three<br />

months initially, and then not less than six<br />

months thereafter.<br />

Browning, Mont., Exhibitor<br />

Asks Relief on Rentals<br />

SALT LAKE CIT'Y—Relief on film rentals<br />

is being sought by the exhibitor in Browning,<br />

Mont., a small town near the Canadian border.<br />

In a letter to one branch manager (Tom<br />

McMahon, Republic) the theatreman enclosed<br />

clippings of the desperate plight of the residents<br />

of the town and asked what could be<br />

done about adjustment in rentals. The operator<br />

pointed out that many of the residents<br />

are Indians and the desperate cold—50 below<br />

on some days—has dealt a body blow to the<br />

showhouse operations.<br />

The operator pointed out that conditions<br />

in general are "terrible" in the area. The<br />

plight of the Indians especially has been<br />

brought to the nation's attention in hearings<br />

in Congress.<br />

American in Butte, Mont.,<br />

Is Destroyed by Fire<br />

BUTTE, MONT.—The American Theatre<br />

here, controlled by Fox Intermountain Theatres,<br />

was destroyed by fire early Wednesday<br />

morning (1). The fire was the second at a<br />

Fox house here in the last three months, an<br />

earlier one having destroyed the Park Theatre.<br />

No loss of life or injuries were caused by<br />

AT EQUIPMENT FIRM CONCLAVE—The current year, marking the company's<br />

was<br />

quarter-century of operations, will be a good one from the business standpoint, it<br />

agreed by executives and branch managers of National Theatre Supply when they met<br />

in Hollywood for their annual sales meeting January 23, 24 and 25. Among those on<br />

hand to view the latest in theatre equipment distributed by the firm:<br />

Top panel, left photo: Oscar Ciniquv. Seattle manager; Heaton Randall, San<br />

Francisco; J. E. Currie (in background) of the home office. New York; Lloyd Owenby,<br />

Los Angeles; J. J. Morgan and J. B. Stone, Denver. Right photo: Oscar Oldknow, vicepresident<br />

and convention host; Arthur J, Palmer, Ampro Corp.; Herb Griffin, International<br />

Projector Corp., and W. E. Green, NTS president.<br />

Bottom panel: Glen Slipper, Omaha manager; Lloyd Owenby, Los Angeles; Ralph<br />

Fries, Philadelphia. Right photo: William Stohl; Knute Williams; Glen SUpper,<br />

Omaha; Lloyd Owenby, Los Angeles; Heaton Randall, San Francisco; J. J, Morgan,<br />

Uenver.<br />

West Coast Mono. Heads<br />

To Kansas City Meeting<br />

the fire Wednesday morning, according to<br />

Bob Anderson, Fox Intermountain city manager<br />

here.<br />

LOS ANGELES—Howard Stubbins, Monogram<br />

west coast franchise holder; M. J. E.<br />

McCarthy, local manager, and Mel Hulling,<br />

San Francisco supervisor, were among those<br />

slated to attend the second of two regional<br />

meetings of Monogram-Allied Artists branch<br />

managers, February 4, 5 in Kansas City.<br />

M. H. Goldstein, general sales manager, was<br />

to preside.<br />

First regional session was held in New York<br />

January 28, 29 with President Steve Broidy<br />

and Vice-President Harold Mirisch attending.<br />

66<br />

BOXOFFICE :: February 4, 1950


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Despite Rainy Los Angeles Weekend<br />

LOS ANGELES—The marines have landed<br />

and. so far as local first run revenues are<br />

concerned, have the situation well in hand.<br />

In its first general release engagement in<br />

five showcases Republic's "Sands of Iw'o<br />

Jima" hauled in a hefty 170 per cent, far<br />

overshadowing its competition.<br />

(Average Is 100)<br />

Chinese, Los Angeles, Loyola, Uptown, Wilshire<br />

Sands of Iwo Jimo (Rep), 2nd run. Belle ol<br />

Old Mexico (Rep) 170<br />

Culver, Ritz, Globe, Studio City, Vogue—Woman<br />

in Hiding (U-I); The Rugged O'Riordana (U-I) 125<br />

Downtown, Hollywood Paromounts-The Heiress<br />

(Para); Hoedown (Col), 2nd wk 8C<br />

Egyptian, Loews Slate—The Red Danube (MGM);<br />

Tension (MGM) 100<br />

Fine Arts—Spring in Park Lane (EL) 110<br />

Four Star—My Foolish Heart (RKO), 6th wk 80<br />

Globe, El Rey, Ins, Guild, Belmonl-Pirates ol<br />

Copri (EC); The Flying Saucer (EC)<br />

Music Halls, Forum— D. O. A. (UA); Bomba on<br />

90<br />

Ponlher Island (Mono), 2nd wk<br />

Orpheum—The Wolf Hunters (Mono), 2nd run;<br />

100<br />

eight acts vaudeville SO<br />

Pontages, Hillstreet-Deodly Is the Female<br />

(Mono); Storm Over Wyoming (RKO) 80<br />

Warners Hollywood, Downtown, Wiltern—Montana<br />

(WB), 2nd wk 90<br />

"Mrs. Mike' Leads Seattle<br />

Trade With 120 Per Cent<br />

SEATTLE—Although snow and cold continued<br />

to cut heavily into grosses, theatregoers<br />

seemed to be getting used to it.<br />

Blue Mouse—The Inspector General (WB), Bomba<br />

on Panther Island (Mono), 4lh d. t. wk<br />

Coliseum— Thelma lordon (Para); Cowboy and<br />

the Prizelighler (EL)<br />

95<br />

100<br />

Filth Avenue—The Heiress (Para); The Blonde<br />

Bandit (Rep), 2nd wk 95<br />

Liberty-Roseanna McCoy (RKO); Hollywood<br />

VarieHes (LP) 110<br />

Music Box— All the King's Men (Col); Girls'<br />

School (Col), 5th d. t. wk 85<br />

Music Hall—Mrs. Mike (UA); Apache Chief (LP),<br />

2nd wk 120<br />

Orpheum—Montana (WB); Square Donee lubilee<br />

(LP), 2nd wk 90<br />

Paramount—Dancing in the Dark (20th-Fox);<br />

Call of the Forest (LP) 80<br />

"Battleground' Scores 200<br />

In San Francisco Opening<br />

SAN FRANCISCO—"Battleground" chalked<br />

up a massive 200 per cent in its opening at<br />

the Warfield here, setting the pace for newcomers.<br />

"Samson and Delilah" registered 175<br />

per cent at the St. Francis.<br />

Esquire—All the King's Men (Col),, 4th d t. wk ...150<br />

Fox—Montana (WB). The Blonde Bandit (Rep),<br />

2nd wk 90<br />

Golden Gate—Port ol New York (EL); Square<br />

Dance lubilee (LP) 9U<br />

Orpheum—South Sea Sinner (U-I); Undertow<br />

(U-1) 135<br />

Paramount—The Inspector General<br />

Coronado (Rep)<br />

(WB); Bells<br />

o( 135<br />

St Francis—Samson and Delilah (Para) 175<br />

ilale—Thelma Jordon (Para); Cowboy and the<br />

Prizefighter (EL), 2nd d. t. wk<br />

United Artists—Mrs. Mike (UA), 2nd wk<br />

85<br />

140<br />

United Nations—Prince of Foxes (20lh-Fox);<br />

Hollywood Varities (LP), 4th d. t. .wk 80<br />

Warlield—Battleground (MGM) 200<br />

"Battleground' Grosses 195<br />

To Pace Portland<br />

PORTLAND — Heavy snows and cold<br />

weather bit heavily into grosses for downtown<br />

houses but helped steady neighborhoods.<br />

Broadway—South Sea Sinner (U-I); Once Mote.<br />

My Darling (U-I) - 12(1<br />

Music Box— All the King's Men (Col); And Baby<br />

Makes Three (Col), 2nd d, t. wk 145<br />

Oriental—The Snake Pit (20th-Fox); A Letter to<br />

Three Wives (2Qth-Fox), 2nd runs 85<br />

Orpheum—Whirlpool (20lh-Fox): Bodyhold (Col). 105<br />

Paramount—Tell It to the Judge (Col); This Was<br />

a Woman (20lh-Fox) 95<br />

Plavhouse—Thelma lordon (Para); Girls" School<br />

(Col), 2nd d t. wk 100<br />

United Artists— Battleground (MGM) 195<br />

'Delilah' Packs Denham<br />

At Denver at Upped Prices<br />

DENVER—"Sam.son and Delilah," with<br />

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the Denham to overflow most of the week.<br />

Aladdin, Bluebird—Sands of Iwo lima (Rep);<br />

Old Mexico (Rep), 5th d wk 130<br />

Belle of I.<br />

Broactway- Adam's Rib (MGM), filh wk 105<br />

Denham—Samson and Delilah (Para) 300<br />

Denver, Esquir^ . bb^-r— Dancing in the Dark<br />

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Orpheum—Tension (MGM) 90<br />

Pararnount—Whirlpool (20th-Fox); Hollywood<br />

Varieties (LP)<br />

Rialto—Montana (WB); There's a Girl in My<br />

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Heort (Mono), 4th d. t. wk<br />

Tobor—Radar Secret Service (LP), and stage<br />

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Vogue—The Quiet One (M-B); Francis the First<br />

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At Salt Lake City<br />

COMPTON, CALIF. — The new $350,000<br />

Compton Drive-In was opened here recently<br />

with a Western Hall of Fame stage show in<br />

which major Hollywood western stars participated.<br />

The drive-in, owned and operated by<br />

Pacific Drive-In Theatres, Inc.. headed by<br />

Charles A. Caballero, is located at Rosecrans<br />

boulevard between Long Beach and Atlantic.<br />

It covers a 20-acre tract and boasts an allpaved<br />

1,000-car parking space.<br />

Mayor Harry T. Laugharn welcomed film<br />

notables over the microphones of three local<br />

radio stations. The program was built around<br />

headliners from the newly organized Western<br />

Hall of Fame, whose chairman Tim Spencer<br />

acted as head man. Members of the Hall of<br />

Fame presented special plaques to veteran<br />

cowboy heroes Hoot Gibson and Col. Tim Mc-<br />

Coy as part of the program.<br />

Among stars appearing in the show were<br />

Dale Evans, Carolina Cotton, Eddie bean,<br />

Andy Parker, and the Plainsmen, the Sons<br />

of the Pioneers, Doye O'Dell of television<br />

fame, Russell Hayden, Andy Clyde. Don Barry.<br />

Preston Foster. Rod Cameron. Andy Devine.<br />

Monte Hale, Rex Allen, Reno Browne and<br />

Richard Foote.<br />

Free bubble gum was distributed to the<br />

kids and an 8xl0-inch photo of the stars was<br />

given to adults as souvenirs.<br />

The Compton is the 15th in the Pacific<br />

Drive-In chain, in which Caballero is associated<br />

with G. A. Diamond, William Forman<br />

and J. H. Tingle. The circuit opened its first<br />

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drive-in in September 1934. Other houses are<br />

located in Long Beach, Orange. El Monte,<br />

Gardena. Burbank. Van Nuys, Reseda, Bell<br />

Gardens, San Bernardino, San Pedro, Inglewood<br />

and Los Angeles.<br />

Feature of the new drive-in is its 85-foot<br />

tower and a front mural which depicts a<br />

fleet of Viking ships. The mural was painted<br />

by Mexican artist Arnolda Rubio. The drivein<br />

has a large concessions stand from which<br />

a staff of 25 specially trained men and women<br />

can serve 1,000 persons in less than 15 minutes.<br />

There is a capacious playground for<br />

children with merry-go-round, swings, slides<br />

and sandboxes and where a supervisor is in<br />

charge at all times.<br />

Landscaping of the 20 acres was in charge<br />

of Henry c. Soto Corp. Harry E. Olmstead<br />

is manager of the new Compton. Olmstead<br />

has a background of some 20 years in the<br />

theatre industry. He spent 14 years with<br />

Warners Theatres in New York before coming<br />

to the west coast. Frank M. Diaz is supervisor<br />

of the entire circuit of drive-ins.<br />

Salt Lake Building Accelerated<br />

SALT LAKE CITY—The pace of new theatre<br />

openings in the Salt Lake City exchange<br />

area continued at top speed, with the Crest<br />

Theatre being the latest to schedule an<br />

opening.<br />

Owned and operated by Crest, Inc., the<br />

showhouse is situated about five miles from<br />

the center of Salt Lake's downtown section<br />

in the rapidly expanding southeast residential<br />

area. It has been built to accommodate 800<br />

patrons, with parking space being provided<br />

for several hundred cars.<br />

New circular lines have been used in the<br />

interior design of the two-story building of<br />

brick and native flagstone.<br />

The theatre will have a second run policy,<br />

Manager Rex Christenseh said.<br />

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LOS ANGELES<br />

por the part they played in the successful<br />

Toys for Tots campaign, sponsored by the<br />

marine corps reserve to provide playthings<br />

for underprivileged children during the last<br />

Christmas season, more than 300 southern<br />

California theatres have been cited by the<br />

reserve corps. Tribute was paid by Maj. Gen,<br />

M. H. Silverthorn. reserve director, to Charles<br />

P. Skouras, on behalf of Fox West Coast;<br />

E. L. DePatie, representing the Warner circuit;<br />

and Gus A. Metzger, board chairman,<br />

Southern California Theatre Owners Ass'n<br />

Blumberg of Principal Theatres<br />

left for San Francisco on a business junket.<br />

L. J. "Buckie" Williams, exploiteer for Lippert<br />

Productions, and Frank Scheindler, local<br />

exchange manager, planed to Phoenix to set<br />

up the campaign for the late-February world<br />

premiere there of Lippert's "The Baron of<br />

Arizona" ... A visitor from the New York<br />

office was Lou Astor. Columbia sales executive<br />

. . . Bob Duningan. theatre operator in<br />

Blythe. is building a 500-car drive-in and<br />

recreation center on the outskirts of city.<br />

Something of a precedent was set when the<br />

Downtown and Hollywood Paramounts began<br />

their day-date run of "Samson and Delilah."<br />

Doors were opened at 9:45 a.m. instead of the<br />

usual noon schedule . . . Mr. and Mrs. Dick<br />

Lemucci have reopened their hewly renovated<br />

Granada in Bakersfield . . . James Banducci's<br />

River Theatre in Oildale and Arvin in Arvin<br />

have been added to the client list by Earle<br />

Johnson's booking service. Banducci is taking<br />

time off for a fishing trip in Mexico.<br />

A luncheon threesome included Al Foreman,<br />

Seattle theatre owner, and Gus Diamond, executive<br />

of Pacific Drive-Ins, with Al Taylor,<br />

local manager for Paramount . Wolf<br />

. . . Alex Cooperman. Eagle<br />

of Panchon & Marco headed for Honolulu<br />

for a vacation<br />

Lion office manager, passed out the cigars<br />

to celebrate the coming of Julie Ellen, a baby<br />

daughter . Sinift has set Arthur Lang<br />

as manager of his Del Mar Theatre.<br />

Bill Roberts has been appointed manager<br />

of FWC's Los Angeles, first run deluxer,<br />

assuming the post vacated when Robert F.<br />

Duke was killed by a hit-and-run driver.<br />

Roberts switches from the Fox Wilshire in<br />

Beverly Hills. Harry Marx transfers from the<br />

Carthay Circle, temporarily closed, to the<br />

Wilshire.<br />

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BOXOFFICE :: February 4, 1950


. . Western<br />

: February<br />

. . Harry<br />

. . Barney<br />

. . Ken<br />

SAN FRANCISCO Twelve FWC Theatres<br />

T ife in Pleasanton" was shown on the<br />

screen of the Roxy Theatre in Pleasanton.<br />

The picture was made up of scenes taken<br />

in the town by Robert Allen, representative<br />

of Reelife Pi-oductions of Hollywood . . . Returning<br />

home from the U-I convention in St.<br />

Louis were B. Rose, district manager; Abe<br />

Swerdlow, branch manager; Jerry Slutsky,<br />

Tony Grabowy and Richard Colbert, salesmen,<br />

and Eddie Smythe, office manager.<br />

Betty Gamble, booker at U-I, is a partner<br />

in the 988 club at Sutter and Hyde street . . .<br />

Two Fox West Coast managers were shifted<br />

to new posts. Herman Kersken will return<br />

to San Francisco and Fay Reader will move<br />

over to Oakland. It is also rumored that<br />

PWC will acquire new Peninsula theatres.<br />

Dave Cantor, RKO publicist, was in town<br />

. . . Lou Singer, manager of the Fox Theatre,<br />

was ill . . . "Samson and Delilah" is breaking<br />

records at the St. Francis . Sarver,<br />

Drive-In Theatre Mfg. Co.. was seen along<br />

the Row . Theatrical Equipment<br />

Co. has disposed of its Navion aircraft to<br />

William David for use in his business as industrial<br />

designer.<br />

Charles Gubser, associated in the new<br />

Showboat Drive-In, to be opened this spring<br />

in Tracy, was on the Row introducing Manager<br />

Fllice of the drive-in . . . S. F. Burns<br />

of <strong>Modern</strong> Theatre Supply, Seattle, was here<br />

for a few days . . . H. R. Maag, RCA western<br />

manager, has been appointed to vice-presidency<br />

of the company. Robert Schultz, RCA<br />

local representative, returned from New York<br />

and Philadelphia.<br />

After a recent standout job on the Martha<br />

Logan cooking cla.sses at the Orpheum, Graham<br />

Kislingbury, publicist for North Coast<br />

Theatres, followed with a campaign on "My<br />

Foolish Heart" at the United Artists. He<br />

selected five local secretaries and allowed<br />

them to follow their slightest whim by making<br />

it possible for them to do whatever they<br />

wanted to. The four local papers covered the<br />

activities fully.<br />

BLOCKBUSTER<br />

Under UA Banner<br />

LOS ANGELES—Management and operation<br />

of 12 Fox West Coast Theatres was<br />

taken over Wednesday (1) by the United Artists<br />

Theatre circuit under terms of the federal<br />

court decree, according to Pat DeCicco. operating<br />

head of the California division of<br />

United Artists Theatres Circuit, Inc.<br />

DeCicco listed these theatres: Four Star<br />

and United Artists. Ix)s Angeles; United Artists,<br />

Pasadena; Capitol and California, Glendale;<br />

United Artists, Inglewood and Long<br />

Beach; Long Beach, Long Beach; Mission,<br />

San Jose; Varsity. Palo Alto; California,<br />

Richmond, and United Artists, Berkeley.<br />

He said the move is the last step in the<br />

complete severance of the joint interests of<br />

Fox West Coast and United Artists.<br />

SALT LAKE CITY<br />

"Cmak Smith jr. has been transferred from<br />

salesman to office manager at Monogram-<br />

Allied Artists. He succeeds Al Mabey who will<br />

manage Film Classics affairs, succeeding the<br />

late Dave McElhinney . Rose, new<br />

district manager at U-I. conferred with the<br />

local staff. He was accompanied by his predecessor,<br />

Foster Blake, who has been promoted<br />

to western division manager . Levy,<br />

Kansas City, has been named new office manager<br />

at U-I. He was in Kansas City this week<br />

to bring his family to Salt Lake.<br />

Vosco W. Call, Brigham City, theatre owner<br />

and operator, has been elected president of<br />

the Brigham City Chamber of Commerce.<br />

He has been active in civic affairs for several<br />

years . , . The UA office force has been realigned<br />

since the death of Jo.seph Madsen,<br />

office manager, Carroll Ti-owbridge, manager,<br />

announced. Duties and responsibilities were<br />

shifted in the realignment, Trowbridge said.<br />

Vincent Gilhool, Bill Vaughan and the<br />

Huish-Gilhool circuit staff have moved into<br />

new offices at 140 South Second East street,<br />

across the street from MGM offices, to put<br />

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BOXOFFICE :<br />

4, 1950 69


. . . January<br />

. .<br />

. . Dick<br />

. . Norman<br />

SEATTLE<br />

\]l7illiam H. Thedford, Evergreen vice-president,<br />

celebrated his birthday January 27<br />

23 is quite a day for the Jack<br />

Hamaker family. Hamaker, manager of the<br />

Fifth Avenue, was born on that date, so was<br />

his 2-year-old son, and this January Mrs.<br />

Hamaker gave birth to a daughter—on the<br />

Helen Rucker is back home after<br />

23 . . .<br />

spending a short time in Providence hospital<br />

Sam Siegel of Columbia flew to<br />

. . . Denver for exploitation work.<br />

Max Hadfield, who has been operating a<br />

theatre in Pullman, Wash., has joined the<br />

EL sales staff as salesman for eastern Washington<br />

. . . Neal Walton came in from San<br />

Francisco . . . Bill Shartin of FC and Fredi<br />

Shartin marked their 28th wedding anniversary<br />

January 22 . . E. R. Bechtel, on<br />

.<br />

Filmrow during the past 14 years with B. P.<br />

Shearer, has been transferred to the San<br />

Francisco branch. Joe Berringer of the<br />

drapery department also has been shifted<br />

there.<br />

William H. Thedford, Carl Mahne, Frank<br />

Christie, Vic Gauntlett. Lowell Parmentier<br />

and Bob Haase, Evergreen executives, will<br />

leave February 11 for Los Angeles to attend<br />

the annual meeting of National Theatres ,<br />

Clint Wineholt, manager of the Liberty<br />

Theatre, in cooperation with Joe Longo of<br />

RKO, posted every snowbank in downtown<br />

Seattle with signs on "Roseanna McCoy"<br />

for an effective ballyhoo stunt.<br />

SPRING HAS SPRUNG,<br />

THE GRASS HAS RE,<br />

Things are booming<br />

in the<br />

DRIVE-IN BIZ /<br />

The most advanced and newest<br />

in equipment— designed especially<br />

for Drive-in Theatre use, by<br />

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SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIF.<br />

C. W. Motris, Pres. ; Wayne Mayhew, Vice-Pres.<br />

So. California Ass'n<br />

To Gather Tuesday<br />

LOS ANGELES—Plans to formulate panels<br />

to be set up for the discussion and interchange<br />

of ideas for the mutual benefit of its<br />

members will be discussed at a general membership<br />

meeting of the Southern California<br />

Theatre Owners Ass'n February 7 in the<br />

Variety clubrooms of the Ambassador hotel.<br />

G. A. Metzger, board chairman, will preside.<br />

The proposed panels would explore various<br />

exhibitor problems including business conditions,<br />

operating -expenses, merchandising,<br />

ways and means of "combating the apparent<br />

apathy of theatregoers," and television and<br />

its effect on grosses.<br />

Additionally, Harry Vinnicof, chairman of<br />

the labor committee, will report on negotiations<br />

with projectionists lATSE Local 150 for<br />

a new bargaining agreement, and Sherrill<br />

Corwin, a vice-president of the Theatre Owners<br />

of America, will discuss the TOA board<br />

meeting which he attended in January in<br />

New York.<br />

North Bend City Council<br />

Enacts Censorship Law<br />

NORTH BEND, ORE. — The city<br />

council<br />

has adopted an ordinance providing for censoring<br />

of motion pictures, theatrical productions<br />

and other entertainment through a fiveman<br />

board. The ordinance prohibits showing<br />

"of anything obscene, indecent or immoral;<br />

any gruesome, revolting or disgusting scene<br />

or any subject which tends to disrupt public<br />

morals."<br />

Postponed Till Feb. 14<br />

HOLLYWOOD — Because of a crowded<br />

court calendar, another postponement, this<br />

time to February 14, was ordered by Federal<br />

Judge William C. Mathes for trial date of the<br />

multimillion dollar damage suit filed by the<br />

Conference of Studio Unions against the<br />

major producers and the lATSE. The action,<br />

originally brought in July 1947, alleges the<br />

producers and lA conspired to deprive CSU<br />

members of their studio jobs as an aftermath<br />

of the 1946 studio strike, in which the<br />

CSU was involved.<br />

Valentine Rayburg Rites<br />

LOS ANGELES—Funeral services were held<br />

in the Wee Kirk o' the Heather for Valentine<br />

Rayburg, 78, retired theatre owner who died<br />

at his home here. Rayburg is survived by a<br />

sister and his son Gerald.<br />

THEATRE /ALE/<br />

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METRO PREMIUM COMPANY<br />

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DENVER<br />

projectionists Local 230 re-elected J. W.<br />

Dooley president: L. A. Barefield, vicepresident;<br />

Dan M. Kelly, treasurer; R. E.<br />

Waller, secretary, and Charles P. Weber, business<br />

agent. The board of trustees includes<br />

H. B. Banzhaf, Allen E. Wilson and G. E.<br />

Campbell . . . Colosseum of Motion Picture<br />

Salesmen has re-elected George Tawson,<br />

20th-Fox, president; Al Brandon, vice-president,<br />

and Bruce Marshall, Columbia, secretary-treasurer.<br />

Among those from Denver attending the<br />

opening of the Gila, Ed Ward's new theatre<br />

in Silver City, N. M., were Fred ICnil, Ward<br />

Pennington, Paul Almeyer and Dick Lutz<br />

. . . William Keith, UA district manager,<br />

conferred with Clarence Olson, local manager,<br />

and together they called on major<br />

accounts . . . William Prass, publicity director<br />

for Metro, has returned from a lengthy<br />

trip through Utah, Idaho and Montana in<br />

the interests of "Battleground."<br />

Dave Cockrill, managing director of the<br />

Denham, is out of the hospital where he<br />

went when he was threatened with pneumonia<br />

. . . Foster Blake, U-I division manager,<br />

and Barney Rose, district manager,<br />

were here conducting a sales meeting at the<br />

exchange . Probstein, owner of the<br />

State, has returned from a six-week vacation<br />

trip to New York • and Florida, and is<br />

sporting a million-dollar tan.<br />

Fox Intermountain Theatre notes: Frank<br />

H. Ricketson, president, has been re-elected<br />

chairman of the board of the Denver Community<br />

Chest, and his aide Robert Selig<br />

has been named a vice-president of the<br />

chest. Selig has just returned from an extended<br />

vacation in the southwest and to Old<br />

Mexico . . . Hall Baetz, Denver city manager,<br />

went to New York to attend the second<br />

annual showmanship conference of 20th-<br />

Fox . . . Jack McGee, Montana district<br />

manager, will become a grandfather this<br />

summer when his son Jack jr. becomes a<br />

father . Conley, La Junta city manager,<br />

is in a Denver hospital suffering from<br />

ulcers . . . Harry Huffman, retired Denver<br />

city manager, and Mrs. Huffman left for<br />

Hawaii where they will spend several weeks<br />

. . . Henry Westerfield, Las Cruces, N. M.,<br />

city manager, is recovering nicely from an<br />

operation in the Las Cruces hospital.<br />

Betty Craig, drama editor and motion<br />

picture critic of the Denver Post, recovered<br />

from a serious illness in time to be able to<br />

attend the world premiere of "The Sundowners"<br />

at Amarillo, Tex. This is the first<br />

world premiere she has attended outside of<br />

Denver . . . Fihnrow visitors: Don Lewis,<br />

Holyoke; Harry McDonald, Torrington, Wyo.;<br />

Joseph LaConte, Fort Collins; Mrs. Marie<br />

Goodhand, Kimball, Neb.<br />

New Sound Installed<br />

SOAP LAKE, WASH.—New Super Simplex<br />

sound equipment has been installed at the<br />

Lake Theatre here.<br />

DRIVE-IN THEATRE<br />

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70 BOXOFFICE : : February 4, 1950


ii<br />

I<br />

Tell Ciiy, Ind., House<br />

Gets Facelifting<br />

TELL CITY, IND.—A year-long rehabilitation<br />

progi-am is nearing completion at the<br />

Ohio Tlieatre, operated by the Settos circuit.<br />

A few major changes remain to be done,<br />

which will be annoimced, Tom Morris, manager,<br />

said when they are started.<br />

Renovation started with the front and has<br />

gone through the entire building. Added<br />

were a new boxoffice of plate gla.ss and glass<br />

blocks, tile facing on the front wall, and an<br />

apartment and office for the manager on the<br />

second floor. Directly back of the boxoffice<br />

a glass-block candy and popcorn stand was<br />

installed where purchases may be made from<br />

the outside or the lobby.<br />

The walls and ceiling of the foyer are of<br />

weldwood cut into squares and given a<br />

checkerboard two-tone effect. New restrooms<br />

have been built on the sides of the lobby in<br />

space formerly occupied by barber and beauty<br />

shops. The main auditorium also has the<br />

checkerboard two-tone walls, and a Celotex<br />

tile ceiling. The stage has been moved back<br />

12 feet and reconstructed entirely of cement<br />

blocks. Cove lighting was installed in the<br />

interior.<br />

The projection booth was modernized and<br />

re-equipped. A Carrier air conditioning system<br />

was installed.<br />

Eden Theatre Firm Sues<br />

For Ruling on Lease<br />

ST. LOUTS—The Eden Theatre Co.,<br />

lessee<br />

of the 5,000^seat Fox Theatre, has filed suit<br />

in circuit court seeking a ruling on a clause<br />

in its lease on the big house. The suit names<br />

the owner of the building. Fox-St. Louis Properties.<br />

The clause provides for payment of<br />

the rent on a percentage of the gross receipts<br />

in addition to a flat rental of $104,000<br />

a year.<br />

The owner of the property claims an additional<br />

$4,000 rent is due for the quarter ending<br />

Sept. 30, 1949. The Eden company says<br />

nothing is due because the Fox was closed<br />

from July 1 to August 18.<br />

The 15-year lease was entered into on June<br />

17. 1936. The Eden Tlieatre Co. is a subsidiary<br />

of Fanchon & Marco.<br />

Rialto, Chicago, Resumes<br />

Burlesque With Films<br />

CHICAGO—The Rialto Theatre here, for<br />

many years a burlesque house but operated<br />

more recently under a straight film house,<br />

resumed tabloid stage bills with screen attractions<br />

January 27. Charles Harris, former<br />

St. Louis showman, heads the Chicago Operating<br />

Co., new operators of the theatre. The<br />

house was closed for one week for remodeling<br />

and redecorating. Four stage shows daily now<br />

are being offered, with a Saturday midnight<br />

performance.<br />

Seek Civil Rights Action<br />

ST. LOUIS—Sidney Redmond and the Rev.<br />

Jasper C. Caston. Negro Republican, members<br />

of the board of aldermen, had an unsuccessful<br />

attempt to take the controversial civil<br />

rights bill from the hands of the board's legislation<br />

committee and bring it before the<br />

entire aldermanic group, contending the<br />

committee is trying to evade voting on the<br />

bill. The vote was 22 to 4.<br />

Empty Seats in Theatre<br />

Not Always Film Fault<br />

POPLAR BLUPP, MO. — The blame for<br />

empty seats in many theatres should not always<br />

be laid on Hollywood. Herb Bennin, St.<br />

Louis MGM manager, declared in an address<br />

at a regional meeting of the Motion Picture<br />

Theatre Owners of St. Louis, Eastern Missouri<br />

and Southern Illinois here last week (24).<br />

"There are many pictures of merit that are<br />

not top films, yet they are excellent entertainment<br />

by any standard, good bread and<br />

butter merchandise which the public will buy<br />

if we find ways and means of letting it knowabout<br />

them," Bennin said. "Here is where the<br />

challenge to exhibitors becomes a real one.<br />

Advertising always has been the life blood<br />

of our business. Recently I saw a theatre ad<br />

in a newspaper which incoi-porated the slogan:<br />

'Happiness for sale!' It certainly had<br />

great public appeal.<br />

SIMILAR THEATRES. VARIED GROSSES<br />

"In my position as manager of a film exchange,<br />

I see the same sized theatres in comparable<br />

drawing areas, and one exhibitor<br />

grosses twice as much as the other with the<br />

same picture. Only then do I realize that<br />

showmanship is not dead. Slowly but surely<br />

the man 'who thinks he can' replaces the<br />

man 'who will not even try.'<br />

"The public will turn out to see a worthwhile<br />

picture in a comfortable theatre, providing<br />

it has been properly advertised. We<br />

have a great responsibility to the people of<br />

our communities, so it is up to the exhibitor<br />

to provide clean, comfortable surroundings<br />

and a friendly atmosphere in his theatre.<br />

"Make your theatre the focal point for<br />

every civic function. Offer your theatre as<br />

often as possible in cooperation with schools<br />

and civic clubs, when you are active in your<br />

community, many of the people who today<br />

are not regular patrons will become motion<br />

picture conscious and you will get their patronage."<br />

President Tom Edwards of the Edwards &<br />

Plumlee circuit, Farmington, Mo., presided<br />

during the luncheon. At the head table also<br />

were Mayor J. W. Robinson, Poplar Bluff;<br />

Charles Weeks jr.. Dexter, and Bill Griffin,<br />

Cairo, co-chairmen of arrangements, and<br />

Myra Stroud, St. Louis, secretary.<br />

REPORTS ON TOA SESSION<br />

At the opening executive session, Edwards<br />

gave a detailed report on the recent TOA<br />

board meeting in Wa,shington, commenting<br />

on such topics as television, repeal of the admission<br />

tax. COMPO and other matters of<br />

interest to the exhibitor.<br />

Lou Ansell. chairman of the board, reviewed<br />

activities of the St, Louis TOA group during<br />

the last year. He mentioned the legislative<br />

efforts in St. Louis. Jefferson City and elsewhere.<br />

He praised the work of Myra Stroud,<br />

secretary, and complimented her on her work<br />

as editor of the new official bulletin.<br />

Other speakers included Les Grand, St.<br />

Louis district manager for the Confection<br />

Cabinet Corp., who talked on "Leave a Sweet<br />

Taste in Their Mouths."<br />

Edwards said that a similar regional meeting<br />

would be held in southern Illinois.<br />

Among those registered for the meeting, all<br />

from Mis.souri, were the following:<br />

St. Loui.s—Mrs. Be.ss Schulter, Mrs. Mildred<br />

LaTour, Arthur Kalbfell. Morty Gottlieb, William<br />

Guinan, Paul Krueger. Tommy James,<br />

Hugh Graham, Harry Haas, Harry Hoff, Arch<br />

Hosier, Edward Arthur, Jack Harris, Tom<br />

Canavan, Dave Arthur, A. L. Matreci, Gordon<br />

Halloran, Gene Fitzgibbons. Bob Jones, Mary<br />

Karches, Clarence Kaimann, Nat Steinberg.<br />

Lutcsville—Truman Lewis.<br />

Willow Springs—R. D. Fisher.<br />

Morehouse—W. H. Dillon.<br />

Sikeston—Pete Medley.<br />

Charleston—Dick Logan.<br />

Lebanon—P. L. Lowe and Ben Donaldson.<br />

Doniphan—Willis Donald Dowdy and Thel<br />

Chilton.<br />

Perryville—Val Mercier. Donald Dunze.<br />

Mrs. John Kiefner and Arnold Counts,<br />

Fredericktown—L. A. Mercier.<br />

Risco—H. Denziler.<br />

Washington—R. A. Marchbank.<br />

Houston—W. R. Elliott and Hugh Houston.<br />

Union—Bill Williams.<br />

Maiden—Helen Fergu.son.<br />

Piedmont—Jeff Jefferis.<br />

Festus—Harry Miller.<br />

Poplar Bluff—The Rev. Daniel I. Daly and<br />

Jack Bizzell.<br />

Among those from Illinois were Ted Bloomer,<br />

Belleville; J. H. Bizzel, Dongola, and W. M.<br />

Griffin. Cairo.<br />

Milwaukee Towne Case<br />

Adds List of Objections<br />

CHICAGO—Counsel for the film companies<br />

in the Milwaukee Towne Theatre case have<br />

filed objections to plaintiff's proposed findings<br />

of fact in Judge John Barnes court. A<br />

40-page booklet lists 34 objections. In answer<br />

to the proposed conclusion that it is lawful<br />

for the defendant film companies to license<br />

films for successions of runs, selecting customers<br />

for each and granting reasonable<br />

clearance between runs, the film companies<br />

contend the burden is on the Towne Theatre<br />

to prove its claim of conspiracy upon which<br />

its suit for damages rests.<br />

Fox Lake Towne Theatre<br />

Due to Open Next March<br />

FOX LAKE, ILL.—The Towne Theatre, a<br />

575-seater being constructed by Fox Lake<br />

Enterprises, a corporation of local residents.<br />

is expected to be completed around mid-<br />

March, according to Robert Bartelt, an officer.<br />

Steel girders have been put in place and<br />

the construction crew has been working on<br />

the walls and celling.<br />

A minimum of wood is being used in the<br />

building. Walls will be of reinforced concrete<br />

and the roof of aluminum. Equipment will<br />

include a television lounge.<br />

Sikeston Interests Sold<br />

SIKESTON, MO.—O. D. Clayton has sold<br />

his interest in the 450-car drive-in to his<br />

partner Sam Potashnick of<br />

Cape Girardeau.<br />

Clayton ha-s moved to Walnut Ridge. Ark.<br />

BOXOFFICE :: February 4, 19.50 71


. .<br />

MILWAUKEE<br />

garl J. Kelley. manager of St. Cloud's Tower<br />

Theatre at 27th and State streets, was<br />

the winner of a $50 U.S. savings bond in<br />

20th-Fox's "Father Was a Fullback" exploitation<br />

contest . . . "Mr. Roberts" played at the<br />

Davidson Tlieatre without any censor trouble.<br />

A deputy from the district attorney's<br />

office and a police sergeant viewed the first<br />

presentation and reported they did not notice<br />

any suggestive lines in the play, and "had the<br />

time of their lives."<br />

"Sands of Iwo Jima," after two weeks at<br />

the Warner, was in a third at Alhambra .<br />

On Pilmrow was Bernard Sherman, who formerly<br />

operated the Douglas Theatre at<br />

Racine. Sherman has just returned from<br />

Texas and is said to be looking for another<br />

theatre to operate in Wisconsin . . . Edward<br />

Weisfeldt was here briefly before taking over<br />

in Detroit February 1 as general manager of<br />

Saul Korman Theatres.<br />

Don Schwarts has secured rights to Movie<br />

Quiz, a theatre giveaway deal, in the Milwaukee<br />

and Minneapolis territories . . . The<br />

Regal building on west Walnut street in the<br />

local Harlem section is reported to be for<br />

sale. The theatre is being operated by Sid<br />

Margoles. The estate of the building's owner<br />

is being liquidated.<br />

The Colos.seum of Motion Picture Salesmen<br />

will join the industry fight to repeal the 20<br />

per cent federal ticket tax, according to David<br />

Beznor, Colosseum general counsel . . . R. C.<br />

iSgg^tia<br />

Cropper, formerly with Pathe in Milwaukee<br />

and Chicago many years ago. died at Boston<br />

from a heart attack. He was branch manager<br />

for RKO in Boston since 1932.<br />

Jack Heywood, operator of the Gem at<br />

New Richmond, Wis., is rushing plans for<br />

the construction of a 850-seat theatre there.<br />

Heywood has operated the Gem 22 years<br />

At the Tower, Oriental and Zenith theatres.<br />

St. Cloud Amusement Co. neighborhood<br />

houses, toy houses are being given away to<br />

kiddies each Saturday. A collection of six<br />

makes a miniature village . . .<br />

"The Fallen<br />

Idol" was in its fifth week at the Fox Downer<br />

on the upper east side.<br />

Weilert Theatre Stymied<br />

By Steel Shipment Delay<br />

ALEXANDRIA, IND. — Theatre construction<br />

on the new theatre in the old Elks building<br />

here is continuing rapidly, while work on<br />

the new Alex Theatre, being built by Mr. and<br />

Mrs. R. S. Weilert, is at a standstill due to a<br />

delay in the shipment of steel beams.<br />

Ike Turner of Decatur, 111., building superintendent<br />

for the Alliance Theatre Corp. who<br />

is in charge of construction, says the roof of<br />

the circuit house has been completed and<br />

cement exit ramps have been poured in the<br />

rear of the auditorium. The new Alliance<br />

house will be known as the Town Theatre.<br />

Cement block sides have been completed<br />

on the Alex, but construction of the brick<br />

front has been halted until steel beams arrive.<br />

The new Alex Theatre is located on<br />

North Harrison street, while the Alliance<br />

house is located on the corner of Harrison<br />

and Church streets.<br />

—<br />

'Outlaw' Again Tops<br />

Loop House Grosses<br />

CHICAGO—The mercury zoomed to 64 degrees<br />

for the warmest January weather in<br />

years and brought thousands to the Loop,<br />

but business at downtown theatres was not<br />

so hot. Two newcomers bowed in above average,<br />

"Ambush" at the United Artists and a<br />

twin bill at the RKO Palace. "South Sea Sinner"<br />

and "The Stagecoach Kid." "The Outlaw"<br />

still was filling seats in a fourth week<br />

at the RKO Grand, the Chicago had an average<br />

second week with "Dancing in the Dark"<br />

plus a stage show headed by Jules Munshin.<br />

the Oriental hit par with a second week of<br />

"Whirlpool" and a stage show headed by<br />

Willie Shore. "The Inspector General"<br />

bowed out of the Woods Theatre with an<br />

average fourth week, while "Mrs. Mike" had<br />

a fair second week at the Roosevelt.<br />

(Average Is 100)<br />

Chicagc Dancing in the Dark (2Cth-Fox), plu<br />

stage sh<br />

..ICO<br />

ck—Tunisian Victory (MGM); Desert Victory<br />

{20th-Fox), reissues 90<br />

Gra-nd—The Outlaw (RKO), 4th wk '.."^''l20<br />

Oriental—Whirlpool<br />

Znd wk<br />

(20th-Fox), plus stage show,<br />

100<br />

Palace South Sea Sinner<br />

_<br />

(U-I); The Stagecoach<br />

Kid (RKO) 100<br />

Roosevelt—Mrs. Mike (UA), 2nd wk.<br />

Selwyn—The Red Shoes (EL), roadshow,<br />

105<br />

58th wk Fair<br />

State-Lake—The Hasty Heart (WB), 2nd wk... 95<br />

Studio Carnegie Hall (U-I). The Great Waltz<br />

(MGM), reissues<br />

go<br />

United Artists—Ambush (MGM) HO<br />

Woods—The Inspector General (WB), 4tli wk. . 100<br />

World Playhouse—Fame Is the Spur (Oxiord);<br />

95<br />

Birth o( a Ballet (Brill). 5th wk. .<br />

"Port' Plus Stage Show Grosses<br />

220 at Indianapolis<br />

INDIANAPOLIS—First run grosses showed<br />

a vast improvement here. The Lyric, with a<br />

stage attraction and "Port of New York,"<br />

led the town at 220 per cent. "The Red<br />

Shoes" at the Circle grossed 140.<br />

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641 North 7th Street,<br />

Milwaukee, Wisconsin<br />

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Racine, Wis., Main Street<br />

Sold to Ohio Showmen<br />

RACINE, WIS.—The Main Street Theatre<br />

here has been sold by Standard Theatres of<br />

Milwaukee to Joseph J. Lee of Dayton and<br />

Alvin Slutz of Cincinnati, who, it is reported,<br />

expect to make a parttime vaudeville house<br />

of it. The building is not included in the<br />

purchase.<br />

The new owners say they will retain the<br />

name of the theatre, but will change the<br />

policy to make it a family theatre, with films<br />

suitable for the whole family. They will introduce<br />

vaudeville programs twice a month.<br />

The theatre will be redecorated and renovated<br />

and the house made available on short<br />

notice to civic organizations and others for<br />

dramatic or musical entertainment.<br />

Sells Her Second Novel<br />

BLUFFTON, IND.—Peggy Goodin, former<br />

Bluffton writer, has sold her second novel,<br />

"Take Care of My Little Girl," to 20th-<br />

Fox in Hollywood. Her first novel. "Clementine,"<br />

was made into "Mickey." by Eagle Lion,<br />

Miss Goodin now hves in Montreal.<br />

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Circle—The Red Shoes (EL)<br />

Indiana—South Sea Sinner (U-I); Hollywood<br />

140<br />

Varieties (LP) 80<br />

Keith s-Sands o( Iwo Jima (Rep), "2nd d. t. wk.''''l30<br />

Loews—Ambush (MGM); Challenge to Lassie<br />

(MGM) 120<br />

Lyric—Port of New York (EL), plus Renfro<br />

Valley Barn Dance on stage 220<br />

Patricia Neal and Randolph Scott were set<br />

for the topline roles in Warners' "Sugarfoot."<br />

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BOXOFFICE :: February 4, 19.50


: February<br />

. . . Opal<br />

. . . Jane<br />

. . Max<br />

. . Irving<br />

. . The<br />

. . Burdette<br />

. . Jack<br />

Premiere of Gloves' INDIANAPOLIS<br />

Planned in March<br />

CHICAGO—Carl Krueger. who produced<br />

"The Golden Gloves Story" here, says he's<br />

not discouraged about making more pictures<br />

in Chicago and will make at least one more<br />

film here this year.<br />

"In some cases." he .says, "we paid higher<br />

labor rates in Chicago than if the picture<br />

had been made in Hollywood, but 'Tlie Golden<br />

Gloves Story' turned out so well it's definite<br />

proof motion pictures can be made better at<br />

the actual locale. When you see the world<br />

premiere in March you'll note production on<br />

a scale impossible at any price in Hollywood."<br />

Krueger. now in Hollywood, reports he expects<br />

to give the film a sneak preview there<br />

in a few days. Cutters, editors and music<br />

conductor Emil Newman have done a fine<br />

job on the finished print, he asserts.<br />

Cluster Circuit to Build<br />

Drive-In at Salem, 111.<br />

SALEM, ILL.—The Cluster circuit, which<br />

operates the Globe, Lyric and Salem theatres<br />

here and the Palace in Johnston City. 111.,<br />

will start construction early in the spring of<br />

a 500-car drive-in on Route 37 about a mile<br />

and half south of Salem, says Loren Cluster.<br />

The drive-in will have in-car speakers and<br />

will cost upwards of $100,000.<br />

The Cluster family has been in exhibition<br />

for the last 42 years. The circuit was founded<br />

by the late Robert C. Cluster, father of<br />

Loren who operates the theatres here, and<br />

Stewart Cluster, who is in charge of the house<br />

at Johnston City.<br />

The Cluster circuit has installed new sound<br />

and projection equipment In the Globe Theatre.<br />

A new Snow White RCA screen purchased<br />

from the St. Louis Theatre Supply<br />

Co., St. Louis, Mo., has been provided for the<br />

Lyric in Salem, while the Salem Theatre will<br />

have the first Excello Simplex heads in this<br />

section of Illinois.<br />

Easter Opening Planned<br />

Of Fond du Lac Drive-In<br />

POND DU LAC, WIS.—The Lake Park Outdoor,<br />

Inc., has pushed forward the tentative<br />

opening date for its new drive-in here from<br />

the originally scheduled late April date to a<br />

possible Eastertime opening. President Sam-<br />

bers.<br />

membership drive continues in full force. The<br />

entertainment committee is planning some<br />

big events for the coming months.<br />

Named as Cameraman<br />

Norbert Brodine has been named as cameraman<br />

for Metro's "Right Cross."<br />

Mat Levy, captain of the RKO Ned Depinet<br />

arive. RKO. and Frank Drumm, assistant,<br />

conducted a two-day meeting at the local<br />

branch (19, 20). Morris Lefko. district manager,<br />

al.so was present . Peterson.<br />

National Theatre Supply manager, attended<br />

the branch managers meeting in Los Angeles<br />

Hughes, bookkeeper at National<br />

Screen Service, was in St. Francis hospital<br />

at Beech Grove following an appendectomy<br />

Lyons, typist at RKO, and Durrell<br />

Ferguson, were married.<br />

Pauline Neese succeeded Suzanne Jones as<br />

secretary to Gene Tunick at Eagle Lion. She<br />

formerly was at Dezel Productions on the<br />

booking desk . Warner branch has<br />

been equipped with new booker's de.sk chairs<br />

and other new office equipment . Van<br />

Borssum of the West and Savoy theatres.<br />

Terre Haute, made his annual visit to Filmrow<br />

to buy and book.<br />

Jules Goldman, Warner city salesman, became<br />

father of a baby girl named Lynn Barbara<br />

. Cohen, Film Classics home<br />

office, conferred with