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BARUCH COLLEGE - zicklin : school of business - CUNY

BARUCH COLLEGE

OF

THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK

PROPOSAL TO ESTABLISH A PROGRAM IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP

LEADING TO THE

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE

Effective FALL 2009

SPONSORED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT

ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

APPROVED BY

BARUCH COLLEGE GOVERANCE

Department of Management, Letter of Intent, March 28, 2008

Zicklin Graduate Curriculum Committee, Letter of Intent, April 2, 2008

Zicklin Faculty, Letter of Intent, April 17, 2008

Baruch College President and Provost, Letter of Intent, September 29, 2008

CUNY, Letter of Intent, November 10, 2008

Department of Management, Proposal, March 28, 2008

College Representative:

Contact:

Dr. Edward Rogoff, Chair, Department of Management

Dr. Ramona Heck, Department of Management

Telephone: 646-312-3649

Fax: 646-312-3620

Email:

Ramona.Heck@baruch.cuny.edu

Provost Signature: ___________________________________________________

1


BARUCH COLLEGE

CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK

PROPOSAL TO ESTABLISH A PROGRAM IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP

LEADING TO THE

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

TITLE PAGE...................................................................................................................................................1

TABLE OF CONTENTS ................................................................................................................................2

ABSTRACT ....................................................................................................................................................3

PURPOSE AND GOALS................................................................................................................................4

NEED AND JUSTIFICATION.......................................................................................................................6

STUDENTS.....................................................................................................................................................8

A. Interest/Demand..................................................................................................................................9

B. Enrollment Projections .....................................................................................................................12

C. Admission Requirements..................................................................................................................13

CURRICULUM ............................................................................................................................................13

COST ASSESMENT.....................................................................................................................................17

A. Faculty ..............................................................................................................................................17

B. Facilities and Equipment ..................................................................................................................20

C. Library and Instructional Materials....................................................................................................20

D. Budget ...............................................................................................................................................20

EVALUATION .............................................................................................................................................23

APPENDICES

APPENDIX A: LIST OF MS IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAMS IN U.S. .....................................27

APPENDIX B: COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR REQUIRED COURSES ...............................................36

APPENDIX C: PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS (SED Format) .................................................................43

APPENDIX D: SAMPLE PROGRAM SCHEDULING (SED Format) .....................................................47

APPENDIX E: FACULTY TEACHING ASSIGNMENTS (SED Format) ................................................50

APPENDIX F: PROJECTED EXPENDITURES (SED Form) ...................................................................57

APPENDIX G: PROJECTED REVENUE (SED Form) .............................................................................59

APPENDIX H: PROJECTED CAPITAL EXPENDITURE (SED Form) ...................................................61

APPENDIX I: FACULTY CURRICULA VITAE.......................................................................................63

APPENDIX J: LETTERS OF SUPPORT ....................................................................................................78

APPENDIX K: EVALUATION REPORTS ................................................................................................84

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BARUCH COLLEGE

CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK

PROPOSAL TO ESTABLISH A PROGRAM IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP

LEADING TO THE

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE

ABSTRACT

Baruch College proposes to offer a new degree program: Master of Science (MS) in Entrepreneurship. A vital

aspect of our economy engages Entrepreneurship which offers numerous business opportunities as well as income

and wealth for diverse groups within our population, especially in the New York City metropolitan area. This

proposed MS in Entrepreneurship, relative to the city market’s potential, can place Baruch College as a major player

for new Entrepreneurship students and builds upon, yet augments, our existing MBA and BBA, with existing faculty

and resources. Research suggests that about one third of the population consists of “nascent” entrepreneurs and 10

percent currently own businesses. Both nascent and current entrepreneurs desire and need advanced education and

could be better served with this proposed MS degree which is appropriate given its shorter duration and lower costs.

Students will engage in a concentrated program designed to meet the needs of those who have backgrounds in

entrepreneurial ventures, are part of family businesses, or are interested in starting their own businesses. The

program is interdisciplinary and offers courses in management, human resources management, marketing, finance,

and law as well as offers students: internship opportunities; assistance with business start-ups, access to the Baruch

College Entrepreneurship Competition (BCEC); student clubs; and other related programs/networks. The

curriculum will prepare students with the technical training, skills and encouragement to become entrepreneurs in

their own right. Whatever business or industry they choose to pursue, graduates of the program will be excellently

situated to begin successful careers and/or new and regenerated ventures in the Entrepreneurship arena.

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PURPOSE AND GOALS

Baruch College proposes to offer a new degree program: Master of Science (MS) in Entrepreneurship. Increasing

numbers of institutions and business scholars around the world are turning their attention to the study of

Entrepreneurship. In addition, Entrepreneurship is increasingly recognized by business schools internationally as

one of the most dynamic, important, and widely applicable segments of business education. Moreover,

Entrepreneurship permeates our economy and accounts for a majority of our national Gross Domestic Product and

the wealth in the US. Entrepreneurship is a major aspect of our economy that offers many business opportunities as

well as income and wealth accumulation for diverse groups within our population, especially in the greater New

York City metropolitan area. However, graduate level training of technical and managerial skills in

Entrepreneurship can be obtained only by those who can afford the high tuition fees associated with an MBA in

Entrepreneurship as currently offered at Baruch College and other local institutions. In addition, there is no public

or private institution of higher education in the New York area that offers entrepreneurship-specific education in the

form of an MS in Entrepreneurship.

Since its launch in 1993, the Lawrence N. Field Center for Entrepreneurship at Baruch College has been one of the

great successes of the City University of New York (CUNY) system. What began with just one course and one

faculty member has grown into a full-fledged program with seven tenure-track and tenured faculty

members/positions, including three endowed chairs. In 2008, the Lawrence N. Field Center for Entrepreneurship

have become an endowed Program -- the Lawrence N. Field Programs in Entrepreneurship -- that conducts research,

offers undergraduate and graduate curriculum including BBA and MBA degrees, and also serves more than 1,000

small business clients annually. First, we engage in a wide-ranging research and publication agenda; our minority

entrepreneurship research is unique within the Entrepreneurship field of study and has gained national prominence

and recognition. We have recently received the 2008 Award for Exceptional Contribution to Entrepreneurship

Research from the Global Consortium for Entrepreneurship Centers. Second, with almost 500 enrolled students in

undergraduate and graduate majors, the Lawrence N. Field Programs in Entrepreneurship have also recently

received national recognition via a joint survey by Entrepreneur magazine and The Princeton Review ranked Baruch

College 18 th among undergraduate entrepreneurial colleges in the nation in 2006. In 2008, our graduate academic

program has been ranked within the top 25 programs by this same ranking survey. And third, we offer an array of

counseling/consulting and training services via the Lawrence N. Field Center (now part of the overall Field

Programs) which includes our highly ranked and award winning SBDC, along with a strong local networking

environment. Local, regional and national conferences, workshops, trainings, and lectures are regularly offered.

From its beginnings to now, the Lawrence N. Field Programs in Entrepreneurship has been making great strides in

establishing itself as a national and international leader in the study of Entrepreneurship. The Zicklin School of

Business has recruited several outstanding Entrepreneurship professors and the Lawrence N. Field Programs in

Entrepreneurship are internationally-renowned recognized for their excellence in this area. Baruch College’s

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Entrepreneurship programs are unique within CUNY, positioning Baruch College at the forefront of this growing

and vibrant field of study.

We envision this new MS in Entrepreneurship augmenting effectively our current MBA in

Management/Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management. In fact, all the required course choices within its

proposed major are being currently taught within our existing MBA, either as a required course or as electives.

Some students simply prefer the MBA degree due to its higher status in the marketplace and their desire to complete

a graduate degree with greater breadth. In contrast, this proposed MS in Entrepreneurship consists of 10 courses (5

required and 5 electives) or 30 credits (15 required and 15 elective) as opposed to the 57 credits for our MBA. Thus,

we do not expect any significant shift of current MBA students to the new offering.

This MS in Entrepreneurship is similar to the other seven MS degree programs at Baruch College, for example, the

MS in Marketing and the MS in Real Estate. MS programs are designed for students who seek a concentrated focus

on a particular subject area and in this case Entrepreneurship. Overall, this new proposed MS in Entrepreneurship

will increase our course enrollments with both MBA and MS students in the same classroom when appropriate and

as experienced by other MS programs in Marketing and Real Estate. This proposed MS moves us forward in our

graduate programming per our recent external review of the Entrepreneurship program here at Baruch College.

Finally, we believe that this proposed MS in Entrepreneurship, in the context of the New York City market’s

potential, can place Baruch College as a major player for new Entrepreneurship students.

The training offered by the MS in Entrepreneurship program will enable graduates to develop the skills needed to

build and sustain successful careers in Entrepreneurship--an important outcome for the New York metropolitan

region’s economy. This program will provide students with advanced core skills in Entrepreneurship as well as the

required training in the management, operation, growth and continuation of entrepreneurial firms. We will

demonstrate in the next section that student demand for the MS in Entrepreneurship is very high, especially in the

greater New York area, because there is currently no existing MS in Entrepreneurship degree offered by any public

or private institutions of higher education. Therefore, there are currently no skill-focused programs for those

interested in developing concentrated knowledge in the area of entrepreneurship through participation in a shorter,

less costly program. The establishment of such a program at Baruch College can further advance our ties with

leaders in the entrepreneurial business community in New York and around the nation. Moreover, members of these

business communities have been consulted in the development of this program proposal and have expressed great

enthusiasm and support for this proposed program. See Appendix J for a list of supporters and their supporting

letters and Appendix H for the evaluation by an external academic reviewer.

Given the expertise and professionalism of Baruch College’s current faculty members, the interest of the student

population in the proposed degree program, the support of the industry and of the Lawrence N. Field Programs in

Entrepreneurship -- established by CUNY at Baruch College to offer Entrepreneurship programs and promote policy

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debates in the New York area--and the current scarcity of graduate-level Entrepreneurship programs in the nation

that are both affordable and academically strong, Baruch College’s MS in Entrepreneurship program is in the

position to rise to national recognition. The MS in Entrepreneurship is well-suited to Baruch College’s mission, to

the College’s potential student population, to its stakeholders, and to its resources to develop and maintain a

nationally-ranked program that both provides for an identifiable population and brings further recognition to the

institution.

NEED AND JUSTIFICATION

Demand for students with an MS degree in Entrepreneurship originates from all industries. Startups now require

advanced knowledge in many subject matter areas as well as technical product knowledge. The changing nature of

the economy demands more sophisticated analyses and the ability to work with people in the financial and

investment sectors (such as investment banks, mortgage securities brokers, and investment trusts) as well as a

variety of venture capitalists. Successful candidates looking to pursue cutting-edge business ventures in these

current conditions must develop (or at least understand) a cadre of expertise including finance, marketing, and

management, to name a few. Even traditional avenues in the Entrepreneurship sector (such as dot.coms, consulting,

and buying and regenerating an existing business) have evolved and now require founders/owners to employ

sophisticated analytical tools in their daily activities.

To substantiate this need, we gathered information on similar MS programs currently offered within the US, paying

particular attention to universities and colleges in New York City and the greater region. Our first finding is that

currently, there is no public or private institution of higher education in the New York area that offers

entrepreneurship-specific education in the form of an MS in Entrepreneurship.

Nationwide, we surveyed six universities that offer high-quality MS in Entrepreneurship programs: University of

Florida; Southern Methodist University – Cox; University of South Florida; Western Carolina University;

Northeastern University; and University of Texas at Dallas. For each university, we gathered information on the

program title, length of program, enrollment, tuition, program design, courses offered, and the school or college

within that particular university that offers this Masters program. We first searched the website of each university

for basic information about its Entrepreneurship program. When there were deficiencies, we attempted to search

further via the department, faculty members or student websites for additional information. The general information

on these programs is summarized in Table A-1 of Appendix A. More specific information on each program’s design

and courses offered is summarized in Tables A-2 and A-3 of Appendix A.

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The comparative information reported in Table A-1 clearly shows that the demand for Entrepreneurship education at

the MS level is strong. In the New York area and the surrounding states, Baruch College’s new MS in

Entrepreneurship will be a unique offering although Northeastern University does have a one-year program but

enrollment figures could not be obtained. The MS in Entrepreneurship programs at University of Florida and SMU

by their respective schools of business, have healthy enrollment levels with similar course credit levels.

Regionally, the Lawrence N. Field Programs in Entrepreneurship have many local contacts among academics and

local business enterprise and both suggest that there is great industry demand for an MS program in

Entrepreneurship. At this moment, professional entrepreneurial opportunities often draw on graduates from basic

finance, marketing, and management programs to create, manage and grow ventures that could be better handled by

graduates trained in skills technically and subject matter-specific to the field of Entrepreneurship. Several industry

supporters and other academics have encouraged Baruch College to establish an MS in Entrepreneurship degree

because currently they see a void in the economy and marketplace for graduates with an academic Entrepreneurship

background. These supporting letters are included in Appendices J and K.

Currently, MS in Entrepreneurship training in the New York area is nonexistent and in the Northeast area is limited.

Nationally, these programs are available only to those who are able to pay high tuition fees, such as University of

Florida and SMU-Cox (see Table A-1). Clearly, high quality Entrepreneurship education in the form of an MS

graduate level is not available to the general public in the greater New York area. Baruch College has the ability to

meet the needs of these New York residents by developing an MS program in Entrepreneurship. Importantly, the

College can expect to benefit from this new MS program which will strengthen the College’s ties with the regional

Entrepreneurship community.

Primarily, students who complete the MS in Entrepreneurship will possess all the skills and knowledge necessary to

start and grow a business. Many are anticipated to already own a business or have a specific start-up idea. For still

other students, there are entry-level management positions in Entrepreneurship, a rapidly growing field. The MS in

Entrepreneurship delivers not only core business skills, but also emphasizes knowledge that is specific to the

entrepreneur. This combination offers students numerous business opportunities for their own self-made

employment and careers. Secondarily, the strong core business training and specific Entrepreneurship knowledge

will equip graduates for many varied and lucrative positions: entrepreneurship development firms, appraisal and

consulting firms, accounting firms, insurance companies, pension funds, banks and financial institutions, investment

banks, entrepreneurship investment trusts, mortgage security brokers, commingled entrepreneurship funds,

regulatory agencies, and firms with large entrepreneurship holdings. These positions require not only general

business knowledge and management skills, but also knowledge and technical training specific to the

Entrepreneurship field. The MS degree in Entrepreneurship proposed by Baruch College is positioned to provide

this type of education. We have garnered supporting letters (included in Appendices J and K) from Baruch alumni,

7


community business owners, organizers and leaders which address the business/employment opportunities this new

MS in Entrepreneurship will offer students.

The MS in Entrepreneurship program is an advantageous and attractive step in the context of the Zicklin School of

Business’s efforts to establish a nationally renowned Entrepreneurship program. By facilitating faculty research

opportunities, as well as cooperation and collaboration with key business leaders, the Entrepreneurship program is

the heart of Baruch College’s plans to strengthen its reputation and profile as a leader in business education and

scholarship in Entrepreneurship. The establishment of an MS in Entrepreneurship program will attract additional

national attention to the Entrepreneurship program and help the Zicklin School of Business be recognized as a leader

in this field. The Zicklin School of Business and Baruch College have long been dedicated to the goal of creating

nationally recognized Entrepreneurship programs with significant impact on the Entrepreneurship industry in the

New York metropolitan area. Vital to that goal is the development of rigorous programs of graduate study in

Entrepreneurship. Thus, the creation of the MS degree in Entrepreneurship will help the College and the School to

achieve this goal.

STUDENTS

This proposed MS in Entrepreneurship is appropriate for various student populations and a number of situations,

particularly given its shorter duration and lower costs. Research suggests that about one third of the population is

continually engaged in “nascent” entrepreneurial behaviors and about 10 percent of the U.S. population currently

own businesses. Both nascent and current entrepreneurs desire and need advanced education and could be better

served with this proposed MS degree. Further, some U.S. students already have an MBA in another subject –matter

area but wish to complete additional in-depth course work as a second graduate degree. Some international students

already have a foreign graduate degree but wish to complete a U.S. graduate degree. Additionally, this proposed

MS in Entrepreneurship is a synergistic addition to the six international locations (such as Taiwan) where other

Baruch College MS degree programs are currently being administered through the International Programs Office.

Students of the proposed MS in Entrepreneurship will be engaged in a concentrated program of Entrepreneurship

courses. As suggested above, the MS in Entrepreneurship is designed to meet the needs of students who have

backgrounds in entrepreneurial ventures, are part of family businesses, or are interested in starting their own

businesses when they graduate. The program is interdisciplinary and also includes courses in management, human

resources management, marketing, finance, and law.

The curriculum will prepare students with the technical training, skills and encouragement to become entrepreneurs

in their own right. Whatever business or industry they choose to pursue, graduates of the program will be excellently

situated to begin successful careers and/or new and regenerated ventures in the Entrepreneurship arena. Students

will also have greater access to high-level technical and analytical careers within entrepreneurial firms as well as

8


positions on Wall Street or high-venture startup firms, and will be qualified for management-level positions in

development and consulting firms.

The proposed MS in Entrepreneurship program builds upon the existing MBA in Entrepreneurship program and the

BBA in Entrepreneurship program. These MBA and BBA programs currently offer and the new MS will also offer:

• Internship opportunities within the Lawrence N. Field Center and with local entrepreneurial firms

• Entrepreneurship job-placement assistance

• Baruch College Entrepreneurship Competition (BCEC), annually

• Baruch Entrepreneurship Network - A mentoring program that matches students with executives in New

York City entrepreneurial firms and Baruch College alumni

• Entrepreneurship Club for students

• Distinguished Lecture Series and non-degree courses offered by Lawrence N. Field Center

• Executives on Campus program

These existing programs greatly enhance students’ interactions with various industries and help them to find suitable

positions and/or ventures upon graduation. The proposed MS in Entrepreneurship affords these opportunities,

increasing students’ potential successes in this challenging and rewarding field while offering a shorter and costeffective

alternative to the MBA when the student’s circumstances and desires warrant such.

A. Interest/Demand

The current student demand for Entrepreneurship related courses is strong. At this moment, Baruch College

regularly offers four Entrepreneurship-related courses for MBA students who major in Entrepreneurship and Small

Business Management. Baruch College has approximately 150 MBA students enrolled in Entrepreneurship required

courses each year (see Table 7). As reported in Table A-1, although charging over $40,000 in tuition for the degree,

University of Florida, as an example, attracts approximately around 50 students to its MS in Entrepreneurship

program offered by the Hough Graduate School of Business.

Relative to the existing MBA Students and Program, the MBA in Management/Entrepreneurship and Small

Business Management is designed to meet the needs of students who have backgrounds in entrepreneurial ventures,

are part of family businesses, or are interested in starting their own businesses when they graduate. The program is

interdisciplinary and includes courses in management, accountancy, economics/finance, marketing, computer

information systems and law.

MBA students can major in Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management by completing 12 credits or four

courses which include 9 required credits and 3 elective credits. Thus in Table 2, MGT9860 is required and two

additional required courses can be chosen from a set of three courses (MGT9861, MGT9865, and MGT9867) listed

below:

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Table 2: MBA Required Courses

MGT 9860 Entrepreneurial Strategy and Cases 3 credits

Choose two from:

MGT 9861 Managing the Entrepreneurial Venture 3 credits

MGT 9865 Researching and Developing Entrepreneurial Ventures 3 credits

MGT 9867 Managing the Family Business 3 credits

MGT9860 is an overview course and MGT9861 is an operations-oriented course in which students perform a

consulting project. In MGT9865 students produce business. Finally, MGT9867 is a family business course.

Further, MBA students need one elective from the courses listed below to complete the requirements for the major.

Table 3: MBA Elective Courses

ACC 9804 Intermediate Financial Accounting 4 credits

ACC 9806 Financial Statement Analysis and Reporting 3 credits

CIS 9444 E-Business Principles and Technologies 3 credits

FIN 9781 Managerial Finance 3 credits

LAW 9708 Law and E-Business 3 credits

LAW 9800 Intensive Survey of Business Contracts and Law of Corporations 4 credits

MGT 9400 Human Resource Management 3 credits

MGT 9862 Entrepreneurial and Small Business Experiences 3 credits

MKT 9701 Advertising and Marketing Communications 3 credits

MKT 9702 Marketing Research 3 credits

MKT 9716 Consumer Behavior 3 credits

MKT 9750 Marketing Strategy 3 credits

MKT 9781

(MGT 9866)

Internet and Small Business Entrepreneurship

3 credits

All course descriptions for required courses and some electives (those included in the proposed MS in

Entrepreneurship) are listed in Appendix B for further information.

As stated at the beginning of this STUDENTS section, the number of students interested in Entrepreneurship is quite

high. Below Figures 4, 5, 6, and 7 show course enrollments in MGT9860, MGT9861 and MGT9865 from 2002

through 2006 as well as total course enrollments for these three MBA required courses. Because MGT9862 has

been taught less frequently and MGT9867 has only recently (fall 2008) entered the set of required courses within the

MBA, their enrollment histories are not presented here.

Similar to the undergraduate program, Baruch College graduate students are commuters as well they tend to have

established careers and/or established businesses. Course enrollment will vary from semester to semester depending

on the time when courses are offered.

10


Figure 4: Management 9860 Enrollment

Entrepreneurial Strategy and Cases

12 0

10 0

80

Enrollment

60

40

20

MGMT 9860

0

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Year

Source: Baruch College, Registrar’s Office

Figure 5: Management 9861 Enrollment

Managing the Entreprepreneurial Venture

35

30

25

Enrollment

20

15

10

5

MGMT 9861

0

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Year

Source: Baruch College, Registrar’s Office

11


Figure 6: Management 9865 Enrollment

Entrepreneurial Ventures

35

30

25

Entrollment

20

15

10

5

MGMT 9865

0

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Year

Source: Baruch College, Registrar’s Office

Figure 7: Total Graduate Course Enrollment

Grad uat e C o urse Enro llment

Enrollment

18 0

16 0

14 0

12 0

10 0

80

60

40

20

0

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Year

Source: Baruch College, Registrar’s Office

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B. Enrollment Projections

Given the fact that Baruch College’s proposed MS in Entrepreneurship program will be significantly less expensive

and a significant portion of the courses will be taught by full-time business faculty members, we anticipate that we

should dominate the local market. In addition, since our program will place more emphasis on our existing

Entrepreneurship courses (i.e., the 5 required courses), the program will attract even more entrepreneurship-oriented

students who might not otherwise seek advanced training. We also intend to build on the reputation of our current

MBA and educational programming offered by the Field Programs. Consequently, we anticipate that 40 students

will enroll in our MS in Entrepreneurship program in the first year, similar to the recent MS in Real Estate forecasts

of student numbers. We hope to have 60 students in the second year, 80 students in the third year, and 100+

students after the 4 th year, as shown in the table below:

Table 1: Estimated Students Numbers for Proposed MS in Entrepreneurship

1 ST YEAR 2 ND YEAR 3 RD YEAR

4 TH AND

5 TH YEARS,

ONWARDS

40 60 80 100+

C. Admission Requirements

Admission into this proposed MS in Entrepreneurship will be the same as the current MBA in

Management/Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management. Admission to Zicklin's MS in Entrepreneurship

degree is offered to applicants whose management potential and academic credentials are competitive with current

standards. All applicants must have a regionally accredited bachelor's degree (or its recognized international

equivalent) and meet the criteria that are currently used by other MS degree programs offered by the Zicklin School.

CURRICULUM

Table A-2 and A-3 report the required and elective courses of existing MS programs offered by six universities

around the nation: University of Florida; Southern Methodist University–Cox; University of South Florida; Western

Carolina University; Northeastern University and University of Texas at Dallas. We grouped all the required

courses offered by those six programs into five distinct groups in relation to our proposed required courses in the

MS in Entrepreneurship.

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From the remaining 10 groups of elective courses listed in Table A-2, we established a 10-course curriculum (one

course from each group of courses in Table A-2) for our MS in Entrepreneurship program. We also propose a

degree program with 30 credit hours requirement (10 courses) from those 15 courses. This 30-hour requirement is

similar to that of the other MS programs offered in the Zicklin School of Business. For the 30 hours requirement, 15

hours are required courses and 15 hours are electives. When compared to other programs, our program allows for

more electives.

The proposed curriculum for the MS in Entrepreneurship is also reflective of the thinking by leading

Entrepreneurship founders and executives who are familiar with industries’ demands. When developing this new

and proposed program, Baruch College consulted with founders and executives in top entrepreneurial firms in New

York. These professionals’ names along with their titles and affiliations are listed in Appendix J and include new

and established business owners as well as community development professionals and leaders. We also consulted

faculty members from outstanding Entrepreneurship programs around the country. As such, this proposal also

represents the best current thinking of the Baruch faculty in Entrepreneurship and suggestions from the top

academics in the field. Note the academic evaluations by two outside reviewers along with their respective vitae in

Appendix K.

The MS in Entrepreneurship major consists of five required courses and five electives. The required courses focus

on entrepreneurial strategy, management, case applications, research and development of business plans for

ventures, and family businesses. The electives allow students to explore a variety of issues related to

Entrepreneurship, including venture capital and entrepreneurial finance, managerial finance, internet businesses,

human resources management, selling and negotiating, advertising and marketing communications and marketing

strategy as well as a special topic seminar course. To summarize, the requirements to obtain an MS in

Entrepreneurship are:

Required courses

Elective courses

Total:

15 credits (5 courses)

15 credits (5 courses)

30 credits (10 courses)

Students can fulfill the 15 hours of required Entrepreneurship courses by taking MGT9860, MGT 9861, MGT9862,

MGT9865, and MGT9867. Students will then take five electives from a list of thirteen courses (CIS 9230, FIN9774

FIN9781, LAW9708, MGT9400, MGT9490, MGT9864, and MGT9866, MGT9868, MGT9875, MKT9701,

MKT9750, MKT9764). The required and elective courses are reported in Table 8 on the following page. Within

Appendix A, it is further noted that these required and elective courses are similar to other MS in Entrepreneurship

degree programs around the country, as noted in Table A-1 and Table A-2.

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Table 8: Proposed MS in Entrepreneurship Program

Required:

Existing

Course

Credits

MGT 9860 Entrepreneurial Strategy and Cases Yes 3

MGT 9861 Managing the Entrepreneurial Enterprise Yes 3

MGT 9862 Entrepreneurial and Small Business Experiences Yes 3

MGT 9865 Researching and Developing Entrepreneurial Ventures Yes 3

MGT 9867 Managing the Family Business Yes 3

Subtotal of Required 15

Electives:

Existing

Course

Credits

CIS 9230 Globalization and Technology Yes 3

FIN 9774 Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Finance Yes 3

FIN 9781 Managerial Finance Yes 3

LAW 9708 Law and E-Business Yes 3

MGT 9400 Human Resource Management Yes 3

MGT 9490 International Human Resource Management Yes 3

MGT 9864 Seminar in Entrepreneurship Yes 3

MGT 9866

(MKT 9781)

Internet and Small Business Entrepreneurship Yes 3

MGT 9868 Entrepreneurial Communications: Selling and Negotiating Yes 3

MGT 9875

(RES 9980)

Real Estate Entrepreneurship Yes 3

MKT 9701 Advertising and Marketing Communications Yes 3

MKT 9750 Marketing Strategy Yes 3

MKT 9764 Internet Marketing and Global Business Yes 3

Subtotal of Electives Take 15 out of 39

Among these 18 courses, ten are existing management graduate courses: MGT9860, MGT9861, MGT9862,

MGT9865, MGT9867, MGT9400, MGT9490, MGT9864, MGT9866, MGT9868, and MGT9875.

Relative to other departments, one course, CIS9230, is an existing offered by the Department of Statistics and

Computer Information Systems; two courses, FIN9774 and FIN9781, are existing courses offered by the Bert W.

Wasserman Department of Economics and Finance; one course, LAW9708, is an existing course offered by the

Department of Law, and three courses, MKT9701, MKT9750 and MKT9764, are existing courses offered by the

Department of Marketing and International Business.

Appendix B lists the course descriptions of the 18 required and elective courses. Appendix C contains the detailed

program requirements relative to all courses, their possible pre- or corequisites. And Appendix D shows examples

of program scheduling over the next four years.

15


As previously noted, admission into this proposed MS in Entrepreneurship will be the same as the current MBA in

Management/Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management. Often the admitted students will have had an

undergraduate degree similar to Baruch College’s BBA in Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management or an

equivalent degree. In addition, the MS in Entrepreneurship features 6-credit preliminary requirements:

Credits

ACC 9110 Financial Accounting 3

MKT 9703 Marketing Management 3

Students with prior academic backgrounds can waive these preliminary course requirements, in full or in part, if

equivalents have been completed successfully. ACC9110 can be waived based on three credits of undergraduate

financial accounting completed with a minimum grade of B-. MKT9703 can be waived based on three credits of

undergraduate marketing management completed with a grade average of B-.

Thus, in total, two courses or six credits (or their equivalents), one Financial Accounting course and one Marketing

Management course will be required of students prior to entry into the MS in Entrepreneurship or while they

complete the required courses in their program. Specifically and related to these preliminary requirements listed

above, the pre- or corequisite for the required course MGT9865 is ACC9110 (or its equivalent), the required course

MGT9860, and MKT9703 (or its equivalent). Two required courses require no pre- or corequisites—MGT9860 and

MGT9867, and the other two required courses, MGT9861 and MGT9862 have the first required course MGT9860

as a pre- or corequisite. Again, the required courses with their respective pre- or corequisites (or their equivalents)

relative to this MS in Entrepreneurship are somewhat similar in number and type/intensity to other MS programs

within the Zicklin School, such as the MS in Marketing, MS in Finance, and MS in Real Estate. All of these preand

corequisites are listed among the course descriptions in Appendix C and summarized in Table C-1. Also, the

typical semester program planning allows time for these prerequisites to be completed, see Appendix D.

Depending on the elective course choices, additional pre- or corequisites may be required (or their equivalents);

namely, Finance, Human Resource Management, and Marketing courses all have additional prerequisites (see

Appendix C. For example, students who might choose either FIN9774 and/or FIN9781 as electives will need to first

take FIN9770 which is the prerequisite for both courses (note that STA 9708 is a prerequisite for FIN9770). Six of

the other electives have assorted prerequisites or their equivalents. Note that once a student has completed or is

currently enrolled in MGT9865, that same student might choose to complete the two Marketing electives that have

MKT 9703 as a pre- or corequisite and these electives are: MKT9701 and MKT9750; or the student might take

MGT9875.

Finally, five electives have no pre- or corequisites (in one case, department permission is required) and these

electives are: CIS9230, LAW9708, MGT9864, MGT9868, and MKT9764.

16


It should also be noted that the proposed MS in Entrepreneurship is a flexible time program. That is, students can

take up to six years to complete the course requirements. However, the Entrepreneurship faculty in the Department

of Management will offer enough courses to allow students to graduate within one year if they desire to do so.

COST ASSESSMENT

A. Faculty

The Entrepreneurship faculty at the Zicklin School is broad and multidisciplinary. Currently, there are seven full

time faculty members in the Entrepreneurship Program of the Management Department, the department in which the

unit is situated. These members consist of three senior chaired positions, one senior position that is the Lawrence N.

Field Programs’ Academic Director, two junior tenure-track faculty members, a seasoned lecturer and an

experienced adjunct lecturer. The analysis of the Entrepreneurship faculty presented in Table 9 identifies the faculty

and provides some descriptive information about their backgrounds.

Table 9: Entrepreneurship Faculty

Name Rank Highest

Degree

Institution from which

Highest Degree was Earned

& Year

Years of Experience

Baruch Industry

Ramona Heck 1 Ph.D. Purdue, 1978 7 5

Thomas Lyons 1 Ph.D. University of Michigan, 1987 2 9

vacant 1 Ph.D.

Edward Rogoff 1 Ph.D. Columbia University, 1980 16 24

Micki Eisenman 3 Ph.D. Columbia University, 2006 3 6

vacant 3 Ph.D.

Robert Foskey 4 MBA Fordham, 1975 35 45

Allison Lehr 5 MBA Baruch, 2002 6 9

Rank: 1=Full professor; 2=Associate Professor; 3=Assistant Professor; 4=Lecturer, 5=Adjunct Lecturer

Note: Professor Ramona Heck is the Peter S. Jonas Chair of Entrepreneurship, awarded in 2000. She assumed the role of

Academic Director of the Lawrence N. Field Programs in Entrepreneurship in August of 2008. Professor Thomas Lyons is the

Lawrence N. Field Family Chair of Entrepreneurship, awarded in 2006. Professor Edward Rogoff is the Chairman of the

Department of Management and served as the Academic Director of the Lawrence N. Field Programs in Entrepreneurship from

1998–2002 and again from 2004 to 2008. The Lawrence N. Field Chair of Entrepreneurship is currently vacant and a search is

being conducted.

Entrepreneurship extends beyond these eight faculty members/positions, as 61 faculty from other groups and

departments participate in the diverse and multidisciplinary course offerings that are part of the Entrepreneurship

curriculum at the Zicklin School.

The vast majority of the faculty (65%) who teach course offerings that are part of the Entrepreneurship curriculum at

the Zicklin School are full time faculty members. Of these, 61% are tenure track faculty with PhDs from the

nation’s leading institutions (see Table 10: Degree Granting Institutions for Full Time Faculty). This high

percentage, indicative of the high level of academic training our faculty has, is one of our key strengths. An

additional 4% of the faculty are full time lecturers, also with advanced degrees (Master’s level), but are not in tenure

track positions. Finally, an additional 34% are adjunct faculty members.

17


Table 10: Degree Granting Institutions for Full Time Faculty

Degree Granting

Institution Number %

NYU 6 13.64

Columbia University 5 11.36

University of Michigan 3 6.82

Baruch College 3 6.82

Purdue 2 4.55

University of Pennsylvania 2 4.55

Cornell 2 4.55

Others 21 47.73

Total 44 100

Vita for all the faculty members teaching courses related to the Entrepreneurship major are included in Appendix I:

Faculty Curricula Vitae.

Overall, the faculty teaching Entrepreneurship have the appropriate background to teach and interact with students

of Entrepreneurship as they have numerous cumulative years of academic and industry experience. Table 11:

Tenure Track Faculty by Rank, shows the breakdown of the tenure track faculty members by rank. Together, they

have published about 700 academic publications and have 115 cumulative professional society memberships.

Table 11: Tenure Track Faculty by Rank

Rank at Baruch Number %

Professor 16 39.02

Associate Professor 13 31.71

Assistant Professor 12 29.27

Total 41 100

Our faculty (both full time and adjunct) are mostly very experienced teachers (average years of experience is 16

(sdv=11)). In addition to the information presented above, many faculty members bring years of business experience

to their positions. Table 12: Average Years Industry Experience by Rank, shows the average years of experience by

faculty rank and Table 13: Faculty Industry Background, describes the more frequent industry backgrounds our

faculty draw from. We believe that the faculty at Baruch College provides students with a rewarding experience

based both on their academic insights and the richness of their industry experiences. It is also important to note that

our full time faculty are involved in the administrative life of the college. Together, they have contributed an

average of 16 years of service assignments (sdv=11).

Table 12: Average Years Industry Experience by Rank

Rank

Average Experience in Industry (yrs)

Full Professor 8

Associate Professor 8

Assistant Professor 5

Lecturer 29

Adjunct 24

Total 74

18


Table 13: Faculty Industry Background

Industry Background Number %

Marketing, Advertising, & Media 17 25.37

Law 12 17.91

Consultant 9 13.43

Finance 6 8.96

Others 17 25.37

None 6 8.96

Total 67 100.00

Finally, it is important to note that the core entrepreneurship faculty members are adequately compensated. Three of

the senior positions are chaired positions; the fourth full professor is Chair of the Management Department. The two

junior faculty members receive compensation that is at the median of salaries as derived by a comparison study

using data from 27 nationally comparative public universities. As such, the core faculty of the Entrepreneurship

Program is financially satisfied with their positions, which increases the likelihood of the school retaining them.

In summary, at the present time, the current capacity of the faculty resources in Entrepreneurship and the Zicklin

School of Business is sufficient to teach the existing courses in the proposed MS in Entrepreneurship program.

Table E-1 in Appendix E lists the current faculty members who are able to teach the 15 proposed courses. It should

be noted that we list the name, title, and qualification of a total of eight Entrepreneurship and three Management

faculty members for the eight Entrepreneurship courses and three electives within the total of 15 courses. Except for

two faculty members, all others have a terminal degree in their fields. Table E-2 in Appendix E reports the

employment status and teaching loads of those faculty members. The table shows that all the eight instructors who

teach the required and elective courses and who are either full-time or adjunct faculty members at Baruch College.

Finally, Appendix I reports the detailed curriculum vitae of the seven regular Entrepreneurship faculty members and

two adjunct faculty members in the Department of Entrepreneurship as well as a Management faculty who will teach

the Entrepreneurship course, MGT9868 were examined.

Any additional student numbers and/or course sections relative to the MS in Entrepreneurship courses will be

managed with the current Entrepreneurship faculty lines (two current vacancies will be filled with current

resources). Overall but independent of implementing this new MS in Entrepreneurship, it is also expected that the

Entrepreneurship program will grow and additional faculty members will be needed in the future. In fact, the

Department of Management will be recruiting three tenure-track faculty members within the next three years. In

addition, three current Baruch College faculty will be assigned to this newly endowed Lawrence N. Field Programs

in Entrepreneurship over this same period. It is anticipated that, by fall 2011, the Entrepreneurship faculty will have

at least a total of ten tenured or tenure-track faculty members, with an additional three faculty from other

departments associated with the Entrepreneurship program.

19


B. Facilities and Equipment

The MS in Entrepreneurship program will not require any additional facilities or space. The College is fortunate to

have available space in the Newman Vertical Campus building to house Entrepreneurship faculty, student activities,

and computer hardware. Currently, all Entrepreneurship faculty members are housed in the Management

Department. The Office of the Department of Management and their seminar room (which can also serve as a

classroom) are also located in the existing Newman Vertical Campus building. Presently, there is enough computer

equipment for current and future faculty offices to support the proposed MS in Entrepreneurship.

C. Library and Instructional Materials

The Newman Library and the Baruch Computing and Technology Center are both committed to maintaining a stateof-the-art

library and computer technology facility to support this program. Over the last decade, the library has

augmented its collection of print and electronic resources in the interdisciplinary field of Entrepreneurship to support

the instructional and research needs of students and faculty. In addition, the Computing and Technology Center has

worked with the Zicklin School of Business and the Lawrence N. Field Programs in Entrepreneurship to implement

the most current hardware (i.e. server) and software needed by students and faculty for accessing, analyzing,

gathering and synthesizing information and other data for research purposes. With continued financial support from

the college, the library and computing technology facility will be able to ensure library and computing resources

remain current and comparable to other peer institutions in the field.

D. Budget

Because we have existing faculty lines within the Department of Management, the initial staffing of the courses in

the MS in Entrepreneurship program will be handled, for the most part, within the teaching capacity fulfilled by the

current existing faculty lines. However, we may need to utilize several very capable adjunct faculty candidates with

advanced degrees who can teach some of the Entrepreneurship courses. Thus, the courses within this program will

be staffed partly by regular faculty members and partly by distinguished lecturers and adjunct faculty members.

Over the next four years, it is expected that new staffing will be funded by the anticipated growth in enrollment

revenues as well as existing and earmarked endowments made to the Entrepreneurship program at Baruch College.

In addition, the recent Field gift will allow the recruitment of three tenure-track faculty members within the next

three years.

At the outset, existing faculty and staff in the Department of Management will provide administrative support

including academic advice, career advice, and guidance to students. Lawrence and Eris Field can be expected to

support future growth of the Entrepreneurship programs. Their most recent gift to Entrepreneurship at Baruch was

one of $10 million.

20


Below, Tables 14, 15, and 16 outline the projected number of courses to be offered, the projected enrollment, and

the projected expenditures and revenues for the program from Fall 2009 through Spring 2014. It is estimated that

within this period, the tuition revenue from the MS in Entrepreneurship program will substantially exceed direct

program costs. As reported in the previous STUDENTS section, we project that there will be 40 students in the

2009-10 year, 60 students in the 2010-11 year, 80 students in the 2011-2012 year, and 100 students thereafter (Table

1). Based on these enrollment estimates, we project net revenues of $137,195 in the 2009-10 academic year. This

number can be expected to grow to $555,017 by the 2013-14 academic-year (Table 16, Column 7).

To calculate the net revenue numbers, we first projected the number of courses offered each semester. The number

of courses offered should be sufficient to allow students to satisfy the program requirements and graduate within one

year if they desire to do so. Information on the projected number of courses offered is provided in Table 14.

Table 14: Projected Number of Courses Offered, Fall 2009 to Spring 2014

Academic

Year

(1)

Fall

Semester

(2)

Spring

Semester

(3)

Total Number

of Courses per

Year

(4)

Number of

Required

Courses per

Year

(5) *

Number of

Elective

Courses per

Year

(6) **

2009-10 7 8 15 5 10

2010-11 10 10 20 10 10

2011-12 13 14 27 15 12

2012-13 15 15 30 15 15

2013-14 15 15 30 15 15

* derived from the 5 required courses for the MS degree program.

** derived from the 13 elective courses for the MS degree program.

It is shown in Table 14 that students should be able to graduate in one year if they desire (since all the 18 courses are

offered from the first academic year). We will increase the number of courses offered based on the projected

increase in student populations (see STUDENT section, Table 1 for the projection of student population). The total

number of courses offered in each year is reported in the fourth column of Table 14. Special attention is paid to the

number of required courses offered each semester to make sure that all courses are available to students throughout

the year. The fifth and sixth columns report the number of required courses and the number of electives offered

during the five-year period. The detailed program schedules (which list the titles of the courses offered in each

semester) for the first four years are reported in Table D-1 of Appendix D.

Since each student enrolled in the MS degree in Entrepreneurship will have to take ten courses to satisfy the

program requirements, we can calculate the total demand for courses by these students. Table 15 estimates the total

number of students that may take Entrepreneurship courses.

21


Table 15: Projected Number of Students in Entrepreneurship Courses, Fall 2009 to Spring 2014

Academic

Year

(1)

Total

Number of

Students

(2)

Number of

Courses

per

Student

(3)

Total Number of

Students in All

(Required/Elective)

Courses

(4)

Number of

Courses

Offered

(R/E)

(5)

Number of

Students

per Required

Class

(6)

Number of

Students

per Elective

Class

(7)

2009-10 40 10 400 (200/200) 15 (5/10) 40 20

2010-11 60 10 600 (300/300) 20 (10/10) 30 30

2011-12 80 10 800 (400/400) 27 (15/12) 27 33

2012-13 100 10 1,000 (500/500) 30 (15/15) 33 33

2013-14 100 10 1,000 (500/500) 30 (15/15) 33 33

The second column in Table 15 reports the number of projected students in each academic year (see STUDENTS

section Table 1 for a discussion of the estimation of student population). Assuming that each student takes a total of

ten courses to fulfill the degree requirement in one year (as reported in the column 3 of the Table 15), the fourth

column summarizes the total demand for Entrepreneurship classes from the estimated student population. The

column also provides information on the demand for both the required courses and elective courses.

The fifth column reports the number of courses we will offer in each year during the five-year period (see the fourth

column of previous Table 14). The information on the number of both required courses and elective courses are also

provided in parentheses. From the fourth and fifth columns, we can calculate the projected number of students in

each required or elective course offered in each year during the 2009-2014 period. This information is reported in

the sixth and seventh columns. The information in these columns shows that the average student number ranges

from 20 to 40 during the period. This means that the numbers of courses offered are adequate to satisfy the student

demand.

From the numbers provided in Table 14 and Table 15, we can estimate the net revenues of the proposed program in

each year during the 2009-2014 period. Table 16 summarizes this result.

Table 16: Projected Expenditures and Revenue (in dollars per year), Fall 2009 to Spring 2014

Academic

Year

(1)

Faculty

Costs

(2)

Equipment

Costs

(3)

Other

Costs

(4)

Total

Costs

(5)

Tuition

Revenue

(6)

Net

Revenue

(7)

2009-10 199,350 10,000 18,855 228,205 365,400 137,195

2010-11 273,780 20,000 25,894 319,674 548,100 228,426

2011-12 380,673 30,000 36,006 446,679 730,800 284,121

2012-13 435,660 40,000 41,207 516,867 913,500 396,633

2013-14 448,740 50,000 42,443 541,183 913,500 372,317

22


We first estimate the faculty costs. Faculty costs are calculated as a weighted average of both regular faculty

member and adjunct faculty member salaries. We use $90,000 as the average salary of a faculty member. For each

faculty member, we add 33% to cover fringe benefits and administrative supports. Consequently, the total salary

cost for a faculty member is $90,000 * 1.33 = $119,700 per year. If we assume that each faculty member will teach a

total of six courses per year, the average cost per class taught by a faculty member is $119,700 / 6 = $19,950.

Adjuncts will be hired either to teach the courses or to fully replace full–time faculty members teaching in the MBA

or BBA programs. Faculty costs, therefore, are projected as if each course were taught by an adjunct at an average

cost of $3,300 per section. (This estimate includes fringe benefits at an average rate of 10% since only a portion of

adjunct faculty members will be eligible for fringe benefits.) Assuming a 60/40 ratio of full-time to adjunct faculty,

a 3% annual increase in salaries, and an increasing number of courses being taught (from Table 15, Column 5), the

faculty costs are annually aggregated in Table 16, Column 2.

As discussed in COST ASSESSMENT section, there is little concern or need for additional facilities and equipment.

However, we did budget estimates of $10,000, $20,000, $30,000, $40,000, and $50,000 each year for the next five

years. This information is reported in the column 3 of Table 16. We assume that other costs will be 10% of the

faculty costs. The other costs (see column 4 of Table 16) include additional secretarial support, additional supplies,

and additional supervision resources. The total cost is the sum of faculty costs, equipment costs, and other costs.

This information is provided in the fifth column of Table 16.

The sixth column reports the tuition revenue based on the information (total number of students in each year)

provided in the second column of Table 15 and an estimated tuition. The estimated tuition per credit is calculated on

the assumption that approximately 15% of students will be out-of state ($500 per credit) and 85% in-state ($270 per

credit), yielding an average tuition per credit of $304.50. If a student desires to graduate in one year and take a total

of ten courses during the year, this estimate yields an average tuition revenue per student of $9,135 per year. The

first year tuition revenue, therefore, is estimated to be $9,135 * 40 = $365,400. The net revenue is the difference

between the tuition revenue and the total costs and is reported in the seventh column of Table 16.

EVALUATION

Internal evaluation and outcomes will be monitored via: 1) trends in student enrollments; 2) student achievements;

3) the number of newly generated businesses by graduates; and 4) faculty performance. For our current BBA and

MBA degrees, learning goals have been identified and declared by the Entrepreneurship faculty. Currently,

evaluation measurements for these same learning goals are being developed. Similar learning goals and their

associated measurements will be utilized to evaluation this new MS in Entrepreneurship. The Department of

Management and the Dean’s Office of the Zicklin School of Business will assist in this process of evaluation.

23


Externally, Entrepreneurship faculty members of the Department of Management developed this MS program by

searching the websites of all the leading business schools offering similar programs as MS degrees in

Entrepreneurship and MBAs in Entrepreneurship. A summary table of the courses offered was established and

circulated among Entrepreneurship faculty members in the Department of Management. The Entrepreneurship

faculty also consulted founders, experts and business leaders in the industry about the program. We targeted our

students and Field Center clients who are currently operating businesses as well as those who are employed in

traditional workplaces such as Wall Street firms. The Entrepreneurship faculty and other Baruch faculty, business

owners, and industry supporters as well as outside academic Entrepreneurship colleagues have all expressed their

views of this proposed program and curriculum as an outstanding and important new effort which will well serve the

New York City, surrounding regions, and potential national student populations nation-wise. As mentioned above,

some of these business founders/owners and industry experts that we consulted wrote letters of support for the

program (see Appendix J). Also attached is the academic evaluation by Dr. Stanley W. Mandel, Executive Professor

and Director of the Angell Center for Entrepreneurship in Babcock Graduate School of Management at Wake Forest

University, and Dr. Howard E. Van Auken, Bob and Kay Smith Entrepreneurship Fellow and Professor of

Management in the College of Business at Iowa State University (see Appendix K).

Once we compiled all information on competing MS in Entrepreneurship programs and consulted experts in the

industry and our own faculty members, the Curriculum Committee of the Department of Management reviewed and

approved this proposal and the curriculum of this proposed MS in Entrepreneurship program. We believe that the

curriculum is entrepreneurially rich and reflects the best recommendations and suggestions about Entrepreneurship

graduate-level education in today’s world.

24

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