Graduate Curriculum Committee - zicklin : school of business - CUNY

zicklin.baruch.cuny.edu

Graduate Curriculum Committee - zicklin : school of business - CUNY

ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

FACULTY MEETING, May 19, 2011

PROPOSALS FROM THE GRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

1. Stan Ross Department of Accountancy

• New flexible core course: ACC 9125 Fundamentals of Managerial Accounting

2. Bert W. Wasserman Department of Economics and Finance

• New required core course: ECO 9xxx Fundamentals of Microeconomics

• New flexible core course: ECO 9xxx Fundamentals of Macroeconomics

• Letter of Intent to establish an Executive MS in Financial Risk Management

3. Department of Management

• New required core course: MGT 9702 Service Operations I

• New flexible core course: MGT 9704 Service Operations II

• Changes in existing courses (changes in prerequisites):

o MGT 9710 Quantitative Analysis for Service Management

o MGT 9740 Sustainability in Supply Chains and Operations

• Changes in MBA – Management (Concentration in Operations Management)

major

4. Department of Statistics and Computer Information Systems

• New required core course: CIS 9001 Information Systems for Managers I

• New flexible core course: CIS 9002 Information Systems for Managers II –

Managing and Harnessing Technology

• New elective course: CIS 9xxx Sustainability and IT

• Changes in MBA – Information Systems major


ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

RECOMMENDATION TO GRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

Stan Ross Department of Accountancy, February 1, 2011

PART A: Academic Matters, Section AII: New Courses

New course to be offered by the Stan Ross Department of Accountancy

AII.10.1 ACC 9125 Fundamentals of Managerial Accounting

This course introduces students to the use of accounting information for internal planning, analysis, and decision-making. The main

objective of the course is to equip our MBA students with the knowledge to understand, evaluate, and act upon the many financial and

non-financial reports used in managing modern firms. The course emphasizes that managing the modern firm requires financial and

non-financial information about the firm’s products, processes, assets, and customers. This information is a key input into a wide

range of analytical tools to support decisions: analyzing profitability of various products, managing product-line portfolios, setting

prices, measuring and managing profitability of customers, making operational and strategic decisions, evaluating investments,

investigating efficiency, and so on. Using numerous case studies, the course will explore the following key topics: multiple objectives

of management-accounting systems; direct and absorption costing; activity-based costing; customer-profitability analysis; costvolume-profit

analysis; relevant costs, opportunity costs, and business decision analysis. 1.5 hours, 1.5 credits. Prerequisite: ACC

9110 or ACC 9112. Not open to students who have completed ACC 9115 or ACC 9811.

EXPLANATION: This course has been taught as a 2 credit course in the past. With the curriculum change in our MBA program, it is

now one of the optional courses within the core. The syllabus has been modified to fit into the new time table. The course will be

offered in fall and summer and is expected to enroll 80 students per section.

Approved by the Stan Ross Department of Accountancy Faculty, February 14, 2011. Syllabus attached.


ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

Baruch College, CUNY

ACC 9125. FUNDAMENTALS OF MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

Professor:

Office:

Email:

Phone:

Office Hours:

Course Overview

This course explores the use of accounting information for internal planning, analysis, and

decision-making.

Managing and evaluating the modern firm requires financial and non-financial information

about the firm’s products, processes, assets, and customers. This information is a key input

into a wide range of analytical tools to support decisions: analyzing profitability of various

products, managing product-line portfolios, setting prices, measuring and managing

profitability of customers, making operational and strategic decisions, evaluating investments,

investigating efficiency, and so on.

The focus of this course is on information generated by internal accounting systems. Along

the way, we will discover that many companies have not provided their managers with useful

information. These managers have to rely on information systems designed years ago for very

different business processes and with very different technologies. We will take a look at a

number of pitfalls that these systems can induce and at the dangers in using these systems to

make business decisions. We will also investigate some modern ideas in how an

organization’s information system should be designed.

To attain the right level of understanding, you will need to be familiar with the mechanics of

the many techniques used to prepare management reports. But the emphasis in this course is

very much on interpretation, evaluation, and decision-making.

Course Learning Objectives

As the result of course cases, reading, lectures, and discussions, students will be able to:

• Indicate how internal reporting affects managerial decisions;

• Illustrate how managerial decisions affect firm profits and value;


• Distinguish among the major approaches used in practice to produce internal financial

reports;

• Appraise the “traditional” managerial-reporting systems;

• Evaluate the common mistakes managers make when using these traditional systems;

• Analyze several modern reporting innovations;

• Judge the major advantages and disadvantages of these several modern reporting

innovations;

• Weigh the value impacts of decisions when relying on incomplete information;

• Integrate various ideas from finance, marketing, and operations in interpreting firms’

reporting systems;

• Present their analysis of firms’ reporting systems in writing and in class discussions;

• Indicate the ethical implications of various managerial decisions.

MBA Program Learning Goals

This course formally addresses the following MBA Program Learning Goals:

• Communication;

• Quantitative Analysis;

• Knowledge Integration;

• Ethical Awareness.

Class Meetings

In each class, we focus on the management aspects of the topic. To prepare for class, you

should go through the readings and prepare the case questions (for classes where we discuss

cases).

Case discussion will take up approximately half of the course. A mix of lectures, cases, and

discussions provides an interactive learning environment allowing for greater understanding of

the managerial implications of reporting-system design and use.

Students will be active participants in case discussions, providing summaries of issues,

analyses, and recommendations. This involves the preparation of the case and reading

assignments before class and the active sharing of your insights during class.


Each student should carefully prepare the assigned case and be ready to be called on to present

their analysis or to comment on others' analyses. You are encouraged to prepare for cases in

teams.

Grading

The course grade will be based on class participation, one closed-book midterm, and a closedbook

final examination:

• Class participation 10%;

• Midterm 40%;

• Final examination 50%.

Class participation. The grade for class participation will depend on the quality of your

interaction and participation in class discussions.

Midterm. There will be one in-class, closed-book midterm.

Final exam. The final exam will be cumulative and closed-book.

Teaching Materials

The required textbook is a custom text based on Managerial Accounting, by Garrison, Noreen,

and Brewer, 13 th edition, 2009. The custom text contains the relevant chapter from the

Garrison-Noreen-Brewer text; it also contains two copyrighted cases we will cover in the

course.

Grading Policy

• There will be no make-up midterm examinations under any circumstances. If you miss

the midterm because of a medical or family emergency, you will need to provide

documentation; in this case, the weight of the midterm will be added to the weight of the

final (i.e., the course grade will be based 10% on participation and 90% on the final

exam).

• The weights, in “Grading” above, are identical for everyone. It is not possible to make up

for poor performance by doing extra work.

• Any form of cheating will be reported to the Dean of Students and will result in failure in

the course and possible suspension from the College. See the statement on Baruch

College’s policy on Academic Honesty below.


• After the midterm, you have one week from the time your exam paper is returned to you

to review the exam for any errors in grading. All requests for re-grading must be

submitted in writing.

Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities may receive assistance and accommodation of various sorts to enable

them to participate fully in courses at Baruch. To establish the accommodations appropriate for

each student, please confidentially alert me to your needs as soon as possible and contact the

Office of Services for Students with Disabilities, part of the Division of Student Development

and Counseling. For more information, contact Ms. Barbara Sirois, Director of this office in VC

2-271 or at 646-312-4590.

Academic Honesty

I fully support Baruch College's policy on Academic Honesty, which states, in part:

“Academic dishonesty is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Cheating, forgery, plagiarism

and collusion in dishonest acts undermine the college's educational mission and the students'

personal and intellectual growth. Baruch students are expected to bear individual responsibility

for their work, to learn the rules and definitions that underlie the practice of academic integrity,

and to uphold its ideals. Ignorance of the rules is not an acceptable excuse for disobeying them.

Any student who attempts to compromise or devalue the academic process will be sanctioned.”

Academic sanctions in this class will range from an F on the assignment to an F in this course.

Also, any form of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Students; this could result

in a suspension from the College.

Additional information and definitions can be found at

http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/academic/academic_honesty.html

Course Outline

Part I. Estimating and managing costs and revenues.

Sessions 1 and 2. Introduction to the course. Internal reporting

systems: theory and practice.


Topics • Course objectives.

• What is management accounting and why do we need it?

• Management accounting, strategy, and value.

• Multiple objectives of managerial-information systems.

• The flow of costs in service and manufacturing companies.

• Direct and absorption costing; normal costing.

Textbook

Chapter 1, pages 1-12 (take a quick glance through this background info);

Chapter 2, pages 31-54 (make sure you understand the terminology – we will

use it throughout the course).

Self-study

Problems

Exercises 2-2, 2-3, 2-4, 2-5; Problems 2-16, 2-18.

Session

Plan

Unlike financial accounting, managerial accounting is not subject to

governmental or legal requirements. Firms design their information systems to

suit very specific purposes. Consequently, there are as many information systems

as there are firms.

Complexity of the modern firm requires managers to rely on aggregated reports,

both to make decisions and to manage costs. You must understand how these

reports are prepared in order to use them. This requires you to comprehend how

information is aggregated and presented. This is the main topic of the session.

We will also discuss the “big picture” of the course, course objectives, and key

dates in the course.

Sessions 3 and 4. Information systems and process complexity.

Seligram ETO case.

Topics • Cost estimation and cost management.

• Two-stage structure of costing systems.

• Selection of allocation bases.

• Failure of “traditional” costing systems.


• Ethical issues: captive internal service providers and other cost centers.

Prepare

Case study Seligram, Inc.: Electronic Testing Operations. Address the following

questions:

1. How has ETO’s competitive environment changed?

2. What caused the existing system at ETO to fail?

3. Calculate the reported costs of the five components described as computed by

a. the existing system;

b. the system proposed by the accounting manager;

c. the system proposed by the consultant.

4. Which system is preferable? Why?

5. Would you treat the new machine as a separate cost center or as part of the

main test room? Why? Compute the first-year overhead rate for the new

machine if it were treated as a separate cost center.

Session

Plan

We will start examining the issues of reporting-system design affecting an

organization’s strategy and performance. The information system at Seligram is

an extremely common one in practice. As many as 60% of publicly-traded firms

rely on similar systems in the majority of their operations. Smaller firms are far

more likely to use these “traditional” systems.

We will take a look at what is wrong with the information system, what

dysfunctional behavior it can induce, and some proposed solutions.

Sessions 5 and 6. Measuring and managing the costs of capacity

resources. SMT case.

Topics • Costs of capacity resources.

• Allocating capacity costs using practical and budgeted capacity utilization.

• The “death spiral” – dangerous reporting-system-induced phenomenon in

cyclical industries.

Prepare

Case study Surface Mount Technology. Address the following questions:

1. OH rates for Sunnyvale Line 6 were $360 in 2008 and $375 in 2009. How are


these OH rates computed by SMT?

2. Compute the OH rates for Sunnyvale Line 6 for 2007, 2010, and 2011. Why

are the rates fluctuating so much? What are the fundamental economic

changes causing these fluctuations?

3. Using SMT’s bidding algorithm, prepare a bid analysis for the Motorola

request if the bid is analyzed (i) in 2010; (ii) in 2011.

Do you expect these bids to succeed?

4. What is likely to happen to OH rates (and, thus, our bids) in the future?

5. Take a look at Project HP-HDC-32 (this is new information, not in the

case). This long-term contract with a major customer involves the assembly

of 10,000 control boards per year on one of the state-of-the-art surface-mount

assembly lines (like Sunnyvale Line 6).

The contract requires the customer to pay us $107 per board. The directmaterial

content is $1.32; the direct-labor content is $0.31. The processing

requirements are 0.2 hours per board.

Compute the unit and total profitability of this relationship in 2009 and in

2011 (labor, materials, and processing requirements remain the same).

Comment.

Session

Plan

We will spend the majority of the sessions discussing the SMT case and some

modern enhancements to SMT’s reporting system.

Sessions 7 and 8. Activity-based costing. Coffee Services

Company case.

Topics • Activity-based costing.

• Differences from and advantages over “traditional” costing systems.

• Hierarchy of activities.

• Translating activity-based costing into improved profitability.

• Implementation of modern cost-management systems.

Textbook Chapter 8, pages 307-331, 333-334.


Prepare

Coffee Services Company case. See the questions in the case.

Self-study

Problems

Exercises 8-1, 8-7, 8-15; and the review problem on pages 334-336.

Session

Plan

We will begin our discussion of activity-based costing (ABC) and activity-based

management (ABM). These information-system tools have become generally

accepted as the solutions to many of the problems of “traditional” costing systems.

However, there is no general agreement about how ABC and ABM should be

implemented for a given firm. Even more problematically, there is no general

agreement about what an economic model of the firm must include to qualify for

the title activity-based.

We will investigate exactly how ABC and ABM differ from the “traditional”

systems. We will also look at what the activity-based models have to offer firms.

Along the way, we’ll focus on several disadvantages of the “modern” systems.

Session 9. Midterm

The midterm exam covers materials from sessions 1-8.

Sessions 10 and 11. Estimating and managing customer

profitability. The Infinity Bank (A) case.

Topics • Analyzing and managing customer profitability.

• Ethical issues: dealing with unprofitable customers.

Read

1. Calmetta Coleman, “Banks Cozy Up to Customers,” The Wall Street Journal

26 April 2001.

2. Matthew Swibel, “Where Money Doesn’t Talk,” Forbes 24 May 2004.

3. Tom Richebacher, “The Art of Customer Profitability Analysis”

http://www.destinationcrm.com/Articles/ReadArticle.aspx?ArticleID=45096


Prepare

Case study Infinity Bank (A). Address the following questions:

1. Summarize Infinity Bank’s competitive environment. What are the major

issues facing the bank? How has the bank performed in 1998-2003?

2. What were the conclusions of the product-profitability project? What were

the surprises?

3. What are the potential advantages of the “supermarket” strategy? What are

the potential disadvantages of the strategy?

4. What are the objectives of customer-profitability analysis (at Infinity and in

general)? What does it add to the product-profitability system? Is it

important? How should Philippa Smith’s customer-profitability pilot study be

improved / extended?

5. What were the conclusions of Philippa Smith’s customer-profitability pilot

study? What were the major sources of variation in customer profitability?

6. Examine the customer-profitability database. Construct a graph to

communicate the profitability of the 2,205 customers in the Weighted Sample

sheet, ranked from best to worst.

7. Given the customer-profitability analysis, does the “supermarket” strategy

make sense?

8. How should the customer-profitability information be used? What should we

do about the large number of unprofitable customers?

9. Overall, what are your recommendations for Infinity Bank’s managers?

NOTE: See the course web page for Excel spreadsheet with case data.

Session

Plan

We will devote these sessions to the discussion of the Infinity Bank case and

customer-profitability analysis.

Part II. Tactical and Strategic Decisions.

Sessions 12 and 13. Introduction to business decisions: costvolume-profit

analysis.

Topics • Variable and fixed costs.

• The profit equation.

• The break-even point.

• The relevant range of analysis.

• General cost-volume-profit analysis.


Textbook Chapter 5 (pages 188-200, 210-211).

Chapter 6 (pages 233-251, Assumptions of CVP Analysis on page 258).

Self-study

Problems

Exercise 6-11; Problems 6-26, 6-31.

Session

Plan

We will discuss the managerial-accounting tool frequently used (and misused) in

practice – cost-volume-profit analysis.

Session 14. Business decisions: relevant costs and relevant

revenues.

Topics • Relevant costs and relevant revenues.

• Opportunity costs.

• Asset-related costs.

• Routine and non-routine business decisions.

• Strategic considerations.

Textbook Chapter 13 (pages 578-598, 602-603).

Self-study

Problems

Exercises 13-4, 13-14; Problems 13-18, 13-25; Case 13-28.

Session

Plan

We will begin this meeting with a concise lecture on relevant-cost and relevantrevenue

analysis. We will do a number of examples, focusing on the following

question: how do we use various management reports to extract data and analyze

implications of decisions?


ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

RECOMMENDATION TO GRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

Bert W. Wasserman Department of Economics and Finance, December 8, 2010

PART A:

Academic Matters, Section AII: New Courses

New course to be offered by the Bert W. Wasserman Department of Economics and Finance

AII.10.1

ECO 97xx: Fundamentals of Microeconomics

Given the complexities of management decision making in the economic environment the course is structured to provide

the student with a broad appreciation of how scarce resources are allocated in a properly functioning economy. The course

leads the students through analysis of issues such as demand dynamics, price determination, the cost function, industry

output and business strategies. Other topics include how management operates in competitive markets, how firms make

their output decisions and how these two directions interact to determine the price level and quantity of output produced.

Students are lead in discussions of pros and cons of government intervention, and industrial organizations such as

monopolies and oligopolies. 1.5 hours, 1.5 credits. Prerequisite: None. Students are expected to have basic mathematics

skills including algebra and geometry. Not open to students who have completed ECO 9708.

EXPLANATION: This is a required core course for M.B.A. students and will be offered at least once a semester. The expected

enrollment will be 65 students per section.

Approved by the Bert W. Wasserman Department of Economics and Finance, December 6, 2010. Syllabus/Course Information sheet

attached.


ECO 97xx Fundamentals of Microeconomics

MBA Program Learning Goals:

Communication

Ethical Awareness

Quantitative Analysis

Course Learning Objectives:

In the completion of this course you will be able to:

1. Differentiate between critical business concepts including;

• The operation of competition and competitive markets in the allocation of

scarce resources.

• The nature and components of the costs of production.

• The tension among efficiency, equity expectations, and politics.

• The tensions between Local government and International economic

policies.

2. Analyze the:

• Integration of various economic parts of the firm.

• Weighing accuracy, objectivity, and relevance of economic data being

applied to the situation being analyzed

• Allocation of economic resources.

• Development and quantification of alternatives solutions to existing

problems.

3. Effectively communicate through oral and written form to present your ideas

and arguments through;

• Discussing in class text readings or/relevant current events.

• Writing a compelling Research Paper incorporating an economic proposal.

4. Analyze and present views on the interaction of legal, social, and ethical

responsibilities of economic stewardship as both an agent of the firm and an

individual within the context of;

• Objective standards of conduct.

• Transparency of conduct.

• Apparent and actual conflicts of interests.

• Delegation of authority.


Purpose: This course is offered as part of the Baruch M.B.A. program by the

Department of Economics and Finance. Given the complexities of management

decision making in the economic environment the course is structured to provide

the student with a broad appreciation of how scarce resources are allocated in a

properly functioning economy. The course will permit the analysis of issues such as

demand dynamics, price determination, the cost function, industry output and

business strategies. In the course of learning microeconomics, you will study how

management operates in competitive markets, how firms make their output

decisions, and how these two directions interact to determine the price level and

quantity of output produced. We will also discuss issues such as government

intervention, and industrial organizations such as monopolies and oligopolies.

Requirements: You are expected to have basic skills in mathematics including

algebra and geometry. Course work will comprise one or two chapters of readings

for each class as the basis of class discussion. There will be a midterm exam

counting 25% of the course grade, and a final exam counting 25%. Each week a 3

x 5 card with two questions on the assigned reading is required. Question cards and

the consequential discussions in Class participation will count 20%. A Course Group

Project to be presented during the final sessions will count for 30%. Regular

reading of the Economist, The Wall Street Journal or similar newspapers and

familiarity with current economic events and issues is strongly emphasized.

Students are encouraged to use the Internet sites suggested and other sites, as

appropriate to amplify their readings.

Question Cards: Should pose at least two original questions each week with

specific citations to the text readings and relevant current events. Questions that

aim to stimulate intelligent class discussion about economic, financial, or analytical

aspects of the texts, or that seek explanation of difficult passages, will receive the

highest marks.

Course Group Project: Management is continually required to present in reports

and proposals its analytical views to governing boards, committees and regulating

bodies. The class will self-select or be assigned into groups to research, analyze

prepare and present an approved topic in such a presentation using the tools of

economic analysis. Each group will be self-governing in this Project and will share

equally in the grade for the success of the Course Group Project Presentation. The

Project will be judged by the quality of research, analysis as well as its persuasion

and the quality of consequential discussion of the class.

Texts:

1. Michael R. Baye - Managerial Economics and Business

Strategy 7 th McGraw-Hill Irwin Publishing, Boston, MA; (2009).

ISBN: 0-07-337579-6

2. Michael C. Jensen - A Theory Of The Firm, Harvard (2000),

ISBN:0- 67401229-1

3. Readings: Additional sources will be made available.


Internet: Text:

http://www.mhhe.com/economics/baye4

Course: http://.baruch.cuny.edu.

Other: http://cepa.newschool.edu/het/ ; http://www.economist.com.

Honesty: Academic dishonesty is unacceptable and will not be tolerated.

Cheating, forgery, plagiarism, and collusion in dishonest acts undermine the

college's educational mission and the students' personal and intellectual growth.

Baruch students are expected to bear individual responsibility for their work, to

learn the rules and definitions that underlie the practice of academic integrity, and

to uphold its ideals. Ignorance of the rules is not an acceptable excuse for

disobeying them. Any student who attempts to compromise or devalue the

academic process will be sanctioned.

Schedule

WEEK TOPIC and Discussions ASSIGNMENTS

1.

Introduction: Syllabus, Requirements,

Baye - Pages 1-27

Administration, Group Project Guidelines.

2.

Market Forces; Demand and Supply, and Baye - Pages 35-65.

Equilibrium

Jensen- Chpts. 1-3

3.

Quantitative Demand Analysis; Price Baye – pages 73-92;

Elasticities, Consumer Behavior 117-137.

Baye - pages 156-177

4.

Preliminary Group

Production Processes; Minimal Unit Cost.

Topic and Biblio.

Due

5.

The Cost Function and Economies of

Scale

Baye -Pages 177-191

6. The Nature of Industry; Market Structure Baye- Pages 235-254

7.

Managing in Competitive Markets,

Monopolistic competition Review

Baye -Pages 265-303

8. -- - Exam #1 --

Oligopoly, Collusion, Game Theory,

9. Pricing, Market Power and Business

Strategies

10.

Government in the Market Place; Anti-

Trust and Regulation

11. ----College Closed----

12.

Management Motivation and

Compensation

Baye -Pages 315-330;

352-371;397-

426;475-500.

Baye - Pages 509- 38.

Jensen Pages 83-91;

205-249


13. Group Project Presentations

14. Group Project Presentations -Review-

---EXAM #2---


ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

RECOMMENDATION TO GRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

Bert W. Wasserman Department of Economics and Finance, December 8, 2010

PART A:

Academic Matters, Section AII: New Courses

New course to be offered by the Bert W. Wasserman Department of Economics and Finance

AII.10.1

ECO 97xx: Fundamentals of Macroeconomics

This course in macroeconomics provides the student with a broad appreciation of the concepts and methodology of macroeconomics

as a context for the technical managerial curriculum. This course examines national output and income; equilibrium in the economy;

employment and prices; fiscal, monetary and industrial policy formulation and their related issues of economic theory. This course

will view macroeconomics through the lens of the American political economy and its global impact. Students will be expected to

present and discuss the readings and current macroeconomic events and the public discourse concerning those events. It will be

geared to students with an adequate background in economics and an appreciation of the American economy, and is designed to

further their skills and knowledge in integrating economics and finance into their portfolio of analytical, communication and

presentation skills. 1.5 credits, 1.5 hours. Prerequisite: None. Students are expected to have basic mathematics skills including

algebra and geometry. Not open to students who have completed ECO 9709.

EXPLANATION: The course is a choice within the new MBA flexible core curriculum and will be offered at least once a semester.

The expected enrollment is 65 students per section.

Approved by the Bert W. Wasserman Department of Economics and Finance, December 6, 2010. Syllabus/Course Information sheet

attached.


ECO 97XX

Fundamentals of Macroeconomics

MBA Program Learning Goals:

Communication

Ethical Awareness

Quantitative Analysis

Course Learning Objectives:

In the completion of this course you will be able to:

1. Describe in detail the meaning of;

• National output and income and how economists use them.

• Fiscal and monetary policy and how they are used to manage the

economy.

• Economic equilibrium and how it is achieved

• Local government policy and International economic policies and how they

can work in unison or be in conflict.

2. Analyze the:

• Economic models of linkages across various aspects of the economy.

• Weighing accuracy, objectivity, and relevance of economic data being

applied to the situation being analyzed.

• Allocation of economic resources.

• Projected impact of suggested economic policies.

3. Effectively communicate through oral and written form your ideas and

arguments through:

• Discussing in class text readings or/relevant current events.

• Writing a compelling Research Paper incorporating an economic proposal.

4. Analyze and present views on the interaction of legal, social, and ethical

responsibilities of economic stewardship by both the central bank and those

business entities through which policy is implemented within the context of;

• Transparency of goals

• Transparency of conduct.

• Apparent and actual conflicts of interests.

• Delegation of authority.


Purpose: This course is offered as part of the Baruch M.B.A. program by the

Department of Economics and Finance. Given the complexities of management

decision making in the economic environment the course is structured to provide

the student with a broad appreciation of how scarce resources are allocated in a

properly functioning economy. The course will permit the analysis of issues such as

demand dynamics, price determination, the cost function, industry output and

business strategies. In the course of learning microeconomics, you will study how

management operates in competitive markets, how firms make their output

decisions, and how these two directions interact to determine the price level and

quantity of output produced. We will also discuss issues such as government

intervention, and industrial organizations such as monopolies and oligopolies.

Requirements: You are expected to have basic skills in mathematics including

algebra and geometry. Course work will comprise one or two chapters of readings

for each class as the basis of class discussion. There will be a midterm exam

counting 25% of the course grade, and a final exam counting 25%. Each week a 3

x 5 card with two questions on the assigned reading is required. Question cards and

the consequential discussions in Class participation will count 20%. A Course Group

Project to be presented during the final sessions will count for 30%. Regular

reading of the Economist, The Wall Street Journal or similar newspapers and

familiarity with current economic events and issues is strongly emphasized.

Students are encouraged to use the Internet sites suggested and other sites, as

appropriate to amplify their readings.

Question Cards: Should pose at least two original questions each week with

specific citations to the text readings and relevant current events. Questions that

aim to stimulate intelligent class discussion about economic, financial, or analytical

aspects of the texts, or that seek explanation of difficult passages, will receive the

highest marks.

Course Group Project: Management is continually required to present in reports

and proposals its analytical views to governing boards, committees and regulating

bodies. The class will self-select or be assigned into groups to research, analyze

prepare and present an approved topic in such a presentation using the tools of

economic analysis. Each group will be self-governing in this Project and will share

equally in the grade for the success of the Course Group Project Presentation. The

Project will be judged by the quality of research, analysis as well as its persuasion

and the quality of consequential discussion of the class.

Texts:

1. N. Gregory Mankiw – Principals of Macroeconomics 5 th ED.

South-Western Cengage Learning, 2009. ISBN: -13: 9780324589993

Internet: Text:

http://www.cengage.com/esouthwesstern/mankiw5

Course: http://.baruch.cuny.edu.


Other: http://cepa.newschool.edu/het/ ; http://www.economist.com.

Honesty: Academic dishonesty is unacceptable and will not be tolerated.

Cheating, forgery, plagiarism, and collusion in dishonest acts undermine the

college's educational mission and the students' personal and intellectual growth.

Baruch students are expected to bear individual responsibility for their work, to

learn the rules and definitions that underlie the practice of academic integrity, and

to uphold its ideals. Ignorance of the rules is not an acceptable excuse for

disobeying them. Any student who attempts to compromise or devalue the

academic process will be sanctioned.

WEEK/DAY TOPIC and Discussions ASSIGNMENTS

1./ DAY OF WEEK

2./DAY OF WEEK

3./ DAY OF WEEK

Introduction

Syllabus, Administration & Review

Measuring Output and Income Ethical

issues of data misrepresentation

Production, Growth, Global Markets

and the Financial system

Chapters 1-4

Chapters 10 and 11

Chapters 12 and 13.

4./ DAY OF WEEK Finance, Ethics & Financial Analysis Chapter 14

5. / DAY OF WEEK The Monetary system Chapter 16

6. / DAY OF WEEK Money Growth and Inflation Chapter 17

7. / DAY OF WEEK Labor Markets and Unemployment Chapter 15

8. / DAY OF WEEK -- - Exam #1 --

9./DAY OF WEEK

Aggregation and the Trade-Off

inflation vs. Unemployment

Chapters 20 and 22

10./DAY OF WEEK Macroeconomics of Open Economies Chapters 18 and 19

11./DAY OF WEEK Monetary and Fiscal Policy Chapter 21

12./DAY OF WEEK Keynes vs. Chicago Chapter 23

13./DAY OF WEEK

Group Project Presentations


14./DAY OF WEEK

Group Project Presentations & Review

DAY OF WEEK TBA ---EXAM #2---


ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

RECOMMENDATION TO GRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

Department of Management, April 10, 2011

PART A:

Academic Matters, Section AII: New Courses

New course to be offered by the Department of Management

AII.10.1

MGT 9702 Service Operations I

Service Operations I is a broad-based introductory course designed to help students recognize the strategic role of operational

decision-making, the importance of sound operations management principles in all business functions, and the managerial levers that

enable competitive positioning of firms. The class is structured around the complex and challenging mandate many managers face

today: reducing the cost of providing services, improving service levels and customer retention, increasing the pace of new service and

product innovation and deployment, and improving quality of the services, while operating with reduced budgets and lower

headcount. Students will learn the fundamentals of designing service delivery systems, managing business process flows, forecasting

demand, structuring supply chains; improving quality using state-of-the-art methods, and implementing change using project

management techniques. This course is part of the required MBA core curriculum, and pre-requisite for Operations Management

major courses. 1.5 hours, 1.5 credits. Prerequisite: STA 9708. Not open to students who have completed MGT 9700.

EXPLANATION: This course is offered to support the revised MBA core curriculum, replacing the existing MGT 9700 as a required

course in the current core program. The material covered in this course represents the first of two parts the existing MGT 9700

currently covers. The intent of the course is to provide the context in which operational decisions are made, and their relevance to a

company’s competitive position. The course will be offered every semester and is expected to enroll 65 students per section.

Approved by the Department of Management Curriculum Committee; April 11, 2011. Syllabus attached.


COURSE INFORMATION SHEET

Course Title: Service Operations I

Course Number: MGT 9702

Course Description:

Service Operations I is a broad-based introductory course designed to help students recognize the

strategic role of operational decision-making, the importance of sound operations management

principles in all business functions, and the managerial levers that enable competitive positioning

of firms. The class is structured around the complex and challenging mandate many managers

face today: reducing the cost of services to consumers, improving service levels and customer

retention, increasing the pace of new service and product innovation and deployment, and

improving quality of the services, while operating with reduced budgets and lower headcount.

Students will learn the fundamentals of designing service delivery systems, managing business

process flows, forecasting demand, structuring supply chains, improving quality using state-ofthe-art

methods, and implementing change using project management techniques. This course is

part of the required MBA core curriculum, and pre-requisite for Operations Management major

courses.

Course Overview:

This course cuts across a variety of organizations, identifying fundamental levers in Operations

Management that allow students to understand the importance of continuously improving and

updating processes through Lean, Six Sigma, and Total Quality Management methods; matching

supply with demand via the forecasting function, inventory management principles, and global

supply chain management; managing the capacity of service delivery systems through constraint

management and yield management techniques. Hands-on simulation exercises, case studies, and

games, accompanied by interactive lectures, enable students to understand the relationships

among the operational levers and their combinatorial impact on performance targets. The course

provides a pathway to pursue the OM discipline in greater depth.

Course Learning Goals

By the end of the semester, students who have taken MGT 9702 should be able to do the

following:

1. Identify the integral role of operations in every business function.

2. Recognize and classify basic operational trade-offs among cost, quality, and customer

service levels.

3. Analyze business processes and recommend operational improvements.

4. Describe and evaluate the relationships among operational levers and their impact on

performance.

5. Define operational risks and design coping strategies for managing supply chains.


6. Explain the role and relevance of Corporate Social Responsibility, and sustainability in

operations.

MBA Learning Goals Addressed in this Course: The Zicklin School of Business has adopted

eight common educational aims for its MBA Program. This course will address the following

learning goals in a significant manner:

1. Communication: Students will be effective oral and written communicators as leadership

and teamwork in business is dependent on developing shared meaning and commitment to

action fostered through communication.

2. Global Awareness: Students will be sensitive to differences in perspectives, institutions,

and practices among business people from around the world as our global economy puts a

premium on global business relationships.

3. Teamwork and Leadership: Students will develop skills that permit them to function

effectively in teams and be given opportunities to experience, understand, and develop their

competencies as leaders.

4. Information Literacy: Students will develop effective information literacy skills. This

includes: framing research questions; accessing and evaluating sources; and using

information ethically and legally.

5. Knowledge Integration: Students will have working knowledge off all functional areas in

business and apply them in a holistic, analytical, and integrative manner to effectively

understand and recommend solutions to business problems.

6. Quantitative Analysis: Students will effectively use quantitative techniques to describe and

analyze business phenomena and help develop solutions to business problems.

Text and Course Materials:

a. Required

• Custom Textbook: ISBN:###### (Contains selected chapters from Krajewski, Ritzman

and Malhotra (KRM), 2009, Operations Management, 9 th ed., Prentice Hall; Simchi-Levy,

Designing and managing the supply chain, Prentice Hall; selected case studies.)

• The Goal, E. Goldratt, North River Press (1992 or 2004 editions)

• MyOMLab Online Quiz Registration Packet

• Littlefield Labs Simulation Registration packet

• HBS Root Beer Simulation Game Registration packet

b. Recommended

• Critical Chain, E. Goldratt, North River Press (any edition)

• Isn’t it Obvious?, E. Goldratt, North River Press (any edition)


Grading:

Midterm: 20%

Online Quizzes: 20%

Assignments: 20%

Final: 30%

Participation: 10%


Schedule:

Meet Date Topics Assignments

1 Unit: Operations Strategy and Competitiveness Reading:

Topic(s): Introduction

KRM chapter 1

Learning Objectives:

• History and development of OM

• OM objectives and goals

• Functions of OM and OM practitioners

2 Unit: Operations Strategy and Competitiveness

Topic(s): Process Strategy

Reading:

KRM chapter 3

Learning Objectives:

• Four major process decision areas

• Relationships between processes and service

design

• Process reengineering

• Integration of processes for competitiveness

3 Unit: Yield Management

Topic(s): Capacity allocation and pricing decisions

Learning Objectives:

• Understanding service inventories

• Pricing policies and demand management

• Substitution effects of demand and supply

4 Unit: Supply Chain Management

Topic(s): Supply Chain Design (SCD)

Learning Objectives:

• Understanding flows in a global supply chain

• SCD and firm performance

• Frameworks for SCD

• Tools for SCD

5 Unit: Supply Chain Management

Topic(s): Supply Chain Design (SCD)

Learning Objectives:

• Tools for SCD

• Risk assessment

• Sustainability in SCD

• Value partitioning in SCM

• CSR in Sourcing

• Ethical issues in SCM

Reading:

Metters, CH 10

Blackboard intro pack

Lemonade Stand Simulation

http://www.coolmathgames.com/

lemonade/

http://www.lemonadestandgame.

com/

Reading: Simchi-Levy

CH 7: Coordinated product and

supply chain design;

Distribution strategies

Chapter 3: Network planning

Hands-on class experience

Beer game

Risk Pooling

Reading: Simchi-Levy

CH 6: Supply chain integration

CH 5: The value of information

(bullwhip)

CH 9: Procurement and

outsourcing strategies

CH 10: Global logistics and risk

management


6 Unit: Supply Chain Management

Topic(s): Contracts and performance metrics

Learning Objectives:

• Synchronizing supply with demand – demand

management, inventory and ordering models

• Managing risk

7 Midterm exam

8 Unit: Process Management

Topic(s): Process Analysis

Learning Objectives:

• Understanding the importance of process flow

charts and service blue prints

• Identifying the metrics for process evaluation

• Recognizing the keys to effective process

management

9 Unit: Process Management

Topic(s): Forecasting Process Demand

Learning Objectives:

• Explaining the role of the forecasting function

in service operations

• Understanding the difference between

judgmental and quantitative forecasting

techniques

• Executing moving-average-based forecasting

methods (e.g., simple moving average,

exponential smoothing)

• Integrating forecasting with capacity planning

10 Unit: Process Management

Topic(s): Constraint Management

Learning Objectives:

• Identify bottlenecks

• Understand the link between capacity

constraints and financial measures

• Describe how to manage constraints in

service operations

11 Unit: Process Management

Topic(s): Constraint Management, Lean Processes

Learning Objectives:

• Understanding how lean systems facilitate

continuous improvement methods

• Identifying the 8 types of waste in any

service system

• Recognizing how value stream analysis

eliminates waste and improves processes

• Appreciating the Toyota Production System

• Integrating the lessons of Littlefield

Laboratories: the complications of managing

simultaneously demand, perishable and

nonperishable inventory, forecasting, capacity

and contracting.

Reading: Simchi-Levy

Chapter 2: Inventory

management and risk pooling

Reading:

KRM chapter 4, Littlefield Labs

simulation overview

Pre-class quiz: chapter 4

Reading: KRM chapter 13 (pp.

462-473 only), case study

(TBD)

Pre-class quiz: chapter 13

Simulation: Littlefield Labs

begins

Reading: The Goal, KRM

chapter 7

Pre-class quiz: chapter 7

Deliverable: The Goal write-up

Simulation:

Littlefield Lab ends

Reading:

KRM CH 8, “Decoding DNA of

TPS”

Pre-class quiz: chapter 8

Deliverable: Littlefield Labs

write-up (date TBA)


12 Unit: Operations Change Management

Topic(s): Project Management

Learning Objectives:

• Understand the core concepts and

components of a Project Charter

• Develop an appreciation for managing

outcomes and milestones vs managing people

• Discuss Issues and Challenges with managing

projects, including the administration of

contracts, roles and responsibilities, as well

as managing implementation risks

• Apply key components of a Project

Management Framework (esp. WBS in a

Project Plan and Project Team Organization)

to the Mustang Case

13 Unit: Operations Change Management

Topic(s): Project Management

Learning Objectives:

• Understand critical project constraints (scope,

time and resources)

• Develop Estimating Factors and a Project

Estimate (for the Mustang Case)

• Learn CPM / PERT and their role in Planning

Projects

• Develop an understanding of Project Tracking

and Monitoring (EVM, Status Reporting)

14 Unit: Operations Change Management

Topic(s): Quality Management

• Understand TQM philosophy and core

concepts of Six Sigma

• Develop an appreciation for the Six Sigma

Methodology and a sample analytical tool

used to manage a Six Sigma process

• Introduce the core concept of SPC

• Discuss 4 key Questions related to the

Reading Material

Reading:

KRM CH2

Critical Chain,

KRM: PERT Mustang case

Pre-class quiz: chapter 2

Reading:

KRM CH2

Deliverable: Project Plan

Reading:

KRM CH2

“Made in U.S.A.: A

Renaissance in Quality” –

Joseph M. Juran

Supporting Material:

Six Sigma at Caterpillar (Video

Clip – in-class)

15 Final Exam

Web-based Pre-class Quiz Schedule:

Chapter

KRM 1, 3

S-L 3, 7

S-L 5, 6

KRM 4

KRM 13

KRM 8

KRM 7

KRM 2

KRM 5

Quiz

Name

Quiz1: Operations Strategy

Quiz2: Supply Chain design

Quiz3: Supply Chain Integration

Quiz4: Process Analysis

Quiz5: Forecasting

Quiz6: Lean Systems

Quiz7: Constraint Management

Quiz8: Project Management

Quiz9: Quality Management

# of Q Time

Allowed

Date/Time

Available

Date/Time

Closed


Name of Instructor: [various]

Department: Department of Management, VC9-240

Phone: (646) 312-xxxx

Office: 9-xxx (Vertical Campus)

Office Hours: D,D,hh-hh. You do not need an appointment to meet with the instructor during

scheduled office hours. If the Department of Management is closed, please call the instructor to

arrange for entry. If the scheduled office hours do not work for you, please contact the instructor

to make an appointment for a mutually convenient time.

E-Mail: ______._______@baruch.cuny.edu

Blackboard

Students must regularly check the Blackboard page for this class, as this will be the instructor’s

primary mechanism for communicating with students regarding assignments and scheduling

matters. It is your responsibility to access Blackboard to retrieve these materials and

information.

Standards of Professional Conduct:

Classroom Behavior

• The classroom is a professional environment. You should treat everyone present with respect

and courtesy.

• Do not disturb the class with the use of cell phones or other electronic devices. This rule

includes texting, which can be quite distracting. Laptop computers may be used for notetaking

only.

Communicating with the Instructor

• An e-mail written to a professor (like an e-mail to a work supervisor or business colleague)

should be considered professional correspondence and should be written accordingly. It

should be in grammatically correct, formal English, spell-checked, and have a subject line

that properly identifies the subject of the e-mail.

• All e-mail communication from the professor to the students will be sent to the student’s

official Baruch e-mail account. It is, therefore, important that students regularly check their

Baruch email accounts.

Attendance and Class Participation

Active learning is encouraged, which means that the instructor will avoid lecturing and instead

encourage class participation and student engagement. All students are expected to be present

and on time at each session and to participate regularly in class discussions. Students will be

evaluated on the basis of the frequency and quality of their contributions to class discussion.


Academic Integrity:

Baruch College’s Policy on Academic Dishonesty can be found on the college website at

http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/academic/academic_honesty.html. I fully support this policy,

which states, in part:

Academic dishonesty is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Cheating, forgery, plagiarism

and collusion in dishonest acts undermine the college’s educational mission and the students'

personal and intellectual growth. Baruch students are expected to bear individual

responsibility for their work, to learn the rules and definitions that underlie the practice of

academic integrity, and to uphold its ideals. Ignorance of the rules is not an acceptable excuse

for disobeying them. Any student who attempts to compromise or devalue the academic

process will be sanctioned.

The Baruch College website goes on to explain the concept of plagiarism as follows:

Plagiarism is the act of presenting another person’s ideas, research or writing as your own:

• Copying another person’s actual words without the use of quotation marks and footnotes.

• Presenting another person’s ideas or theories in your own words without acknowledging

them.

• Using information that is not considered common knowledge without acknowledging the

source.

• Failure to acknowledge collaborators on homework and laboratory assignments.

The Library has a plagiarism tutorial on its website. I strongly suggest that you complete the

tutorial: http://newman.baruch.cuny.edu/help/plagiarism/Index.htm.

IF YOU ARE STILL IN DOUBT, DON’T DO IT!

Any act of plagiarism or academic dishonesty with regards to your work in this course will

result in a failing grade in the course. Furthermore, a full report of any academic

dishonesty or plagiarism will be made to the appropriate College authorities.


ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

RECOMMENDATION TO GRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

Department of Management, April 10, 2011

PART A:

Academic Matters, Section AII: New Courses

New course to be offered by the Department of Management

AII.10.1

MGT 9704 Service Operations II

This course builds upon its precursor, MGT 9702, Service Operations I, providing students with the appropriate tools and techniques

to make operational decisions for improving business processes and service quality, planning and managing capacity, and designing

and managing efficient and responsive supply chains. The goal of the course is to familiarize students with the use of decision tools

that are applicable to universal business processes such as customer relationship management, order fulfillment, supply and logistics

fulfillment, quality improvements, and capacity management in service-focused businesses.

1.5 hours, 1.5 credits. Prerequisite: MGT 9702. Not open to students who have completed MGT 9700.

EXPLANATION: This course is a continuation of MGT 9702, covering tools and techniques that are applied to operational decision

contexts. The material covered in this course represents the second of two parts the existing MGT 9700 currently covers. It is intended

to present analysis-based solution methodologies to the decision problems presented in MGT 9702. It is required of all Operations

Management majors and provides the analytical foundations, which the OM major courses build upon. The course will be offered

every semester and is expected to enroll 65 students per section.

Approved by the Department of Management Curriculum Committee; April 11, 2011. Syllabus attached.


COURSE INFORMATION SHEET

Course Title: Service Operations II: Operational Decision making

Course Number: MGT 9704

Course Description:

This course builds upon its precursor, MGT 9702, Service Operations I, providing students with

the appropriate tools and techniques to make operational decisions for improving business

processes and service quality, planning and managing capacity, and designing and managing

efficient and responsive supply chains. The goal of the course is to familiarize students with the

use of decision tools that are applicable to universal business processes such as customer

relationship management, order fulfillment, supply and logistics fulfillment, quality

improvements, and capacity management in service-focused businesses.

Course Overview:

This course introduces students to structured decision-making methodologies in complex

operational environments. Specific focus areas include designing supply chains that seek to

balance customer service risk exposure, and inventory costs; improving customer service

experiences while optimizing service staff; scheduling service deliveries to maximize availability

at minimum costs; managing projects that deliver fully on time and within scope commitments

while staying within budgets; designing business processes to achieve efficiencies and reducing

waste; managing and controlling quality to achieve consistency and eliminate waste. Case

studies, in-class mini-cases, hands-on exercises, computer simulations and spreadsheet modeling,

use of quantitative analysis methodologies comprise the tools with which students are exposed to

operational decision-making environments.

Course Learning Objectives:

By the end of the semester, students who have taken MGT 9704 should be able to do the

following:

1. Evaluate components of a supply chain network, and manage them effectively through a

judicious balance of customer service levels, inventories, distribution and risk.

2. Analyze and design customer service systems involving direct customer contact.

3. Examine, evaluate, design and re-arrange core business processes to improve customer

satisfaction, through the generation and sequencing of value-added tasks, and the

identification and elimination of non-value-added activities

4. Apply basic forecasting methods and tools to incorporate predictable changes in customer

demand patterns for goods and services

5. Critically evaluate business tradeoffs, risks, and sustainability concerns in making

operational decisions.

6. Recognize and match appropriate analytical tools to different types of operational

decision analysis.

MBA Learning Goals Addressed in this Course: The Zicklin School of Business has adopted

eight common educational aims for its MBA Program. This course will address the following

learning goals in a significant manner:


1. Communication: Students will be effective oral and written communicators as leadership

and teamwork in business is dependent on developing shared meaning and commitment to

action fostered through communication.

2. Global Awareness: Students will be sensitive to differences in perspectives, institutions,

and practices among business people from around the world as our global economy puts a

premium on global business relationships.

3. Teamwork and Leadership: Students will develop skills that permit them to function

effectively in teams and be given opportunities to experience, understand, and develop their

competencies as leaders.

4. Information Literacy: Students will develop effective information literacy skills. This

includes: framing research questions; accessing and evaluating sources; and using

information ethically and legally.

5. Knowledge Integration: Students will have working knowledge off all functional areas in

business and apply them in a holistic, analytical, and integrative manner to effectively

understand and recommend solutions to business problems.

6. Quantitative Analysis: Students will effectively use quantitative techniques to describe and

analyze business phenomena and help develop solutions to business problems.

Name of Instructor: [various]

Department: Department of Management, VC9-240

Phone: (646) 312-3625

Office: 9-240 (Vertical Campus)

Office Hours: D,D,hh-hh. You do not need an appointment to meet with the instructor during

scheduled office hours. If the Department of Management is closed, please call the instructor to

arrange for entry. If the scheduled office hours do not work for you, please contact the instructor

to make an appointment for a mutually convenient time.

E-Mail: ______._______@baruch.cuny.edu

Text and Course Materials:

• Custom text ISBN #: __________ ; constructed from:

o Simchi-Levy., Designing and managing the supply chain, Prentice Hall

o Krajewski / Ritzman / Malhotra, Operations Management, Prentice Hall

• Metters, et. Al. Successful Service Operations Management 2ed, publicly available & on

Blackboard

• Myron Hlynka’s, http://web2.uwindsor.ca/math/hlynka/qfaq.html


• Maister, D.H. 1985. “The Psychology of Waiting Lines” in The Service Encounter, edited by

J.A. Czepiel et al., Lexington Books, pp. 113-123.

• Katz, Larson and Larson. 1991. “Prescription for the Waiting-in-Line Blues: Entertain,

Enlighten, and Enlarge.” Sloan Management Review, 32(2), pp. 44-53.

• HBS Case “Denver International Airport”

Grading:

Midterm: 20%

Assignments: 40%

Final: 30%

Participation: 10%

Schedule:

Meet Date Topics Assignments

1 Topics: Introduction & Service Design Principles

2

Learning Objectives:

• Understand the service design attributes

• Understand the elements of customer experience

• Interface between front and back-office processes

Reading: Metters 2 nd Ed

CH 5, 6,7 (Blackboard)

3 Topic: Forecasting

Learning Objectives:

4

• Trend adjustments

• Seasonality

• Error Tracking

5 Unit: Supply Chain Management

Topic(s): Supply Chain Design (SCD)

Learning Objectives:

• Distribution planning models

• Network optimization

• Facility/warehouse location models

6 Unit: Supply Chain Management

Topic(s): Supply Chain Design (SCD contd.)

Learning Objectives:

• Supply chain contracts (with numbers)

• Inventory management: Periodic and

Continuous models

7

• Ethical concerns in SCM

8 Midterm exam

9 Unit: Process Management

Topic: Introduction to Waiting Line Systems

Learning Objectives:

• Psychological aspects of queue design

• Structural properties of queueing systems

• Single-server queueing systems: the M/M/1

model

Reading: KRM CH13

Reading:

Simchi-Levy

CH 3: Network planning

CH 7: Distribution

strategies

Metters: CH 14

Reading: Simchi-Levy

CH 2: Inventory

management and risk

pooling

CH4: Supply Contracts

Reading:

• KRM Suppl. C

• “FAQ on Queueing

Theory: ‘queueing’ or

‘queuing’?” [1]

• “The Psychology of

Waiting Lines” [2]

• “Prescription for the

Waiting-in-Line Blues:

Entertain, Enlighten,

and Enlarge” [3]


10 Unit: Process Management

Topic: Performance Analysis of Queueing Systems

Learning Objectives:

• Multiple server queues: the M/M/S model

• The performance analysis metrics of a queue

11 Unit: Process Management

Topics: Little’s Law and Queueing System Design

Learning Objectives:

• Value of Little’s Law in analyzing process flows

• The optimal number of servers: (a) economic

perspective and (b) service-level perspective

12 Unit: Operations Change Management

Topic: Quality Management

• Six Sigma DMAIC Methodology and Analytical

Tools for Six Sigma

• SPC Control Charts (p-Charts, X-bar and R

charts)

13 Unit: Operations Change Management

Topic: Project Management

• Apply a Project Management Framework to

the HBS Case

• Develop a Risk Management Plan

• Develop Estimating Factors and Project

Estimates

14 Unit: Operations Change Management

Topic: Project Management

• Develop CPM with Three Activity Time

Estimates and Time-Cost Models

• Develop a Baseline Project Plan

• Develop a Project Tracking Template using

EVM

15 Final Exam

Reading: KRM Suppl. C

Assignment 1: NYPD Patrol

System Case Study

Reading: KRM CH 4 & 5

Reading: KRM CH 2;

Teaching Note

(Blackboard)

Assignment 3: HBS Case –

“Denver International

Airport”

Assignment 3: HBS Case –

“Denver International

Airport”

Deliverable: Project

Management Toolkit

Blackboard

Students must regularly check the Blackboard page for this class, as this will be the

instructor’s primary mechanism for communicating with students regarding assignments

and scheduling matters.

It is your responsibility to access Blackboard to retrieve these materials. If you do not

have computer and Internet access that allows you to reach Blackboard, please contact a

classmate for the assignments. Do not email the instructor for assignments.

Standards of Professional Conduct:

Classroom Behavior

• The classroom is a professional environment. You should treat everyone present with respect

and courtesy.

• Do not disturb the class with the use of cell phones or other electronic devices. This rule

includes texting, which can be quite distracting. Laptop computers may be used for notetaking

only.

Communicating with the Instructor


• An e-mail written to a professor (like an e-mail to a work supervisor or business colleague)

should be considered professional correspondence and should be written accordingly. It

should be in grammatically correct, formal English, spell-checked, and have a subject line

that properly identifies the subject of the e-mail.

• All e-mail communication from the professor to the students will be sent to the student’s

official Baruch e-mail account. It is, therefore, important that students regularly check their

Baruch email accounts.

Attendance and Class Participation

Active learning is encouraged, which means that the instructor will avoid lecturing and instead

encourage class participation and student engagement. All students are expected to be present

and on time at each session and to participate regularly in class discussions. Students will be

evaluated on the basis of the frequency and quality of their contributions to class discussion.

Academic Integrity:

Baruch College’s Policy on Academic Dishonesty can be found on the college website at

http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/academic/academic_honesty.html. I fully support this policy,

which states, in part:

Academic dishonesty is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Cheating, forgery,

plagiarism and collusion in dishonest acts undermine the college’s educational mission and

the students' personal and intellectual growth. Baruch students are expected to bear

individual responsibility for their work, to learn the rules and definitions that underlie the

practice of academic integrity, and to uphold its ideals. Ignorance of the rules is not an

acceptable excuse for disobeying them. Any student who attempts to compromise or

devalue the academic process will be sanctioned.

The Baruch College website goes on to explain the concept of plagiarism as follows:

Plagiarism is the act of presenting another person’s ideas, research or writing as your own:

• Copying another person’s actual words without the use of quotation marks and

footnotes.

• Presenting another person’s ideas or theories in your own words without

acknowledging them.

• Using information that is not considered common knowledge without acknowledging

the source.

• Failure to acknowledge collaborators on homework and laboratory assignments.

The Library has a plagiarism tutorial on its website. I strongly suggest that you complete the

tutorial: http://newman.baruch.cuny.edu/help/plagiarism/Index.htm.

IF YOU ARE STILL IN DOUBT, DON’T DO IT!

Any act of plagiarism or academic dishonesty with regards to your work in this course will

result in a failing grade in the course. Furthermore, a full report of any academic

dishonesty or plagiarism will be made to the appropriate College authorities.


ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

RECOMMENDATION TO GRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

Department of Management, April 10, 2011

PART A: Routine Academic Matters, Section AIV: Changes in Course Number, Title, Description, Credits, Hours, Co- or

Pre-requisites

AIV.10.1

Change in Prerequisite

FROM/TO: MGT 9710 Quantitative Analysis for Service Management

Intended to help managers deal with issues in modern operations planning by exposing them to the analytical and practical approaches

that are finding increased emphasis in a primarily service-dominated industry. Topics to be examined include demand management

and forecasting, capacity and staff planning, workforce scheduling, distribution and inventory management, and quality management.

Emphasis will be placed on assessing the proper use and fit of these applications in actual systems in an organizational environment.

3 hours, 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGT 9700 or MGT 9704.

EXPLANATION: In conformance with the newly created MGT 9702 and 9704 courses to replace MGT 9700.

Approved by the Department of Management Curriculum Committee; April 11, 2011. Syllabus attached.


The Bernard M. Baruch College

Department of Management

MGT 9710

Quantitative Analysis for Service Management

Dr. Lie-Fern Hsu

Office: Room 9-284

Phone: (646) 312-3656

e-mail: Lie-Fern.Hsu@baruch.cuny.edu

Office Hours: M,W 5:05 PM – 5:55 PM

______

Text: Barry Render, Ralph M Stair, and Michael Hanna, Quantitative Analysis for Management,

10 th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2009.

Course Description:

This course is intended to help managers deal with issues in modern operations planning by

exposing them to the analytical and practical approaches that are finding increased emphasis in a

primarily service-dominated industry. Topics to be examined include demand management and

forecasting, capacity and staff planning, workforce scheduling, distribution and inventory

management, and quality management. Emphasis will be placed on assessing the proper use and

fit of these applications in actual systems in an organizational environment.

Course Learning Goals

By the end of the semester, students who have taken MGT 9710 should be able to do the

following:

1. Describe the trade-off curves for the cost of waiting time and cost of service, understand the

three parts of a queuing system: the calling population, the queue itself, and the service

facility; describe the basic queuing system configurations, understand the assumptions of the

common waiting line models, analyze a variety of operating characteristics of waiting lines,

and design and manage service processes that focus on customer waiting and service

delivery costs.

2. Understand the importance of inventory control and ABC analysis; use the economic order

quantity to determine how much to order; compute the reorder point in determining when to

order more inventory; handle inventory problems to allow back orders, quantity discounts or

non-instantaneous receipt; understand the use of safety stock; discuss enterprise resource

planning systems; and design and manage inventory policies that balance the costs of

availability and inventory holding costs.

3. Understand and know when to use various families of forecasting models, analyze and

compare the quantitative forecasting models, and design and implement forecasting systems

for retail environments.

4. Model a wide variety of medium to large Linear Programming (LP) problems, understand

major LP application areas, including marketing, production, labor scheduling, fuel

blending, transportation, and finance; and plan workforces and manage service capacity to

meet customer demand for services.


5. Structure LP problems for the transportation and transshipment models, solve facility

location and other application problems with transportation models, and design distribution

systems to minimize logistics costs.

6. Define the quality of a product or service, develop four types of control charts: x-bar, R, p,

and c; understand the basic theoretical underpinnings of statistical quality control including

the central limit theorem, and design and manage quality assurance systems to satisfy

customer expectations.

MBA Learning Goals Addressed in this Course: The Zicklin School of Business has adopted

eight common educational aims for its MBA Program. This course will address the following

learning goals in a significant manner:

Communication: Students will be effective oral and written communicators as leadership and

teamwork in business is dependent on developing shared meaning and commitment to action

fostered through communication.

Ethical Awareness: Students will be sensitive to ethical issues in business, understand the

importance of behavior and their responsibilities as business people to uphold ethical principles

in their dealings.

Teamwork and Leadership: Students will develop skills that permit them to function

effectively in teams and be given opportunities to experience, understand, and develop their

competencies as leaders.

Knowledge Integration: Students will have working knowledge off all functional areas in

business and apply them in a holistic, analytical, and integrative manner to effectively

understand and recommend solutions to business problems.

Intellectual Competence in a Field of Study: Students will have the opportunity to develop a

specialized intellectual competence in at least one business discipline to support post degree

employment aims.

Quantitative Analysis: Students will effectively use quantitative techniques to describe and

analyze business phenomena and help develop solutions to business problems.

Schedule:

Meet Date Topics

1 - 3 Topic: Management of Demand in Waiting

Reading Requirements

Chapter 14

Learning Objectives:

• Waiting Line decision Problems

• The Behavior in a Queue

• Basic Structure of Waiting Line systems

• Waiting Line Models

• Performance Measurement of Waiting Line

Models

• Cost Analysis of Waiting Line Systems

4 Student Presentations and Discussions on


• Case Study: Saveway Supermarkets

• Case Study: Renaissance Clinic

5-8 Topic: Inventory Management

Chapter 6

Learning Objectives:

• Major Functions of Inventory

• Inventory Costs

• Independent versus Dependent Demand

• Inventory Systems for Independent

Demand Items: Fixed Order Quantity

Systems & Fixed Order period Systems

• Inventory Models for Fixed Order Quantity

Systems:

Model I: Basic Economic Order Quantity

(EOQ) Model II: EOQ with Back Orders

Model III: EOQ with Gradual Deliveries

(Productions)

Model IV: EOQ with Quantity Discounts

• Order Point and Safety Stock determined

by a desired service level

• Order Point and Safety Stock based on

minimum total cost criterion

• Single Period Inventory Problems

• Inventory Models for Fixed Order Period

Systems

• Depend Demand Inventory Systems

• ABC Classification of Materials

9 Student Presentations and Discussions on

10 1st Examination

• Case Study: Professional Video

Management

• Case Study: TexMex Foods

11 -

13

Topics covered: Management of Demand in

Waiting & Inventory Management

Topic: Forecasting

Learning Objectives:

Chapter 5


• Types of Forecasting models

• Components of Demand

• Time Series Forecasting (Simple moving

Average, Weighted Moving Average,

Exponential smoothing, Regression)

• Regression (Simple Regression, Seasonal

Index, Multiple Regression)

14 Student Presentations and Discussions on

• Case Study: Kwik Lube

• Case Study: Aquatrix Corporation

15-

18

Topic: Capacity Planning and Workforce

Scheduling

Learning Objectives:

• Linear Programming (LP) Problems

• Properties of LPs

• Guidelines for Model Formulation

• LP Solutions

• Slack and Surplus Variables

• Sunk Cost and Relevant Cost

• Sensitivity Analysis

• Range of Optimality and 100% Rule

• Shadow Price

• Dual Price

• Range of Feasibility and 100% Rule

• Reduced Cost

• Capacity Planning Examples

• Labor Planning Examples

Chapters 7, 8, 9

19 Student Presentations and Discussions on

20 2nd Examination

• Case Study: Red Brand Canners

• Case Study: Chase Manhattan Bank

21-

23

Topics covered: Forecasting & Capacity Planning

and Workforce Scheduling

Topic: Distribution Planning Chapters 10


Learning Objectives:

• Transportation Simplex Method

• Transportation Model - Maximization

Problem

• Transshipment Problems

24 Student Presentations and Discussions on

• Case Study: Andrew-Carter, Inc.

• Case Study: Custom Vans, Inc.

25-

27

Topic: Quality Management

Learning Objectives:

• Definitions of Quality

• Why is Quality Important?

• Total Quality Control

• The Role of Inspection in Quality Control

• Inspection of Attributes versus Variables

• Acceptance Sampling and Process Control

• Control Charts for Variables

• CONTROL Charts for Attributes

• Single Sampling Plan

• Double Sampling Plan

• Sequential Sampling Plan

• Operating Characteristic Curve

• Acceptance Sampling by Attributes

• Acceptance Sampling by Variables

• Average Outgoing Quality

Chapter 17

28 Student Presentations and Discussions on

• Case Study: Hydrolock, Inc.

• Case Study: Bayfield Mud Company

3rd Examination

Grading

Class Participation 10%

Homework Assignments / Presentations 30%


Examination #1 20%

Examination #2 20%

Examination #3 20%

Course Policy

1. No make-up exams except bona-fide documented emergencies.

2. This is a short and intensive course and it is absolutely necessary to avoid absences. If

any absence is unavoidable, you are responsible for making up any work you miss due to

the absence, and you must be sure to obtain full class notes from a classmate. A second

absence will need a valid written excuse. More absences will result in a grade penalty.

Academic Integrity:

Baruch College’s Policy on Academic Dishonesty can be found on the college website at

http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/academic/academic_honesty.html. I fully support this policy,

which states, in part:

Academic dishonesty is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Cheating, forgery, plagiarism

and collusion in dishonest acts undermine the college’s educational mission and the students'

personal and intellectual growth. Baruch students are expected to bear individual

responsibility for their work, to learn the rules and definitions that underlie the practice of

academic integrity, and to uphold its ideals. Ignorance of the rules is not an acceptable excuse

for disobeying them. Any student who attempts to compromise or devalue the academic

process will be sanctioned.

The Baruch College website goes on to explain the concept of plagiarism as follows:

Plagiarism is the act of presenting another person’s ideas, research or writing as your own:

• Copying another person’s actual words without the use of quotation marks and footnotes.

• Presenting another person’s ideas or theories in your own words without acknowledging

them.

• Using information that is not considered common knowledge without acknowledging the

source.

• Failure to acknowledge collaborators on homework and laboratory assignments.

The Library has a plagiarism tutorial on its website. I strongly suggest that you complete the

tutorial: http://newman.baruch.cuny.edu/help/plagiarism/Index.htm.

IF YOU ARE STILL IN DOUBT, DON’T DO IT!

Any act of plagiarism or academic dishonesty with regards to your work in this course will

result in a failing grade in the course. Furthermore, a full report of any academic

dishonesty or plagiarism will be made to the appropriate College authorities.


ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

RECOMMENDATION TO GRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

Department of Management, April 10, 2011

PART A: Routine Academic Matters, Section AIV: Changes in Course Number, Title, Description, Credits, Hours, Co- or

Pre-requisites

AIV.10.1

Change in Prerequisite

FROM/TO: MGT 9740 Sustainability in Supply Chains and Operations

The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of environmental and social sustainability issues in managing global and

domestic supply chains. It will introduce the students – through a series of case studies, projects, and guest lectures from industry

leaders – to the most important concepts of sustainability within the end-to-end supply chain. Students will investigate building an

operations strategy for sustainability, the economic value of sustainable operations, sustainable product

design/packaging/manufacturing, managing a sustainable supply chain, social responsibility in the supply chain, building a “green”

information technologies infrastructure to support operations, green logistics and reverse logistics, and modern standards for

measuring and certifying sustainable operations. 3 hours, 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGT 9700 or MGT 9702.

EXPLANATION: In conformance with the newly created MGT 9702 and 9704 courses to replace MGT 9700, the prerequisite is

changed to MGT 9700 or MGT 9702 only.

Approved by the Department of Management Curriculum Committee; April 11, 2011. Syllabus attached.


SYLLABUS

Course Information

MGT 9740 Sustainability in Supply Chains and Operations

Instructor: Attilio Bellman, PhD

Department: Management

Office: 2-240 Vertical Campus

Course Description

This purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of environmental social sustainability

issues in managing global supply chains. It will introduce the students—through a series of case

studies, projects, and guest lectures from industry leaders—to the most important concepts of

sustainability within the end-to-end supply chain. Students will investigate building an

operations strategy for sustainability, the economic value of sustainable operations, sustainable

product design and manufacturing, managing a sustainable supply chain, social responsibility in

the supply chain, building a “green” information technologies infrastructure to support

operations, reverse logistics, and modern standards for measuring and certifying sustainable

operations.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, the student will be able:

• Define “sustainability” in operations and supply chain management and discuss the

different ways sustainability may influence operations.

• Identify and develop business models that take sustainability into account in delivering

services as well as developing and producing products.

• Analyze examples of global sustainable business practices and discuss the benefits and

challenges of practices in terms of operations effectiveness and customer requirements.

• Use tools that bring objectivity to the measurement, comparison and verification of

sustainable operations.


MBA Learning Goals Addressed in This Course


• Teamwork and Leadership: Case analyses and presentations are group based.


Leadership is a common theme in most case studies, especially regarding sustainability

ethics and decision-making.

• Ethical Awareness: Major themes about ethics permeate the course and the case studies

in particular (see summary of cases below). These fall into two broad categories: (i) the

tradeoffs in sustaining the environment vs. sustaining profits (and/or minimizing

operational costs) and (ii) social responsibility issues in global supply chains.

• Communication: Students will make case presentations and participate actively in case

discussions.

• Knowledge Integration: Integration will come directly from case-based teaching.

Examples include sustainable service, product and process design; managing a

sustainable supply chain, building a “green IT” infrastructure; bringing sustainability to

customers.

• Global Awareness: More than half the case studies investigate issues in global supply

chains (e.g., social issues, cultural differences, regional and international regulations,

managing sustainability and bringing sustainability to customers).

• Quantitative analysis: Due to the need to measure, certify and optimize for

sustainability, quantitative reasoning skills will be used throughout the course.



Course Schedule and Outline

Unit I

Class 1

Introduction: Issues in Sustainable Supply Chains

Conceptual foundations: Define sustainability; Describe sustainability in

operations and supply chains; Overview of issues and trends in sustainable

operations and sustainable supply chain. What are sustainable operations? How

does a sustainable supply chain function? How can companies make their supply

chain sustainable? Why is sustainability important to companies and consumers?

Analytical toolbox: Tools to measure and analyze sustainability initiatives, costs,

risks, and outcomes. Revenue and cost capturing metrics, total cost computation,

quantifying qualitative benefits, Carbon footprinting, break-even analysis for

sustainable projects.

Legal framework: Laws and regulations at home and in key countries (BRIC,

Europe). Government appraisal systems and degree of implementation on the

ground.

Ethics and sustainability: Ethical dilemmas and how companies have responded

to high cost, low revenue, non-mandatory situations.

Quantifiable

Benefits

Cost of Sustainability

High Low

High Acceptable Desirable

Low Dilemma No harm


Class 2

Unit II

Social responsibility in supply chains. Case discussion: “IKEA’s Global

Sourcing Challenge: Indian Rugs and Child Labor,” by C.A. Bartlett, V.

Dessain, A. Sjoman, Harvard Case 9-906-414, 14-Nov-2006.

Building an Operations Strategy for Sustainability: How do companies define

what sustainability means to them and how sustainability in operations influences

their bottom line? Should companies determine how to incorporate sustainability

into their services and product strategy and how they can leverage sustainability

as a competitive advantage?

Class 3 Case Discussion: “Wal-Mart's Sustainability Strategy,” by L. Denand and E.

Plambeck, Stanford Case OIT-71, 30-Sept-2009. What percent of environmental

improvement opportunities are within Wal-Mart’s supply chain? How are

suppliers addressing these opportunities? How is Wal-Mart is opening up to

environmental nonprofits and reducing impacts profitably? What are Wal-Mart’s

sustainable value networks and what’s required for effective strategy? How are

they measuring environmental performance and using the results with associates,

suppliers, customers, policy makers and the public? How is Wal-Mart trying to

bring sustainability into supply logistics?

“The Wal-Mart Supplier Sustainability Assessment” (based on Wal-Mart

public documents and presentations). How is Wal-Mart working with their

suppliers to increase energy/fuel efficiency and utilize renewable energy sources

in their operations and throughout the supply chain? How is Wal-Mart planning

to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and yet improve its bottom line?

Class 4

Carbon Disclosure Project Supply Chain: In many sectors such as retail,

information technology and fast-moving consumer goods, supply chain emissions

from activities such as processing, packaging and transportation often exceed

those arising from an individual company’s own operations. The Carbon

Disclosure Project extends awareness of an organization’s carbon footprint,

moving beyond the measurement of direct greenhouse gas emissions to include

climate change risks and opportunities across the supply chain.

Class 5

Case Discussion: “Sustainability and Competitive Advantage” by M. Berns et

al., Sloan Management Review, Fall 2009, 51(1), pp. 19-26. “Forget how

business is affecting sustainability ... how is sustainability affecting business? The

first annual Business of Sustainability Survey and interview project has answers.”

Class 6 Case Discussion: “Scandinavian Airlines: The Green Engine Decision” by J.

Lynes, Ivey Case 909M28, 11-June-2009. “Scandinavian Airlines (SAS) is an

innovator of strategic environmental management ... This case study is part of a

larger study that was conducted between 2002 and 2005 on the motivations for

environmental commitment at SAS. This green engine case study looks at the

airline’s determination to invest in the best available environmental technology

for its new fleet of aircraft.”

Class 7

Case Discussion: “GE's Imagination Breakthroughs: The Evo Project” by

C.A. Bartlett, B.J. Hall, and N.S. Bennett, Harvard Case 9-907-048, 30-June-


2008. Executives must decide what to recommend to GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt

regarding an innovative hybrid diesel-electric locomotive development program

(“Evo”) that experiences continual battery cost/performance problems and lack

of commercial viability. One executive “argues that it represents an important

and disruptive [green] technology that could change the competitive game going

forward.”

Class 8

Class 9

Unit III

Case Discussion: “Toyota Motor Corp.: Launching Prius” by F.L. Reinhardt,

D.A. Yao, and M. Egawa, Harvard Case 9-706-458, 7-Dec-2006. “Although

students will know that Toyota decided to launch the Prius and that the car is now

regarded as a success, it was far from clear at the time … exactly how the product

ought to be launched, and very few students will know the circumstances of the

product introduction (positioning, volume, and price) on which the success of the

introduction depended.”

Guest Speaker: Sustainability Strategy at Company NNNNNN

Sustainable Service, Product and Process Design: We will review how firms

describe and distinguish product, service and process designs and then show how

sustainability can start with the design of a product or a service and continue with

how a product is manufactured or a service is delivered.

Class 10 Case Discussion: “Maria Yee Inc.: Making 'Green' Furniture in China” by M.

Shao and G. Carroll, Stanford Case SI-110, 16-Jan-2009. Maria Yee Inc.

struggles with cost competiveness, logistics, developing a reliable green supply

chain, and getting consumers to appreciate/value the ecological benefits of their

furniture.

Class 11

Class 12

Case Discussion: “Cradle-to-Cradle [C2C] Design at Herman Miller: Moving

Toward Environmental Sustainability” by D. Lee and L. Bony, Harvard Case

9-607-003, 16-Dec-2009. How can Herman Miller capture first-mover advantage

from a strategic environmental initiative through operational excellence? What is

required to get suppliers to comply with the C2C protocol? Should Herman

Miller share know-how to accelerate adoption of environmentally beneficial

practices by competitors?

Case Discussion: “Lean and Green: The Move to Environmentally Conscious

Manufacturing” by R. Florida, California Management Review, Fall 1996,

39(1), pp. 80-105. “This article examines the relationship between advanced

production practices and innovative approaches to environmentally conscious

manufacturing. It argues that adoption of manufacturing process innovations

creates incentives for adoption of environmentally conscious manufacturing

strategies.”

Class 13 Case Discussion: “Plantar S.A. (Brazil): The Value of Carbon Assets” by J.

Zerio and M.A. Conejero, Thunderbird Case TB0011, 28-Aug-2009. “[W]hat was

the true value of a ton of carbon dioxide removed from the atmosphere? How

would market prices be set? Who would be the major players in the international

market place? Given the … time frame of the project—28 years—what would be

the appropriate Internal Rate of Return? … What would be the real ecological

impact of the project? What methodologies would need to be followed?”


Unit IV

Class 14

Class 15

Class 16

Class 17

Class 18

Class 19

Class 20

Managing a Sustainable Supply Chain: Once a firm considers how

sustainability should be embedded into its operations and supply chain strategy,

such strategy must be executed. We will analyze how some companies deploy

operations in a sustainable way.

Lecture – Introduction of Final Project Research Topics and Team Assignments

Case Discussion: “McDonald's Corp.: Managing a Sustainable Supply Chain”

by R.A. Goldberg and J.D. Yagan, Harvard Case 9-907-414, 16-Apr-2007.

“McDonald’s Europe was targeted by Greenpeace in a public campaign against

Amazon deforestation caused by soya farming. … McDonald’s worked with

Greenpeace, Cargill, and the Brazilian soya industry to find a solution… [and]

was charged with developing the ‘strategies and tools’ necessary to build on the

Brazilian soya success and move closer to the vision of a sustainable supply

chain.”

Case Discussion: “Starbucks Corporation: Building a Sustainable Supply

Chain” by S. Duda et al., Stanford Case GS-54, May 2007. “If Starbucks was

able to overcome the implementation issues that it faced, C.A.F.E. Practices

could go a long way towards improving the sustainability of its coffee supply

chain while at the same time improving Starbucks’ image as a socially

responsible corporation.”

Case Discussion: “Green Rubber: The Revolution of the Rubber Recycling

Business” by C.H.L. Woo, Asia Case Research Center, Univ. of Hong Kong,

Case HKU835, 2009. The CEO “envisages Green Rubber becoming a global

trademark for most rubber-based products, the way ‘Intel Inside’ has for

computers. … [T]he company’s biggest challenge will be to convince consumers

and rubber-product manufacturers of the importance of recycling and that

recycled products are as good as virgin rubber. … How can GRG achieve

sustainability in the long run with its environmentally conscious and

commercially driven innovation?”

**Mid-term exam** - New Service Design Exercise.

Case Discussion: “The European Recycling Platform: Promoting Competition

in E-Waste Recycling” by M. Shao and H. Lee, Stanford Case GS-67, 28-Aug-

2009.

OR

“From Garbage to Goods: Successful Remanufacturing Systems and Skills”

by G. Ferrer and D.C. Whybark, Business Horizons, Nov-Dec 2000, pp. 55-64.

Guest Speaker: RecycleBank

“At RecycleBank, we are defining and building the 21 st -century economy. It is a

place where communities, companies and individuals are financially rewarded

for positive green actions that create economic efficiencies. We started in 2005 by

financially rewarding households for the amount that they recycle, because

recycling enabled us to the connect with every home in every neighborhood. We

are now expanding our service to financially reward people for additional green

actions that include using solar and wind power, using water efficiently, riding


public transportation, and buying products that are manufactured from recycled

content.”

Unit V

Building a “Green IT” Infrastructure: The IT infrastructure is a consideration

in supporting data to manage a company’s operations and supply chain. Managing

IT in a sustainable way can play a role in a company’s sustainability strategy.

Class 21 Case Discussion: “Green IT Matters at Wipro Ltd.” by R. Chandrasekhar and I.

Bose, Asia Case Research Center, Univ. of Hong Kong, Case HKU875, 2009.

“The case provides an opportunity … to examine three issues related to Wipro’s

Green IT strategy: Green IT strategy formulation, Green IT strategy execution

and Green IT strategy evaluation.”

Class 22

Class 23

Unit VI

Class 24

Class 25

Unit VII

Class 26

Class 27

Class 28

Case Discussion: “The Real Green IT Machine” by B. Allen, Darden Case

UV1338, 20-Mar-2009. A short case that uses quantitative analysis to support

economic decision-making regarding the design of a bank’s next “green” data

center.

Guest Speaker: Green IT

Bringing Sustainability to Customers: What value do consumers place on

purchasing products that were designed, manufactured and distributed in a

sustainable way? What is government’s role in providing incentives for such

distribution systems?

Case Discussion: “From Plague to Paradigm: Designing Sustainable Retail

Environments” by S. Bishop and Dana Cho, Rotman Magazine, Spring 2008, pp.

56-61. “Considering a shopper’s context is the key to understanding their

motivations and making green products and services relevant to them.”

Case Discussion: “Toyota: Driving the Mainstream Market to Purchase

Hybrid” by J. Saperstein and J. Nelson, Ivey Case 904A03, 3-Feb-2004. “As

Toyota’s focus on hybrid-electric technology is evolving from one product to the

full line of vehicles, the company’s challenge is to develop consumer attitude and

purchase intent, from an early adopter, niche market model into universal

mainstream acceptance.”

Oral Presentations and Final Projects

Begin oral presentations of final projects

Oral presentations of final projects

Finish oral presentations of final projects


Course Expectations


Assignments: If you are not in class when an assignment is scheduled to be handed in, you must

email the assignment to me prior to the relevant class period. If you miss a class, you are

required to get notes and other relevant information discussed during class from one of your

classmates. If you have any questions after you review the notes, you should schedule a time to

meet with me.

1. Readings: Students must read the assigned portions of the text as well as any additional

readings posted on Blackboard or provided in a course packet. From time to time, I may

provide you with additional readings or give you in class quizzes or exercises on the

readings.

2. Homework Assignments: In addition to the assigned readings which are essential for

classroom discussion, you will turn in three (3) case analysis papers. I will provide a

hand-out with the questions to be addressed in your analysis.

3. Mid-Term Exam: As a general rule, there will not be any make-up exams given for the

mid-term exams. Mid-term exams will be given in class and are closed book exams.

(Exceptions for serious illness with advance notice to the professor prior to the time of

exam administration and written doctor notes will be considered.) The mid-term exam for

this class will be an in-class team analysis which may include mini-cases where you will

need to apply the theories that you have learned in the readings to a hypothetical business

case.

4. Final Project: There will be a written final research project, which has an individual and

team component. You will also make an oral presentation on your paper in class with

your team member(s). I will provide more detail for this project and a list of suggested

topics. There will be interim deadlines for this final project to ensure your steady

progress over the semester.

Use of Blackboard: Additional material, including specific readings, handouts, problems, or

exercises will be posted on Blackboard throughout the semester. It is your responsibility to

access Blackboard to retrieve these materials. If you do not have computer and Internet access

that allows you to reach Blackboard, please speak to me so that we can arrange for you to get

course materials.

Use of Other Technology: Thou shalt be innovative in using technology in your education.

Thou shalt not tweet, mail, call, text, digit, live feed, surf, read, or indulge in any other

multimedia communication during class time, unless and only when it is relevant to class

material and content. All e-mail communication from the professor to the students will be sent to

the student’s official Baruch e-mail account.

Grading: Your final grade for this course will be computed as follows:

Class Contribution 25%

Homework: (N short papers) 20%

Mid-Term Exam:(essays/mini-cases) 20%


Final Research Project:(oral and written reports) 35%

It is of fundamental importance that the students come too class very well prepared on the case

study to be discussed. Students must read the

case study and come to

class ready

for an in-depth

discussion of the case

study. Class contribution accountss for 25% of f the final grade. Each student

will be directly involved in case discussions.

Students should read

the Zicklin School of Business Written and Oral Communication

Assessment Criteria, located in the Syllabus section of this course’s Blackboard site. Students are

additionally expected

to adhere to writing standards described in The

Little, Brown Writing

Handbook, (10 th edition) by Fowler and Aaron.

Materials:

1. Case Book (required): Paper copies of all case studies that require a royalty is available

for purchase from University Readers, San Diego, CA. Orderr online at

www.univers

sityreaders.com/students

by following these steps:

Delivery is 1 to 4 business days. Cost is approx. $70.

2. Additional Readings (required): Items from above reading list that do not require a

royalty (e.g., articles, corporate documents) will be available for download from the

Baruch Newman Library’s electronicc reserve system. See the

course Blackboard site

for

details.


3. Other Resources (optional): The professor will post on Blackboard a list of additional

books, articles, and videos which may be of interest to you, or may serve as a resource for

your final project.

Recording Policy: There is no audio/video recording of class sessions without prior approval by

the instructor.

Class Contribution: One-fourth of your overall grade is based on your class contribution. In a

case-based instructional environment, an important way that you learn is through discussions

with each other. To promote this, at the end of each class your contribution will be assessed on a

scale from 0 to 4, based on the following:

4 = Student added value to the lesson. Contributions indicate not only strong preparation

for class, but comments were also added significant value to discussions.

3 = Student contributed in class, and contributions either added value or indicated

preparation by the student, but not necessarily both.

2 = Student contributed to class, but contributions failed to show preparation or failed to

add value.

1 = Student attended class, but did not speak; no basis to know if student was prepared.

0 = Student absent from class.

Academic Integrity: Students are expected to know and adhere to the Baruch College

Academic Honesty Policy, found at

http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/academic/academic_honesty.html. It states, inter alia, that

Academic dishonesty is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Cheating, forgery,

plagiarism and collusion in dishonest acts undermine the college's educational mission

and the students' personal and intellectual growth. Baruch students are expected to bear

individual responsibility for their work, to learn the rules and definitions that underlie the

practice of academic integrity, and to uphold its ideals. Ignorance of the rules is not an

acceptable excuse for disobeying them. Any student who attempts to compromise or

devalue the academic process will be sanctioned.

I fully support Baruch College’s policy on Academic Honesty. Academic sanctions in this class

will range from an F on the assignment to an F in the course. A report of suspected academic

dishonesty will be sent to the Office of the Dean of Students.


ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

RECOMMENDATION TO ZICKLIN GRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

Department of Management, May 11, 2011

Part A: Academic Matters, Section AI: Changes in a Degree Program

AI.10.1 MBA in Operations Management (Concentration in Operations Management) (HEGIS CODE: 0506.00,

PROGRAM CODE: 01922 ): Changes in courses in concentration

FROM: Courses in Major (12 credits)

Required: Credits

MGT 9500 Management Science 3

MGT 9710 Quantitative Analysis for Service Management 3

MGT 9720 Service Management Strategies 3

Choose one course from:

MGT 9560 Management Information Systems 3

MGT 9730 Project Management: Strategic Design and Implementation 3

MGT 9740 Sustainability in Supply Chains and Operations 3

TO: Courses in Major (15 Credits)

Flexible Core Courses Required for Management (Concentration in Operations Management) Majors

ACC 9125 Managerial Accounting a 1.5

MGT 9704 Service Operations Management II b 1.5

Note: ACC 9125 and MGT 9704 will apply towards the maximum 18 credits that a student can take in their

MBA major.

continued


Part A: Academic Matters, Section AI: Changes in a Degree Program

AI.10.1 MBA in Operations Management (Concentration in Operations Management) (HEGIS CODE: 0506.00,

PROGRAM CODE: 01922 ): Changes in courses in concentration

Required: Credits

MGT 9500 Management Science 3

MGT 9710 Quantitative Analysis for Service Management 3

MGT 9720 Service Management Strategies 3

Choose one course from:

MGT 9560 Management Information Systems 3

MGT 9730 Project Management: Strategic Design and Implementation 3

MGT 9740 Sustainability in Supply Chains and Operations 3

OPR 9730 Simulation Modeling and Analysis 3

EXPLANATION:

a Managerial ACCT 9125 provides the toolset for analyzing fixed and variable costs, product costs, investment decisions, and

budgetary planning. In addition, coverage of variance analysis, transfer pricing and activity-based costing is indispensible for making

operating decisions in any business environment and this body knowledge cannot be provided in OM courses that constitute the major.

b MGT 9704 provides the essential foundation for making decisions that are based on tools and techniques that facilitate productivity

improvement and operational efficiency. In addition, this requirement establishes a 3-credit basis upon which the major will be built,

consistent with all other MBA concentrations in the ZSB.

c OPR 9730 provides a valuable tool set in simulation modeling that is relevant and useful in analyzing current operational business

processes and evaluating improvement alternatives.

Approved by the Department of Management Curriculum Committee; May 11, 2011.


ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

RECOMMENDATION TO GRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

Department of Statistics and Computer Information Systems, April, 2011

PART A:

Academic Matters, Section AII: New Courses

New course to be offered by the Department of Statistics and Computer Information Systems

AII.10.1

CIS 9001: Information Systems for Managers I

This course focuses on examining the role of Information Systems (IS) in organizations. Relationship between information systems,

competitive advantage, and organizational change are examined. The course focuses primarily on two components: (1) IS strategy,

and (2) Information Technology (IT) infrastructure. The course emphasizes the role of alignment between an organization’s business

and IS strategies. The course introduces basic components of IT infrastructure, highlighting the relationship between these

components and IS strategy. Case studies are used to reinforce the importance of Information Systems in organizations. 1.5 hours, 1.5

credits. Prerequisites: None. Not open to students who have completed CIS 9000.

EXPLANATION: This course is offered as part of the recently revised Baruch MBA program core curriculum. It will be offered every

semester and is expected to enroll 65 students per section.

Approved by the Department of Statistics and Computer Information Systems on March 15, 2011. Syllabus attached.


Instructor:

Department: CIS

E-Mail:

CIS 9001 – Information Systems for Managers I

Zicklin School of Business, Baruch College, CUNY

Syllabus

Office: Room

Phone:

1. Course Description

This course focuses on examining the role of Information Systems (IS) in organizations.

Relationship between information systems, competitive advantage, and organizational change are examined.

The course focuses primarily on two components: (1) IS strategy, and (2) Information Technology (IT)

infrastructure. The course emphasizes the role of alignment between an organization’s business and IS

strategies. The course introduces basic components of IT infrastructure, highlighting the relationship between

these components and IS strategy. Case studies are used to reinforce the importance of Information Systems

in organizations.

2. Learning Goals and Objectives

o Oral communication

• Students will be able to articulate orally the role and importance of information technology in

business

o Written communication

• Students will be able to prepare written reports that analyze the role and importance of

information technology in business

o

Information literacy

• Students will be able to draw from appropriate sources that are relevant to examining

Information Technology’s role in business and use the information drawn from such sources

suitably in developing their analyses.

o Technology literacy 2

• Students will be able to articulate the capabilities and limitations of information technology

• Students will be able to analyze the relationship between IT and business strategy

• Students will be able to articulate the managerial challenges in and solutions for implementing

and using IT systems

o

o

o

o

Ethical awareness

• Students will be able to analyze the role of ethics in deploying IT systems

Global awareness

• Students will be able to articulate the global role of Information Technology in shaping

businesses

Knowledge integration

• Students will be able to integrate several business disciplines and theories in analyzing the

impact of IT on business

Teamwork and leadership

• Students will develop experience in working in teams and in using the opportunity provided in

taking leadership roles


3. Course Material/Readings

Required Textbooks:

• Information Systems: A Manager’s Guide to Harnessing Technology—Version 1.1, by John

Gallaugher, Jul 2010, ISBN 13: 978-0-9823618-1-8, ISBN 13 Color: 978-1-936126-21-7.

• Adventures of an IT Leader, by Robert D. Austin, Richard L. Nolan, and Shannon O'Donnell,

Harvard Business Press (April 21, 2009), ISBN-10: 142214660X, ISBN-13: 978-1422146606.

Cases: Cases that are needed for this course are identified on the schedule page.

4. Grading

Mid-term exam 30%

Final exam 30%

Case write-ups 15%

Project report 15%

Class participation 10%

5. Course Website

All course material, including the syllabus, schedule, assignment instructions, announcements, will

be posted on blackboard. You are expected to check the course website on blackboard at least twice a week.

6. Case analyses

• Case analyses should be completed in teams of 4-5 students each.

• Each group will prepare written analyses for two cases.

• Cases will be assigned to student teams by the instructor.

• Each team member is required to contribute his/her fair share of work for each deliverable that

requires teamwork. The instructor reserves the right to ask for percentage of work contribution

by each team member for all deliverables.

• Please refer to detailed instructions provided on blackboard for preparing case write-ups.

• Each student should come to class prepared to analyze and discuss the case (the schedule page

identifies when cases are scheduled to be discussed).

7. Project

The course project should be completed in teams of 4-5 students each. These are usually the same

teams that are created for case analyses. The project involves preparing a report on a topic relevant to the

course. Refer to blackboard for detailed instructions for the project.

8. Class Participation

Students will be expected to develop compelling ideas and articulate them well in the classroom. Your

class participation grade will depend on the substantive contributions and insights you bring to the

discussion. Assigned readings should be read before each class session so that you are well prepared to

discuss relevant issues and questions.

Class participation is especially critical during case discussions. You will be expected to thoroughly

prepare for and actively participate in each case discussion. I will randomly call on students to discuss and

answer questions about the case.


9. Academic Integrity Statement

The CIS Department fully supports Baruch College's policy on Academic Honesty, which states, in

part: "Academic dishonesty is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Cheating, forgery, plagiarism, and

collusion in dishonest acts undermine the college's educational mission and the students' personal and

intellectual growth. Baruch students are expected to bear individual responsibility for their work and to

uphold the ideal of academic integrity. Any student who attempts to compromise or devalue the academic

process will be sanctioned." Additional information can be found at

http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/academic/academic_honesty.html. Deliverables that are required to be

completed individually should not involve collaboration with other students. Deliverables that are required

to be completed in a team should not involve collaboration across teams. Unauthorized collaborative work

will result in appropriate disciplinary action. Academic sanctions in this class will range from a grade of F on

the assignment to a grade of F in the course. A report of suspected academic dishonesty will be sent to the

Office of the Dean of Students.

10. Course Coordinator

Prof. Michael Palley

E-mail: mpalley@baruch.cuny.edu

Phone: 646.312.3362

Office: B11-229

Please note that this syllabus is subject to change.


Class Outline

Week Topics Sub-topics Readings

IS Strategy

1. Introduction

to IS

• What is IS?

• IT Interaction model

2. IS Strategy • Alignment with business strategy

• IT-enabled value chain

• Porter’s five forces model and IT

• Resource-based view and IT

3. IS Strategy • Virtual integration

• Supply chain management, JIT

• Commoditization of IT

• IT-enabled innovations

• Syllabus

• G-1

• “The IT Interaction Model: An Overview”, by Silver, Markus &

Beath

• G-1

4. CASE: Zara • Supply chain management • G-2

5. IS Strategy • Cost and value of IT

• IT asset classes

• Organizational ambidexterity and IT

6. CASE:

Netflix

• Supply chain management

• Managing customer relationship

• Long tail

• G-2

• “The Power of Virtual Integration: An Interview with Dell

Computer’s Michael Dell” by Joan Magretta, Harvard Business

Review

• “IT Doesn’t Matter”, by Carr, HBS

• G-3

• A-4, 5, 8

• “Generating Premium Return on Your IT Investments”, Weill and

Aral, MIT Sloan Management Review

• “The Ambidextrous Organization”, by O’Reilly and Tushman,

Harvard Business Review

G-4


Week Topics Sub-topics Readings

Information Technology Management

7. IT Infrastructure • Hardware

• Moore’s law

• Technology for the bottom of the pyramid

• Emerging technologies

8. Midterm exam

9. IT Infrastructure • Software

• Cloud computing

• Open source software

10. IT Infrastructure • Evolution of IT

11. IT Infrastructure • Networking

• Internet architecture

• Mobile computing

12. IT Infrastructure • IT project risks

• Build vs. buy vs. rent

• Systems development process

13. CASE: Jharna Software –

The move to agile methods

• Agile vs. traditional development

G-5

G-9

G-10

G-12

A 6, 7, 14

“The one minute risk assessment tool” by Tiwana and

Keil, Communications of the ACM

“Myths and paradoxes in Japanese IT offshoring” by

Tiwana et al., Communications of the ACM

HBS

14. IT Infrastructure • Database management G-11

Final Exam


ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

RECOMMENDATION TO GRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

Department of Statistics and Computer Information Systems, April, 2011

PART A:

Academic Matters, Section AII: New Courses

New course to be offered by the Department of Statistics and Computer Information Systems

AII.10.1

CIS 9002: Information Systems for Managers II—Managing and Harnessing Technology

This course examines how organizations can leverage information technologies to create business value. The course is relevant to all

business majors. With a central focus on Information Systems (IS) strategy, the course examines how organizations can harness

innovation and emerging technologies to support business goals. Case studies are used to emphasize practical applications. This is the

second of a sequence of two courses that introduce students to Information Systems strategy. 1.5 hours, 1.5 credits. Prerequisite:

CIS9001. Not open to students who have completed CIS 9000.

EXPLANATION: This course is offered as part of the “flexible core” offerings in the recently revised Baruch MBA program core

curriculum. It will be offered every semester and is expected to enroll 65 students per section.

Approved by the Department of Statistics and Computer Information Systems on March 15, 2011. Syllabus attached.


CIS 9002--Information Systems for Managers II: Managing and Harnessing Technology

Zicklin School of Business, Baruch College, CUNY

Syllabus

Instructor:

Department: CIS

E-Mail:

Office: Room

Phone:

1. Course Description

This course examines how organizations can leverage information technologies to create business value. The

course is relevant to all business majors. With a central focus on Information Systems (IS) strategy, the

course examines how organizations can harness innovation and emerging technologies to support business

goals. Case studies are used to emphasize practical applications. This is the second of a sequence of two

courses that introduce students to Information Systems strategy.

2. Learning Goals and Objectives

- Information and Technology Literacy:

• Students will be able to analyze the impact of current developments in information technologies

on business strategy

• Students will be able to articulate the managerial challenges involved in providing IT services in

organizations

- Global Awareness:

• Students will be able to evaluate the opportunities presented by IT for businesses to compete on a

global scale

- Communication:

• Students will be able to illustrate their arguments in written reports and oral presentations by

analyzing business case studies related to Information Systems in organizations

- Ethical Awareness:

• Students will assess ethical considerations regarding the use of IT in organizations on issues such

as privacy, data security, and technology-based competitive tactics.

3. Course Material/Readings

Required Textbooks:

• Information Systems: A Manager’s Guide to Harnessing Technology—Version 1.1, by John

Gallaugher, Jul 2010, ISBN 13: 978-0-9823618-1-8, ISBN 13 Color: 978-1-936126-21-7.

• Adventures of an IT Leader, by Robert D. Austin, Richard L. Nolan, and Shannon O'Donnell,

Harvard Business Press (April 21, 2009), ISBN-10: 142214660X, ISBN-13: 978-1422146606.

Cases: Cases that are needed for this course are identified on the schedule page.

4. Grading

Mid-term exam 30%

Final exam 30%

Case write-ups 15%

Project report 15%

Class participation 10%

5.Course Website

All course material, including the syllabus, schedule, assignment instructions, announcements, will

be posted on blackboard. You are expected to check the course website on blackboard at least twice a week.


6. Case analyses

• Case analyses should be completed in teams of 4-5 students each.

• Each group will prepare written analyses for two cases.

• Cases will be assigned to student teams by the instructor.

• Each team member is required to contribute his/her fair share of work for each deliverable that

requires teamwork. The instructor reserves the right to ask for percentage of work contribution

by each team member for all deliverables.

• Please refer to detailed instructions provided on blackboard for preparing case write-ups.

• Each student should come to class prepared to analyze and discuss the case (the schedule page

identifies when cases are scheduled to be discussed).

7.Project

The course project should be completed in teams of 4-5 students each. These are usually the same

teams that are created for case analyses. The project involves preparing a report on a topic relevant to the

course and making a presentation. Refer to blackboard for detailed instructions for the project.

8.Class Participation

Students will be expected to develop compelling ideas and articulate them well in the classroom. Your

class participation grade will depend on the substantive contributions and insights you bring to the

discussion. Assigned readings should be read before each class session so that you are well prepared to

discuss relevant issues and questions.

Class participation is especially critical during case discussions. You will be expected to thoroughly

prepare for and actively participate in each case discussion. I will randomly call on students to discuss and

answer questions about the case.

9.Academic Integrity Statement

The CIS Department fully supports Baruch College's policy on Academic Honesty, which states, in

part: "Academic dishonesty is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Cheating, forgery, plagiarism, and

collusion in dishonest acts undermine the college's educational mission and the students' personal and

intellectual growth. Baruch students are expected to bear individual responsibility for their work and to

uphold the ideal of academic integrity. Any student who attempts to compromise or devalue the academic

process will be sanctioned." Additional information can be found at

http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/academic/academic_honesty.html. Deliverables that are required to be

completed individually should not involve collaboration with other students. Deliverables that are required

to be completed in a team should not involve collaboration across teams. Unauthorized collaborative work

will result in appropriate disciplinary action. Academic sanctions in this class will range from a grade of F on

the assignment to a grade of F in the course. A report of suspected academic dishonesty will be sent to the

Office of the Dean of Students.

10.Course Coordinator

Prof. Michael Palley

E-mail: mpalley@baruch.cuny.edu

Phone: 646.312.3362

Office: B11-229

Please note that this syllabus is subject to change.


Managing Emerging IS Issues and

Technologies

Managing Digital

Platforms

Week Sub-topics Readings

1 Introduction Managing with Technology A-1, 2, 3

2 Commoditization of Business Processes Standardization of Business Processes

Pressures towards Commoditization

When to Standardize (Taking Competitive Strategy into Account)?

Case: Standardization and Innovation

3 Introduction to Offshoring and

Outsourcing

4 Managing New Technologies and

Vendors

5

Emerging Technologies I

Difference between Offshoring and Outsourcing

Control and Coordination Issues

Backsourcing

Managing Outsourcing: Ethical Considerations

Case: Emerging Technology

Case: Vendor Partnering

Shifting Alliances: Competition and Collaboration

Open Source Software

Emerging Wireless Technologies

Mobile Computing

Trends in Business Intelligence

6 Emerging Technologies II Cloud computing, Utility and Grid Computing

Software as a Service (SaaS), Virtualization

When Regulation Lags Technology: Thin Line Between the Legal and

the Ethical

7

8

9

10

Introduction to Digital Platforms I

Introduction to Digital Platforms I

Managing Digital Platforms

Search and online advertising

Network Effects

One-sided, Two-sided and Multi-sided platforms

Managing Partners/Competitors in Digital Platforms

Case Analysis: Google Android

Comparing Technology Strategies and Tactics of Google, Microsoft

and Apple in the Mobile Market

Social Graphs

Facebook as a Platform

Understanding and Leveraging Search Engines

Introduction to Online Advertising

A-16

Notes

A-13; A-14

G-10.1-10.5

HBS

G-10.6-10.11

G-6

HBS

G-8

A-13

G-14


11

IS Governance I

Understanding the case for IS Value

Case: IT Priorities

Case: IT and the Board of Directors

A-8, 9

Other Critical Issues

12

13

14

IS Governance II

IS Security

IS Privacy

IT Service Management: What Managers should know about ITIL

IT Audit, Regulatory and Ethical issues

Common Security Threats (Social Engineering, Software

Weaknesses, Network vulnerabilities)

Security Solutions; Emerging Threats

Case: IVK: Crisis and Damage

Information Aggregation Industry: Opportunities and Concerns

Online Information Privacy Vs Offline Information Privacy

Privacy Threats and Solutions

Disclosure and Legal Liability Issues: Ethics and the Law

Case: ChoicePoint

Notes

G13

A-10. A-11

WSJ: What They

Know

HBS

Notes

Final Exam


ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

RECOMMENDATION TO GRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

Department of Statistics and Computer Information Systems, April, 2011

PART A:

Academic Matters, Section AII: New Courses

New course to be offered by the Department of Statistics and Computer Information Systems

AII.10.1

CIS 9xxx: Sustainability and IT

This course examines the relationship between Information Technology and sustainability. Students will be introduced to different

theories and practices pertaining to business, Information Technology, and sustainability. The course examines both ‘greening of IT’

and ‘greening by IT’. Greening of IT refers to the impact of information systems on the environment including challenges such as

carbon footprint of information systems and e-waste. Greening by IT refers to IT-enabled solutions that focus on reducing green-house

gas emissions. 3 hours, 3 credits. Prerequisites: None.

EXPLANATION: The course will be offered once a year. It is expected to enroll approximately 35 students. This course was offered

as a special topics course during spring 2011 and attracted an enrollment of 33 students. The mean enrollment of graduate courses

offered by the Department of Statistics and Computer Information Systems was 30.

Approved by the Department of Statistics and Computer Information Systems Faculty, March 15, 2011. Syllabus attached.


CIS 9xxx: Sustainability and IT

Zicklin School of Business, Baruch College, CUNY

Instructor:

Department:

E-Mail:

Office: NVC

Phone:

Office Hours:

1.Course Description

This course examines the relationship between Information Technology and sustainability. Students will be

introduced to different theories and practices pertaining to business, Information Technology, and

sustainability. The course examines both ‘greening of IT’ and ‘greening by IT’. Greening of IT refers to the

impact of information systems on the environment including challenges such as carbon footprint of

information systems and e-waste. Greening by IT refers to IT-enabled solutions that focus on reducing greenhouse

gas emissions.

2.Learning Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

• Analyze the impact of IT on the environment

• Assess the business value of green IT

• Examine the relationship between IT, sustainability, and business strategy

• Assess energy needs of IT

• Identify challenges in reducing the environmental impact of IT

• Develop solutions that will help reduce environmental impact of IT

• Suggest the use of IT solutions to reduce green-house gas emissions

• Assess the impact of and discuss solutions to address issues related to e-waste

3.Learning Goals Addressed

MBA Learning Goals

• Information and Technology literacy: In examining the relationship between Information

Technology and sustainability, the course presents IT-based solutions to address

challenges to sustainability. Students will be able to develop recommendations for ITbased

solutions to address sustainability challenges.

• Ethical awareness: The course raises ethical awareness by presenting issues that require

ethical decision making (such as electronic waste and its adverse health impact).

• Communication, Teamwork, and leadership: The course requires the completion of a

project that involves student presentations and development of a written report that

involves group work.

• Global awareness: Presenting the challenges in sustainability pertaining to Information

Technology as a global issue rather than a localized issue (by including examples and case

studies that involve multiple stakeholders distributed globally), the course raises global

awareness.

• Information Literacy: The course requires students to prepare written reports as part of

their project. The project involves performing library research. Students should be able to

select appropriate sources, examine the credibility of the sources, search for relevant

publications, and draw upon those publications to develop their analyses in their projects.

• Knowledge integration: The course expects students to integrate knowledge from various

business disciplines, including other areas of Information systems in analyzing concepts

pertaining to sustainability and IT.


Sustainability Program Learning Goals

• The mutuality of community and business needs: The course examines the relationship

between both environmental and social sustainability and Information Technology.

Through examples and case studies, the course emphasizes the critical role that IT can

potentially play in enabling or inhibiting both areas of sustainability.

• Environmental, social and governance issues: The course focuses on organizational issues

involved in implementing both environmental and social sustainability issues pertaining to

Information Technology.

• Best practices of sustainable firms: The course presents various solutions that have been

identified in practice, that focus on reducing IT infrastructure’s carbon footprint and in

using IT to reduce carbon footprint of other business functions.

4.Course Material/Readings

Required Textbooks:

1. Lawrence Webber and Michael Wallace, “Green Tech: How to Plan and Implement Sustainable IT

Solutions,” AMACOM, 2009, ISBN-10: 081441446X/ISBN-13: 978-0814414460.

2. Thomas L. Friedman, “Hot, Flat, and Crowded 2.0: Why We Need a Green Revolution--and How It

Can Renew America”, Picador, 2009, ISBN-10: 0312428928/ ISBN-13: 978-0312428921.

Recommended Books:

1. Toby Velte, Anthony Velte, Robert Elsenpeter, “Green IT: Reduce Your Information System's

Environmental Impact While Adding to the Bottom Line”, McGraw-Hill Osborne Media, 2008,

ISBN-10: 0071599231/ISBN-13: 978-0071599238 (available as an e-book through our library).

2. Gary Hird, “Green IT in Practice: How One Company is Approaching the Greening of its IT,” IT

Governance, 2008, ISBN:9781905356614 (available as an e-book through our library).

3. Greg Schulz, “The Green and Virtual Data Center,” Auerbach Publications, 2009,

ISBN:9781420086669 (available as an e-book through our library).

4. George Spafford, “The Governance of Green IT: The Role of Processes in Reducing Data Center

Energy Requirements,” IT Governance, 2008, ISBN:9781905356744 (available as an e-book through

our library).

Articles:

Journal and trade press articles relevant to green IT will be provided during the course of the semester as part

of the list of readings. Links to such articles will be provided in the schedule page accessible through

blackboard and/or via the E-Reserve page at our library.

Cases:

The course schedule lists several cases that the students are expected to purchase directly from the case

publisher, read ahead of the class session when the case is scheduled to be discussed, and discuss in class.

5.Course Deliverables and Grade Distribution

Deliverables

Points

Project report + presentation 400

Case analyses 200

Final Exam 200

Participation (Class discussion + Wiki) 200

TOTAL 1000


6.General Course Policies

6.1 Case analyses and Project

All case analyses and the project are completed in teams of four students each. Due dates shown in

the course schedule will be strictly enforced. Late submissions will not be accepted. If you miss any classes

during which we complete any partial work on any of the deliverables, you will lose the points for the parts

you missed.

Links to instructions for all deliverables will be available through blackboard. Unless otherwise

stated, all deliverables will be submitted through the ‘Assignments’ section in blackboard (no printed

copies). Each team member is required to contribute his/her fair share of work for each deliverable that

requires teamwork. The instructor reserves the right to ask for percentage of work contribution by each team

member for all deliverables. Work distribution should be done within each team for each deliverable rather

than across deliverables. In other words, team members should contribute equally towards the development

of each of the deliverables listed in this syllabus.

6.2 Class Participation, Attendance and Student performance

Students are expected to attend all classes. If one or more classes are missed, it is the student's

responsibility to determine the specific material covered during their absence and make the necessary

arrangements for making up what is missed. Class discussion is strongly encouraged. Your class

participation grade will depend on how much you contribute to in-class discussions. No direct credit shall be

awarded just for attendance. Assigned readings should be read before each class session. This course

requires continuous commitment of students both inside and outside of the classroom.

Case analysis and discussions are a critical component of the course. Students are expected to read the

cases before the corresponding class sessions and be well prepared to discuss the cases in class. In addition to

participating in in-class discussions, students are also expected to contribute to the course Wiki. Instructions

for contributing to the Wiki will be provided on blackboard.

Please note that this syllabus is subject to change. Changes will be notified through blackboard.

6.3 Academic Integrity Statement

The CIS Department fully supports Baruch College's policy on Academic Honesty, which states, in part:

"Academic dishonesty is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Cheating, forgery, plagiarism, and collusion

in dishonest acts undermine the college's educational mission and the students' personal and intellectual

growth. Baruch students are expected to bear individual responsibility for their work and to uphold the ideal

of academic integrity. Any student who attempts to compromise or devalue the academic process will be

sanctioned." Additional information can be found at

http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/academic/academic_honesty.html. Deliverables that are required to be

completed individually should not involve collaboration with other students. Deliverables that are required

to be completed in a team should not involve collaboration across teams. Unauthorized collaborative work

will result in appropriate disciplinary action. Academic sanctions in this class will range from a grade of F on

the assignment to a grade of F in the course. A report of suspected academic dishonesty will be sent to the

Office of the Dean of Students.


Tentative Schedule

Week Topics and Links to Slides Readings Deliverables/milestones

1. Course Introduction

What is sustainability and why is it important?

“Green IT: More than a three percent solution?”

Stephen Ruth, IEEE Internet Computing, July/August

2009

2. Making the business case for Green IT

**CASE: “Green IT matters at Wipro LTD”, Indranil

Bose & R. Chandrasekhar, Asia Case Research Centre,

The University of Hong Kong, 2009.

3. Climate change and its impact: Role of IT

“My IT carbon footprint”, Kirk W. Cameron, IEEE

Computer, November 2009.

4. Basics about energy

Business of Green

“Competitive Environmental Strategies: When does it

pay to be green?” Renato Orsato, California

Management Review, 48(2), 2006.

“Why sustainability is now the key driver of innovation”

Ram Nidumolu, C. K. Prahalad, M. R. Rangaswami,

Harvard Business Review, September 2009.

“Smart appliances learning to save power grid”,

MSNBC.com, November 26, 2007.

5. Standards, regulations, and initiatives

“America’s Green Strategy”, Michael Porter (in Business

and the Environment, (eds.) Richard Welford and

Richard Starkey, Taylor and Francis, 1996.

“Green Rankings: The 2009 List”, Newsweek

“Negotiators at climate talks face deep set of fault lines”,

Tom Zeller, New York Times, December 5, 2009.

6. **CASE: Corporate Greenhouse Gas Accounting:

Carbon Footprint Analysis, Case: UVA-ENT-0113,

Darden Business Publishing, 2009

**CASE: Carbon credit markets, Case: UVA-F-1583,

Darden Business Publishing, 2009.

7. Global view

“China builds high wall to guard energy industry” New

York Times, July 13, 2009.

“China racing ahead of US in the drive to go solar”,

New York Times, August 24, 2009.

Syllabus

WW 1

F 1 & 2

E-Reserve

WW 3

ACRC

F 5, 6, & 7

E-Reserve

WW 4, 5, 6

F 9, 10, & 11

E-Reserve

WW 2

F 12

F 3, 4, 8, & 13

8. Virtualization WW 10

Student profile

Team member List

Project conception (initial report)

Case analysis reports

9. Green data centers

“HP rethinks energy”, Forbes, August 17, 2009.

WW 11


Tentative Schedule

Week Topics and Links to Slides Readings Deliverables/milestones

“Novel way to cool data centers passes first test”,

ComputerWorld, September 10, 2009.

“Feds hand out $47million in grants for green data

centers”, Jeffrey Burt, e-Week.com, January 6, 2010.

10. Greening with IT: IT solutions to reduce carbon footprint

Green supply chain

United Nations Environment Program

“Energy scoreboards: Designed for the home”, New

York Times, February 27, 2010.

“Tagging Technology to Track Trash”, Jonathan Fildes,

BBC News, July 14, 2009.

“Researchers track 3000 pieces of Seattle trash”, The

Seattle Times, September 13, 2009.

“Climate wizard”, The Engineer, December 17, 2009.

“University of Minnesota computer scientists to help

track global climate change through new data mining

tools”, University of Minnesota, December 15, 2009.

11. Fortune at the bottom of the pyramid

**CASE: E+Co and Tecnosol, Department of Corporate

Strategy and International Business, University of

Michigan.

E-waste

Ethical considerations in managing electronic waste

“Smuggling Europe’s waste to poorer countries”,

September 26, 2009, New York Times.

**CASE: The European Recycling Platform: Promoting

Competition in E-Waste Recycling, Case: GS67-PDF-

ENG, Harvard Business Publishing, 2009.

12. Research in Green IT

“Assessing Green IT Initiatives Using the Balanced

Scorecard,” Radhika Jain, Raquel Benbunan-Fich, and

Kannan Mohan, IEEE IT Professional (forthcoming).

“Unpacking Green IT: A Review of the Existing

Literature,” Stoney Brooks, Xuequn Wang, and Saonee

Sarker, Americas Conference on Information Systems,

2010.

“Identifying Green IT Leaders with Financial and

Environmental Performance Indicators,” Yong Seog

Kim and Myung Ko, Americas Conference on

Information Systems, 2010.

“Green Business and Online Price Premiums: Will

Consumers Pay More to Purchase from Environmentally

Friendly Technology Companies,” Robert D. St. Louis

and Joseph A. Cazier, Americas Conference on

Information Systems, 2010.

WW 7, 12, 14

WW 8, 9

HBS

E-Reserve

13. Project presentations


Tentative Schedule

Week Topics and Links to Slides Readings Deliverables/milestones

14. Project presentations

15. Final Exam

Acronyms used above:

WW – Chapters from Webber and Wallace

F – Chapters from Friedman

Darden – Case from Darden Business Publishing, University of Virginia

HBS – Case from Harvard Business Publishing

ACRC – Asia Case Research Center, The University of Hong Kong


ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

RECOMMENDATION TO ZICKLIN GRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

Department of Statistics and Computer Information Systems

March 15, 2011

Part A: Academic Matters, Section AI: Changes in a Degree Program

AI.10.1 MBA in Information Systems (HEGIS CODE: 070100, PROGRAM CODE: 01936): Changes in

courses in major

FROM: Courses in Major (12 credits)

Information Technologies Courses (6 credits) Credits

Choose two of the following Information Technologies courses:

CIS 9340 Principles of Database Management Systems 3

CIS 9444 e-Business Principles and Technologies * 3

CIS 9350 Networks and Telecommunications 3

CIS 9490 Systems Analysis and Design 3

CIS 9550 Emerging Trends in Information Technologies * 3

CIS 9556: Risk Management Systems 3

CIS 9590 Information Systems Development Project 3

CIS 9771 Special Topics in Information Technologies 3

Information Systems Strategy Courses (6 credits)

Choose two of the following Information Systems Strategy courses:

CIS 9230 Globalization and Technology + 3

CIS 9444 e-Business Principles and Technologies * 3

CIS 9550 Emerging Trends in Information Technologies * 3

CIS 9555 Information Technology in Financial Markets 3

CIS 9556: Risk Management Systems 3

CIS 9700 Integrating Information Technology and Business Processes 3

CIS 9775 Special Topics in Information Systems Strategy 3

Students are welcome to construct an alternate program of 9000-Level CIS courses with the permission of the CIS graduate advisor.

+ CIS 9230 is also on the list of international business elective choices.

* Course may be used as either an ‘Information Technologies’ course or an ‘Information Systems Strategy’ course.


Part A: Academic Matters, Section AI: Changes in a Degree Program

AI.10.1 MBA in Information Systems (HEGIS CODE: 070100, PROGRAM CODE: 01936): Changes in

courses in major

TO: Courses in Major (13.5 credits)

Flexible Core Course Required for IS majors (1.5 credits) Credits

CIS 9002 Information Systems for Managers II 1.5

Note: CIS 9002 will apply towards the maximum 18 credits that students can take in their major.

Information Technologies Courses (6 credits)

Choose two of the following Information Technologies courses:

CIS 9340 Principles of Database Management Systems 3

CIS 9444 e-Business Principles and Technologies * 3

CIS 9350 Networks and Telecommunications 3

CIS 9467 Business Modeling with Spreadsheets 3

CIS 9480: Information Technology Project Management 3

CIS 9490 Systems Analysis and Design 3

CIS 9556: Risk Management Systems * 3

CIS 9590 Information Systems Development Project 3

CIS 9771 Special Topics in Information Technologies 3

Information Systems Strategy Courses (6 credits)

Choose two of the following Information Systems Strategy courses:

CIS 9230 Globalization and Technology 3

CIS 9444 e-Business Principles and Technologies * 3

CIS 9555 Information Technology in Financial Markets 3

CIS 9556: Risk Management Systems 3

CIS 9700 Integrating Information Technology and Business Processes 3

CIS 9xxx Sustainability and IT 3

CIS 9775 Special Topics in Information Systems Strategy 3

Students are welcome to construct an alternate program of 9000-Level CIS courses with the permission of the CIS graduate advisor.

* Course may be used as either an ‘Information Technologies’ course or an ‘Information Systems Strategy’ course.


Part A: Academic Matters, Section AI: Changes in a Degree Program

AI.10.1 MBA in Information Systems (HEGIS CODE: 070100, PROGRAM CODE: 01936): Changes in

courses in major

EXPLANATION: This change conforms to the new MBA program adopted by the Zicklin School of Business in Spring 2010, plus

updates the course offerings from the Department of Statistics and Computer Information Systems:

Required Course: We are requiring CIS 9002 Information Systems for Managers II as a ‘flexible core’ course for MBA/IS majors.

This is to ensure that IS majors take three credits of foundation material in IS, which is consistent with the MBA requirements of the

other major business disciplines.

Electives: We have modified the elective offerings of the program:

• We have dropped CIS 9550 Emerging Trends in Information Technologies because it is redundant; CIS 9771 Special Topics in

Information Technologies and CIS 9775 Special Topics in Information Systems Strategy serve the same purpose;

• We have added two existing courses to the list of electives. These courses have been either revised or created since the last

time the MBA/IS was revised, but were not added to the MBA at the time of the course adoptions: CIS 9467 Business

Modeling with Spreadsheets, and CIS 9480: Information Technology Project Management;

• We are adding a brand new course, CIS9xxx: Sustainability and IT, to the choice of electives.

Approved by the Department of Statistics and Computer Information Systems, March 15, 2011.

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