Views
6 months ago

Albemarle Tradewinds August 2015 Web Final

August 2015

Frisco Native American

Frisco Native American Museum One of the “in-progress” exhibits at the Frisco Native American Museum & Natural History Center is the display of Native American Police Tribal Patches. While the collection numbers over fifty patches, the exhibit is considered a work in progress because the museum is always seeking new items for the display. Although tribal police historically held a variety of titles, the best known may be the lighthorsemen. In the late 1700’s, some tribes had no organized law enforcement structure and were subject to police hired by United States Indian agents. However, other tribes such as the Cherokee, had well-developed systems of tribal laws and tribal courts. Their system included regulatory companies of mounted horsemen organized to deal primarily with horse and property theft. Over time, the companies gradually became known as the “Lighthorsemen,” and their authority was expanded to include more serious crimes. The name was also adopted by the Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole. The Lighthorsemen were generally organized into companies and responsible for different districts. In most cases, individuals were required to provide their own horse and weapon. When the tribes lost their native lands in the late 19th century, a number of tribes continued to use the Lighthorsemen name for elements of their police forces. In the twenty-first century, the Bureau of Indian Affairs provides law enforcement assistance for tribes without a reservation or police department; however, generally police are hired and supervised by a tribal council and given responsibility for protecting residents and visitors to the reservation. As expected, their patches range widely in design and symbols, and the museum always welcomes new donations. The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday and is located on Hatteras island in Frisco. For more information, visit the web site at www.nativeamericanmuseum.org or call 252-995-4440. Albemarle Tradewinds has never required contracts from it’s clients. 24 Albemarle Tradewinds August 2015 albemarletradewinds.com

Historical Events during the Month of August By: Wanda Lassiter, Curator, Museum of the Albemarle The month of August has quite a few events with anniversaries. August 4 marks the birthday of the United States Coast Guard as well as George Durant’s 1661 purchase of property in Perquimans County from Cisketando, a Yeopim Indian chief. On August 4, 1790 Plymouth was established as a port of delivery through the United States Congress. Barrels of tar, corn and rice, and hogsheads of tobacco were carried through this port bound for the West Indies. On August 7, 1888 the Trustees of Corner Stone Baptist Church purchased land on South Martin Street in Elizabeth City. Colonel Edward Moseley purchased a lot on the “Town of Queen Anne’s Creek” on August 12, 1714. This town later became known as Edenton. A few days later, but a few years before, Virginia Dare is born on Roanoke Island on August 18, 1587. Annie S. Barkwell married James C. Abbott on August 26, 1932, in Elizabeth City. After the marriage, James operated R. C. Abbott Company, the local John Deere farm equipment dealer. Visit the Museum’s newest exhibit I DO! Weddings in the Albemarle, 1831-2015, to view the Juliet cap and ring bearer’s pillow used at their wedding. Aftershocks from the 7.3 magnitude earthquake that hit Charleston, South Carolina were reported in Perquimans, Northampton, Dare, and Hyde Counties on August 31, 1886. Reports also stated that the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse was swaying due to the aftershocks and buildings in the regions suffered from cracked plaster walls and chimneys. The Northampton County Courthouse in Jackson reported damage to the exterior walls. Total damage was approximately $5.5 million, roughly $112 in today’s standards. Cuba, Chicago, and Boston were also reported to feel the aftershocks. Credit Card Knife Available at River City Computers! Only $1.50 Great to have in your wallet for that emergency situation. Folds up like a credit card and unfolds into a knife. Plastic and Stainless Steel. 2525620987 facebook.com/AlbemarleTradingPost Albemarle Tradewinds August 2015 25