360 GRADI MAGAZINE // March-April 2021

360.gradi.magazine

360 GRADI Magazine is the trendy, elegant, refined, and sophisticated publishing about Second Life (the virtual world by Linden Lab).
Out every two months.

360 GRADI

Magazine

ARTIST

CIOTTOLINA XUE

Art

Ciottolina Xue’s 3D art is known

and appreciated for her strong

communication ability.

LA “DOLCE

VITA”

OF ARNOO

CONSCIOUSNESS

AS CONTROLLED

HALLUCINATION

Psychology

What enables us to distinguish

ourselves from the world around

us? Let’s explore the concept of

consciousness.

Photography

SOUL OF DREAMS

Dream destination, perfect for

Destinations

photographers since it allows rez by

joining the group.

360 GRADI

MARCH/APRIL 2021 - N. 4

1


CONTENT

16

Creating

TIP & TRICKS:

HOW TO CREATE

DRESSES IN SL

clothes seems

to be more complicated

than it actually is because

of unclear, rushed

tutorials that take some

steps for granted. My first

two tutorials.

20

What

CONSCIOUSNESS

AS CONTROLLED

HALLUCINATION

is

consciousness

and what function

does it play in our

existence?

46

The

SOUL OF

DREAMS

magic of a dream

land. Let’s explore it

through Pino’s eyes.

74

A

LOST LAGOON

land that takes

us back to the past,

to a way of living

on a human scale

that we risk losing.

Let’s explore it with

Serena Domenici.

98

3D

CIOTTOLINA

XUE

artist appreciated

and known for

her ability to

communicate her

emotions and

thoughts through

a skillful use of

modeling.

126

Vocalist

ASAHRA

LANNOK

and vocal

teacher, she founded

a major academy for

learning the singing

profession.

142 Spartan

TMD EVENT

introduces

us to the world of

men’s fashion and

recommends TMD

events for the best

buys.

154

He

ARNOO

PLANER

likes to playfully

call himself

“paparazzo”. He is a

photographer who

is especially skilled

in portraiture that

catches the eye of

the beholder.

174

CAMP

ITALIA

Camp Italia is an

educational land,

which aims to train

new users of SL. It

proposes different

cultural contents.

360 GRADI MAGAZINE is the magazine that covers Second Life at 360°. Destinations, Art, Music, Fashion, Photography, Furniture and Decoration

all in one bimonthly magazine. You can read the magazine on the web, visiting our YUMPU page.

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Welcome to issue #4 of 360 GRADI MAGAZINE.

74 126 142

LOST LAGOON

ASAHRA

LANNOK

TMD EVENT

A land that takes us back

in time, to a way of life

more on a human scale.

Professional vocalist who

founded a major vocal

school in SL.

In the men’s fashion

industry, Spartan

introduces us to what’s

trending.

WELCOME

Welcome to issue #4 of the magazine.

In this fourth issue 360GRADI introduces

several new contributors that you can get

to know in the editor’s notes and explore

while reading.

I am very pleased with their entrance,

their presence enriches the magazine

and allows us to propose better and richer

content. Each one brings his experience

and professionalism in his specific

area of expertise.

Enjoy reading!

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TEAM

LADMILLA VAN FRANK

PINO

JARLA

ART

MUSIC

DESTINATIONS

DESTINATIONS

PHOTOGRAPHY

Artist and Owner of THE

EDGE Gallery.

Dj , Designer and Architect

Planning.

Art and destination blogger at

Art Korner Blog.

Art critic, journalist and editor.

Photographer.

OEMA

EDITOR

Founder of VIRTUALITY blog

and 360GRADI Magazine.

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VIOLET

DEGOYA

SPARTAN

ASHLEY

MARKETING

PSYCHOLOGY

MALE

FASHION

FEMALE

FASHION

Social Media Marketing

Expert.

Psychiatrist.

Photographer, former blogger

and expert in the fashion

industry.

Fashion Blogger.

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EDITORS’ NOTES

We have reached the fourth issue of 360GRADI Magazine.

This issue is full of exciting news, mainly thanks to the entry in the

360GRADI Team of four new collaborators that I am sure you will

appreciate very much.

This issue is full of

interesting news,

especially thanks

to the entry in

the 360GRADI

team of three new

contributors that

I am sure you will

appreciate very much.

In the MALE FASHION sector, we welcome Spartan, who illustrates

the world of male fashion. This is, as we know, a niche sector,

little explored and, for this very reason, much appreciated. I’m

convinced that Spartan can direct men’s fashion, helping the

men of the virtual world find their own style. Spartan is also a

photographer, so he offers his images. In the area of FEMALE

FASHION, I am pleased to have Ashley Yexil with us, an established

fashion blogger with a wealth of experience in the fashion

industry. Her delicate and impactful images are an added asset to

our Magazine.

In the DESTINATIONS section, Pino and Frank are joining us.

Pino has a past as an art and literary critic: he took the opportunity

to resume writing and decided to collaborate with 360GRADI. His

writing style quickly grasps his professionalism.

Frank is an art and destination blogger at the Art Korner blog

that he created. I appreciate the work Frank is doing and his

contribution to the fashion industry, so his willingness to

collaborate with 360GRADI is greatly appreciated.

Four people are joining, and two are leaving us, namely

Serena Domenici and Misoindite Romano. We thank them for

their collaboration with the Magazine and wish them a good

continuation in their most passionate activities.

Finally, I wanted to introduce the section “Tips and Tricks,” with

some tutorials divided by theme.

See you at the next issue.

WELCOME

360GRADI is an interactive magazine

available on YUMPU. Pick up your

copy of the kiosk at the newsroom.

6 360 GRADI


Contributing to a magazine is

not easy: it requires passion,

commitment and a lot of

perseverance.

- Oema

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ART PROMOTION ON FACEBOOK

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VIOLET BOA

My responsibilities include planning, implementing, and managing PR

strategies and organizing and managing various PR activities.

I use different channels to optimize the outreach and success of a

campaign, with a customer-oriented focus and assured delivery that I

represent unequivocally. I carry out the interests, wishes, needs, and

expectations of my clients.

Violet Boa,

MARKETING

Head Column

A natural part of my work involves arranging interviews and

coordination, researching and collecting opportunities for

partnerships, establishing and maintaining relationships with

journalists, influencers, and bloggers, and supporting the team

members of my client in communicating and running a campaign.

Through years of experience with social media management, which

always requires excellent communication, presentation, leadership

skills, and excellent organizational and time management skills, I

have become self-critical and am still interested in new impulses.

Learning, be it self-directed or through knowledge of apt sources, is

part of the daily process.

Observations and reflections (self-reflection) of the external and

internal situations give me the chance to recognize problems and

change them positively.

I am a positive but also critical thinker and analytical problem solver

who - with a lot of empathy - accepts conflicting interests, personal

(in) tolerance, and others’ opinions. I am very adaptable and willing

to compromise to get positive alternatives that make everyone happy

and lead to the desired success.

My top ten topics of interest are fine art, photography, design, digital

art, music, performing arts, literature, science, mindfulness, and a

positive attitude.

I feel very honored and proud of the trust that Oema has placed in

me and invited me in my role as PR to act for magazines from the first

publication of their classy, stylish and elegant 360 GRADI Magazine.

We have an exciting and excellent task ahead of us, and I am looking

forward to it!

Violet

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LUNDY ART GALLERY

LUNDY ART GALLERY IS A CREATION OF LEE1 OLSEN AND PERIODICALLY

FEATURES NEW ARTISTS.

THE GALLERY BOASTS A VERY LARGE EXHIBITION SPACE, ALLOWING THE

VISITOR TO APPRECIATE NUMEROUS WORKS OF ART.

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EXHIBITING ARTISTS

Deyanira Yalin, Moya

Patrick, Etamae,

Ilyra Chardin, Adwehe,

ZackHermann, Sandi

Benelli, Jessamine2108,

Steele Wilder, Adelina

Lawrence,

Magda Schmidtzau ,

Jos (mojosb5c) , JudiLynn

India, Antonio Camba, and

Mrs. Kamille Kamala

TELEPORT TO LUNDY ART GALLERY

http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Brussel/12/130/2003

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CAMP ITALIA

CAMP ITALIA, EDUCATION AND ENTERTAINMENT IN ONE DESTINATION.

COME VISIT US!

Camp Italia is an educational sim in Italian language with an international vocation, where

you can find a warm welcome, artistic and musical events, many lessons to learn how to use

Second Life and breathtaking landscapes for a wonderful experience of your SL.

Visit Camp Italia & Enjoy!

Slurl

https://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Camp%20Italia/127/64/23

Official Website

https://campitaliasecondlife.org

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TIPS & TRICKS

HOW TO CREATE CLOTHES

For all those who are passionate about creating mesh clothes in SL, I have created (for now

only two) tutorials that illustrate (I hope) in a simple way how to create their own clothes using

Marvelous Designer.

I propose in this space these two videos taken from my Youtube channel.

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OUR SPONSOR: HC INCORPORATED

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DEGOYA GALTHIE

Since the beginning of his appearance in the world, man has tried to

represent and tell his experience with different tools such as drawing,

photography, and cinema; at the base of this incessant search is

the desire to describe one’s inner world with ever greater levels of

fidelity. In our post-modern society, the most advanced frontier of

this research is represented by virtual reality. This technology allows

us to “immerse ourselves” in a computer-generated environment, in

which it is possible to move and interact as in reality.

Degoya Galthie,

Head Column

BRAIN, MIND AND

VIRTUAL REALITY

Virtual reality has numerous applications ranging in different fields

and represents an advanced communication interface that allows

people to interact naturally at a distance. It is now a technology

growing in popularity in the entertainment industry, where it finds

applications and the video game sector, cinematography, theme parks,

and museums. Social networks, e-commerce, education, sport are just

some of the many areas that virtual worlds promise to revolutionize.

In the medical field, virtual reality is demonstrating excellent

potential with applications in neuroscience and psychotherapy.

In light of these premises, the goal I set myself in this section of the

magazine is to tell the “virtual revolution” through a perspective

that highlights the transformative impact of this technology on

the brain and human experience. In particular, I will investigate the

effects of virtual experiences on one’s real-world and highlight the

opportunities that virtual technologies can offer, and highlight the

potential risks they imply through a survey of the most advanced

research in psychology and neuroscientific field. Finally, I will try

to explain how simulation technologies are changing how people

communicate and interact, analyzing the opportunities and challenges

implied by the emergence of virtual worlds.

Degoya

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LA COSCIEN

CONSCIOUS

COME ALLUCINAZIONE C

AS A CONTROLLED HALL

SOGNO MODULATO DAI

MODULATED BY THE SE

Written by DEGOYA GALTHIE.

Images Scritto by JARLA da DEGOYA CAPALINI. GALTHIE.

Immagini di JARLA CAPALINI.

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ZA

NESS

ONTROLLATA: UN

UCINATION: A DREAM

SENSI

NSES

Let’s explore the notion of consciousness, so much

exploited in different contexts. Let’s clarify.

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CONSCIOUSNESS

AS A CONTROLLED

HALLUCINATION: A DREAM

MODULATED BY THE SENSES

In this article I will discuss the brain as a cognitive organ: the term cognitive

means that it is connected with the functions of knowledge and consciousness.

When I speak of

Neuroscience, I am

referring to that body

of knowledge that

studies the brain not

from a clinical point

of view, because this

is already in the field

of neurology, psychiatry

and neurosurgery,

but they deal with it

to understand how it produces images

of the world. in the normal daily life of

every human being. So how does the

brain construct and represent a world,

including ourselves, when we are studying

it. In this article I will talk about

the brain as a cognitive organ: the term

cognitive means that it is connected

with the functions of knowledge and

with consciousness.

Therefore, I will enter the field of discussion

of this article starting from

neuro-philosophy because I believe it

is the best approach to talk about consciousness.

Consciousness is the awareness

of existing, of one’s individuality

and unity; through consciousness we

distinguish the self from the other from

the self and the internal world from the

external one.

To some it may seem obvious that consciousness

serves to distinguish the

self from the other from the self, yet

there are diseases such as those that

affect the prefrontal lobe and make the

subject lose what Aristotle had framed

as the principle of identity: that is, I

know to be me. In these diseases it occurs

that the subject has the impression

and the conviction that someone from

the outside imposes on him some wills

that are not his own and, consequently,

passively carries out these orders. As a

result, he feels invaded and pervaded

as if he were a demon, losing control of

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What is

Consciousness?

his own existence. This

occurs in that syndrome

called influencing delirium

which is a frontal

lobe pathology during a

schizophrenic syndrome.

You see how an apparently

obvious fact that

should not be explained

is something that, on the

other hand, in certain

clinical contexts, cracks

and jams; therefore the

prefrontal lobe contributes

to constituting that

aspect of consciousness

that some philosophers

such as Aristotle, in his

Principles of Logic, put in

the first place: the principle

of identity, that is,

everyone is equal to himself.

Going deeper into the discourse

of consciousness

as maximum cognitive

function, linked to higher

cortical functions, when

I use the term higher cortical

functions I am referring

to what, in the common

sense, we often use

with the expression “that

person has a lot of gray

matter”. With this expression

I refer to an area

of the brain that lies on

the outside, a bit like the

peel of an orange, which

allows us to do the best

things and perform the

best performances from

a cognitive point of view.

To clarify some neuro-philosophical

issues

connected with consciousness,

I will examine a

hyperbole that circulates

in the world of experts in

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this matter and argues that consciousness

is a controlled hallucination, a

dream modulated by the senses.

It is obvious that a

description of this

kind immediately poses

problems for us.

When someone asks

me: “but does this

thing exist?” I answer

him: “yes I have seen

it, I have seen it myself

with my own eyes”.

This happens because we are convinced

that everything that our senses

and our cognitive system processes

and collects is certainly safe, but it is

not. Here then appears the concept of

consciousness as a controlled hallucination.

To better explain this idea, I refer to

the comic by Milo Manara, where he

is inspired by the script of a Fellini film

that the director has not been able to

make, not having had the time since

he died before. The screenplay, named

G. Mastorna’s Journey, has this plot: a

gentleman arrives by plane in a strange

city in an unidentified Asian country;

he lands, checks out, calls a taxi, goes

to the hotel, takes a shower and then

turns on the television. On television

they show images of the plane, with

which he arrived, which explodes and

crashes to the ground; the reporter

says they are all dead. Here is a gap in

the reality examination that oscillates

between the pole of reality and the

pole of fantasy, dream or unreality but

is usually compensated and harmonized

by the function of consciousness.

However, there are limit states in which

this capacity for harmonization gets

stuck or states of creative and artistic

inspiration, where there is space for a

fascinating narrative and screenplay

like the one described by Fellini in this

film, which unfortunately we have not

been able to see.

The assumption that consciousness is a

controlled hallucination

suggests

to us that what

we see, in large

part, are things

that we believe

we see and are convinced that we have

seen; this is so true to the point that

man since antiquity and the thought of

the history of philosophy have posed

this problem as primary. Plato wondered

and was convinced of the fallacy of

the senses; he believed that our beliefs

were credibly true when based on abstract

ideas. The Latin etymology of the

abstract term tells us that a belief is true

insofar as it is independent of the senses

that are fallacious. In other words,

if I say: “the triangle has three sides”, this

sentence, which belongs to the world

of abstract ideas, is very likely true because

I do not need with the senses to

count the three sides. The three sides

are already in the concept of a triangle,

everything else is fallacious. Descartes

also moved with his methodical approach

to doubt and asked himself: “How

can I be sure that my senses tell me the

truth?” To this end, he introduced the

concept of the deception of an evil genius:

“I see things and this evil genius cheats

me and

makes me

believe these

things are

true”. It follows

that the

relationship

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I have through the senses with the world

is certainly an altered relationship; he

will later solve the problem of knowledge

in other ways, but Descartes is not

the main topic of this article.

If we observe the

image of a rainbow,

intended

as a perceptual

experience of

color, this forces

us to declare that reality is not as it

appears to us for the good reason that

colors do not exist in the physical world.

For example, the

green of a plant is

not a physical property

of the plant,

as is the weight

and chemical nature

based on the

cellulose or the

shape of its leaves;

the green color of

the plant is not in

the plant, but is in the posterior part of

the brain which is called the occipital

lobe where the visual area is located. In

humans, vision is the most developed

sense, in fact most of the brain areas are

involved in the recognition and coding

of visual stimuli. Visual stimuli are collected

from areas of the occipital cortex

based on different characteristics. The

visual stimuli come from the retinas of

the two eyes, where the visual receptors

are located, and are transmitted

by each optic nerve to the brain, where

they are transformed into moving

images, multicolored, recognizable and

recalled by memory. The visual area is

organized in such a way that there are

five layers of neurons, one superimposed

on the other and these sheets

perform different functions of visual

perception. All the information coming

from the retina arrives upside down in

the V1 area, the image is broken down

according to its characteristics and these

parts are processed in the relevant

areas of the visual cortex. Subsequently,

the image is reconstructed in the prefrontal

cortex, which will allow us to

see it straightened and in color. come

The V1 area is highly specialized in the

processing of information regarding

the shape and placement of static or

moving objects in the visual field. Cells

in V2 also respond to various complex

characteristics, such as the orientation

of illusory contours and binocular disparity.

The V3 is responsible for the

perception of the shape of moving

objects. Area V5 is essential for processing

information relating to movement.

What interests us is the fourth of

these overlapping sheets which is the

one that processes the colors. In other

words, the color phenomenon does not

reside in nature but appears in this plate,

which we have said to be the fourth

and which we call V4; so, this is where

the color phenomenon is born but not

the color experience that we will examine

later. We realize that, when we

talk about the fact that colors are not a

reality of the world but a production

of our brain, the repercussions in the

artistic field and especially in that of

the visual arts are obviously important.

If you look at the

left image for the

first time, most of

you will not be able

to understand what

it is, but if you later look at the image

on the right almost everyone will be

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able to give those disorganized bits a

unique process.

of conceptualization.

For example,

when you look at

the second image

you will say that

it is a beard who

could be a revolutionary from South

America. If you try again to look at the

previous image in the light of what you

have experienced through the vision of

the South American barbudo, you will

be able to see what you had not seen

before. This happens because the brain

works like this from the point of view

of visual perception.

The anterior part

of our brain, called

the prefrontal

lobe, is the part

of the brain that

evolved, in the

phylogenetic sense

of the term, at the

end of the evolution

of mankind; it appears in its anatomical

and functional fullness only in

homo sapiens, therefore about 300,000

years ago. It is at this level that all the

higher cortical functions are carried

out: reason, criticism and judgment, the

functions of anticipation, projection

into the future and reality testing. So

it underlies all the functions that are

connected with the reasonable ego and,

when the frontal lobe gets sick, we enter

the chapter where the mind is lost

and where the symptoms are constituted

by a loss of fundamental data. In

fact, we call these conditions “dementia”.

When I sit quietly, perhaps in a circus,

and see a horse with the retina of my

eye, the image of this horse through the

retina arrives, as I said before, in the visual

area that is posterior to the brain;

this area, also called the calcarine area,

corrects all distortions of the visual input

connected with the eye. The eye

basically analyzes the data in a very

crude way because it performs a function

similar to that of an antenna; then

the input arrives in the posterior region

where it is corrected. All the distortions,

due to the fact that the retina is a crumpled

organ and the images arrive upside

down, are improved and therefore the

processing of the visual area makes

me see a horse. But if things were only

like this (I see the horse in the occipital

area) they would support the theory

of knowledge based on the tabula rasa:

whatever enters my brain through the

eye I reproduce it faithfully, instead

it is not so. At this point a much more

important function comes into play

where visual input is projected onto the

prefrontal lobe. On the basis of perceptual

data and considering that we are

talking about an equine, a mammal and

an animal that neighs, the prefrontal

lobe, which is capable of extracting a

process of conceptualization from all

the data of sensory experience, comes

to say that it’s a horse. In practice, the

process of symbolic thought and concept

as a universal value occurs only

in the frontal lobe. The speech at this

point becomes even more fascinating

because the frontal lobe in addition

to giving a name, as the repository of

symbolic thought, is able to symbolize

the object I see through language and

linguistic functions, it does one more

thing. most extraordinary. He is able to

imagine things apart from the data of

factual experience. For example, at this

moment I can focus on the Colosseum,

I can see it in detail because the pre-

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frontal lobe has this ability to represent

a representation of a certain thing and

actually see it. Of course, I can distinguish

if I see something with my imagination or

if I see it through the senses, but what is

even more extraordinary, is that this thing

that I see because I produce it with my

imagination at the pre-frontal level, then

it appears in the occipital cortex, that is,

in the same place where the image of the

horse had arrived.

Numerous neurophysiological studies

have shown us that if I produce a visualization

through the prefrontal lobe or

passively undergo a perception, which

through the retina reaches the prefrontal

lobe, both these stimuli arrive at the

visual area in the occipital lobe. From an

electrophysiological point of view, we are

witnessing the same phenomenon, that is,

the image connected with a factual perception

is identical from the point of view

of the electrophysiological organization of

these areas of the brain to one produced

by our own brain. This is why, referring to

the images above, we are able to transform

a shapeless percept, where our brain is

unable to reconstruct this influx of discordant

data, into a single conceptualization

process; this happens after we have seen

the figure of the South American revolutionary

beard easily identified because

here the outlines of the image are sharper.

A complex

problem is

that reality

produces

ambiguous

perceptions

much more

often than

we believe it does. For example, let’s take

this image, which is one of the most classic

forms of ambiguous percepts, and observe

it with a moment’s attention; you

will find that you can decide to see

the white part and then you will see a

glass, or to see the black part and then

you will see the profile of two girls

looking at each other at a very close

distance. The surprising thing is that

I, as with a kind of switch, can decide

to switch from one type of vision to

another type of vision; I do this with

an act of the will resulting from it that

perception is not a blackboard where

what I write then I see written. This

happens through the prefrontal lobe

which, when faced with an ambiguous

percept, makes us see what this

brain area decides to see or not to see.

The motivational mechanisms that

trigger one choice rather than another

and all these functions from a technical

point of view are called executive

functions, although this is an interesting

topic I will not deal with in the

article.

Regarding

the cognition

of color,

I mentioned

earlier that in

area V4 color

comes to life

and becomes a visual phenomenon;

I remind you of a diatribe which,

however, did not take place in terms

of direct exchange of ideas because

Newton died shortly before Goethe

was born. But there was a strong

contrast in the two points of view,

opening a debate that still today is debated.

Goethe did not share Newton’s

approach to vision as for the latter,

vision was a pure fact of optical physics:

there are the rays of light parallel

to each other, then there is a lens that

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makes them converge, and so on. Goethe

did not like this thing and I will tell

you that neuroscience does not like it either,

so much so that Vittorio Gallese, a

great figure of Italian neurology, tells us

this, giving Goethe fully right: “... color

cannot be considered and studied exclusively

as physical attribute of the visible,

but it is always also an affective quality

of the experience of the image …” (2017).

The emotional component, past experiences

and autobiographical memory

connected with that phenomenon play

a preponderant role on the aspect of

pure optical physics. Why does this

happen? The speech I made earlier on

area V4 clarifies the mechanism as it

is here that a light radiation becomes

color because this area is designed to

build, on that raw datum of electromagnetic

radiation, the experience of color.

Going deeper into the subject, things become

even more interesting, our brain

is increasingly fascinating and demonstrates

that it can do things that are incredibly

relevant. Area V4 is connected

with various other regions of the brain,

for example with the hippocampus

which is the nucleus that processes memory,

especially in the sense of fixing

the data by storing them in the memory

store. Another connection is with the

amygdala, another important subcortical

nucleus of our brain, which in itself

would not be a nucleus connected with

memory even if it plays a certain very

characteristic role at the beginning of

our life, but we will see this later. However,

the amygdala gives a powerful affective

and emotional connotation to

the event we are witnessing, for example

the color red. Another connection

is that between this lamina V4 and the

nucleus accumbens which is located in

the lower part of the frontal lobe and

is quite indented with respect to the

prefrontal lobe itself. The nucleus accumbens

is the nucleus of gratifications,

pleasure, enjoyment and motivation;

everything that seems beautiful and

interesting to us, that tastes us and that

gives us pleasure, finds in the nucleus

accumbens the manager of all these

electrophysiological activities. To understand

the nucleus accumbens all the

stimuli of cocaine go. Always connected

with the V4 area is the limbic lobe which

is the biological basis of emotional

phenomena.

So you see that all this set of neural

networks

make vision

and color

make a leap

from pure

perception

to a big and

very important

transformation

of this phenomenal experience

into something that deeply involves all

of our subjectivity. This image could represent

the synthesis of what has been

said so far; it seems obvious that this

boy in front of an exhibition of paintings

would see them empty if the brain

did not have this stratification and if it

did not have all this organization that

transforms a pure optical physics datum

into something that on the level of the

phenomenology of creative experience

it involves him. Without all this neurophysiological

organization he would

see all the canvases empty or at most

with some black and white spots. This

other image expresses a strongly sensual

content where the red color is important

and refers to an aspect of sen-

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suality, without

which it would

be a banal and

black and white

photograph.

This is roughly

the process

of how the

neurophysiology of vision is organized.

Although it is my intention to describe

some aspects of Neuroesthetics more

generally, in this article I have focused

on the neurophysiology of vision, referring

mainly to painting and visual arts.

However, the general mechanism could

be extended to all fields of art and to the

Neuroesthetics of formal experience.

I mentioned earlier that the prefrontal

lobe plays an important role in the

production of mental images and I will

now try to deepen the subject. I gave the

example of the Colosseum and pointed

out that the posterior visual areas react

substantially, from an electrophysiological

point of view, in the same way

whether we imagine it or actually see

it. I make this premise because most

ordinary people, but also many neurologists

until a few years ago, believed

that cognitive function was connected

with the capacity of symbolic thinking.

Ability, therefore, to produce concepts of

universal value and, as we read in every

philosophy manual, a concept is a web of

fixed relationships derived from sensitive

experience; therefore, the operations

that the prefrontal lobe does are all in

the sphere of verbal thought, of thought

that can be spoken in some way. This is

partly true but not entirely, our ability to

produce mental images means that we

can also think with images; that is, the

thought product of the reasonable self is

not limited to verbal language and words

but we can also think through images.

A musician, a painter and even a poet

cannot ignore mental images; this was

also supported by Karl Jaspers, the father

of non-biological psychopathology,

giving a very important contribution

to the knowledge of this phenomenal:

“it is possible to think instead of concepts

... in images, figures, notes, myths, gods,

landscapes, colors, actions. All the primitive

images of the world are constructed

in this way and the language of words is

based on them”.

The importance of what Jaspers argued

makes us understand

how, in

reality, we very

often use mental

images to reason;

this happens

above all in particular

emotional situations or when we

let ourselves go and relax deeply, for

example in meditation, in a yoga exercise

and when we abandon ourselves

to daydreams. In all these situations we

are no longer the rational being who

puts words together to form a thought,

according to the principles of Aristotelian

logic. There are circumstances in

which the images also form thoughts

based on the figurative function, but

following a different syntax which is

not the one we learn with language, although

symbolic thought has evolved.

The importance of mental images leads

us to a consideration

that is of

considerable importance:

how

does the human

brain, therefore

man, read, take

curls and headbands and give them the

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meaning of a word. For example, in this

image at a certain point in the text, the

protagonist says: “the forest of Dean!!! … I

used to go there once to go camping with

my parents”. When we read the word forest

they form in the reader’s mind like

drawings of trees and flying birds, so

when we read, thanks to this ability, we

produce mental images relating to what

we are reading. When I read the word

forest, not from the ophthalmologist who

puts a few letters in front of me to read,

but in the context of a novel, I produce

visualizations evoked by the word forest.

That’s why we love reading novels so

much, because we visually experience

what is not actually visual.

How can all this happen? In seeing this

image, we all say this is

a letter “f” and a written

word is made up of signs

that become circles, rods,

dots, thank you (typographic

fonts). At this

point you may be wondering

what is the use of

talking about something

so immediate and so

obvious about which

there seems to be nothing to say. What

seems so obvious to us actually required

a job on the part of our brain that lasted

about 300,000 years, since homo sapiens

acquired symbolic thought, therefore the

thought formed by concepts of universal

value that apply to everyone. . From this

first phase, from this conquest, 295 thousand

years have passed, at least, to get to

write this conquered symbolic thought;

the evolutionary work, which our brain

did to get to conquer the use of writing

and with this enter into history, lasted a

very long period. This not only because

of the importance of thinking in a universal

way that would bring everyone together

(for which the one who is a dog

for me is also a dog for one who is on

the other side of the world) but also because

it was essential that I could write

my thoughts and then pass it on to future

generations. Evolution has done

its best and only after a suitable period

of time has it succeeded; the cuneiform

characters which are the first forms of

writing that appeared in human culture

appeared about 5000 years ago.

In this drawing, which shows the human

brain seen from its lower part and

from the back, those areas are highlighted

that took 295,000 years to organize

themselves functionally and preside

over the recognition of the shape

of the letters. Only when this skill was

developed was our brain able to read

and write, that is, the curls and circles

that form the words began to make sense

and, with the advent of writing, man

entered history.

Let’s review another aspect of considerable

interest which is that of mirror

neurons, a topic I wrote about in previous

articles of the journal but which

deserves to be analyzed for the countless

and important functions of these

nerve cells. Mirror neurons are a set

of structures, among which the most

studied is that relating to the prefrontal

lobe, which first of all constitute the

neurobiological basis of empathy; empathy

is that psychic function, but with

a strong neurobiological basis, which

allows us to enter the mind of others,

to formulate a theory of what the other

thinks and what the other intends to

do. This function allows us, for example,

to play as a team and to hunt in

groups; it allows us in the fraction of a

moment to understand, playing soccer,

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which of my teammates is the most suitable,

for what he is doing and what he is

thinking at that moment, to receive my

ball pass. Without empathy we would not

be able to do teamwork; not only this but

we would not even be able to fall in love

or establish a relationship of friendship

that presupposes the ability to enter the

mind and make us a theory of what the

other is thinking or feeling.

This discovery, extremely important, moreover,

explains to us

why in many forms

of autism, however,

the individual lives

in his solitude and is

unable to establish a

relationship of empathic

relationship with the world. Thanks

to this discovery, the work of a group of

Italian scientists headed by prof. Giacomo

Rizzolatti, and thanks to the understanding

of the brain mechanisms underlying

empathy, we have passed from the vision

of the brain as a purely neurological organ

capable of making us move and / or

feel, therefore from a pure sensory-motor

organ to a cognitive and affective. An organ

capable of producing not only knowledge,

but also subjectivity and intersubjectivity

and therefore relationships

with others.

I can look at these images and

describe them as a gentleman

drinking milk and, to do this,

I have to put myself in the

other’s shoes by means of a mechanism

that Vittorio Gallese

called embodied simulation.

If there were no mirror neurons,

for example, this image

would be described as three

women on a chair. This is in

fact the answer

given by patients

with a degenerative

disease of the

prefrontal lobe and

of the connections

with which this

anatomical part is

connected; therefore,

schizophrenic

patients, patients

suffering from

frontotemporal

dementia or Pick’s disease and also Alzheimer’s

patients who in the mid-terminal

phase of the disease also undergo

an invasion of the prefrontal lobe.

If I ask those who have the availability

of an efficient

prefrontal lobe

and mirror neurons

that are

also functioning,

instead,

describing this

picture they tell

it this way: “these are three girls scared

to death because they have seen a mouse

or something similar; this fright led

them to climb onto a chair for fear of

coming into direct contact with the mouse.

Luckily there was his little brother in

the house, they called him and told him

take that stick, go and look under that

piece of furniture because it is nearby

that we saw the mouse. So, you try to kill

him because that’s how the fear passes

away”. See what difference there is

between a brain structure capable of

giving a narrative of facts and another

brain structure impoverished by a

disease, which can only express what

visual perception allows us to observe:

three women on a chair.

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Without empathy, art could also exist

but no one would know that it exists,

everything that cannot be shared is placed

outside common sense. It seems obvious

that mirror neurons enter the phenomenology

of art in an overwhelming

way, because they allow us to put ourselves

in the shoes and mind of the poet

who wrote that text, of the painter who

painted that picture. Without this function,

someone could also do something

beautiful that we could call art, but no

one would appreciate it; this is because

there would be no inter-subjectivity that

links in a network the emotions, beliefs,

concepts and ideas of the people who

participate in this common artistic experience.

This network explains how, even

in abstract art, beauty is expressed by the

artist and shared by the viewer.

Vittorio Gallese (2014) explained to us

that neuroscience research in recent decades

has shown that perception is a multimodal

process that involves the activation

not only of the corresponding areas

of the brain (therefore the sensory ones,

for example) but also of brain circuits.

sensor-motor, viscero-motor and affective

So it is all our brain that is recruited to

perform these functions which from the

point of view of emotions and cognition

represent the maximum performance

that our brain is able to give, and it is not

little.

Let us now observe

the tenth table of the

Rorschach test and

also here we discover

how nothing is as it

appears to us, because

we believe we see it in

a certain way and instead the neurophysiology

studies show us other things. Rorschach

was a psychiatrist who lived in

the early years of the last century, also

a painter. The fact is, if the Rorschach

test were not so, which would not

work so marvelously from the point

of view of psychodiagnosis, we see the

color in the V4 area before we see the

movement (V5) and the movement

we see it before. see form (V3-V4). In

other words, color, shape and movement

reach the brain at different times

and in different areas; we are convinced

of the simultaneity of perception,

but in reality, this is not the case.

This fact explains why in front of table

10 of the Rorschach someone, working

with rational Aristotelian thought,

will say: “they are two mice that are

both attached to an axis”; this is an indication

of ordered, regular and linear

thinking in which the emotional and

affective component does not play a

decisive role. Another person, instead

of facing this same image, may say: “Oh

my God, what a fear! But this is blood;

oh my god I can’t tolerate seeing all this

blood”. It is obvious that, in this case

for the cerebral organization of this

individual, the visual component that

reaches the brain first plays a prominent

role; this considered the cyto-architectural

organization of the brain

and therefore circuit in the brain of

that subject. The color responses (C) are

more involved with the overall value

(unconscious mechanisms) than those

of form (F) (index of ordered and linear

thinking). So, this test, considering the

neurophysiological characteristics that

we have just said, that is that the color

arrives before the movement and before

the form, allows us to understand

which is the unconscious organization

and the thigh of an individual. It is obvious

that this distancing of times is a

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distancing of a few milliseconds not of

hours, so much so that we do not even

notice it.

Another fascinating

field is

that of the two

memories: one

controlled by

the amygdala

and the other

by the hippocampus.

I have to make a premise: when

we are born and in the first three years

of life, the hippocampus is there but it is

not functioning. In the following years

it begins to mature and until its full maturity,

the mind and the higher cortical

functions are predominantly governed

by the amygdala. This organ during

the individual life cycle will almost

completely stop being connected with

memory but will be connected with

fears, strong emotions, aggression and

violence and, on a pathological level, for

example, with post disorder. -traumatic

from stress. But at this early stage of life,

however, it is the only point of reference

where data relating to personal experiences

can be stored.

The amygdaloid memorization processes

are different from the subsequent

ones in the hippocampus, as the latter is

connected with the linguistic areas; therefore

if I cross the street and meet Giovanni,

then when I cross the street and

meet another person I can tell him that

I have met Giovanni. Since the hippocampus

is connected with the language

centers, my experience is verbally utterable

and transmissible so I can share it

with all the others through language.

What the amygdala does and does it in

the first three years of life and continues

to do it in a minor way until the

age of 6-7, however, is a completely different

job; makes sure that all the sensory

experiences that involve us in that

age phase are absorbed by our brain.

The brain in that phase of life is just

like a sponge that holds everything, but

there is no hippocampus ready to store

the material in the memory warehouse

and give it a linguistic appearance, this

because the amygdala unfortunately

has no connection with the centers that

oversee language. So, the emotions, the

traumas but also the beautiful things,

the smile of the mother, all these things

remain imprinted in our brain and then

they will affect us, for better or for worse,

even as adults. The case of little Hans

narrated by Freud is anecdotal, where

the child at the age of three had a strong

fright triggered by the vision of a runaway

horse; later around the age of 10

he developed a phobia of horses. If the

problem had happened at the age of 10,

thanks to the indirect linguistic abilities

of the hippocampus, Hans would have

been able to say: “… mom, what a fear!

Console me because that horse scared me

too much”. He would have verbalized

and it could have ended there. Instead,

this traumatic episode happened

around the age of 2-3, so everything

that happened, all the confiscation of

anxiety, fear, anguish and terror remained

in a part of the brain. Furthermore,

this is an area that we share with reptiles

and is located in the back of our

brain, an ancestral area that is much

older than the one generated with the

evolution towards homo sapiens. So, the

emotions and both the negative and positive

aspects of the emotions are localized

there and cannot be verbalized; the

negative aspects can then take the form

of psychopathological conditions such

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as phobia.

Any of our cognitive, social, loving, religious,

political, artistic experiences go

through the activation of specific brain

areas. Today, thanks to neuroimaging

technologies, it is possible to visualize

which areas of the brain are activated

or deactivated when a subject is exposed

to any of the activities described

above. Even the aesthetic experience is

subject to the laws that regulate brain

activities and the nervous structures

involved, so art can be considered as

an extension of the brain function. To

conclude, beyond the commercial phenomena

related to the art market that

determine the value of artistic artefacts,

Neuroaesthetics is allowing us to better

understand the effects that an artistic

experience, perceived as beautiful, has

on our brain. Semir Zeki, a neurobiologist

at University College London and

father of Neuroaesthetics, argued that

looking at a painting by Caravaggio (if

we like Caravaggio) is, for the brain, like

receiving a kiss; admiring a work of art

stimulates the same brain areas sensitive

to falling in love. His classic research

involved a large group of subjects whose

brain activity was detected through

functional magnetic resonance imaging

(fMRI) while viewing 28 paintings by

artists including Botticelli, Leonardo

Da Vinci, Cezanne and Monet. The study

found that the visualization of the

works of art had stimulated an increase

in dopamine, one of the hormones of

well-being, in the orbito-frontal cortex,

and that there was a greater activity

of the brain areas generally related to

falling in love and pleasure. deep (this

substance is associated with the use of

drugs as well as the feeling of love). In

subsequent studies he has shown that

our brain reacts in a very similar way

both when we are in love and when

we admire a work of art that we like,

the same areas are activated in the

two different situations. This is one of

the many proofs of how much art can

be useful within therapies for dealing

with serious psychopathologies such as

anxiety and depression. Zeki emphasized:

“... there have been great advances

in our understanding of what happens

inside our brains when we look at works

of art. We have recently discovered that

when we observe things that we consider

beautiful, there is an increase in activity

in the pleasure recognition centers of the

brain. There is a large supply of dopamine

in this area, also known as the “feel-good”

transmitter. Essentially the feel-good centers

are stimulated, similar to the states of

love and desire. The reaction was immediate”.

Traditionally, art has

always been associated

with beauty but

ever since, in 1917,

Marcel Duchamp presented

a urinal, which

he called La Fontana,

at an art exhibition, everyone admits

that, for something to be considered a

work of art, it need not be perceived as

beautiful. One of the most debated questions

in aesthetics is whether beauty

can be defined by objective parameters

or whether it depends entirely on

subjective factors. Although subjective

criteria play an essential role in everyone’s

aesthetic experiences, today we

can hypothesize that there are specific

principles with a biological basis that

can facilitate the perception of beauty.

In a study by the Parma group, directed

by Giacomo Rizzolatti, the presence of

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a specific parameter, that is the golden

proportion, in the stimuli presented, determined

brain activations different from

those evoked by the stimuli in which this

parameter was violated.

When we look at a face that we find beautiful,

the Reward dopaminergic circuit

is activated (the main centers of which

are located in the ventral mesencephalic

tegmental area, in the ventral striatum

and in the orbitofrontal cortex). It is a circuit

that is triggered for all hedonically

relevant stimuli, generating pleasant sensations.

Seeing an attractive face makes

us feel like we’ve just won some money,

seeing an unattractive one like we’ve

just lost it. The brain therefore responds

quickly and automatically to beauty (understood

as what we experience as beautiful).

Aesthetic attraction is also the basis

of a cognitive bias such as that of judging

intelligent, at first glance, a good-looking

individual. Therefore beauty is associated

with a moral idea of overall goodness,

with all the practical (and unconscious)

implications that this entails (even on

judicial decisions). There is a subjective

experience of beauty, determined by

personal life experiences and, often, by

cultural coordinates that lead to the reception

of information deemed reliable on

age, fertility, health and our brain is well

trained to recognize them. In a recent

editorial in Nature (2015) Karl Grammer,

a Viennese anthropologist, an important

pioneer of studies on attraction, says: “Human

beings are obsessed with beauty. And

when you find an obsession like this, there

must be something deeper than a simple

cultural norm”. Aesthetic judgment is then

a complex blend of genetic, cultural and

subjective factors, which took millions of

years to evolve. In this aesthetic dimension,

art, one of the highest expressions of

human complexity and of the most refined

ways of representing sensations

and emotions, provides one of the most

precious documents on the functioning

of our brain because, as Paul Klee

wrote, “the art does not reproduce the

visible, it makes invisible things visible”.

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SOUL OF D

IN S

La magia di una land da sogno.

The magic of a dream land.

Scritto da PINO VITI.

Immagini di JARLA CAPALINI e

Written by

DAVI

PINO

SPERBER.

VITI.

Images by JARLA CAPALINI and

DAVI SPERBER.

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REAMS

SECOND LIFE

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SOUL OF

DREAMS

“Take nothing but photos, leave nothing but footprints.” So

reads a sign at the landpoint of this magnificent sim, born of the

commitment and visionary creativity of owner Xana Newall.

This is a land full

of aesthetic and

cultural “citations”,

suspended between

present and past and

characterized by a

refined retro taste.

“Take nothing but photos, leave nothing

but footprints.” So says a sign at the

land point of this magnificent sim, born

from the commitment and visionary

creativity of the owner Xana Newall,

and the poetic epigraph sounds like a

sort of invitation to explore it without

violating its untouched beauty with

invasive superficiality. And we would

like to follow the enchanting paths

It is possible at the door to sign up for the Soul Of

Dreams group.

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Everything is

represented with

meticulous attention

to detail.

on tiptoe, not to break

the magical atmosphere

of the places with our

presence or disturb the

precious balance between

art and nature.

At the entrance, it is

possible to enroll in the

Soul Of Dreams group,

and the registration

fee of 250 L$ entitles

you to stay in the land,

to the great joy of the

photographers who will

find an abundant source

of inspiration for their

work. Testimony of their

interest is the existence of

a group of the same name

on Flickr (https://www.

flickr.com/groups/souls_

of_dreams) reserved

for photos taken in this

magical place.

It’s a land, this one, full

of aesthetic and cultural

“citations,” suspended

between present and

past and characterized

by a refined retro taste.

Everything is represented

with meticulous attention

to detail, and every

piece seems to demand

attention and respect,

as well as admiration

for the great work that

is perceived beyond

appearances. But it comes

naturally to think that

“Soul of Dreams” was

not a simple open-air

museum exhibition in the

intentions of those who

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I recommend accepting the region’s light settings

for the best experience.

In different points of the region we can find

signs indicating the main attractions.

created it: it does not perform

but lets you discover it slowly;

it does not show but suggests;

it does not say everything and

immediately but guides us

with discretion without ever

giving up the intriguing aura of

mystery that surrounds us as

soon as we arrive. The default

setting is nocturnal, teasing our

imagination and concealing

signs and signals at first reading.

Soon, however, we begin to

understand the arcane language

of the places. Immediately, halfhidden

by the lush vegetation,

we discover a stone pavilion

overlooking the sea by way

of veranda: many columns of

the building have collapsed or

broken, almost as if to testify,

with a “romantic” taste in the

literary sense, the inevitable

passage of time, while a table

set for two at the center of the

veranda seems to be waiting for

who knows how long, and for

how long, a mysterious couple

that toasts to love without

beginning and end.

And time seems to have left its

indelible patina everywhere, but

without altering any meaning

or function. An old ticket office

with its sign was torn down but

with a rotating lamp that still

turns, a vintage Ape-car with its

load of flowers that never wilted,

a gas stove peeling and rusty but

still working, an old fountain

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with the basin full of weeds but with

water still flowing: everything seems to

tell us, under the banner of captivating

contradictions and melancholic

nostalgia.

Going further in, we will cross a bridge

that will lead us to a dock with a pier

where old fishing boats and a sailing

boat are moored; it is a small city built

on canals: it could be a miniature

Amsterdam, but the austere buildings

with a decidedly Victorian imprint, the

signs of the typically “British” stores,

a wonderful Irish Pub and the red

telephone booths certainly take us back

to a London of times gone by. There

is no shortage of vintage cars, oldfashioned

bicycles, old-style billboards,

and even the cart with steaming roast

chestnuts: all of a delightfully “vintage”

taste that leads us to browse inside the

meticulously reconstructed stores.

But there’s more: once out of the city,

we can go into dense woods and climb

steep paths immersed in unspoiled

nature, and one of them will take us to a

beautiful rustic farmhouse where every

detail is a work of art.

Spectator of our wanderings is a sea

near and far as only it can be when the

summer is over. Illuminated by the sun

of an autumn sunset or by the silvery

spring moon, it will accompany us on

our journey with the murmur of its

tireless waves.

Leaving this magnificent land, we will

realize that we have partly disregarded

the indications of the sign at the

entrance: we have taken photos and

captured emotions and memories; we

have not only left footprints but also

a piece of our heart. “Soul” as in soul,

“Dreams” as in dreams.

Nomen omen...

References

Soul of Dreams

Teleport:

http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/

Glanmire/78/16/21

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MEDITERRANEO-OC

TELEPORT:

http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Mediterraneo%20OC/114/190/21

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LOST LAGO

Lost Lagoon ci permette un salto indietro nel

tempo, facendoci gustare un tempo e uno stile

di vita che rischiamo di dimenticare.

IN IN SES

Lost Lagoon allows us to step back in time,

giving us a taste of a time and lifestyle that we

are in danger of forgetting.

Scritto da SERENA DOMENICI.

Written Immagini by di SERENA JARLA CAPALINI.

DOMENICI.

Images by JARLA CAPALINI.

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OON ON

ECOND LIFE LIFE

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The creator is Jana Guyot who has realized an

atmospheric setting that takes us back in time.

LOST LAGOON

IN SECOND LIFE

Spring

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DEDICATED TO PHOTOGRAPHERS

LOST LAGOON allows rez to anyone who joins the group the

region is joined to. The cost to join the group is L$150.

Here time seems to stand still, reminding

us of landscapes of uncontaminated

beauty.

I look at the sea from

this wooden terrace

impregnated with

saltiness and life,

and I feel as if I were

transported back in

time to fifty years ago

and maybe more when

certain beautiful

natural landscapes

existed, but above all

resisted the boorish

and merciless attack of

building speculation

and commercial

massification in the

name of money.

Here, time seems

to have stopped,

reminding us

of landscapes of

uncontaminated

beauty like certain

places in the south of

Italy or the Maremma

coast, or even like the

French Camargue: in

fact, it seems that from

one moment to the

next, a young Brigitte

Bardot can be seen

walking on the beach.

In short, a mixture of

beauties was skilfully

mixed and masterfully

reproduced in Second

Life by someone who

had very clear ideas

because nothing was

left to chance. Every

detail, refined in its

simplicity, has its

precise reason for

being.

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I won’t hide from you

that I often take refuge

on that terrace, resting

on stilts almost at sea

level, to write and think.

Now and then, I lift my

eyes to look around me,

placid and at the same

time waiting for I don’t

even know what, for I

don’t even know who.

I breathe. I imagine. I

question myself. I reflect.

As you well know,

the world has been

devastated by an

unexpected pandemic,

and not all of us live in

such beautiful places

and close contact with

nature. Many of us are

forced by the continuous

lockdowns to stay in

apartments far from

the sea, the mountains,

and unspoiled nature,

surrounded only by

concrete. So this is the

right place to find that

world that seems to no

longer belong to us and

find the strength to react

and fight so that all this

does not remain only

virtual but returns to be

part of our lives.

It’s lovely that the owner

of this charming place:

http://maps.secondlife.

com/secondlife/Sea%20

Starr/248/94/22 , has

given us this gift: a

refuge of body and soul

in which to venture

along beautiful

trails up to the top of

rolling hills, where

dwellings and gazebos,

cleverly furnished

with a delightful

retro taste, make

the scenery change,

without disrupting

the harmony of the

place but reminding

us of a past of discreet

elegance but refined.

Everything blends

wonderfully with

the landscape below,

more ‘wild’ but

treated harmoniously

in a crescendo of

details that can not

certainly escape to

eyes that love the

beauty of details. Soft

and shaded colors

delicately turned to

amber and sepia tones

as in old photographs

yellowed by time,

lazy flights of seagulls,

placid seafoam on

sand and cliffs, clouds

that chase each other

unhurriedly in the sky

of an eternal sunset:

everything tells with

the silence of ancient

wisdom, coagulating

dreams and memories

in a nostalgic inner

experience, while

the deja-vu rises to a

category of the spirit.

I love this place

because it makes me feel

free and melancholy, of

that melancholy that does

not tear but cradles and

caresses the heart as the

sea wind caresses the skin.

Yes, this is my enchanted

place, where time seems to

have stopped forever.

References

Lost Lagoon (Teleport)

http://maps.secondlife.

com/secondlife/Sea%20

Starr/249/14/24

Lost Lagoon Flickr

https://www.flickr.com/

groups/4505438@N21/

pool/

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LADMILLA MEDIER

Ladmilla Medier,

ART

Head Column

“Art does not reflect what is seen, rather it makes the

hidden visible.”

(Paul Klee)

I don’t think that there is an absolute definition of

Art. Still, this short, famous quote represents the

path that I will propose in this section dedicated

to Art: together we will know the artists active

in Second Life and their works, we will discover

the study, the conceptual elaboration, and the

artistic technique that gave rise to the creations;

each of us will be able to listen to the whispering

stories, awaken dormant memories and provide our

interpretation, find the essence that goes beyond

the visible.

I am sure it will be a fascinating journey!

Ladmilla

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CIOTTOLIN

Artista Well known conosciuta and appreciated e apprezzata artist che who trasforma transforms i suoi

sentimenti her feelings ed and emozioni emotions in arte into 3D.

art.

AR A

Written by LADMILLA MEDIER

Scritto da LADMILLA MEDIER

Images by LADMILLA MEDIER

Immagini di LADMILLA MEDIER

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NA A XUE

RTISTA

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CIOTTOLINA XUE

WORDLESS STORIES

Ciottolina Xue is an Italian

artist, a Second Life

resident from fourteen

years. Her creations

hit the feelings of the

observer and tell stories

with spontaneity and

wonder, as only a child

could do.

The origin of her virtual

name is very sweet and

she tells it in a very

descriptive way, so it

seems that we can see

her…

2. PROPAGANDA

Ciottolina (Peebles) is

the daughter of Fred

and Wilma Flintstones,

characters from the

animated series “The

Ancestors”.

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“I don’t know if I create

art, I certainly don’t

consider myself an

artist.”

The first time they called

me by this name I was

fourteen years old, I was

a little girl with long,

auburn and curly hair.

In May of that year I

was at school for having

an oral question. I was

overheated because of the

outside temperature and

the agitation for the test,

so I put my hair up in a

bun and secured it with a

pen I took from my pencil

case, it was bone-shaped

and soon a kid from my

class exclaimed: “There!

We have Ciottolina

(Peebles)!”

From that moment on,

they never stopped to call

me that.

The artist kindly provided

us with info about her

real life, her personality

and her way of living

Second Life, allowing us

so to know her better,

to feel her closer and to

share her interest in the

environment, to appreciate

her confidentiality and

spontaneity, her great

ability to give affection…

CIOTTOLINA XUE

In real life I am a Doctor

of Veterinary Medicine, I

have a master’s degree in

Biology and one in Natural

Sciences, I run a veterinary

laboratory and I am

employed in the research

center “Biodiversity,

flora and fauna” near the

“Abruzzo National Park”

(Abruzzo is a region of

Central Italy).

I live the current pandemic

with determination, with

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the belief that everything

is going to be all right; my

profession makes me move

often also in this time but,

respecting the necessary

security measures, I come

home every night healthy.

I do not have much time

to devote to the virtual

world so my connections to

Second Life are few, if there

are no important events to

follow in the metaverse I am

online a couple of nights a

week only.

I am a very shy girl, I hardly

organize the exhibitions

of my works, indeed many

of those realized were

almost extorted by those

who asked me (laughs). I

like to decorate the land

“SOLODONNA” with my

works, it is owned by my

two Second Life moms:

Sniper Siemens and Elettra

Beardmore; I love them

so much and they are

probably the reason why

I am still hanging in this

virtual world after fourteen

years;”SOLODONNA” is

the land where I like to be

when I am online, It is very

rare for me to move from

it or from the land where I

have my Gallery.

Ciottolina is a friendly

and spontaneous person,

I was pleasantly surprised

by her modesty: she does

not need to feed her ego;

what I admire about her

is the ability to appreciate

others and their skills,

while following her path

and creating amazing

artworks in my opinion,

even if she does not think

so…

I do not know if what I

create is art, I definitely do

not think I am an artist;

there are so many good

artists in the metaverse

that create really

wonderful artworks, this

is why I was surprised

when I was asked for an

interview.

I try to express feelings

with my artworks, to tell

stories that cannot be

told in words, to capture

an intense gaze or an

important gesture as we

often can see in photos, I

try to do so in 3D, whether

it is a statue, a flower

or a robot, everything

expresses a feeling.

I use Art as a

communication medium,

so there are no creations

in my repertoire made just

for creating something, I

feel happy and rewarded

for the work I have done

when people coming to

visit my exhibition tell me

in private the emotions felt

looking at my artworks,

the emotions that I wished

people could feel when

I created them. Every

work of mine talks about

me, reveals a side of my

being, shows my feelings,

thoughts and interests;

I am probably the sum

of the sensations told by

what I create: in each one

of my creations there is a

piece of my soul.

The human and artistic

sensitivity that gleams

through Ciottolina’s

works therefore fully

represents her way of

perceiving reality, the

great importance she

gives to affections, her

thoughts about society

and the new habits that

some of us acquired

with the development

of technology (I must

say that I fully share her

point of view)…

In this time period people

are no longer used to

search for the news they

are interested in, using

reliable sources, I think

they even forgot how to

search for them: many

settle for reading them

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on Facebook rather than

inquire from authoritative

and recognized websites or, as

I think is safer, at a traditional

library. The world of

information offers countless

journalism sites, or supposed

ones, which spread news on

purpose distorting them as

they please, at the expense of

the user who will never know

the truth of the facts.

My creation

“PROPAGANDA” (Photo 2) is

an invite to do it yourself, to

find personally infos, to study

for having better ideas and

to not accept passively other

people’s opinions: the robot

putting the face back on the

man, now covered with all

kinds of newspapers, is trying

to help him to recover his lost

identity.

I love all my robots cause they

represent the characteristic

innocence, wonder and

curiosity of children, cause

they show in every expression

the inherent childhood

spontaneity.

One of my robots is looking at

an earthworm resting on its

finger, the expression on the

face of the robot observing

the little being is the essence

of the childhood wonder I try

so hard to find in people’s eyes

(Photo 3).

There are also some robots

3. ROBOT LOMBRICO -

Earthworm robot

in my collection that

represent a dear friend of

mine, sadly a heart attack

took him away six months

ago; he was a wonderful

man and artist, his avatar

is named Oblomov (jos

bookmite) but in real

life his name was Mario

Emanuele Degni.

In fourteen years of

Second Life I never

reached a level of

intimacy with a man as

with Jos, and I do not

mean sex: he was the only

one I allowed to see right

through me, the only one

I felt true and honest; I

cried a lot when he left us

and I realized that Mario

was a friend even in real

life.

The artist is also

sensitive to social issues,

in fact her commitment

to Second Life for a

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charity project that she

wanted to describe here, is

noteworthy ...

I collaborated during the

last week of February

to organize the Harvey

Memorial Festival, a

charity event that aims to

raise funds for helping the

research for the treatment of

ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral

Sclerosis) and to promote the

knowledge of this disease;

the event is dedicated to

the memory of the friend

Harvey22 Albatros who died

a few years ago precisely

because of the ALS.

Ciottolina’s creations are

therefore inspired by her

sensitivity and personal

experience, but it is also

interesting to know the

digital resources she uses

for creating her artworks

and the realization

process…

For creating the mesh

shapes I use the Cinema 4D

program and for processing

the textures I work with

Photoshop. The most

important aspect of my

creation is the expression

of the subject: each of my

work is a heap of shapes

around an expression.

All that remains now is

to visit [C8] Creazioni,

her Gallery where it

is possible to buy her

artworks: it is a large

room divided into three

levels separated by a

few steps. The place is

very welcoming and full

of atmosphere, you can

feel the personality of

the artist in every detail;

we immediately meet

her beloved robots then,

continuing to walk among

her beautiful creations,

we discover a flowering of

roses from which tender

children blossom. The

walls are covered with

magnificent images of her

works and exhibitions, it

is a total immersion into

Art.

Thank you Ciottolina!

References

[C8] Creazioni: https://

maps.secondlife.

com/secondlife/

Lighthouse%20

Oasis/28/160/2772

Galleria di Ciottolina:

https://maps.secondlife.

com/secondlife/

Lighthouse%20

Oasis/28/160/2772

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5. ROBOT TRANSENNA -

Barrier robot

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6. ROBOT 1 - Painted by

(Dipinto da) Jos Oblomov

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7. LA DANZA DELL’AMORE -

The dance of love

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8. MATERNITA’ -

Motherhood

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9. INNOCENZA - Innocence

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10. SFRUTTAMENTO DELLA

DONNA - Exploitation of

women

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11. SILENZIO - Silence

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12. L’EQUILIBRIO INTERIORE -

Inner balance

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13. IL FUMO UCCIDE - Smoking

kills

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VAN LOOPEN

Van Loopen,

MUSIC

Head Column

If I were not an architect in life, I would probably be a

musician.

I think in music.

I live my daydreams in music.

I see my life in terms of music.

Since 2009 in Second Life, I try to share this emotion

with others.

As editor and music consultant for 360 GRADI, I would

like to shed light on an often underestimated world, but

which is instead one of the main activities in the “second

life.”

The message in music arrives more efficiently at its

destination, touching the most intimate and personal

chords, without the need for other intermediaries in

communication.

In the variegated musical world of Second Life, I will

deal with emerging artists and those who are now well

established and often do not know each other well

enough.

I take advantage of this space to give some point of

reference in the music scene of Second Life because

“people consume music as if it were a handkerchief for

the nose.”

(Zucchero)

Van

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ASAHRA LA

LIVE

Asahra is a highly

regarded vocalist who

offers private lessons

inworld.

Written by VAN LOOPEN.

Images by JARLA CAPALINI

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NNOK

SINGER

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ASAHRA LANNOK

SINGER

Immediately I heard a completely

different voice, even from the

most talented and impeccable

singers of SL, really particular and

recognizable, without any stylistic

frills but naturally and innately,

in a well-defined musical field: R

& B, soul, funky, and groove (old

style), are the musical extremes in

which ranges in SL showing off

her passionate voice, that only a

particular black culture, moreover

Jamaican, can have in her DNA.

Dear friends of 350GRADI,

from this magazine issue,

I will deal with singers socalled

“characterizing,” that

is, those artists who, for their

stylistic peculiarities and musical

preparation, have chosen

precisely to characterize in a

well-defined and recognizable

musical style.

My experience in Secondlife

(12 years) has made me know

a multitude of live singers and

are now recognizable those who

have a varied repertoire from

those who prefer a thematic

repertoire, perhaps more

appropriate to their singing

characteristics.

However, I can safely say that

this rule does not always apply

to all singers. Often it is a natural

choice of taste, for affinity,

culture, and personal history,

rather than a ploy to brilliantly

carry out specific performances

and interpretations.

In this issue, I have the pleasure

of introducing you to a vocal

coach working in RL for 20 years

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Asahra is a voice

teacher as well as an

accomplished vocalist.

She founded Meraki

Vocal Academy in

January 2021.

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and who has chosen to

interpret a well-defined

musical style in SL for her

own taste and pleasure.

This doesn’t mean that

by teaching singing and

improving its problems,

she couldn’t easily

interpret other musical

styles with the same skill

and success.

I’m talking about the

young Londoner Asahra

Lannock.

The meeting with Asahra

was entirely accidental

because I met her during

an evening dedicated to

Valentine’s Day in an

American land (I think).

It was a real surprise for

me, so much so that I was

utterly mesmerized.

Right away, I heard a

completely different

voice, even from the

most talented and

impeccable singers of

SL, really particular and

recognizable, without

any stylistic frills but

naturally and innately,

in a well-defined

musical field: R & B, soul,

funky, and groove (old

style), are the musical

extremes in which

ranges in SL showing

off her passionate voice,

that only a particular

black culture, moreover

Jamaican, can have in her

DNA. So really, for this

occasion, our Asahra goes

well beyond her margins

of musical choice, ranging

in a valuable way from

blues, reggae, jazz, pop,

rock, up to the Opera, as

you would expect from a

singing teacher.

Speaking of teaching,

Asahra is really

passionate about music

and passing it on to those

who want to learn. She

cares about reminding

us of her school, Meraki

Vocal Academy, a family

before being a workplace.

I’m glad I knew her better

since SL needs people

committed, as she is,

to pursue a particular

discourse in the musical

field, which is not only

aimed at the evening musical

performance.

And indeed, in one way

or another, with different

commitments but then

aimed at the same end goal,

so far every artist I’ve had

the pleasure to interview is

committed with her passion

to “give” something of herself

and the “musical art,” to the

listener.

Maybe this is why the music

sector in Secondlife is one of

the most thriving and active.

That’s why it transmits and

brings to light with easy

empathy what is already

inside our life experience.

I give you some official social

media/web links of Asahra:

SL: secondlife:///app/

group/5be75540-1e58-a18ba571-7408345a9dd5/about

Soundcloud: https://

soundcloud.com/asahralannock

Facebook: https://www.

facebook.com/asahra.

lannock

The Meraki Vocal Academy

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Facebook page: https://

www.facebook.com/

merakivocalacademysl

The Meraki Vocal

Academy Website:

https://asahralannock.

wixsite.com/

merakivocalacademysl

Schedule events:

https://teamup.com/

ksffsankqnjnvrsm6o

Van: Asahra, before

entering into the musical

discourse and as per our

practice, can you give us

a description of yourself?

Personal origins, where

you live, hobbies, work

etc. What do you think

about yourself?

Asahra: I’m from London,

UK and have traveled

quite a lot. I’ve always

known what I wanted

to do from a young age,

and that was singing. I

livestream bi-weekly

at Vibe Live Music on

Thursdays @4pm slt and

Can be found through

out SL booked privately

for events, concerts,

birthdays, weddings, and

engagements. I also teach

vocal lessons weekly at

my Vocal Academy.

Van: Let’s go directly into

the musical discourse

now: you founded and

manage in SL a school

for vocalists, the Meraki

Vocal Academy. Please

explain to us when it

was born and what the

goals are.

Asahra: Yes! I created

the academy in January

2021 and launched the

first term February 28th

2021. Each term is for

6 weeks and completes

with an “end of term”

Graduation event.

It is open to people

with little to no vocal

experience as well

as the well practiced

vocalist... our classes

include both and with

full participation, we

have seen great results

and improvement in as

little as 3 weeks! There

are Private Lessons and

Group Lessons available

depending on your

desire and can do 1 term

only or make it your

regular class as we really

become a family.

Van: You are a vocalist

in RL; what was the

motivation that led you

to be one in SL as well?

Asahra: yes, I’ve been in

the music industry for

over 20 years, having

started at 6years old and

began taking bookings

at 10years old. I have

been a player of SL since

2009 as a teenager and

straight away would join

the karaoke events lol

so it was natural for me

to take it more seriously

within time. I actually

enjoy music and singing

^^

Van: Asahra, your

musical interpretations

are well defined and

circumscribed in

an undeniable and

definitive musical style.

R&B, soul, and funky

seem to be in your

blood. Where does your

knowledge come from,

and what is your musical

history?

Asahra: Thank you :) my

parents are collectors of

music and being from

the Caribbean (Jamaica),

music and poetry is a

big part of our culture.

Where kids would watch

tv for entertainment I

was digging through my

parents music collections

and learning the songs

from their parents age.

I’m also a little history

buff so I have a thirst to

learn the craft I enjoy as

deeply as possible and

that included learning

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it’s origins... blues, reggae,

jazz, pop, rock, Opera, and

classical instrumentals...

listening to the music

allowed me to write and

sing in various styles and

jam with the music as an

instrumentalist would.

Van: Do you remember

when you first got into

SL? On your own, or did

someone tell you about it?

Asahra: lol yes it was

in 2008 after hearing

a news report about a

couple divorcing due to a

game that was compared

to Sims. As lover of sims

I wanted to know what

this Game was... once

I joined I realised the

platform of SL is so much

more than a mere “game”

but a social platform and

really world of it’s own.

Van: What message

would you like your

interpretations to convey

to your listeners?

Asahra: I tend to seek to

relate to my audience in

some way... drawing their

memories to attach to

whatever i sing to really

convey the story. Singing

is really a vulnerable

experience for a vocalist...

we really open ourselves

up during that time, so

I always seek to create

a memorable, fun and

emotional experience. It’s

an opportunity to share

and represent something

that I love and almost

give others a chance to

love it to or see it from

my perspective. I do

the same with Meraki

Vocal Academy, it’s a hub

for lovers of music and

singing that’s why the

glorified bathroom singer

is more than welcome

hehe.

Van: I have heard you

sing several times in SL,

but it was enough for

me to dare to compare

you to Bruno Mars or

Donny Hathaway on

the male side, with vocal

influences from the best

female R&B and gospel

singers of the 70s. But

which singers are you

really inspired by?

Asahra: aww thank you I

love Bruno Mars haha...I

was born in the 90’s and I

have to say for me it was

the best time for music

in all genre’s so finding

one influence was really

hard... my parents played

Whitney, Celine Dionne,

Michael Bolton, Berres

Hammond (reggae), the

one and only Michael

Jackson and the Jackson

5... then I grew up and

would listen to Destiny’s

Child, Pink, Faith Evans,

Toni Braxton and Mary

J Blidge... really the list is

too long to say haha.

Van: Would you like to

sing along with other

singers in SL? If so, with

whom?

Asahra: Yes I love to go

to live events in SL when

I am not singing myself

and have managed to

make many friends

within the SL Music by us

supporting one another.

I have shared the stage

with Samm Quendra and

Tony Slade, Taboo Reign,

Mahogany, Scorpio Aeon

and Ambrosia Kamala..

Singing along with any of

these amazing vocalists

would be a pleasure as

well as TJ Joubert.

Van: What is your

favorite song that you

feel is yours?

Asahra: wow, that’s a

very interesting question

and would be really hard

to answer... How Could

An Angel break my Heart

by Toni Braxton would

have to be given that title

as it was the first cover

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song I ever performed live

as a child and won me my

first competition at 14. it

also was the first song to

ever make my audience

cry so I would say it is

with me forever.

Van: Finally, in thanking

you for giving some of

your time to 360GRADI

Magazine, I would like to

ask you what you think

about the music business

in SL? What would you

change or improve?

Asahra: I would say

that the music industry

is fun and diverse and

welcoming from my

experience... there has

been separation within

the vocalists of SL when

first getting into it...

knowing what’s what

was really a one-man

mission for the most

part however I feel

with creating places/

HUBS like Meraki

Vocal Academy that it’ll

hopefully bring us all

closer and more unified,

creating a safe space for

vocalists to come and

master their craft but also

learn how to get into livestreaming

in SL in a much

simpler way.

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SPARTAN

Spartan,

MALE FASHION

I am experienced in the men’s fashion industry as a former

blogger. I am also close to fashion houses, so the fashion

and photography industry is definitely my passion

in Second Life.

On 360GRADI I would like to present some of my suggestions

for men’s looks, hoping they can be of support to

male avatars struggling to choose how to dress and find

their own style.

I enjoy collaboration and am open to suggestions.

Spartan

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TM

SHOPPIN

Written by SPARTAN.

Images by SPARTAN.

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G EVENT

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TMD

SHOPPING

Formal or informal? Lace-up or

loafer? Polo or shirt? Dress in

size, tailored or tailored? From

head to toe, the choice of how to

dress is made of rules, exceptions,

confirmations and innovations.

In the Virtual World of Second

Life, men’s fashion has ample

and vital space even for

designers.

Formal or informal? Lace-up or

loafer? Polo or shirt? Tailored

or tailored suit? From head to

toe, dressing is made up of rules,

exceptions, confirmations, and

innovations.

It depends only partly on general

trends and much more on

personal style, circumstance, and

roles.

A quick focus on the excellences

in the men’s fashion sector on

Second Life that little by little is

becoming commercially strong

as the women’s fashion sector

that is now the most commercial

and sought after in various

aspects since the creation of the

Mesh.

Men’s fashion is gaining strength

from similar industries such as

modeling schools and catwalk

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TMD brings together the

most interesting and quality

stores in the men’s fashion

industry.

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and styling agencies.

Many recognized male

models and designers

have chosen this genre

thanks to their creativity

and skill with Mesh.

Let’s not forget all the

EVENTS dedicated to

men’s fashion.

I’m not going to talk

specifically about events

because there are so

many, and I don’t want

to advertise any of them

in this article but, one of

them that I particularly

like is “TMD.”

References

TMD

http://maps.secondlife.

com/secondlife/

TMD/125/101/22

At TMD, gather the most

exciting and quality

stores according to my

criterion in “bad fashion,

“ which has led to the

revelation of many

excellent and creative bad

bloggers whose photos

speak for themselves.

Personally speaking, a

blogger and photographer

who has a passion

for men’s design and

photography.

“A Picture Says a

Thousand Words.”

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JARLA CAPALINI

Jarla Capalini,

PHOTOGRAPHY

Head Column

Writing with light, from the Greek φῶς, φωτός, “light” and

γραϕία, “writing”, this is “photography”.

Now I know that talking about photography in Second

Life will surely make purists curl their noses or smile at

the most benevolent professionals and enthusiasts. Still,

once there were film and exposure meter, then came

digital cameras and files today. We also use phones to take

pictures, and thanks (maybe) to them, photography is now

within everyone’s reach.

Here then is that a “viewer,” with all its peculiarities

techniques can become a perfect means to “write” with the

virtual “light” the encounter between the subject and the

eye of the photographer, from which a new possible vision

is born.

The imagination of reality, albeit virtual.

This one we will do in our journey among the

photographers of Second Life: we will talk about

technique, composition, inspiration and

passion, hoping to convince skeptics that our images,

although depicting a world of pixels,

can rightly be considered “photography.”

Jarla

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ARNOO

PLANER

Arnoo began creating stolen photos and called

himself a “paparazzo” for fun. Today he is a

respected photographer in the Esselian community

on Flickr.

Writen by JARLA CAPALINI.

Images by ARNOO PLANER.

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PHOTOGRAPHER

ARNNO

Arnno, who began by photographing

“famous” people including

artists, bloggers, models, and

even other photographers, met by

chance here and there, has returned

over the years his shots “stolen”

in the form of images full of

life, feeling, and depth, managing

to capture unique aspects of each

subject photographed that have

made his style unique and imitated

by many.

The definition “paparazzo” given

to certain photographers, specialized

in capturing famous people

in particular, rare, perhaps

compromising public or private

situations, is an author definition

that has spread thanks to the

reporter’s character in “La Dolce

Vita” movie, which is called Paparazzo.

There are several theories

on the origin of the name:

it seems that the character of a

George Gissing book, that Fellini

was reading at the time, inspired

Fellini and Flaiano: Coriolano

Paparazzo, but there are several

others and it seems that Fellini

enjoyed playing tell a different

version in each interview.

The term was certainly not a

compliment; on the contrary, it

was used in a vaguely derogatory

way, as the reporter was

hunting for scoops for money at

any cost and by any means, until

Rino Barillari valued the figure

of the “paparazzo” in Italian photojournalism.

The proper preamble on the origin

of the “paparazzo” was necessary

to frame the photographer

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His portraits are unedited and

extremely expressive.

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we are interviewing in

this issue, who is not just

a “paparazzo” as he likes

to define himself, but a

portraitist of great sensitivity:

Arnno Planer

Arnno, who started photographing

“famous”

people including artists,

bloggers, models and even

other photographers, met

by chance here and there,

has given us back his “stolen”

shots over the years

in the form of images full

of life, feeling and intensity,

managing to capture

peculiar aspects of each

subject that have made

his style unique and imitated

by many. Now his

stream is the historical

memory of Second Life

and by scrolling through

his numerous albums,

we can navigate through

over 10 years of SL.

Jarla: When, how and

why did you start taking

pictures on Second Life?

Arnno: I have been on SL

since 2007. Very quickly,

I took pictures for my profile,

to have memories too.

Images of my avatar or

my friends. Little by little,

friends, friends of my

friends, started asking me

for portraits… and I got

caught up in the game.

This occasional hobby has

“ I take pictures of

people and things

that attract me”

Arnoo

become almost daily from

the moment I opened a

Flickr account, in 2011.

The introduction of

meshes in the mid-2010s

made this activity even

more exciting, with increasingly

realistic and

photogenic avatars, objects

and landscapes.

Jarla: How did you become

the most famous

paparazzo in the virtual

world?

Arnno: Haha! It has not

been thought through.

So, I opened this Flickr account

and I loved it very

quickly. I discovered the

SL community on Flickr.

It was awesome! My

Flickr nourished my second

life and my second

life nourished my Flickr.

I naturally took to photograph

these new friends

from the Flickr community.

It pleased me do it

without their knowledge

and surprise them by

posting very quickly on

Flickr. I think it came like

that. However, I’m not a

real paparazzo: these are

stolen photos, but never

compromising (smile). My

idea is only to make a surprise,

a cool wink.

Jarla: What makes you

decide whom to photograph?

What inspires

you?

Arnno: I take pictures of

people and things that

appeal to me. Today, I

am much less present

on Second Life. Nevertheless,

I still enjoy this

creative hobby and the

interactions it generates

on Flickr or Facebook.

There are things that also

helped rekindle my enjoyment,

like the Black

Dragon viewer since

one year and its built-in

poser that allows me to

play with my avatar a

lot more. I have a lot of

fun developing a sort of

ego trip with him. He is a

character a little narcissistic,

megalo, seducer, ridiculous

too, to whom I like

to give a lot of freedom.

Jarla: Since you have decided

who to photograph,

how long does it take you

to shoot the picture in

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Second Life?

Arnno: I do not control

anything! For “paparazzo”

pics, it often happens that

I had time to take only

one or two photos. In 10

seconds... It’s luck, if it’s

exploitable. However, I

am also able to take 100

or 150 photos of a subject,

to test different angles,

windlights, adjust the

depth of field, shadows

etc. I don’t look at the photos

I take. I shoot, I shoot,

and I see afterwards! And

sometimes, I throw it all.

Jarla: Do you edit your

photos, what do you base

your choices on in post

processing?

Arnno: Uh ... I had developed

an agility on

the small software that

I use for editing (ippicy.

com). But this agility has

been completely called

into question since the

discontinuation of flash

player at the start of the

year. Therefore, that’s my

current challenge. Master

again this software,

which has changed a

lot. I’m not very good in

editing, so I do the minimum.

I often use texturing

background images,

to change the mood, to

accentuate shadows, etc.

I try to make it rather realistic,

especially with a

natural attitude.

Jarla: How much do your

mood and feelings affect

you while shooting?

Arnno: If my mood and

feelings are affecting me, I

am not aware of it. It is really

the image, what it inspires

in me, that decides.

Jarla: You are also a

fashion blogger and a

landscape and interior

photographer, you have

also done exhibitions, you

have one right now at

Diamonds in the Sky Gallery,

are these different

genres of photography all

facets of your personality

or is there one that reflects

you more?

Arnno: Of course, I have

tried everything i could,

yes. But today I focus on

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photos of avatars, those

I meet or mine. It’s what

I do better or less badly. I

never thought of myself

as a blogger. It was an experience,

a discipline with

its own requirements,

very interesting. But I

don’t have time anymore.

I am continuing for a few

designer friends only.

Jarla: I know that you

don’t consider yourself an

artist, but what is an artist

for you?

Arnno: Neither artist, nor

even photographer! I’m

a guy who takes screenshots

on Second Life, like

a tourist who tries to take

the best pictures possible

of his vacation. I have a

fairly restrictive, classic

definition of the word

artist. An artist, it’s a lot

of talent but also a lot of

work, to create works

that have meaning, things

that will move us, make

us think, Help us to live

and become less stupid!

Second life allows and

generates many expressions,

especially artistic

ones. That’s great! But

any artists? Maybe a few

... But mostly I see many

people on Second Life

who live a little artist life.

It is often very annoying

for me!

“I don’t know if I have

a secret. I’m inspired

by others and I

experience a lot”

Arnoo

Jarla: What is your relationship

with Arnno the

“Paparazzo” today?

Arnno: I have already

answered a little, I think.

First, I want to say that in

15 years of Second Life,

Arnno has managed to

become more mature ...

and also less present on

Second Life. I have a lot

of affection for Arnno,

to bring it to life through

images, a bit like the

hero of my comic book.

Through my images but

also through those of others,

because Arnno says

always yes to be photographed.

Ask Tatiana Easterwood!

Jarla: What’s your best

“flaw”?

Arnno: If I’m talking

about Arnno: being quite

narcissistic, egocentric,

exhibitionist… that gives

me material for a lot of

images!

Jarla: Thank you for accepting

the interview.

Arnno: Mercì

After hundreds of photos,

thousands of followers

and millions of views and

likes, Arnno is the VIP;

he no longer photographs

famous people, but people

become famous because

Arnno photographs them

and I do not exclude that

now there is also someone

who tries to meet

him hoping to be immortalized

by him.

Arnno Actual exhibit:

Diamonds in the Sky Gallery

- March 2021

http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/

HaStArA/22/232/3501

Flickr -> https://

www.flickr.com/photos/67665515@N07/

Facebook -> https://www.

facebook.com/arno.planer/

Twitter -> @aplaner1

Instagram -> arnoplaner

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CAMP ITAL

IN S

Camp Italia è un punto di riferimento importante

nel settore culturale della comunità italiana in

Second Camp Italia Life. is an important landmark in the

cultural sector of the Italian community

Scritto da OEMA.

Immagini di OEMA.

Written by OEMA.

Images by OEMA.

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IA

SECOND LIFE

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CAMP ITALIA

IN SECOND LIFE

Camp Italia is an educational region that deals with various

educational and cultural projects. Let’s explore it together with

owner Asia Connel.

I like Camp Italia

because it is

an educational

destination, one of

those locations whose

sole purpose is to teach

and promote cultural

content.

I like Camp Italia because it is an

educational destination, one of those

places whose sole purpose is teaching

and promoting cultural content.

I want to talk about Camp Italia in this

issue because I believe that the Italian

community can find (and does find) a

significant point of reference in this

Mediterranean-style region. This is

especially true if the visitor is looking

for a supportive community that speaks

his mother tongue, Italian.

Camp Italia, in the panorama of Second Life, is

an educational sim dedicated to welcoming new

users and instructing them to learn how to use the

platform.

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Asia Connel

introduces us to

Camp Italia

To get better acquainted

with Camp Italia, I asked

a simple question to Asia

Connel, the founder,

and promoter of this

appreciable educational

project.

Oema: Asia, what are

Camp Italia’s goals and

what exactly do you do in

Second Life?

Asia: Hi Oema, in this

first year, the Camp Italia

sim has organized many

events and participated

in many others. In the

Second Life panorama,

Camp Italia is an

educational sim dedicated

to welcome new users

and educate them to learn

how to use the platform.

Starting from this target,

we aimed to make Camp

Italia a sim that reflects

an authentic link with

RL’s Italian system (“real

life”).

Camp Italia participated

last year in Fantasy Faire

as a sponsor of Fantasy

Faire Radio, then to

Milano Digital Week, and

the Italian BCorp Arkage

with an online broadcast

on some of the significant

Italian presence in SL.

This year, a support team

has been consolidated,

including Kirsten, Demi,

Ughetta, Once, and some

other avatars on an

occasional basis.

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I recommend accepting the region’s light settings

for the best experience.

Basic and advanced courses

were organized to learn how to

use the platform during last year,

from April to August, and a new

course has just started.

Camp Italia has organized several basic and

advanced courses to learn how to use the

platform.

The lockdown has seen many

users return, often quite

bewildered by the changes that

SL (“second life”) has undergone

in recent years since the mesh.

Many, really many, the art

exhibitions organized, just

as many the evenings of live

music. Camp Italia participated

in the memory of the fallen

of Nassiriya with an ad hoc

ceremony held at the sim. In

other moments linked to Italy’s

historical memory, such as the

deportation of Italian Jews and

the Foibe massacres’ victims.

It participated in the sixteen

days against violence against

women as per the call of the

United Nations. It dedicated

the square of the welcome

area to the magistrates Falcone

and Borsellino with a special

plaque. Also, General Dalla

Chiesa was named a square on

the waterfront of Burano. This

indicates a strong desire to make

virtual worlds an extension of

so-called real life.

Lessons, exhibitions, concerts,

alternate with moments

of socialization where one

finds oneself having a chat,

sometimes at the bar, sometimes

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in the camping area, often

at the swimming pool of the

Tuscan farmhouse are part of

this project. Camp Italia has

dedicated an area to Italy and

Japan’s cultural and institutional

relations, the nation that gave

life to the first embassy in Italy.

Here, too, this first embassy’s

history has been reconstructed

through period photos and

historiographical material.

The welcome area is divided

between social and cultural

spaces such as a small museum,

a classroom, and a permanent

exhibition on Futurism. There

is also a sandbox that users use

during practical lessons and a

small church that re-proposes

the Catholic Church’s Christian-

Jewish tradition with moments

of prayer.

exhaustive to describe a project

that deserves attention and

participation from the Italian

Community in SL. I refer the

reader to Asia Connel (same

name inworld).

References

Camp Italia:

http://maps.secondlife.

com/secondlife/Camp%20

Italia/126/64/23

These are the moments that

Camp Italia has built-in an

atmosphere of cordial sociality

and respect, opening also to non-

Italian realities, which is always

desirable in an international

context like Second Life.

Camp Italia participated in

SLB17 last June with a scale

reconstruction of the sim’s

main square and had space in

an episode of Designing Worlds

with an interview of Saffia

Widdershins to my avatar.

Asia’s words are the most

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Un grazie speciale a

Un ringraziamento speciale ai nostri

affezionati lettori che hanno messo il

kiosk della rivista sulla loro land:

Lee Olsen

LUNDY ART GALLERY

Tia Rungray

STRUKTURO

-Ñïéü- (nieuwenhove)

NOIR’WEN CITY

Dixmix source

DixMix Art Gallery

Anelie Abeyante

La Maison d’Aneli

Ilyra Chardin (ilyra.chardin)

Emergent Gallery

LIV (ragingbellls)

Raging Graphix Gallery

Michiel Bechir

Michiel Bechir Gallery at Embrace

Michiel Art Cafe

Hermes Kondor

Viktor Savior de Grataine (viktorsavior)

SHINY (narayanraja)

Bohemio Love

Jaz (Jessamine2108)

Art Promotion

Camp Italia

Mediterraneo-Oc

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SL PHOT

SEEN ON

“inside me ”

MIna Arcana

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FLICKR

OGRAPHERS

Chosen by

the publisher.

Beautiful

photographs

seen on the

Flickr group

of 360 GRADI

Magazine.

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Alba

Silverfall

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MIna Arcana

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Anto Haiku

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Roxaane

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Lidiane

Miller

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Ashley Yexil

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ANTO HAIKU

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Santra Seranno

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Choice

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Lidiane

Miller

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Elaine

Lectar

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Twain Orfan

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Simply Jana

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Say

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Kirammer

Kingsley

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Jo

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Coqueta

Georgia

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Grazie per la lettura.

Speriamo che tu

abbia gradito questo

numero.

360 GRADI Magazine

Copyright.

Non siamo affiliati a

Linden Lab.

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Per la pubblicità su 360

GRADI Magazine scrivi

a:

360gradi.sl@gmail.com.

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