Report - London Borough of Hillingdon

hillingdon.gov.uk

Report - London Borough of Hillingdon

Cabinet

Meeting date: THURSDAY 10 TH NOVEMBER 2005

Time:

Venue:

7.00PM

COMMITTEE ROOM 6, CIVIC CENTRE

HIGH STREET, UXBRIDGE

Councillors in the Cabinet

Councillor Ray Puddifoot

Councillor David Simmonds

Councillor Sandra Jenkins

Councillor Philip Corthorne

Councillor Solveig Stone

Councillor Jonathan Bianco

Councillor Douglas Mills

Councillor Keith Burrows

Councillor Mike Heywood

Portfolio / designated area of responsibility

Leader of the Council (Cabinet Chairman),

Older People’s Champion

Deputy Leader of the Council, Social Services and

Health, future development of Children’s Services

Environment

Housing

Education, Youth and Leisure

Finance, Regeneration and Corporate Services

Performance, Partnerships and Community Safety

Planning and Transportation

Service Co-ordination

Further information

This agenda was published on 2 November and contains reports which detail the business

of and decisions to be made by the Cabinet at its meeting on the 10 November. If you

would like further information, please call Hillingdon’s Cabinet Office on 01895 250 472,

email cabinet@hillingdon.gov.uk or visit the Council’s website www.hillingdon.gov.uk

Mark Braddock – Cabinet Secretary

Involving the Public in the way we do business…

Members of the Public and Press are very welcome to attend this

meeting. Free parking is available via the entrance to the Civic

Centre in the High Street. Bus routes 427, U1, U3, U4 and U7 all

stop at the Civic Centre. Uxbridge underground station, with the

Piccadilly and Metropolitan lines, is a short walk away. Please

enter from the Council’s main reception where you will be

directed to the Committee Room.

Please switch off your mobile phone when entering the room and

note that the Council operates a no-smoking policy in its offices.

This agenda

is available in

large print


Agenda & Business

1. Apologies for Absence

2. Declarations of Interest in matters coming before this meeting

3. To receive the minutes of the Cabinet meeting held on 12 October 2005 (pages 1 –

12)

4. To confirm that the items of business marked Part I will be considered in Public and

that the items marked Part 2 will be considered in private

5. Consideration of Cabinet reports (listed below)

6. Any Business transferred from Part 1 of the agenda.

Cabinet Reports – Part 1 – Members, Public and the Press

Items are marked in the order that they will be considered. A reference number is shown to

indicate that this item has previously appeared on the Council’s Forward Plan. The

Forward Plan is a publicly available document updated each month which outlines, as far

as possible, the Cabinet’s work programme over the next four months.

Page No. Ref No.

1 Hillingdon Council’s Strategy for Older People 13 -

2 Development of Children’s Services 42 427

3 Consultation and Engagement – A Future Strategy 52 361

for Hillingdon

4 Hillingdon’s Domestic Violence Strategy 64 512

5 Council Workforce Plan 2005-2015 112 516

6 Equality Standard for Local Government – an

140 441

update

7 West London Tram – Consultation Response 151 -

8 Performance Management Audit – Action Plan 185 514

9 Draft Joint Municipal Waste Management Strategy 206 335

10 Acorn Youth Club development, Columbia Avenue, 220 508

Eastcote

11 Refurbishment and reopening of Public

226 515

Conveniences in Shopping Centres

12 Proposed Charging for Pre-Application Advice on 229 504

Major Development Schemes

13 Budget Month 6 2005/06 Revenue and Capital 240 465

Monitoring

14 The Great Barn, Manor Court, Harmondsworth 271 -

Cabinet Reports - Part 2 – Private, Members Only

The reports listed below in Part 2 are not made public because they contain confidential or

exempt information as defined by law in the Local Government (Access to Information Act

1985). This is because:

• Part of Item 14 and the whole of Item 15 contain information relating to the financial

or business affairs of any particular person (other than the Authority). (paragraph 7

of the Schedule to the Act).


• Items 16 - 24 contain information relating to any terms proposed or to be proposed

by or to the authority in the course of negotiations for a contract for the acquisition

or disposal of property or the supply of goods or services. (paragraph 9 of the

Schedule to the Act).

Page No. Ref No.

14 The Great Barn, Manor Court, Harmondsworth 285 -

– Part 2 Appendix

15 Uxbridge Lido and Sports Centre Procurement 298 388

– Leisure Management Operator

16 Frank Welch Court, Eastcote – Progress on

339 477

Redevelopment

17 Bedwell Gardens Community Centre, Hayes 344 370

18 Sites E, H and L at Hillingdon House Farm,

360 -

Uxbridge

19 King Edwards Road, Ruislip – Former Hostel 364 473

20 Tender for new 4 bed Respite Care Home at 371 458

Burns Close, Hayes

21 Tender for Provision of Insurance Cover 377 513

22 Tender for Home Improvement Agency and

387 493

Home Handyperson Scheme

23 Pole Hill Open Space, off Gainsborough Road, 392 482

Hayes – Grant of Licence

24 Herlwyn Avenue Playing Fields, West End

Road, Ruislip – Grant of Licence

396 483

7. Any Items transferred from Part 1

8. Any Other Business in Part 2


Cabinet Decisions – 12 th October 2005

DECISION LIST

The left hand column indicates the decision number, which relates to the report number on

the main agenda. The middle column details the actual decision made, the reason for that

decision and also any alternatives considered or rejected. The right hand column indicates

the name of the officer(s) responsible for implementing/following up the decision in each case.

Cabinet Members Present – Councillors:

• Ray Puddifoot (Leader of the Council and Cabinet Chairman)

• David Simmonds (Deputy Leader and Cabinet Member for

Social Services & Health)

• Philip Corthorne (Cabinet Member for Housing)

• Mike Heywood (Cabinet Member for Planning & Transportation)

• Sandra Jenkins (Cabinet Member for Environment)

• Douglas Mills (Cabinet Member for Performance, Partnerships

& Community Safety)

• Solveig Stone (Cabinet Member for Education, Youth &

Leisure)

Officer contact

CABINET

OFFICE

01895 250472

Other Party Leaders Present – Councillors:

• Rod Dubrow-Marshall (Leader of the Labour Group)

• Mike Cox (Deputy Leader of the Liberal Democrat Group)

Apologies for absence received from :-

• Jonathan Bianco (Cabinet Member for Finance, Regeneration

and Corporate Services)

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Councillor Rod Dubrow-Marshall declared a general personal and nonprejudicial

interest as Dean of Faculty at Buckinghamshire Chilterns

University College, which was a provider of courses to the Council’s

Social Services Group and as a member of the Board of Hillingdon

Homes. He also declared a personal and non-prejudicial interest as a

Governor of Uxbridge High School (Item 4).

MINUTES OF MEETING HELD ON 8 TH SEPTEMBER 2005

The minutes of the meeting held on 8 th September 2005 were agreed

as a correct record.

CABINET

OFFICE

01895 250472

CABINET

OFFICE

01895 250472

Cabinet Decisions 12.10.2005 Page 1


DISTRIBUTION OF REPORTS IN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE

Reports on item 8, items 10 to 16 and part of item 9 were considered to

contain exempt information as defined in the paragraphs to the

Schedule to the Local Government (Access to Information) Act 1985.

These reports and part report were considered in the private section of

the meeting with the exception of item 16 which the Cabinet agreed to

consider in the public part of the meeting in view of the public interest in

the issue.

1 COUNCIL PLAN AND COMMUNITY STRATEGY :

PROGRESS REPORT ON WORK PROGRAMME

DECISION

That the Cabinet notes the progress made to date and indicates

that it wishes all targets to be met.

REASON FOR DECISION

Cabinet agreed that both the Community Strategy and Council Plan

should be monitored regularly.

CABINET

OFFICE

01895 250472

TRACY

WATERS

01895 277694

PAUL

WILLIAMS

01895 250986

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

Cabinet could have instructed officers to take further action on the work

programmes.

2 HEATHROW AIRPORT MASTER PLAN –

CONSULTATION RESPONSE

DECISION

TIM JURDON

01895 250610

1. That Cabinet agrees the Council’s response to BAA’s Heathrow

Airport Interim Master Plan consultation as set out in the report

together with the responses to the questions set out in Appendix 1

and the following additional response to Question 8 :-

‘Reference is made in the Interim Master Plan to the need for

demand management on roads in respect of any schemes for

additional public transport infrastructure (para 9.35 refers). The

Council expects any such potential road pricing proposals to take

full account of the needs of existing local residents and

communities. They should not be financially disadvantaged

simply to facilitate the commercial expansion of Heathrow

Airport.’

and the following additional response to question 7 :-

‘The Council notes that BAA is not willing to cooperate in setting

up community liaison with stakeholders to cover and evaluate

Cabinet Decisions 12.10.2005 Page 2


complaints about airport noise.’

2. That the wording of the final response to be made is delegated

to officers, in consultation with the Cabinet Member for Planning

and Transportation, including the following additional wording in

the response :- ‘BAA has a regulatory responsibility to develop a

strategic environmental impact assessment with regard to

Heathrow Airport.’

REASON FOR DECISION

The response will make BAA aware of the Council’s views in order to

seek to improve the content and subsequent outcomes from the Master

Plan in accordance with the Council’s priorities.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To make no comment.

3 VOID TRANSFER POLICY

DECISION

That the Council continues to jointly deliver the Void Transfer

Agreement with Chiltern Hundreds Charitable Housing

Association (CHCHA) to transfer another 100 Council homes to

the Association.

MELISSA

SPARKS

01895 556689

REASON FOR DECISION

The scheme enables the Council to maximise the use of a limited

number of its dwellings in order to secure additional affordable homes

for rent on a permanent basis to meet local housing need.

The scheme also impacts beneficially on the Council’s Comprehensive

Performance Assessment as it contributes to the Government targets of

reducing numbers of households in temporary accommodation and the

length of time in B & Bs.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To terminate the Agreement.

4 SCHOOL ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

DECISION

1. That Cabinet approves a draft forward plan for consultation

with schools.

VENETIA

ROGERS

01895 250494

2. That Cabinet agrees that projects at the schools identified in

paragraph 14 of the report should be programmed as soon as

Cabinet Decisions 12.10.2005 Page 3


capital resources permit.

3. That a further report be made to Cabinet following consultation

with schools.

4. That Cabinet approves the draft LEA Assessibility Strategy as a

basis for consultation with schools and relevant community

groups and other partners.

REASON FOR DECISION

The development of a forward plan for capital investment in the

schools’ estate is essential in order to support school improvement,

ensure that buildings are safe and fit for purpose, discharge the

Council’s statutory responsibilities for health & safety, ensure that the

best use is made of scarce capital resources, ensure that propertyrelated

risks are managed, and for the Council’s decision-making

processes to have credibility with schools.

The LEA is required to have in place an Accessibility Strategy for

schools.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To not proceed with the development of a forward plan. Cabinet could

have proposed amendments to the consultation document or to the

draft Accessibility Strategy.

5 PLANNING OBLIGATIONS – QUARTERLY FINANCIAL

MONITORING REPORT

DECISION

That the Cabinet notes the updated financial information as set

out in Appendix 1 to the report.

REASON FOR DECISION

The District Audit “Management of Planning Obligations” Action Plan

1999 contained a number of recommendations. Recommendation R13

specifically requires the Council to produce regular financial

statements. The regular reporting of such information is necessary to

aid transparency and assure probity in the area of planning obligations.

JALES

TIPPELL

01895 250402

PAUL

NEEDHAM

01895 277084

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

It is a requirement of the District Audit report and an obvious example

of good practice to monitor income and expenditure against specific

planning agreements and ensure that expenditure takes place in

accordance within the parameters of those agreements.

Cabinet Decisions 12.10.2005 Page 4


6 CORPORATE EQUALITIES AND DIVERSITY PLAN

Cabinet recorded its thanks to officers for producing the Plan.

DECISION

That the Plan be agreed and approved for publication on the

external and internal websites and officers be instructed /

requested to utilise its contents in developing service plans.

SONIA

GANDHI

01895 277019

REASON FOR DECISION

This plan will ensure that the Council reach its target of level 2 for the

Equality Standard for Local Government by March 2006, and levels 3 /

4 by March 2008. No target has yet been set for level 5, but it is

anticipated that the Council will achieve this target by March 2010.

Ensuring that the actions stated in the plan will result in meeting all of

the equality and diversity best value performance indiactors as

indicated in the Council Plan.

Many of the actions listed will help the council meet short, medium and

long term targets as stated in the Community Strategy.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

Cabinet could have modified the plan.

7 BUDGET – MONTH 5 2005/06 REVENUE MONITORING

DECISION

1. That Directors provide Cabinet Members with options to ensure

any forecast overspend on revenue budgets for the current year is

reduced to bring it back in line with the approved budget.

PAUL

WHAYMAND

01895 556074

2. That the Leader of the Council assisted by other Cabinet

Members, be instructed to review the Adult Education and Special

Education Needs budgets and report back to Cabinet at a later

date.

REASON FOR DECISION

To ensure the Council achieves its budgetary objectives.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

None.

The report relating to this item had been dispatched less than 5 working

days before the Cabinet meeting and the Chairman therefore agreed

that it may be discussed as urgent so that decisions on the budget may

Cabinet Decisions 12.10.2005 Page 5


e taken based on the most up to date information available.

8 BOTWELL GREEN SPORTS AND LEISURE CENTRE –

APPOINTMENT OF QUANTITY SURVEYORS / COST

CONSULTANTS AND DESIGN TEAM TO DEVELOP THE

DESIGN

BILL KING

01895 250566

DECISION

1. To agree to progress the development of the Botwell Green

Sports & Leisure Centre.

2. To authorise the expenditure of £750K as outlined in the

body of the report to develop the project up to pre-construction

stage.

3. To agree to the appointment of Atkins Consultants to act as

the Council’s Quantity Surveyor/Cost Consultants for the project.

4. To agree to the appointment of an architect led design team

at the conclusion of the best value review undertaken by the

appointed quantity surveyor and officers based on the submitted

tenders that will provide the most suitable design solution.

5. To authorise the Asset Management Review Project Director

to commission surveys as necessary to develop designs to preconstruction.

6. To agree to the submission of detailed planning

application(s) at RIBA Stage D to secure consent for the

development of the Project.

7. To agree to the submission of Outline Planning application

for the disposal of Hayes Pool.

REASON FOR DECISION

To enable progress of a key project, which is part of the Education,

Youth & Leisure Asset Management Review strategy of developing new

leisure facilities to meet the needs of the community.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To not approve the appointments and cancel the project.

This report was considered in part 2 because it contained exempt

information as defined in paragraph 8 of the schedule to the Local

Government (Access to Information) Act 1985. (The amount of any

expenditure proposed to be incurred by the authority under any

particular contract for the acquisition of property of the supply of goods

or services).

Cabinet Decisions 12.10.2005 Page 6


9 REFURBISHMENT AND REOPENING OF PUBLIC

CONVENIENCES IN SHOPPING CENTRES

DECISION

GERRY

EDWARDS

01895 250903

1. To request officers to progress the reopening of the public

conveniences at Botwell Lane, Hayes and Manor Farm, Ruislip

(Option b) and to report the proposed programme to the

November meeting of the Cabinet.

2. To agree to the funding of CCTV provision from the CCTV

budget.

REASON FOR DECISION

To respond to the requests of older people and disabled people in the

borough for the Council to reopen some of the public toilets previously

closed using funding from the fund for disabled and older people’s

priorities.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To reopen alternative or additional public conveniences.

The report relating to this item had been dispatched less than 5 working

days before the Cabinet meeting and the Chairman therefore agreed

that it may be discussed as urgent because of the need to progress

works speedily.

Appendix A to this report was considered in part 2 because it contained

exempt information as defined in paragraph 8 of the schedule to the

Local Government (Access to Information) Act 1985. (The amount of

any expenditure proposed to be incurred by the authority under any

particular contract for the acquisition of property of the supply of goods

or services).

10 RUISLIP MANOR SPORTS AND SOCIAL CLUB

DECISION

1. That in view of its wish to see the preservation of a valuable

sports and recreational facility in the Ruislip area, the Cabinet

supports the existence of Ruislip Manor Sports and Social Club

(RMSSC) and the need for it to continue to provide such a facility

for the benefit of the community.

DORIAN

LEATHAM

01895 250569

2. That Cabinet authorises the Corporate Director of Education

Youth and Leisure to explore whether, as part of the voluntary and

community sector initiative, it is possible for RMSSC to assist in

the area of youth development and thereby attract grant funding

from the Council.

Cabinet Decisions 12.10.2005 Page 7


3. That Cabinet authorises the Head of Corporate Property

Services and the Borough Solicitor to explore whether the

Landlord is prepared to permit the location of the London

Ambulance Services’ vehicles on part of the playing fields which it

has demised to RMSSC.

4. That in the event that a satisfactory solution cannot be

found by pursuing the courses of action set out in Decisions 2 and

3 above, Cabinet authorises offices to explore generally whether

any assistance, including the possibility of providing financial

assistance, can be given to RMSSC.

5. That once officers have explored the possibilities set out in

the above recommendations and the outcome of the arbitration

process is known, to report back to the Leader and the Chief

Executive who will have the delegated authority to decide the form

and extent of any assistance which the Council may decide to

provide to RMSSC.

REASON FOR DECISION

Cabinet wishes to explore the steps which it can legitimately take to

support and assist RMSSC.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To not provide assistance to the RMSSC.

This report was considered in part 2 because it contained exempt

information as defined in paragraph 4 of the schedule to the Local

Government (Access to Information) Act 1985. (information relating to

any particular applicant for, or recipient or former recipient of, any

financial assistance provided by the authority ).

11 ACCEPTANCE OF TENDER FOR TERM CONTRACT –

SCHEDULE 33 – ERECTION AND RENEWAL OF STREET

FURNITURE

DECISION

E BALA

01895 250443

That the Term Contract Schedule 33 – Erection and Renewal of

Street Furniture be awarded to Cyril Smith (Fencing) ltd.

REASON FOR DECISION

The analysis of tenders received shows that the one recommended

offers best value to the Council.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To accept an alternative tender.

Cabinet Decisions 12.10.2005 Page 8


This report was considered in part 2 because it contained exempt

information as defined in paragraph 9 of the schedule to the Local

Government (Access to Information) Act 1985. (Any terms proposed by

or to the authority in the course of negotiations for a Contract for the

acquisition or disposal of property of the supply of goods or services).

12 REPLACEMENT OF THE LIBRARY COMPUTER

MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

DECISION

1. That Cabinet approves that SirsiDynix be awarded preferred

supplier status for the contract subject to satisfactory terms and

conditions being negotiated.

DERRICK

FERNANDES

01895 250701

2. That Cabinet approves the re-phasing of the costs of the capital

project, as set out in Table D in Section 9.0 of the report.

REASON FOR DECISION

SirsiDynix offered the best value.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To accept another of the tenders.

This report was considered in part 2 because it contained exempt

information as defined in paragraph 8 of the schedule to the Local

Government (Access to Information) Act 1985. (The amount of any

expenditure proposed to be incurred by the authority under any

particular contract for the acquisition of property of the supply of goods

or services).

13 SELECTION OF SUPPLIER OF NETWORK HARDWARE

DECISION

1. That Company A is awarded preferred supplier status for this

contract subject to satisfactory terms and conditions being

negotiated.

STEVE

PALMER

01895 556009

2. That Company B is awarded secondary supplier status should

satisfactory terms and conditions fail to be negotiated with

Company A.

REASON FOR DECISION

Company A has clearly demonstrated their ability to officers to deliver

the items in the current capital programme. Company B has also

demonstrated that they have the ability to deliver but at a higher cost

than Company A.

Cabinet Decisions 12.10.2005 Page 9


ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To award the contract to another company.

This report was considered in part 2 because it contained exempt

information as defined in paragraph 8 of the schedule to the Local

Government (Access to Information) Act 1985. (The amount of any

expenditure proposed to be incurred by the authority under any

particular contract for the acquisition of property of the supply of goods

or services).

14 UXBRIDGE RUGBY FOOTBALL CLUB – HILLINGDON

HOUSE FARM

DECISION

1. To approve the terms set out in Appendix A and B for the grant

of an Agreement for a Lease and Lease for a term of fifteen years

in respect of the land shown edged black on plan UXB444 dated

7 th September 2005 to permit construction of the rugby pitch.

MAYUR

PATEL

01895 277279

2. That paragraph 5 in Appendix B be amended to add the

following wording to the end:- ‘, as attached to the lease.’

REASON FOR DECISION

To allow the construction of a new rugby pitch.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To not grant an agreement.

This report was considered in part 2 because it contained exempt

information as defined in paragraph 9 of the schedule to the Local

Government (Access to Information) Act 1985. (Any terms proposed by

or to the authority in the course of negotiations for a Contract for the

acquisition or disposal of property of the supply of goods or services).

15 APPOINTMENT OF CONSULTANT TO PREPARE

OUTLINE PLANNING APPLICATION AND ANY

NECESSARY ACCOMPANYING REPORTS FOR THE

DISPOSAL OF HARLINGTON ROAD DEPOT

DECISION

SETISH

VEKARIA

01895 277245

To appoint Bickerdike Allen Partners to prepare the outline

planning application and any necessary accompanying reports

and assessments for the disposal of Harlington Road Depot.

Cabinet Decisions 12.10.2005 Page 10


REASON FOR DECISION

To progress the project.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To identify an alternative resource to manage the planning application.

This report was considered in part 2 because it contained exempt

information as defined in paragraph 9 of the schedule to the Local

Government (Access to Information) Act 1985. (Any terms proposed by

or to the authority in the course of negotiations for a Contract for the

acquisition or disposal of property of the supply of goods or services).

16 PROGRESS REPORT ON THE POTENTIAL ACQUISITION

OF HARMONDSWORTH BARN

DECISION

1. That Cabinet expresses its wish to purchase the freehold of

Harmondsworth Barn but notes that the condition survey and

estimated annual maintenance revenue costs are still to be

confirmed.

2. That Cabinet notes that the appropriate delegated officer will

take any necessary decision with respect to Harmondsworth Barn

in consultation with the Leader of the Council and the Cabinet

Members for Finance, Regeneration and Corporate Services and

Planning and Transportation.

JANET

RANGELEY

01895 250553

SARAH

DRYSDALE

01895 277078

REASON FOR DECISION

To ensure that the barn is secured for the community.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

None.

The report relating to this item had been dispatched less than 5 working

days before the Cabinet meeting and the Chairman therefore agreed

that it may be discussed as urgent in order that a formal statement

indicating the Council’s interest in securing the long term future of the

Barn is made before the Official Receivers close the accounts on 31 st

October 2005.

This report was identified as containing exempt information as defined

in paragraph 8 of the schedule to the Local Government (Access to

Information) Act 1985. (The amount of any expenditure proposed to be

incurred by the authority under any particular contract for the

acquisition of property of the supply of goods or services).

The Cabinet decided to consider the item in the public part of the

Cabinet Decisions 12.10.2005 Page 11


meeting in view of the public interest in the issue.

The meeting closed at 8.33 p.m.

THIS DECISIONS SHEET WAS PUBLISHED ON 13 TH OCTOBER 2005. NO DECISIONS

WERE CALLED IN FOR SCRUTINY AND ALL DECISIONS THEREFORE CAME INTO

FORCE ON 20 TH OCTOBER 2005.

Cabinet Decisions 12.10.2005 Page 12


HILLINGDON COUNCIL’S STRATEGY FOR

OLDER PEOPLE

ITEM 1

Contact Officer Phillip Sharpe 01895 277274

Papers with this report

Appendix 1 - attached

SUMMARY

This report outlines the development of a multi-agency, Council strategy for older

people which links to Hillingdon’s Community Plan. Members are asked to adopt the

strategy attached as appendix one and agree to the monitoring procedures outlined.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Cabinet agrees:

1. To adopt the strategy as outlined in Appendix 1.

2. That an action plan be developed following publication of the strategy

which will be monitored by an inter-agency strategy group, older people and

the Older People’s Champion.

3. That a copy of the action plan be brought to Cabinet in January 2006 for

information.

REASONS FOR OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

The adoption of this strategy and development and implementation of an action plan

will enable the Council to work with partners and the community to continue to

improve services for older people and take appropriate action on those areas for

further development identified by older people during the consultation Adoption of

the strategy assists the Council and its partners in meeting the requirements of the

Comprehensive Performance Assessment (CPA) Key Lines of Enquiry (KLOE’s),

delivering the Community Strategy and in further improving services to older people

in our Community.

OPTIONS AVAILABLE

Cabinet could amend the Plan.

INFORMATION

1. The development of a Health & Social Care Strategy for Older People in

September 2004 identified a range of issues important to older people which were

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 13


outside of the strategy’s health and social care remit. At the same time the Council

carried out a self-assessment against the CPA KLOE’s for older people which

highlighted the need to develop a Council wide and interagency strategy

encompassing the wider spectrum of older peoples’ well-being. This strategy has

now been developed in partnership with a wide range of partners including the PCT,

Hillingdon Hospital, the voluntary sector, Police, Ambulance Service and Fire

Brigade.

Financial Implications

2. The draft capital programme provides for £250k for each of the next 3 years

to support this initiative. In the medium term this strategy will mitigate future revenue

budget pressures as it will enable more people to live in their own homes which is a

more cost efficient option than utilising residential care.

CORPORATE CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

3. This strategy was agreed at management board on the 27.9.05 and has been

produced by an interdepartmental and interagency group involving all of the

Council’s departments.

Corporate Finance Comments

4. Corporate Finance has reviewed this report and the financial implications

within it. The view of Corporate Finance is that this report and its financial

implications properly reflect both the direct resource implications on the service

concerned and any wider implications on Council resources as a whole.

Legal Implications

5. The Local Government Act 2000 is relevant to the Council's Strategy for Older

People in two respects which can be briefly summarised as follows:

6. Section 2 provides that every local authority has the power to do anything

which it considers is likely to achieve the promotion or improvement of the economic,

social or environmental wellbeing of an area. These three heads of wellbeing have a

very wide scope and therefore give considerable discretion to a local authority.

7. It is important to note that the above power may be exercised in relation to or

for the benefit of the whole or any part of a local authority's area or all or any persons

resident or present in such an area. The power can therefore clearly be used to

underpin the Council's Strategy for Older People in Hillingdon.

8. As is stated in the strategy document, it is important to recognise that the

themes for the Plan for Older People are linked to Hillingdon's Community Plan 2005

which outlines the Council's vision for the future of Hillingdon's communities.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 14


9. Section 4 of the Act makes it a requirement for every local authority to

prepare a Community Strategy for promoting or improving the well-being of their

area and contributing to the achievement of sustainable development in the United

Kingdom.

EXTERNAL CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

10. The document was endorsed by the PCT management board on the 8.9.05

On 3 October 2005 at the Assembly for Older People, The Leader of the Council,

Cllr Ray Puddifoot launched Hillingdon Council’s Strategy for Older People and also

announced his appointment as Champion for Older People. This was also widely

reported in the local media and comments invited by them.

11. 1000 copies of the strategy went out to older people and community groups

for comment by 21 October. It has also been through a reader’s panel and

confirmed as “understandable and promising”.

Below are some of the comments received:

• Older people welcomed the Leader as their Champion and felt that this

would have the positive effect of raising their value and profile in the

community.

• The Gazette and The Leader articles about both the launch of the

strategy, and the Leader as Champion, were very positive and viewed it as

an excellent opportunity to improve the lives of older people in the

community.

• There were 2 subsequent letters in the Gazette, both with a useful

contribution to service planning.

• Many older people do not feel safe in their homes or in the community and

welcomed the ‘overall’ approach of the plan which includes community

safety.

• “The appearance of local areas with suitable lighting and safe pavements

is important to older people”.

• “A clean and attractive borough where the environment is protected,

transport links improved and our heritage preserved – is what we want”.

• “Promoting active ageing – this would be beneficial to ALL residents… not

merely the elderly…”

• “If telephone surveys are to be carried out, please send a written notice…I

would like to congratulate the Council on its efforts at consultation.”

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Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 15


• It is useful that this strategy will also influence any health processes and

inefficiencies. Older people want more information on the healthcare that

is available and the cost where applicable.

12. Older people also welcomed The Leader’s intention to make £250,000 available

to improve access/facilities in the community.

Other partners and stakeholders have been consulted and have contributed to the

strategy.

The strategy will be amended, as and when necessary, to reflect any further views

that are expressed by older people or stakeholders.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

Consultation responses

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APPENDIX 1

September

2005

For

Consultation

Hillingdon

Council’s

Plan for Older

People

Improving the

quality of life

for our older

residents

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Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 17


Forward – By the Older

People’s Champion

Hillingdon’s older

residents are one of our

greatest resources. They

are part of our living

history for younger

generations to learn from.

Some were children at the

time when London was

being bombed day after

day. Others came to

escape oppression.

Others to find a better life

for their children. They

have served Hillingdon

well as good neighbours,

as parents, as councillors,

as volunteers, as public

servants and as business

people.

I want to work with older

residents to find out what

a better Hillingdon will

mean for them and this

plan aims to set out how

the council will champion

their ideas. I also want to

work with people who are

50+ so that we start to

plan for their future.

In any community, and

certainly in one as diverse

as Hillingdon, there will be

no single view about what

older people want from

their council. Mostly they

will want the same as

everyone else – to live in a

safe clean environment, to

be able to easily access

services and to receive

prompt help with any

problems or difficulties.

Older people are more

likely to be physically frail

and some socially

isolated.

In putting this plan

together we will consult

widely with older people –

individually and with

organisations that work

with them. We cannot do

everything that they would

like. Sometimes we do

not have the power and

for some things we do not

have the money. I

believe this plan

champions and celebrates

older people. I will

continue to work with my

fellow councillors and

officers to ensure we do

what we say we are going

to do in this plan.

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Introduction

This plan identifies what

the council can do directly

and through its influence

that will improve life for

older people.

There are many examples

of good practice and

excellence in Hillingdon.

Co-operation between the

council and the health

service, and voluntary

sector for example, is

already bringing better

services and helping more

older people to live

independently. We want

to build on our successes

and improve how we work

for older people across the

council. We want a better

quality of life for all older

people.

While many older people

in Hillingdon will carry on

enjoying the same quality

of life as they grow older,

some will become isolated

and physically or mentally

frail. This plan sets out

what we propose to do to

improve their lives and

when we can, preventing

some of the problems

associated with growing

older. The plan talks

about our longer-term

aspirations and the

actions we will take in the

next three years to

achieve our goals.

It is important to

understand that the

themes for this Plan for

Older People, are linked to

Hillingdon’s Community

Plan 2005, which outlines

the council’s‘vision’ for the

future of Hillingdon’s

communities. The seven

key areas of this vision

are:

• A borough of

learning and

culture – where

residents can

develop their skills,

broaden their

knowledge and

embrace new

leisure pursuits.

• A safe borough –

where crime and

the fear of crime is

falling, policing is

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visible and our

community is

safer.

• A clean and

attractive

borough – where

the environment is

protected,

transport links

improved and our

heritage

preserved.

• A borough with

improving health,

housing and

social care –

where first class

health and social

care and decent,

affordable housing

are available to all.

• A prosperous

borough – where

enterprise is

encouraged,

businesses

supported and

new jobs created

for local people.

• A borough where

children and

young people are

healthy, safe and

supported –

where our young

people are valued,

properly educated

and given the

opportunity to

thrive.

Under these themes this

Plan for Older People

proposes eight areas for

action:

• Safe and secure

• Involved and

participating

• Living

independently

• Staying healthy

• Meeting housing

needs

• Out and about

• Reducing

discrimination

• Consulting and

informing

While none of these are

distinct, they provide a

convenient way of

organising what we need

to do. Feeling secure and

staying healthy have close

links in promoting the

participation of older

people, and there are

similar close links between

other areas. Many things

determine our health and

quality of life. This plan

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Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 20


focuses on what the

council can do either

directly or by influencing

what others do to achieve

its aims.

Each of these eight

sections is organised into:

• Issues for older

people

• What the council

wants to achieve

• What the council

is doing now

• Actions the

council will take

in the next 3

years.

_____________________

Promoting Active

Ageing

Our society has changed

radically over the past 20

years. People are living

longer, demanding better

healthcare, high

standards, and they will no

longer put up with the one

size fits all services of the

past. People of 50+ are

now doing things which 20

years ago people of 30

would have done. For

many, old age has

become a state of mind

rather than a fixed

chronological point.

The foundations for a

good, healthy old age are

laid in early life and

depend on physical

activity, good diet, mental

stimulus, good quality

housing, health care and

employment opportunities.

In Hillingdon we want to

ensure that our services

are developed in

consultation with people

aged 50+ to ensure that

services reach the

standards they will expect.

We want people to remain

as healthy as possible and

to enjoy the many

opportunities of life. We

will therefore extend our

health promotion activities

to those people who are

50+.

Some facts and figures

Although the total number

of people over 60 in

Hillingdon is decreasing,

the proportion of those

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over 75 is increasing.

The older population is

also becoming more

diverse.

There will, over time, be

an increasing number of

older people from the

diverse communities who

live in Hillingdon. We

face the challenge of

making Hillingdon a good

place for all older people.

Information from the 2001

census has important

implications for how we

meet the needs of older

people.

• 79.1% of

Hillingdon’s

population is white

• 20.9% from black

minority ethnic

communities

• 36,000 have a

(limited) long-term

illness

• 18,000 have poor

health

• 13,000 are

pensioners living

alone

It is likely that the 2001

census under represents

the numbers of people in

these groups. We are

likely to have to respond

to a much greater

proportion of people with

both high and low level

needs.

This Plan is based on the

following Principles:

A whole life perspective

We need to challenge the

idea that there is a group

of “old people” – “ageing”

is simply a process – and

it is disability or frailty, not

age, that leads to the

need for assistance.

A positive view of

ageing

Older people are a

valuable resource for our

community. We need to

use their abilities and

experience and not think

of them on as only users

of services.

Combating

discrimination

There are still inequalities

and discrimination within

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society despite legislation

and codes of practice.

Age discrimination needs

to be tackled alongside

other discrimination. Age

can add to other forms of

discrimination.

Citizenship and rights

Older people need to be

encouraged to be active

participants in planning

and commenting on the

services they receive.

Communication and

Consultation

Good communication and

consultation are important

in quality services. We

will ensure equality and

fair access based on

accurate and up-to-date

information.

A Council wide

approach

We are one council and

believe that working

across departments and in

partnership with other

organisations is the best

way for us to improve the

well-being of Hillingdon’s

older people.

Now we come to the 8

areas for actions:

1. Safe and Secure

Issues for older people

Many older people worry

about their safety when

they leave their homes

and even sometimes

whilst in their own homes.

They read in the papers

and hear on TV about high

levels of crime and

violence and this often

increases their anxiety.

Although older people are

less likely than others to

be the victims of street

robbery, they are the

group of people most

fearful of such crime.

This fear can increase

social isolation, cause

anxiety and stop older

people leaving their

homes.

It is recognised however

that older people are at

risk from those using

deception to enter their

homes and steal from

them, or trick them into

making payments.

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What the council wants

to do

We want to increase older

people’s confidence by

reducing both their fear of

crime and the chances of

them becoming victims.

We will work with older

people, the police,

housing providers and the

voluntary sector, to

improve the safety of older

people.

We will, in consultation

with older people, review

our progress annually and

develop action plans for

the future.

What we are doing now

Safeguarding adults

Some older people are

abused and exploited by

relatives, neighbours and

even carers and

professionals, and they

are often reluctant to take

any action. The council

has re-launched its policy

and procedures for

responding to vulnerable

people who may be at risk

from harm or exploitation.

Alarm Service

Hillingdon has a well

established alarm service,

CareLine, enabling older

people to quickly get help

in an emergency. The

Age Concern

Handyperson Service and

Frays Care and Repair

Service can help with

upgrading home security.

Community Safety Team

The Council’s Community

Safety Team are working

with Health colleagues,

the Police, Fire Services

and others, on Community

Safety Plans for 2005-

2008. The priorities

which emerged from the

2003/04 audit are:

• Violent crime

(including hate

crime)

• Tackling antisocial

behaviour

• Residential

burglary

• Motor vehicle

crime (theft of and

from motor

vehicles)

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and other issues for the

Community Safety Team

include:

• Publicity

campaigns to

show people what

the reality is.

• Closer links with

the police to

combat

abandoned

vehicles, graffiti

etc.

• Closer liaison with

the community.

What we will do in 2005-

08

• Continue to work

with the police to

encourage a

stronger

community police

presence.

• Seek, with others,

to tackle antisocial

behaviour

that makes older

people nervous

about leaving their

homes.

• Tackle fear of

crime.

• Develop neat, tidy

and well lit

maintained streets

which discourage

low level crime.

2. Involved and

participating

Issues for older

people

Older people face a

number of barriers to

participating in the life

of the community.

Some are difficulties in

getting out and about,

some arise from an

‘attitude’ that does not

value older people and

some from lack of

confidence.

Lack of involvement can

lead to greater isolation

and the needs of those

older people being

overlooked. They are

more likely to have

friends and relatives

who have died and to

have lost spouses and

partners. They are

less likely to be working

and may be restricted in

travelling because of

ailing hearing and sight.

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What the council

wants to do

We want older people

to participate in

community activities

that they enjoy. We

want them to continue

making a valued

contribution to

community life in

Hillingdon.

Social activities prevent

isolation and promote

good mental health.

We need to see older

people as a resource

for our community, and

to use their skills and

experience to benefit us

all. We want to reduce

barriers to their

involvement, whether

physical or stemming

from the attitude of

others. We will

therefore promote their

participation in social,

political and cultural

activities.

What we are doing

now

These are just some

examples.

Befriending Schemes

Age Concern offers

opportunities for older

people to be linked to a

volunteer Befriender, to

join the Phone Pals

Scheme, or to

participate in its Active

Age projects. There

are also Friendship

Clubs for those older

people who suffer from

mental illness.

Lunch Clubs

There are a range of

lunch clubs across the

borough including a

Multicultural Food and

Fitness Club in Hayes.

Many clubs offer

transport, as well as a

freshly cooked lunch.

Further information is

available from the

Hillingdon Handbook

published by Age

Concern.

Lifelong learning

We are encouraging

older people to learn to

use computers and

websites, through Adult

Education and College

courses. There is also

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free computer training

for them in libraries.

Libraries

The library services

offer a wide range of

free access to books,

films, music, computers

and a talking book

service for the visually

impaired. They will

also deliver to people

who are housebound,

and there is a mobile

library service where it

may be difficult to

access a branch library.

What we will do in

2005-08

• Increase

opportunities for

older people to

attend lunch clubs

(and similar

groups) through

partnerships with

the voluntary

sector and local

businesses.

• Develop more

opportunities for

older people to

become involved

in volunteering

which uses there

skills and

experience.

• Continue a

programme of

library

refurbishments to

improve access to

their services, and

provide public

toilets.

• Recruit volunteers

to give ‘added

value’ to the Home

and Mobile Library

Service.

• Work with Healthy

Hillingdon to

support their

health promotions,

for example,

healthy walks.

3. Keeping

Independent

Issues for older

people

Keeping independent is

sometimes hard for

older people. Poor

health and frailty make

it harder for some older

people to cook, clean

and shop. Loss of

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work and friends, and

distance from families,

can limit social contact.

Confidence can be lost,

sometimes with

depression and anxiety

as added difficulties.

There is still an

assumption that

residential care is the

only safe place for

people as they get

older. Some older

people worry that they

are becoming a burden.

What the council

wants to do

We want to assist older

people to live as

independently as

possible in the

community. We want

to tackle the difficulties

that arise through frailty

and poor physical and

mental health, and

through poverty and

social isolation.

We want fewer older

people to go into

residential care, and

recognise that this

depends on moving

more resources into

intensive home and

community support.

We know that there will

always be some older

people who need and

want to live in

residential or nursing

homes, and we will help

them to find places that

are best for them.

What we are doing

now

Personal Care

We provide personal

care to over 3000 older

people, so that despite

their frailty they are able

to live in their own

homes.

Meals Service

We deliver meals to 600

older people who are

unable to prepare a

meal for themselves.

Equipment Service

We provide 92% of

equipment within 7

days to help people

manage basic tasks

around their homes.

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Minor and Major

Adaptations

We assess the needs of

older people for minor

and major adaptations

to their homes to

enable them to continue

living at home.

Day centres

We manage four day

centres providing social

and leisure activities.

Help leaving hospital

We have increased the

number of rehabilitation

places for people who

no longer need to be in

a hospital bed but still

require some extra time

and support to decide

what is best for them.

Breaks for carers

Older people looking

after older people, is a

big issue. Older carers

can experience double

isolation. Hillingdon

Carers run drop-in

sessions, arts courses

and a monthly support

group. The sessions

are for all carers but

about 50% are older

people.

We can offer carers a

break from caring.

Improving

assessment and how

we manage care

We have improved this

service with the

introduction of a ‘single’

assessment process.

We will continue to

improve the quality of

community care

assessments so that we

are looking at the

‘whole’ needs of a

person and not just

their social and health

care.

Supporting voluntary

organisations

We currently support 49

Voluntary organisations

in Hillingdon to provide

a wide range of

services.

Hillingdon Joint

Visiting Team

This is a partnership

between Hillingdon

Council and the

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Pension Service to help

people to maximise

their income.

Dignity for Older

People

The opportunity to die

with dignity is

recognised by health

professionals the world

over as one of the most

fundamental of all

human rights. While

death as a subject is

often taboo, many older

people are happy to talk

about and plan for their

death and funeral. In

Hillingdon we ensure

that death is dignified

whether at home, in

hospital, in residential

or nursing home care.

What we will do in

2005-08

Improve access to

services

We will make it easier

for older people and

their relatives to contact

us, and improve our

ability to respond

quickly.

Better care for people

leaving hospital

We want to ensure that

when older people

leave hospital they

have the best chance of

returning to live at home

or that they are helped

to move to a suitable

alternative.

Easier access to

health and social care

We will continue to

develop more joined up

services between the

council and primary

health care staff.

We will work with

partners to develop a

wider range of services

for all older people from

our diverse community.

Preventative services

We will seek

opportunities to develop

preventative services,

including help with

housework, gardening

and shopping for the

frailest older residents.

We will develop links

with partners, for

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example, housing

associations, pubs,

clubs and general

entertainment providers

etc to see how

resources can be used

to benefit older people

in their vicinity.

4. Staying healthy

Issues for older

people

Action to improve the

health of older people

needs to start well

before they become

older. The prevention

of cancers, heart

disease, strokes,

diabetes and serious

respiratory illness all

depend on taking action

as early as possible.

But, it is never too late

for prevention to be of

benefit. Exercise,

healthy eating and

stopping smoking all

have major benefits for

older people.

Older people need to

have their health needs

taken seriously and

have their mental and

physical health closely

monitored. They need

people to take into

account the difficulties

that arise from lack of

mobility, changes in

mental capacity, and

deterioration of sight

and hearing. Falling is

one of the most

common causes of

hospital treatment for

older people and the

risk needs to be

reduced.

What the council

wants to do

• Improve well-being

• Health

• Access to sports,

exercise and

leisure activities

• Encourage

participation in

sport and physical

activity

• Encourage greater

use of green and

other open spaces

• Support

campaigns aimed

at improving the

health of the 50+

What we are doing

now

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Partnerships with

health

Modernising the way we

provide health and

social care services to

provide a more

integrated approach.

Older people are

registered with local

doctors who will support

and manage periods of

ill health. This will also

include access to other

support services like

District Nurses,

Therapists, palliative

care and bed-based

care etc.

The Ambulance Service

is taking part in a

scheme to attend

people at home who

have fallen but do not

require hospital

admission.

Sports and Leisure

Over the past year we

have been working with

various older peoples’

groups on exercise

sessions, training

leaders and introducing

new activities. We

have produced a

booklet on Activities for

50+ in Hillingdon in

consultation with older

people, and produced a

Sports Strategy.

It is a fact that currently

15.6% of Hillingdon’s

population are 60+ and

74% of over 65s do not

do any exercise at all.

What we will do in

2005-08

• Action this ‘whole’

approach plan for

the well-being of

older people.

• Work to increase

the integration of

health and social

care staff

delivering support

to older people

living at home.

• Encourage and

support the need

to get health

promotion and

information to all

older people.

• Reduce street and

transport hazards

that can contribute

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to older people

falling.

5. Housing needs

Issues for older

people

Older people face some

specific problems in

relation to housing.

These include:

• Owner occupiers

or tenants living in

poor housing

where they do not

have enough

income to invest in

improvements or

where landlords

are reluctant to

carry them out.

• Housing which is

too large for their

needs and is

difficult to

maintain.

• Being more

susceptible to cold

and damp.

• Difficulties with

accommodation

where there are

stairs.

• Lack of any

housing which is

adapted to meet

the needs of older

people with mental

health problems,

especially

dementia.

What the council

wants to do

We want to ensure that

there is sufficient

accommodation

suitable to meet the

needs of all older

people living in

Hillingdon.

We want older people

to:

• Feel secure and

comfortable in the

home in which

they live.

• Be given as wide a

choice as possible

about where they

live.

• Have access to

improvements and

adaptations so

they are able to

continue living in

their home.

• Contribute to

housing

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developments and

neighbourhoods.

What we are doing

now

Supported Housing

We provide supported

housing with extra care

so that people with

additional needs can

remain living in the

community, if that is

what they want.

Improving the quality

of homes

We have continued to

improve the security

and warmth of council

homes and are working

towards meeting the

standards in the

Government paper -

“Decent Homes”.

We will, when

necessary, enforce

private landlords to

make the homes they

rent out safe and

secure.

What we will do in

2005-08

We will consult with

older people about the

types of housing they

want, for example,

blocks of housing

designated only for

older peoples’ use or

mixed tenancies of both

older and younger

people.

We will develop more

housing for use in

rehabilitating people

needing to be

discharged from

hospital.

Improving mobility at

home

We will continue to use

the Disabled Facilities

Grant to help older

people live

independently, and

publicise the grant more

widely.

We will provide a

Handyperson Service to

help older people

maintain their homes as

a safe, warm and well lit

environment.

Supporting People

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Older people are one of

three key priorities for

the Supporting People

Programme and we will

continue to fund

housing related support

services in sheltered

housing schemes. We

will also fund other

housing related support

like the Home

Improvement Agency.

Meeting the needs of

all older people

We will continue to work

with older people from

our diverse community

to ensure their differing

housing needs are met.

Anti-social behaviour

We will work with the

police and other

partners to reduce

racial and other

harassment

experienced by older

people.

The council has

developed action plans

to ensure equitable

services for all older

people.

Helping people

housed in the private

sector

We will, through the

Home Improvement

Agency, develop our

work with vulnerable

older people in private

accommodation.

6. Getting out and

about

Issues for older

people

Older people often face

problems that limit how

far they can walk

without needing a rest.

They find it harder to

deal with some of the

common obstacles on

pavements, or which

make it harder to cross

busy roads. Buses

and stations often

require high levels of

mobility to board and

travel securely.

Travelling around

Hillingdon by public

transport can challenge

the able bodied. For

frail older people it is a

serious problem.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 35


Some problems in

getting out and about

have already been

referred to such as the

fear of crime and anti

social behaviour.

Older people also worry

about finding

somewhere to sit for a

rest or go to the toilet.

What the council

wants to do

We want to make it

easier for older people

to get out and about.

We want to reduce the

difficulties they

experience, whether as

pedestrians, or using

public and private

transport. We want

them to be able to have

a say on plans to

develop transport in

and out of Hillingdon.

What we are doing

now

The council supports

the following accessible

transport schemes:

• Freedom Passes

• Blue badges

• Taxicard scheme

• Capital Call

• Dial-a-Ride

Hillingdon

Community

Transport

We use our influence

with Transport for

London to make public

transport easier to use

for older people. This

includes more easy

access buses, more

routes, more bus

shelters with seats and

safer driving.

The Leader of the

Council has made

£250,000 available for

works in the community

which will benefit older

and disabled people,

and they have been

asked to identify

priorities.

Working with Healthy

Hillingdon on projects

which encourage and

assist people to get out

and about.

Supporting the Arts

Services, for example, a

50s dance class at the

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 36


Compass Theatre and

educational

performances and

workshops.

What we will do in

2005-08

• Improve the

conditions of

pavements,

carrying out more

repairs and

working harder to

prevent

obstructions by

traders and others.

• Improving street

lighting.

• Provide more

street seats so that

older people can

rest while out or

while waiting for a

bus.

• Looking at how

parking can be

made easier for

frail drivers and

passengers, and

for people visiting

older people.

• Improving

pedestrian

crossings ensuring

more of them work

properly.

• Exploring the use

of other council

facilities to

improve socialising

and activities for

older people.

• Increasing the

number of public

toilets that older

people can access

from 10 to 14.

• Working with the

voluntary sector

and with

businesses to

develop more

accessible toilets

that can be used

by older people.

• Involving residents

in monitoring the

performance and

setting standards

for council

contractors, so

that the job gets

done properly.

7. Reducing age

discrimination

Issues for older

people

Age discrimination is

not subject to legislation

in the same way as

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 37


ace and sex, although

laws about age

discrimination in

employment are

expected to come into

force in 2006.

Older people

experience a range of

discrimination. They

may be viewed as a

burden, incapable of

expressing their views

about how they wish to

be treated, They may

be patronised by the

well-intended, and

sometimes abused and

treated with hostility.

They may also

experience

discrimination because

of their race, religion,

gender or sexual

orientation as well as

because of their age.

What the council

wants to do

We will challenge age

discrimination. We will

work to identify and

eliminate age

discrimination in access

to our services.

We want to work with

partners to reduce

direct and indirect

discrimination based on

age.

What we are doing

now

Working with health

partners to action the

recommendations of the

National Service

Framework for Older

People on reducing age

discrimination in terms

of access to health and

social care services.

We are ensuring that

this also applies to

other council policies

and services.

We are working to

achieve level 2 of the

Equality Standard for

Local Government by

March 2006, endorsing

our commitment to

stopping all forms of

discrimination, including

that based on age.

What we will do in

2005-08

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 38


• Review our

policies on

employment and

training

recognising the

continued

contribution of

older people.

• Improve customer

care and the

understanding of

the needs of older

people.

• Develop an action

plan to reduce age

discrimination.

8. Consulting and

Informing

Issues for older

people

The voices of older

people are not always

listened to. Frail older

people find it difficult to

get to meetings or

participate in other

ways. Some cannot

speak for themselves.

Older people are more

likely to find reading

reports difficult because

of the small print.

Hearing loss may

hamper taking part in

discussion or using the

phone.

Older people often lack

good information about

what is happening

locally because they

are isolated. While

some older people have

an excellent knowledge

about events that they

regularly participate in,

others know little and

hardly ever participate.

What the council

wants to do

We want older people

to be consulted on all

aspects of planning.

We want to ensure that

the way we consult

makes it easy for them

to contribute.

We will improve the

quality and availability

of information about

what is happening in

Hillingdon.

What we are doing

now

• Supporting the

Older People’s

Assembly

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 39


• Supporting the

Fifty and Over

Representative

Committee

• Supporting other

forums like

Sheltered Housing

which offer a direct

voice to older

people

• Encouraging the

active participation

of representatives

from the whole of

our diverse

community within

the Older People’s

Assembly. For

example, those

who are

housebound or in

residential or

nursing home

care.

• Developing an

Involvement and

Consultation

Programme for

older people,

• Developing a

website

information forum

for older people

What we will do in

2005-08

We will consult with

older people about this

plan and how well it is

being delivered, and

about how it may need

to change over time.

We will improve access

to the Older People’s

Assembly through

telephone conferencing,

a website information

forum, questionnaires

and using advocates for

those who cannot

speak for themselves.

We will ask older

people if they would like

their own consultation

charter and information

strategy.

We will make better use

of :

- Hillingdon People

- The Press

- Assemblies and

Forums

- Telephone surveys

and the voluntary sector

to inform and involve

older people,

particularly about what

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 40


we are achieving,

events, changes and

plans that will be of

interest to them.

We will continue to

ensure that information

is available in large

print, on tape and disk,

and we will improve the

availability of

information for older

people whose first

language is not English.

We will also promote

the publication of clear

information in plain

language with clear

easy to read layouts.

We will ensure that

council information is

produced in a suitable

format for older people

with learning

disabilities.

We will produce an A-Z

of services for older

people which includes

access to health, social

care, housing and daily

living facilities.

We will publish the

Better Care High

Standards Charter and

ask older people and

other users of services

to work with us to

ensure that the

standards are being

met.

Conclusion

This Plan heralds the

beginning of a new way

of valuing and working

with older people using

a ‘whole’ of life

approach.

We welcome the

involvement of The

Champion for Older

People, and older

people themselves in

making this Plan a

success and model for

the future.

Hillingdon’s Plan for

Older

People/September.05

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 41


PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 42


DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN’S SERVICES ITEM 2

Contact Officer

Papers with this report

Kamini Rambellas /Chris Spencer

01895 250527 / 01895 250529

Appendix A Action Plan - attached

SUMMARY

This report updates Cabinet on new developments within children’s services including:

• Development of the Children and Young People’s Plan

• Establishment of a Local Safeguarding Children Board

• Implementation of the agreed recommendations of the Best Value Review of

Services to Vulnerable Children

• Progress in developing Education Children & Youth Services department.

• Priorities identified in the self assessment for the Joint Area Review

RECOMMENDATIONS

Cabinet is asked:

1. To note the progress being made to develop a framework for the integration of

Children’s Services in Hillingdon through:

• Establishment of the Local Children’s Safeguarding Board

• Implementation of the decisions of the Best Value Review of

Vulnerable Children

• Preparation of the Children and Young People’s Plan

• Development of Services in accordance with legislative

requirements.

2. To agree to receive a further report outlining the next steps in March 2006.

REASONS FOR OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

To keep the Cabinet informed of progress in this new area of development.

OPTIONS AVAILABLE

None.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet Report – 10 th November 2005 Page 42


INFORMATION

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT (APA) FEEDBACK

3. Following the submission of the Annual Performance Assessment self assessment,

the Inspectors have delivered their provisional findings.

4. The inspectors recognised that a good start has been made in mapping need and

analysing where service provision should be developed. They acknowledged that the

authority has already made some significant changes in the deployment of resources to

target identified development priorities, and that appropriate changes are being made in

elected member and senior officer responsibilities within the authority to deliver the new

children’s services agenda.

5. They accept that the timetable for implementing these changes takes sensible

account of current service performance issues and what needs to be done to implement

change effectively.

6. In summary the inspectors identify that the key task for the authority now is to ensure

that the recent and planned changes in structures and processes follow through to

better service provision on the ground and improved outcomes for children and young

people locally. This will take time. Building on the recent improvements in working

relationships with schools and other partners is a key requirement.

INTEGRATED CHILDREN’S SERVICES REVIEW AUDIT COMMISSION REPORT

7. The report (June 2005) has concluded that ‘Hillingdon has made significant progress

towards the development of Children’s Integrated Services’ the key issues for further

development are identified as:

o Agreement and dissemination of the vision as set out in the Local

Preventative Strategy as the vision of the Children and Young People’s

Strategic Partnership Board (CYPSPB) in it’s Children and Young

People’s Plan

o Development with partners of a clear overall project plan with allocated

tasks, timescales, and a risk management plan

o Representation of children, young people and families at CYPSPB

o Establishment of a clear governance framework for CYPSPB including a

joint performance management framework;

o Development of a joint workforce plan and proposals for pooling of

budgets.

See Action Plan at Appendix A

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet Report – 10 th November 2005 Page 43


JOINT AREA REVIEW (JAR)

8. Following the APA the council was required to complete a broader self assessment

for the Joint Area Review (JAR) taking into account the contribution of partners in the

wider children’s economy. The JAR links with the Comprehensive Performance

Assessment (CPA) process.

9. The Council’s self assessment for the JAR identified the priorities set out in the table

below:

Being

Healthy

Staying Safe

Enjoying & Achieving

+ve

Cont

1. Continue to reduce risks and negative health outcomes particularly in

physical health, emotional health and sexual health.

2. Create a comprehensive CAMH service to meet the requirements of the

National Service Framework (NSF) by 2006

3. Increase the number of looked after children accessing health assessments

4. To increase access to safe and inclusive play opportunities

1. Develop safeguarding agenda through the newly constituted Local

Safeguarding Children Board

2. Implement the Common Assessment and Lead Professional Framework

Strengthen preventative work and maintain numbers of local Looked After Children

(LAC) excluding Airport children and Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children

3. (UASC) in line with national averages

4. Implement structural change to enable integration of services

5. Improve timescales for core assessments and increase number of adoptions.

6. Increase uptake of health assessments by older LAC

1. Implement the outcomes from Review of School Improvement Services to

improve the monitoring, challenge and impact of support to schools

2. Implement as a matter of utmost priority our new secondary strategy and

associated 14-19 strategy

3. Improve Key Stage 4 achievement in secondary schools

4. Improve attainment in primary schools recognising the changing

characteristics of the pupil population and addressing changing needs

5. Improve achievement in science at Key Stages 3 and 4

6. Continue to improve attendance, closing the gap to national averages.

7. Continue to improve attainment of LAC

1. Increase the proportion of young offenders in education and training post 16

2. Create a sustainable approach to communication, feedback and participation

of children and young people in service development

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet Report – 10 th November 2005 Page 44


Well being

Service

Management

1. Introduce the 14-19 Learner Offer to improve the range of options available to

young people

2. Further develop work based learning opportunities to increase participation

post 16

3. Improve support for existing childcare providers, particularly around updating

existing qualifications

4. Plan for the establishment of 13 Children’s Centres by 2008

1. Create an integrated department for Education, Children and Youth Services

2. Develop Children and Young People’s Plan

3. Develop a communication and participation strategy for all children and young

people

4. Develop an overarching commissioning strategy prioritising children’s

placements

5. Maintain and improve partnerships with all including the voluntary and

community sector;

6. Continue the development of a Workforce Strategy

10. Ten complex cases have been identified by the inspectors for closer scrutiny .

Hayes and Harlington has been identified as the area for the neighbourhood study.

Nine key areas of service have been identified for closer investigation, these include:

• Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services(CAMHS) particularly for the over

16’s.

• Ensuring children and young people are encouraged to attend and enjoy school

and achieve

• Attending to the needs of vulnerable children and young people in transition

• Children and young people participate in decision making and in supporting the

community.

• 14-19 education and training planned and delivered in a coordinated way.

• Addressing the health and safeguarding needs of children and young people with

learning difficulties or disabilities.

CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE’S PLAN (CYPP)

11. The guidance on CYPP outlines that the Local Authority has duty to prepare the

plan which should cover children 0-19 and care leavers up to 25. The Plan is a

strategic and overarching plan, it should be succinct and accessible.

12. Work that has been completed for the JAR has placed the authority in a good

position to produce the Children and Young People’s Plan and it is intended that a draft

will be in place by January 2006 in advance of the requirement for April 2006.

13. The plan should cover the following:

• Improvements – identified in the JAR

• Vision

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet Report – 10 th November 2005 Page 45


• Assessment of Needs

• Priorities and key actions planned – identified in the JAR

• Statement of how resources will be deployed

• Explanation of how plan relates to arrangements for performance management

and review of services

• Arrangements for co operation under the duty to co-operate with partners.

• Explanation of how plan is consistent with the strategic plans of local partners

14. The guidance requires that children and young people are involved in the

preparation of the plan. In preparing the draft the authority will be relying upon the

consultation conducted as part of the Best Value Review’s (BVR) and will be consulting

more fully with children and young people on the draft plan between November and

January.

INTEGRATION OF SERVICES AND IMPLEMENTATION OF BEST VALUE REVIEW

15. Development of an Integrated Children’s Department is being managed under the

HIP Programme and using the HIP Toolkit to ensure delivery. The following progress

has been made:

• The development of one Community Access and Support Team (CAST) which

will serve West Drayton and Yiewsley and be based in West Drayton recruitment

is underway and the CAST co-ordinator has been appointed.

• Staff have been appointed to the new Intensive Family Support Service and the

service is in place.

• A Coordinator for the Central Parenting Support Team is being recruited.

• Re organization of Social Care is progressing to create central integrated

Safeguarding Service and Looked After Children Service, is in progress.

Recommendations about future structures were presented to staff in October.

• Models for the Management Structure of Education, Children’s and Youth

Service are under consideration and were presented to staff at the end of

October.

LOCAL SAFEGUARDING CHILDREN BOARD (LSCB)

16. Section 13 of Children Act 2004, requires all local authorities to set up a Local

Safeguarding Children Board (LSCB) as the statutory successor to the Area Child

Protection Committee. Their primary focus will be on the outcome ‘Staying Safe’. The

membership of the Board is prescribed in legislation and the Director of Children’s

Services is accountable for the arrangements. There are a number of provisions in the

Children Act (2004) that relate directly or indirectly to agencies responsibilities to

safeguard and promote the welfare of children. Section 10 of the Children Act 2004

requires agencies to co-operate with one another, Section 11 places a duty on all

agencies to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and Section 12 requires that

information is exchanged and an index of children can be developed.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet Report – 10 th November 2005 Page 46


17. The objective of LSCB will be to co ordinate and ensure the effectiveness of what is

done by each of the Board partners individually and collectively for the purpose of

safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children, including ensuring that all child

deaths are reviewed and lessons learned, through contributing to Child Death

Screening Teams.

18. Hillingdon’s LSCB was launched on 4 October at the Compass Theatre, 150 local

stakeholders attended. Presentations at the launch and a play performed by young

people at Bishopshalt School were successful in raising the profile of the Board and it’s

wider agenda which is to prevent harm to children, whilst strengthening protection and

promoting children’s welfare.

19. The LSCB is taking the lead in implementing the Common Assessment Framework

(CAF) and Lead Professional (LP), ahead of the statutory requirement of April 2006.

The Common Assessment and Lead Professional Framework provides a means for

weighing up concerns about children and young people and for co-ordinating support to

promote well-being across a number of dimensions including Being Healthy, Staying

Safe, Enjoying and Achieving, Achieving Economic Well being, Making a Positive

Contribution.

20. The CAF and LP framework will become a central component of the integration

agenda, ensuring that a common language, common assessment process and

standards are established across all professional groups.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

21. The Integration and BVR initiatives are funded from within existing budgets and are

currently forecast to remain within budget.

22. The LCSB is funded from existing base budget, government grant and contributions

from partners and is currently forecast to remain within budget.

CORPORATE CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

Corporate Finance Comments

23. The recommendation of the report to note progress contains no direct financial

commitments. However, the ongoing developments described in the report have

financial implications that are identified above. These resource issues are currently

being developed through the Medium Term Financial Forecast (MTFF) process, and the

rationale for, and values of, any additional resources required and any available savings

will be presented when the MTFF is reported to Cabinet on 15 December 2005.

Legal Implications

24. The legal implications are contained in the body of the report.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet Report – 10 th November 2005 Page 47


BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

APA self assessment

JAR self assessment

Guidance on Children and Young People’s Plan

Children Act (2004)

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet Report – 10 th November 2005 Page 48


Action Plan

APPENDIX A

ACTION PLAN ARISING FROM

CHILDREN’S INTEGRATED SERVICE REVIEW

ISSUE ACTION Timescale

Managing Change

A clear overall project plan

with allocated tasks and

timescales has not as yet

been agreed

Project plan exists for HIP

project

CB to pull together high

level plan from existing

documents for CfC Board

to agree

Completed

It is intended that the

children’s integrated

service projects will form

part of the HIP. It will be

important for other senior

partners to be engaged in

this process to ensure

engagement and

embedding of the project

outcomes.

A risk management plan

has not as yet been

agreed.

Developing ambitions

The impetus from the

extensive consultation for

the BVR should be built

upon to ensure that

stakeholders, particularly

children, young people

and their families, are able

to systematically inform

the development and

review of services and

plans.

The agreed vision as set

out in the Local

Preventative Strategy will

need to be formally

agreed and disseminated

as the vision of the

CYPSPB in its Children

and Young People’s Plan.

C f C Board are steering

group for HIP project

To be completed by CB

after Project Plan

competed

Work Plan includes

developing participation

and communication

strategy for child, young

people and families as

well as professional

stakeholders

Lead PN – staff

Lead MP – Children + Yp

To update as part of CYP

Plan

CB to develop project plan

Completed

November 05

Ongoing

November 05

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 49


Action Plan

ISSUE ACTION Timescale

It will be important that the

new role and

responsibilities of Director

of Children’s Services is

developed in order that

the postholder is able to

play a pivotal role in

achieving change.

Ongoing – evidence

chairing C f C Exec and

vice chair of LSCB

Ongoing

Interagency working

Further work is needed to

establish clear

governance arrangements

for the CYPSPB and its

sub-groups.

Methods of representation

of the views of children,

young people and families

at the CYPSPB should be

agreed.

Integrated frontline

delivery

Detailed mapping to

inform a joint workforce

plan should be developed

which identifies the skills

and range of staff needed,

addresses how teams will

be integrated, managed,

supported and employed.

Concern has been

expressed by interviewees

regarding capacity to

address this complex and

time consuming area.

Capacity issues and

resource implications will

need to be reviewed

regularly.

To include in work plan of

Children’s Development

Team

Part of CYPSPB Action

Plan/ participation plan

C+F restructure has

commenced

Experience from MAST

and CAST

kept under review by C f C

Exec

January 2006

2005

Ongoing

Ongoing

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 50


Action Plan

ISSUE ACTION Timescale

The current arrangements Applies only to MAST December 2005

for secondments and

managing staff in

integrated teams should

be subject to a risk

assessment to ensure that

the lack of S31

agreements does not

subject the partners to

unforeseen risks or

liabilities.

Integrated processes

Hillingdon has a joint

information sharing

protocol but further work is

needed to develop subprotocols

and embed

these in practice.

progress as part of ISA Ongoing as

required

Capacity will be needed

from a specialist resource

to develop and implement

any pooling proposals.

Managing Performance

A joint performance

management framework

needs to be developed.

No immediate plans for

pooling budgets

LSCB is developing plan

Action for CYPSPB

September for

LSCB

January CYPSPB

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 51


CONSULTATION AND ENGAGEMENT - A FUTURE

STRATEGY FOR HILLINGDON

ITEM 3

Contact Officers

Papers with this report

David Holdstock / Paul Williams

01895 250822 / 250986

Appendix A - attached

SUMMARY

The report sets out the need for a strategic approach to consultation, a corporate

consultation strategy and a draft three-year development programme for consultation

and engagement in Hillingdon.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That Cabinet agrees:

1. the vision statement : ‘consultation and engagement are placed at the

heart of policy making and service delivery in Hillingdon to help deliver

excellent services and make the best use of resources’.

2. that consultation be linked to communications under the new Head of

Communications, following the restructure of communications within the

council.

3. that officers examine the current structure of dealing with both internal

and external communications across the council and identify resource(s) to

work with the new Head of Communications to deliver a corporate

Consultation Strategy and three year development programme.

4. to the creation of a Consultation Board which includes a member

champion to sponsor the Council’s annual consultation programme.

5. subject to the review of communications to identify resources, that the

Council undertake an annual residents’ survey to underpin future service and

policy development.

REASONS FOR OFFICER RECOMMENDATIONS

To ensure a comprehensive approach to the development of consultation and

engagement in Hillingdon, thereby ensuring that residents’ and communities’ issues

are increasingly utilised in the development of service plans, strategies and priorities.

OPTIONS AVAILABLE

Cabinet can reject the proposals in whole or in part.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 52


INFORMATION

1. On 28 April 2005, the Cabinet endorsed an approach to consultation and

engagement based on the following

a] To better manage and co-ordinate consultation, it should be broken down

into service user consultation, more general policy consultation and local

consultation.

b] A consultation strategy therefore must focus at three levels : at Group /

service level, council wide and with partners.

c] All opinion / information gathered will be analysed and used to inform

service planning and will be reflected in the Medium Term Financial Forecast

[MTFF]. Feedback will be given as a matter of course to groups consulted.

d] A comprehensive consultation strategy and development programme will

be developed.

2. An outline illustrative programme to develop consultation and engagement

has been drafted and is included at appendix A to illustrate potential areas for

improvement.

3. The programme and the recommendations of this report are based on ‘good

practice’ advice and guidance from good and excellent rated councils. This includes,

as key aspects, the importance of the council having appropriate consultation skills

available, locating these under the Head of Communications and introducing an

annual public survey, truly representative of opinion across the borough, which

would be used as a foundation to review and inform future service priorities and

policy development.

4. By adopting a strategic approach to consulting with the borough’s many

communities, businesses and voluntary organisations, we will ensure that the council

is responding appropriately to local needs.

Why consult?

5. Consultation can be a useful tool to help us to:

• assist with prioritisation

• plan services

• develop new services as a result of the outcomes of consultation

• test new ideas and policies before implementing them

• allocate resources more effectively

• improve relationships with those who live, work and study in the borough and

those who choose to visit Hillingdon

• measure satisfaction levels which can then be used as a performance indicator to

monitor performance

• develop new approaches

• work more effectively with our partners and influence opinion, where appropriate

• co-ordinate the work with our partners

• provide background information for other council activities

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 53


• anticipate problems before they occur.

6. In establishing authority-wide objectives and performance measures, the

council must find out the views of local residents, businesses, user groups and other

stakeholders on what they want for their local area and what they think the priorities

for the council should be. These views should then be taken into account when

priority and policy setting is planned.

7. As part of modernisation and good business management service users

should be consulted before service objectives and improvement targets are set or

services are changed, re-aligned or re-designed. Improving services should take

account of users’ wishes, requirements, attitudes and their views of current

performance. Consultation can also help to identify individuals and groups in the

community who are not using services and why, thereby assisting the council in

ensuring services are delivered to an increasingly diverse population in Hillingdon.

8. To become good or excellent, this council should carry out a range of

consultation exercises and, in particular, an annual residents’ survey in similar vein

to organisations already identified as good or excellent.

9. Hillingdon Council currently has a Citizens’ Panel, which allows consultation

throughout the year on major issues.

10. Cabinet is reminded that some useful building blocks are already in place to

support the development of consultation processes over the next three years,

namely the corporate consultation team, a draft annual programme of consultation, a

set of established standards for consultation practices and the appointment of the

new head of communications.

Financial Implications

11. It is anticipated that the costs of the annual residents' survey will be in the

region of £30k, it is also possible that additional staff resources, estimated to cost

£50k, will be needed with particular consultation skills, which may not be available

within the current staffing portfolio. The proposed funding strategy will be to fund the

annual resident's survey through the potential savings that can be achieved by

centralising the communications function. Any review will be put on hold to allow the

new structure to mature and by doing so look to develop consultation skills in house

to support the delivery of the annual residents' survey.

CORPORATE CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

Corporate Finance Comments

12. A corporate finance officer has reviewed this report and the financial

implications contained within it, and is satisfied that the report and its financial

implications properly reflect both the direct resource implications on the consultation

function and the wider implications on the Council’s resources in total, through the

funding strategy identified above.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 54


Legal Implications

13. Members should note that as part of the CPA process the issue of public

consultation is stressed as a way of ensuring that local authorities reflect the desires

of their community in the provision of services. Such a process is also

recommended as way of ensuring an efficient use of resources as it enables a local

authority to focus on those matters of importance to the local community. Clearly

any consultation needs to be undertaken in a structured way which delivers accurate

results from the broadest range of the community. Failure to do so could result in a

local authority concentrating on matters which only benefit a small vocal element of

the community but does not reflect the desires of the wider community.

Corporate Property Services

14. Corporate Property Services fully support the consultation process detailed in

this report

Relevant Service Groups

15. All Service Groups are represented on the consultation co-ordinators groups

and have contributed to the report.

EXTERNAL CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

16. The PCT and the Police are included in the corporate consultation group and

their comments have been taken into account in preparing this report. In addition,

comments and advice have been sought from Westminster City Council and others

as a source of best practice.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

None

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 55


Illustrative Consultation and Engagement Strategy 2005 –2008

Appendix A

The table below illustrates the kind of actions that would be considered in developing

the council’s consultation and engagement strategy. A definitive programme will be

worked up following the review of communications, subject to Cabinet’s decisions.

2005 /06 2006/07 2007/08 Comment

Service User

Consultation

• Build on existing

good practice to

extend service

user

consultation

more widely

across Council.

• Develop

feedback

mechanisms for

those consulted.

• Use consultation

to inform service

planning and

MTFF process.

• Ensure

responsibility to

consult is

included in ALL

service managers

PADAs.

• Extend service

user consultation

to ALL council

services.

• Develop

feedback for ALL

user groups

consulted.

• Demonstrate that

consultation

major influence in

service

development /

MTFF process.

• Develop

consultation with

non users

• Consider

possible links/

efficiencies with

LSP partners

• Ensure that

consultation

process take

account of

comment and

opinion from non

user groups.

• Develop links /

efficiencies as

appropriate with

LSP partners

Critical aspect of

development to

ensure that the

Council is fully

engaging with

specific service

users [ and non

users] and

complying with

equalities

legislation.

Management and

Procedure

• Ensure

corporate team

is properly

representative[

including the

Police and

PCT], is

• Extend corporate

team to include

additional LSP

partners. Ensure

team is delivering

work programme

and terms of

• Transfer team on

virtual basis.

• Identify any

possible

economies of

scale /

efficiencies

Once the

corporate process

has become

established, team

business can be

accomplished

without the need

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 56


working well

and has a

timetabled work

plan

• Confirm terms

of reference

reference

to have meetings.

• Identify

member

champion.

• Ensure liaison

with corporate

team.

• Establish links

to Cabinet

• Involve member

champion in

corporate team.

• Raise profile of

consultation in

political process

and decision

making

• Ensure

consultation and

engagement

process is fully

co-ordinated with

political process

and led by

members.

The object of the

aspect of the

programme is to

ensure that the

process becomes

member driven.

• Revise existing

consultation

programme

and submit to

Cabinet for

approval

• Link to LSP

partner

consultation

where possible

• Devise extended

programme with

member input,

which reaches

wider public.

• Work up

proposals to

extend

sophistication,

range and

effectiveness of

consultation.

• Link to some

partner

consultation as of

course.

• Continue, with

partners and

within resources,

to develop the

sophistication,

range and

effectiveness of

consultation

If the council’s

consultation and

engagement

processes are to

develop, then they

must be extended

with the benefit of

the appropriate

skills and

knowledge.

• Ensure that the

results of

consultation are

taken into

account in the

service planning /

MTFF process

2006/07.

• Begin systematic

reporting back

on key messages

from consultation

as part of the

Quarterly

Performance

• Ensure the

consultation

programme

complements the

need to take

account of

consultation in

service planning /

MTFF process.

• Forge stronger

links between the

information

function [needs

information and

performance

• Ensure that

needs information

, performance

information,

complaints and

consultation are

integrated and

fully inform the

service planning /

MTFF process as

a matter of

course so that

policy is clearly

evidence based.

This is beginning

to happen and be

seen to be

happening, but

needs to be seen

across the whole

council since it is

the prime objective

of consultation

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 57


Review [ QPR]

• Establish a

customer

relationship

management

system and

comprehensive

approach to

complaints

across the

Council

information] and

consultation to

better inform the

QPR and policy

development.

• Ensure

complaints are

taken into

account along

with consultation

to inform policy

development

• Ensure that the

corporate team

and Group

Directors begin

to feedback

comments to

those consulted

on the outcomes

of their

consultation.

• Include work to

make this

systematic in the

corporate team’s

work plan.

• Introduce

systematic

feedback to those

consulted on the

outcomes

resulting from

their comments.

• Include feedback

in the corporate

consultation

programme and

ensure it is

undertaken.

• Extend as

consultation

extends

• Ensure feedback

to those

consulted

becomes integral

and expected

aspect of any

consultation or

engagement

exercise.

This has been

identified through

inspection as a

failing in the

council and it is

critical to begin

addressing it

comprehensively

asap.

• Estimate

corporate and

service costs of

consultation

programme

against corporate

consultation

programme

• Submit MTFF bid

for consultation

programme,

based on

corporate and

service

requirements as

for all other areas

of council activity

• Embed bidding

process and

transparency of

costs fully in the

MTFF process

Whether or not the

profile of

consultation is

raised and its

resourcing

increased, the

allocation of

funding fro

consultation and

engagement

should be a more

transparent

process.

• Ensure Head of

Communications

plays a leading

role in

developing and

• Appoint a

consultation

officer to work to

the Head of

Communications

• Same as year two

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

This is a key

resource issue

based on

Westminster’s

advice. Whether or

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 58


developing and

directing the

work of the

corporate team.

• Ensure the

consultation and

communications

programmes

dovetail

Communications

to help develop

the council’s

programme and

improve its

consultation.

[ Alternatives – buyin

expertise or

develop in house.

Latter will still

require new

resources if to be

properly

delivered]

• Ensure the

consultation and

communications

programmes are

fully integrated

through the Head

of

communications /

corporate team

not an

appointment is

made, the

communications

and consultation

agendas need to

be fully coordinated

and, it is

suggested, both

managed by the

Head of

Communications.

• Employ a range

of mechanisms

and media [

including ICT] to

deliver

consultation

based on best

practice applied

elsewhere.

• Use consultation

officer to advise

on most

appropriate

mechanisms and

media [ including

ICT] for specific

consultations

within

consultation

programme

[ Alternative. Train

key officers from

across the

council

• Ensure most

appropriate

mechanisms and

media [ including

ICT]are used

consistently as

matter of course

across the council

This action links

directly to the

proposed

employment of a

skilled consultation

professional.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 59


• Apply agreed

standards for

consultation as

widely as

practicable

• Ensure agreed

standards of

consultation are

taken into

account in

devising

consultation

programme

• Ensure

consultation

standards are

applied

consistently

across the

council.

• Extend to LSP as

appropriate

Consultation

standards have

been agreed by

Cabinet but are

quite exacting and

are not applied

consistently for all

consultation.

• Based on best

practice

elsewhere,

monitor

effectiveness of a

chosen piece of

consultation.

• Build monitoring

of effectiveness

into consultation

programme for

specific aspects

of programme.

• Build monitoring

into whole

programme

It is important to

monitor the

effectiveness of

consultation and

learn from this

evaluation.

Corporate

Consultation

• Widen

representation at

existing forums.

• Align forum

meetings and

agendas around

community plan

themes

• Collate, coordinate

and

distribute

comment across

Council[ LSP]

• Ensure, where

possible,

feedback taken

into account in

service planning/

MTFF for

2006/07

• Ensure feedback

to those

consulted on

actions /

outcomes

resulting from

their comments

• Embed process

begun in first

year and extend

forums to include

other groups, in

particular

business.

• As for year two

up to manageable

number of forums

Need to make the

most of this

existing means of

communication,

whilst accepting its

overall limitations

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 60


• Make use of

citizens panel up

to March 06.

• Use all other

consultation and

communication

exercise to add

people to panel

• Replace citizens

panel with biannual

residents’

survey.

• Use survey to

identify group of

citizens willing to

respond to any

other smaller ,

specific survey

requests.

[Alternative.

Ensure citizens

panel is more

representative,

ensure it is

regularly topped

up and use it for

annual opinion

survey

Use outcomes of

annual survey as

main plank of

service planning/

MTFF process.

• Embed annual

survey as key

aspect of

council’s

consultation

process which

informs policy

direction.

• Supplement with

minority group

survey as

necessary

This is a second

key aspect of the

draft programme.

If the decision is

taken to maintain

the citizens panel,

then it needs to be

topped up

consistently and

also used for an

annual survey.

• Identify notable

event before

March 2005 to

pilot direct

council contact

with residents.

• Include

appropriate

events, such as

the Hayes

carnival in the

programme of

consultation for

2006/07 .

• Ensure comment

circulated to

inform service

planning / local

area perspectives

and appropriate

feedback to those

consulted.

• As for year two.

• Include

attendance at

events and follow

up action in

specific officers

PADAs

Direct contact with

residents art even

a limited number

of events can

produce valuable

comment and also

enhance public

opinion of the

council

• Ensure that

consultation

through the

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 61


connecting

communities

forum is as

effective as

possible.

• Identify best

practice from

elsewhere on

how to engage

‘hard to reach

‘communities.

Local

Consultation

• Complete local

question time

meetings.

• Develop

community

councillor role

• Continue local

question time and

consider taking to

more local level.

• Establish

community

councillors at

heart of local

engagement and

ensure their

comments

feedback into

service

development .

• Introduce annual

locality

conferences in

the three

parliamentary

constituencies to

replace the

community

conference.

• Take stock of

local ‘hard to

reach’ groups.

• Continue local

question time,

engaging local

councillors.

• Introduce area

forums to

supplement

locality

conferences.

• Introduce area O

and S committees

to cover

parliamentary

constituencies.

• Identify and

implement

proposals to

reach local ‘hard

to reach’ groups

There is an

increasing

Government focus

on neighbourhood

and more local

engagement. It is

inevitable that

Government will

expect all councils

to take action to

increase local

engagement.

• Identify

manageable

number of

established

groups by area

to begin some

form of dialogue

with eg officer

and /or member

• Extend number of

existing groups

with which some

dialogue is

developed

through officer /

member contact.

• Include contact

responsibilities in

• Further extend so

there is officer or

member contact

at least once a

year with range of

existing groups

across the

borough.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

The key issue

here is that there

are many existing

groups already in

the borough which

the council can

use to extend its

consultation and

engagement

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 62


and /or member

attendance at

annual meetings

of specific

community

groups.

responsibilities in

specific officers

PADAs

• Include contact

responsibility in

most officers

PADAs.

• Ensure

appropriate

training provided

without creating

new ones.

• Progress

‘neighbourhood

partnerships’

pilots, including

the involvement

of local people to

genuinely

influence local

affairs.

• Extend pilots on

the back of safer

neighbourhood

policing initiative.

Consider some

form of

constitution

guaranteeing

local community

involvement.

• Link locality

initiatives to local

management of

contracts ,

residents quality

promise etc.

• Learn lessons

from original

pilots and

consider

delegation of

some limited

decision making

and budget.

• Extend

neighbourhood

pilot s across the

borough, possibly

based on

‘constitution’

which guarantees

local involvement

with some

delegated powers

and budgets.

The pilots offer a

real opportunity to

develop

meaningful local

engagement on a

broader front.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 63


HILLINGDON’S DOMESTIC VIOLENCE STRATEGY ITEM 4

Contact Officers David Brough 01895 250636

Papers with this report

Domestic Violence Strategy 2005/08 - attached

SUMMARY

This report seeks approval to the Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy which aims to:

• Raise awareness of domestic violence in Hillingdon.

• Improve partnership working and the sharing of best practice across the Borough.

• Improve the range of support available and access to it for women and children.

• Implement Government guidance on tackling domestic violence.

• In line with the Community Safety Strategy

Reduce the levels of domestic violence

Reduce repeat victimisation by 25%

Increase detection rates to 60%.

• Meet the Best Value Performance Indicator for action against domestic violence.

RECOMMENDATIONS

1. That the Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 2005/08 be approved.

2. That formal endorsement of the Strategy be sought from the Police, the Primary

Care Trust and other relevant partner agencies.

3. That a member of the Cabinet as nominated by the Leader, and the Chief

Executive be allocated responsibility for the implementation of the Strategy.

4. That the Domestic Violence Forum be made responsible for the annual

monitoring of the Strategy.

REASONS FOR OFFICER RECOMMENDATIONS

Since the setting up of the Domestic Violence Forum in 1996 the Council and its partners

have made considerable progress in dealing with domestic violence and this has been a

continuing high priority in the Community Safety Strategy. However domestic violence

remains at a disturbingly high level in the Borough and there is a clear need for a separate

strategy to bring together in a more coherent manner the various activities of Council

departments and statutory and voluntary agencies. The introduction by the Government of

new and more detailed Best Value Performance Indicators for domestic violence includes

a specific requirement to have a multi-agency strategy.

OPTIONS AVAILABLE

To approve the Strategy with or without amendments.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 November 2005 Page 64


COMMENTS OF OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY COMMITTEE

The detailed strategy has not been considered by Overview and Scrutiny but it

incorporates the key issues identified by the joint scrutiny of children and domestic

violence carried out by the Education and Health and Social Services Overview and

Scrutiny Committees in 2004.

INFORMATION

1. Domestic violence accounts for approximately a quarter of reported violent crime in

London. It is well known that many victims do not report what has happened to them or

they suffer numerous incidents over many years before making a report. The number of

cases reported to Hillingdon Police therefore under-represent the full scale of the problem

but over the last three years they have increased as follows:

Year

Incidents

2002/03 2762

2003/04 2500

2004/05 3307

2. The reasons for this increase are not known and it impossible to say whether there

have been more incidents or it is simply due to more reporting or a mixture of the two.

During the last year there was extensive media coverage of domestic violence and there

has certainly been a growing awareness that the Police and other parts of the judicial

system have a commitment to tackling this issue. Whatever the factors at work it is clear

that domestic violence remains a major issue for Hillingdon and as a result it is a high

priority in the community safety strategy for 2005/08 that was approved by the Cabinet on

10 February and the Council on 17 March.

3. The strategy includes the following targets and proposals in relation to domestic

violence:

Targets

We will reduce repeat victimisation for domestic violence, racial and homophobic offences

by 25%.

We will improve confidence among victims of domestic violence by achieving a minimum

detection rate of 60%.

How will we achieve this?

• Development of a comprehensive domestic violence strategy that is agreed

amongst all relevant agencies

• The Hillingdon Domestic Violence Forum to promote awareness of domestic

violence

• Annual White Ribbon Day seminar to inform practitioners of different domestic

violence issues

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 November 2005 Page 65


• Delivery of domestic violence awareness training across partner agencies, including

teachers in schools.

• Improve integration and intelligence between partner agencies (in particular the

Police, Council and Health Care).

4. The attached domestic violence strategy has been developed in response to the

first bullet point and includes all of the other action points. However Council involvement in

tackling domestic violence is not just because it is a crime. It does enormous damage to

individuals and families and this has substantial implications for Social Services and

Housing in particular but also for schools and Education, Youth and Leisure Services. In

addition it places substantial burdens on the Health Service. The strategy therefore has

clear links with a range of other Council and multi-agency strategies including those for

children, housing, education and mental health services.

5. The strategy has been devised by Housing Services as a result of its success in

securing resources from the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister for the creation of a post

of Domestic Violence Co-ordinator. Work on the strategy has been overseen by the

Domestic Violence Forum which includes representatives of all Education, Youth and

Leisure Services, Housing and Social Services and the Chief Executive’s Office together

with the Police, the Primary Care Trust and numerous local voluntary agencies.

6. The preparation of the strategy has been carried out in accordance with Home

Office guidance on the development of domestic violence strategies. Account has also

been taken of the proposals in the draft Second London Domestic Violence Strategy which

was published by the Greater London Authority in July 2005.

7. In addition it should be noted that the Government has introduced more rigorous

and detailed Best Value Performance Indicators for domestic violence with effect from

2005/06 in order to assess the overall provision and effectiveness of local authority

services in helping victims and preventing the incidence of domestic violence. A full

description of the Indicators is set out in Appendix 2 to the attached strategy and it will be

seen that one of these is that the local authority must have produced and adopted a multiagency

strategy developed in partnership with other agencies. This also requires the

designation of a member of the Executive and a Chief Officer to have responsibility for the

implementation of the strategy and the Cabinet is asked nominate one of its members for

this purpose.

8. As part of the development of the strategy a mapping exercise was undertaken.

This highlighted the excellent work that is taking place through multi-agency co-operation

between Education, Youth and Leisure Services, Social Services and Housing and the

Police. It also identified a number of gaps in service provision and areas where there is a

need for increased multi-agency work. The major issues are as follows:

• More work is needed to develop a clear picture of the level of understanding within

the community as a whole of domestic violence as a crime.

• A common assessment tool is required together with a common recording system.

• More information is needed on male and same sex victims.

• Training should be extended across all agencies.

• Further action is needed to support victims through the legal process.

• An agreed approach is needed on dealing with perpetrators.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 November 2005 Page 66


9. As a result of this exercise the strategy identifies the following key areas for action:

• Raising awareness

• Improving service provision and access

• Improving information sharing and data management

• Developing legal, civil and criminal justice responses

• Perpetrator work

10. The strategy sets out the actions needed to address these issues and includes an

implementation plan with timescales. It is proposed that the Domestic Violence Forum

should be given responsibility for monitoring the achievement of the targets.

Financial Implications

11. Implementation of the strategy does not require additional resources at this stage.

The continuation of the post of Domestic Violence Co-ordinator will enable many of the

recommendations to be taken forward without the need for extra funding. The approval in

the current year’s budget of a second outreach post in Social Services for dealing with

victims on domestic violence will also assist in meeting current needs. In addition

resources have been identified within the community safety budget to fund awareness

campaigns and to support the work of the Domestic Violence Forum.

12. However the mapping exercise which was undertaken in developing the strategy

identified that there are gaps in local service provision. The implementation plan highlights

areas that will need to be further investigated and any proposals to provide or extend

services will need to identify sources of funding.

CORPORATE CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

Corporate Finance Comments

13. Corporate Finance has reviewed this report and the financial implications within it.

The view of Corporate Finance is that this report and its financial implications properly

reflect both the direct resource implications on the service concerned and any wider

implications on Council resources as a whole.

Legal Implications

14. The Crime and Disorder Act 1998 places a joint duty on the Council and the Police

to tackle crime and disorder in the local area and to improve community safety. Section 17

of the Act also gives the Council a specific duty to consider the community safety

implications of everything it does.

15. The Act also requires the production of a local strategy every three years by the

Council and the Police to tackle crime and disorder in their communities and there is also a

requirement for these bodies to work in partnership with other statutory agencies including

the Probation Service, the Health Service and the Police Authority. These requirements

have been met by the production of the community safety strategy for 2005/08.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 November 2005 Page 67


16. There is no separate legal duty to have a specific domestic violence strategy but as

set out in the report this is clearly an important element of the overall community safety

strategy.

17. In the Domestic Violence Strategy which is appended to the report, specific

reference is made to developing appropriate legal, civil and criminal responses to domestic

violence.

18. There are a number of legal remedies which are available to help protect the victims

of domestic violence in both the criminal and civil courts. Examples are the prosecution of

perpetrators and non-molestation and ouster injunctions, the provisions of which

perpetrators are required to observe.

19. Although the Council does not have the direct responsibility for seeking such

remedies on behalf of the victims, it can nevertheless play an important support role,

working in conjunction with its partners, and in this respect, the key actions outlined in the

Strategy to address this particular area are welcome.

EXTERNAL CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

20. Consultation was undertaken through the Domestic Violence Forum and its

Executive. Membership of the Forum includes representatives of the Police, Primary Care

Trust and numerous local voluntary organisations active in the field.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

Community Safety Strategy 2005/08

Home Office Guidance for Partnerships on Developing Domestic Violence Strategies

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 November 2005 Page 68


Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy

Contents:

• Foreword

• Executive Summary

• Introduction:

‣ Definition of domestic violence

‣ Positive statement on domestic violence

‣ Background

‣ Aims

• Understanding of domestic violence within Hillingdon:

‣ Statutory services

‣ Voluntary services

‣ Awareness raising

‣ Training provision

‣ Co-ordination

‣ Local context

• Key deliverables and targets:

‣ Raising Awareness

‣ Improving service provision and access to it.

‣ Improving information sharing and data management

‣ Developing legal, civil and criminal justice responses.

‣ Perpetrator Work

• Implementation plan

• Strategy action plan monitoring process

• Appendices

‣ Appendix 1 - Feedback from DV Forum Meeting.

‣ Appendix 2 - Best Value Performance Indicators

(Actions Against Domestic Violence )

‣ Appendix 3 - Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy

Gap Analysis 2005

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 69


Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

Foreword

Domestic violence is the secret scandal of Hillingdon. Often unreported and

largely un-discussed it brings pain and suffering to many thousands of people

in the Borough. It affects every section of the community and does untold

damage, particularly to women and children but increasingly to men too. The

Council with its partners has a profound duty to tackle this sad state of affairs.

The setting up of the Domestic Violence Forum in 1996 (and its predecessor

the Domestic Violence Working Party) brought together for the first time the

statutory and voluntary agencies that could begin to address the problem. The

Forum has put the issue on the agenda and much good work has been done,

particularly by Housing Services, the Police and the voluntary sector and with

schools.

However there is still an enormous challenge to be faced if we are to achieve

the significant reduction in domestic violence that we all seek. The targets set

in the 2005/08 community safety strategy and the Government’s new Best

Value Performance Indicators make it even more important that all agencies

are working together to best effect.

The domestic violence strategy set out in this document has been drawn up

with the full support and involvement of all the agencies represented on the

Forum. It charts a course for the next three years and highlights the priorities

we need to adopt. Building on the excellent work to date and harnessing the

goodwill and commitment of all those involved I am sure that we can and will

succeed. We owe it to those who have suffered domestic violence and still

suffer in silence and to future generations across the Borough.

Councillor Mary O’Connor

Chair of Hillingdon Domestic Violence Forum

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 70


Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

Executive Summary

The Domestic Violence coordinator, under the management of Housing and

Social Services and guidance of the Domestic Violence Forum, will take the

strategic lead in developing and implementing the Strategy and the Delivery

Plan.

The Strategy and Implementation Plan has been developed in partnership

with all relevant statutory and voluntary partners.

Hillingdon Council has a responsibility to adhere to the Best Value

performance Indicators (BVPI 225) introduced in 2005 in relation to domestic

violence. This Strategy reflects all indicators and a Chief Officer and

Executive Member are therefore to take responsibility for its implementation

within the local authority.

Each partner needs to remember their responsibilities both as service

providers and employers. As such, each should introduce a Workplace

Domestic Violence Policy to recognise and support staff experiencing

domestic violence, as well as hold perpetrators accountable. The policy

should provide easy access to support information and raise awareness

amongst service managers and staff.

Information sharing, in relation to individual cases, is crucial for effective multi

agency working at a local level. This increases victim’s safety and holds

perpetrators accountable. It is vital an information Sharing Protocol be

developed and implemented to support this. It is also important that this

process is not cumbersome, preventing appropriate responses in crisis

interventions and reflecting the core definition of domestic violence.

Clear, objective, measurable aims, performance indicators and targets to

monitor the progress and success of the Strategy will be detailed in the

Implementation Plan.

To improve responses to Domestic Violence, anonymised data on domestic

violence should be collected by all partners to provide the statistical evidence

by which to measure performance.

Most of the statutory agencies often refer clients to organisations that offer

services from volunteers. These organisations are often poorly resourced and

the burden of crisis work often limits their capacity to train and develop

through research.

Parental conflict undermines the effectiveness of parent education

programmes and it is important that frontline agencies are supported in

delivering such interventions effectively, sharing Good Practice standards, so

that responses to Domestic Violence are more consistent across the region.

The Domestic Violence Coordinators will be offering a course in parental

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conflict to frontline parenting educators, professionals and volunteers

supporting families to address this matter, which will be accredited.

The Domestic Violence Strategy will be presented to Hillingdon Cabinet for

approval.

Housing & Social Services Department

On behalf of Hillingdon Domestic Violence Forum

September 2005

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Introduction

Definition of Domestic Violence

In order to address this issue, and harness the many agencies that are key to

delivering the targets set out in this strategy LBH has accepted the

governments ‘core’ definition of domestic violence as follows:

“Any incident of threatening behaviour, violence or abuse (psychological,

physical, sexual, financial or emotional) between adults who are or have been

intimate partners or family members, regardless of gender or sexuality."

The government has made it clear that this definition incorporates issues such

forced marriage and so called ‘honour’ killings as well as older abuse when

committed within the family or by an intimate partner.

The term ‘domestic violence’ is used to describe the pattern of abuse such as

threats, intimidation, physical, sexual, emotional or psychological violence of

one person, usually a woman, by another, usually a man, with whom they

have had an intimate or family relationship.

Domestic violence can affect anyone regardless of age, race, class, religion,

sexual orientation or disability. We recognise that in this society certain

groups may face additional obstacles and discrimination when seeking help.

Domestic Violence is unacceptable and is a crime. Everyone has the right to

live their life free from fear, intimidation and violence.

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Positive Statement on domestic violence:

Domestic violence is a crime and a disgrace to the society in which we live. In

Hillingdon it accounts for more than a quarter of the annual total of violent

crime recorded by the Police. Being attacked in your home by your partner is

a much greater risk than being mugged in the street.

As well as being a crime it also destroys lives, damages the self-confidence

and prospects of its victims and costs the community a vast some of money.

In addition it passes from generation to generation with boys brought up in a

family where violence is the norm being much more likely to become

perpetrators when they grow up.

It affects all sections of the community, all parts of the Borough and all age

groups. However there is overwhelming evidence that the vast majority of

those who suffer domestic violence are women. Tackling domestic violence is

therefore not only an imperative in making Hillingdon safer but it is also a vital

step towards the achievement of equality for women. Until women are able to

feel safe in their relationships and safe in their homes they will never be truly

free.

Everybody in Hillingdon, particularly women and their children, are entitled to

live in a society which challenges all violence against individuals, regardless

of their race, religion, sexuality, disability, age, class or livelihood or their

relationship with the perpetrator or whether such violence occurs inside or

outside the home.

For all these reasons the Community Safety Partnership has given high

priority to domestic violence ever since it was set up in 1998 and it continues

to give it the same priority in the Community Safety Strategy for 2005-2008.

The Council, the Police, the Primary Care Trust, the Probation Service and

the judicial agencies are committed to ensure that this statement of intent is

turned into practical action which addresses the causes of domestic violence,

supports survivors, punishes perpetrators and sends a clear message that

this crime will not be tolerated in our Borough.

The agencies recognise that the voluntary sector plays a central and crucial

role in dealing with domestic violence and they commit themselves to work

with all relevant local organisations through the Domestic Violence Forum and

by any other practical means in the achievement of these aims.

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Background.

The importance of tackling Domestic violence has long been recognised by

the council, and substantial progress has been delivered through the work of

the Domestic Violence Forum, formed in May 1996, which has brought

agencies working to tackle domestic violence together for the first time

borough wide.

This strategy document has been developed to ensure that work of the

various agencies and the council is strategically relevant to the needs of

domestic violence victims in the London Borough of Hillingdon. It is also

linked to the council’s community safety strategy, which ensures that the work

on domestic violence coherently contributes to the local authority’s strategic

agenda.

Each stage of the development of this strategy was subject to consultation

with the Domestic Violence Forum members, which encompasses both

statutory and voluntary agencies, thus ensuring the approach agreed was

pertinent.

The strategy is for a three-year period from 2005 to 2008 and is owned by the

Forum who also has the responsibility of updating it.

* * * * *

• Domestic violence constitutes 18% of all murders in this country.

In previous years there have been domestic violence related murders

within Hillingdon, however in 2004/05, there were no murders in Hillingdon

with links to domestic violence.

• Home Office figures show that almost half of all murders of women are

committed by partners or ex partners; an average of 2 women are killed

every week in Britain.

• An estimated 100,000 women every year seek medical treatment for

injuries received in the home.

• Over 50% of women who are in contact with mental health services have a

history of domestic abuse (DoH 2002) and 25% of suicides are due to the

same cause.

• In Hillingdon, DV accounts for over 80% of all hate crime:

‣ 2002/03 = 2,762 incidents

‣ 2003/04 = 2,500 incidents

‣ 2004/05 = 3307 incidents

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Hillingdon Victim support currently deals with 48 reports of domestic

violence each week.

• In a sample of clients presenting to Hillingdon Community Safety Unit

Domestic Violence Coordinator in 2004/05, 37% suffered domestic

violence during pregnancy, and 28% were the victim of sexual

assault/rape.

Hillingdon Women’s Centre receive approximately 30 enquiries per month

and the majority of their client group are women fleeing or experiencing

domestic violence:

‣ Between April 2004 - March 2005 they dealt with 4186

enquiries concerning domestic violence

* * * * *

It is well known amongst agencies working with domestic violence, that those

whose lives are affected by domestic violence include not only the immediate

victim, but also wider family of the victim/perpetrator.

As well as the personal cost to these victims in terms of emotional and

physical damage to their development there is also a broad spectrum of more

hidden costs to any society in which domestic violence occurs. These costs

are manifested in crime, cycles of abuse, and arrested development of young

people. The costs to any society of addressing the results of domestic

violence are therefore great.

To identify the scale of the problem within Hillingdon, we have used London

wide research on the cost of domestic violence, which was supported by the

Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) and has produced the following figures per

year. The figures quoted are for the whole of London.

Service Criminal

Justice

System

Annual

Cost

Total

Legal System

£142.29

million

£185.94

million

Civil

Legal

Costs*

£43.65

million

National Health

Service

Physical Mental

Injuries healthcare

£170.69

million

£24.62

million

Local Authority

Social

services

£31

million

Housing

£22.11

million

Lost

Economic

output**

£373.84

million

Business

Savings

to

employers

£4 million

£1195.31 million £53.11 million £377.84 million

£1,812,20 million

*About half is born by legal aid and half by the individual.

**This is the cost of time off work due to injuries.

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The total figure for London was divided by 32 (the total number of boroughs in

London) to evaluate the cost to the borough of Hillingdon

Service Criminal

Justice

System

Annual

Cost

Total

Legal System

£4.446

million

Civil

Legal

Costs*

£1.364

million

National Health

Service

Physical Mental

Injuries healthcare

£5.334

million

Local Authority

Social

services

Housing

Lost

Economic

output**

£769,000 £968,000 £690,000 £11.68

million

Business

Savings

to

employers

£125,000

£5.81 million £6.103 million £1.658 million £11.805 million

£25.421 million

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Aims:

Domestic Violence is a crime that reaches into every corner of our society.

Due to its pervasive nature, and high volume of this crime within the borough,

Hillingdon considers a strategic partnership approach vital in order to tackle it

effectively.

In developing this strategy, the council and partner agencies are committing

resources and raising domestic violence high onto the local agenda as a key

area to be addressed. This strategy seeks to target issues relating to

domestic violence within the borough, incorporating other strategic and

development work carried out and ongoing across the borough.

The aims are to:

• Raise awareness of Domestic Violence within Hillingdon

• Improve partnership working and sharing of best practice across the

borough

• Improve the range of support available, and access to it for women

and children

• Implement Government guidance on tackling Domestic Violence

• In line with the Community Safety Strategy –

‣ Reduce the levels of Domestic Violence

‣ Reduce repeat victimisation of domestic

violence by 25%

‣ Increase detection rates to 60% by March

2008

• Meet the Best Value Performance Indicators on actions required

against domestic violence

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Understanding of Domestic Violence within Hillingdon.

Statutory services

1. Social services

Social Services and Housing departments merged in October 2004. This is already delivering

improved, coordinated responses to domestic violence, and is set to continue doing so.

Managers from both departments meet regularly to coordinate services to avoid overlapping

or duplication of work and delivery of DV Training. Both departments are represented at the

DV Forum and at the DV Executive Meetings.

Social Services employ a DV Coordinator in partnership with the police through the

community safety unit, and are planning to take on one further support worker to help with the

increasing workload coming through from the improved police assessment process.

The DV Coordinator provides emotional support to victims, carries out casework, and refers

and signposts to other agencies including healthcare, childcare, offers advocacy support, a

help line and an out of hours service.

The DV coordinator also delivers DV Awareness Training, and regularly reports to the DV

Forum.

Characteristics of Parents with Children on the Child Protection Register. June 2005

Domestic violence 40 – 43%

Substance Use 26 – 28%

Mental illness 7 – 8%

Physical Disability 1%

Learning Disability 4%

Domestic Violence & Mental illness 2%

Domestic violence & Substance misuse 11 – 12%

Learning disability & physical disability 1%

Domestic Violence & Substance use & mental illness 1%

None 33%

2. Housing

The Housing Service is committed to improving service delivery to all victims of domestic

violence. The housing needs of women at risk of domestic violence are being recognised

through the Supporting People Shadow Strategy as well as the Homelessness Strategy. The

strategies recognise a need to increase capacity and address the diversity of need, as well as

enable victims to stay in their homes.

In addition, a Domestic Violence Housing Policy has been developed covering assessment of

need, accommodation options and availability of support to be offered to anyone experiencing

domestic violence.

The Hillingdon Sanctuary Scheme has also been developed and launched in partnership with

the Police, Community Safety Unit, Care Line and Hillingdon Homes offering security

measures to victims who choose to remain in their home.

They have appointed a DVC who is based in the Emergency Housing Unit, with a strategic

role to develop information protocols, develop statistical data collection processes, coordinate

partnership working, provide Multi-Agency DV training.

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3. Education

Research show that prevention work in schools should start at or prior to the age 11, before

attitudes begin to harden.

The Education department is committed to preventative work. A programme around domestic

violence is delivered in schools for staff with a focus upon raising awareness and prevention.

The Children Act established a duty to promote well being in cooperation between agencies.

Citizenship, Sex and Relationships Education, Social and Health Education and specific

subject areas provide opportunities for teachers to raise consciousness of domestic violence

and encourage discussion and debate.

6th form students have produced a leaflet for secondary school children, which gives advice

on how to get help and raises awareness of domestic violence.

4. Health

Healthcare workers are a crucial factor in the identification of cases of domestic violence, and

the provision of care to those who experience domestic violence. The midwifery services play

a very important role in identifying incidences of domestic violence during pregnancy and the

impact upon the mental health difficulties for children that witness it.

Hillingdon’s Child and Adolescent Mental Health Development Strategy (May 2005 – 2008)

strives ‘to develop a holistic corporate approach to secure better services and better

outcomes for children’ according to particular requirements set out in the recently published

CAHMS standard, The mental Health and psychological Well being of Children & Young

People. This leads towards more effective coordination across health, GPs, education, social

care, voluntary sector, youth leisure, Sure Start, Children’s Fund and youth justice.

In addition, MAST (Multi-Agency Support Team) works with children at risk of becoming

looked after to prevent accommodation.

The Hillingdon Hospital trust is represented on the domestic violence forum by a senior

Accident & Emergency (A&E) department sister, who is vice chair of the forum and plays an

active role in training, informing and supporting colleagues and patients.

Staff in A&E receive domestic violence awareness training, and there is a protocol in place,

with a questionnaire to help staff in its implementation.

Like staff in A&E, midwives follow local guidelines. They are encouraged to attend domestic

violence training and are aware of the referral process. Midwives, GPs and health visitors are

key to the early detection of domestic violence in the antenatal process.

All other community staff (health visitors, school nurses, nursery nurses and mental health

nurses) are offered training by the Community Safety Unit Domestic Violence coordinator on

a regular basis and within child protection training. Families for whom domestic violence is an

issue are treated as priority and are referred to appropriate agencies as necessary.

The Primary Care Trust (PCT) shares the forums concerns regarding the harmful effects of

domestic violence, and supports its work. The PCT has addressed the recommendations of

the overview and scrutiny panel and has its own action plan in relation to the health and crime

project report, which is reflected above.

5. Crown Prosecution Service.

The Crown Prosecution service (CPS) always aims for safe convictions in which the public

can have confidence and which deliver justice for victims, witnesses and defendants. The

CPS will ensure that witnesses are supported to enable them to give their best evidence.

The CPS have a Public Safety Agreement (PSA) that largely follows governmental guidelines

regarding avoiding delays in bringing perpetrators to justice, helping victims and witnesses

give evidence, Bail and Sentencing as well as a Code of Practice for Crown Prosecutors.

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The law in the Domestic Violence Crimes and Victims Act, which offers powers to arrest on

Common Assault, bolsters this policy.

The PSA Targets 2005-08 are to:

• Improve the delivery of justice by increasing the number of crimes for which an

offender is brought to justice to 1.25 million by 2008

• To reassure the public, by reducing the fear of crime and anti-social behaviour, and

building confidence in the Criminal Justice system.

The CPS strategy also aims to “strengthen the prosecution of hate Crime and crimes of

domestic violence”

The CPS are developing a more sophisticated approach to prosecuting by:

• Ensuring independence whilst working with victims professionally and sensitively;

• Actually seeking, and considering, the needs and requests of the individual victim

whilst addressing the wider public interest issues for stirrings potential future victims;

• Balancing the night of the victim and any children against the right, of the defendant;

• Meeting the shared needs of all victims, whilst also ensuring that specific needs of

different communities are taken into account;

• Addressing value for money within a preventative as well as prosecutorial framework.

The CPS strategic plan is largely compatible with the joined up partnership working approach

that is modern and efficient; with core values that are replicated with other domestic violence

strategies across local regions and nationally.

6. Hillingdon Police

Hillingdon Police have demonstrated great leadership in taking the domestic violence agenda

forward and creating a more sophisticated approach to dealing with this crime. They have

helped to dramatically improve effectiveness by gathering information that focuses more on

the pattern of behaviour of domestic violence perpetrators, which are linked to issues of

power and control.

The police have helped to provide 3 rd Party Reporting Sites to improve the quality of

information, enabling them to be more effective in response / reports and providing more

detailed evidence for the justice process.

The Borough commander works closely with Democratic Services and the Community Safety

team, and the police regularly send representatives to the domestic violence Executive

Committee, Domestic Violence Forum, Anti-Social Behaviour Teams, Victim Support, Elder

Abuse and Neighbourhood Watch. They also strategically contribute to Supporting People

Consultation Processes.

The Metropolitan Police have introduced an additional risk assessment form, which has been

implemented by Hillingdon police and contains more in-depth questions to help identify risks

posed by the perpetrator, thus helping to reduce repeat offending in the long term.

The Community Safety Unit is a dedicated team comprising 15 police officers (both uniform

and detective), which are branch supervised by 3 sergeants and deal with all domestic

violence related issues, from minor domestic arguments to serious assaults on either male

and female victims. The target group incorporates homophobic and race hate crime victims.

The officers work to identify repeat instances of all domestic incidents and attempt to reeducate

both victim and perpetrator. The officers deal with the victims, witnesses and

perpetrators.

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There is a dedicated domestic violence coordinator within the unit, funded by Social Services

to assist many of the victims and advise them on injunctions, civil actions, refuges etc. and

provide the much needed support and reassurance the vulnerable victim needs.

The Crime Prevention officers specialising in domestic violence issues work closely with the

CSU and advise on security for the home address. They have been instrumental in setting up

the Hillingdon Sanctuary Scheme in partnership with Hillingdon Homes, Careline, Housing,

Shepherds Bush Housing Association and outreaching local locksmiths whilst monitoring cost

effectiveness, impact upon the victim and maintenance of security measures installed.

Voluntary Services

1. Support Services

Shepherd Bush Housing Association (SBHA) provides floating support to victim of domestic

violence. The support is practical and includes emotional advice to women all over the

borough. They also offer a limited counselling service as well as advocating on behalf of their

clients with regard to housing and benefits.

The domestic violence floating support service (DVFSS) provided by SBHA operates a

counselling service for women who are supported through the floating support service or who

live in the refuge or the safe houses. 2 Counsellors see 8 clients per week between them.

2. Accommodation based services

SBHA provides a refuge for seven women and their children as well as 2 safe houses for 11

single women. There is also a Play worker who offers individual support, a Family Counsellor

for mothers and children, as well as a Play Therapist who offers group activities and support

to the children. All of these services are funded through the Children's Fund.

SBHA has obtained funding to set up a residential for ex-refuge tenants and their children

who have remained in the borough which will offer confidence building and self-esteem

raising sessions as well as getting valuable feedback from the service users to effect tailor

future service provision.

3. Advocacy services

The DVFSS supports women using the legal system by accompanying clients to solicitors

appointments or to court, and where appropriate, liasing with Victim Support Witness Service

and other Court Support Services.

Hillingdon Women’s Centre provides a limited legal service run on a voluntary basis.

Sure Start provides a range of services and support to families within their areas, including

specific groups and links to specialist agencies to ensure a network of provision to increase

safety and choices available to victims. There are links between Hillingdon and the local

programme. Sure start offers key staff allocated according to need and as appropriate uses

other agency input and support. Services include family support workers across all

programmes, which provides support for young and/or vulnerable mothers, a key worker

system of individual support for women or children, crèche and play workers to support

attendance at groups and to support the parents relationship with the child.

4. Outreach

Hillingdon has invested in a Primary Well being Pilot project to promote the emotional health

and well being of primary school aged children. The pilot includes in-service training for

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teachers, parent information sessions, whole class ‘circle time’ sessions and individual work if

required.

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Awareness raising

The council has a full complement of advertising, using a range of different media in

appropriate community languages, and its website carries regularly updated information about

anti domestic violence services. The council pro-actively promotes awareness raising events

such as White Ribbon Day.

Domestic Violence forum produces a range of information for women and agencies including

help cards for women with key agency details and posters with anti domestic violence

messages.

HAVS produce a newsletter, which features community news, training and funding

opportunities.

Training

The council is rolling out multi agency D V Training to develop a more effective, standardised

response to clients that are fleeing / experiencing or concerned about domestic violence

across the borough.

Providing training is a key way of supporting agencies to develop their services.

Multi-agency 2-day courses run every month and provide training to a wide range of

statutory and voluntary sector agencies.

The Community Safety Unit and Hillingdon Housing. Domestic Violence Coordinators also

assist in the development of customised courses for agencies or departments. Training is

linked to relevant agency policies, procedures and protocols.

The Probation Service has recently introduced a system that identifies perpetrators of

domestic violence to attend a 30+ week course based on the Duluth Model. This course is

focused on addressing the needs of victims and witnesses through a consultative process.

Co-ordination

The council have employed a full time Domestic Violence Coordinator within housing to work

with the various agencies delivering services to victims and ensure that the service is

seamless and addresses the needs of service users.

A Domestic Violence Pack is being developed to include a directory of all local agencies, as

well as similar information from neighbouring Local Authorities – this will be distributed to all

agencies taking part in the multi –agency training and to services involved in the provision of

domestic violence services across the borough.

SBHA services carry out risk assessments and support planning. These tools, agreed with

the client, inform and direct the service they receive. In addition, the local police have

adopted a generic assessment tool that is used throughout frontline services – it is used to

assess risk of perpetrators as well as to build towards Safety Planning for victims.

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Local context

The Housing Services conducted a mapping exercise (as detailed above) of

the services currently available within the borough.

The areas used as a guide during the mapping exercise were those indicated

in the guidance document published by the home office in December 2004 to

assist local authorities with developing domestic violence strategies.

This allowed for a comprehensive gap analysis to be conducted.

The key findings of the gap analysis were:

Presently, the complex nature of domestic violence defies the necessity for

building a systematic way of understanding its impact. Health, Police and the

council’s housing dept have all developed ways to collect data but their

different criteria, modus operandi and the ‘masked or hidden’ issues arising

often reduce compatibility.

Local voluntary organisations operating on limited resources with clients at

crisis point can be reluctant to contribute to mapping exercises as the needs

they identify may then be taken up by rival agencies with the resources to

develop services.

There is a strong commitment to develop good practice and outreach to all

communities. Many organisations have primary concerns with survival, and

reaching targets and these qualities can contribute to minimise ‘thinking out

side the box’, which is important to enable the power-sharing roles in

partnership working, with a view towards prevention.

However, more work is needed to develop a clear picture of the level of

understanding of this crime within the community as a whole.

Violent relationships often become more violent over time. While it is

impossible to predict with any degree of certainty when relationships will

escalate to lethal violence, researchers have identified some common factors.

The police have taken a strong initiative in adopting a new assessment tool

that they consistently use for domestic violence cases. This has resulted in

more effective ways to determine the lethality of perpetrators, as well as

providing earlier intervention by the agencies they refer victims to.

This tool is being shared and developed with other agencies through multi

Agency DV training and will be instrumental in developing a common

assessment tool. It is compatible with adult and child protection procedures.

Many agencies are moving toward a common assessment tool, indicating that

in the future the information they share will be more meaningful and enable

more effective referrals.

Until then, there is no common assessment tool in place.

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Agencies working within the borough with victims of domestic violence record

and use their own statistics for development purposes and to ensure that

service delivery is meeting local need. There is no commonality across the

agencies at this stage, and the statistics are not combined. This is a key area

that the domestic violence forum is committed to addressing.

In the meantime, there is no common statistical recording, or gathering

and using of any statistics that are recorded.

The police have worked in partnership with local business to develop third

party reporting sites with the aim of increasing reportage of domestic violence,

homophobic behaviour and hate crimes. The police, representatives from the

Council and Democratic services regularly attend the DV and LGBT Forums

in order to develop links with local associations, clubs, volunteer groups to

raise awareness and to address the issues arising about abuse within gay

and lesbian relationships. There is anecdotal evidence that social pressures

contribute to the reluctance of these groups to declare incidents.

Despite the work carried out as above, at this stage, there is no firm

evidence about male and same sex victims of domestic violence

Members of the DV Forum benefit from regular updates of research

developments and Good Practice but this is not sustained over the entire

health / housing sector. Research based developments can outstrip common

knowledge so that many outmoded attitudes and responses continue to

prevail. There have recently been good initiatives that reach out to

marginalised groups within the borough.

Despite this however there are still gaps in service provision across the

borough for all victims of domestic violence

We are at an early stage of rolling out the monthly DV training process (to be

reviewed in December ’05). There has been a good response to this training

package from Housing & social services, Youth offending, Links and

Voluntary organisation so far. Although the DV Training programme is freely

available to all DV Forum members, it is also run on a roll-on format, which

offers flexibility and choice and is set out in a way that allows for planning by

management.

This demonstrates that whilst there is an encompassing training

package, not all departments are signed up to it.

The CPS has adopted a new policy that will encourage agencies to have a

more joined up approach to supporting victims. Advocacy services are being

developed to provide legal support to victims on a voluntary basis.

Magistrates rely on information provided by the prosecution authorities. Their

legal advisors have been trained and on-going training is also provided for

staff and magistrates in areas such as victim awareness & support, how to

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issue bail etc. Systems have been introduced that promote the safety of

victims.

The Uxbridge Magistrates Court works closely with the Witness Service and

has developed facilities to protect victims that appear in court.

Despite this there is no agreed approach to supporting victims through

the legal process.

Although there have been examples of Perpetrator Prevention Interventions

across South East / London regions such as Camden Safety Net and the

Living Without Violence Prevention Programme in Brighton, funding is difficult

to identify and maintain. These programs have thorough assessment

processes and have support programmes for the family, victims and

witnesses that run alongside the corrective behavioural group work that last

36 weeks. Local agencies that develop successful prevention programs

services in the future will contribute to reducing costs.

Despite this there is no agreed approach to dealing with perpetrators.

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Key Deliverables:

From the mapping exercise and gap analysis, the key deliverables for this

strategy focus on the following main themes:

• Raising Awareness

• Improving service provision and access to it.

• Improving information sharing and data management

• Developing legal, civil and criminal justice responses.

• Perpetrator Work

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Raising awareness:

Why a priority?

Despite the targeted campaigns on domestic violence by the government,

voluntary sector and police, and the increased visibility of domestic violence

through the media coverage it now receives; there persist many

misconceptions surrounding domestic violence that affect how victims are

perceived, and that lead to perpetrators being excused their actions.

Research shows that some young people think that violence to a partner is

acceptable in some circumstances. For many a level of violence in their lives

is commonplace and accepted as inevitable.

In order for the society we live in to confront domestic violence a basic level of

understanding of the issues surrounding it must be reached.

Lack of recognition of domestic violence within Hillingdon, and lack of

awareness of the services that exist to deal with it have lead to under

reporting and under recording of the true extent of domestic violence.

There are two aspects to ensuring that domestic violence is recognised by

society:

• Awareness of the general public,

• Awareness of those working with people who may be affected by domestic

violence, targeted at different groups including the public, victims and

perpetrators.

Our key actions to address this area will be:

• Public awareness:

• Training for staff:

‣ To work with local media to raise awareness.

‣ To ensure there is clear accessible information

provided to the public. (Creatively placed)

‣ To build on national campaigns, and incorporate

them into local strategy.

‣ To do outreach work in schools and local

businesses as part of a raising awareness

campaign

‣ To ensure a consistent message is given to the

public by all partner agencies regarding domestic

violence.

‣ To hold regular information events for practitioners

& staff

‣ To provide information to agencies via a newsletter

‣ To provide cross borough multi agency training

‣ To ensure domestic violence training links with

agency training plans and staff development

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Improving Service provision and access to it:

Why a priority?

Our research has clearly indicated the gaps in our service provision in this

area. Refuges and other services within the borough are continuously

oversubscribed and though Supporting People has helped to coordinate the

delivery of services, there are still gaps in this area.

Our key actions to address this area will be:

• Mapping of service provision within the borough

• Providing clear information to all agencies involved in work with victims of

domestic violence on service provision and routes into services within the

borough.

• To widely promote local and national help-lines

• Developing a common risk assessment tool for use across the borough

• Participating in strategic work to tackle domestic violence across West

London partnership, and ensuring this is widely available

• Carrying out ongoing local consultation with service users to continuously

address gaps in service at a strategic level

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Improving information sharing and data management:

Why a priority?

Within Hillingdon there are many agencies working towards reducing

domestic violence, supporting the victims of domestic violence, and increasing

the levels of prosecution.

There is scope to increase the level of joint working that currently takes place,

thus reducing duplication of services and effort, confusion over responsibility,

and the cost that this brings about in terms of human and financial resources.

For a more effective policy where more perpetrators are brought to justice and

more victims supported appropriately it is vital that information is shared and a

common database and method of recording is established.

Our key actions to address this area will be:

• Draw on national and local good practise

• Build on existing local processes (e.g. child protection system)

• Reduce the duplication of services through streamlined communication

• Develop and agree a common tool for reporting incidents of domestic

violence, and monitoring victims and perpetrators.

• Ensure that all agencies have appropriate mechanisms to facilitate the

analysis of this data, and are equipped to incorporate it into the

development of their service.

• Further develop effective and appropriate networks for information sharing.

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Developing appropriate legal, civil and criminal responses to domestic

violence:

Why a priority?

The civil and criminal justice system is instrumental in ensuring the effective

protection of women and their children. Its input into this process is threefold:

• It is one of the main mechanisms that can provide abused women the

safety for themselves and their children that they seek.

• It can deliver justice to perpetrators of domestic violence

• It can send a clear message to society that domestic violence is a crime

that will not be tolerated.

Our key actions to address this area will be:

• To promote the training of all those involved in the civil and criminal justice

system.

• To ensure that women have access to appropriate advice and advocacy

services

• To promote effective working relationships between the key domestic

violence support agencies, and the legal and advice service providers.

• To develop domestic violence courts, in line with national good practise

• To promote a supportive approach for women using the civil and criminal

justice system and consistent sanctions for perpetrators

• To implement government proposals on improving the protection of

women

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Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

Perpetrator Work

Why a priority?

To date the main body of funding spent, and work done to combat domestic

violence has had a victim focus. This, whilst it has been necessary, has failed

to address the cause of the domestic violence itself, and therefore missed a

key element in preventing its reoccurrence.

To achieve a reduction in repeat victimisation significant focus must be on the

perpetrators. To address this for convicted perpetrators there must be

improved coordination amongst the criminal justice agencies. For non

convicted perpetrators and those who come forward with the wish to address

their own behaviour there should be easier access to specialised, appropriate

programmes.

Our key actions to address this area are:

• Ensure the criminal justice implementation group performs according to

best practice and adapts to new developments

• Investigate ways in which perpetrators can be assisted to change their

behaviour

• Introduce a systematic approach to dealing with perpetrators (check if

exists.

• To implement nationally approved programmes of work with perpetrators

• To ensure women are provided with parallel support services.

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Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE STRATEGY IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

Action Lead Officer By When

Raising awareness

− To work with local media to raise awareness

Domestic Violence

Forum

September

06

− To ensure there is clear accessible information provided to the public

(creatively placed)

Domestic Violence

Forum

December

06

− To build on national campaigns, and incorporate them into local strategy DV Exec. Committee March 07

− To ensure a consistent message is given to the public by all partner agencies

regarding domestic violence.

Domestic Violence

Forum

September

06

Develop a domestic violence education pack in consultation with the wider domestic

violence forum.

− To do outreach work in schools and local businesses as part of a raising

awareness campaign

− Carry out an evaluation of education work done to measure the impact of the

awareness raised in schools.

2. Improving Service provision and access to it

− Mapping of service provision within the borough

− Providing clear information to all agencies involved in work with victims of

domestic violence on service provision and routes into services within the

borough.

− Developing a common risk assessment tool for use across the borough

Education

December

06

Domestic Violence March 07

Forum Members

Education June 07

Domestic violence

co-ordinators

Domestic violence

co-ordinators

Police & domestic

violence coordinators

December

05

June 06

March 06

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Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

− Participating in strategic work to tackle domestic violence across West London

partnership, and ensuring this is widely available

All service providers March 08

Lobby for additional refuge places in the borough

Domestic Violence March 08

Forum

− Carrying out ongoing local consultation with service users to continuously Domestic Violence March 08

address gaps in service at a strategic level

Forum

− To widely promote local and national help-lines All service providers December 06

3. Training

Multi–agency training – continue & review delivery plan

− To hold regular information events for practitioners & staff

− To provide information to agencies via a newsletter

− To provide cross borough multi agency training

− To ensure domestic violence training links with agency training plans

and staff development

− Businesses to send their employees on multi agency training.

Domestic violence coordinators

Domestic Violence

Forum

Domestic Violence

Forum

Domestic violence coordinators

Domestic Violence

Forum

Domestic Violence

Forum

December 05

June 07

September 06

April 05 - March

08

March 06

June 07

4. Improving information sharing and data management

Develop a reporting mechanism on repeat homelessness due to

domestic violence

Develop an information sharing protocol and have it agreed between

key statutory partners

Housing Services March 06

Domestic Violence

Forum

March 07

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Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

− Draw on national and local good practice

− Build on existing local processes (e.g. child protection system)

− Reduce the duplication of services through streamlined communication

− Develop and agree a common tool for reporting incidents of domestic

violence, and monitoring victims and perpetrators.

− Ensure that all agencies have appropriate mechanisms to facilitate the

analysis of this data, and are equipped to incorporate it into the

development of their service.

− Further develop effective and appropriate networks for information

sharing.

5. Developing appropriate legal, civil and criminal responses to

domestic violence

− To promote the training of all those involved in the civil and criminal

justice system.

− To ensure that women have access to appropriate advice and

advocacy services

− To promote effective working relationships between the key domestic

violence support agencies, and the legal and advice service providers.

− To develop domestic violence courts, in line with national good practise

− To promote a supportive approach for women using the civil and

criminal justice system and consistent sanctions for perpetrators

− To implement government proposals on improving the protection of

women

6. Perpetrator Work

Review the council tenancy agreement to ensure that there is a specific clause

stating that perpetration of domestic violence by a tenant can be considered

grounds for eviction.

Police March 06

Domestic Violence

Forum

Domestic violence

coordinators

Police & Probation

service

Domestic Violence

Forum

Domestic violence

coordinators

Crown prosecution

service

Crown prosecution

service

Police & Probation

service

September 06

April 05 – March

08

April 05 – March

08

April 05 – March

08

April 05 – March

08

December 07

December 07

December 07

Hillingdon Homes December 05

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Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

Ensure the criminal justice implementation group performs according to best practise

and adapts to new developments

− Identify ways in which perpetrators can be assisted to change their

behaviour

− Introduce a systematic approach to dealing with perpetrators

− To implement nationally approved programmes of work with

perpetrators.

− To ensure women are provided with parallel support services

− Ensure the criminal justice implementation group performs according to

best practise and adapts to new developments

Police & Probation

service

Domestic violence

Coordinators

Police & Probation

service

All service providers

working with this group

Domestic Violence

Forum

Police & Probation

service

April 05 – March

08

June 06

June 06

December 07

December 07

April 05 – March

08

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Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

Strategy action plan monitoring process.

This strategy was developed in order to ensure that Hillingdon meets national

and regional standards of excellence in responding to Domestic Violence.

Housing services, through their domestic violence coordinator, took the lead in

developing the strategy.

It was instrumental that the members of the Domestic violence executive

committee were closely involved throughout the period of development in

order to involve key partners at a strategic level.

The Domestic violence forum participated in a consultation process on the

draft strategy during its inception.

This collaborative approach to the development of the strategy will be

continued during the 3 years of its operation to ensure that the targets and

time frames are met.

Following the launch of this strategy the Domestic Violence Forum Executive

Committee have taken the lead role in ensuring that targets are met and work

is delivered.

In order to achieve this the action plan and progression of it will be reviewed

quarterly at this group’s meetings.

The executive committee will follow up on all named leads within the action

plan, whilst the domestic violence forum will provide support and information

to all named leads on designated tasks.

All members of the domestic violence forum are signed up to its terms of

reference, which this strategy falls under, and therefore have the opportunity

to contribute to every stage of the strategies implementation.

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Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

Appendices.

Appendix 1

Feedback from DV Forum Meeting.

The DV Forum met to review the 2nd draft of this strategy and approved the

key Deliverables by way of a consultation Exercise on 14 th September 2005.

What follows is a summary of recommendations made by the forum, which

have been included within the action plan and strategy:

• The strategy should include an objective to ensure resources are made

available

• Invite and encourage local drama schools, Brunel University to create

teaching packages that could be made widely accessible to young

people, such as 6 th Form, Youth Offenders with a focus upon “Reduce

Stigma = Reduce Crime”.

• Representatives from senior management, directors, cabinet members,

management as well as frontline staff should receive training in basic

awareness of DV and assessment skills when appropriate.

• Multi agency DV Training must essentially continue to be rolled out on

a regular basis and remain free of charge to encourage partner

agencies to attend.

• Promote the 11 points on the BVPI

• The DV Forum is a good example of how partnership can be effective –

the following agencies should be invited if not attending: Health,

Housing (including Residential Social Landlords), Crown Prosecution

Service, Statutory and Voluntary social care agencies, Mental Health,

Police, Civil & Criminal Courts, REAP, Age Concern, Refugee & BME

Organisations, Travellers representatives, Refuge, Benefits, Youth

Offending, Anti-Social Behaviour Teams, Probation and Drug & Alcohol

Teams.

• Attendance coordinated to maximise opportunities for partner agencies

to network and familiarize with diverse ranges of DV related services.

• Pursue a vision that incorporates advocacy support, rehabilitation &

Prevention of perpetrators, Family Therapy to address recovery from

the long term problems attributed to living in intimidating

circumstances, client centred partnership working

• Define responsibilities to help organisations understand their roles and

links

• Supporting People could play an important role

• Basic awareness for GPs, dentists and all hospital departments

• Promote client centred partnership working across the region

• A possible additional key deliverable that addresses the question about

duplication of statistics

• Promote the Sanctuary Scheme to increase options of safety for

victims

• Perpetrator work for men that want to stop abusive behaviours

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Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

• Domestic Violence training to be mandatory for all staff that come into

contact with victims, witnesses and perpetrators

• Itemise domestic violence on team meeting agendas so that strategic

thinking is consistently reinforced

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Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

Appendix 2

Best Value Performance Indicators

Actions Against Domestic Violence

Purpose/Aim

The purpose of this BVPI is to assess the overall provision and effectiveness

of local authority services designed to help victims of domestic violence and

prevent further domestic violence.

Description

The percentage of the following questions to which a local authority can

answer ‘yes’. (To answer ‘yes’ the local authority must have fully achieved to

goal described; it is not enough that the authority is working towards the goal.)

1. Has the local authority produced a directory of local services that can

help victims of domestic violence?

2. Is there within the local authority area a minimum of 1 refuge place per

ten thousand population?

3. Does the local authority employ directly or fund a voluntary sector

based domestic violence co-ordinator? (For district Councils of fewer

than 35,000 households, the responsibility for co-ordinating domestic

violence can be designated within the job description of an existing

senior officer. For District Councils that contribute to a county-wide coordinator,

see definition.

4. Has the local authority produced and adopted a multi-agency strategy

to tackle domestic violence developed in partnership with other

agencies?

5. Has the local authority support and facilitate a local multi-agency

domestic violence forum that meets at least 4 times a year?

6. Has the local authority developed an information-sharing protocol and

had it agreed between key statutory partners?

7. Has the local authority developed, launched and promoted a

‘sanctuary’ type scheme to enable victims and their children to remain

in their own home, where they choose to do so and where safety can

be guaranteed? (For smaller district authorities, or fewer than 35,000

households this can be arranged in partnership with neighbouring

authorities)

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Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

8. Has there been a reduction in the percentage of cases accepted as

homeless due to domestic violence that had previously been re-housed

in the last two years by that local authority as a result of domestic

violence?

9. Does the council’s tenancy agreement have a specific clause starting

that perpetration of domestic violence by a tenant can be considered

grounds for eviction? (For local authorities that have transferred their

housing stock, the clause should be contained in LSVT organisations’

tenancy agreement.)

10. Has the local authority funded and developed a domestic violence

education pack in consultation with the wider domestic violence forum?

11. Has the authority carried out a programme of multi-agency training in

the last twelve months covering front line and managerial staff in at

least two of the following groups: housing staff, social services staff

providing services in the local authority area; education staff; health

staff; and front line police officers?

Definition

1. The directory must list both statutory and voluntary agencies that can

provide emergency housing, advice (welfare, housing and legal),

counselling and support, and include any local women’s aid contact

details and the National Domestic Violence Helpline. It must be widely

distributed and updated at least every 2 years. A directory should be

available for each district and not just county level, as a minimum it

should be available on the local authority’s web-site. A directory for

services that work with victims of domestic violence can be provided

separately from the Directory for Victims of Domestic Violence.

2. ‘Places’ means the number of rooms providing bed spaces for a

woman and her children. Rooms not normally designated, as

bedrooms should be counted towards the total. ‘Refuge’ means

emergency accommodation for women and children who have been

referred for help having experienced threats to their physical safety. It

must provide help, advice and advocacy support as well as being part

of an integrated local approach involving partnership with other local

and statutory bodies.

3. Calculate ‘Local Authority population’ using the latest ONS mid-year

estimates.

4. The co-ordinator should be employed at a local authority level (see

exemption below) and have responsibility for strategically co-ordinating

domestic violence issues throughout the local authority area. Where

funding has been provided to the voluntary sector or local area. Where

funding has been provided to the voluntary sector or local partnership

to employ a co-ordinator this will meet the definition as long as their

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Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

role remains to co-ordinate work in both the statutory and voluntary

sectors across the area covered by the local authority. Exemption in

cases where District Councils fun a county-wide co-ordinator the

District Council will meet the requirements of this BVPI if the

responsibility for ensuring that any county-wide work is implemented at

a district level is included in the job description of an existing senior

officer for that district.

5. The strategy should have been developed in partnership with all

relevant statutory and voluntary partners. It should be supportive of,

and aligned with, the authority’s Crime and Disorder Reduction

Strategy (CDRP). The strategy should cover a 3-year period with an

action plan reviewed annually. The action plan should contain at least

50% outcomes that are SMART and include a section on how the

needs of BME communities will be addressed. A Chief Officer and an

Executive member in the authority should have been allocated

responsibility for its implementation.

6. The forum should have a mix of statutory and voluntary sector

representatives at a senior enough level to aid the implementation of

decisions and the strategy action plan. The forum should be formalised

as part of the Crime and Disorder Partnership.

7. The information-sharing protocol must facilitate the exchange of

information to enable domestic violence to be effectively tackled across

all statutory agencies. Key statutory agencies are defined as the

Police, Health, Housing, Social Services and Education. The protocol

will also provide an opportunity to implement Homicide Reviews where

appropriate. It must ensure that confidentiality and victims safety is

protected.

8. A sanctuary type scheme must provide security measures to allow the

woman to remain in her home where she chooses to do so, where

safety can be guaranteed and the violent partner no longer lives within

the home. It must be available across tenures where the landlord of a

property has given permission for the work to be carried out. It must

consist of additional security to any main entrance doors to the

accommodation and locks to any vulnerable windows. Wherever

possible it must provide a safe room in the home secured with a solid

core door and additional locks. It is essential that this service be only

provided where it is the clear choice of the victim. The scheme should

be implemented through partnership with the police and/or the

voluntary sector that could provide supplementary support. It may be

provided directly by the local authority or through a third party funded

as part of the local authority’s homelessness prevention work through

grants that may be available for crime reduction initiatives.

9. The indicator is met if there is a percentage reduction in homelessness

acceptances due to domestic violence. Acceptances who were

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Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

previously homeless in another local authority area should not be

included. Reductions achieved in preventing repeat homelessness

should be clearly linked to positive measures adopted to provide

genuine alternatives for women to either remain in their own home or

be placed in alternative accommodation, removing the need to become

homeless. Alternative accommodation may be secured by arranging a

reciprocal property with another social landlord, or a safe management

transfer. Any options or measures to prevent repeat homelessness

must only be taken with the full consent of the victim of domestic

violence.

10. Any clause should make clear that evidence of domestic violence for

eviction purposes does not need to rely on a criminal charge. Evidence

may be based on a possession action using civil evidence.

11. The domestic violence education pack must have been specifically

designed for use in schools and with youth groups. It must aim to

challenge attitudes of tolerance to violence and help young people to

achieve positive relationships based on mutuality and respect. Schools

and youth groups cannot be forced to run a programme on domestic

violence but the pack must be easily available and actively promoted.

Schools should be encouraged to use the material as part of their

PSHE or Citizenship curriculum.

12. The training programme must cover domestic violence awareness

training, the legal framework, information sharing, and who provides

what services to victims of domestic violence with referral and contact

points. The programme should be developed in consultation with the

Domestic Violence Forum and reviewed by the forum annually.

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Appendix 3

Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy - Gap Analysis 2005

Service

requirement/aspect of

domestic violence to

address

Preventative work within

education (raising

awareness)

Linked to BV 225 (Q10) –

Has the local authority

funded and developed a

domestic violence

education pack in

consultation with the wider

domestic violence forum?

Current Position Excellent Position Action required to address Gap

Identified within the

council’s Domestic

Violence policy.

2 officers have attended

training for Westminster

Domestic Violence

intervention project.

Have developed and published a pack for

schools on Domestic violence prevention,

both in secondary and primary. This should

comprise inset training days for all school

staff and in-depth training for nominated

teachers.

Pack will have features of Westminster

model, as well as any other necessary local

variations.

All schools to have received training and be

implementing project.

The education pack must have been

specifically designed for use in schools and

with youth groups.

More schools to accept training

and allocate resources to allow

project to be implemented.

“Training the Trainer” Parent skills

courses offered to parent

educators from all agencies.

Work with local media to raise

awareness.

Ensure that clear accessible

information is creatively provided

to the public.

Outreach work in schools and local

businesses as part of raising

awareness campaign.

Evaluation of education work done

to measure the impact of

awareness raised in schools

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Corporate Social

responsibility and the

employers role

Linked to BV 225 (Q4) –

Has the local authority

produced and adopted a

multi-agency strategy

developed in partnership

with other agencies?

Linked to BV 225 (Q5) –

Does the authority support

and facilitate a local multiagency

domestic violence

forum that meets at least

four times a year?

Lancaster counselling

service for staff

Multi-agency strategy is

currently being

developed and will be

completed in Q3 05. All

Domestic Violence

Forum members will be

consulted in the process.

The council supports and

facilitates the Domestic

Violence Forum that has

been in place since 1996

and meets 6 times a

year. The DV forum

retains a degree of

independence with a

chair elected from the

voluntary sector. The

local domestic violence

co-ordinators work very

closely with the forum,

and have an input into

determining their annual

work programme.

Promotion of good practise for employers

on Domestic Violence and the workplace

across the borough, involving local

businesses in promoting help lines and

services imaginatively.

Businesses to send their employees on

multi agency training.

Holistic, multi-agency wrap-around service

with an efficient Information Sharing

Protocol that is focused upon prevention of

domestic violence and protecting victims

and witnesses and developing work and

research on perpetrators of domestic

violence.

Full representation on the Domestic

Violence Forum by all statutory and

voluntary agencies.

Progress action to be delivered

through Local Strategic

Partnership work.

Promote domestic violence training

for Human Resources and

Personnel departments

Multi-agency Domestic Violence

Training

Developing Advocacy services

Strategy document & action plan to

be implemented.

Continue to consult with Domestic

Violence forum – sharing research

evidence of good practise, whilst

developing links to relevant

services that come into contact

with domestic violence.

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Supporting women through

the legal system

Support systems available

specifically for children

CPS/police have a

positive charge protocol

in the absence of victim.

There is a police victim

care unit with positive

intervention procedure.

Victim Support Service

have/are addressing

these needs

Fast track/specialist DV court.

Access to solicitors

Advocacy Service.

Information raising awareness of domestic

violence made accessible to minority

groups.

Improved support to parents through

targeted services.

Early intervention and protection –

improved information sharing, common

needs assessment framework, assignment

of lead professional for children in multiple

risk, and multi disciplinary teams in

schools.

Work force reform strategy.

Create accountability & integrated local

services.

Establish a fast track/specialist

Domestic Violence court with

access to solicitors

Advocacy Service with training

made available to relevant

agencies.

“Training the Trainer” Parents

Skills Course offered to Parent

Educators across all disciplines

and agencies.

Multi-Agency Domestic Violence

Training – including governing

bodies, executive & councillor

representatives. Also to Human

Resources and Personnel

departments.

Crisis support/outreach to

perpetrators

No current provision

Murder Reviews.

Training programme on how to challenge

perpetrators, community perpetrators

programmes linked into Multi Agency

Public Protection arrangements, support

group for partners

Outreach to relevant individuals

within statutory / voluntary

agencies to develop a service that

addresses the behaviour of

perpetrators whilst protecting

victims and witnesses

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Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

Telephone advice / contact

line for women &

Information provision to

victims

Linked to BV 225 (Q1) –

Availability of directory of

local services that can help

victims of domestic

violence.

Work/refuges specifically

targeting marginalized

groups within the borough

(e.g. prostitution, travellers,

Black & Minority Ethnic

groups)

Linked to BV 225 (Q2) –

Availability of a minimum of

1 refuge place per ten

thousand population.

Guidelines for health care

workers

Police have a witness

care unit for this purpose

in addition to the liaison

with the Crime

Prevention Unit

Housing D V Coordinator

currently developing a

directory of local services

Police have recognised

the gap but have not

structured a targeted

programme for these

groups yet.

Some work on this has

been done through the

health and crime group

Primary Care Trusts

follow statutorial

guidelines.

Publicise national lines widely, have local

information lines set up & also widely

publicised. Creative use of advertising

services, as previous.

A domestic violence directory providing

information, contacts and criteria of work of

support agencies in and around the local

area.

Specialised support services/workers

operating within existing teams with these

client groups, tied in to existing services.

Development of Domestic Violence policy

and good practise guidelines, training of all

health professionals, implementation of

guidelines, including operation of routine

enquiries, proactive role for Primary Care

Trusts in local multi agency work on

Domestic Violence.

Share resources to improve

training of voluntary services e.g.

Equal Opportunities.

Media to promote new D V

directory and service provision.

Develop links with neighbouring

local authorities to provide detailed

account of local services for

persons fleeing domestic violence.

Develop 3 rd Party Reporting sites

across the region.

Develop Advocacy training /

services.

Outreach projects to encourage

members of minority groups and

raise awareness of domestic

violence.

Multi Agency Domestic Violence

Training.

Promote Core Definition of

domestic violence.

Accident &Emergency

provide statistics

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 108


Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

Monitoring and regular

consultation with women

Collection and

interpretation of statistical

data

according to statutorial

guidelines.

There is no data to

suggest that women are

consulted about

development of future

services across the

borough.

Although individual

agencies do collect data

to support effective

domestic violence action,

there is need for a

coordinated collection &

reporting process.

Building consistently upon links with local

voluntary agencies that comer into contact

with victims and encourage feedback and

representation for the domestic Violence

Forum.

The Domestic Violence forum is

investigating choosing a preferred Common

Monitoring program which will use software

packages that are capable of collecting

data from multiple and varied sources.

There are cost implications in this that need

to be resolved.

Mapping of service provision within

the borough.

Develop a reporting mechanism on

repeat homelessness due to

domestic violence.

Draw on local and national good

practice.

Build on existing local processes

such as Child Protection system.

Linked to BV 225 (Q8) –

Has there been a reduction

in the percentage of cases

accepted as homeless due

to domestic violence that

had previously been rehoused

in the last two

years as a result of

domestic violence (repeat

homelessness)

There is no data

available through

Accident & Emergency

Services.

The data is being

collected by Housing

Services since April

2005. However, there is

no data for the previous

year for a comparative

analysis to be carried out

yet.

Ensure that all agencies have

appropriate mechanisms to

facilitate the analysis of data, and

are equipped to incorporate it into

the development of their service.

Further develop effective and

appropriate networks for

information sharing.

Reduce the duplication of services

through streamlined

communication.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 109


Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

Joined up approach and

info sharing

Linked to BV 225 (Q3) –

Whether the local authority

employs directly or funds a

voluntary sector-based

domestic violence coordinator

Linked to BV 225 (Q6) –

Whether the local authority

developed an informationsharing

protocol and had it

agreed between key

statutory partners.

Outreach

services/community

relevance.

2 co-ordinators are

employed at local

authority level and one of

them has responsibility

for strategically coordinating

domestic

violence issues within

the borough.

No protocol agreed.

There is a floating

support service in the

borough as well as an

outreach service

provided by the

Community safety Unit

domestic violence

coordinator. Voluntary

organisations provide

community based routes

into services

Social service awareness of CP issues

recording DV etc. Develop an information

sharing protocol, which is agreed between

key statutory partners.

Multi agency training

To facilitate the exchange of information

between the police, health, housing, social

services and education

Multi agency training to increase

awareness of services available, and to

ensure that staff working in this field are

able to set realistic expectations and

outcomes with their clients of the services

available.

Wide reaching service accessible by all

sections of the community.

Use police risk assessment tool as

basis for joint Risk Assessment

Promote information exchange

through multi agency training and

maximising attendance at

domestic violence forum.

Develop an information sharing

protocol.

Research within the community

and service user groups to identify

gaps in service provision.

Consideration of further

development of new services, or

building on existing ones.

Linked to BV 225 (Q7) –

Whether the local authority

has developed, launched

Housing Services in

partnership with the

Metropolitan Police,

Increased publicity as to options

available to victims of domestic

violence.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 110


Hillingdon Domestic Violence Strategy 08/2005

and promoted a ‘sanctuary’

type scheme to enable

victims and their children to

remain in their homes,

where they choose to do

so and where safety can

be guaranteed.

Others

Hillingdon Homes &

Shepherds Bush

Housing Association

developed and launched

the scheme in July 2005.

Monitoring of Sanctuary Scheme

performance and perceptions in

relation to neighbouring boroughs.

Linked to BV 225 (Q9) –

Whether the council’s

tenancy agreement have a

specific clause stating that

perpetration of domestic

violence by a tenant can

be considered grounds for

eviction.

Hillingdon homes

tenancies have a clause

that stipulates that

persistent anti social

behaviour will lead to

eviction. This includes

violence against people

living within the home.

The clause should make clear that

evidence of domestic violence for eviction

purposes does not need to rely on a

criminal charge. Evidence may be based

on a possession action using civil evidence.

Hillingdon homes to ensure this

clause is in place and used

effectively.

Linked to BV 225 (Q11) –

Whether the local authority

carried out a programme of

multi-agency training in the

last 12 months covering

front line and managerial

staff in at least two of the

following groups: housing,

social services, education,

health staff and front line

police officers

Multi agency training,

that fulfils this criteria has

been in place since June

05

The training must cover domestic violence

awareness training, the legal framework,

information sharing & who provides what

services to victims with referral and contact

points. The programme should be

developed in consultation with the Forum

and reviewed by the forum annually.

Training programme to be

reviewed after 6 months.

Following the review steps to be

taken by facilitators to needs of

subscribers are met.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 111


COUNCIL WORKFORCE PLAN 2005 – 2015 ITEM 5

Contact Officer

Papers with this report

Roger Hackett/Pacey Cheales

01895 250579 / 250118

Appendices A & B- attached

SUMMARY

In July 2005 the Cabinet approved the workforce strategy 2005-15. Officers were ask

to develop a more detailed Workforce Plan, which would set out the actions and

targets needed to support the Workforce Strategy. The plan is set out in this report.

RECOMMENDATION

That Cabinet approve the Workforce Plan

REASONS FOR OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

Cabinet endorsement is needed so that it is clear that the plan as well as the

strategy has been formally adopted by the council.

OPTIONS AVAILABLE

To not or not adopt the Strategy

INFORMATION

Background

1. In July 2005 the Cabinet approved a Workforce Strategy for 2005-15

2. Within the context of the vision, values and Community Strategy priorities set

out in the Council Plan, the Workforce Strategy for 2005 – 2015 identifies four

strategic themes that will drive a high performing workforce and council:

Clear Vision and Leadership

Modernisation and Improvement

Attract and Retain High Calibre People

Continuous Learning and Improvement

3. These strategic themes emerged from an analysis of external factors, the

current workforce, organisational issues as well as the future direction of the council.

The final section of the Strategy sets out a number of top-level objectives for each of

the four strategic themes.

4. The 10 year Workforce Strategy needed to be underpinned by a Workforce

Plan that translates the four themes into a number of tangible actions and targets.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 112


The details of this Workforce Plan have now been developed by officers and

includes a number of existing HIP People Management deliverables as well new

issues that have been highlighted in the Workforce Strategy. The Workforce Plan

ensures that

• leadership and accountability for implementing the Workforce Strategy and Plan

is clearly and effective allocated amongst officers.

• the practical implementation of the Workforce Strategy and Plan fit with the

council’s existing strategies and priorities.

• Employers are seeking to provide more quantative performance measure into

their people management arrangements. This is in order to see how well this

critical area is being managed both from a VFM perspective and against good

practice. The plan sets out those areas that it is proposed that data be regularly

collected and monitored .There are various models being considered and the one

used in the plan is based upon a model being developed by the ALG.

CORPORATE CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

Corporate Finance comments

5. There are no direct financial implications arising from this report. However, as

staffing costs within the authority excluding schools totals £115m the proper planning

for staffing requirements is a crucial part of the medium to longer term financial

planning for the authority. If it is successfully implemented it should be capable of

generating savings or avoiding extra costs in areas such as recruitment and agency

costs.'

Legal Implications

6. There is a plethora of employment-related legislation and case law which

underpins the relationship between the Council and its employees. The law in this

area primarily focuses on the various rights and obligations of both employers and

employees.

7. The Workforce Strategy is a welcome document as whilst it is based on well

established legal principles, it goes further than strict compliance with the law and it

sets out a framework, which if adopted by the Council, will help to develop good

employment practice and will serve to enhance the relationship between the Council

and its employees.''

Further Consultation

8. Group representatives and the Trade Unions views on both the plan and the

strategy have been sought . The Strategy has been published on Horizon and staff

comments sought

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 113


BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

Cabinet report 14 th July 2005 (Workforce Strategy)

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 114


DRAFT

APPENDIX A

HILLINGDON WORKFORCE PLAN

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 115


DRAFT

Workforce Plan 2005/2010

The following plan describes how we are going to translate our workforce strategy into actions and targets over the next and

subsequent years based on where we are now, our achievements to date and the challenges we face. It shows how this plan links

to our strategy, our corporate objectives and our staff values. It also highlights the key influences, which the activities are seeking

to address. Although the strategy covers the period 2005/10 the plan concentration on setting targets for the medium term of

2005/8.

This plan will be a developing document with a process of review and change initially led by the HIP people management group.

This will be informed by feedback from internal and external stakeholders and policy changes.

Further work needs to be done to develop S.M.A.R.T. action plans to deliver activities. With these will then come the information to

realistically populate the final three columns. If the document is to achieve the objective of a whole organisation approach then

Board members and their teams need to be involved in deciding the detailed indicators which would for them signal success,

These will also need to be subject to review over the period of the plan as assessment and service changes take place.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 116


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

CLEAR VISION &

LEADERSHIP

Organisational Ownership

Board level leadership on workforce

management. Director of Social

Services & Housing, Champion of

People Management in the council.

Done

Hugh Dunnachie

Increased profile of workforce

at Board level via quarterly

reporting to Management

Board.

Review and clarification of the roles

and responsibilities for workforce

issues between Board, Groups,

Personnel and HIP people,

management team.

Feb.

2006

HIP People

Management

Team

Effective management of both

‘hot’ issues eg disciplinary and

grievance, recruitment and new

initiatives eg job remodelling

and career pathway

development. Delivery of

agreed quantitative measures.

Co-ordination of cross organisational

initiatives to resolve problems

shared across groups.

From

July

2005

Recruitment &

Retention Officer

Council/Hillingdon wide action

plan and projects to address

common initiatives eg level of

agency staffing overseas

recruitment developed as part

of recruitment & retention

initiative work.

Board Members and other

professionals to ensure appropriate

aspects of national initiatives are fed

into the plan.

Ongoing

Board HIP

People

Management

Team

Plan updated to reflect national

initiatives.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 117


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

Effective resource planning

Partnership Planning

Develop a resource plan (financial

and human) to implement this plan.

Develop a partnership plan with

partner organisations and

outsourced providers to take forward

whole Hillingdon issues and

maximise community benefits of

workforce initiatives.

By Mar

2008

HIP People

Management

Team

HIP People

Management

Team

CEO & Service Group Plans

evidence resources committed

to delivering /sustaining

Workforce Strategy and Plan.

Partnership Plan formally

endorsed by all contributing

partners.

Integration of workforce

planning into the

organisation service/team

Clarify and agree workforce related

Group, team and individual

objectives for inclusion in plans and

Padas.

Jan2006

HIP People

Management

Team

Service Planning & PADA

guidance for 2006/7 revised

Ensure through Service and team

plans and Padas all managers

objectives include appropriate

workforce related objectives.

Jan

2006

HIP People

Management

Team

Sample Survey provides

evidence of link between PADA

objectives and workforce

matters

Building Leadership

Competence and capacity

Review ‘Building Hillingdon’s Future’

programme and introduce more high

quality management development

targeted in Y1 at 4 th and 5 th tier

managers.

April 06

Head of Training

& Development

XX% increase per annum in

employee satisfaction with

leaders judged through staff

surveys.

Introduce a qualifications framework

Nov 05

Head of Training

Quality and skills profile of

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 118


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

for leaders and managers.

& Development

managers through 360 degree

feedback benchmarked against

competency framework

Roll out the Leadership

Development programme and

ensure full coverage.

April

2006

Head of Training

& Development

Qualifications framework in

place for management

development of top XXX

managers

Introduce management development

programmes linked to Succession

planning.

To be

advised

Head of Training

& Development

Leadership/management

programme delivered via

modular format encompassing

learning needs identified

through the 360 degree

feedback process.

Introduce the expectation and

opportunities for managers to take

up secondments and job

swops/shadowing with high

performing organisations or services

with the council.

Mar

2007

Head of Training

& Development

Introduce new secondment

arrangement to encourage job

“swop” for XX managers per

annum

Joint working between Social

Services and Housing with PCT

Ongoing

SSD/H and PCT

Current joint working

arrangements continued.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 119


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

Communication of our

values, culture and

objectives

Communicate our vision, values,

culture and objectives through coordinated

staff

communication/briefings

Ongoing

Head of

Communications

Assess success through staff

survey results showing XX%

increase in employee

awareness and recognition.

Improve upward and sideways

communication systems through the

implementation of the Staff Survey

Action Plan in line with its timetable.

Ongoing

HIP People

Management

Team

Values compounded through

including in competency

framework behaviours

Define our workforce management

values.

Done

Completed and reviewed as

part of annual council Plan

refresh

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 120


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

MODERNISATION AND

IMPROVEMENT

In 2005/6 develop and implement

the action plans derived from this

Workforce Plan for the period 2005-

10.

End

2005/6

HIP People

Management

Team

Action Plan agreed HIP People

Management Team

Modern Information

Systems

Through the HR portal of the new

HR/Payroll system provide

managers and staff with the tools

and resources that will enable them

to better manage their people.

By Aug

2008

People

Management

Steering Group

Implementation of new people

management system in line with

project plan and monitor

effectiveness management

information with sample annual

survey of managers

Introduction of self service and

workflow modules of new people

management system and achieve

XX% use of self service modules.

Ensure that the implementation of

the new HR system goes smoothly

and that the planned improvements

in service and efficiency are realised

in line with the agreed project

timetable for 2005/8.

Aug

2008

The People

Management

Steering Group

Agreed project deliverables, cash

and non-cash benefit achieved in

agreed timescales.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 121


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

Complete the Process mapping of

personnel Policies on our intranet

site June 2005.

Done

Inventory of process agreed ad

mapped within agreed

timescales.

Carry out third Staff survey in

Feb/March 2006 in order to assess

culture change and effect upon

employee satisfaction that the

various organisational development

initiatives have made.

June

2006

Personnel

Service

Survey completed on time.

Results evaluated and assets

employee satisfactions and

impact of previous initiatives.

Attractive rewards strategy

and framework

As part of our R&R package we are

committed to:

- Introducing an employer child

Tax Credit System to help

attract and retain working

parents. This will enable

these staff to pay up to £50

per week to registered carers

free of tax and NI. It is

planned to have this scheme

up and running by July 2005.

- Also as part of the Wellness

Strategy to introduce an

improved Private Health Care

Done

Done

Recruitment &

Retention

Officer

Revised arrangement in place for

June 2005 and take up of

scheme monitored annually.

Implementation of new schemes

in July 2005 and July 2006

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 122


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

scheme for staff by July 2005.

Develop proposals for a noncontributory

scheme in

2006/7.

Publicise the Rewards strategy for

2005/6.

End

2006/7

Ongoing

Personnel

Service

Personnel

Service

Personnel

Service

Ensure that the arrangements for

determining Team Bonus pay are

established by the last quarter of

2005/6.

Mar

2006

Arrangements for evaluation to

be in place by the end of 2005/6.

Team Bonus action plan

delivered to agreed timescales.

Linking performance &

rewards management

Amend Pada guidance to

incorporate Team Bonus

arrangement, Whole Job

assessment and succession

planning by end October 2005.

Oct 05

HIP People

Management

Team

New guidance published and

aligned with revised service

planning guidance.

Putting in place mechanisms for

gaining feedback from all levels of

the organisation on what reward

initiatives will be most attractive and

Mar

2006

Personnel

Service

Through 2006 Staff Survey and

periodic online and sample

surveys with staff.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 123


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

ensure staff feel valued.

Improve our management of

performance by revising the Council

behaviour codes and procedures

ensuring that they comply with new

legislative requirements.

Dec

2005

Personnel

Service

Revised performance

management arrangements

endorsed by Management Board

Put in place arrangements to meet

the 2005/6 attendance management

targets of 9 average days.

June 05

to Jan

06

Personnel

Service

Management board and Steering

Group agreement to

arrangements for 2005/6.

Monitoring arrangements in place

for 2005/6

Put in place compliance and

monitoring arrangements for

attendance management.

From

Aug

2005

Personnel

Service

Compliance Report published

Feb 2006. Setting on level of

compliance with key indicators.

Review the changes in conditions of

service introduced in 2004/5 as

there are potentially further savings

in excess of £100k that could be

achieved.

By June

2006

Personnel

Service

Joint agreement with Trade

Unions on revised Conditions of

Service

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 124


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

Equalities & Diversity

Annually monitor recruitment

arrangements to ensure that we

maintain or improve the existing

workforce profile so that it better

reflects the community we serve.

Ongoing

Personnel

Services

Targets for Workforce profile set

annually, monitored and XX%

improvement in workforce profile

achieved per annum.

Publish proposals for Equal Pay

auditing by October 2005.

Oct 2005

Personnel

Service

Proposal published with clear

action plan to address equal pay

within agreed timescales

Review and define more clearly the

competency schedules linked to

knowledge and skills required.

Dec

2006

T&D Section

Revised competencies agreed

Ensure that the action plans in the

Workforce EO monitoring report for

2004/5 are widely published

internally and externally and

implemented in line with the agreed

timetable.

Feb

2006

Personnel

Services

Report published with monitoring

of action plan delivery in place.

Implement the action plan of the

2004/5 Equalities Workforce report

in 2005/6. To ensure that the

workforce reflect the community the

council serves

Ongoing

in

2005/6

Personnel

Service

Implementation of plan agreed

July 2005 XX% of Action Plan

targets/outcomes achieved.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 125


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

Risk management

Include workforce risks in Risk

Register.

Done

Personnel

Service

Include in Corporate Risk

Register

Include identification of workforce

risks in contract performance

reporting from outsourced providers.

For incorporation into shared

workforce planning.

Ongoing

Service

Groups

Included in Group/ Team Service

Plans

Modernisation and

remodelling

Review of job remodelling projects

underway in schools and NHS,

April

2006

HIP People

Management

Team

Report to the HIP People

Management Team agreed

actions

Job remodelling system developed

in the light of lessons learned above,

June

2006

HIP People

Management

Team

Approved by HIP People

Management Team and

implementation plan agreed

Identify criteria for prioritisation of

service areas for job remodelling.

Sept

2006

HIP People

Management

Team

Approved by HIP People

Management Team

Role out programme of remodelling.

2006-8

HIP People

Management

Team

Programme delivered on time,

achieving agreed efficiency and

performance outcomes.

As JDs and person specifications

From

HIP People

Monitoring in place to ensure

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 126


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

are reviewed we will re-write them in

terms of knowledge and skills

required in line with remodelling.

Sept

2006

Management

Team

XX% of jobs aligned with

remodelling objectives

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 127


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

ATTRACT AND RETAIN

HIGH CALIBRE STAFF

Celebrating success internally and

publicising it externally.

Ongoing

Personnel

Service

Continuation of staff recognition

scheme and agreed programme

of publicity and promotion

Working in partnership

Recruit the R&R officer and by the

end of 2005/6 to have implemented

the agreed action programme. This

will include developing better

relationships with colleagues and

other sources of staff for skill

shortage areas and raising the

council’s profile as an employer and

applying the R&R model we have

developed to the skill shortage

areas.

Approved

June

2005

Personnel

Service

Agreed work programme to be

implemented 2005/6, delivering

agreed outcomes, cash and noncash

efficiencies

Attractive staff care

Developing a co-ordinated package

from effective initiatives, which is

publicised internally and as an

attraction tool.

Done

Personnel

Service

Publicise Employee Benefits to

staff and Job applications on

websites. Monitor effectiveness

with sample of employees and

applicants.

Review and roll out pilot recruitment

and retention initiatives, which have

proved effective.

By June

2006

R&R

Officer/Groups

Implementation of agency

worker conversion programme

delivering agreed migrations

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 128


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

In light of demographic data

developing initiatives to attract

workforce groups ie young BME

increasing older workers and

registered disabled.

Annually

volumes and efficiency gains

Quantitative targets to attract

priority groups set, monitored,

reviewed annually and delivered.

Complete the home working pilot in

Legal Services and roll out home

working arrangement in the civic

centre.

By June

2007

HIP Programme

Managers

Increased numbers of home and

mobile workers to target of c

800-900 in civic centre.

Progressing in partnership

with our workplace

Looking at models for workforce

involvement in job remodelling and

developing workforce involvement

in planning. Including unions but

giving a voice to our non-union

workforce by direct involvement.

Sept

2006

Personnel

Service

Targets for workforce

involvement established at all

levels. Employee report

increased levels involvement via

staff survey and sample surveys.

Maximising potential

In conjunction with job remodelling

to begin identifying career pathways

through the organisation based on

knowledge and skill sets.

From

Sept

2006

Personnel

Service

Clear career pathways identified

and publicised to staff and

reported awareness amongst

staff monitored annually.

Revise Pada system to meet the

demands of this plan.

Mar 2007

Personnel

Service

New PADA arrangement

publicised, implemented and

compliance monitored.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 129


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

Attracting the best

Researching models of career

management operating in other

industries and organisations.

Sept

2006

Personnel

Service

Research completed and report

agreed by HIP People

Management Team

Introducing a more systematic

approach to career management

and succession planning based on

revised Pada system.

From

Mar 2007

Personnel

Service

New arrangements published

and implemented and evidence

of improved career management

reported via staff survey and

other sample surveys

Proactive Management of

Temporary Staff

Develop modern apprentice

schemes.

During 2005/6 we will seek to

reduce the level of use of agency

staff particularly in skill shortage

areas by seeking to convert long

term agency staff to direct

employment.

By April

2006

Mar 2006

T&D section

Groups and

R&R Officer

New arrangements in place and

number of agreed modern

apprenticeship’s recruited and

complete modern apprenticeship

with council.

Reduced use in 2005/6

compared to 2004/5, by XX%

and £XX

Monitor the implementation of the

TMP response service during

2005/6 to achieve a continued

reduction in the time taken to recruit

to vacancies.

Quarterly

Personnel

Service

Reducing time taken to recruit to

vacancies by 3 days

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 130


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

Produce quarterly monitoring

reports on exit feedback from

2005/6 onwards.

Quarterly

Personnel

Service

Quarterly Reports produced and

remedial actions implemented to

reduce adverse feedback.

Raising profile, improving

our brand and promoting

Hillingdon as an employer

of choice

Appoint a Head of Communications

to be in post before mid 2005/6.

To produce with Head of

Communications on an internal

communications strategy and

ensure it is published by last quarter

of 2005/6.

Done

Mar 2006

Head of

Communications

Appointment May 2005

Publication of internal

communication strategy.

Ongoing monitoring of improved

effectiveness of workforce

monitoring messages.

Raise employee awareness of the

achievements of the authority so

staff are proud to work for

Hillingdon.

Mar 2006

Head of

Communications

Staff survey feedback evidences

XX% increase in reported staff

awareness.

Raising the Hillingdon profile and

brand as an employer of choice.

Explore use of Apprenticeship

Schemes, Bursaries and career

conventions

First

Phase by

June

2006

Recruitment &

Retention

Officer

Mar 2006 Recruitment &

Retention

Officer

Implementation of Recruitment &

Retention work programme.

Evidence of increased

applications via sample survey of

applicants.

Determine council policy in these

roles

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 131


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

Introduce work experience for

young people

Mar 2006 Recruitment &

Retention

Officer

Partnership works with

Connexions and careers service

on council work. Separate

programme.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 132


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

CONTINUOUS LEARNING

AND IMPROVEMENT

Developing different ways of

learning in the organisation.

Mar

2008

T&D Team

E-Induction rolled out across the

organisation

Mentoring and Coaching

available for staff via the T&D

Team. Monitor of take-up to

ensure fair and equitable access

to learning.

Partnership interagency

working

Developing closer learning

partnerships with other organisations

across Hillingdon and the region.

Mar

2008

T&D Team

Management Development

programme developed, delivered

with neighbouring Boroughs and

the PCT

Developing co-ordinated links with

education establishments to source

potential staff and meet learning

needs.

June

2006

T&D Team

Qualifications delivered by

Borough educational partners

(Uxbridge College). Targets for

number of applicants and new

starters from local education

establish set, monitored and

delivered.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 133


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

Promoting and sharing best practice

within the organisation, with partners

and providers.

June

2006

T&D Team

DASH delivering parts of the

equalities programme involving

the DDA

User involvement

Linking learning with

organisational priorities

Research and develop models of

service user involvement in

recruitment and training.

Reviewing our learning and skills

strategy with input from across the

organisation to ensure opportunities

offered are targeted to deliver skills

and qualifications required for job

remodelling and career pathway

developments.

June

2007

Mar

2006

T&D Team

T&D Team

Report to HIP People

Management Team. Priority

areas for user involvement

identified, targets set and

delivered

A defined Learning and Skills

strategy in place. Targets

established, resources allocated,

monitors in place and evidence

from surveys of staff /managers

that correct skills/qualifications

are being developed.

Ensuring access to learning is linked

to performance and skills

development as identified through

Pada, Career pathway and career

Mar

2006

Personnel

Service

Process and applications for

learning highlight the need to link

to PADA Monitoring in place to

ensure compliance and fair

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 134


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

management systems.

access to learning.

Ensuring managers actively

participate in staff development by

supervising and authorising

development plans.

Ongoing

All People

Managers

Learning identification and

planning process is feed via

PADA. XX% of staff have

development plans

Developing a method of training and

contracting service groups to provide

a range of learning activities eg

coaching learning.

June

2006

HIP People

Management

Team

A range of learning activities

included in Personnel

Development Plans.

We need to ensure that the whole

organisation achieves IIP

recognition.

Done

Accreditation obtained annual

plans to maintain accreditation,

delivered in place

Modernising learning and

development

Improve the development and

promotional opportunities for our

staff by better management of

secondment and project

arrangements.

From

Mar

2006

Personnel

Service and

People

Managers

Implementation and monitoring of

revised arrangements for

secondment

Targets set for staff undertaking

secondment opportunities

internal and externally with

partner organisations. Staff

satisfaction with secondments

reports in annual survey.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 135


DRAFT

Objectives How we will achieve By When Responsibility Indicators of Success

Review and improve our policies and

guidance on secondments, coaching

and mentoring.

Mar

2006

T&D Section

and Personnel

Service

Policy and guidance on

secondments, coaching and

mentoring defined.

Delivering a training programme

using a wide range of intelligent and

flexible learning solutions in line with

our core competency framework and

organisational values.

Ongoing T&D Section Annual Corporate Training

Programme agreed with

Management Board. Managers

and staff evaluations report

training is effective and supports

councils competency/values

framework.

Define and develop an

evaluation/assessment strategy.

June

2006

T&D Section

A corporate evaluation strategy in

place outlining minimum

standards for evaluation of all

learning. Comprehensive

evaluation report on all council

learning reported to management

board.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 136


PEOPLE MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE INDICATORS SURVEY (1)

APPENDIX B

NAME:

TELEPHONE:

BOROUGH:

E-MAIL:

(Please refer to Notes for Guidance for additional information.)

Section 1: Developing Leadership Capacity

1.1 Percentage of senior managers appraised. ______%

1.2 Percentage of staff that indicate senior management

communicate borough's strategic aims and objectives effectively.

______%

1.3 Percentage of staff that indicate reasons for change are well communicated. ______%

1.4 Percentage of staff that indicate change is well managed. ______%

1.5 Number of managers on leadership/management development programmes. ______

1.6 Average gross training expenditure per Elected Member. £_____

Section 2: Developing the Skills and Capacity of the Workforce

2.1 Average number of 'off the job' training days per employee. ______0.0

2.2 Percentage of employees who have had a performance appraisal. ______%

2.3 Does the performance appraisal produce an agreed development

and training plan? Yes No

2.4 Training spend as a percentage of staff budget. _______%

Section 3: Developing the Organisation

3.1 Employment Tribunals

Total

Won (including withdrawn)

Lost

Settled

________

________

________

________

3.2 Is an employee survey conducted (at least) every two years? Yes No

3.3 Percentage of employees indicating they are satisfied with their job. _______%

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 137


3.4 Percentage of staff that would speak highly of the borough to others. _______%

3.5 Number of reportable accidents per employee. _______

Section 4: Resourcing the Organisation

4.1 Average time taken to recruit. _____days

4.2 Percentage of the workforce the age groups listed:

16 to 24 _______%

25 to 39 _______%

40 to 49 _______%

50 and over _______%

4.3 Voluntary leavers as a percentage of staff in post. _______%

4.4 Average number of vacancies (excluding agency cover). _______%

Average number of vacancies (including agency cover).

_______%

4.5 Percentage of staff leaving within the first a year of appointment. _______%

4.6 Terminations

Total

Early retirements/ ill health retirement

Redundancy

Disciplinary/capability/unsatisfactory probation

Sickness

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

Section 5: Pay and Rewards

5.1 Single status review

Completed and implemented (100%)

More than 75% complete

Between 50% to < 75% complete

Between 25% to < 50% complete

Less than 25% complete

_______

_______

_______

_______

_______

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 138


5.2 Equal pay audit

Completed

Currently being conducted

Planned and resources identified

Still under consideration

_______

________

_______

_______

Section 6: HR Function

6.1 Average FTE personnel services staff per FTE employees. 1:_____

6.2 Average personnel services salary pay bill cost per FTE employee. £______

6.3 Percentage of employees covered by Investors In People. _______%

6.4 How does the (1) HR strategy (2) workforce plan/strategy link to the borough's strategic

plan:

HR

Workforce

Fully ____ _______

Partially

Not at all

No current plan/strategy

____ _______

____ _______

____ _______

Section 7: Audit Commission Best Value Performance Indicators

7.1 Equality Standards - level achieved. (1 to 5) _______

7.2 Early retirements (excluding ill-health retirements) as a

percentage of the workforce.

_______%

7.3 Ill health retirements as a percentage of the total workforce. _______%

7.4 The proportion of working days/shifts lost to sickness absence. _______days

7.5 Number of staff declaring that they meet the Disability Discrimination

Act disability definition as a percentage of the total workforce.

_______%

7.6 Minority ethnic community staff as a percentage of the workforce _______%

7.7 The percentage of top 5% of earners that are :

Women

From Black And Minority Ethnic Communities

_______%

_______%

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 139


EQUALITY STANDARD FOR LOCAL GOVERNMENT –

AN UPDATE

ITEM 6

Contact Officers Sonia Gandhi 01895 277019

Papers with this report

Appendix - attached

SUMMARY

This report informs the Cabinet of progress on moving through the levels of the

Equality Standard for Local Government (EsfLG). The Equality Standard recognises

the importance of fair and equal treatment in local government services and

employment and has been developed as a tool to enable authorities to mainstream

gender, race and disability into council policy and practice at all levels.

The equality standard broadens the approach to equality and was introduced in

2002. Hillingdon Council stated its commitment to the standard in March 03, and

achieved level 1 in March 04.

The standard is a recognised framework of self-assessment and audit procedures for

equality across the Council and is supported by the Commission for Race Equality,

Equal Opportunities Commission, Disability Rights Commission, the Employers

Organisation, DIALOG, and the Local Government Association.

Although the standard is a self-auditing tool, this can be subject to external audits

and the requirement to present evidence when requested by the Audit Commission

as well as any of the supporting bodies listed above.

RECOMMENDATIONS

The Cabinet is asked to note :

1. the level of the Equality Standard for Local Government the Council is

currently at.

2. the timetable the Council has set to achieve further levels.

3. the current assessment of where we are at the moment.

4. the action that is needed and how that action can be realised.

REASONS FOR OFFICER RECOMMENDATIONS

The EsfLG is a self-auditing tool to ensure that we are delivering excellence in

service provision, employment and community engagement to all our residents in

Hillingdon.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report – 10 th November 2005 Page 140


The Council reached level 1 of the ESfLG by March 04 and has set targets to reach

level 2 by March 06 and levels 3/4 by March 08. It is anticipated that we will meet

Level 2 without difficulty in March and in fact in some areas we are already working

towards level 3.

The EsfLG is an integral part of the Council Plan, and is also one of the national best

value performance indicators.

OPTIONS AVAILABLE

Cabinet may choose to instruct officers to take further action on the checklist or not.

COMMENTS OF OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY COMMITTEE

The Committee received a presentation from Sonia Gandhi on the report. The

Committee commended the work of officers, especially in relation to Partnership

Working and Civil Ceremonies and requested an update report to come to

Committee at a later date

INFORMATION

1. The ESfLG has five levels. The Council has reached level 1, which

demonstrates commitment to the Equalities agenda, will reach level 2 by March

2006, and is targeted to reach level 3/4 by March 2008.

2. Having reached Level One it will be useful for members to take note of what

the Council have achieved and what is required for level 2.

3. To reach level 2 an authority will need to demonstrate:

Statement

That it has engaged

in an impact and

needs/requirement

assessment

That it has engaged

in consultation with

designated

community, staff and

stakeholder groups

That it has engaged

in the development

of information and

monitoring systems

Evidence

All service areas and corporate services have

completed a full equality impact needs assessment –

on disability, age, race, gender, faith, sexual

orientation and community cohesion

The Council are the lead in the LSP, and have

developed a community strategy with a theme group –

Opportunities for all. This group has a responsibility to

monitor key equality measures for across the Borough.

Through this partnership the Council shares equality

documents such as the Race Equality Scheme with

stakeholders, staff and representative forums

The Council has a diverse range of methods of

engagement with detailed monitoring forms, e.g. the

contact centre with reporting systems such as the

CRM and documents such as Hillingdon Profiles. To

ensure staff data is up to date the Council are

undergoing a data cleansing exercise by June 06

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report – 10 th November 2005 Page 141


That it has engaged

in an equality action

planning process for

employment, pay

and service delivery

That it is developing

a system of selfassessment,

scrutiny and audit.

All of the equality assessments have given rise to

detailed action plans for every service area. In

addition, the Council annually commission an external

specialist to devise a workforce monitoring report. This

report provides recommendations and action for

employment and pay. These recommendations form

the basis of the workforce strategy

The Corporate Equalities and Diversity Group receive

monitoring reports from service area equality groups

on how the services are performing against their

equality action plans.

There is also detailed monitoring of comments and

complaints through the Contact Centre.

CORPORATE CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

Corporate Finance Comments

4. There are no financial implications relating to this report

Legal Implications

5. As is stated in the body of the report, the Equality Standard is a self-auditing

tool to ensure that the Council is delivering excellence in service provision,

employment and community engagement to all Hillingdon residents.

6. There is a variety of legislation which underpins the Council's equalities and

diversity agenda. Cabinet will recall that at its October meeting, it considered a report

on the Council's Corporate Equalities and Diversity Plan which set out a summary of

this legislation.

7. Achievement of the various levels of the Equality Standard will not only help

the Council to demonstrate that it is securing fair and equal treatment in its services,

employment practices and community engagement but it will also assist the Council

in meeting its various statutory obligations and therefore minimise the risk of

successful legal challenges being brought against it

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

Nil

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report – 10 th November 2005 Page 142


APPENDIX A

Equality Standard for Local Government – an Update

1. Briefing on the Equality Standard for Local Government

The Equality Standard recognises the importance of fair and equal

treatment in local government services and employment and has been

developed as a tool to enable authorities to mainstream gender, race and

disability into council policy and practice at all levels.

The equality standard broadens the remit of the “Racial Equality means

Quality” and was introduced in 2002. Hillingdon Council stated their

commitment to the standard in March 03, and achieved level 1 by June 04.

The standard is a recognised framework of self-assessment and audit

procedures for equality across the Council and is supported by the

Commission for Race Equality, Equal Opportunities Commission, Disability

Rights Commission, the Employers Organisation, DIALOG, and the Local

Government Association.

Although the standard is a self-auditing tool, this can be subject to external

audits and the requirement to present evidence when requested by the

Audit Commission as well as any of the supporting bodies listed above.

The Equality Standard

The Equality Standard is a framework that sets up a way of working within

local authorities which will make mainstreaming equalities into service

delivery and employment an issue for all aspects of the council’s work.

Using five levels, authorities will introduce a comprehensive and

systematic approach to dealing with equalities. These levels cover all

aspects of policy-making, service delivery and employment.

The Standard will:

• Provide a systematic framework for the mainstreaming of equalities

• Help local authorities to meet their obligations under the law

• Integrate equalities policies and objectives with Best Value

• Encourage the development of anti-discrimination practice appropriate

to local circumstances.

• Provide a basis for tackling forms of institutionalised discrimination.

• Provide a framework for improving performance, over time.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 143


APPENDIX A

Putting the Equality Standard in place

The standard builds on the principles of:

• Quality

• Leadership

• Community involvement.

Local authorities will be able to assess their progress based on five levels:

Level 1: Commitment to a Comprehensive Equality Policy

Level 2: Assessment and Consultation

Level 3: Setting equality objectives and targets

Level 4: Information systems and monitoring against targets

Level 5: Achieving and reviewing outcomes

Extending equalities – beyond gender, disability and race

The Standard provides a framework that can be easily extended to antidiscrimination

policies for age, sexuality, class and religious beliefs. Local

authorities can readily adapt the principles to these other categories of

equality by extending their equality objectives, targets and monitoring

systems. These additional equality objectives, which should be consistent

with published guidelines on age and sexuality, would be driven through

the self-assessment procedure and would effectively become part of the

Best Value process.

2. The Equality Standard for Local Government: Moving up the

Levels.

The ESfLG has five levels. The Council have reached level 1 and have a

target to reach level 2 by March 2006, level 3 /4 by March 2008.

Most London Councils have already reached level 3, with many

approaching level 5.

Having reached Level One it will be useful for members to take note of the

next levels.

The Equality Standard Level 1: Commitment to a Comprehensive Equality Policy

An authority must have adopted a comprehensive equality policy that commits it to

achieving equality in race, gender and disability through:

Improving equality practice at both corporate and departmental level

Earmarking specific resources for improving equality practice

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 144


APPENDIX A

Equality action planning and equality target setting within all departments and

service areas.

Systematic consultation

A fair employment and equal pay policy

An impact and needs/requirements assessment

Progress monitoring

Audit and scrutiny

The Equality Standard Level 2: Assessment and Consultation

An authority will need to demonstrate:

That it has engaged in an impact and needs/requirements assessment

That it has engaged in consultation with designated community, staff and

stakeholder groups

That it has engaged in the development of information and monitoring systems

That it has engaged in an equality action planning process for employment, pay

and service delivery

That it is developing a system of self-assessment, scrutiny and audit

The Equality Standard Level 3: Equality Objectives and Targets

An authority will need to demonstrate:

That it has completed a full and systematic consultation with designated

community, staff and stakeholder groups

That it has set equality objectives for employment, pay and service delivery

based on impact/needs assessments and consultation

That equality objectives have been translated into action plans with specific

targets

That it is developing information and monitoring systems that allow it to assess

progress in achieving targets

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 145


APPENDIX A

That action on achieving targets has started

The Equality Standard Level 4: Information Systems and Monitoring against

Targets

An authority will need to demonstrate:

That it has developed information and monitoring systems that allow it to assess

progress in achieving targets

It is measuring progress against targets and effectively information and

monitoring systems.

Monitoring reports are being produced at specified intervals and circulated to

designated consultation and scrutiny groups.

Monitoring systems are providing useful information about progress towards

specific targets

The Equality Standard Level 5: Achieving and Reviewing Outcomes

An authority will need to demonstrate:

It has achieved progress towards the targets set at level 3

It has reviewed and revised targets monitoring and consultation systems.

It has initiated a new round of action planning and target setting

Through its achievement it can be seen as an example of good practice for

other local authorities and agencies.

3. LEVEL 2 EQUALITY STANDARD – Where we are at the moment

It puts together in one place both the action items under corporate

commitment and service level action to avoid duplication.

LEADERSHIP ACTION PROGRESS

• Published in variety

of formats

• Co-ordinated with

R E S (Race

Equality Scheme)

1.1 Publish corporate

equality and

diversity plan

(CEDP)

• Plan going to

Cabinet for

publication in

Oct 05

• RES on web –

incorporates

action plans

from the CEDP

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 146


APPENDIX A

1.2 Equality impact and

needs

analyses

1.3 Corporate

mechanism for

assessing service

level equality

targets

1.4 Corporate structure

for overseeing

monitoring

1.5 Procedures for

dealing with

harassment in

employment and

service provision

• Responsibility

clearly allocated

• Work on

assessments

underway

Reports to

corporate group

(e.g. CEDG) on

these

• Department targets

exist

• How monitoring will

be done (and coordinated

with

RES)

• Services

monitoring

programme

• Documented

• Lists of nominated

officers trained

• Multi agency

panels to counter

harassment

• Recommended

definition of

harassment and

form to record it

2.0 CONSULTATION

2.1 CEDP Circulated • In variety of

formats

• Time table to

publish final CEDP

2.2 Review equality

content of

community strategy

2.3 Consultation with

community and staff

• Review completed

and the strategy

corresponds with

equality plans

• Planned

• Held

Reported on

• Co-ordinated

corporately

• For staff too

• Key managers

informed of

responsibilities

• Assessments all

done, action

plans completed

• All service areas

have equality

groups

• Equality targets

set for next 3

years

• Corporate

Equalities and

Diversity Group

had timetable of

monitoring in

place to monitor

service and

corporate plans

• Harassment

procedures

done – racial

harassment

being re- written

• Racial

harassment

forum developed

• Plan will be in

several formats,

and consulted

through

recommended

strategy

Content to be reviewed

by Jan 06

Consultation will follow

recommended formats

and will be completed

by March 06

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 147


APPENDIX A

2.4 Consultation with

members,

employee, reps and

departments

2.5 Departmental

consultations

Monitoring of User

Focus

2.6 Equality self

assessment,

scrutiny and audit

on service delivery

2.7 Equality objectives

included in

partnerships

3.0 CUSTOMER CARE

AND SERVICE

DELIVERY

3.1, See above

3,2

• Members consulted

Reported on

• Employee reps

consulted

Reported on

• Department

consultation reports

for each

department e.g.

ask each SMT to

comment on CEDP

Reports on

departmental

consultations e.g.

with Connecting

Communities and

other consultations

e.g. on disability

and with women

(form of

consultation so

women can attend

– timings, play

areas, crèches etc)

• Framework for

guidance on user

focus developed

• Monitoring

arrangements in

place throughout all

service and

corporate areas

• Self assessment

plans by

community and

stakeholders and

for each

department

• CEDP circulated to

partners

• Consultation

meetings with

partners

• CEDP

presented at

management

board

• All equality

groups aware of

action plans and

monitoring

timetable

• Connecting

communities

mapping

underway

• User focus

guidance and

framework

developed and

full response

provided by Nov

05

• Monitoring

arrangements in

place by March

06

All areas completed

self assessment plans

CEDP to be circulated

to Hillingdon Partners

by Dec 05

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 148


APPENDIX A

3.3 Review

procurement and

contracted services

3.4 See above

4.0 Employment and

equal pay

4.1 Fair employment

policy

4.2 Employment and

equality

assessment of local

labour market

4.3 Workforce profiling

in equal pay review

4.4 Publicity for

vacancies does not

restrict range of

applicants

4.5 Standard range of

recruitment forms

• Evidence of review:

evaluation of

contracted services

• Equal pay review

started

• Data sufficient to

enable equal pay

review, if not plans

exist to ensure it

can be collected

• Planned

• Started

• Plan

• Complete

• Recruitment

procedure

reviewed

• Reviewed

• Exist

and jobs

4.6 Monitoring staff • Reports on

monitoring and how

complies with RES

4.7 Employment

procedures

consistent

with

current legislation

and codes of

practice

• Procedure

reviewed

• Are many

consistent

New procurement

procedures in place

that have taken on

board comments from

the CRE procurement

guidance documents

Equality employment

action plan developed

This will follow the

employment action

plan

Workforce strategy and

steering group in place

This is under review

Under review

Employment

monitoring reports

done on annual basis

These were assessed

by an external

consultant and internal

legal services

4. Conclusion

The EsfLG is a self-auditing tool to ensure that we are delivering excellence in

service provision, employment and community engagement to all our

residents in Hillingdon.

The Council reached level 1 of the ESfLG by March 04 and has set targets to

reach level 2 by March 06 and levels 3/4 by March 08. It is anticipated that we

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 149


APPENDIX A

will meet Level 2 without difficulty in March and in fact in some areas we are

already working towards level 3.

The EsfLG is an integral part of the Council Plan groups, and is also one of

the national best value performance indicators.

Failure to meet level 2 will result in a lowering in score for the CPA, BVPi’s

and also other national benchmarks.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 150


WEST LONDON TRAM CONSULTATION

RESPONSE

ITEM 7

Contact Officer Janet Rangeley 01895 250553

Papers with this report

Appendices 1 and 2 - attached

SUMMARY

Transport for London (TfL) carried out a public consultation on the proposed West

London Tram scheme between 29 th June and 8 th October 2004. The results of the

public consultation were reported to the TfL Board on 25 th March 2005 and made

available to London Borough of Hillingdon on 31 st March 2005. A report detailing the

findings and the implications for Hillingdon was considered by Cabinet on the 14 th

July 2005 and referred to full Council for consideration on 21 st July 2005. The full

Council report was deferred for further information from Transport for London (TfL)

on the feasibility of including a route along Coldharbour Lane to Hayes station in

Phase 1 of the tram scheme. This report updates Members on the outcome of that

further work and the most recent TfL consultation on details of the tram scheme,

outlines the next stages in progressing the Tram proposals and proposes options for

the future involvement of the Borough in the tram scheme. Officers are seeking

Cabinet endorsement of the recommendations in the report including referring the

report for consideration by full Council on 24 th November 2005, so that this Council’s

position regarding the West London Tram proposals can be confirmed with TfL.

RECOMMENDATIONS

1. That Cabinet refers the following options on the Council’s position on

the West London Tram proposals for consideration by full Council on the 24 th

November 2005:-

Option 1: that officers are instructed (a) to draw up a ‘letter of no objection’ to

Transport for London and (b) to continue to work with the TfL Tram team in

progressing the scheme.

Option 2: that Hillingdon Council formally objects to the West London Tram

proposals on the grounds identified in paragraph 22 of this report and

instructs officers to withdraw from any work related to progressing the Tram

proposals.

2. That the Council’s response on Transport for London’s current

consultation on changes to the scheme in Hillingdon, as outlined in

paragraphs 14 and 15 of this report, be the subject of a Cabinet Member for

Planning and Transportation report.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 151


REASONS FOR OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

In light of

• The second more detailed consultation by TfL on the West London Tram

proposals and the responses, particularly in relation to Hillingdon, and

• The recent response by TfL on the ‘Hayes/Phase 1’ option,

officers consider it appropriate that:-

a) Members revisit the Council’s current position of being a strong client in

respect of the Tram proposals, and

b) indicate to TfL whether or not they have an objection to the West London tram

proposals.

Recommendation 2 of this report relates to the most recent consultation on the tram

scheme and officers consider that the most appropriate way of formally responding

is with a Cabinet member report.

OPTIONS AVAILABLE

Not to respond to the consultation report and updated information on the Tram

scheme at this stage.

INFORMATION

1. The Cabinet, at its meeting of 28 th January 2003 considered a report on the

West London Tram (WLT) from Shepherd’s Bush to Uxbridge. The Cabinet

confirmed Hillingdon’s position as a “strong client” supporting Transport for London

(TfL) in the development of the proposals. This position indicated support in

principle for the tram proposals without being formally committed to it. This provided

the Council with flexibility in its views on the details of the scheme and allowed for

the possibility of objecting to the proposals should the details be unacceptable.

2. The WLT route along the Uxbridge Road is currently served by bus routes

427 into Uxbridge and 607, which the tram route would replace. The general

principle of the scheme is to retain both trams and general traffic along the entire

route, reallocating roadspace to allow these different modes to co-exist. In some

sections, the tramway is in the centre of the road, but elsewhere is located on one

side or the other of the Uxbridge Road.

3. In May 2002, the Mayor announced that, of the various schemes being

considered, he would give initial priority to the West London Transit, using trams,

and the East London Transit, which would be based on a guided busway. It was

intended that these schemes would go ahead first, with another two schemes going

ahead later. In this way, resources could be concentrated on the two more preferred

schemes. Over the last 2 years, TfL have been engaging Hillingdon officers in the

development of the proposals through regular technical working groups and for a

period of time held Steering groups with the three boroughs concerned and their

respective Portfolio holders for Transport. The latest detailed design drawings were

issued in May 2005 and Hillingdon officers continue to be consulted by the West

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London Tram team on the associated urban design guidance, draft planning

conditions and draft supplementary guidance for eventual inclusion in Hillingdon’s

Local Development Framework. The 2004 consultation material included a limited

assessment on the environmental impacts of the proposal. These are based on the

traffic reduction expected along the corridor of the tram. At this stage TfL are

understood not to have assessed the environmental impact of increased traffic and

congestion within the wider areas likely to be affected in Hillingdon, eg. the

residential areas adjoining the Uxbridge Road.

4. On the 17 th June 2005, TfL issued the results of a MORI poll on the West

London Tram (WLT). The research examined the reactions of residents in six town

centres to the WLT Scheme. Between 15 th April and 5 th May 2005, 1,815 telephone

interviews were undertaken in Uxbridge, Southall, West Ealing/Hanwell, Ealing,

Acton and Shepherd’s Bush. The poll results show that 48% of people in the project

area support the WLT scheme compared to 37% against. Out of the six centres

surveyed, support outweighs opposition in Uxbridge, Southall and Shepherd’s Bush,

is split in West Ealing/Hanwell and Acton and in Ealing opposition outweighs

support. The results also indicated that the WLT scheme is favoured by young

people (under 25’s), people from ethnic minorities and socio-economic groups D and

E.

Results of the 2004 Public Consultation

5. TfL carried out a second, more detailed public consultation on the WLT

proposal from 29 th June to 8 th October 2004 , the results of which are summarised in

part A, paragraphs 6-10 below. A separate five week consultation on the location of

a depot site was undertaken in September / October 2004, the outcome of which is

summarised in part B, paragraphs 11-12 of this report.

A: The Tram Route and Associated Measures

6. The consultation methods focused on questionnaires, meetings and road

shows and TfL also carried out independent market research as part of the

consultation to gain a better understanding of local views. The target audiences for

the public consultation were statutory consultees and a wide range of stakeholders

including residents, businesses and local organisations in Hillingdon, Ealing,

Hammersmith and Fulham and in the other boroughs and districts identified as being

in the catchment area for the tram or implications for displaced road traffic.

Approximately 454,000 questionnaires were distributed, with the total number of

respondents being 16,895 (3.84% return). A summary of the responses received is

as follows:-

• 16,895 completed questionnaires (of which 1,511 were identified as from

Hillingdon)

• 243 letters or e-mails

• 54 responses from stakeholders

• 8,930 visitors to road-shows

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• 1,100 feedback forms from the road-shows with 264 follow-up questions to

answer

• 1,384 calls to the free-phone helpline

• 81 calls to the multi-lingual helpline

• 17,000 visitors to the West London Tram Website

• 15 responses in seven languages other than English

Of the 16,895 completed questionnaires, only 26% of respondents indicated that

they lived on the proposed route.

7. A breakdown of the questionnaire responses which could be ‘traced’ to a

specific borough is provided in Table 1 below.

Table 1

Borough

Number of Responses

Ealing 5,211

Hammersmith & Fulham 1,566

Hillingdon 1,511

Hounslow 815

Kensington & Chelsea 417

Richmond 140

South Buckinghamshire 71

Harrow 59

Westminster 51

Brent 46

Barnet 4

Camden 4

Other 68

Did not give address 6,932

Total 16,895

8. The overall findings of the consultation are:

i) 30% of the respondents support the proposals

ii) 55% do not support the proposals

iii) 48% said there would be no advantages from the proposed tram.

iv) 47% said the main disadvantage is that it would divert more traffic onto

residential streets.

v) 26% said they would use the tram at least once per week.

vi) 22% said they would use the tram less than once per month

vii) 40% said they would never use the tram.

viii) 54 formal responses from organisations, the key findings of which are

summarised in Appendix 1 to this report. Only 13 organisations (25%)

stated their support for the tram.

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Support was higher than opposition from respondents living in South

Buckinghamshire, Kensington & Chelsea, Hillingdon and Brent. Opposition

outweighed support in Hammersmith & Fulham, Hounslow and Ealing.

Findings of the Independent Market Research

9. In addition to the questionnaires, meetings and roadshows, TfL conducted

market research the aim of which was to assess public opinion on the proposed tram

based on interviews with a representative sample of people in West London. The

interviews were conducted face-to-face in people’s homes and comprised a sample

of 815 residents living within the distribution area for the consultation brochure and

an additional 192 residents living within 800m of the proposed route.

The overall findings from the market research are:-

i) 65% felt there is a serious need to improve public transport and reduce

congestion on the Uxbridge Road

ii) 45% support the proposed tram

iii) 13% would use the tram every day,

iv) 33% would use it at least once a week.

v) 27% said they would use it less than once per month.

vi) 24% said they would never use the tram.

vii) 40% felt that there will be reduced congestion with the tram

viii)

ix)

90% thought there were advantages to the tram.

86% thought there were disadvantages to the tram (27% of these

respondents said the most important disadvantage would be more

traffic in residential roads

10. Comparatively, a higher number of persons in younger age groups supported

the tram. Support for the tram was higher within groups using public transport

compared to amongst motorists. The market research shows slightly higher potential

usage of the tram than indicated by the consultation responses.

B: Alternative Depot Sites

11. The West London Transit scheme includes a depot for storing and

maintaining trams not in service. The preferred depot location is on land in

Hillingdon adjacent the Grand Union Canal, on the south side of the Uxbridge Road

currently occupied by a retail warehouse. Two alternative depot locations have been

proposed on land:-

a) south of the Uxbridge Road between the Minet Country Park and

Springfield Road, and

b) between the Grand Union Canal and the Great Western mainline

railway within the Southall Gas works redevelopment site in the

London Borough of Ealing.

12. A leaflet giving details of TfL’s preferred location for the depot and the two

alternatives was distributed to approximately 1000 properties in Southall. A total of

39 responses (59% negative and 41% positive or neutral) and a petition with 37

signatures objecting to the preferred location were received. Only 9 of the

respondents specifically favoured the location of the tram depot on the retail

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warehouse site, with 5 favouring location (a) above and 1 respondent favouring

location (b) above. Overall the key concerns were of the impact of the proposals on

the local area, residents and businesses. The Council’s response to the alternative

depot locations was contained in the Cabinet Member report of October 2004 and

supported in principle the depot location on the existing retail warehouse, but neither

of the two alternative depot locations [(a) and (b) above] (see Appendix 2 to this

report).

Feasibility of Hayes/Coldharbour Lane included in Phase 1 of scheme.

13. The report for consideration by full Council on 21 July 2005 was deferred to

allow TfL to undertake a feasibility study for extending the tram route along

Coldharbour Lane to Hayes station in Phase 1 of the scheme. During

August/September, the WLT team prepared an option evaluation report and

concluded that it is not possible to include the route to Hayes station in Phase 1 of

the scheme as there is insufficient information available to be presented for the

Transport and Works Order application next year and there is limited time to prepare

such information. For inclusion in Phase 2 of the scheme (potential programme

starting 2020), the WLT team made the following recommendations:-

• that consultants be appointed to gather data, develop a feasibility design,

update the modelling and produce an outline business case, which would

need approval of TfL’s internal panels, finance committee and ultimately TfL’s

Board;

• that a joint proposal between TfL and the London Borough of Hillingdon

should be developed to start this process;

• that further work on alternative service patterns to optimise frequency and

clarify off-peak demand and a sensitivity test to determine the business case

in the absence of Crossrail be developed with officers.

Consultation on changes to the scheme: 17 October – 16 December 2005

14. Recently TfL issued a further consultation on the Tram scheme where it is

proposing significant changes to the design proposed in 2004 or where it did not

publish information in 2004. This include temporary construction compounds,

electrical sub-stations, the depot test track and some changes to the track alignment.

Details of the proposals have been sent by TfL to relevant ward councillors, the

Cabinet member for Planning and Transportation and will be distributed to residents

around the areas in the forthcoming weeks.

15. In Hillingdon the consultation focuses on

• the depot test track (adjacent to the preferred depot location off the Uxbridge

road) which would run into the southern part of the Minet Country Park close

to the Grand Union Canal;

• 6 sub stations (Uxbridge, St Andrew’s roundabout Uxbridge, Coney Green

Hillingdon Hill, Newport Road Hayes End, Coldharbour Lane adjoining

Lombardy Retail Park and the Ossie Garvin roundabout;

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• 11 temporary construction compounds, 1 strategic (likely to last the whole

construction period of possibly 4 years) at Springfield Road Hayes and 10

local (likely to last possibly for a year or less).

The closing date for comments is the 16 th December 2005 and officers are

recommending that Hillingdon’s formal response is the subject of a Cabinet Member

for Planning and Transportation report.

TfL’s next stages for progressing the WLT Scheme

16. Given the need to undertake further traffic modelling for those areas which are

expected to experience the impact of displaced traffic, particularly through residential

areas, (see paragraph 17 below) TfL have deferred the submission of an application

to the Government under the Transport and Works Act (TWA) to late spring/early

summer 2006 (originally it was scheduled for December 2005).

17. For any form of railway scheme to proceed, an Order is required under the

Transport and Works Act (TWA) 1992. This type of Order gives powers for

constructing and operating the tram, including any land acquisition required. TFL

has to seek powers from the Government under the TWA to progress the proposals

to construction. The process for obtaining a TWA includes the requirement to hold a

Public Inquiry. The TWA Order also covers any associated highways powers and

any complementary measures needed to implement the scheme. Such measures

will more than likely be needed in the predominantly residential areas to the north

and south of the Uxbridge Road in order to discourage general traffic from seeking

unsuitable alternative routes through these areas. It is therefore regrettable that the

further traffic modelling work referred to above will not include any area in Hillingdon,

but will focus on Ealing and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea.

Discussions between Hillingdon officers and the WLT team have not resulted in the

further traffic modelling work being extended to include Hillingdon.

18. A Public Inquiry overseen by an independent inspector is likely to be towards

the end of 2006. The inspector at the Public Inquiry will consider the proposals, and

representations from organisations against the proposal. Based on the Inspector’s

recommendations, the Secretary of State for Transport will decide whether to grant

the powers to TfL to enable it to proceed with the WLT proposals.

19. As a requirement of the TWA application, Hillingdon (and the other local

authorities through which the tram would run – Ealing and Hammersmith and

Fulham) needs to inform TfL as to whether it supports the scheme or opposes it. If

the Council decides to support the WLT proposals, TfL would require the Council to

submit a “Letter of No Objection”. In such circumstances, the Council would not need

to be represented at the Public Inquiry and the majority of costs involved would be

during and after the implementation stages. (At this stage officers are not in a

position to advise Members of the likely costs involved for this scenario, but they are

likely to be significant). Should the Council decide to oppose the WLT proposals,

representations will need to be made to the Public Inquiry. In the latter

circumstances, there would also be significant costs incurred due to need to

commission technical and legal advice and support as there is currently limited

capacity within the in-house expertise to take on the volume of work envisaged.

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However, if other Boroughs object to the proposals there is likely to be an

opportunity for joint working and associated cost efficiencies. Should the Council

decide to pursue an objection to the scheme, then officers would bring a further

report on the likely costs involved to Cabinet for consideration. For the time being,

the costs of officers’ time and input are contained within the existing Planning and

Transportation Group budget, although as the tram scheme progresses it is likely

that the costs will increase considerably as more of the details of the scheme

emerge.

20. For members information, the current situation with other Boroughs which are

affected by the WLT proposals is as follows:

London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham: To date the Borough has

been neither a joint promoter nor strong client. However officers have been

informed that the borough is likely to object in light of the recent proposals for

a strategic construction compound at Shepherd’s Bush Green..

London Borough of Ealing: a decision was made at a recent cabinet meeting

to confirm Ealing’s role of a joint promoter of the Tram scheme with TfL.

• Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea: although the proposed tram

system will not be located in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea,

the Royal Borough has formally objected to any proposal to progress the

West London tram project mainly for the following reasons – poor value for

money, the major negative impacts on the roads in the Borough, the poor

quality of the traffic modelling and the lack of detailed information provided by

TfL on the impact of the proposals on the Borough.

21. The timetable for the WLT scheme has slipped since the original was

published as shown in Table 2 below.

Table 2.

ORIGINAL STAGE REVISED

Autumn/Winter 2004 Report on consultation February 2005

Winter 2004 Mayoral decision Autumn 2005

Spring 2005

Transport and Works Summer 2006

Order deposit followed by

42 days objection period

Autumn 2005 Public Inquiry Early spring 2007

Summer 2006

Secretary of State Early 2008

decision

Spring/Summer 2007 Construction starts/TWO Spring 2009

awarded

Early 2011 First tram/scheme opens 2013

Implications for Hillingdon and its future role

22. Officers are mindful of the fact that the results of the second consultation on

the WLT proposals are useful indicators of the support/non support for the scheme.

They also acknowledge the feasibility work on Hayes and Phase 1. However, they

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still have considerable reservations in respect of the fact that the main areas of

concern for Hillingdon remain unresolved. These concerns have been continually

raised by officers over the last 2-3 years and are as follows:-

(i) Hayes Hub / Town Centre option. Hillingdon has frequently requested that

the option to take the tram to Hayes town centre via Coldharbour Lane be

considered in Phase 1 of the scheme. The public consultation document

did not refer to this option. Hillingdon still considers this to be the most

appropriate route for Phase 1, as it would:-

• consolidate local and strategic proposals to make Hayes Station a subregional

transport hub,

• ensure that the Hayes interchange is part of a truly integrated transport

system,

• recognise the necessary economic and transport linkages with Heathrow and

this part of West London,

• meet many objectives of the Mayor’s London Plan(2004) and Transport

Strategy (2001), particularly those related to the designated Areas of

Opportunity in the Hayes/Heathrow part of the Borough;

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

(v)

the route to Uxbridge being considered ahead of any proposed route to

Hayes Town Centre;

Uxbridge terminus. The route options into Uxbridge town centre are of

major concern, especially if the route is to run through and terminate in the

pedestrianised area outside the Underground Station. This would have

significant impact on both the established pedestrian area along the High

Street and also the proposed environmental enhancements to Windsor

Street, currently being programmed for implementation over the next year.

Any alternative proposals to locate the terminus outside/in the proximity of

the Civic Centre will not provide Uxbridge with a high quality, ‘seamless’

transport interchange (based on the tube and bus stations) which is

considered essential to strengthening the public transport network in the

borough as well as being essential to the future development of Uxbridge;

the proposals within Hillingdon will result in the reduction of 50% in the

carriageway capacity for other modes of transport and the impact on

adjoining roads of traffic dispersal resulting from this significant reduction.

As the further traffic modelling work being undertaken excludes Hillingdon,

the impact of traffic dispersal and any mitigating measures will not be fully

identified.

insufficient information provided on the traffic modelling undertaken at key

junctions along the Uxbridge Road in Hillingdon, resulting in considerable

difficulties in assessing the level of impact of the tram displacing traffic into

the adjoining residential areas and the associated traffic measures

required to accommodate this displaced traffic. The effects of the tram will

have a major impact on Hillingdon’s ability to carry out its functions under

the Traffic Management Act. In addition, there is very little baseline data

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on which the borough can assess the financial implications of any traffic

measures and subsequently identify funding to implement appropriate

schemes if necessary; Officers cannot emphasise strongly enough how

regrettable it is that the further traffic modelling work referred to in

paragraph 17 above will not include any area in Hillingdon, but will focus

on Ealing and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea.

(vi)

(vii)

(viii)

(ix)

The consultation documents of summer 2004 contained scant detailed

information on the section of the route in Hillingdon. None of the junctions

along the Uxbridge Road in Hillingdon featured in the Consultation

Document;

No references were made to the impact of the proposals on Conservation

Areas and the numbers of trees along the route that may be affected;

Not all the information needed to determine the full impact of the

scheme on the residents and businesses in the Borough is available;

The extremely low level response to the public consultation ( 3.8%) and

the low percentage of the respondents in favour of the proposals.

23. Further discussions with TfL have not resulted in the above concerns

being fully addressed, and officers are of the strong view that it would not be in

Hillingdon’s best interests to maintain its position of a ‘strong client’. Further

information relating to the feasibility of the Hayes/Phase 1 proposal has indicated

that this is not possible and the borough’s preferred route for Phase 1 cannot be

accepted. As such Members are requested to consider the option of objecting to the

WLT scheme and in association with this, it is suggested that officers be instructed

to withdraw from any development work on the WLT proposals. Should Members

wish to consider the option of not objecting to the WLT proposals then officers would

need to be instructed to draw up a ‘letter of no objection’ to Transport for London.

Associated with this decision would be the need to confirm that Hillingdon officers

can continue with the development work on the WLT proposals. Full Council

authorisation would be required whichever option is chosen.

Financial Implications

24. Hillingdon officers have continued to assist TfL in the development of the

proposals, these costs have been contained within existing budgets and this will

continue if it is agreed to support the proposal.

25. If it is agreed to oppose the proposal at a Public Inquiry there will be

significant costs incurred on staff time and legal costs. It is too early to fully quantify

what these might be, but it is likely that there will be insufficient provision available

within existing budgets, and there may be a need to seek additional budget approval

to meet the costs.

26. The costs of this major scheme will be substantial. TfL will fund the scheme

as part of the London Mayor Capital Programme, and funding allocations will

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normally be made to participating boroughs as and when particular sections of the

work progress. The details of the capital funding will need to be examined when

more details are available. However the Mayor of London’s Business Plan does not

include funding for the implementation of the scheme. It is expected that during the

next Central Government Spending Review a bid for funding will be made.

CORPORATE CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

Corporate Finance comments

27. As noted in paragraph 25 above, if the option to formally object to the West

London Tram proposals is pursued, additional, unquantified, revenue costs will be

incurred, most likely in 2006/07 and 2007/08 based on the timetable in Table 2

above. It is noted from paragraph 19 above that Cabinet would receive a further

report determining the level and timing of these costs. Along with the cost of this

additional work, the funding for it has yet to be established, although in the absence

of any countervailing savings it should be assumed to be an additional burden on the

Council Tax requirement in the first instance.

Legal Implications

28. As indicated in the body of the report this scheme is being implemented under

the process of a Transport Works Act Order. This is a system which was devised to

deal with major infrastructure projects.

29. In summary an Order can be made under the provisions of the Transport

Works Act 1992. The effect of such an Order is to authorise the construction or

operation of the works in question and to grant powers of compulsory purchase. An

Order does not replace the need for planning permission but it should be noted that

as part of the submission for the Order a request for deemed planning permission

can be made. Given that the tram link will pass through 3 boroughs it is highly likely

that such a request will be included in this case. It operates in a similar fashion to

what are called Permitted Development rights, these are the rights people rely on to

construct certain sizes of extensions to existing properties.

30. The Council can elect to either support the project or to oppose it. If it elects

to support the project it will have to provide a letter indicating that it supports it. This

will avoid the need for the Council to attend the public inquiry which will be required

as part of the process for obtaining the Order. In the event that Members resolve to

oppose the scheme the Council will need to attend at the public inquiry to put

forward its objections to the scheme. Any objections will have to be based on

relevant grounds such as impact on traffic or environmental matters. The Council will

have to instruct a barrister to represent it at such an inquiry and may also have to

instruct external experts to appear as witnesses if there are no staff who can deal

with this matter. It is not possible at the present time to provide any indication as to

the costs the Council would incur in attending such an inquiry.

It should be noted that which ever course of action the Council decide to adopt it will

be necessary to pass a resolution at a full Council meeting making that decision.

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Under the rules governing decision making by local authorities the function of

deciding this matter is one reserved to the full Council.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

L.B.Hillingdon Report to Transportation Sub Committee – 8 th June 2000

L.B.Hillingdon Cabinet Report– 28 th January 2003

L.B.Hillingdon Cabinet member report October 2004

Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea: West London Tram report 28 th January

2005

Transport for London: ‘West London Tram – Hayes Town Centre Option Evaluation’

9th September 2005

Transport for London: ‘ West London Tram: Consultation on changes to the scheme

in Hillingdon’ - 17 October 2005

Transport for London: West London Tram: Public Consultation 2004 – Full Report

1. Public Consultation and Market Research Results

2. Public Consultation results – Summary Brochure

3. Public Consultation 2004 – Full Report

4. Appendix A – Consultation materials and methodology information

5.Appendix B, Stakeholder Responses

6. West London Tram – MORI Poll results. June 2005

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APPENDIX 1 - SUMMARY OF KEY STAKEHOLDER RESPONSES

STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

Acton Alliance

*

"Consultation a waste of time"

"Conditionally supportive"

"Transport for London needs to include provision for

businesses and private vehicle use along the whole

length of the Uxbridge Road"

"Realistically we all know that a large proportion of

commuters will continue to use private vehicles as the

main preferred mode, no matter what else is on offer…."

"Ken Livingstone has decided to have the tram regardless

of the impact on residents

"We are unable to support TfL's current proposal for the

Acton Green Residents

implementation of the WLT project…."

Association * "A majority of 95% of the Acton Green Residents voted

against the project"

B & Q

*

Bedford Park Society

*

"Our principle objection is the allocation of land identified

for the tram depot"

"objection of the preferred location of the depot"

"This to be a flawed scheme to which we are

unequivocally opposed

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STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

"Scheme, as it now stands will have a detrimental effect in

Acton"

Bromyard Avenue Residents

Association *

"The congestion, pollution, noise and increased danger to

pedestrians, cyclists and drivers would be unacceptable"

Capital Shopping Centre

(Chimes, Uxbridge) *

Capital Transport Campaign

*

"CSC supports the proposed location of the terminus

adjacent to the Uxbridge Underground Station"

"The reduction in stops will impose significant access

problems for those of limited mobility…."

CBI London

"We are unable to comment on this project in isolation…"

"Rather than view and assess transport projects for

London individually and in isolation, we need a holistic

approach"

Central Ealing Residents

Association *

"it is therefore questionable to what extent a tram would

enable drivers to switch from their cars"

"the paragraphs that compare the capacity of trams and

buses are misleading"

"the tram stops are a matter of particular concern"

"the impacts on traffic circulation along both the Uxbridge

Road itself and on the adjoining network are not spelt out"

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STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

Churchfield Community

Association *

"The CCA would oppose any tram proposal which

involves the diversion of traffic on local residential streets

including Churchfield Road"

Cllr. Harvey Rose

*

"I am not in favour of sending main stream traffic down

side streets"

Ealing Cycling Campaign

Ealing Friends of the Earth

*

Cyclists generally concerned about the physical

environment.

"We feel strongly that the cycle lane should retain the

main roads priority"

"sees it as a real opportunity to deliver both a substantial

improvement in public transport"

Ealing Hospital 48% of the staff "thought the tram is a good idea"

"The A4020 corridor is already overloaded…"

Ealing Passenger Transport

Users Group *

"Road pricing or congestion charging which will be

commonplace by the time the tram becomes operational,

will control any foreseeable increase in road usage and at

a much lower cost"

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STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

Ealing Village Residents

Association *

"Taking the tram in its present form with TfL's published

preferences in the Consultation Document will be

extremely detrimental to the Borough and the

businesses…."

East Acton Residents

Association *

Electric Tbus Group

*

"sadly, as the planning process has evolved, we have

been dismayed to find that our views appear to have been

totally ignored…"

"…West London Transit scheme is necessary to relieve

future congestion levels…."

GLA Conservative Group

*

"We believe the project to be a highly costly scheme

which cannot justify the high level of expenditure required

for the building in terms of ridership it is likely to attract"

"we also question the validity of the tram running as far as

Uxbridge. The route will eat into the pedestrian precinct in

the Town Centre"

GLA Green Group

*

"we believe that the West London Tram should go

ahead…."

"we need a TfL/Mayoral guarantee that this area of West

London will have more money for traffic reduction if the

tram goes ahead."

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STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

"Labour Assembly Members strongly support the

proposals for the tram"

GLA Labour Group

*

"we note the fears about displaced traffic congestion are

considerable and would suggest that TfL commissions

research into outcomes elsewhere"

Notwithstanding our strong support for the principle of the

tram, we would welcome an independent appraisal of the

benefit cost assessment of the proposal, particularly in the

light of the recent National Audit Office into light rail and

tram schemes elsewhere"

On the basis of the very detailed information give to the

Liberal Democrat Assembly members and research team

by Transport for London's Project Team, they cannot at

this stage support the continuation of the West London

Transit project proposed by the Mayor for London"

GLA Liberal Democrat Group

*

"Liberal Democrats do not believe that at a currently

estimated cost of £650 million, building a tramway along

the Uxbridge Road from Shepherds Bush to Uxbridge will

be good value for money for Londoners. They note that

the original estimate given for the project was around

£425 million"

"Liberal Democrats do not accept that Transport for

London necessarily know better than local communities

what is in their best interests"

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 167


STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

GLA Transport Committee

"If the scale of TfL's projections is accurate, it would seem

sensible / essential to enhance / support public transport

in the area to ensure a sustainable growth in population

and employment"

"The Committee has concerns on the following five points:

- The credibility of TfL's passenger projections

- The viability of parts of the proposed routes

- -The financial burden of debt repayments

- Assumptions underlying the business case

- Management of project risk

The committee would welcome an independent analysis

of these points prior to TfL's application for a Transport

and Works Act in Spring 2005"

GLA UKIP Group

*

"Traffic modelling shows considerable increases in traffic

in surrounding roads"

"We feel that a solutions-led approach to the Uxbridge

Road has been taken by TfL rather than a problems-led

approach"

Goldsmiths Residents

Association *

"I find the whole consultation process a total waste of my

time…."

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 168


STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

Gordon Road and

Surrounding Streets

Residents Association

(GRASS)

"Our principle concerns are the unacceptable

consequences of congestion, pollution, noise and

safety…."

* "…in the absence of information about the environmental

impact or business case, and without detailed traffic

modelling and details of the assumption on which

passenger predictions are based, we cannot comment on

these important matters"

Grange Grove Residents

Association *

"….we stressed that traffic management must be an

integral part of the consultation"

"The number of electric wheelchairs being used in Central

Croyden has increased since the trams have began

running, two wheelchair positions are provided in each

Greater London Action on

tram"

Disability (GLAD) * "The tram will not stop people using their cars, but will

cause congestion on residential side streets, surrounding

the proposed route"

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 169


STAKEHOLDER

SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

Greenside Residents Action

Group *

"….we do not consider the tram as a practical or

acceptable solution to the residents or local traders"

"The questions in consultation forms are considered

loaded to lead to responses that fit with the pre-set plan to

introduce the tram"

"Local residents consider the current level of predicted

costs for a 20 km stretch of road as disproportionate to

any possible benefits (£650 million capital costs, £48

million annual operating costs"

Hammersmith and Fulham

Historic Buildings Group *

"….the tram would be detrimental to the visual amenity of

the historic buildings and townscape of Uxbridge Road,

Shepherds Bush and Hammersmith

Hammersmith Society

*

"We also hope that this consultation exercise is a genuine

one and not purely cosmetic. The Mayor's decision to

press ahead with the extension of the congestion zone in

spite of an overwhelming negative response does not

offer a great deal of encouragement in this respect"

"Your scheme seems to us to be a massively overcomplicated

solution to the problem"

hfcyclists

*

"The work so far is flawed in not looking at the modelling

for the evening peak or the area to the east of Sheperds

Bush Green"

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 170


STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

Kingsdown Residents

Association *

"From the start the majority of members questioned the

suitability of the Uxbridge Road as a light railway route. It

is a busy road that has 27,000 vehicles travelling daily.

The road is needed for this traffic. Residents do not want

it displaced to their roads. It is not like Croydon where

two thirds of the route use existing railway track"

London Borough of Brent

"The use of modern trams, which are emission-free at

point of use and offer attractive and reliable alternative to

private cars, is in principle a sound concept which will

deliver a high quality public transport service. However

the cost of building and operating a tram system needs to

be compared in relation to cast and quality issues

associated with other models such as bus, guided bus,

trolley bus etc"

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 171


STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

"The council is currently considering whether it should join

with TfL in promoting the Transport and Works Order to

seek powers to construct and operate the scheme.

Should the Council pass the necessary resolutions, the

working framework and respective roles and

responsibilities would be defined in a joint Promotion

Agreement"

London Borough of Ealing

* "In summary, the Council's support for the scheme has

remained constant since inception. While it addresses the

existing problems of traffic congestion and public transport

quality and capacity on the Uxbridge Road Corridor, and

the environmental issues that these problems have

created, the Council also sees it as a critical enabler for its

strategies to improve the quality of life and economic

prosperity in the Borough"

London Borough of

Hamersmith and Fulham

"This is a very serious issue, but Uxbridge Road should

not be considered in isolation. Other main roads suffer

from congestion as least as bad as that in the Uxbridge

Road and there are several areas where public transport

is worse. It is important to recognise that the tramway

would not just serve Uxbridge Road but the whole area

between the District and Piccadilly lines and the Central

Line"

"The Council has made it clear on a number of occasions

that we support the scheme in principle, but there are

several detailed issues which need to be resolved before

we could support it unreservedly"

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 172


STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

London Borough of Harrow

"the Council has general concerns with regards to the

limitations of the proposal, the impact on existing traffic

and the impact on other modes of public transport,

particularly in Harrow"

"The lack of high capacity, fast and reliable orbital public

transport service in West London is recognised by

Transport for London and Wes London boroughs. The

current proposal for the West London Tram does not

address this problem. The Council therefore strongly

requests that a high quality orbital transport system is

considered for West London. An orbital extension of the

Tram may be the solution and part of the bus route 140

corridor would be well suited for this purpose"

"Harrow is also concerned about the disruption to general

traffic and the level of diverting traffic during construction

works on the tram. These may effect Harrow and hence

we would advise that all works are well publicised and

programmed in with consideration to minimise the

disruption to existing roads users"

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 173


STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

"It is regrettable that the consultation document contains

scant detailed information on the section on the route in

Hillingdon. In order for any consultee to be able to make

an informed response, this information should have been

a pre-requisite"

London Borough of

Hillingdon

"In Hillingdon, the introduction of a dedicated tram route

would result in substantial reduction in Highway capacity.

It is evident from the proposals that 50% of present

carriageway capacity would be lost over considerable

sections of the route within the borough. A corresponding

result in traffic reduction could not be expected, hence

traffic displacement on adjoining residential roads would

be a major issue. The consultation document provides no

information on how this issue is being addressed. Any

displacement of traffic onto inappropriate roads is not

considered acceptable in Hillingdon"

"There are also serious concerns about the route through

the pedestrianised area of the High Street, terminating in

front of Uxbridge Underground Station. The potential

conflict with pedestrians in one of the busiest parts of

Uxbridge town centre , has not been addressed"

"As regards the transport input, Southall Depot site only

has merit if the route to Hayes via Coldharbour Lane, is

progressed and adopted in the base scheme. Running of

non-passenger-carrying services along Hayes By-pass

(A312) is not an attractive proposition"

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 174


STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

London Borough of

Hounslow

2Hounslow supports the concept of a tram along the

Uxbridge Road. The Council accepts the need to provide

a more attractive mode of public transport along this major

public transport corridor. Based on the material presented

by the West London Tram project team, the Council

believes that the trams, as a mode, provide the best

potential for promoting modal shift, encouraging

regeneration and maximising accessibility in the face of

rising levels of population, car ownership and traffic

congestion"

"The Council, cannot therefore, give its unqualified

support to any proposal that significantly increases the

level of traffic congestion or reduces the quality of the

environment in the borough. We Urge Transport for

London to reconsider the proposed road closures and

employ alternative measures to maximise the priority and

effectiveness of the proposed tram service"

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 175


STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

London Chamber of

Commerce

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

"it is important to note that there is a limited amount of

funding available to spend in a city with many different

transport requirements. As such, the Chamber believes

that any proposed scheme must offer both good value for

money and bring real and measurable benefits to both the

business and wider community. The LCCI remains

unconvinced that the West London Tram will be able to

achieve these objectives. We question the suitability of

this route for a tram scheme, the impact that it will have

on local business and whether the scheme really can

provide value for money"

"The proposed route of the tram runs along the A4020

between Uxbridge and Sheperd's Bush, a key transport

corridor, and there are a large number of businesses sited

along both sides of the road. The London Chamber is

extremely concerned that, so far, there has not been a

study of the impact that the scheme will have on the local

economy"

London First

*

In view of the proposed route and the funding priorities

suggested in the London Business Board letter to Alistair

Darling on 5th April 04, and the subsequent outcome of

the spending review, London First is unable to support the

significant investment required for the West London Tram

project at the present time and as proposed"

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 176


STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

London Forum of Amenity

and Civic Societies

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

"Further to the comments above on the proposed tram

scheme, the opinion of this organisation is that the tram is

not an effective and justifiable solution to the transport

requirements in that corridor and should be abandoned or

drastically amended"

London Transport Users

Committee *

"LTUC supports the proposal for the introduction of the

West London Tram as part of a modern integrated

transport system for West London. The project was

thought to be the most effective and efficient means of

meeting the demands of transport along the Shepherds

Bush - Uxbridge Corridor. The committee also accept that

the tram would encourage people to switch from their cars

to public transport - a laudable aim that would bring

benefits to the environment and to air quality."

Norland Conservation

Society *

"Trams are often perceived as beneficial to the

environment, but these benefits are dependant on clever

planning to anticipate potential problems and plan around

them. From your web site and the leaflets available

describing plans for the tram, it appears that your

intention is to introduce the tram regardless of the

consequences. You do not seem to have thought of any

solutions to these problems"

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 177


STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

Park Community Group

*

"The disbelief in the business case for the tram which is

based on projected passenger numbers which we do not

believe will materialise. Moreover, existing tram schemes

have almost failed to reach forecast passenger numbers"

RAC Foundation

*

Royal Borough of Kensington

& Chelsea *

"In our view, however, a fixed tram system is not the best

solution. It would be expensive and inflexible and would

reduce available road capacity, already under pressure.

In UK experience, trams generally have not had great

success in attracting new users and have not proved

financial viable, as the recent NAO report has

demonstrated"

"The project is very expensive in capital terms and the

estimated benefit cost ratio is only 1.5:1. There is clearly

a substantial risk that the ratio could fall below 1, making

the project economically unviable, if actual costs or

benefits differ from the estimates by a relatively small

margin"

"The Council's formal response therefore is to object to

any proposal to progress the West London Tram Project"

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 178


STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

Royal Society for the

Protection of Birds *

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

"This development may have impacts on the environment

due to damage to habits and disturbance. We have noted

that there is a potential for this scheme to result in the loss

of trees along the route. These issues should be fully

addressed in the Environmental Impact Assessment. As

a minimum, works should be timed so as not to affect

nesting birds. The RSPB would also wish to see any

felled trees replaced with native broad-leaf species"

Save Ealing's Streets

*

"The proposals for the tram and traffic to share the same

roadspace at a number of pinchpoints will inevitably

cause traffic to back up and encourage displacement on

to surrounding streets. The flow of traffic entering these

shared sections is to be restricted and, since the traffic will

have to wait behind the tram when it stops in these

sections, impatient drivers will be bound to seek

alternative routes. Although we are not all convinced

about them, the findings of the traffic modelling confirm

these fears. Moreover, some of the accompanying

restrictions to traffic turning right at junctions along the

route would compound the problem; for example, the

restriction on eastbound Uxbridge Road traffic turning

right into Springfield Road will result in more traffic in the

residential streets behind the Town Hall"

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 179


STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

Save Ealing's Streets cont.

"We note that this section picks out just eight sections of

the route for more detailed information, but while these

feature what may be some of the trickier problems for the

engineers, many sections carry implications that should

be highlighted. For instance, most of the route through

Hillingdon will mean reducing the width of the existing two

and three-lane route to single lane traffic. Considering the

problems that arose recently over a similar reduction of

the highway through the installation of a bus lane along

the A312, the consultation should have drawn more

attention to it"

Shaa Road Residents

Association *

"The tram would be expensive to maintain and under

used, concern for ever higher Council Taxes to pay for

what could easily turn out to be a white elephant"

"People are very concerned that other tram systems in

England are not achieving the targets they were expected

to"

"Many believe that the money would be far better and

more sensibly spent improving the existing underground

and bus services"

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 180


STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

South Buckinghamshire

District Council *

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

"The Council is supportive of the tram link from Uxbridge

into London. However, whilst there is no mention of it in

the current documentation, the Council vehemently

opposes any subsequent proposals for the extension of

the route to Denham or the provision of a park and ride

facility in the Green Belt in South Bucks"

St. Augustine's Priory

*

From a social point of view, I think there are inherent

dangers in the scheme. Nationwide, we are now

recognising the problems of a north-south divide brings to

the country. It seems lunatic to deliberately and artificially

impose a north-south divide on West London. I have tried

hard to think of any benefit this scheme could bring. I

hope that the suggestion of decreasing the size of Haven

Green will be recognised for the eco-vandalism that it is,

and my heart goes out to those many people living in the

narrow roads on either side of Ealing Broadway who are

now facing the very real anxiety that their homes will be

demolished to push through a pointless and ill-thought out

plan"

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 181


STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT TRAM

DO NOT SUPPORT

TRAM

COMMENTS / KEY ISSUES

Transport 2000

*

We strongly support the proposed West London Tram and

would be pleased to lend our name in it's favour. The

Tram would greatly increase the carrying capacity of the

road and do so in a clean, quiet, accessible and attractive

way. It would bring other advantages not mentioned in

the consultation questionnaire including: improved road

safety, encouraging a shift from the car to other modes,

boosting regeneration and revitalisation of town centres

and the entire transport corridor, providing an opportunity

to remodel the environment of the Uxbridge Road and

improve facilities for pedestrians and cyclists"

West Acton Residents

Association *

"The introduction of the tram along the Uxbridge Road

may reduce the demand for private car use. However, the

projected road traffic densities presented by the

consultants employed by TfL indicated an overall increase

in the number of journeys overall in the area, with or

without the introduction of the tram"

"The only acceptable option for the tram through Acton

High Street would be if it had two lanes with a further two

lanes for other road traffic, even this option requires the

demolition of a number of existing properties"

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 182


APPENDIX 2

Tim Finch

Transport & Works Manager

West London Tram

Transport for London Borough of Hillingdon

Windsor House

42-50 Victoria Street

London

SW1V 1LW

30 July 2004

Dear Tim

DEPOT SITE ALTERNATIVES

I refer to the drawings you recently left with me, regarding the alternative depot sites.

I would stress that the views stated below are only initial officer views and are based on the

assessments made from Faber Maunsell Drgs 2101B and 3051G. As you will no doubt appreciate,

at some stage, Council Member level views/endorsements of these will need to be made.

As regards the transport input, Southall Depot site only has merit if the route to Hayes, via

Coldharbour Lane, is progressed and adopted in the base scheme. Running of non-passengercarrying

services along Hayes By-pass (A312) is not an attractive proposition.

My initial view on the site at the junction of Uxbridge Road and Grand Union Canal (Drg 3051G) is

that in transport terms it is very close to Uxbridge Road and hence obviates the need for lengthy

journeys form the main route to depot site. Traffic modelling and junction design at this location

will need to cater for various competing/conflicting road user interests. Views of the adjoining

landowners would be crucial in determining the acceptability of this site for the depot.

On the planning side, you should be aware that the site is presently designated as an Industrial and

Business Area (IBA) in the adopted Hillingdon Unitary Development Plan. Policy LE2 seeks to

limit uses in such locations to Business, Industrial and Warehousing purposes (Use Classes B1-B8)

and for Sui Generis Uses appropriate in an IBA. A tram depot is likely to be regarded as a Sui

Generis use and it is possible that the Council would regard it as an acceptable Sui Generis use in

an IBA, given the limited range of suitable locations for depots in built up areas and the current

retail use of the site.

I would also draw your attention to Policy OEI, which seeks to prevent development where

associated noise and vibration would have a detrimental effect on the amenities of nearby

residential properties. It would be necessary to ensure that adequate mitigation of environmental

impacts be undertaken to safeguard the living conditions of nearby homes. Nevertheless, on the

basis of the information provided, I would say that there is unlikely to be any in-principle planning

objection to the sitting of the tram depot on this location at the junction of Uxbridge Road/Grand

Union Canal.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 183


I trust the above is helpful, and would stress that these are initial officer views.

Yours sincerely

pp

Janet Rangeley

Strategy Manager

cc Chandra Raval – LB Hillingdon

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 184


PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AUDIT – ACTION

PLAN

ITEM 8

Contact Officers Tracy Waters 01895 277694

Papers with this report

Audit Commission report - attached

SUMMARY

The Audit Commission carried out an Audit of Performance Management as part of

the Annual Audit Plan for 2005/06 in order to evaluate current performance

management arrangements.

The findings of the audit were positive, and led to five recommendations for the

council to act on.

The audit took account of the council’s performance management framework, the

impact of the corporate centre through HIP, and Scrutiny. Through interviews and

focus groups the audit carried out three detailed probes in services suggested by the

council as examples of where performance levels had been raised after barriers to

improved service had been overcome. The three probes investigated performance in

Social Services and Housing, and Planning in particular: the percentage of adults

receiving a service who had received a description of their needs, elements of the

housing benefit service and improvements in determining planning applications.

The audit commission made five recommendations for the council to implement.

1. Implement a corporate approach to capturing and sharing notable practice;

2. Reviews the outcomes from performance clinics and analyses identified

issues

3. Reviews and where practicable increases the frequency at which PSA

performance data is collected.

4. Undertakes more detailed cost benefit analysis, particularly when outsourcing

aspects of service: and

5. Reviews its range of local performance indicators and removes those where

the cost of data capture outweighs the value of the information provided.

RECOMMENDATIONS

1. That Cabinet note the outcome of the three probes and note that this

reflects well upon the Council and the HIP Performance Management Group.

2. That Cabinet approve the action plan

REASONS FOR OFFICER RECOMMENDATIONS

It is good practice to consider and act upon the recommendations arising from audits

carried out by the Audit Commission.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 185


OPTIONS AVAILABLE

To add, delete or amend the actions recommended by the report.

INFORMATION

1. The main findings of the audit were as follows.

2. Performance Management is embedded within services from senior

managers to front line teams and performance is a standing item at weekly and

monthly management and team meetings where indictors are reviewed and remedial

action taken within relevant service areas.

3. Within the 'Probe' service areas where failing performance had been identified

there has been an increase in capacity to monitor performance and identify

issues inhibiting service delivery. Examples of interventions to improve performance

against target are;

• Restructuring of services to provide improved supervision ratios;

• The improvement of IT provision

• Development of more efficient work practices; and

• Communication and engagement with staff.

4. At the corporate level there is a focus on key performance targets at

Management Board and through the H.I.P./CPA Steering Group. Resources have

been provided to build individual staff capacity and technological and structural

support. Performance Clinics have been introduced to provide additional support

and guidance where underperformance has been identified. The findings of these

Performance Clinics should be analysed to identify common or recurring themes.

Overview and Scrutiny play a significant role in the overall monitoring of council

performance. Procedures for identifying and tackling cross cutting issues have been

developed the Council's own work and the London Borough of Hillingdon

comparative data contained within the annual Local Authority Overview and Scrutiny

survey would suggest that there is a capacity issue that warrants further

investigation.

5. Performance has improved within the probe areas both in terms of

performance indicator scores, albeit in some instance only very recently, and through

the increased focus and use of performance management information to guide

management action. The true test for Hillingdon, as it is for all Councils, is to ensure

service improvements are sustained and built upon over the long-term.

6. Whilst the increased focus on performance has given rise to examples of

innovative working and notable practice these are not widely known outside of

individual services and more action could be taken to ensure that these are more

effectively shared with colleagues.

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 186


7. The capacity to monitor and analyse information is well established within the

services reviewed but there remains a need to develop more analytical capability at

the strategic level and also to undertake more detailed cost benefit analysis in some

service areas.

8. Performance data for some LPSA targets is collated and reported annually

which restricts the potential for early intervention.

9. There was a common belief at all levels within the Council that there were too

many indicators, especially at a local level with the potential to divert activity away

from key performance targets.

Financial Implications

10. There are no direct financial implications as a result of this report.

CORPORATE CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

Corporate Finance Comments

11. A corporate finance officer has reviewed the report and is satisfied that the

content and recommendations have no direct financial implications on the

performance management function or for the Council’s resources in total, since the

Action Plan will be delivered within existing staff resources.

Legal Implications

12. The Audit Commission has a number of powers under the Audit Commission

Act 1998 which include the power to carry out an Audit of a local authority's

Performance Management arrangements.

13. When carrying out an audit of a local authority, the Audit Commisssion has

the right to examine whether a local authority's practices are consistent with its

general duty to secure best value which arises under the Local Government Act

1999.Therefore,if Cabinet approves the five recommendations made by the

Commission, which are incorporated in the Action Plan, this will assist the Council in

demonstrating that it is meeting its duty under the 1999 Act''.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

2005 Report - Audit of Performance Management by Audit Commission

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 187


2005 Performance Management Audit Action Plan

Recommendations Action Responsible

officer

1. Implement a corporate Groups to identify success factors from Directors

approach to capturing and performance improvements and share JD with

sharing notable practice. with HIP Performance Management HIP/PMG

Group

Deadline

2 Months

Action

Complete

Case studies of improving

performance/good customer care

celebrated and communicated

Customer

Care Group

And

HIP/PMG

Quarterly

2. Review the outcomes of

performance clinics and

analyses of identified issues

3. Review and where

practicable increase the

frequency at which PSA

performance data is

collected

4. Undertake more detailed

cost benefit analysis,

particularly when

outsourcing aspects of

service.

5. Review the range of local

performance indicators and

remove those where the

Re-launch Customer Care Awards

Audit of Performance clinics and report to

HIP/ PMG / Management Board

Continue to collect PSA data quarterly

where it can be collected quarterly.

Continue to collect PSA data monthly

where quarterly monitoring shows target

has slipped

Amend existing project management

guidance for business case and project

evaluation.

SMT’s to review local performance

indicators to identify local measures

which relate to the achievement of group

JD with

HIP/PMG

Oct 2005

Completed

TW On going PSA will

end in

2006

PSO with P

Whaymand

Board in

preparation

for Council

June 2006

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 188


cost of collection outweighs

the value of the information

provided.

and service plans and target a given level

of performance – targets to be included in

Group and Team plans

Plan

Performance

Supplement

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

Cabinet report 10 th November 2005 Page 189


Performance Detailed Report

30/06/2005

Last saved: 25/08/2005 10:16:00

Hillingdon

Performance

Management

London Borough of Hillingdon

2005-2006


The Audit Commission is an independent body responsible for ensuring that

public money is spent economically, efficiently and effectively, to achieve

high-quality local and national services for the public. Our remit covers more than

15,000 bodies which between them spend nearly £125 billion of public money

every year. Our work covers local government, housing, health, criminal justice

and fire and rescue services.

As an independent watchdog, we provide important information on the quality of

public services. As a driving force for improvement in those services, we provide

practical recommendations and spread best practice. As an independent auditor,

we monitor spending to ensure public services are good value for money.

Document Control

Author

Filename

Doug West

Hillingdon Performance Management

Status of our reports to the Council

Our reports are prepared in the context of the Statement of Responsibilities of

Auditors and Audited Bodies issued by the Audit Commission. Reports are

prepared by appointed auditors and addressed to members or officers. They are

prepared for the sole use of the audited body, and no responsibility is taken by

auditors to any member or officer in their individual capacity, or to any third party.

Copies of this report

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Hillingdon Performance Management │ Contents 3

Contents

Summary Report 4

Introduction 4

Background 4

Audit approach 5

Main conclusions 5

Recommendations 6

Detailed Report 7

Performance management processes 7

Corporate issues 8

Scrutiny 9

Impact in 'Probe' Services 12

Areas for Development 15

The way forward 15

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4 Hillingdon Performance Management │

Summary Report

Introduction

1 Effective performance management is accepted as being critical to the success of

a well run local authority. A major contribution of performance management is its

focus on achieving outcomes. It reminds us that training, strong commitment and

lots of hard work are not results. The end result of all this activity must be the

delivery of useful products and services that effectively meets the needs of the

community. Managing performance is about supporting staff to make a

difference.

2 At any level performance management arrangements should:

• explicitly cite what the organisation’s aims and objectives are

• detail what needs to be done to achieve the stated objectives

• ensure individuals who are best placed to ensure the delivery of targets have

real ownership for doing so

• detail performance measures to enable progress to be tracked

• include the means to identify and address areas of poor performance

3 Performance management is more than establishing the mechanics such as

setting targets, having plans and measuring indicators which are easier to deal

with in comparison to getting the right focus, leadership and culture in place.

Often public bodies have performance management systems in place, but cannot

make them work well in practice. This suggests that there are wider reasons for

lack of success, other than the absence of a mechanism or framework.

Background

4 The Modernising Government agenda has set challenging new performance

objectives for councils. The Gershon review of public sector efficiency, for

example, details central government’s expectation that councils will be able to

release resources to front line services by successfully meeting specified

efficiency savings targets. These are to be achieved in essence through

productivity increases as a result of workforce reform and training, investment in

ICT and process reform. Performance management is a key tool to enable

councils to meet these challenges.

5 Our recent direction of travel summary report produced for the council as part of

our requirement to assess and annually report continuous improvements included

an assessment of the council’s performance management arrangements. In brief

the report found that the reporting arrangements on the Hillingdon Improvement

Plan had been improved with quarterly reporting and better linking of finance and

activity data. The staff personal development and performance appraisal system

(PADA) has been revised and the arrangements for its implementation reviewed.

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Hillingdon Performance Management │ 5

6 To help the Council to further develop and refine its approach to performance

management we agreed as part of the 2004/2005 audit plan to undertake a

review of the current arrangements.

Audit approach

7 To evaluate the current performance management arrangements we used probes

in three services: Environmental Services, Housing and Social Services. The

services were selected after consultation with the Council as areas where

underperformance had been identified in terms of; the processing of certain

planning applications, elements of the housing benefits service and within social

services the percentage of adults receiving a service who had received a

description of their needs within relevant time scales

8 The work involved a desk top review of documentation, interviews with directors,

senior managers and focus groups with front–line staff and service managers.

Main conclusions

9 Performance Management is embedded within services from senior managers to

front line teams and performance is a standing item at weekly and monthly

management and team meetings where indictors are reviewed and remedial

action taken within relevant service areas.

10 Within the 'Probe' service areas where failing performance had been identified

there has been an increase in capacity to monitor performance and identify

issues inhibiting service delivery. Examples of interventions to improve

performance against targets are;

• Restructuring of services to provide improved supervision ratios;

• The improvement of I.T. provision;

• Development of more efficient work practices; and

• Communication and engagement with staff.

11 At the corporate level there is a focus on key performance targets at

Management Board and through the H.I.P./CPA Steering Group which is a

member level body chaired by the Leader of the Council and attended by the

portfolio holder for Performance and senior council officers. Resources have

been provided to build individual staff capacity and technological and structural

support. Performance Clinics have been introduced to provide additional support

and guidance where underperformance has been identified. The findings of these

Performance Clinics should be analysed to identify common or recurring themes

or barriers to progress.

12 Overview and Scrutiny play a significant role in the overall monitoring of council

performance. Procedures for identifying and tackling cross cutting issues have

been developed. Whilst a detailed evaluation of officer support for Overview and

Scrutiny falls outside the scope of this report the Council's own work and the

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6 Hillingdon Performance Management │

comparative data contained within the annual Local Authority Overview and

Scrutiny survey would suggest that there is a capacity issue that warrants further

investigation.

13 Performance has improved within the probe areas both in terms of performance

indicator scores, albeit in some instance only very recently, and through the

increased focus and use of performance management information to guide

management action. The true test for Hillingdon, as it is for all Councils, is to

ensure service improvements are sustained and built upon over the long-term.

14 Whilst the increased focus on performance has given rise to examples of

innovative working and notable practice these are not widely known outside of

individual services and more action could be taken to ensure that these are more

effectively shared with colleagues.

15 The capacity to monitor and analyse information is well established within the

services reviewed but there remains a need to develop more analytical capability

at the strategic level and also to undertake more detailed cost benefit analysis in

some service areas.

16 Performance data for some LPSA targets is collated and reported annually which

restricts the potential for early intervention.

17 There was a common belief at all levels within the Council that there were too

many indicators, especially at a local level with the potential to divert activity away

from the key performance targets.

Recommendations

18 We recommend that the Council:

• Implements a corporate approach to capturing and sharing notable practice;

• Reviews the outcomes from performance clinics and analyses identified

issues;

• Reviews and where practicable increases the frequency at which PSA

performance data is collected;

• Undertakes more detailed cost benefit analysis, particularly when outsourcing

aspects of service; and

• Reviews its range of local performance indicators and removes those where

the cost of data capture outweighs the value of the information provided.

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Hillingdon Performance Management │ 7

Detailed Report

Performance management processes

19 The Council's performance management framework for 2005/06 consists of a

Council plan, a performance supplement, group and service plans and individual

plans produced through the use of the Council's Performance and Development

Agreement (PADA) process. The Council plan for 2005/06 entitled "Making a

Difference" incorporates the Best Value Performance Plan and includes the

Leader's Statement that sets out the tasks for the groups for the coming year as

well as providing an assessment of the progress made against the Council's

targets and objectives in the preceding year. The Council plan documents how

the Council is to work with local strategic partners to address the aims detailed

within the community strategy. However, at the time of our fieldwork the new

community strategy had not been signed-off by all of the local partners nor

published. The performance supplement provides a commentary on the Council's

progress against Best Value performance indicators to meet best value statutory

requirements.

20 In interviews with senior and middle managers and focus groups with managers

and front line staff the focus on performance management was evident. In the

three service areas subject to detailed probes performance issues were standing

agenda items at management and team meetings which were held at monthly or

weekly intervals. Issues affecting performance were routinely identified and

addressed.

21 The PADA I process is well understood and embedded within the organisation. All

staff we spoke to at senior, middle management and operational level stated that

they had received timely appraisals. Evidence of a 'golden thread;' the consistent

use of objectives from the Council plan, to Group plans and then finally to

individual performance plans was provided within the probe areas. Departments

had individual systems to monitor compliance with PADA processes but there is

no monitoring at the corporate level. Systems to monitor whether regular 1-2-1s

were undertaken were less systematic. As identified in the IDeA peer review

report (2004) it is difficult to demonstrate the ‘golden thread’ running from the

community strategy through to individual staff targets given the absence of a

finalised community strategy. The Council needs to ensure that group and

individual plans tie into the new community strategy as part of the next group and

individual planning cycle.

22 Staff are kept informed of performance issues by a range of methods including

team meetings and briefings, the circulation of minutes, and corporate and

directorate updates. Staff we spoke to were clear as to their departmental

objectives and progress in achieving them. There is often a natural reluctance to

provide critical feedback and systems are needed to overcome this barrier. The

Council has implemented two notable approaches, for example 'skip' meetings

I

Performance and Development Appraisal

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8 Hillingdon Performance Management │

between managers and staff which enable staff to talk directly to their line

manager's manager and 'diagonal slice' meetings across a range of management

levels and teams. The design of these meetings should help alleviate some of the

reluctance staff may feel about being candid about areas where performance is in

need of improvement. Such initiatives and good practice are shared at the H.I.P.

Performance Management Group and through the training programme

undertaken by the newly formed Project Support Office. However, awareness of

them amongst staff is mixed resulting in lost opportunities to implement notable

practice. We recommend that the Council implements a corporate approach to

capturing notable practice and sharing it more widely.

23 Performance Clinics have been introduced, initially within Housing and Social

Services. Performance clinics are convened to address identified areas of poor

performance. Initially a piece of research is undertaken to collate appropriate data

on the particular service area. A meeting is then held, chaired by the appropriate

Group Director and attended by service and team managers as well as other

appropriate personnel. The output from these clinics is an action plan which is

then monitored. Initially developed within Social Services these are now being

rolled out across the Council. These workshops are in the relatively early stages

of implementation and their contribution to service improvement has yet to be

evaluated and analysis to identify common factors impacting on performance has

yet to be undertaken. We recommend that the Council reviews the outcomes

from the performance clinics so that any common issues might be identified and

shared.

24 One factor seen as improving the focus on performance is the production of more

frequent and timely performance indicators which enable managers and staff to

identify and address underperformance at an earlier stage and we were given

examples of where early identification of issues had enabled effective

interventions to take place. However there are areas of performance, including

approximately 30 per cent of PSA I targets where data is still collected annually

and we recommend that where practicable the Council reviews and where

practicable increases the frequency at which PSA performance data is monitored

and analysed.

Corporate issues

25 There are a number of ways in which the corporate centre impacts on

performance, through the Hillingdon Improvement Programme, the use of

Scrutiny and by building capacity. For example, by providing resources: to

develop individual staff capacity, re-design business processes as well as

through the appropriate investment and implementation of new technologies.

26 Corporate involvement is seen by senior staff as motivational rather than 'hands

on' and this includes the visibility of the leader of the Council and Chief Executive

in holding well publicised quarterly award ceremonies where the contribution of

staff in delivering improved performance is publicly recognised.

I

Public Sector Agreement

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Hillingdon Performance Management │ 9

27 The Corporate Centre, through the various H.I.P projects undertakes dip

sampling and audits to ensure that appropriate systems are in place, for example

the proportion of staff that have had PADAs and how the sickness absence

policy is being implemented within departments.

28 Regular Executive Briefings are provided to Members and senior staff but whilst

performance trends against a wide range of targets are listed there is no analysis

as to the reasons for changes in performance. Senior staff we spoke to felt that

the quality of analysis could be developed to support the strategic decision

making process.

29 There are elements of cost benefit analysis in place including the outsourcing of

residential homes and of comparing the costs of using agency rather than in

house staff, however the analysis is limited. For instance, it does not provide the

Council with sufficient data to show whether, for example, Market Factor

Supplements are set at the levels to deliver the most cost effective mix of 'in

house' or agency staff. We recommend that the Council undertakes more

detailed cost benefit analysis, particularly when outsourcing aspects of services.

Hillingdon Improvement Programme

30 The Hillingdon Improvement Programme (HIP) was started in April 2003. It was

established to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the Council and to

assist the Council in its endeavours to become an Excellent rated authority as

determined by the Comprehensive Performance Assessment (CPA) process.

31 The H.I.P. Steering Group is linked to the CPA continuous improvement

programme and membership of the Steering Group has now been expanded to

include all Portfolio Leads. This group considers all performance issues which are

considered critical to delivery of CPA improvements and 'triggers' performance

clinics for those key performance indicators where consistent underperformance

against targets is noted.

32 Performance Management is itself a H.I.P. project and all departmental Heads of

Performance participate in regular meetings which oversee the performance

framework and identify and address issues such as the provision of appropriate

I.T. and staff training.

33 There was a wide knowledge and understanding of H.I.P. amongst staff we spoke

to and CPA and the Council's drive to improve performance were seen as drivers

to encourage cross departmental working.

Scrutiny

34 Overview and Scrutiny play a significant role in the overall monitoring of council

performance and procedures for identifying and tackling cross cutting issues have

been developed. Whilst a detailed evaluation of officer support for Overview and

Scrutiny falls outside the scope of this report the Council's own work and the

comparative data contained within the annual Local Authority Overview and

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10 Hillingdon Performance Management │

Scrutiny survey would suggest that there is a capacity issue that warrants further

investigation.

35 Overview and scrutiny has two key roles to play. Firstly, it is tasked with holding

the Executive (i.e. the Cabinet) to account for the decisions they make (the

scrutiny part) and secondly reviewing Council policies and making

recommendations for future policies (the overview part). An effective Overview

and Scrutiny (O&S) function can assist in driving up performance, the overview

element in particular through its on-going monitoring and reviewing role.

36 In reviewing the role of O&S in terms of