2018 TNA and TSNA Joint Annual Conference

emiller

Embassy Suites - SE Murfreesboro

JOINT ANNUAL

Oct.

26-28,

2018

TNA &

TSNA

CONFERENCE

ADVOCACY IN ACTION


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Advocacy in Action

October 26-28. 2018

Murfreesboro, TN Embassy Suites SE-Murfreesboro

Table of Contents

Welcome from the TNA President ..................................................................3

Welcome from the TNA Executive Director ..........................................................5

Welcome from the Tennessee Student Nurses Association ............................................9

TNA Conference Schedule .........................................................................11

TSNA Conference Schedule .......................................................................19

Embassy Suites Floor Plan Meeting Rooms .........................................................23

General Announcements .........................................................................27

Meet Our Keynote and Plenary Speakers ...........................................................29

Meet the Presenters ..............................................................................31

Tennessee Nurses Political Action Committee (TNPAC) ..............................................39

2018 Membership Assembly Rules and Information ...................................................41

110 th Membership Assembly Agenda ...............................................................42

Disclosures to Participants, Continuing Nursing Education Instructions ................................43

Introduction to Robert’s Rules of Order ............................................................44

2015-2017 Legislative and Health Policy Statements .................................................49

Nightingale Tribute & Memoriam ..................................................................56

TNA Board of Directors & Staff ...................................................................58

2018 Slate of Candidates .........................................................................59

Poster Abstracts ................................................................................67

TNA Financials ..................................................................................90

TNA Leadership Opportunities ....................................................................93

Area of Interest Form ............................................................................94

TNA Past Presidents .............................................................................95

Tennessee Nurses Foundation (TNF) – Mission – Goals – Initiatives ....................................96

TNF Board of Trust Roster ........................................................................97

TNA Member Benefits ...........................................................................98

TNA 2019 Events ...............................................................................100

Printed and Published for the Tennessee Nurses Association by:

Arthur L. Davis Publishing Agency

517 Washington, P.O. Box 216, Cedar Falls, IA 50613 • (319) 277-2414

www.tnaonline.org

Published by:

Arthur L. Davis

Publishing Agency, Inc.

1


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Welcome from the TNA President

Haley Vance, DNP, APRN, CPNP-AC

On Behalf of the Tennessee Nurses Association Board of Directors & Staff, I want to

welcome you to the 2018 Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) & Tennessee Student

Nurses Association (TSNA) Joint Annual Conference.

This year’s conference theme is “Advocacy in Action”. What an amazing opportunity

we have as nurses to inspire, innovate, and influence both the profession of nursing

and the patients that we care for. Many long hours have gone in to planning

conference this year to provide you with intentional and thoughtful time for open

dialogue regarding issues here in Tennessee, excellent continuing education, poster

sessions, and networking opportunities.

We have many distinguished guests joining us this year. Susan Hassmiller, RN, PhD, FAAN from the Robert

Wood Johnson Foundation will kick us off on Friday afternoon sharing her first-hand experience with the

current healthcare system. Our keynote speaker on Saturday is Mary Jo Assi, DNP, RN, FNP-BC, NEA-BC,

FAAN , the Associate Chief Nursing Officer for Press Ganey. She will lead us and inspire us to focus on

providing compassionate and connected care. Our closing speaker on Sunday is Rozanne Filson, BBA who

serves as an Account Executive in the Healthcare Division of Aon’s Affinity Insurance Services, Inc. Her

expertise on healthcare risk management and insurance-related topics will provide practical strategies and

information for preventing malpractice in our day-to-day practices.

Though politics may not be everyone’s first love, knowing the individuals that represent us is important. We

look forward to hearing from our TN Gubernatorial candidates – Bill Lee (R) and Karl Dean (D) – regarding

their priorities for the upcoming years.

This will be our first conference with our new Executive Director, Tina Gerardi. She has traveled the state

over the past 8 months connecting with and engaging nurses from all our TNA districts. If you have not had

the privilege to meet her, please take this opportunity to do so. She is fabulous and truly devoted to the

profession of nursing!

Many of you may know that Wilhelmina Davis is retiring. We could never adequately thank her for the ten

amazing years of service she has given to Government Affairs for TNA.

I look forward to meeting and interacting with you throughout the weekend! Welcome to conference!

Sincerely,

Haley Vance

3


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Welcome from the Executive Director

Tina Gerardi, MS, RN, CAE

Welcome to the 2018 Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) & Tennessee Student

Nurses Association (TSNA) Joint Conference. I am so excited to be attending my first

Membership Assembly and Annual Conference as the executive director of TNA. I am

confident that we will learn together, exchange ideas, chart the course for nursing

for the upcoming year, share our stories and our wisdom with our colleagues and the

future of nursing, our students. I think we can also have some fun along the way!

This year’s theme, Advocacy in Action, recognizes the advocate in every registered

nurse. Whether at the bedside, in the classroom, in the board room, or in the Capitol,

each day we advocate for quality patient care, quality nursing practice, quality nursing

education, quality nursing research, quality nursing leadership, and quality health for all Tennesseans. Our

opening plenary speaker Sue Hassmiller and our keynote speaker Mary Jo Assi will share the need for

compassion as we advocate for our practice and our patients. Our closing plenary speaker, Roxane Filson

will highlight the need to be vigilant in assuring safe nursing practice in our daily work.

In addition to the educational opportunities, the Membership Assembly will convene to do the work of the

Association – setting direction and priorities for the upcoming year. TNA will also elect new members of

the board of directors, support the work of the Tennessee Nurses Foundation and the Tennessee Nurses

Political Action Committee, and confer awards on outstanding nurses from across the state.

I look forward to meeting you and working together to make TNA the unifying voice for nursing in Tennessee.

2018 Conference Planning Committee

This year’s conference has been diligently planned under the direction of Jenny Webb

(TNA Board Director of Education) and our 2018 Conference Planning Committee.

Please thank the following individuals for their yearlong

effort in planning our annual conference:

Shante Addy

Trish Baise

Diane Cunningham

Wilhelmina Davis

Kathryn Denton

Sharon Hinton

Carla Kirkland

Anne Mitchell

Kamiko Ritchey

5


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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

7


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Welcome from the TSNA President

Kamiko Ritchey, BSN, RN

Welcome to the 2018 TNA and TSNA Annual Joint Conference. I would like to

personally thank you for attending this conference and your dedication to our

association, as well as your commitment to the field of nursing. Becoming a nurse is

one of the most challenging and most rewarding opportunities.

Tennessee Student Nurses Association (TSNA) allows you to:

• meet people all over the state that have one thing in common, nursing.

• connect with people that are enduring the same schooling, clinicals, and busy

schedules.

• gain perspectives from other nursing students

• recognize the difference in other programs around the state and some of the different things they are

doing in their schools

• create a sense of community

• gain professionalism and knowledge of nursing as a whole

• acquire information about state laws currently in action and those soon to be in action

Nursing changes daily, and we are fortunate enough to have an organization like TSNA to be a part of the

change, and create a platform to voice our own opinions toward nursing issues that matter most. TNA’s

Legislative Summit is held annually, usually in April, in Nashville, TN and is a great place to expand on

knowledge and topics related to current legislation in nursing.

Becoming a member of the TSNA is one of the greatest decisions you’ve already made, or will make. You

have the chance to be a part of something great and make a difference for future nurses, like yourself. This

is an organization that links people by connecting schools and students all over the state, and gives you the

opportunities and resources to enhance your future.

At conference, you will have the opportunity to hear from nursing professionals around the state, learn

about hot topics in nursing, meet local vendors and others from across the nation, and take part in an

NCLEX review! Thank you for joining TNA and TSNA. We’re glad you’re here!

9


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Tennessee Nurses Association

Conference Schedule*

*Schedule subject to change without notice

Friday, October 26 Activity/Event Location Contact Hours

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. TNA Registration Open Foyer

10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Silent Auction Open Mirabella A

10:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. First Time Attendees Orientation Oakleigh A-B

10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Membership Assembly Oakleigh A-B

TNA Candidates Forum

12:15 p.m. – 12:45 p.m. Lunch Oakleigh A-B

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Opening Session Oakleigh A-B 1.0 Contact Hours

Compassion in Care: The Rule,

Not the Exception

Susan B. Hassmiller, RN, PhD, FAAN

Senior Advisor for Nursing

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Students encouraged to attend

2:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Issues Forum Oakleigh A-B 3.0 Contact Hours

Past Presidents Forum

Break

Legislative Forum with

Gubernatorial Candidates (invited)

6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Welcome Reception & Exhibits Mirabella E-F

DJ & Costume Contest

Saturday, October 27

7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Registration Open Foyer

7:00 a.m. – 7:45 a.m. Early Morning Dance Party Private Dining Room B

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. Poster Set-Up Oakleigh C

Black font indicates TNA activity/event (students are welcome to attend)

Red font indicates TNA CE activity

11


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Saturday, October 27 Activity/Event Location Contact Hours

7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Sunrise Snack Oakleigh A-B

7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. TNF Silent Auction Open Mirabella A

8:10 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Live Music by Trevor Martin Oakleigh A-B

8:30 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Membership Assembly Oakleigh A-B

10:15 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Break Foyer

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Concurrent Session A Oakleigh C 1.0 Contact Hour

Poster Presentations

Presenters will be available to answer

questions or discuss poster content

Concurrent Session B Mirabella B 1.0 Contact Hour

Effects of Bullying on Emotional

Well-Being as Described by

Non-Tenured University Faculty

Leslie Reed Brietenmoster

Concurrent Session C Mirabella D 1.0 Contact Hour

Enabling Nurse Driven

Documentation Redesign

Deborah Ariosto

11:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Transition to Lunch

11:45 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Exhibits & Schools of

Nursing Luncheon

Mirabella E-F

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Concurrent Session D Oakleigh A-B 1.0 Contact Hour

Teaching Nursing Students

How to “Care”: Mission to Haiti

Sarah Pierce

Concurrent Session E Mirabella B 1.0 Contact Hour

How Soon is Early? Implications of

Palliative Care Consultation Timing

Among A Cohort of Hospice Decedents

Samuel Robbins

Concurrent Session F Mirabella D 1.0 Contact Hour

Keeping Staff Safe in the Acute

Psychiatric/Behavioral Health Setting

Sarah Gunnin/Dixie Waye

Black font indicates TNA activity/event (students are welcome to attend)

Red font indicates TNA CE activity

13


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Saturday, October 27 Activity/Event Location Contact Hours

3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. Concurrent Session G Oakleigh A-B 1.0 Contact Hour

Evaluation of Distress Tolerance and

Treatment Retention in Women in

Recovery for Substance Use Disorders

Tamika Hudson

Concurrent Session H Mirabella B 1.0 Contact Hour

The Potential Impact of Adverse

Childhood Experiences (ACE):

Recognition and Early Intervention

Tamara Bland/Nan Gaylord

Concurrent Session I Mirabella D 1.0 Contact Hour

A Primer on Preeclampsia for

the Primary Care Provider

Diane Folk

4:15 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Break Foyer

Visit Posters for Self Study CE

Oakleigh C

4:30 p.m. Silent Auction Closes Mirabella A

4:30 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. Membership Assembly Oakleigh A-B

TNPAC Auction

5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Keynote Session Oakleigh A-B 1.0 Contact Hour

Building Compassion into Every

Day Practice: What Every Nurse

Needs to Know

Mary Jo Assi, DNP, RN, FNP-BC,

NEA-BC, FAAN

Associate Chief Nursing Officer

Press Ganey

Students Encouraged to Attend

6:45 p.m. – 7:15 p.m. TNA Achievement Awards Oakleigh A-B

7:15 p.m. – 8:45 p.m. TNA Awards Reception Mirabella E

7:15 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. TNF Silent Auction

Payment & Pick up

Mirabella A

Black font indicates TNA activity/event (students are welcome to attend)

Red font indicates TNA CE activity

15


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Sunday, October 28 Activity/Event Location Contact Hours

7:00 a.m. – 7:30 a.m. Early Morning Dance Party Private Dining B

7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Sunrise Meditation/Reflection Time Mirabella D

7:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. Visit Posters for Self Study CE Oakleigh C

7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Sunrise Snack Foyer

7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. TNA Registration Open Foyer

7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Voting for TNA Elections Mirabella B

8:15 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. First Time Attendee Debriefing Oakleigh A-B

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Concurrent Session J Oakleigh A-B 1.0 Contact Hour

Pediatric Sleep Apnea

(aka: Sleep Disorder Breathing)

Hiding Behind Common Medical

Diagnosis

Stacy Whitehead

Concurrent Session K Mirabella B 1.0 Contact Hour

Having the Conversation: Assessing

Patient’s Goals and Wishes

Michelle Rickard

Concurrent Session L Mirabella D 1.0 Contact Hour

A Step Ahead: A Unique Program

Preventing Unplanned Pregnancies

in Tennessee

Michelle R. Collins/

Jennifer Matthews/Kellie Mitchell

10:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Break Foyer

Breakdown and Remove Posters

Oakleigh C

10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. Closing Plenary Session Oakleigh A-B 1.0 Contact Hour

Errors Happen! Malpractice

Case Studies

Roxanne Filson, BBA

Nursing Service Organization

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Membership Assembly/Adjournment Oakleigh A-B

Students Encouraged to Attend

The Tennessee Nurses Association is an approved provider of continuing education by the South

Carolina Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s

Commission on Accreditation.

Black font indicates TNA activity/event (students are welcome to attend)

Red font indicates TNA CE activity

17


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Tennessee Student Nurses Association

Conference Schedule*

*Schedule subject to change without notice

Friday, October 26 Activity/Event Location Contact Hours

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Opening Session Oakleigh A-B

Compassion in Care: The Rule,

Not the Exception

Susan B. Hassmiller, RN, PhD, FAAN

Senior Advisor for Nursing

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. TSNA Board of Directors Meeting Broadlands A-B

3:00 p.m. – 5 p.m. TSNA Registration Open Foyer

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. TSNA House of Delegates Meeting Broadlands A-B

6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Welcome Reception & Exhibits Mirabella E-F

DJ & Costume Contest

Saturday, October 27

7:00 a.m. – 7:45 a.m. Early Morning Dance Party Private Dining Room B

7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Sunrise Snack Foyer

8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. TSNA Registration Open Foyer

8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. TSNA Meeting

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. NCLEX Review Part 1 Broadlands A-B

10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Poster Presentations Oakleigh C

11:45 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Exhibits & Schools of

Nursing Luncheon

Mirabella E-F

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. NCLEX Review Part 2 Broadlands A-B

3:15 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Panel of Speakers/Resume Writing Broadlands A-B

5:00 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. Break Foyer

Black font indicates TNA and TSNA activity/event

Lilac font indicates TSNA activity

19


For inquiries, visit tiny.utk.edu/tnayearbook2018


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Saturday, October 27 Activity/Event Location Contact Hours

5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Keynote Session Oakleigh A-B 1.0 Contact Hour

Building Compassion into Every

Day Practice: What Every Nurse

Needs to Know

Mary Jo Assi, DNP, RN, FNP-BC,

NEA-BC, FAAN

Associate Chief Nursing Officer

Press Ganey

6:45 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Candidate Speeches and Q&A Broadlands A-B

7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Student Outing

8:00 p.m. Voting Opens Online

Sunday, October 28

7:00 a.m. – 7:30 a.m. Early Morning Dance Party Private Dining B

7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Sunrise Meditation/Reflection Time Mirabella D

7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Sunrise Snack Foyer

9:00 a.m. Voting Closes Online

9:00 a.m. – 10 a.m. TSNA Meeting Broadlands A-B

10:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Break Foyer

10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. Closing Plenary Session Oakleigh A-B

Errors Happen! Malpractice

Case Studies

Roxanne Filson, BBA

Nursing Service Organization

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. TSNA Meeting Broadlands A-B

12:15 p.m. – 2:15 p.m. House of Delegates/

Officer Transition

Broadlands A-B

Black font indicates TNA and TSNA activity/event

Lilac font indicates TSNA activity

21


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Embassy Suites Meeting Rooms

Anatole

Room

Located in the East

Side of Hotel

Churchill

Boardroom

Wynthrope

Boardroom

The Reserve

Boardroom

Cambridge

A

Cambridge

B

Broadlands

A

Broadlands

B

Oakleigh

A

A

Mirabella Grand Ballroom

G

Oakleigh

B

B

E F

H

C

I

Oakleigh

C

D

J

22


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

General Announcements

Welcome to the 2018 TNA & TSNA Joint Conference. Please follow the conference schedule so you don’t

miss any of our planned activities, events, educational sessions or Membership Assembly meetings. Please

greet and make welcome the new members and first-time attendees to our conference. New members have

lavender ribbons and First Timers have turquoise ribbons.

Donations for the Tennessee Nurses Foundation Silent Auction can be accepted up until 11 a.m. on Saturday.

Donations can be dropped off in the Mirabella A room.

There is no assigned seating for any general sessions, plenary speakers, or the keynote held in Oakleigh

A-B, but please sit near the front of the room to make our speakers feel welcome. However, during the

Membership Assembly business sessions it is important that you sit in the designated area for TNA

members and non-members. This is necessary for voting on any issues brought forward during the

business meeting.

Not a TNA member? Join TNA now and receive $29 off your Full membership annual dues. Don’t miss out

on this opportunity to become part of the Voice for all nurses in Tennessee.

To receive the 1.0 contact hour for attending the poster presentations, you must visit ten posters. Poster

presenters will be present during Concurrent Session A on Saturday morning to answer questions or

discuss poster content. You will be able to do poster self-study during other times throughout Saturday

and Sunday morning.

Registration Hours

Friday: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Saturday: 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Sunday: 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

VOTE on Sunday

Vote Sunday morning between 7:30 – 9:00 a.m. in

Mirabella B. Election results will be announced during

the closing Membership Assembly session beginning

at 11:30 a.m.

23


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Meet the Keynote and Plenary Speakers

Friday

Opening Plenary Speaker

Susan B. Hassmiller, RN, PhD, FAAN

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m

Saturday

Keynote Speaker

Susan Hassmiller is the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Senior Advisor for

Nursing. In partnership with AARP, Hassmiller also directs the Foundation’s Future of

Nursing: Campaign for Action. This 50-state and District of Columbia effort strives to

implement the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine’s report on the Future

of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health and will additionally seek to build a

Culture of Health. Hassmiller served as the report’s study director. She is also serving

as Co-Director of the Future of Nursing Scholars program. Sue will share with us her

first-hand experiences with the current healthcare system.

Mary Jo Assi, DNP, RN, FNP-BC, NEA-BC, FAAN

5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m

Mary Jo Assi is the Associate Chief Nursing Officer for Press Ganey. Mary Jo Assi leads

strategies for strengthening caregiver resilience and engagement, reducing patient

suffering and delivering compassionate, connected care. Mary Jo will share highlights

from the November 2017 book by Christina Dempsey, chief nursing officer for Press

Ganey, The Antidote to Suffering: How Compassionate Connected Care Can Improve

Safety, Quality, and Experience.

Sunday

Closing Plenary Speaker

Roxanne Filson, BBA

10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Roxanne Filson is an Account Executive in the Healthcare Division of Aon’s Affinity

Insurance Services Inc. Roxanne works with over 30 national, state, and specialty

healthcare professional organizations as Affinity Insurance Services’ primary day-today

contact. Roxanne has been part of the Affinity team for five years and frequently

presents at professional organization meetings on healthcare risk management and

other insurance-related topics. Errors Happen! Malpractice Case Studies will be a

review of the nature of claims, injuries and outcomes from both a risk and a fiscal

perspective. Roxanne will also review claim scenarios as a didactic tool with a focus

on risk management. Roxanne graduated with a Bachelor of Business Administration

degree in International Business and is currently enrolled at Colorado State University

to obtain her M.B.A.

25


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Saturday

2018 Presenters

Effects of Bullying on Emotional Well-Being as Described

by Non-Tenured University Faculty

Presenter: Dr. Leslie Reed Brietenmoser, PhD, MSN, RN,

AHN-BC, ADS, CHT, CCAP, CMTP, HTPA

Associate Professor

School of Nursing

Austin Peay State University

Enabling Nurse Driven Documentation Redesign

Presenter: Deborah Ariosto, PhD, RN-BC

Director, Nursing Analytics

Patient Care Informatics

Clinical Assistant Professor,

School of Nursing

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Teaching Nursing Students How to “Care”: Mission to Haiti

Presenter: Sarah Pierce, DNP, AGACNP-BC, CCRN, PLNC

Assistant Professor of Nursing

Freed Hardeman University

27


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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

How Soon is Early? Implications of Palliative Care Consultation

Timing Among A Cohort of Hospice Decedents

Presenter: Sam Robbins, DNP ACHPN

Assistant in Medicine

Outpatient Palliative Care

Palliative Care and Internal Medicine

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Keeping Staff Safe in the Acute Psychiatric/Behavioral Health Setting

Presenter: Sarah Gunnin, BSN, RN

Nurse Manager

Poplar Unit

Woodridge Psychiatric Hospital

Co-Presenter: Dixie Waye, RN

Nurse Manager

Spruce/Willow Units

Evaluation of Distress Tolerance and Treatment Retention in

Women in Recovery for Substance Use Disorders

Presenter: Tamika S. Hudson, DNP, APRN, FNP-C

Instructor in Nursing

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing

Nursing Director

Vanderbilt Program in Interprofessional Learning

29


TENNESSEE CENTER FOR HEALTH

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

WE CARE ABOUT NURSING

Faculty approaching

retirement

Inadequate faculty

compensation

No clear educational path

to academia

Lack of clinical instruction

sites

Insufficient simulation

facilities

Poor work-life balance

Generational differences

Compassion fatigue

We take a collaborative approach to issues in the nursing field. Applying the principles of

community impact, we work with CNOs, deans, directors, employers, students and professionals

to address these challenges and remove barriers that limit growth.


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

The Potential Impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE):

Recognition and Early Intervention

Presenter: Tami Bland, DNP, CPNP-PC

Coordinator, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, College of Nursing

Co-Presenter: Nan Gaylord, PhD, RN, CPNP-PC, PMHS, FAANP, FAAN

Professor

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville,

College of Nursing

A Primer on Preeclampsia for the Primary Care Provider

Presenter: Diane Folk, DNP, CNM, NP

Faculty Nurse Midwifery Education Program

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing

Sunday

Pediatric Sleep Apnea (aka: Sleep Disorder Breathing)

Hiding Behind Common Medical Diagnosis

Presenter: Stacy Whitehead, DNP, APRN, FNP-C

Nurse Practitioner

Cardiology Center of Dalton

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Having the Conversation: Assessing Patient’s Goals and Wishes

Presenter: Michelle Rickard, DNP, CPNP-AC, CHPPN, BMTCN

Assistant Professor

University of Tennessee Health Science Center

Coordinator of Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Option

A Step Ahead; a Unique Program Preventing Unplanned Pregnancies in Tennessee

Presenter: Michelle Collins, Ph.D, CNM, FACNM, FAAN

Professor, Program Director

Nurse-Midwifery Education Program

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing

Co-Presenter: Jennifer Matthews

Executive Director

A Step Ahead Foundation of Middle Tennessee

Co-Presenter: Kellie Mitchell, MPH, CHES

Director of Strategic and Affiliate Operations

A Step Ahead Foundation of Middle Tennessee

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

2018 TNA District Basket

Challenge and Auction

REMINDER: All Proceeds Benefit TNPAC

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Southwest: Your Best Choice for Nursing

Your Success Starts Here!

(901) 333-5425

www.southwest.tn.edu/nursing

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Thanks to the following for their

contributions and support!

Sharon Adkins

Michelle Arwood

Patricia Baise

Diana Baker

Michelle Baldwin

Bonnie Black

Jean Blackburn

Loretta Bond

Cynthia Borum

Mary Lynn Brown

Diane Campbell

Deb Chyka

Donna Copenhaver

Patsy Crithfield

Gary Crotty

William Crowe

Diane Cunningham

Patricia Cunningham

Peggy Davis

Jehan Ellis

Chita Farrar

Linda Foster

Tina Gerardi

Mary Bess Griffith

Derenda Hodge

Alvin Jeffrey

Jennifer Kitkowski

Kathleen Jones

Holly Kimbrell

Carla Kirkland

Cheryl Leonard

Angela Lunsford

Virginia Massey Holt

Connie McCarter

Cathy McKinney

Middle TN APRN

Erin Morgan

Sandy Murabito

Carole Myers

Allyson Neal

Diane Pace

Dara Rogers

Christi Schrotberger

Erin Shankel

Tracey Stansberry

Deborah Sullivan

Cathy Taylor

TN ACNM Affiliate

Haley Vance

Aaron Valasquez

Raven Wentworth

West TN NPs

Tracy Wilson

ALL TNA DISTRICTS

October 2017 - September 2018

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WHY IS TNPAC

IMPORTANT?

Nurses, the largest group of

health care professionals,

need legislative support and

a strong professional voice

to ensure a quality practice

environment and excellent

health care for patients.

Joining our efforts with other

nurses through the Tennessee

Nurses Association and TNPAC

contributions, nurses can make

the difference in important

health care decisions.

WHY CONTRIBUTE

TO TNPAC?

When Tennessee politicians

gather to make decisions

about nursing and health care,

it’s important they hear from

the experts - Tennessee’s

nurses. What’s the best way to

get their attention? Through

the Tennessee Nurses Political

Action Committee

(TNPAC).

WHAT ARE THE

BENEFITS?

When you contribute to

TNPAC, your funds are used

to support the election of

state legislative candidates

who support nursing and

quality, cost-effective health

care. TNPAC’s support is

given regardless of political

affilliation, and instead, focuses

on improving health care.

TNPAC POLICIES

When selecting candidates/legislators for financial

support, TNPAC considers the following criteria,

regardless of political party.

Candidate profile and background

Dynamics of a political race

Leadership position in a political party

Political potential

Leadership position in the Legislature

Committee assignments and/

or chairmanships

Sponsorship or co-sponsorship

of key legislation

Voting records on issues of concern

to nurses and consumers

Working relationships with

nurse constituents

TNA Lobbyist recommendations

For additional information, call of write to: Tennessee Nurses Political Action Committee

545 Mainstream Drive, Suite 405 Nashville, TN 37228-1296 • Phone 615.254.0350 • www.tnaonline.org

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

2018 TNPAC GUBERNATORIAL

AND LEGISLATIVE FORUM INVITEES

Karl Dean

Bill Lee

Candidate for Governor

Candidate for Governor

Kelly Northcutt Candidate for Senate District 13

Dawn White Candidate for Senate District 13

Katrina Robinson Candidate for Senate District 33

Gloria Johnson Candidate for House District 13

Rep. Eddie Smith Candidate for House District 13

Jean Marie Lawrence Candidate for House District 26

Robin Smith Candidate for House District 26

Esther Helton Candidate for House District 30

Joda Thongnopnua Candidate for House District 30

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

2018 Membership Assembly Rules & Information

Membership Assembly (MA) General Rules of Order

1. All TNA members may speak. Before addressing the MA, it is necessary to secure the floor by going to a

nearby microphone. After recognition by the President, the member shall state his or her name and district

before speaking.

2. Any TNA member may make motions.

3. All motions shall be presented to the President in writing on the forms provided.

4. TNA members shall be limited to three minutes when speaking.

5. No member who has already had the floor in debate on the immediate pending question shall be entitled to

the floor a second time until others who wish to be heard on the question have had an opportunity to speak.

6. The voting body shall consist of the Board of Directors, and TNA members in attendance.

7. Only the resolves of resolutions/proposals shall be acted upon by the MA.

8. The President may suspend the Rules in order to allow a nonmember to speak.

9. All cell phones, pagers and other devices shall be silenced throughout meetings during MA.

Guidelines for Discussion on Resolutions/Proposals

1. To facilitate discussion, comments will be limited to three minutes, and no member may speak more than

once to a question if someone who has not spoken wishes to do so.

2. Individuals who suggest substantial changes in the wording of any proposal are asked to submit those

changes in writing before the hearing is adjourned.

3. Sponsors or the Reference Committee may perfect the resolution/proposal for presentation to the MA

after completion of the hearings.

4. The sponsor may withdraw a resolution/proposal at any point in the review process.

5. Only the resolves of resolutions/proposals shall be acted upon by the MA.

Continuing Nursing Education (CNE) Credit

RN participants attending CE sessions will be awarded contact hours. The procedure is as follows:

1. Complete the CNE Evaluation and leave it in the tray at the registration desk before you leave.

2. Complete an Attendance Verification of CNE Activity listing the sessions you attend. Participants

must attend an entire CNE session to receive credit.

3. Detach the yellow copy of the Attendance Verification form and leave it in the tray at the registration desk.

4. Retain the white copy for your professional portfolio.

Registration

Friday

Saturday

Sunday:

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

7:30a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Conference Badges

All meetings of the conference are open to registered participants. Badges must be worn to gain admission

to all sessions and activities. Exclusive of invited guests, attendance at any meeting other than the Awards

Reception, Welcome Reception or School of Nurses Luncheon requires the payment of at least one day’s

registration.

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

110th Membership Assembly

October 26-28, 2018, Embassy Suites SE, Murfreesboro, TN

Friday, October 26, 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Call to Order and Pledge of Allegiance – Haley Vance, TNA President

Greetings – Haley Vance

Greetings – Kamiko Richey, TSNA President

Recognition of members or those with family members in the Armed Forces – Haley Vance

Introduction of Reference Committee – Alvin Jeffery, Chair

Adoption of the Membership Assembly Agenda – Haley Vance

Adoption of Rules of Order – Donna Copenhaver, TNA Secretary

Treasurer’s Report – Mary Bess Griffith, TNA Treasurer

Nightingale Tribute/Moment of Silence – Le-Kenya Kellum, TNA Vice President

Slate of Candidates/Nominations – Diane Butler, Nominating Committee Chair

Candidate Statements

Announcements – Tina Gerardi, TNA Executive Director

Recess – Haley Vance

Saturday, October 27, 8:30 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

Call to Order – Haley Vance

Singing of The National Anthem – Trevor Martin

Introduction of Parliamentarian – Haley Vance

Updates on 2017 Resolutions – Haley Vance

Introduction of 2018 Resolutions – Alvin Jeffery

Introduction of Staff – Tina Gerardi

Executive Director Remarks – Tina Gerardi

Announcements – Tina Gerardi

Recess – Haley Vance

Saturday, October 27, 4:30 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

Call to Order – Haley Vance

Ongoing Resolutions – Alvin Jeffery

Recess – Haley Vance

TNPAC Auction – Sharon Adkins

Sunday, October 28, 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Call to Order – Haley Vance

Unfinished Business – Haley Vance

President’s Address – Haley Vance

Report of Tellers – Diane Butler

Introduction of New Board Members – Haley Vance

Board of Directors Oath of Office – Tina Gerardi

Announcements, PAC and TNF Contributions – Tina Gerardi

Adjournment – Haley Vance

SEE YOU IN MEMPHIS, OCTOBER 18-20, 2019

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Disclosures to Participants

Outcome

Participants will gain knowledge and new tools to integrate into their practice.

Contact Hour Credit

Participants at the 2018 TNA & TSNA Joint Conference can earn a maximum of 10-11 contact

hours for attending.

Official Accreditation Statement

The Tennessee Nurses Association is an approved provider of continuing nursing education by South

Carolina Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s

Commission on Accreditation.

Requirements for Successful Completion for Continuing Education Credit

To receive contact hour credit for each session attended, attendees must

• Visit at least ten posters

• Be seated in the session room no later than five minutes after it has started.

• Remain in the session until the scheduled ending time.

• Complete and submit the Evaluation Form(s) and the Verification of Attendance/Certificate

Form listing each session attended. Turn in the yellow copy before you leave the conference.

Conflicts of Interest

The ANCC has established guidelines whereby all speakers must disclose any affiliations which may

cause a conflict of interest.

A Conflict of Interest occurs when an individual has an opportunity to affect educational content about

health-care products or services of a commercial interest with which she/he has a financial relationship.

No conflicts of interest were disclosed.

Commercial Support

Sponsors have made contributions to Tennessee Nurses Association in support of the 2018 TNA & TSNA

Joint Conference. See handout included in the conference packet for a final list.

Non-Endorsement of Products

The Tennessee Nurses Association’s approved provider status refers only to continuing nursing education

activities and does not imply that there is real or implied endorsement of any product, service, or company

referred to in this activity nor of any company subsidizing costs related to the activity.

Off-label Product Use

This CNE activity does not include any unannounced information about off-label use of a product for a

purpose other than that for which it was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Introduction to Robert’s Rules of Order

What Is Parliamentary Procedure?

It is a set of rules for conduct at meetings that allows everyone to be heard and to make decisions without

confusion.

Why is Parliamentary Procedure Important?

Because it’s a time tested method of conducting business at meetings and public gatherings. It can be

adapted to fit the needs of any organization. Today, Robert’s Rules of Order newly revised is the basic

handbook of operation for most clubs, organizations and other groups. So it’s important that everyone

know these basic rules!

Organizations using parliamentary procedure usually follow a fixed order of business.

Below is a typical example:

1. Call to order.

2. Roll call of members present.

3. Reading of minutes of last meeting.

4. Officers reports.

5. Committee reports.

6. Special orders – Important business previously designated for consideration at this meeting.

7. Unfinished business.

8. New business.

9. Announcements.

10. Adjournment.

The method used by members to express themselves is in the form of moving motions. A motion is a

proposal that the entire membership take action or a stand on an issue. Individual members can:

1. Call to order.

2. Second motions.

3. Debate motions.

4. Vote on motions.

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

There are four Basic Types of Motions:

1. Main Motions: The purpose of a main motion is to introduce items to the membership for their

consideration. They cannot be made when any other motion is on the floor, and yield to privileged,

subsidiary, and incidental motions.

2. Subsidiary Motions: Their purpose is to change or affect how a main motion is handled, and is voted

on before a main motion.

3. Privileged Motions: Their purpose is to bring up items that are urgent about special or important

matters unrelated to pending business.

4. Incidental Motions: Their purpose is to provide a means of questioning procedure concerning other

motions and must be considered before the other motion.

How are Motions Presented?

1. Obtaining the floor

a. Wait until the last speaker has finished.

b. Rise and wait in line at microphone.

c. Wait until the Chairman recognizes you.

2. Make Your Motion

a. Speak in a clear and concise manner.

b. Always state a motion affirmatively. Say, “I move that we ...” rather than,

“I move that we do not ...”.

c. Avoid personalities and stay on your subject.

3. Wait for Someone to Second Your Motion

4. Another member will second your motion or the Chairman will call for a second.

5. If there is no second, your motion is lost.

6. The Chairman States Your Motion

a. The Chairman will say, “it has been moved and seconded that we ...” Thus placing your motion

before the membership for consideration and action.

b. The membership then either debates your motion, or may move directly to a vote.

c. Once your motion is presented to the membership by the chairman it becomes “assembly

property”, and cannot be changed by you without the consent of the members.

7. Expanding on Your Motion

a. The time for you to speak in favor of your motion is at this point in time, rather than at

the time you present it.

b. The mover is always allowed to speak first.

c. All comments and debate must be directed to the chairman.

d. Keep to the time limit for speaking that has been established.

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

e. The mover may speak again only after other speakers are finished, unless called upon

by the Chairman.

8. Putting the Question to the Membership

a. The Chairman asks, “Are you ready to vote on the question?”

b. If there is no more discussion, a vote is taken.

c. On a motion to move the previous question may be adapted.

Voting on a Motion:

The method of vote on any motion depends on the situation and the by-laws of policy of your

organization. There are five methods used to vote by most organizations, they are:

1. By Voice – The Chairman asks those in favor to say, “aye”, those opposed to say “no”. Any member

may move for an exact count.

2. By Roll Call – Each member answers “yes” or “no” as his name is called. This method is used when a

record of each person’s vote is required.

3. By General Consent – When a motion is not likely to be opposed, the Chairman says, “if there is no

objection ...” The membership shows agreement by their silence, however if one member says, “I

object,” the item must be put to a vote.

4. By Division – This is a slight verification of a voice vote. It does not require a count unless the chairman

so desires. Members raise their hands or stand.

5. By Ballot – Members write their vote on a slip of paper; this method is used when secrecy is desired.

There are two other motions that are commonly used that relate to voting.

1. Motion to Table – This motion is often used in the attempt to “kill” a motion. The option is always

present, however, to “take from the table”, for reconsideration by the membership.

2. Motion to Postpone Indefinitely – This is often used as a means of parliamentary strategy and allows

opponents of motion to test their strength without an actual vote being taken. Also, debate is once

again open on the main motion.

Parliamentary Procedure is the best way to get things done at your meetings.

But, it will only work if you use it properly.

1. Allow motions that are in order.

2. Have members obtain the floor properly.

3. Speak clearly and concisely.

4. Obey the rules of debate.

Most importantly, BE COURTEOUS.

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

2015-2017 Legislative and

Healthy Policy Statements

Introduction: The Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) is the professional association representing

Tennessee’s approximately 100,000 registered nurses. This position paper outlines the basic philosophy of

the TNA’s Membership Assembly relative to health care policy which may be addressed by the Tennessee

General Assembly and the U.S. Congress.

Mission: To improve health and health care for all Tennesseans and residents of the state, advance nurse

leaders and the practice of nursing as essential to improvement efforts and transformational change, and

serve as the voice for professional nurses.

The American Nurses Association’s Code of Ethics outlines foundational provisions that

frame TNA’s initiatives and actions.

Vision: TNA supports a transformed health care delivery system that ensures that all Tennesseans and

residents of the state are able to access equitable and affordable essential services when and where they

need them. The transformed system envisioned by TNA is patient-centered, promotes inter-professional

collaboration and care coordination to improve patient outcomes and experiences, primary care and

prevention are priorities, value is emphasized, and there is expanded use of information technology to

promote efficiency and effectiveness.

Goals: TNA is supportive of initiatives that improve health and health care and advance the following goals:

Optimal health system performance, including:

Improved patient care experiences;

Improved population health; and

Reduced per capita cost for health care.

Access to high-quality, affordable and acceptable care for all Tennesseans and residents of the state,

including:

Provision of a standardized package of essential health care services provided and financed by public and

private plans with protection against catastrophic costs and impoverishment; and

Direct access to a full range of professional registered nurses and other qualified providers in a variety of

settings

Full practice authority and enhanced participation in the delivery of care and policymaking for all

professional nurses, including:

Support for the Tennessee Board of Nursing as the sole regulatory authority over nursing education and

practice;

Adoption of the Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, and

Education (2008);

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Elimination of financial, regulatory, organizational, and institutional barriers to the practice of professional

nursing;

Participation of registered nurses on all local, state, and national health care advisory, policymaking, and

governing boards, committees, and task forces; and

Inclusion of APRNs as licensed independent providers (LIPs) in hospital licensure rules, health plans, and

health care facilities.

Assuring an adequate, competent and diverse nursing workforce to meet current and projected health

care demands, including:

Improved data collection and information infrastructure to inform policymaking, planning, and evaluation;

Promotion of higher levels of education and training through seamless academic progression,

inter-professional education of health professionals, and lifelong learning;

Funding for nursing students and faculty, including loan forgiveness programs; and

Support for nurse safety in the patient care environment, staffing effectiveness plans,

whistleblower protection, and bans on mandatory overtime.

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Special THANKS to our Sponsors and Exhibitors

(At Press Time)

The Tennessee Nurses Association expresses sincere and heartfelt thanks to all Sponsors and

Exhibitors for your support in helping make the 2018 Annual Conference a huge success.

Silver Sponsorship

Bronze Sponsorship

Schools of Nursing

Luncheon Sponsors

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Exhibitors

A Secret Safe Place for Newborns of Tennessee

Arkansas State University

Becker Professional Education

Bradford Health Sciences

Chamberlain College of Nursing

Erlanger Health System

HCA Healthcare Tristar Residency

Hurst Review Services

Innovated Financial Group

Jaci’s Jewels

Kaplan Nursing

NSO Professional Insurance

Saint Thomas Health

Southern New Hampshire University

Sprint

Tenet Healthcare

TN Professional Assistance Program (TnPAP)

UWorld

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

University of Tennessee - College of Nursing Knoxville

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing

VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System & Memphis VA

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

In Memoriam

T he Tennessee Nurses Association would like to pay tribute to all of the TNA members

who gave their devotion and dedicated their lives in service as a registered nurse. Each one is

loved by family, friends and peers. Listed below are TNA members who passed away this year.

If you know of others, please contact TNA.

Ernestine Chism, MSN, RN

Virginia Maxwell George, MSN, RN, MA

Beverly E. Skipper, MSN, RN

Deborah Lynn Sweeney, DNSc, RN

Victoria A. Whitehead, MSN, RN

The Nightingale Tribute Reading

Nursing is a calling, a lifestyle, a way of living.

Nurses here today honor those who have passed on

and their life as a nurse.

They are not remembered by their years as a nurse,

but by the difference they made during those years

by stepping into people’s lives... by special moments.


TheyWere There

When a calming, quiet presence was all that was needed,

She was there.

In the excitement and miracle of birth or in the mystery and loss of life,

He was there.

When a silent glance could uplift a patient, family member or friend,

She was there.

At those times when the unexplainable needed to be explained,

He was there.

When the situation demanded a swift foot and sharp mind,

She was there.

When a gentle touch, a firm push, or an encouraging word was needed,

He was there.

In choosing the best one from a family’s “Thank You” box of chocolates,

She was there.

To witness humanity, its beauty, in good times and bad, without judgment,

He was there.

To embrace the woes of the world, willingly, and offer hope,

She was there.

And now, that it is time to be at the Greater One’s side,

They are there.


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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Inspire!

Add value and credibility to your educational activities! Apply for individual activity approval today.

Innovate!

Does your organization offer multiple educational activities for nurses? Become an approved Continuing

Nursing Education Provider Unit.

Influence!

Use your nursing expertise as a volunteer Peer Nurse Reviewer assisting TNA to approve high quality

educational activities. Training is free and review assignments are customized to fit your schedule.

Stop by the TNA Continuing Nursing Education table for more information or contact Sharon Hinton,

tna.cne@tnaonline.org. Visit our website https://www.tnaonline.org/continuing-education-general-information/

The Tennessee Nurses Association is accredited as an approver of continuing nursing education by the

American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

TNA Board of Directors and Staff

Haley Vance

DNP, APRN, CPNP-AC

President

Nashville

Sandy Murabito

MSN, Ed.D, RN

Past-President

Nashville

La-Kenya Kellum

DNP, RN, NE-BC,

CNML

Vice President

Memphis

Donna Copenhaver

EdD, MSN, RN

Secretary

Eagleville

Mary Bess Griffith

MSN, RN, CS, FNP

Treasurer

Union City

Trish Baise

DNP, RN, NEA-

BC, FACHE

Director - Operations

Kingsport

Allyson Neal,

DNP, APRN, PMHNP-BC,

CNS-BC, CPNP

Director - Membership

Sevierville

Jenny Webb

PhD(c), MSN, RN, CNE

Director - Education

Humboldt

Loretta Bond

PhD, RN, CNE

Director -

Government Affairs

Antioch

Laura Reed

DNP, APRN, FNP-BC

Director - Practice

Olive Branch, MS

Deb Chyka

DNP, RN

Representative –

Presidents Council

Knoxville

TNA Staff

Tina Gerardi

MS, RN, CAE

Executive Director

Diane

Cunningham

Office Manager

Wilhelmina Davis

Manager of

Government

Affairs/Lobbyist

Kathryn Denton

Manager of Marketing,

Member Services/IT

Managing Editor -

Tennessee Nurse

Sharon Hinton,

RN-BC, MSN,

DMin

Nurse Peer Review

Leader

Anne Mitchell

Membership &

Administrative Support

Tracy Depp

Communications

Consultant

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Tennessee Nurses Association

2018 Slate of Candidates and Statements

President Elect – vote for one (1)

Carla Kirkland, MSN, APRN, ACNP-BC, FNP-BC, ENP-BC

District 1

Nurse Practitioner

ApolloMD, St. Francis Memphis Emergency Department

Collierville

I have served as a Director, President-Elect, and President of Tennessee Nurses Association District

1 (Shelby/Fayette Counties). In those roles I have worked to increase educational and networking

opportunities for our nurses, and to educate the community regarding nurses in District 1. Since becoming

President of District 1, I have regularly attended the state TNA Board meetings, gaining an understanding of

policies and concerns at the state level.

I have served TNA as a member of the Government Affairs Committee for 3 years, Convention Planning

Committee for 3 years, and was on the recent Executive Director Search Committee. I am Co-Chair of the

TNA APRN Task Force. I am also a TNA Representative for the Coalition for Access to Care. I have been a

Nurse Practitioner for 18 years, initially in Primary Care, and now in Emergency Medicine. I am excited about

working with APRN groups, RNs, and other stakeholders around the state, so that together we can obtain

Full Practice Authority for Tennessee.

I am comfortable with, and enjoy, meeting with our legislators and other elected officials, promoting the

nursing profession and improved access to affordable, quality health care for all Tennesseans. I would love

to work with TNA at a higher level to support our professional nurses and work for improved health care in

our state. I have worked very hard as President of District 1, and would carry that same energy and passion

to the role of TNA President Elect.

Slate continued on next page.

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Vice President – vote for one (1)

William Crowe, Jr, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, ACNP-BC, FHM, FACHE

District 4

Assistant Vice President

Erlanger Health System

Chattanooga

Currently, I am the Assistant Vice President for the Medicine Service Line and Nursing Services at Erlanger

Health System in Chattanooga, Tennessee, an academic medical center, level 1 trauma center, and regional

referral center affiliated with the University of Tennessee College of Medicine. Erlanger is the nation’s

seventh largest public health system.

For the system, I oversee the adult hospitalist program at five facilities, pulmonary critical care, advanced

practice, nursing professional development, and nursing research. With over 37 years of experience in

healthcare and over 30 years of experience as a nurse, my experience spans a variety of settings including

flight nursing, the Emergency Department, critical care, administration, quality, research, education, and

advanced practice. I am also an experienced EMS clinician providing care both on the ground for a large

inner city 911 system and in the air as part of an air medical evacuation crew.

I have an undergraduate degree from Georgia State University, a Masters degree as an Acute Care Nurse

Practitioner from Southern Adventist University, a Post Masters Certificate as a Family Nurse Practitioner

from Southern Adventist University, and a doctorate from the University of South Alabama.

In addition to my full time responsibilities at Erlanger, I also serve as a Clinical Instructor for the University of

Tennessee College of Medicine, Coordinator/Assistant Professor of the AG-ACNP Program at the University

of Tennessee at Chattanooga, and I find time for clinical practice in the Emergency Department. I have also

been elected to the Board of Directors for the Fourth District of the Tennessee Nurses Association, and I am

the Chattanooga Council President of TONE.

My research interests include topics in quality, patient flow, resident education, and multidisciplinary

rounding. I have presented locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally.

As a new nurse back in 1988, I was active in the state nursing association. I was in Georgia at the time. As

my career progressed and life became more hectic, I became dormant in the group. With age comes some

wisdom and while I have always thought active membership in the state nursing association was important,

only over the last decade or so have I realized the real importance and value of membership. With the

recent veterinary nurse bill that floated through the legislature and the attempts last year to limit the scope

of practice of advanced practice registered nurses, the nurses of Tennessee must band together and have

strong leaders and representation in order to advance the profession. I have served on the District Four

Board of Directors, and have filled the position of Vice President when our Vice President unexpectedly

took the President position. Now, I would like to represent the entire state as the Vice President of TNA.

My diverse involvement with nursing (hospital, university, District 4, Tennessee Organization of Nurse

Executives, both registered nurse and advanced practice registered nurse, administration) makes me

an excellent choice for the role of Vice President. If elected, it would be my pleasure to represent all of

Tennessee’s nurses.

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Julie Hamm, BSN, MSN, ACNP-BC

District 3

Manager: VPEC, Weight Loss Center & Interventional Pain

Vanderbilt Medical Center

Hermitage

I have served on the board before. I have served on the nominating committee and as Secretary. I am

interested in serving again. I was a productive member of the board and worked closely with many of the

current board members in the past, including Jill Kinch and Haley Vance. I hope you would consider me for

serving again.

Treasurer – vote for one (1)

Heather Jackson, MSN, RN, FNP-BC

District 3

Assistant Director Outpatient Surgery, Interventional Pain Advance Practice Team Lead

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Franklin

I am currently attending the Medical University of South Carolina in pursuit of my PhD and have become

very passionate about political involvement in my studies. Currently, I am practicing at Vanderbilt University

Medical Center as a nurse practitioner in the Interventional Pain Center as well as Assistant Director for

Outpatient Surgery. I believe I may greatly contribute to the mission of TNA and would like to be a part of

your team.

Director – Membership – vote for one (1)

Marcia (Spear) Barnes, DNP, APRN, ACNP-BC

District 15

Assistant Professor

Jeanette C. Rudy School of Nursing and Health Professions

Cumberland University

I have been active in my specialty organization for many years serving on numerous committees as both

members and chair. I have held board positions including Director, President Elect, and President. As I have

transitioned into academia, I wish to be involved more generally in the nursing profession and in nursing’s

professional organization. I am hardworking, ethical, honest and devoted to the nursing profession. I am

committed to projects and service opportunities that I undertake and see them through to fruition with

pride and a sense of accomplishment. I currently serve as faculty advisor for the Student Nurses Association

at Cumberland and want to instill the importance early of our professional obligations as nurses to belong

our nursing professional organization and participate in the voice of nursing.

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Tracy M. Collins, DNP, FNP-BC

District 1

Clinical Associate Professor

University of Memphis Loewenberg College of Nrusing

Memphis

It is my desire to serve as the Director-Membership for Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA). In my role of

Clinical Associate Professor for the University of Memphis Loewenberg College of Nursing (UofM LCON),

my responsibilities include providing support for students and promoting evidence-based practices to

educate undergraduate and graduate nurses. I collaborate with faculty and the leadership team to help

identify faculty development needs and instructional support. I work with the director of the Family Nurse

Practitioner (FNP) program by planning events for the next semester, implementing innovative nursing

ideas, and evaluation of students and preceptors. I also help gather relevant data for continuous quality

improvement to comply with accreditation standards and regulatory requirements.

I start each semester at the UofM LCON by helping to revise and update courses. I serve as the coordinator

for online and hybrid courses. My service to UofM LCON includes the graduate council, curriculum task

force and evaluations committee. I operate as the clinical placement coordinator in the LCON Family

Practitioner program and TN eCampus. I help facilitate LCON simulation activities as students come to the

campus for clinical activities, lab symposiums and evaluations of their clinical skills several times throughout

each semester. I am respectful, kind, accountable, and exhibit a very high level of patience, integrity and

understanding. I model great communication skills and approachability to others. I am connected to the

community and healthcare institutions, as well as the academic domain.

As an informed and innovative nursing educator and advocate, this opportunity will heighten my skills as

a practicing FNP and member of TNA. By serving as the next Director of Membership, I can offer effective

leadership skills to accommodate the diverse population TNA encounters daily and better serve my community.

Slate continued on next page.

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Director – Education – vote for one (1)

Dana Ragle, MSN, RN

District 9

Nursing Educator

TCAT Crossville

Crossville

I love my home state of TN, I love being a nurse and I especially love teaching others to be the best nurse

they can be. To be able to help with nursing education protocols for our state would be and honor. I have

been a RN for almost 13 years but have worked in healthcare since I was 18. Since receiving my licensure, I

have worked med-surg, homecare, hospice, Labor room, newborn nursery and postpartum. Turns out my

true love is nursing education for which I have earned my MSN, RN earlier this year. I am currently worked

on a MBA in nursing management with plans to work for my PhD in nursing philosophy.

Nancy Stevens, DNP, APRN-BC, CEN TRN-C, FAEN

District 04

Clinical Resource Specialist - APN

Erlanger Health System

Ooltewah

Served as the Director of Clinical Education for Erlanger Health System and was responsible for the clinical

nursing staff education across the enterprise, which consisted of a Level 1 Trauma Center, and 4 satellite

facilities. Responsible for overall program development, administration, and implementation of the all

education programs for nursing clinical staff. Collaborated with the Nursing Administration, Physicians and

other nursing leaders to develop and oversee implementation of educational programs including employee

assessments of educational needs. Served as a key liaison between nursing, medical staff, students, and

educational partners. Worked closely with organizational development to assure appropriate orientation for

all nursing clinical staff. Additionally was responsible for review, reorganization and implementation of clinical

educational programs for the enterprise as needs arose. Responsible for the orientation and staff training

highlighting process and learning opportunities, in addition to planning and directing regular meetings with

staff. Responsible for student placement at all of Erlanger facilities assuring a positive learning environment.

At the present time, as a clinical resource specialists, Advanced Practice Nurse, and representative of

Erlanger, coordinate and instruct in a transitional program for LPN to RN association degree program,

in addition to continuing responsibilities in the Department of Education at Erlanger Health System.

Additionally work as a practicing nurse practitioner in the Emergency Department.

Served as the Clinical Coordinator for all educational programs for the Level 1 Trauma Center and 3 additional

Emergency Departments across the enterprise. Worked with bedside nurses, physicians and administration

to develop and implement educational programs in addition to development of orientation process of all new

employees to the Emergency Services Division. Foster the educational experience via hands-on developmentally

appropriate and highly interactive methods to enhance nursing and student learning. Was responsible for hiring

and supervising additional education coordinators for the enterprise. Provide performance evaluation and

feedback for all activity and group leader positions within the educational program.

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Susan Thul, DNP, APRN, CNM

District 4

Assistant Professor, School of Nursing

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, School of Nursing

Ooltewah

I am an Assistant Professor of Nursing at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga’s (UTC) School of

Nursing. I have worked in this role since 2013 and teach in the Doctor of Nursing Practice and Family Nurse

Practitioner and Nurse Anesthesia programs. I am a retired U.S. Navy Nurse and Certified Nurse Midwife.

My clinical areas of expertise include women’s health and vulnerable populations, with an interest in caring

for “at-risk” populations. Prior to moving to Tennessee, I served as the Director of Perinatal Outreach for

the Medical University of South Carolina where I developed a care delivery model spanning three counties,

providing perinatal care supporting approximately 500 deliveries annually for women at risk in the low

country region of South Carolina. My doctoral work focused on the development of entrepreneurial training

for advanced practice nurses, including nurse midwives, in the primary care setting. My Navy tenure

culminated in assignment as the Director of Quality Improvement for the Naval Hospitals in the Southeast

Region. During that time, I developed several quality improvement initiatives ultimately cited by the Joint

Commission as benchmarks for improvement practice.

I am a member of the American Nurses Association, The American College of Nurse Midwives (ACNM), The

Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) and the TN affiliate for the ACNM. I would appreciate the opportunity

to serve the TNA as the Director of Education, as I believe educated and informed nurses are powerful

nurses. I am a believer in full practice authority and would like to use my experience and passion to further

that agenda. We, as nurses, face challenges in the state of TN and I would like to be part of the solution to

those challenges. Thank you!

Slate continued on next page.

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Nominating Committee – vote for two (2)

Donna Fraysier, DNP, MSN, APN, ACNS-BC, NEA-BC, CDE

District 05

Assistant Professor

East Tennessee State University

Kingsport

I am interested in serving on the TNA board in order to become more involved. Healthcare in our country is ever

changing, and nurses are in a great position to lead that change. However, to lead change nurses must stand

strong together, united in purpose. I have been a nurse for more than 20 years, and I have worked in academia

for more than five years. I am an APN, and I have a DNP in Executive Leadership. I hold two certifications from

ANCC: Adult Health Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Executive Advanced. Currently, I am the Concentration

Coordinator for the MSN- Nursing Administration and DNP- Executive Leadership concentrations at East

Tennessee State University. I have served on the board of the Epsilon Sigma at Large Chapter of Sigma Theta

Tau for nearly five years. If elected to serve on the TNA board I will serve to the best of my ability. My education

and background in nursing leadership has prepared me to serve in a TNA board position.

Shelley Hawkins, PhD, APRN-BC, FAANP

District 1

Professor & Executive Associate Dean of Academic Affairs

UTHSC College of Nursing

Germantown

I have been a Registered Nurse for more than 35 years and an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse for

more than 20 years. In 1987, I began my career as a nurse educator and have held academic appointments

inclusive of both faculty and administrative roles for more than 30 years. I have extensive experience in

assuming leadership roles in nursing and building teams to achieve successful outcomes that advance the

profession of nursing. I recently served as Chair of the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties

(NONPF) Nominating Committee having previously served as a member of the committee. In addition, I

provided leadership for the NONPF Program Director Special Interest Group in my role as Chair for two

years. During that time, I established a nurse practitioner program director mentoring program that was

successfully piloted and continues into its second year. I served on the Search Committee for selection

of the first NONPF Chief Executive Officer. I have been an active member of the American Association of

Nurse Practitioners (AANP) for more than 20 years having been inducted as a Fellow in 2007. I have held

multiple roles in the AANP organization including recent election to the Fellows Nominating Committee.

I am a long-time member of the American Nurses Association and currently serve on the National Panel

for Telehealth. Having been a nurse and academician for more than 30 years, I am keenly aware of the

challenges confronting the nursing profession. I have taught countless undergraduate and graduate

students in several different nursing programs across the country. I am skilled in developing relationships

with colleagues and students based on trust, honesty, and integrity. In my current role, I have countless

opportunities to communicate with nurses who practice in the state of Tennessee. I serve as a role model

who is highly respected by students and colleagues. Through these relationships, I have successfully

recruited colleagues who have the attributes necessary for building a strong Board of Directors.

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Shondell Hickson, DNP, APN, ACNS-BC, FNP-BC

District 03

Associate Professor and Nurse Practitioner

Austin Peay State University, Matthew Walker Clinic, Simmons School of Nursing

Clarksville

Leadership Succession Chair- Sigma Thea Tau (Nu phi chapter) - Manage the preparation, distribution

and tallying of election ballots// Notify all candidates (elected and non-elected) of the election results//

Develop and maintain policies and procedures related to the position of leadership succession chair. Submit

modifications or new policies and procedures to the board of directors for approval.

Faculty Senator - Educational policy and general welfare//Policy for the regulation of student conduct and

activities//Scholastic policy, including requirements for admission, graduation, and honors. Approval of

candidates for degrees.

Resource Committee Chair – Work with the DON of the SON to ensure that students/school have

all supplies, equipment each academic year Co- Chair of Program Evaluation Committee- Make

recommendations for the revision of competency based curriculum goals and objectives. Member of the

strategic planning committee – development of the SON 5 year strategic plan.

Kay Murphree, MSN, RN, CMSRN, EdD

District 15

Assistant Professor

Middle TN State University

Murfreesboro

Serving on the TNA Nominating Committee is of interest to me as a means of collaborating with other

nurses in our state who are interested in sharing their time and talents. After spending the past five years

completing a doctorate in nursing education while teaching full time, I am looking forward to having more

time to serve in volunteer positions upon my August graduation. I have worked as an acute care bedside

nurse (22 years) and as a nurse educator in the clinical and classroom setting. I have current experience

in serving on the Leadership Succession Committee of the Xi Alpha chapter of the Sigma Theta Tau

International Honor Society of Nursing.

Sarah Pierce, BSN, MSN, DNP, AGACNP-BC, RN, PLNC, CCRN

District 06

Assistant Professor of Nursing

Freed Hardeman University

Jackson

I am very interested in a leadership role in TNA. I think the nominating committee would be a great entry

point to begin leading in TNA. I am excited to begin this journey!

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Poster Presentation Abstracts

Assessment of Learning Orientation: A Potential Tool in Advocacy and Policy Making

Kimberly Dinsmore (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Policy learning among those involved in policy development has been shown to be a critical element

in policy change (Moyson, 2017), a theory termed Sabatier’s Advocacy Coalition Framework. Yet the

predisposition for policy learning among legislators, regulators, stakeholders, researchers, journalists,

advocates and others has not been systematically studied.

Learning orientation is defined as the degree to which a person is dependent on content providers (such

as instructors and journalists) as they learn a policy, educational material, or other information. A 25-item

questionnaire instrument named the Learning Orientation Questionnaire

(Cicivec, 2014) has been proposed to measure dependence on others in learning, a condition that could

lead to susceptibility to bias in policy makers.

Objectives:

The purpose was to evaluate the psychometric properties the Learning Orientation Questionnaire using

both factor and cluster analysis methods.

Methods/Procedures:

Four hundred and seventy-two undergraduate nursing students at the first semester junior level completed

the Learning Orientation Questionnaire online. The data was imported into an R language processor

(Version 3.3.1) for plotting and statistical analysis.

Findings:

This first step was manual extraction to identify correlations between items and group them into categories

using cluster analysis. Six cluster categories were formed and on the themes of learning interest, ambitious

goals, instructor, instructor copycat, achievement of goals, and lone survivor.

The second step was the automatic extraction of factors with functions in the R language. The items were

grouped by the automatic extraction into four factors rather than six. The automatic extraction combined

the factors learning interest and ambitious goals together and removed the lone survivor factor. The lone

survivor factor contained one question (q24) with a low eigenvalue of (0.3). This question was deemed both

minor and irrelevant to the topic of the questionnaire and therefore is proposed to be removed from the

questionnaire. The automatic extraction method combined the factors of instructor and instructor copycat

into a single factor. These two clusters had a high correlation coefficient (r = ), so these are proposed to be

merged into a single factor, unifying the findings of the cluster and factor analysis, and resulting in a fourfactor

questionnaire instrument.

The factor structure indicates that the 25 item instrument can be reduced to 8 and still retain much of the

explanatory power of the original survey (77% to 93% of variance accounted for in original factors).

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

The conclusions are that the Learning Orientation Questionnaire (1) has four factors, (2) could be reduced in

size to only 8 questions instead of 25, (3) was suitable for testing in policy makers and advocates.

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Childhood Vaccinations: A Necessary Practice

Brie LaJeret (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Vaccinations represent one of the greatest successes of modern science. Childhood vaccinations have

allowed for the eradication of several infectious diseases including polio, measles, mumps, and diphtheria.

However, since the late 1990’s when a small, erroneous research study was published suggesting a link

between Autism and vaccines, the vaccination rate has declined. Although numerous research studies have

since debunked the correlation between Autism and immunizations, parents continue to question the safety

of immunizations. Nurses possess a unique position in which they could influence positive change in this

significant patient and community issue. An effective education plan has the potential to completely change

the view of vaccination.

Objectives:

To demonstrate that an education plan initiated during the prenatal period can effectively increase the

childhood vaccination rate.

To educate nurses on their role in the patient education process/plan

To raise awareness to the importance of vaccinations

Methods/Procedures:

N/A

Findings:

N/A

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

To begin vaccination education during prenatal checkups and continue education throughout the prenatal &

postnatal periods and into the first year of life.

Complementary Therapies: A Hungarian Approach

Brie LaJeret (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

As the opiate addiction continues to rise and cripple communities, new ways to treat pain and addiction

need to be developed/adopted. Unfortunately, some of the pitfalls of available complementary therapies are

cost and availability. Fortunately, the American healthcare system can look to the international healthcare

community for possible solutions. For example, Hungary offers many complementary therapies for the

treatment of its citizens. These complementary therapies can be prescribed by a healthcare professional

and the cost is covered by the national healthcare plan. Some of the available and most widely used

therapies include: balneo-therapy and thermal baths, massage, electrotherapy and yoga.

Objectives:

• To educate nurses on complementary therapies

• To demonstrate the effectiveness of complementary therapies as used by the international community,

specifically Hungary.

• To widen the nursing knowledge base by introducing Hungarian therapies

Methods/Procedures:

N/A

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Findings:

N/A

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

N/A

Co-Sleeping Contention: How Are Families Really Sleeping?

Michelle Collins (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

In the recent past, there has been an intentional movement on the part of some maternal-child health

stakeholders, to aggressively “warn” parents as to the “dangers” of co-sleeping. Despite sound evidence to

prove the benefits of, and lack of harm, when practiced in the absence of all known hazards especially by

breastfeeding mothers, and with likely over 2 million USA mothers at least intermittently bedsharing with

their infants, the US government NICHD has launched a nationwide educational campaign to inform the

public as to the inherent “danger” of co-sleeping. This session will discuss the current climate of support

(and lack thereof) for co-sleeping (in various forms) between infants and their parents. The biologic

imperatives that underlie the practice and which support the co-sleeping relationship will be presented, as

well as diverse lines evidence that justifies and legitimizes co-sleeping. Finally, directives on how to best

counsel clients amidst a sea of conflicting information on the topic will be presented.

Objectives:

Objective 1* Participants will be able to describe the biologic imperatives which underscore the maternalinfant

co-sleeping relationship.

Objective 2* Participants will be able to describe the current climate of opinion not only in the US, but

outside the US as well, of the co-sleeping relationship.

Objective 3* Participants will be able to detail strategies for counseling clients regarding co-sleeping, in an

environment of mixed messaging.

Methods/Procedures:

N/A

Findings:

Research findings will be presented that question the Back to Sleep campaign outcomes.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Given the sound research statistics that the majority of families co-sleep at any given time with their

children, this presentation will discuss strategies to be discussed with families. As opposed to the current

strategy of “just say no” health care providers must consider options to the traditional “scare tactics”

currently in use to be able to educate parents on safe co-sleeping.

Cultivating Shared Governance in an Outpatient Mental Health Setting

Teris Webb (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Successful shared governance implementation challenges the status quo and depends on leadership

cultivating collaborative and autonomous environment. Shared Governance requires the participation of

leadership who exhibits a professional identity that reflects a responsible, empowered and equitable role

and an understanding of the professional identity of clinical staff, which is often lacking from a culture of

status quo.

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Objectives:

The Shared Governance team in an outpatient mental health setting of a unionized federal hospital.

The group chose their first project to review the VA policy Special Hazard Food and Beverages will be

consumed in the direct patient care rooms by consensus and identified champions and set time lines.

Methods/Procedures:

Using the 5S model of Improvement. Consisting of consultation of regulatory agencies referenced in the

policy (The Joint Commission and Center for Disease Control). Literature review and other VA outpatient

mental health centers were contacted.

Findings:

Improved professional work environment, understanding of the patient care area within the outpatient

mental health setting, definition of exposure as it relates to infection control, identified designated area

to eat meals, obtained a larger table to eat in the designated break area, post -shared governance staff

satisfaction scores improved overall.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Shared Governance can be initiated in the most resistant cultures. Clinical staff professional identities are

transformed; they become patient focused, autonomous and more satisfied with their practice. Investigation

into the impact of using shared governance on professional identity in similar environment is needed.

ED Protocol for Patients Presenting with Mental Illness

Kathryn A. Berger (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Appropriate Emergency Department treatment during a mental health exacerbation episode for a patient.

A State of TN task force met and developed a protocol that should be used for patients who present to the

ED in an active mental health crisis.

Objectives:

The attendees will have an understanding of the mental health patient care process, requirements for

admission to a State of Tennessee mental health hospital and the protocol for treating these patients on

presentation to an ED.

Methods/Procedures:

Discussion/written presentation will include the treatment protocol for mental health patients and the path

these patients take from the presentation of their symptoms to admission to a State-operated mental health

facility.

Findings:

This is a relatively new process, I am not sure if definitive data has been ascertained but if this data is

available, it will be included.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

The recommendation is that all Emergency Departments in Tennessee adopt this protocol, train their staff

on the importance of using it. Data collection on the decrease in admission to an acute mental health

facility and frequency of ED visits for these patients will determine to efficacy of using the protocol.

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The Effect of Imprisonment on Quality of Care

Taylor Shaw (Presenter)

Mia McCain (Co-Presenter)

Dylan Price (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

A large issue within correctional facilities is that overall prisoners do not receive the quality care they would

receive if they were not inmates. The conditions in correctional facilities are disease ridden and lack a

holistic approach, with research showing that inmates often are not treated with genuine empathy or care.

Additionally, inmates are beginning to reach older ages, but correctional facilities often lack any ways to

accommodate older inmates.

Objectives:

N/A

Methods/Procedures:

Review of Literature

Findings:

Multiple articles showed evidence that correctional facilities lack programs to help inmates’ transition from

imprisonment to the free world, which was a common factor in prisoners having recidivism. It is evident that

the less education and quality of care that prisoners receive, the less likely the inmate is to thrive once in the

free world.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

N/A

The Effect of Normal Saline on the Kidneys

Zack VanderBoegh (Presenter)

Kelsey Bales (Co-Presenter)

Tyler Patterson (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

The purpose of this research poster is to bring forth knowledge towards the issue of the effects normal

saline has on the kidneys. During the 19th century, intravenous fluids came to be discovered and used

among various patients. Normal saline is used all over the world to treat dehydration related to certain

symptoms among many individuals.

Objectives:

Develop knowledge regarding the effects of Normal Saline on the Kidneys.

Methods/Procedures:

Review of Literature

Findings:

The various scholarly articles show the benefit of using balanced fluid solutions are used rather than normal

fluid solutions causing an overall benefit towards individual patient-outcomes. Normal saline is known to

alter kidney function which results in a disruption within the kidney’s which can lead to other problems

throughout the body.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Healthcare professionals need to continue to conduct research regarding this topic to optimize the

understanding to these effects which could be potentially harmful towards our patients.

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The Effect of the Nursing Shortage on Patient Outcomes

Christina Shands (Presenter)

Abbey Dew (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

As of 2016, 8 out of every 10 Americans suffer from one or more chronic health conditions. Nursing is

among the fastest growing occupations in the US, but the country still faces a large shortage of nurses.

Lack of adequate numbers of nursing staff can impact patient well-being. Higher patient mortality and more

medication errors occur because we have less nurses working more hours. Health care employers can help

fix the problem by offering higher wages, more education and training opportunities, and more incentives.

Only a comprehensive strategy consisting of immediate and long-term measures can ensure Americans

do not continue to suffer due to lack of adequate RNs. The shortage of nurses is a very important problem

because the situation is not getting better but it is getting worse. The shortage of nurses is due to many

reasons such as an increased workload, educational obstacles, and workload obstacles. Nurses play

a critically important role in ensuring patient safety by monitoring patients for changes in health and

performing tasks to ensure patients receive high quality care. Without an adequate number of nurses, the

mortality of patients will increase.

Objectives:

Develop knowledge regarding the effects of the nursing shortage on patient outcomes.

Methods/Procedures:

Review of Literature

Findings:

The nursing shortage is a major problem in our healthcare system, and it will continue to worsen unless the

problem is fixed. In this research paper we identified some of the major causes of the nursing shortage.

Some of the problems were pay wages, undesirable hours, burnout, and a shortage of teaching staff in

nursing school.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Further research needs to be done in order to figure out what short term and long-term interventions need

to be implemented and how in order to start fixing the nursing shortage. Further research needs to be done

to figure out why it is so difficult to get an adequate amount of faculty at nursing schools, and research also

needs to be done in order to fix some of the undesirable wages of nurses.

The Effects of Exercise in Patients with Symptoms of Alzheimer’s

Hunter Morse (Presenter)

Todd Keim (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Alzheimer’s, the most common cause of dementia, is a neurologic degenerative disease that results in

memory loss and other cognitive abilities, leading to a loss of independence. It is a disease that occurs in

various stages and it is often misconstrued that the disease is a normal part of the aging process. More

than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s, accounting for the 6th leading cause of death in the

United States. There is currently no treatment for the disease, rather just measures to help maintain mental

functioning as an individual progresses through the different stages. Currently, the most effective way in

dealing with this debilitating disease is taking proper measures in preventing the onset. This critical analysis

of Alzheimer’s provides insight to the effects of exercise on the brain and how exercise is a preventative

measure for degeneration of the structure of the brain.

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Objectives:

Develop knowledge regarding the effects of exercise in Alzheimer’s patients.

Methods/Procedures:

Review of Literature

Findings:

At the present time, research shows that aerobic exercise slows the progression of brain degeneration,

while also showing inclines in hippocampal volume, which is the part of the brain responsible for processing

information. Studies also indicate that there is not yet a particular exercise regimen that is best to follow.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

The research studies reviewed for this paper call for further research regarding Alzheimer’s disease and the

evidence-based preventative measures of aerobic exercise on preventing the onset of the disease.

The Effects of Long Shift Hours on Nurses

Roxanne Becerra (Co-Presenter)

Brittany Brown (Co-Presenter)

Latoya Busby (Co-Presenter)

Angelina Johnson (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

The incidence and effects of fatigue are critical to every nurse’s professional practice. Rising incidents of

nursing fatigue, burnout, low patient satisfaction, and poor patient care across the healthcare continuum

is an increasing concern in the nursing field (Stimpfel, 2012). The purpose of this study is to investigate

the connection between long shift hours worked by nurses and the incidence of poor nurse and patient

satisfaction in healthcare.

Objectives:

Develop knowledge regarding the effects of long shift hours on nurse’s professional practice

Methods/Procedures:

Review of Literature

Findings:

Working longer shifts was found to play the greatest role in facilitating nursing fatigue and insufficient care

performed on patients. This study shows the relationship between the hours worked by nurses and the

domino effects that proceed to follow.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Further studies are needed to establish causal relationships and develop preventative measures

(Stimpfel, 2012).

The Effects of Mentoring on Nursing Incivility in New Graduate Nurses

Amy Edmison (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Incivility is an ongoing issue in nursing that contributes to burnout and turnover in nurses. New graduates

are particularly susceptible to stressors in the health care environment and are frequently targets of

incivility. These issues combine to further complicate the nursing shortage in health care settings.

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Objectives:

To explore the effects of a mentoring program on incivility experienced by new graduate nurses.

To explore the effects of a mentoring program on turnover in new graduate nurses.

Methods/Procedures:

New graduates with less than two years nursing experience hired to a medical-surgical unit were given

questionnaires assessing incivility. Mentors, chosen by managers meeting specific criteria, were sent to

training provided by the facility. Then, the pairs commenced into a mentoring relationship. After the

relationship ended per the facility regulations, the mentees were re-surveyed to assess the perception of

incivility experienced after mentoring. Data will be analyzed using a dependent samples t-test.

Findings:

Pending: complete by August 2018

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Pending: complete by August 2018

Elementary Asthma Education: Implementation of the Green Means

Go Program in an Urban Elementary School

Jennifer David (Presenter)

Nina Armstrong (Co-Presenter)

Elizabeth Carew (Co-Presenter)

Lauren Larkin (Co-Presenter)

Mia Pecora (Co-Presenter)

Conor Quinn (Co-Presenter)

Hannah Ritter (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Approximately 20 percent of students at an urban elementary school in Nashville, TN have an asthma

diagnosis. This school does not retain a school nurse on site leaving teachers and students responsible for

managing asthma exacerbations. In the past, it has been necessary for school staff to call 911 for emergency

interventions for severe asthma exacerbations.

Objectives:

To partner with an urban elementary charter school in Nashville, Tennessee to enhance children’s

understanding of how to self-identify asthma symptoms and react appropriately to avoid medical crises.

Methods/Procedures:

Forty-two children with asthma in second and third grade were identified and assigned to participate in four

weeks of the Green Means Go program led by students at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing (VUSN).

The Green Means Go Program consists of three lesson plans and one final review lesson. It was developed

by Natasha McClure DNP, RN, CPNP, Assistant Professor VUSN and has been used in other elementary

schools in Nashville. Each lesson consisted of one theme that was reinforced through videos, activities, and

lectures. Lesson one is an overview of asthma and asthma symptoms. Lesson two is an overview of the

Asthma Action Plan and the different color zones. Lesson three is an overview of asthma triggers and how

to prevent trigger exacerbations. The final review consists of the important aspects of each previous lesson.

Prior to Lesson one, a pre-test was given to evaluate the understanding of asthma. The same test was given

after the final review to assess improved understanding of asthma.

Findings:

Student retention was 79% over the course of four lessons. Increased understanding of asthma was

demonstrated via test scores. Scores improved from a pretest average of 73.3% to a posttest average of 80.3%.

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Recommendations for Practice/Research:

The Green Means Go program enhanced student’s knowledge about asthma management and asthma

exacerbation prevention. This knowledge was supported through the improvement of test scores of the

post-test versus the pre-test. We identified a community partnership with an urban elementary school with

hopes to continue and sustain the program for future cohorts of VUSN students. Future projects should

implement a home visit program in accordance with the Green Means Go lesson plans as well as provide

materials for teachers and parents to provide continuing asthma education for students.

Evolution of the APRN/RN First Assistant Role: Advocating Change in Tennessee

Nancy Appling (Presenter)

Diane Pace (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

An increasing number of APRNs are seeking role preparation as Registered Nurse First Assistants (RNFA).

The increased education and skill set are highly marketable and heightens the level of patient care for the

perioperative patient. The Association of periOperative Room Nurses (AORN) has established RNFA program

curriculum standards. The Competency and Credentialing Institute (CCI), the credentialing body for the

RNFA certification exam posts “acceptable RNFA programs” on their website. Of the 16 programs listed on

the website, 4 are university based. The University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Nursing

developed the first RNFA program in the state. In 2016, Tennessee legislators, without full understanding of

the AORN national standards for RNFA education, enacted RNFA title protection that omitted APRNs from

title protection. Paradoxically, APRN certified RNFAs are the only RNFAs eligible for Medicaid, Medicare and

most third-party reimbursement. The 2017 TNA general assembly voted to support a resolution to modify the

existing statue for RNFA title protection. The proposed resolution is currently in committee.

Objectives:

Identify the evolving role for APRNs as RN First Assistants

Discuss the AORN National Standards for education of the APRN RNFA

Describe Credentialing requirements for certification of the RNFA

Advocate for APRN inclusion into RNFA Title Protection in the state of Tennessee

Methods/Procedures:

N/A

Findings:

N/A

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Advocacy for change in state title protection for the APRN RNFA

Increase awareness of legislative process and resources

Promote reimbursement parity for RNFAs

Expansion of Nurse Practitioner Scope of Practice to Include

Buprenorphine for Addiction: An Advocacy Brief

Heather Jackson (Presenter)

Alexis Weber (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Over the past twenty years the United States has suffered from an opioid epidemic, which continues to

threaten public health. Opioid dependence and illicit drug use contributes to crime and disruption to the

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community as well as family dynamics. Drug overdose deaths continue to rise and have nearly tripled from

1999- 2014 exceeding the number of deaths caused by motor vehicle accidents. Over 1000 emergency

department visits are related to the misuse of opioids and an estimated 91 people die from opioid overdose

every day in the United States. Additionally, this epidemic is associated with an increase in infections

due to intravenous drug use as well as health care expenses due to hospitalizations and emergency care.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention these costs are estimated to be $78.5 billion

per year which consists of medical management, substance abuse treatment, and legal consequences.

Unfortunately, access to medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid addiction remains a barrier.

Prohibiting nurse practitioners from prescribing buprenorphine is one such limiting factor that prevents

life-sustaining treatment for patients suffering from opioid addiction. Section 303 of the Comprehensive

Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) granted buprenorphine-prescribing privileges to nurse practitioners

with appropriate training which could increase access to addiction care. Unfortunately, many states

continue to have laws prohibiting nurse practitioners from prescribing buprenorphine for addiction,

including Tennessee.

Objectives:

Analyze positive effects of buprenorphine treatment for opioid addiction and the extent in which nurse

practitioners may increase access to MAT throughout the state of Tennessee as well as the United States.

Methods/Procedures:

A review of literature was conducted and utilized the harm reduction conceptual framework.

Findings:

N/A

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

MAT with buprenorphine is the safest and most effective treatment for opioid addiction; however, access

remains a barrier for patients. Nurse practitioners may serve patients needing addiction treatment but are

limited by buprenorphine prescribing regulations for addiction. These regulations restrict nurse practitioners

from prescribing buprenorphine and should be revised to provide access to addiction treatment. Ultimately

this could assist in preventing individual harm, societal harm, reduce healthcare costs, as well as improve

patients’ quality of life.

A Fourth Trimester

Chandler Hollingsworth (Co-Presenter)

Larrun Neder (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

A Fourth Trimester is the concept of at home care and teaching for the postpartum mother (especially a

first-time mother). This critical analysis of the current status of postpartum health care in the United States

what is known about the impact of home health care provided during the postpartum period, what is not

known about home health care provided during the postpartum period, and future implications for research

with home health care provided during the postpartum period.

Objectives:

Develop knowledge regarding home care and education for the postpartum mother.

Methods/Procedures:

Review of Literature

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Findings:

A fourth trimester of healthcare can make a world of difference in health of both the mother and child after

child birth. By going home with the mother and providing the much-needed care and attention the mother

needs postpartum, a fourth trimester could decrease the number of cases of postpartum depression and

infant mortalities and increase the amount of time and infants that are breastfed.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Further studies are still indicated for this topic. The majority of the research that has been done at this point

is quantitative. Little is known about the actual effects emotionally of postpartum home care. In addition to

that, most of the research has been conducted on a small scale in other countries. Research could benefit

from being conducted with a larger population of postpartum mothers in the United States.

From Rural to Urban: A Multifaceted Approach for Preparing Culturally Competent FNP

Students and Addressing the Diverse Needs of Underserved Populations

Farron Kilburn (Presenter)

Mary Blanton (Co-Presenter)

Pamela Camp (Co-Presenter)

Joanie Jackson (Co-Presenter)

Amber Roache (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Healthcare in the U.S. is nearing a crisis level and the reasons are multifactorial: lack of access to care

or insurance coverage; lack of providers, especially in underserved urban and rural areas; and a growing

nursing shortage. Within urban and rural areas in the Southeast, chronic conditions frequently associated

with the social determinants of health are widespread and disproportionately affect vulnerable groups.

Rural residents are more likely than urban residents to die from the top five leading causes of death, and in

Southeast Tennessee, rural residents face even higher mortality rates for all leading causes of death.

Preparing culturally competent nurse practitioners to take on more primary-care provider roles is one

solution for addressing the healthcare deficit and diverse needs of rural and urban populations, especially in

the Southeast.

Objectives:

This project outlines an innovative academic-practice partnership model that prepares Family Nurse

Practitioner (FNP) students to address the healthcare needs of underserved populations both as students in

the midst of training and as practice-ready professionals after graduation.

This project, funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), implements a

multifaceted approach to training culturally competent FNP students who are prepared to continue working

with underserved populations upon graduating. The project examines the impact of (1) enhanced curriculum

focused on the social determinants of health and (2) longitudinal clinical placements at underserved rural

and urban clinical sites on FNP students’ ability to provide culturally competent care and their interest-level

in working with underserved populations after graduation.

Methods/Procedures:

Project strategies were initially implemented over a 5-month period for ten FNP students in their final

semester, Spring 2018; Five students were placed at clinics in rural counties and 5 were placed in urban

clinics. Project strategies are ongoing—ten additional FNP students will experience rural and urban clinical

placements from the beginning of their program in May 2018, allowing for deeper curriculum impact and

longevity at clinical sites.

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Post-graduate surveys will reveal outcomes for employment intentions for the first graduating cohort

participating in the project. Qualitative data from curriculum interventions were collected from program

participants and their clinical preceptors to display gains and lessons learned in providing culturally

competent care. Baseline data for self-efficacy related to working with underserved rural and urban

populations will be established for the ten incoming student trainees in May 2018. Mid-intervention data for

the new 2018 trainees will be available by October 2018 to report further outcomes.

Findings:

Initial qualitative data suggests that project strategies increased self-efficacy in working with underserved

populations as well as an increased interest in pursuing post-graduation employment at clinics working

with underserved populations, especially those trainees who were exposed to longitudinal rural clinical

placements. Quantitative data on post-graduation employment for program participants will be available by

October 2018. Project barriers were noted and addressed regarding identifying preceptors in urban clinics.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Ongoing research for further curriculum enhancements that integrate clinical and classroom learning is

necessary. Research on identifying and implementing education methods for preceptors in underserved

areas in order to ensure thorough student training is recommended.

Gaming in the Classroom: Annual St. Patrick’s Day Final Exam Review

Mary Lee Jacobson (Presenter)

Cynthia Powers (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how a variety of gaming techniques could be used for test

and skills review for an accelerated BSN program. Games have been used to engage students in interactive

learning and to enhance recall.

Objectives:

Discuss how gaming can engage students in interactive learning

Identify benefits and barriers to using gaming in the classroom.

Methods/Procedures:

To prepare first semester students for the foundations/skills course final exam a jeopardy style game was

developed based on the final exam blueprint. Since the event occurred in March the faculty used a St

Patrick’s Day theme for decorations, prizes and refreshments.

Poster will include procedures for identifying appropriate content for gaming, developing the games and

implementing gaming in the classroom

Findings:

Students’ evaluations were positive, and consistent with evidence. The poster will present background,

methods, barriers and benefits, and outcomes.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Gaming can be an effective way to engage students in interactive learning and can be a valid method for

exam review.

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Health Education and BMIs in 3rd Grade Students at Norman Smith Elementary

Eve Rice (Presenter)

Jessica Eckenrode (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

N/A

Objectives:

1. APSU and BSN students will participate as a team with their instructors to deliver preventative healthcare.

Will have the opportunity to learn evidence-based preventative care, coordinate activities, and manage their

BMI of the children studied.

2. An underserved community-based population of students who are presently not receiving adequate

health education will receive evidence-based care on an ongoing basis to improve their health status

regarding weight management and nutritional guidelines.

3. The overall goal is to obtain a decrease in BMIs for overweight third grade students over a two-month

period and to continue to follow these students through fifth grade.

Methods/Procedures:

Two APSU nursing professors, one of whom is also a pediatric nurse practitioner and six to twelve BSN

nursing students will provide health education through reading two purchased health promotion books

with the elementary students, discussing the literature in small group settings and sharing healthy snacks

(fruit and vegetable), and engaging in aerobic activities for this underserved population for one day a week

for three consecutive weeks during the PE class time (30-45 minutes). During the first-class session, BMI

indices will be measured for each participant by obtaining their height and weight. We will continue to

follow these participants through 5th grade and see if the education improves their individual BMI indices

and reducing childhood obesity.

Findings:

The findings are still being assessed for this spring.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

“Health systems can address childhood obesity through the implementation of best practice guidelines

complemented by community-based resources, programs and policies that foster behavioral management

strategies that aid children’s diet, physical activity, sleep, stress and wellbeing.”

Childhood Obesity Guidelines

“In 2010 and 2017, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force provided a Grade B recommendation that

providers screen children aged 6 years or older for obesity and provide or refer children with obesity to

intensive lifestyle modification program.

In 2007 the American Academy of Pediatrics released the Expert Committee Recommendations that

suggest screening all children for obesity (>=2 years) and providing tiers of care regarding the treatment

and prevention of obesity.”

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2017). Childhood Obesity Guidelines. Retrieved from:

https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/strategies/healthcare/index.html

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Implementing Research into Practice: Practical Application of Translation Frameworks

Erin Morgan (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Evidenced-based practice is vitally important for safe, effective, andcost-efficient patient care. As nursing

and medical science continue to advance, nurses of all types are asked to keep up with advancing

knowledge while continuing to manage patients. Knowledge translation frameworks offer a practical

template for those who seek to implement evidenced based change into any practice environment.

Objectives:

Translation frameworks such as the Ottawa Model for Research Utilization (OMRU) and Knowledge to

Action Framework provide a purposeful plan for implementing evidenced based change in hospital and

outpatient environments. The speaker will provide a brief discussion of a number of frameworks, their

history, and use in nursing practice.

Methods/Procedures:

The Ottawa model was initially developed to implement process change in the hospital environment.

Discussion of both inpatient and outpatient applications are imperative as nurses experience evidencebased

translation in all environments. The OMRU provided the foundation for rural spirometry

implementation research conducted by this speaker. Pulmonary function testing (PFT) machines were

implemented in three rural primary care practices. The resulting use was measured compared to previous

practice and respiratory diagnoses. The Ottawa Model considers six elements important to successful

implementation: the practice environment, potential adopters, evidenced based innovation, implementation

strategies, adoption, and evaluation. Assessment of supports and barriers was completed to address

potential problems and utilize strengths.

Findings:

The Ottawa model was initially implemented to change patient skin care outcomes within a large hospital

system (Graham & Logan, 2004). The authors used the model to plan effectively with nurses and specialists

throughout the hospital leading to successful implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of their design.

Since that time multiple researchers have used the model in hospital and outpatient environments.

The OMRU remained valuable to successful implementation of spirometry in the rural environment. Two

sites were owned by a regional family practice group while the other was a nurse practitioner (NP) owned

clinic. The ability to work directly with providers and staff at the NP owned clinic proved valuable for

collaboration and implementation. Ultimately the NP owned clinic with one full time and one-part time

provider performed the most PFT tests (n=43) while the site with three full time providers performed only

nine tests.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

While spirometry was successfully implemented in rural primary care locations, the use varied widely.

Implementation was most successful at the NP clinic where providers and nurses were active participants in

the process. The remaining sites voiced concerns about time needed to perform the test and patient acuity

as barriers to PFT use. Project planning at these sites was performed by administrators instead of providers

leading to a lost sense of ownership of the intervention.

Nurses and providers are increasingly asked to do more with the same amount of time and resources.

However, new evidenced based changes will continue to occur in both the hospital and outpatient

environments. Well-designed translation of new knowledge can occur when all parties are included in

the process. New interventions and programs are more likely to succeed if designers use a framework for

implementation.

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Improving Recruitment and Retention of Public Health Nurses in a Local Health Department

Tina R. McElravey (Presenter)

Sara Day (Co-Presenter)

Alisa R. Haushalter (Co-Presenter)

Judy Martin (Co-Presenter)

Ernestine Small (Co-Presenter)

Background:

The United States is experiencing a critical nursing shortage that includes public health nurses (PHNs).

Continued shortages within local health departments (LHDs) can negatively influence population health.

The purpose of this project was to identify strategies for improving recruitment and retention of PHNs

within LHDs.

Methods:

Literature review to identify best evidence regarding recruitment and retention of PHNs, roles and value

of PHNs for population health and historic shortages of PHNs over time. Analyzed PHN vacancy, turnover

and retirement rates. Reviewed related county and organizational policies and processes. Reviewed

internal documents to identify division goals, PHN feedback, current salaries and compensation study

recommendations. Conducted key informant interviews. Identified system barriers and enhancers.

Results:

Factors influencing recruitment and retention include salaries below market value, lack of a career ladder

and pay inequities based upon funding source. Processes are layered with significant variability existing.

Lack of promotional, educational and mentoring opportunities exists. Lastly, there is a need for an

organizational cultural shift towards open communication, respect of PHNs and employee empowerment.

Conclusion:

Multiple strategies are necessary to address the PHN workforce shortage in LHDs. Failure to recruit and

retain PHNs in LHDs may significantly effect population health now and in the future.

Recommendations:

Promote public health as a nursing specialty. Implement innovative recruitment strategies. Streamline

and decentralize hiring processes. Increase salaries to market. Offer recruitment and retention bonuses.

Implement a clinical career ladder. Provide educational and mentoring opportunities to prepare PHNs for

promotional opportunities. Focus on organizational culture. Institute a PHN Committee to continue efforts.

LPN Workforce

Teresa Brown (Presenter)

Petra Green (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Utilization of the LPN workforce in acute care settings

Objectives:

To share how we utilize the LPN work force to their highest level of licensure and how it has impacted

vacancies, staff satisfaction and patient satisfaction.

Methods/Procedures:

At CHI Memorial, we started a process of hiring LPNs for purpose of Discharge paperwork and some patient

teaching. This was started due to a cumbersome electronic system that required RN time spent doing

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clerical duties and a need for expedited thru put. We then advanced our concept to also include duties

within their scope of practice such as medication delivery, IM and Sub Q medications, procedures and tasks

and are labeling this role as LPN Extenders. Most recently, we have started yet another approach to using

LPNs in a role in TEAM Nursing.

Since we are using this workforce at the bedside, we have developed a focused orientation outline and

annual skills day, have written a job description and changed policies to assure compliance with TN State

requirements.

Findings:

We have experienced improved HCAHPS scores, expressed staff satisfaction and filled vacancies initially

intended for RNs only. We are able to use a work force that otherwise would be used mostly in long term

care facilities.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

N/A

Maternal Factors that Influence Obesity in Toddlers

Haley Williams (Presenter)

Ashlee Ledbetter (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

The purpose of this research paper is to analyze and review at least eight scholarly articles that discuss

the factors that influence childhood obesity. Articles reviewed were mostly primary sources. The goal of

this paper was to show maternal and family factors as they relate to the increasingly prevalent issue of

childhood obesity. We believe this an extremely important topic in today’s society. Obesity in childhood

ages is more prevalent now than it has ever been. Preventive measures are much more effective than trying

to treat the already existing problem. Therefore, the healthcare field has a true demand to understand and

educate patients and their families about preventive interventions that help avoid obesity as a child. This, in

turn, would decrease the amount of health problems in children and toddlers and overall, reduce healthcare

costs to families. It would also promote overall health and wellness in these patients.

Objectives:

Develop knowledge regarding the maternal factors that influence toddler obesity.

Methods/Procedures:

Review of Literature

Findings:

N/A

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

N/A

Piloting an Academic Medical-Legal Partnership: Building Capacity to Increase the

Percentage Seniors (60+) who Receive Advice about and Execute an Advanced Care

Plan and a Healthcare and/or Financial Power of Attorney.

Carrie Plummer (Presenter)

Breanna Baraff (Co-Presenter)

Maggie Bulger (Co-Presenter)

Helana Anderjack Garrett (Co-Presenter)

Susan Gray (Co-Presenter)

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Anna Harty (Co-Presenter)

Kaitlyn McGowan (Co-Presenter)

Caitlyn O’Neil (Co-Presenter)

Jordan Reed (Co-Presenter)

Mary Spitler (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

2017 study conducted by Honoring Choices Tennessee found that fewer than a third of adult Tennesseans

reported having documented Advanced Care Plans (ACPs). More specifically, a 2016 study conducted by

Vanderbilt University Medical Center showed that 55% of adult patients polled had advance directives.

However, only 24% reported giving a copy to their care provider (Vanderbilt Patient & Family Affairs

Survey, 2016). A review of the literature reveals that patients, caregivers, healthcare providers and the legal

system encounter multiple barriers in developing and documenting these important decisions, including:

knowledge deficits, limited access to affordable legal counsel, inadequate clinic time and discomfort with

discussing these issues.

Objectives:

• Pilot a Medical-Legal Partnership (MLP) between Vanderbilt nursing and law students at the Vanderbilt

Internal Medicine Clinic

• Collaborate with VUMC patient affairs and education on recruitment materials

• Counsel 100% of interested patients on ACPs/POAs during a primary care visit

• Assist 65% of the clinic’s patients to complete new and/or update existing ACP/POA

• 50% of completed ACPs/POA will be returned by the patient and uploaded in the electronic health

record (EHR)

Methods/Procedures:

Nursing and law students, underwent intensive training related to ACP, POA, end of life issues, and how

to screen for other potential health-harming legal needs. Under direct supervision from faculty, students

counseled and provided assistance with the completion of ACPs and/or POAs for patients receiving care at

the Vanderbilt Internal Medicine Clinic. Patient encounters (in person and via phone) were documented via

REDCap – a research-based and HIPAA-compliant database. Completed ACPs/POAs were uploaded into

the patient’s EHR via EPIC.

Findings:

Final outcomes of this project are still in process as of submission of this abstract. To date, the majority

(>60%) of patients were receptive to having conversations with the students about ACP in the primary

care setting. After being provided with information and the ACP document, >75% of patients indicated a

desire to discuss with family members and complete the form at home. A smaller percentage of the patients

reported having already completed ACPs; however, a concurrent review of the EHR revealed many of these

patients’ documents were not on file. This discrepancy, in part, may be attributed to a recent change over to

a new EHR. An unanticipated finding showed younger patients (< 65 years of age) also to be interested in

completing ACPs.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

The evidence-based literature indicates many healthcare providers are uncomfortable having conversations

about advance care planning and end of life care. However, the majority of patients polled desire to have

these conversations with their primary care provider. Clinicians would benefit from training on how best to

initiate these conversations with patients. Care teams, including social workers and lawyers, should undergo

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interprofessional, team-based training to better understand each other’s roles and skill sets. Topics for

additional research include identifying barriers to advance care planning, strategies for communicating

about this issue with patients and families and identifying information dissemination techniques.

Pressure Ulcer Prevention

Margaret Horn (Presenter)

Kelsey Smith (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Pressure ulcers are a major topic in the nursing community currently and have been for quite a while. They

are described as easily preventable but for some reason, they are still occurring frequently. This research

problem paper discusses some of the reasons why they are still frequently occurring and some of the

changes nurses can make to reduce that number. It also provides the reader with what is known about the

prevention of pressure ulcers, what is not known about the prevention of pressure ulcers, and implications

for future research on the prevention of pressure ulcers.

Objectives:

Develop knowledge regarding pressure ulcer prevention.

Methods/Procedures:

Review of Literature

Findings:

All of the studies reviewed for this research paper indicate that further research should be conducted on

why pressure ulcers are still frequently occurring in healthcare settings today. During this time, it is known

that pressure ulcers continue to be a major concern in hospitals and other care facilities such as nursing

homes. They are increasing the rate of hospital acquired infections and causing patients to deal with

unintended and unnecessary pain during their stay. Studies have also shown that preventable measures can

be taken to decrease the amount of pressure ulcers that do occur.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

There are many research opportunities available on the prevention of pressure ulcers and there is a current

need for them to be done. Having many questions on pressure ulcers that are still unanswered, research can

continuously be done to provide patients with the best quality of care and life.

Teaching Advocacy through Community Education

Tammy Howard (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Education: Nursing course assignment to raise awareness of substance use during pregnancy. (could also be

considered a community initiative)

Objectives:

1) Participants will become aware of student assignment that promotes community awareness about the

effects of substance use (NAS related drugs, alcohol and smoking) on pregnancy and newborn.

2) Participants will understand how community awareness promotion is related to advocacy.

Methods/Procedures:

Poster design will describe the student project and its impact upon the community.

Project: OB clinical course group project assignment - Students (groups of 2-4 students) develop a

presentation about the effects of NAS related meds, alcohol and smoking on the pregnancy and newborn.

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Following approval of the presentation (peer review process) the group presents their group project to a

high school class (mostly in the Upper Cumberland area) to raise awareness about the effects of substance

use during pregnancy. The ultimate goal is to reduce the number of pregnancies effected by substance use.

The target audience for the project: high school students who are for the most part pre-pregnancy status.

Findings:

N/A

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

N/A

The Thirst is Real: Increasing Access to Water for Floor Nurses

Allyson Shambaugh (Presenter)

Tara Roeder (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Dehydration amongst floor nurses is a serious and overlooked problem in the healthcare environment. The

fast pace of the acute care setting combined with a physical absence of water on the floor (due to OHS

regulations) leads to a dehydrated nursing staff. Given the negative impacts of dehydration on cognitive

function, dehydrated nurses can prevent patients from receiving optimal care.

Objectives:

Our study seeks to develop a better understanding of hydration amongst floor nurses and assess strategies

to improve nurse hydration status.

Methods/Procedures:

We intend to evaluate hydration of nurses before and after the installation of a hydration station and

educational posters on the unit. Participants will complete a standardized cognitive function test, record

their fluid intake, and submit a urine sample at the beginning and end of their shift.

Findings:

Results are expected Fall of 2018.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

We hope this study will further efforts to advocate for better hydration amongst nurses. Nurses exert

a dramatic impact on healthcare team success and patient well-being. In the healthcare environment,

maintaining adequate hydration levels in nurses is paramount to the health and safety of all.

Transition into Practice Socialization of Graduate Nurses

Angel Boling (Presenter)

Pamela Cherry (Co-Presenter)

Queen Welch (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

In this time of unprecedented change in healthcare, as reflected by Kavanagh and Szweda (2017),

“delivering on the promise of safe, high quality patient care requires a highly engaged and competent team”

(p.57). Nurses play a critical role in the success of the patient experiences and positive patient outcomes.

However, the widening preparation-to-practice gap challenges the ability of health care systems to deliver

consistent, safe, quality care. Often the problems associated with the transition of nursing students into

professional nursing practice have been acknowledged as traumatic and stressful. Although there have been

improvements in nursing education to bridge the gap, increased opportunities to prepare nurse for this

transition from education to practice still exist.

In the fall of 2017 the Nursing Division at Baptist College of Health Sciences in Memphis, Tennessee

partnered with Baptist Hospital-Memphis to strengthen new graduates’ professional socialization through a

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creative and innovative model of transition from academia into practice. The outcomes were to reduce new

graduate dissatisfaction and stress, to improve nurse retention and thus improve the patient experience.

The poster will depict the framework of the “Transition into Practice Socialization” model that includes (1)

assignment of the clinical preceptor for the senior student’s capstone clinical immersion experience who will

also serve as the graduate’s preceptor post-graduation, (2) student learning assignments, (3) KATA process,

(4) structured transitional experiences in practice (STEP) model for new graduate orientation, and (5)

preceptor training, compensation, and recognition. Additionally, outcome data (i.e. patient satisfaction and

new graduate retention) will be presented. Reference

Kavanagh, J. & Szweda, C. (2017). A crisis in competency: The strategic and ethical imperative to assessing

the new graduate nurses’ clinical reasoning. Nursing Education Perspectives, 38, 57-62.

Objectives:

The poster presentation will depict the framework of the “Transition into Practice Socialization”

The objectives of the model are to:

(1) enhance new graduate retention

(2) impact patient satisfaction

Methods/Procedures:

The Improvement KATA process was used to identify current situation and the target condition related to

new graduate satisfaction.

Findings:

N/A

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

N/A

Transitioning to Practice: Does a Summer Externship Program Improve

Students’ Perception Related to Competency, Interprofessional Collaboration,

and Role Transition from Student to Nurse

LeAnne Wilhite (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

An integral component of nursing programs is the practical experience gained by clinical rotations through

varied health care settings. Offering a diverse student experience in the hospital setting prior to graduation

fosters a continued growth for the student exposing them to the nursing culture including interprofessional

development and skilled communication. A summer externship program allows continued exposure to

bedside nursing as well as a more comprehensive understanding of the team approach necessary for

successful patient care.

Objectives:

This qualitative phenomenological study attempts to identify common themes among the students

related to their summer externship experience and the impact on their perceptions related to competency,

interprofessional collaboration, and role transition from student to nurse.

Methods/Procedures:

The data was collected via an anonymous reflective survey given to the students in the fall semester

following the summer externship experience to allow for assimilation of the experience by the student. The

findings were aggregated via common themes related to the students’ perception of the experience as it

related to competency, interprofessional collaboration, and role transition from student to nurse.

Findings:

A common theme was an improvement in communication skills and a broader understanding of the role of

the registered nurse.

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

N/A

Unrestricted Intrapartum Oral Intake; Affects on Clinical Outcomes and Satisfaction with the

Labor Experience in Low-Risk Patients.

Nadia Robinson (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Since Mendelson’s landmark 1946 study warned of the significant risk of aspiration to intrapartum patients

who did not fast while hospitalized, nurses on labor and delivery wards have maintained NPO or severely

restricted intrapartum PO intake policies (Mendelson, 1994). These policies have persisted despite advances

in intrapartum anesthesia delivery methods, airway protection/intubation technology and current evidence

which demonstrates that aspiration in labor is rare in low-risk patients (Harty, 2015). Furthermore, evidence

shows that benefits of eating during labor are decreased duration of labor (Ciardulli et al., 2017), improved

fetal tolerance of labor (Harty, 2015), and increased patient satisfaction (Vallejo et al, 2013).

Objectives:

The purpose of our proposed innovate project is to increase patient satisfaction with all stages of labor by

recommending the implementation of unrestricted intrapartum oral intake policies for low-risk patients.

Methods/Procedures:

N/A

Findings:

N/A

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

For 12 months preceding implementation of an unrestricted intrapartum PO intake policy for low risk

patients, collect anonymous labor experience satisfaction data from postpartum patients who had been

low-risk throughout labor, prior to discharge. For 12 months following implementation of an unrestricted

intrapartum PO intake policy for low-risk patients, collect this same data. Provide eligible patients with

written and verbal information on the risks and benefits of intrapartum oral intake. This data will enable us

to serve as informed nurse advocates for optimal nutrition intake to benefit patients during the course of

their labor.

Prior to implementation of policy change and/or study, we will seek engagement, input and approval

from facility legal counsel, administration, ethics teams, Institutional Review Boards, and staff to ensure all

stakeholders are appraised of the current evidence, and effectively prepared to support the study and/or

change in facility policy.

Using Facebook in the Classroom: A Developing Case Study

Rebecca Bush (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Students are more technology driven and tend to gravitate toward alternative learning techniques.

Facebook is a common social medium that is actively used by college students. As discovered, Facebook

can be used effectively as a teaching tool in the classroom.

Objectives:

Participants will discover alternative learning and teaching strategies by using Facebook as teaching tool in

the classroom.

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Methods/Procedures:

N/A

Findings:

N/A

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

College students use technology in every facet of their lives: socially, academically, and professionally. Yet in

the traditional university classroom, technology is limited to the comfort zone of the professor. There seems

to be a huge disconnect in how to engage the students using technology and make the learning more

active-based for the students. Facebook is a common medium in which to actively engage the students.

It provides a format that is readily available at no additional cost to the professor. Using Facebook to

teach also offers flexibility for learning outside of the traditional classroom walls. Facebook is an innovative

learning medium that is conducive for using case studies effectively in a nursing program.

Using Simulation to Support a Safe Change in BCMA Vendors

Deborah Ariosto (Presenter)

Shilo Anders (Co-Presenter)

Carrie Reale (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Safe medication administration is a high volume, high risk, time consuming aspect of nursing care. Over half

a million drugs are administered each month in this inpatient setting alone. With the implementation of a

new EHR system, more than 4,000 nurses were trained to administer medications using new workflows,

systems and tools. The Operational Readiness team identified medication administration as one of the most

significant impact areas in the transition to evaluate.

Objectives:

The goal of the project was to facilitate a safe and easy transition to a new vendor for medication

administration at a large academic medical center through formal usability studies and feedback at each

phase of the implementation, stabilization, and ongoing system optimization.

Methods/Procedures:

Nurses (n=15) were recruited representing adult, pediatrics, acute and critical care and were given 1 hr

training in the new system 6 months before go-live. Comparative test methodology was used to evaluate

the two BCMA systems. Participants completed the following set of med administration core tasks in each

of the system versions:

1) Hold two orders (sc insulin set dose + sliding scale dose); administer three/address BCMA alerts (adjust

dose amount for partial package dose, and administer multi-package dose);

2) Switch existing IV fluids to new IVF ordered rate;

3) PRN pain medication and pain assessment;

4) sc insulin doses [set dose + sliding scale] based on glucose value;

5) Document meds previously administered/documented on paper MAR during downtime and administer

a PRN medication now; and

6) Message pharmacy to adjust insulin schedule

Metrics included task success, safety-related errors, difficulty, and task completion time as well as

standardized usability survey.

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Findings:

Overall, performance with the planned system was good if not better than the current. Nonetheless, several

opportunities for go-live and future enhancements emerged related to e-learning modules to help nurses

adapt to new workflows; screen display and organization, confusing and disruptive alerts. Insulin continued

to be problematic in both systems and is a priority for future system changes

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Celebrating improvements and timely mitigation of problems relies upon reliable, repeatable and actionable

evaluations of workflow. Formal evaluation of the impact of new technology on nursing care is critical

before, during and after implementation to ensure patient safety and nurse satisfaction.

Using Telehealth to Reach Socially Isolated Patients with Chronic Pain

Kathryn Hansen (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Seventeen percent of individuals in the state of Tennessee report chronic pain. In rural communities in the

middle Tennessee area, the ratio of population to primary care providers is approximately 2800:1, indicating

diminished access to primary and specialty care. Twenty five percent of the patients at the Osher Center

for Integrative Medicine (OCIM) live outside Nashville city limits, barring them from consistent access to

multidisciplinary chronic pain care.

Objectives:

This project aims to elucidate the feasibility of telemedicine as a means to provide access to nonpharmacological

strategies to control and manage chronic pain. An ancillary goal of this project is to

determine if the HIPAA-compliant telehealth platform is an effective way to decrease social isolation in this

population of patients and improve pain coping skills.

Methods/Procedures:

This project implemented four multimodal telehealth sessions during spring of 2017 to four existing patients

of OCIM with restricted access to care. The topics of these sessions were adapted from existing Mind Body

Medicine curriculum and included acupressure, stress management, nutrition education, and movement,

with guided meditation included at the beginning of each session. Validated surveys PROMIS-29 and

Pain Self Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ-2) were utilized to assess physical, mental, and social health and

confidence to one’s ability to lead a normal life despite pain, respectively. Additionally, novel questions

surrounding computer literacy were included in these pre- and post-intervention surveys.

Findings:

Project in process, results to follow

Expected outcomes include reports of improved confidence in social interactions and sense of community,

improved ability to manage pain on daily basis, and confidence in utilizing the telehealth platform as a

means to engage in health education.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

After analysis is complete, recommendations, as appropriate, for implementing telehealth groups for chronic

pain patients will be made

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Tennessee Nurses Association

Statements of Financial Position

December 31, 2017 and 2016

2017 2016

ASSETS

Current Assets

Cash $127,629 $ 80,183

Investments 243,484 222,041

Accounts receivable 32,445 41,950

Prepaid expense 5,740 2,660

Total Current Assets $ 409,298 $ 346,834

Property and equipment, net 6,863 14,453

Total assets $ 416,161 $ 361,287

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

Current liabilities:

District dues payable $ 36,878 $ 34,441

Accrued expenses 10,384 11,204

Deferred revenue 49,122 56,514

Total current liabilities 96,384 102,159

Net Assets

Unrestricted net assets 319,777 259,128

Total liabilities and net assets $ 416,161 $ 361,287

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Tennessee Nurses Association

Statements of Activities and Changes in Net Assets

For the Years Ended December 31, 2017 and 2016

Unrestricted net assets:

91

2017 2016

Revenues and support:

Membership dues $ 344,768 $ 320,710

Convention 92,429 83,235

Administrative fees 65,504 68,337

Continuing education approval plan 53,606 72,319

Legislative summit 26,335 24,075

Investment income 21,443 10,421

Affinity programs 17,517 27,525

Other revenue 8,988 2,220

Interest income - money market 24 19

Total unrestricted revenue $ 630,614 $ 608,861

Unrestricted expenses:

Salaries and benefits 318,065 351,456

Convention 76,165 62,564

Office rent 42,006 39,940

Insurance 34,800 57,859

Equipment repairs and maintenance 34,714 21,658

Professional services 12,224 13,549

Depreciation 7,590 7,921

Legislative summit 7,533 5,856

Office supplies 5,986 3,682

Staff travel and development 5,870 3,356

Dues, subscriptions, and publications 5,861 7,121

Meetings 4,256 1,987

Service charges 4,205 6,663

Equipment rental 3,930 7,650

Postage 3,028 5,173

Software expense 2,161 21,448

Other expenses 1,546 1,168

Membership development 25 574

Total unrestricted expenses 569,965 619,625

Increase (decrease) in unrestricted net assets 60,649 (10,764)

Net assets-Beginning of year-as previously reported 259,128 315,227

Prior period adjustment - Note 2 - (45,335)

Balance at beginning of year, restated 259,128 269,892

Net assets - End of year $ 319,777 $ 259,128


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Tennessee Nurses Association

Statements of Cash Flows

For the Years Ended December 31, 2017 and 2016

2017 2016

Operating activities:

Increase (decrease) in unrestricted net assets $ 60,649 $ (10,764)

Adjustments to reconcile increase (decrease) in

unrestricted net assets to net cash

provided by operating activities:

Depreciation 7,590 7,921

Unrealized gain on investments (12,360) (2,997)

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

(Increase) decrease in accounts receivable 9,505 (2,051)

(Increase) decrease in prepaid expense (3,080) (2,660)

Increase (decrease) in district dues payable 2,437 21,846

Increase (decrease) in accrued expenses (820) 1,168

Increase (decrease) in deferred revenue (7,392) (2,251)

Net cash provided by operating activities 56,529 10,212

Investing activities:

Proceeds from sale (purchases) of investments, net (9,083) (7,424)

Net cash used for investing activities (9,083) (7,424)

Increase in cash 47,446 2,788

Cash-Beginning of year 80,183 77,395

Cash-End of year $ 127,629 $ 80,183

Non-cash transactions:

The Association wrote-off $62,080 of property and

equipment with related accumulated depreciation

of $62,080 in 2016.

92


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

TNA

LEADERSHIP

OPPORTUNITIES

TNA DISTRICTS

District Committees

District Board of Directors

Networking and mentoring

opportunities

Great place to meet colleagues

in your area

Help nurses in your area thrive

District President’s contact

informaton at tnaonline.org

STATE

TNA Committees, TNA Board

of Directors, Task Forces and

TNF Board of Directors

Meet and network with nursing

and healthcare leaders in

practice, legislation,

academics, research and other

areas.

NATIONAL

The American Nurses

Association, much like TNA,

has many opportunities to

become involved. When you

join, you will receive valuable

information from ANA and

ways to serve on a national

level.

YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Did you know that the association is completely run by the members

of TNA? Your participation in TNA makes a difference. Our membership,

made up of registered nurses just like you, volunteer their time

to make this organizations a viable part of the healthcare delivery

system in Tennessee. Many nurses will say they are where they are

today because of nurses they met in TNA. We invite you to become

involved today! A TNA staff member, or a member of the TNA Board

of Directors will be happy to help answer any questions you may have.

We look forward to hearing from you.

CONTACT US

Phone : 615-254-0350

Email : tna@tnaonline.org

Web : www.tnaonline.org

Tennessee Nurses Association

545 Mainstream Drive, Suite 405

Nashville, TN 37228-1296

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Email: tna@tnaonline.org

94


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

TNA PAST PRESIDENTS

*Mrs. Lena A. Warner 1905-1918

*Nina E. Wootton 1918-1919

*Myrtle Marion Archer 1920-1921

*Mrs. Daisy Gould 1921-1923

*Mrs. Myrtle E. Blair 1924-1925

*Abbie Roberts 1926-1927

*Mrs. Corrine B. Hunn 1928-1929

*Hazel Lee Goff 1930-1932

*Nancy Rice (Nashville) 1933-1935

*Aurelia B. Potts (Nashville) 1936-1937

*Mattie E. Malone (Memphis) 1938-1939

*Lennis Ault (Knoxville) 1940-1942

*Frances H. Cunningham (Memphis) 1942-1944

*Beatrice M. Clutch (Nashville) 1944-1948

*Ruth Neil Murry (Memphis) 1948-1950

*Elizabeth H. Killeffer (Cookeville) 1950-1952

*Violet M. Crook (Union City) 1952-1955

*Catherine M. Sterling (Memphis) 1956-1959

*Vesta L. Swartz (Johnson City) 1960-1961

*Mary Frances Smith (Memphis) 1962-1966

*Dorothy L. Griscom (Memphis) 1966-1969

*Dorothy Hocker (Nashville) 1969-1971

*Mary Evelyn Kemp (Nashville) 1971-1973

*Erline Gore (Nashville) 1973-1975

*Patsy B. McClure (Knoxville) 1975-1977

*Emma Lou Harris (Chattanooga) 1977-1979

*Mary Windham (Clarksville) 1979-1981

Annie J. Carter (Nashville) 1981-1983

Margaret Heins (Knoxville) 1983-1985

Virginia(Ginna)Trotter Betts(Nashville) 1985-1987

Margaret Heins (Knoxville) 1987-1989

Frances Edwards (Nashville) 1989-1993

Carol Blankenship (Johnson City) 1993-1995

Sharon Adkins (Nashville) 1995-1997

Margaret (Peggy) Strong (Memphis) 1997-1999

Gary Crotty (Knoxville) 1999-2001

Wanda Neal Hooper (Nashville) 2001-2003

*Maureen Nalle (Knoxville) 2003-2005

Susan Sanders (Lynchburg) 2005-2007

Laura Beth Brown (Nashville) 2007-2009

Elizabeth (Beth) H. Smith (Piney Flats) 2009-2011

Lena Patterson (Ooltewah) 2011-2012

Jill S. Kinch (Nashville) (Interim President) 2012-2013

Frances (Billie) Sills (Johnson City) 2013-2015

Sandra (Sandy) Murabito (Nashville) 2015-2017

*deceased

95


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Take Advantage of the Many Scholarship

Opportunities Available Through the

Tennessee Nurses Foundation

Scholarship applications—reviewed once each year.

The deadline is November 1.

• RN to BSN Scholarship

• Maureen Nalle Memorial Graduate Nursing Scholarship

• Arthur Davis LPN to RN Scholarship

Grant applications—reviewed twice each year.

The deadline is the last day of February and August.

• Nursing Research Grants

• Leadership Nursing Program

Additional Opportunities!

• Nurse Mentoring Toolkit

• Honor A Nurse

• Edna Mason Memorial TNA Conference Scholarship

TNA Membership Dues Scholarship

• Tennessee Professional Assistance Program (TnPAP)

TNF Grant Review Process

The review process will take approximately four to six weeks. If you miss a deadline, your application will

not be reviewed until after the next deadline date. Deadline dates vary, please visit tnaonline.org and click

on the TNF link for complete details.

Visit tnaonline.org and click on the TNF link for complete details,

email tnf@tnaonline.org or call 615-254-0350. The mission of the Tennessee

Nurse Foundation it to promote professional excellence in nursing.

TNF, 545 Mainstream Drive, Suite 405, Nashville, TN 37228-1296

Donate to TNF and HELP A NURSE—Thank you!

96


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

2018-2019 TNF Board of Trust and Staff

Sue MacArthur

Ed.D, APRN, BC

President

Columbia

Ashley Berry

RN

Portland

Janice Harris

MSN, RN

Wartrace

Position Vacant

Vice President

Rebecca Lane Bone

MSN, RN, CNE

Dickson

Bill Jolley

Vice President, TN

Hospital Association

Non-Nurse

Community Leader

Debra Sullivan

PhD, MSN, RN,

CNE, COI

Treasurer

Readyville

Donna Copenhaver

Ed.D, MSN, RN

Eagleville

La-Kenya Kellum

DNP, RN, NE-BC,

CNML

Memphis

Dara Rogers

BSN, RN, OCN

Secretary

Murfreesboro

Mary Bess Griffith

MSN, RN, Ph.D(c),

CS, FNP

Union City

Sandy Murabito

Ed.D, MSN, RN

Nashville

Haley Vance

DNP, APRN,

CPNP-AC

Ex-Officio

Nashville

Amy Hamlin

Ph.D, MSN,

FNP-BC, APN

Ashland City

Raven Wentworth

DNP, RN, APRN,

AGPCNP-BC, FNP-BC

Jackson

STAFF

Tina Gerardi

MS, RN, CAE

TNF Executive

Director

Mike Harkreader

MS, RN, CARN

TnPAP Executive

Director

Kathryn Denton

TNF Program

Manager

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION














TNA/ANA Member Benefits-at-a-Glance

Check Out Our Benefits!

TNA Visa Card

Get the card that rewards you

and supports TNA with every

purchase. Visit

TNAonline.org/Visa for details.

Protect yourself with

Professional Liability

Insurance through NSO. Visit: https://

www.tnaonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/NSO-

Liability-Insurance-Benefit-TNA.pdf

One Main Financial

Provides a wide variety of personal loans to meet your

needs, from auto loan refinance, debt consolidation, and

home improvement projects to travel excursion and

more! Visit www.onemainfinancial.com/TNAnurses for

details.

TNA Career Center

Find and post employment opportunities at TNA’s

online Career Center. Click the Career Center link at

TNAonline.org

Gallagher Affinity (NEW)

Offering insurance, office supplies discount, financial

services, travel discounts, as well as small business

solutions.

Financial and Long Term Care planning through

Innovative Financial Group, LLC

Carson Newman University

A 10% tuition discount is available to TNA

members and their immediate family. Apply today

at onlinenursing.cn.edu/TNA

Walden University

A U.S. regionally accredited university offering online

bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees. 10% tuition

benefit offered.

Chamberlain University

TNA members receive waived application fees,

complimentary no-obligation written transcript

evaluation (including obtaining official transcripts for

applicants), and 10% savings on tuition for all of the

online programs.

Free Online Continuing Education—Available at

no or reduced cost through ANA Members Only

OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in

Nursing—The current issue of this peer reviewed electronic

journal is available only through ANA MembersOnly

on Nursingworld.org

Free weekly Legislative Updates and PRN Alerts

when the Tennessee Legislature is in session

Free monthly e-newsletter TNA News Express for

Members

















American Nurse Today—ANA’s official monthly (six

print/six electronic) journal packed with

information you can use in your practice.

The American Nurse—published every other month

to keep you current on nursing policy and ANA issues

you need to know

Leading edge conferences and exciting educational

events at the national, state and local levels at

member discounted rates

Numerous networking opportunities

Enhance and extend your leadership skills through

ANA’s Leadership Institute

Discounted products through nursesbooks.org, the

official publishing arm of ANA

As a member, you will save up to $125 on an ANCC

Initial Certification and $150 on

Recertification

Provide opportunities to comment on policy

development at state and federal levels and

give input on scopes and standards of nursing

and specialty practice

Tennessee Nurses Foundation’s scholarship

programs—RN to BSN Scholarship, Maureen Nalle

Memorial Graduate Nursing Scholarship, TNF’s TNA

District Educational Scholarship, Edna Mason

Memorial TNA Conference Scholarship, Arthur Davis

LPN to RN Scholarship and TNA Membership Dues

Scholarship Program

Tennessee Nurses Foundation—Leadership

Nursing program, Nursing Research Grants

program, Mentoring Program, and the Scholarly

Writing Contest

American Nurses Foundation—Nursing

Research Grant Fund

Discussion groups—free subscription to TNA’s

Listservs

Information and Position Statements—

affecting your practice, your profession and the

policies that impact us all—via ANA MembersOnly

on NursingWorld.org

Tennessee Prescription Drug Card Program

Savings of up to 75% on both brand and generic

medications

Term Life Insurance offered by Hartford Life and

Accident Insurance Company

Auto Insurance offered by Nationwide

Visit TNAonline.org for further information on member benefits or call 615-254-0350

99


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

April 3, 2019 October 17-19, 2019

TNA Legislative Summit

War Memorial Auditorium

301 6th Ave N

Nashville, TN 37243

TNA-TSNA Annual Conference

Hilton - Memphis

39 Ridge Lake Blvd

Memphis, TN 38120

Visit TNAonline.org for details!

100


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Tennessee Nurses Foundation • Contribution Form

Honor A Nurse

The Tennessee Nurses Foundation (TNF) welcomes you to publicly recognize a nurse. With your $50 tax-deductible donation to

TNF, your honored nurse’s name will appear in the Tennessee Nurse,(mailed to over 90,000 RNs), as well as in the designated

“Honor A Nurse” section of the Tennessee Nurses Association’s (TNA) website at www.tnaonline.org. A photo and brief paragraph

may also be submitted to further recognize your honored nurse.

Make a statewide commitment to honor a special nurse that:

• won an award • is a nurse family member • is a friend, or a colleague

• is retiring • is dedicated to nursing and to patients • is in memoriam

• received a promotion • has a special event or occasion coming up • is in celebration of Nurses Week

Patients and patient’s family members:

• Honor A Nurse that truly made a difference in their care, or the care of a family member.

Your $50 donation will go toward continued support of the TNF and their work pertaining to scholarships, and grants that support

the needs of nurses in Tennessee. TNF is a nonprofit, 501(c)(3) organization. Donations are tax-deductible to the fullest extent

allowed by law and support the mission of TNF.

DONOR INFORMATION

Donor Name:

Address:

Email Address:

(Street) (City) (State) (Zip)

Phone Number:

(Home)

(Work)

PAYMENT INFORMATION Authorized Payment Amount: $

(Minimum $50 donation for each nurse honored)

Check payable to TNF is enclosed

MasterCard/Visa/American Express/Discover

Card Number

Cardholder Name

Address

(Please Print)

City____________________________________ State______ Zip__

HONORED NURSE INFORMATION

• Honoree’s Name & Credentials:

Exp. Date:____/____ Code:

• Choose which quarter you would like the honored nurse listed in the Tennessee Nurse publication and the TNA website,

(choose only one quarter for both listings) Winter Spring Summer Fall

• Comments regarding the Honored Nurse:

• Include photo of Honored Nurse (if available) with contribution form or email to tnf@tnaonline.org. Photo requirements:

digital photo that has been taken at a high resolution of 300 dpi (which equates into setting the digital camera to take the largest file

size possible) or an actual commercially printed photograph, (we cannot accept photographs that have been printed on a desktop

printer)

• Send notification of gift to:

(Name) (Street) (City) (State) (Zip)

SUBMIT COMPLETED FORM TO: TNF • 545 Mainstream Dr., Ste. 405 • Nashville, TN 37228 • Fax: 615-254-0303 • Phone: 615-254-0350

101


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Job Seekers: Keep Your Career on the Move!

Our Career Center is the best source for jobs in all practice settings for nurses. It’s

where Tennessee nurses go to ind the right job and where employers go to ind the

right talent. With easy to use tools like customizable job alerts and multiple resumes,

the TNA Career Center is the best place to grow your career!

Employers: Find the Most Qualiied Candidate!

each the largest ualiied job seeking nurses by recruiting with the TNA Career

Center. Our members are highly ualiied and passionate about nursing and are

looking for a rewarding opportunity.

Need more information?

Contact Brian DiIorio at 1‐866‐376‐0949 x 6028 or

bdiiorio@associationcareernetwork.com

Visit the Tennessee Nurses Association Career Center today

and discover the difference we can make for you.

To search or post a job, please visit us at:

http://tnaonline.careerwebsite.com

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2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

Do you have an extra

$

37,084

lying around?

That’s the average cost for a nursing

professional to defend against a medical

malpractice suit. Add another $164,586

if the claim is settled against you.*

When you add up all the numbers,

NSO equals peace of mind.

NSO is the preferred provider

of malpractice insurance for

TNA members

For rates and coverage details

visit www.nso.com

*Nurse Professional Liability Exposures: 2015 Claim Report Update, NSO and CNA, www.nso.com, October 2015

Nurses Service Organization is a registered trade name of Affinity Insurance Services, Inc.; (TX 13695); (AR 100106022); in CA & MN, AIS Affinity Insurance Agency, Inc. (CA 0795465); in OK, AIS

Affinity Insurance Services Inc.; in CA, Aon Affinity Insurance Services, Inc., (0G94493), Aon Direct Insurance Administrators and Berkely Insurance Agency and in NY, AIS Affinity Insurance Agency.

X-13411-0918

103


2018 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | ADVOCACY IN ACTION

OneMain Financial

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anytime you need.

When it comes to managing your

money, you don’t have to feel like

you’re on your own. We’ve teamed

up with our friends at OneMain

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tools and resources to help busy

nurses like you.

Explore topics like budgeting, loans,

credit and more in a relevant and

fun way. Plus, OneMain has financial

calculators, the MoneySKILL money

management course and educational

videos to help you feel confident

about your financial decisions.

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OneMainFinancial.com/learn

All loans subject to our normal credit policies.

104

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