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Jeweller - May 2019

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VOICE OF THE AUSTRALIAN JEWELLERY INDUSTRY<br />

MAY <strong>2019</strong><br />

Watch list<br />

SELLING WITH STYLE IN THE<br />

FASHION WATCH SECTOR<br />

All Thai’d up<br />

+ +<br />

HANDCRAFTED EXCELLENCE AND A<br />

ROYAL TOUCH AT THE BANGKOK FAIR<br />

Cast track<br />

WHAT’S NEW IN THE CASTING<br />

AND REFINING INDUSTRY


New Certified Rubies<br />

In stock & online now<br />

Visit our website or call our Melbourne office for details:<br />

Room 405, 4th Floor, Wales Building, 227 Collins Street, Melbourne VIC 3000<br />

Ph: +61 (0) 3 9654 5200 / Interstate Orders 1300 843 141 E: sales@oagems.com www.oagems.com


WORLD SHINER PTY. LTD.<br />

www.worldshiner.com<br />

Sydney Brisbane London<br />

New Zealand<br />

Melbourne<br />

Tokyo Mumbai Florence Stuttgart Chicago


The <strong>Jeweller</strong>y Design<br />

Awards are back<br />

Returning to the <strong>2019</strong> International <strong>Jeweller</strong>y & Watch Fair, the <strong>Jeweller</strong>y Design Awards represent the industry in<br />

recognising and celebrating the best of the best in Australian and New Zealand craftsmanship.<br />

The Awards Finalists will have their designs showcased as part of an exclusive display at the<br />

International <strong>Jeweller</strong>y Fair <strong>2019</strong> held at ICC Sydney, with cash prizes to be won!<br />

AWARD CATEGORIES<br />

• 1st & 2nd Year Apprentice/Student Award • 3rd & 4th Year Apprentice/Student Award<br />

• Australian Opal Award • Bridal Award • CAD/CAM/Cast Award • Coloured Gemstone Award • Diamond Award<br />

• Innovative Timepiece Award • Men’s Accessories & <strong>Jeweller</strong>y Award • Pearl Award • Precious Metal Award<br />

Do you have what it takes?<br />

Enter the Awards online at www.jewelleryfair.com.au<br />

INTERNATIONAL<br />

JEWELLERY & WATCH FAIR<br />

AUGUST 24 > 26, <strong>2019</strong><br />

ICC Sydney I Exhibition Centre I Darling Harbour<br />

Organised by<br />

For further information regarding the awards, including full terms and<br />

conditions, please visit www.jewelleryfair.com.au or give our<br />

team a call on 02 9452 7513


SELLING WITH STYLE IN THE<br />

FASHION WATCH SECTOR<br />

VOICE OF THE AUSTRALIAN JEWELLERY INDUSTRY<br />

HANDCRAFTED EXCELLENCE AND A<br />

ROYAL TOUCH AT THE BANGKOK FAIR<br />

MAY <strong>2019</strong><br />

WHAT’S NEW IN THE CASTING<br />

AND REFINING INDUSTRY<br />

CONTENTS<br />

MAY <strong>2019</strong><br />

17/<br />

23/<br />

31/<br />

FEATURES REGULARS BUSINESS<br />

17/ PARTNER IN TIME<br />

When is a watch not a watch? <strong>Jeweller</strong><br />

takes a look at why people love this<br />

stylish, affordable accessory.<br />

23/ THE CAST WORD<br />

How green technology and 3D<br />

printing are defining the casting<br />

and refining industry.<br />

28/ WATCH THIS SPACE<br />

Find out what’s next for Baselworld as<br />

it faces an uncertain future.<br />

31/ BANG ON<br />

Thailand’s signature craftsmanship<br />

wins fans at the Bangkok Gem and<br />

Jewelry Fair.<br />

9/ Editorial<br />

10/ Upfront<br />

11/ News<br />

33/ Gems<br />

Organic Gems Part II: Pearls<br />

41/ My Store<br />

42/ 10 Years Ago<br />

43/ Calendar<br />

44/ My Bench<br />

46/ Soapbox<br />

Martin Foster on the pain and<br />

politics of the Swiss shows.<br />

35/ Business feature<br />

Chris Petersen decodes how to sell<br />

digitally upgraded products.<br />

37/ Selling<br />

The biggest sales mistakes are the<br />

easiest to make, writes Brian Jeffrey.<br />

38/ Management<br />

There are two key elements for<br />

leadership, says David Brown.<br />

39/ Marketing<br />

Sue Barrett shows you how<br />

to apply your sales skills to<br />

everyday situations.<br />

40/ Logged On<br />

Simon Dell shares seven simple<br />

steps to online success.<br />

Watch list<br />

All Thai’d up<br />

+ +<br />

Cast track<br />

Front cover description:<br />

Thomas Sabo fashion watches<br />

combine the brand’s signature<br />

style and quality, and are the<br />

perfect complement to<br />

Thomas Sabo jewellery.<br />

Visit: thomassabo.com.au<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong> <strong>Jeweller</strong> 5


conferences<br />

Designed to inspire,<br />

motivate, educate and<br />

build relationships.<br />

The lessons learned<br />

from our expert team<br />

and fellow members<br />

are some of the<br />

greatest benefits you<br />

can receive.<br />

stock<br />

ranging /<br />

merchandising<br />

Access to our<br />

best selling stock<br />

analysis reports plus<br />

defined category<br />

management, purchase<br />

& replenishment<br />

planning information.<br />

management<br />

training<br />

Business Mentoring,<br />

KPI Benchmarking &<br />

Business Analysis &<br />

Store Consultancy as<br />

well as extensive tailored<br />

management training<br />

programs & special HR<br />

/ Policies & Procedures<br />

packages available to<br />

every member.<br />

marketing<br />

Choose and pay for<br />

the marketing that<br />

you want to suit your<br />

business. Your choice of<br />

Catalogues, Brochures,<br />

Instore, Customer<br />

Loyalty, Direct Marketing<br />

and more.<br />

staff<br />

training<br />

Comprehensive industry<br />

specific staff training at<br />

an individual store level<br />

which is also accessible<br />

24/7 via our exclusive<br />

member extranet.<br />

online<br />

solutions<br />

Access a suite of<br />

extremely cost effective<br />

online solutions to<br />

keep your store ahead<br />

of the game. Including<br />

a highly sophisticated<br />

Direct Marketing / Loyalty<br />

Program, Social Media<br />

platform, Ecommerce<br />

gateway & more.<br />

DREAM BIG<br />

RETAIN YOUR NAME & YOUR INDEPENDENCE!<br />

We offer the most extensive retail support in the industry,<br />

with a young & dynamic head office team, with over<br />

50 years combined <strong>Jeweller</strong>y industry experience.<br />

You’ve worked hard to build your own brand in your<br />

community - Join our family of like minded <strong>Jeweller</strong>y<br />

Specialists, keep your independence & experience our<br />

dynamic group today!<br />

- We Specialise in HANDS ON Retail Assistance<br />

- Ask us about our Staff Training Programs<br />

- Enjoy the Best Prices in the Industry<br />

- Is your Current Buying Group offering you the<br />

One on One assistance that you Deserve?<br />

Leading Edge Group - one of Australia’s largest & most cost effective buying<br />

groups. No cost to join & everything to gain!<br />

championing independent retailers<br />

Find out more. Talk to Anita Gounder, General Manager<br />

building valuable business communities<br />

P 02 8732 9540 E goundera@leadingedgegroup.com.au<br />

www.leadingedgegroup.com.au


EDITORIAL<br />

BUYING GROUPS ARE RIGHT TO UNITE<br />

In what can only be described as a big<br />

step forward, both Showcase <strong>Jeweller</strong>s<br />

and Leading Edge <strong>Jeweller</strong>s have decided<br />

to collaborate with Expertise Events and<br />

incorporate their annual conferences and<br />

buying days into the International <strong>Jeweller</strong>y<br />

& Watch Fair (IJWF).<br />

Traditionally both groups have organised their<br />

events to take place a few days prior to the<br />

Sydney trade show.<br />

Unlike Nationwide <strong>Jeweller</strong>s, which has<br />

always organised its educational program and<br />

buying days to be conducted on the actual<br />

fair floor, Showcase and Leading Edge held<br />

their activities off-site a few days beforehand,<br />

hoping that their members would stay on to<br />

attend the trade show proper.<br />

The fact that suppliers to both groups would<br />

have their costs doubled and even tripled by<br />

having to attend the groups’ annual events –<br />

at different locations – as well as the Sydney<br />

fair, was an ongoing issue.<br />

It’s been a major bone of contention for<br />

many years, because not only did suppliers<br />

incur multiple event costs, as well as flights<br />

and accommodation, staff would be out<br />

of the office for extended periods of time.<br />

And while suppliers have grumbled about<br />

the inefficiency and inconvenience for<br />

sometime, to a large extent they put up<br />

with it in the good times.<br />

However as trading conditions weakened, the<br />

suppliers’ voices got louder until grumbling<br />

became full-on complaints. That was<br />

especially true when the buying groups were<br />

not getting their members showing up to<br />

their own conferences in large numbers as<br />

they had previously.<br />

Something had to give. With the divide in the<br />

industry over the past three years, it was most<br />

welcome news that, for the first time since its<br />

inception, the Sydney trade fair will feature all<br />

three buying groups on the floor with their<br />

respective educational and training programs<br />

being conducted at the same time.<br />

The news was obviously welcomed by the<br />

suppliers who can ill-afford unnecessary costs<br />

in the current business climate. Every dollar<br />

and effort needs to go into reinvigorating the<br />

industry so the new arrangements will go<br />

a long way towards a more harmonious and<br />

focused attitude.<br />

The same attitude would also be ideal when<br />

it comes to industry awards. I remember a<br />

time when 600 to 800 people would gather<br />

at the Sydney Town Hall for the Australian<br />

<strong>Jeweller</strong>y Awards. The talents of our<br />

homegrown designers and jewellers were<br />

put on show at a gala industry event.<br />

Sadly times have changed, and worse, we<br />

now have two competing jewellery design<br />

awards: the incumbent JAA Australian Design<br />

Awards and the new, larger, <strong>Jeweller</strong>y Design<br />

Awards promoted by Expertise Events and<br />

showcased at the IJWF.<br />

While that’s not ideal, it’s worse because,<br />

THE UPSHOT<br />

WAS THAT TWO<br />

JEWELLERY<br />

DESIGN<br />

COMPETITIONS<br />

WERE HELD IN<br />

2017 AND TWO<br />

WILL TAKE PLACE<br />

AGAIN THIS YEAR.<br />

while both are biennial events, they take<br />

place in the same year!<br />

The clash came about when Expertise Events<br />

decided to launch a new style of jewellery<br />

design competition in the ‘odd’ years; the<br />

JAA’s competition had always been in ‘even’<br />

years. However, in 2016 the JAA failed to<br />

secure support for its event and postponed it,<br />

deciding to hold it the following year.<br />

The upshot was that two jewellery design<br />

competitions were held in 2017 and two will<br />

take place again this year.<br />

That now causes new problems because the<br />

obvious sponsors for such an industry event<br />

are being asked to support two events at<br />

the same time – while there is no event the<br />

following year. And while sponsors do so as<br />

a way to support emerging talent, it seems<br />

rather silly to have two events at the same<br />

time one year and none the next.<br />

The obvious solution is for the JAA to go back<br />

to their even year competition and have the<br />

Expertise Events competition in the odd year.<br />

Even better still would be to have one<br />

event every year, with the JAA working with<br />

Expertise Events to promote the wonderful<br />

and talented jewellery designers Australia<br />

has to offer.<br />

Forget a big step forward – that would be<br />

a giant leap!<br />

Coleby Nicholson<br />

Managing Editor<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong> <strong>Jeweller</strong> 9


UPFRONT<br />

n HIDDEN GEMS<br />

A routine traffic stop took a very<br />

interesting turn in New Mexico last<br />

month. Eusebio Padillo, 23, was pulled<br />

over for riding his motorcycle without a<br />

license plate. In the course of his arrest,<br />

police found a small bag containing 44<br />

diamonds – believed to be stolen – in<br />

his anal cavity! A bumpy ride indeed.<br />

n SCENT OF SUCCESS<br />

Middle Eastern perfume company<br />

Spirit Of Dubai Parfums has broken<br />

the Guinness World Record for most<br />

diamonds set on a perfume bottle.<br />

The 6ft 5in-tall flask of Shumukh, a<br />

unisex fragrance, is inset with 3,571<br />

diamonds totalling 38.55-carats. It also<br />

features topaz, pearls, 18-carat gold<br />

and pure silver – so it’s no surprise it<br />

has broken the record for the world’s<br />

most expensive fragrance too, priced at<br />

$1.295 million per bottle.<br />

n HAIR TODAY…<br />

Melbourne man Hayden Peters’<br />

650-strong jewellery collection is full<br />

of treasured pieces dating back to the<br />

Victorian era. But there’s one section<br />

that’s different from the others – the<br />

items are made from human hair!<br />

Known as ‘mourning jewellery’, they date<br />

back to the trend of the 19th century,<br />

which saw locks of the deceased’s hair<br />

turned into rings, lockets and brooches.<br />

EMERALD:<br />

MAY BIRTHSTONE<br />

DID YOU KNOW?<br />

Emeralds were mined as early as 1500BCE<br />

by the ancient Egyptians. Today, the world’s<br />

supply mostly comes from Colombia, where<br />

the native people hid their mines so well<br />

it took the Conquistadors 20 years to find<br />

them! This deep green gem is associated with<br />

rebirth, youth, good fortune and foresight.<br />

As the birthstone for <strong>May</strong>, it represents the<br />

coming of spring in the northern hemisphere.<br />

DIGITAL<br />

BRAINWAVE<br />

WHO SAID?<br />

“Millennials consider fashion<br />

watches to be an extension<br />

of their personality.”<br />

Turn to page 17 to find out ><br />

INSTASHOPPING<br />

Instagram has begun testing its new Checkout feature, which will finally allow users to<br />

buy products without leaving the app. The US-only trial includes more than 20 wellknown<br />

companies like Burberry, Nike and Zara. Previously, users would have to tap ‘View<br />

on Website’ buttons on images, which would then link them to an e-commerce site.<br />

The new feature will allow users to store their payment information – including PayPal,<br />

Visa and Mastercard – on their Instagram profile for one-click transactions. If successful,<br />

the feature is predicted to roll out globally by the end of <strong>2019</strong>.<br />

TOP PRODUCT<br />

The new Cluse Le Couronnement watch<br />

combines modern appeal with refined details<br />

and innovative functionality. Bordered with<br />

faceted hexagons, this timepiece features an<br />

easily interchangeable soft strap in genuine<br />

leather. Available in a range of colours, making<br />

it fun to mix and match with your other<br />

jewellery, all Cluse watches are created with<br />

impeccable attention to design and the finest<br />

materials. Distributed by Heart & Grace.<br />

VOICE OF THE AUSTRALIAN<br />

JEWELLERY INDUSTRY<br />

jewellermagazine.com<br />

Publisher & Editor<br />

Coleby Nicholson<br />

Associate Publisher<br />

Angela Han<br />

angela.han@gunnamattamedia.com<br />

Journalists<br />

Arabella Roden<br />

arabella.roden@jewellermagazine.com<br />

Myles Hume<br />

myles.hume@gunnamattamedia.com<br />

Production Manager<br />

& Graphic Design<br />

Jo De Bono<br />

art@gunnamattamedia.com<br />

Accounts<br />

Paul Blewitt<br />

finance@gunnamattamedia.com<br />

Subscriptions<br />

info@jewellermagazine.com<br />

<strong>Jeweller</strong> is published by:<br />

Gunnamatta Media Pty Ltd<br />

Locked Bag 26, South Melbourne,<br />

VIC 3205 AUSTRALIA<br />

ABN 64 930 790 434<br />

Phone: +61 3 9696 7200<br />

Fax: +61 3 9696 8313<br />

info@gunnamattamedia.com<br />

Copyright: All material appearing<br />

in <strong>Jeweller</strong> is subject to copyright.<br />

Reproduction in whole or in part is<br />

strictly forbidden without prior written<br />

consent of the publisher.<br />

Gunnamatta Media Pty Ltd strives to<br />

report accurately and fairly and it is<br />

our policy to correct significant errors<br />

of fact and misleading statements in<br />

the next available issue. All statements<br />

made, although based on information<br />

believed to be reliable and accurate at<br />

the time, cannot be guaranteed and<br />

no fault or liability can be accepted<br />

for error or omission. Any comment<br />

relating to subjective opinions should<br />

be addressed to the editor.<br />

Advertising: The publisher reserves<br />

the right to omit or alter any<br />

advertisement to comply with<br />

Australian law and the advertiser<br />

agrees to indemnify the publisher for<br />

all damages or liabilities arising from<br />

the published material.<br />

10 <strong>Jeweller</strong> <strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong>


NEWS<br />

NEWS<br />

Mixed news for Michael Hill<br />

Releasing its quarterly trade update recently,<br />

Michael Hill International revealed that<br />

same-store sales shrunk 1.5 per cent and<br />

total sales 0.8 per cent year-on-year. The<br />

share price slipped 7 cents to 60 cents in the<br />

wake of the news.<br />

But while those numbers may seem<br />

discouraging, they are a marked<br />

improvement on the international jewellery<br />

chain’s previous two quarters, which showed<br />

same-store sales falling 11 per cent and 2.9<br />

per cent consecutively.<br />

The company put the good news down to<br />

its new integrated, customer-lead operating<br />

model, adopted in March, which focuses<br />

on more closely aligning merchandise,<br />

marketing and retail.<br />

Daniel Bracken, CEO Michael Hill, said in a<br />

statement, “The company’s performance<br />

continued to stabilise during the quarter as<br />

refinements to the strategy improved our<br />

position,” adding, “We have already seen the<br />

potential for the new integrated model to<br />

lift customer engagement and sales, as well<br />

as improve operational efficiencies.”<br />

Michael Hill closed five under-performing<br />

stores during the quarter – including the<br />

final Emma & Roe location – and opened<br />

one new site. E-commerce now represents<br />

2.9 per cent of total sales, and is up 53 per<br />

cent when compared to the same period<br />

THE TIDE MAY BE TURNING FOR THE RETAILER<br />

in the 2018 financial year. The company<br />

also made redundant 27 staff at its Brisbane<br />

headquarters in mid-February, as part of<br />

cost-cutting measures.<br />

It was reported that the job losses came<br />

across ‘all sections, from manufacturing to<br />

office administration’.<br />

In Australia, same-store sales were down<br />

3.4 per cent, which analysts attributed to<br />

challenging overall conditions for retail.<br />

However, the results were worse across the<br />

Tasman, with the company’s New Zealand<br />

operations reporting same-store sales<br />

down 6.3 per cent due to falling consumer<br />

sentiment and spending in the wake of the<br />

Christchurch shooting.<br />

Michael Hill operates 171 stores in Australia<br />

and 52 in New Zealand.<br />

More management changes at Pandora<br />

Following several other high-profile exits,<br />

Pandora International’s chief operating<br />

officer (COO) Jeremy Schwartz tendered his<br />

resignation last month, just ahead of the<br />

imminent commencement of new president<br />

and CEO Alexander Lacik.<br />

Schwartz had been acting as ‘co-CEO’ of the<br />

company alongside chief financial officer<br />

Anders Boyer since September 2018, after<br />

CEO Anders Colding Friis quit the company.<br />

Some had speculated Schwartz – who was<br />

previously CEO of The Body Shop – could<br />

take on the top job full-time, before Lacik<br />

was named to the position in mid-February.<br />

Lacik – a Swedish executive who has been<br />

CEO of Britax since 2017 – took the reins<br />

on 23 April.<br />

Peder Tuborgh, chairman of Pandora’s<br />

board of directors, said in a statement,<br />

“I have sympathy for Jeremy’s decision<br />

considering the overlap of competencies<br />

between him and Alexander Lacik. I would<br />

like to thank Jeremy for his significant<br />

contributions to Pandora.”<br />

Elsewhere, the company has announced<br />

plans for its first nation-specific designs,<br />

releasing a peach blossom-inspired<br />

collection for the Chinese market.<br />

Huge diamond<br />

found in Botswana<br />

One of the largest diamonds in history<br />

has been unearthed in Botswana. The<br />

unbroken 1,758-carat stone was found<br />

at the Karowe Mine, which is owned by<br />

Canadian mining company Lucara.<br />

The diamond weighs around 350g<br />

and measures 83mm x 62mm x 43mm.<br />

It has been classified as near-gem<br />

quality with some areas of high-quality<br />

white gem, though analysis has not yet<br />

been completed.<br />

It’s the largest diamond ever recovered<br />

in Botswana and is thought to be the<br />

second largest found in history, second<br />

only to the Cullinan Diamond which was<br />

discovered in South Africa in 1905.<br />

Lucara also found a 1,111-carat gem<br />

quality diamond at Karowe in 2015. Both<br />

were discovered<br />

using TOMRA XRT<br />

technology, a<br />

ground-breaking<br />

sensor sorting<br />

system that has<br />

detected four of<br />

the top ten largest<br />

diamonds in the<br />

world to date.<br />

“Lucara’s technologically advanced, XRT<br />

diamond recovery circuit has once again<br />

delivered historic results,” Eira Thomas,<br />

president and CEO Lucara, said. “Karowe<br />

has now produced two diamonds<br />

greater than 1,000 carats in just four<br />

years, affirming... the likelihood of<br />

recovering additional, large, high quality<br />

diamonds in the future.”<br />

Lucara is also currently trialling its own<br />

online diamond selling platform, named<br />

Clara. The site allows Lucara to match<br />

buyers’ requirements rather than the<br />

traditional system, which has them buy<br />

‘by the bucket’. It incorporates blockchain<br />

technology to maintain traceability.<br />

The company is now attempting to bring<br />

other independent diamond producers<br />

on board, touting its service as an<br />

alternative to selling through the likes of<br />

DeBeers and Alrosa.<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong> <strong>Jeweller</strong> 11


NEWS<br />

IN BRIEF<br />

*<br />

WORLD’S LARGEST PEARL<br />

A Canadian man has unveiled what is<br />

believed to be the world’s largest natural<br />

pearl, which weighs in at a whopping 27kg!<br />

Abraham Reyes inherited the enormous<br />

gemstone from his aunt and had no idea<br />

it was even a pearl, let alone valuable.<br />

Nicknamed the ‘Giga Pearl’, it has now been<br />

appraised at between $60 million and $90<br />

million. It’s four times the size of the previous<br />

largest natural pearl, the Lao-Tzu Pearl – also<br />

known as the Pearl of Allah.<br />

*<br />

HISTORY FOR SALE<br />

British auction house Bonhams is set to sell<br />

the original agreement for the inspection of<br />

the legendary Cullinan Diamond between<br />

King Edward VII and diamond dealers M.J<br />

Levy & Nephews. The contract, which<br />

brokered the cutting of the 3,106-carat stone<br />

– the largest gem-quality diamond ever<br />

discovered – is dated January 29, 1908. The<br />

Cullinan was later used to create nine of the<br />

Crown Jewels of Great Britain.<br />

*<br />

LONDON HEIST STUMPS COPS<br />

An ‘audacious’ jewellery heist in the heart<br />

of London has the city’s Metropolitan<br />

Police pleading with the public for answers.<br />

The burglars drilled through the wall of a<br />

neighbouring bookmaker in order to gain<br />

access to George Attenborough & Son<br />

<strong>Jeweller</strong>s on Fleet Street, obscuring a CCTV<br />

camera with white paint in the process.<br />

Once inside, the thieves stole more than<br />

$900,000 in jewellery before escaping.<br />

Police were called to the store at 2am.<br />

*<br />

DIAMOND SOLD FOR $14 MILLION<br />

A flawless 88.22-carat oval diamond has<br />

surpassed the highest estimates at a Hong<br />

Kong auction, fetching US$13.7 million. The<br />

D colour Type IIa brilliant-cut stone was the<br />

top lot of more than 200 items, and was<br />

bought by a Japanese collector after fierce<br />

competition from two rival bidders. He has<br />

named it the ‘Manami Star’ after his daughter.<br />

*<br />

RARE BLUE GEM FOUND IN CANADA<br />

A new study by the University of British<br />

Columbia has found that Canada’s Baffin<br />

Island is home to the prized cobalt blue<br />

spinel. The gemstone – known for its intense<br />

colour and durability – frequently lies in plain<br />

sight in the remote territory.<br />

Diamond inclusions hold secrets<br />

Geoscientists from the US and Canada have<br />

discovered that ancient sulphur-rich mineral<br />

deposits, trapped inside diamonds, can offer<br />

new insights into how Earth’s continents<br />

were formed.<br />

The research group from the Carnegie<br />

Institution of Washington, the Gemological<br />

Institute of America (GIA) and the University<br />

of Alberta demonstrated diamonds held<br />

details about historic geological events that<br />

led to long-term land stability, a key factor in<br />

supporting life.<br />

Lead study author Karen Smit of the GIA said<br />

that while mineral diamond inclusions may<br />

lack appeal in the gem trade, for geoscientists<br />

they have helped solve mysteries about the<br />

foundations of Earth.<br />

“We’ve found a way to use traces of sulphur<br />

from ancient volcanoes, that made its<br />

way into the mantle and eventually into<br />

diamonds, to provide evidence for one<br />

particular process of continent building,” Smit<br />

said following the study, which was recently<br />

published in the journal Science.<br />

The group’s analysis of Sierra Leonean<br />

diamonds indicated the West African<br />

continent experienced two ‘subduction<br />

events’, where oceanic plates sunk from<br />

the Earth’s surface into its depths when<br />

Rare gem unearthed at Argyle<br />

The iconic Argyle Mine in Western Australia’s<br />

Kimberley region has produced the largest<br />

gem-quality white diamond in its history.<br />

The 28.84-carat stone has been named<br />

Argyle Octavia after its octahedral shape,<br />

and is thought to be one of the most<br />

unique large white diamonds to come<br />

from the mine.<br />

Argyle, which is owned by Rio Tinto and has<br />

been operating since 1983, is best known<br />

as one of the world’s premier sources of<br />

natural colour diamonds. In particular, it<br />

accounts for more than 90 per cent of the<br />

global supply of pink diamonds.<br />

Gem-quality white diamonds above 20<br />

carats have accounted for just 0.0007 per<br />

cent of Argyle’s production since the mine<br />

opened, making the Octavia an ultra-rare<br />

find. It’s particularly special as Argyle is set to<br />

close in 2020.<br />

SCIENTISTS ANALYSED SIERRA LEONEAN STONES<br />

one tectonic plate slid beneath another. The<br />

sulphur-rich inclusions only exist in diamond<br />

samples from more than 2.5 billion years<br />

ago – before atmospheric oxygen became as<br />

abundant as it is today.<br />

“This means that the sulphur in these<br />

mineral inclusions must have once existed<br />

on the Earth’s surface and was then drawn<br />

down into the mantle by subduction,” the<br />

researchers wrote.<br />

The team’s comparison to diamonds from<br />

Botswana showed similar results, however<br />

diamonds mined from northern Canada<br />

did not show the same sulphur chemistry,<br />

meaning that the North American continent<br />

was formed differently.<br />

THE ARGYLE OCTAVIA WHITE DIAMOND<br />

Arnaud Soirat, chief executive of Rio Tinto’s<br />

copper and diamonds portfolio, said in a<br />

press release: “We are delighted with this<br />

discovery, which is a testament to the<br />

extraordinary Argyle orebody that continues<br />

to deliver these miracles of nature, even as it<br />

nears the end of mine life.”<br />

The Octavia will be sold by tender in<br />

Antwerp later this year.<br />

12 <strong>Jeweller</strong> <strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong>


NEWS<br />

Breitling exits Baselworld<br />

Following last month’s Baselworld trade show,<br />

watch company Breitling has announced<br />

it will not return in 2020, blaming the<br />

scheduling shift from March to the end<br />

of April.<br />

Instead, it will pursue it’s own road shows and<br />

the Breitling Summit format, which involves<br />

inviting select groups of retailers, media,<br />

customers and collectors to see exclusive<br />

product launches and developments. The first<br />

one was held in London last October.<br />

But while the exit could be seen as a blow<br />

to Baselworld and its new CEO, Michel<br />

Loris-Melikoff, Breitling CEO Georges Kern<br />

emphasised that the door was still open for<br />

the future. “We will decide whether we will<br />

return to Baselworld from 2021 onward at a<br />

later date, and this will depend on the timing<br />

INSTEAD OF TRADE SHOWS, BREITLING WILL RUN<br />

ITS OWN ROAD SHOWS AND SUMMIT FORMAT<br />

of the event and the possibility of holding the<br />

Breitling Summit.”<br />

He added, “We would like to emphasise that<br />

the extensive innovations developed and<br />

implemented by Baselworld’s management<br />

under Michel Loris-Melikoff in such a short<br />

timeframe have had a positive impact<br />

and can lay the foundations to take<br />

Baselworld in a new direction in the future.”<br />

In more positive news for Baselworld, Rolex<br />

has decided to expand its presence at the<br />

2020 show, with sister brand Tudor taking its<br />

own stand in Hall 1.0 for the first time.<br />

“This is a strong demonstration of confidence<br />

in the successful future of Baselworld and<br />

gives us a boost for the tasks ahead,” Loris-<br />

Melikoff said.<br />

The announcement comes off the back of<br />

a new report into the global Swiss watch<br />

industry by Morgan Stanley and LuxeConsult,<br />

which showed Rolex Group, which includes<br />

Rolex and Tudor, is far and away the industry<br />

leader with 22.2 per cent market share. The<br />

company – which is privately owned by the<br />

Fondation Hans Wilsdorf family trust – turns<br />

over CHF11.5 billion ($16 billion) in retail sales<br />

per year.<br />

For more on Baselworld, turn to page 28.<br />

Lab-grown still out in Mumbai<br />

The world’s largest diamond bourse, the<br />

Bharat Diamond Bourse (BDB) in Mumbai,<br />

India, has denied rumours it is planning to lift<br />

the ban on the sale of synthetic diamonds on<br />

its trading floors.<br />

Anoop Mehta, BDB president, was reported<br />

as saying that advances in synthetic diamond<br />

detection technology could form the basis<br />

for overturning the band, and that the policy<br />

would be reviewed at board level “in the next<br />

five to six months”.<br />

However, a spokesperson for BDB later<br />

clarified: “Local media quoted Anoop Mehta<br />

that he may consider allowing synthetic<br />

diamonds after six months, but the BDB<br />

management committee has rejected the<br />

proposal to allow synthetics. This decision will<br />

be finalised at the BDB general body meeting<br />

and presently there is no other proposal to lift<br />

the ban.”<br />

THE BHARAT DIAMOND BOURSE IN MUMBAI<br />

The policy has been in place since 2015,<br />

and was justified at the time due to reports<br />

of mixing lab-grown stones with mined<br />

diamonds. Reports that the ban would be<br />

withdrawn in 2017 were also proven to be<br />

false.<br />

Meanwhile, lab-grown diamonds have been<br />

given a boost in China. The Guangzhou<br />

Diamond Exchange (GZDE) has signed a<br />

strategic co-operation agreement with local<br />

synthetic diamond suppliers.<br />

+ MORE BREAKING NEWS<br />

JEWELLERMAGAZINE.COM<br />

Major US jewellery<br />

chains facing<br />

legal action<br />

Sterling Jewelers, the largest jewellery<br />

company in the US, is currently embroiled<br />

in a far-reaching arbitration case with<br />

thousands of female employees, who<br />

allege decades of sexual harassment<br />

and discrimination.<br />

Sterling, which is a subsidiary of UK-based<br />

Signet Jewelers, is the parent of wellknown<br />

US chains like Zales, Jared The<br />

Galleria Of Jewelry and Kay and is worth<br />

more than $6 billion.<br />

While the legal proceedings – which<br />

have been in process for ten years – were<br />

reported on in the past, a New York Times<br />

exposé, published in April, has revealed<br />

previously unknown sordid details.<br />

The piece includes multiple accounts<br />

of men being promoted above more<br />

qualified female colleagues, women<br />

being paid less per hour than men<br />

doing the same job, and women being<br />

overlooked for management positions<br />

despite their experience.<br />

More troubling are the allegations of<br />

a ‘boys’ club’ culture rife with sexual<br />

harassment, coercion and abuse,<br />

despite the company having a majority<br />

female workforce.<br />

Responding to the new report, a<br />

spokesperson for Signet said, “We’re<br />

disappointed that the New York<br />

Times decided to publish an article<br />

primarily based on decades-old<br />

allegations, and [that] we believe<br />

casts our company unfairly,” adding<br />

that women make up 74 per cent of<br />

management positions and that the<br />

board has achieved gender parity under<br />

CEO Gina Drosos.<br />

The story is another blow to the jewellery<br />

group, which reported financial losses of<br />

US$657.4 million for the 2018-19 financial<br />

year and has begun several rounds of job<br />

cuts in the US.<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong> <strong>Jeweller</strong> 13


NEWS<br />

Future of Canadian<br />

mining in doubt?<br />

Canada may be the world’s third-largest<br />

rough diamond producing country<br />

by volume, according to recent figures<br />

from the Kimberley Process, but the<br />

future of its mining industry has been<br />

called into question amid rising costs<br />

and low-value yields.<br />

A new report from Bloomberg found that<br />

every mine in Canada produces stones<br />

that fall well below the global average<br />

price per carat.<br />

In addition, Canadian stones have<br />

tended to be smaller and lower quality than<br />

expected. This sector in particular is facing<br />

increasing competition from synthetic<br />

diamonds, which are cheaper<br />

to produce and sell.<br />

Diamond mining is still a young industry<br />

in the country, with the discovery of<br />

kimberlite in its Northwest Territories<br />

occurring in 1991. But while there were<br />

once high hopes for the region, two of its<br />

main mines, Ekati and Diavik, are now at the<br />

mature end of their life cycle and nearing<br />

closure. Several other major mines have lost<br />

significant market value in recent years and<br />

have changed ownership several times.<br />

Establishing new mines has been<br />

hampered by the high cost of labour and<br />

the remoteness of the sites; northern<br />

Canada is frozen most of the year with<br />

temperatures as low as -50 o C and little<br />

existing infrastructure.<br />

However, recent technology breakthroughs<br />

including drones, autonomous vehicles and<br />

sensors could be the key to overcoming<br />

some of the challenges.<br />

A revival of the CanadaMark brand,<br />

emphasising the ethical practices and<br />

positive associations consumers have with<br />

Canada itself, is also taking place.<br />

MINING IN CANADA IS FACING CHALLENGES<br />

HORMONE-COATED<br />

BACKINGS FOR<br />

JEWELLERY ARE<br />

BEING TESTED<br />

<strong>Jeweller</strong> to the stars shines in Australia<br />

Celebrity jeweller Robert Procop has joined<br />

forces with Australian diamond expert Garry<br />

Holloway to launch his latest collection,<br />

which was designed with A-lister Angelina<br />

Jolie and her daughter Zahara. The Style<br />

of Jolie collection made its debut at Holloway<br />

Diamonds in Melbourne on April 30.<br />

Procop’s association with Jolie dates back<br />

many years. He has also created pieces for US<br />

President Ronald Reagan and was CEO of the<br />

UK’s Crown jeweller, Garrard.<br />

Procop was introduced to Holloway last year,<br />

saying: “We just clicked. He invited me to<br />

Australia, and I thought, what better place<br />

to launch the new Jolie Collection than in<br />

Australia with a true pioneer in this age-old<br />

diamond industry.”<br />

ROBERT PROCOP AND GARRY HOLLOWAY<br />

All profits from the Style of Jolie range go<br />

towards The Education Partnership for<br />

Children of Conflict, which builds schools and<br />

dormitories in Afghanistan and Cambodia.<br />

The launch also raised money for Dementia<br />

Australia, of which Holloway is a supporter.<br />

Contraceptive jewellery in the works<br />

Scientists have begun testing a new<br />

form of contraception: jewellery.<br />

Researchers from the Georgia Institute of<br />

Technology have developed a hormonecoated<br />

backing for jewellery including<br />

earrings, watches and rings, which can<br />

deliver doses high enough to prevent<br />

pregnancy through the skin.<br />

The method mimics nicotine patches and<br />

existing contraceptive patches, but on a<br />

much smaller scale. Scientists first tested<br />

the hormone backings on pigs before<br />

moving on to hairless rats.<br />

They used a 16 hours on, eight hours<br />

off cycle to mimic a woman taking her<br />

jewellery off before going to bed. “The more<br />

contraceptive options that are available,<br />

the more likely it is that the needs of<br />

individual women can be met,” said lead<br />

author Professor Mark Prausnitz. “Because<br />

putting on jewellery may already be part of<br />

a woman’s daily routine, this technique may<br />

facilitate compliance with the regimen.”<br />

While human trials are yet to begin, the<br />

initial positive results were published in the<br />

Journal Of Controlled Release.<br />

CIBJO president addresses OECD<br />

Addressing a forum of the Organisation for<br />

Economic Co-operation and Development<br />

(OECD) in Paris last month, CIBJO president<br />

Gaetano Cavalieri discussed the organisation’s<br />

plans to ensure responsible sourcing across<br />

jewellery, gemstone and precious metals.<br />

CIBJO released its Responsible Sourcing Blue<br />

Book in January this year, which references<br />

to the OECD’s Due Diligence Guidance<br />

for minerals from high-risk areas, and also<br />

promotes compliance with the Kimberley<br />

Process and the World Diamond Council<br />

System of Warranties.<br />

During his OECD speech, Cavalieri noted<br />

that the jewellery industry is largely operated<br />

by small-to-medium enterprises, which are<br />

frequently family owned and run and have<br />

limited resources.<br />

He noted that while awareness of responsible<br />

practices has grown among CIBJO members<br />

and the public over the past decade, the<br />

challenge was “meeting the requirements of<br />

a socially aware business community, while<br />

trying to protect the fabric of our industry”.<br />

As a result, the Blue Book was written so that<br />

all industry members ‘irrespective of size or<br />

financial capacity’ could apply its standards.<br />

CIBJO is also in the process of setting up a<br />

free online platform to educate members<br />

about due diligence.<br />

14 <strong>Jeweller</strong> <strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong>


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FASHION WATCHES<br />

HEART & GRACE<br />

All in good<br />

FASHION WATCHES HAVE SEEN A METEORIC RISE IN<br />

POPULARITY IN THE LAST TEN YEARS. ARABELLA RODEN<br />

DISCOVERS WHAT MAKES THIS MARKET TICK<br />

ashion watches are best defined by what they’re not, rather than what<br />

they are. They aren’t concerned with the high-tech features of Japanese<br />

timepieces like Seiko or Citizen, nor do they embrace the app-enabled<br />

futurism of Apple and Samsung smartwatches. They lack the toughness<br />

of rugged Swiss brands like Luminox, Omega or Victorinox.<br />

It’s not about haute horlogerie either – while consumers of fashion watches might<br />

admire the elegance of a Rolex, Jaeger-LeCoultre or Patek Philippe, they won’t be<br />

keeping their timepiece in the family for generations; nor will they be spending<br />

upwards of $10,000.<br />

As it turns out, the fashion watch is not actually a watch at all – it’s an accessory.<br />

And in terms of price, design and esepcially marketing, it should be treated<br />

as such. Ranging from around $100 to $500, with accessories from around<br />

$50, fashion watches are more akin to designer sunglasses than they are to<br />

other timepieces.<br />

There’s no denying their appeal to younger consumers either. Jake Kassan, cofounder<br />

of US fashion watch company MVMT – which now has revenues of US$70<br />

million per year with 88 per cent of its customers under 35 – recently told the New<br />

York Times, “Watches have evolved. Our audience cares more about the style of a<br />

watch than its function.”<br />

He added, “The belief that traditional watches are relics of the past is false. Our<br />

consumers may not be the most formal in their attire, but they are very intentional.<br />

They think about what they wear, about what is on trend and up-to-date... A watch<br />

is their statement piece.”<br />

John Rose, managing director West End Collection – one of the leading suppliers<br />

of fashion watches in Australia and New Zealand, representing Olivia Burton, Paul<br />

Hewitt, Christian Paul, Bering and Ice-Watch among others – has a similar outlook.<br />

“Millennials see their watch as an expression of their personality, a fashion item,<br />

and will generally purchase a new watch every year or two,” he explains.<br />

This repeat purchase power gives fashion watches an edge for retailers. And while<br />

fashion watch brands tend to be as digitally savvy as their target market – with a<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong> <strong>Jeweller</strong> 17


INSTYLE WATCHES<br />

WEST END COLLECTION<br />

strong social media and e-commerce strategy – there’s still a place for<br />

them in the traditional retail space.<br />

Like all watches, consumers often need to get a feel for a timepiece<br />

and try it on in person before they purchase. With many fashion<br />

watches designed to accommodate easily interchangeable<br />

wristbands and other customisable components, it’s all about<br />

the in-store experience.<br />

Dr Eloise Zoppos, senior research consultant and research fellow at<br />

Monash University’s Australian Consumer and Retail Studies unit, has<br />

found that bricks-and-mortar stores “still hold a special place in the<br />

hearts of Australian shoppers”.<br />

“The number of shoppers using physical stores has increased over the<br />

past four years,” she says. “In fact, from 2015 to 2018, the number of<br />

shoppers always using a physical store increased significantly from<br />

11 per cent to 21 per cent. This increase is thanks to our desire for a<br />

more sensory and social experience at physical stores – both of which<br />

can’t be replicated online.”<br />

Dr Zoppos adds, “Consumers today want a sensory experience<br />

where they can touch, feel and try on products, and they also want<br />

a social experience.”<br />

75 years of classic design –<br />

The Mondaine Swiss Railyway Watch<br />

Additionally, some retailers are combining in-store retail with<br />

e-commerce; ‘click and collect’ is one way to do this, as is ‘reserve in<br />

store’. “This provides customers with a completely integrated online<br />

booking platform that allows them to reserve an item in-store to try on<br />

within 24 hours,” Dr Zoppos explains. It’s a feature that works well for<br />

fashion watches, as well as jewellery pieces.<br />

Here, <strong>Jeweller</strong> takes a closer look at the fashion watch market and how<br />

retailers can take this category to the next level.<br />

HEY, GOOD LOOKING<br />

When it comes to fashion watches, image is everything – both in<br />

terms of how the watch itself looks and how it’s marketed.<br />

It’s a competitive sector driven by aesthetics, so design consistency<br />

and differentiation is key. Essentially, the appearance of the product<br />

should align across all channels both online and off-line, and stand out<br />

from other products in the same category.<br />

Proudly distributed by<br />

“The market has changed significantly,” says Phil Edwards, managing<br />

director of Duraflex Group Australia which distributes fashion<br />

watches including Thomas Sabo, JAG and Police. “There are more<br />

competitor brands now and customers are spoilt for choice.”<br />

02 9417 0177 | www.dgau.com.au


FASHION WATCHES<br />

Rose explains, “Each brand targets a different customer – for example, Olivia<br />

Burton targets a female-only audience. It only uses product and floral imagery in<br />

advertising and promotional materials, rather than a model or brand ambassador,<br />

because Olivia Burton watches appeal to all age groups and demographics.”<br />

While Olivia Burton focuses on florals, Paul Hewitt calls back to its Nordic heritage.<br />

Think Scandinavian minimalism – wide, solid faces with fine, slender metal hands –<br />

and subtle nautical themes like anchor-shaped hour markers.<br />

However, the brand also caters to its key demographic of Millennials, who are<br />

very aware of trends. As a result, rose gold, dark mauve and holographic details<br />

have played a role in recent collections. Paul Hewitt’s interchangeable straps are<br />

also similar to personalised jewellery in that they can be changed to suit a specific<br />

outfit or occasion – putting the ‘fashion’ in ‘fashion watch’.<br />

Cluse, which was founded in Amsterdam in 2013 and is distributed by Heart &<br />

Grace, defines itself by simplicity and femininity. Without numbered hour markers,<br />

Cluse designs show off the face of the watch, which is decorated with on-trend<br />

finishes like marbling, animal print and rose gold. Straps include everything from<br />

burgundy lizard to soft grey, changing the look and feel of the watch instantly.<br />

But more than just multiple straps, consumers also aim to buy multiple watches<br />

based on the season and rising trends. That’s where competitive pricing comes<br />

in. “The younger fashion watch buyer is more influenced by price,” says Rose.<br />

“Higher quality watches attract a slightly more mature customer, who is generally<br />

HEART & GRACE<br />

discerning about their purchase.” These watches tend to skew higher in price.<br />

A TOUCH OF LUXURY<br />

DURAFLEX<br />

Rachel Clay is an expert on the watch market and head of influencer marketing<br />

and social media at Matter Of Form in London. In contrast to fashion watch<br />

consumers, she says that “luxury consumers at the highest end are superpassionate<br />

about their watch purchases; they will likely be collectors with a love<br />

and respect for the timeless craftsmanship that goes into each timepiece. They<br />

view their purchases as investments and view collecting watches as a hobby.”<br />

These consumers tend to be older, wealthier, and willing to wait years – and even<br />

Christian Paul<br />

SYDNEY


INSTYLE WATCHES<br />

DURAFLEX<br />

SAMS GROUP<br />

AUSTRALIA<br />

PinkKimberley.com.au<br />

E pink@samsgroup.com.au<br />

W samsgroup.com.au<br />

P 02 9290 2199<br />

undergo an application process – in order to<br />

purchase a watch. The design stays the same<br />

not just season to season, but generation to<br />

generation. Heritage and tradition are the<br />

selling points.<br />

The fashion watch market couldn’t be more<br />

different. It’s all about younger consumers<br />

and the convenience they expect in every<br />

form of retail. Trends straight from the<br />

catwalk, and increasingly from social media,<br />

are featured in the collections, which are<br />

released several times per year – nearly as<br />

frequently as they are purchased.<br />

But as opposite as the two markets seem to<br />

be, they hold some things in common.<br />

Some of the most well-known fashion watch<br />

brands – like Daniel Wellington, Olivia Burton<br />

and Christian Paul – have a vintage appeal,<br />

despite being founded within the last five to<br />

ten years.<br />

They frequently claim inspiration from refined<br />

European travellers, exotic locations like<br />

Cuba, and antiques found at quaint English<br />

markets, calling back to the romantic heritage<br />

of timepieces without actually having those<br />

years of history behind them. Millennials are<br />

noted for their nostalgia and love of travel,<br />

which perhaps explains these elements in<br />

constructing the ‘story’ of the products.<br />

There’s also a sense of quality in the design,<br />

with classic elements like Roman numerals,<br />

leather or fine-chain metal straps, and subtle<br />

logos giving these pieces everyday elegance.<br />

Pierre Cardin, distributed by InStyle Watches,<br />

takes a similarly timeless approach – although<br />

these watches have a genuine history, being<br />

associated with the French fashion designer<br />

of the same name. The timepieces offer a slice<br />

of designer luxury, incorporating the likes of<br />

Australian opal, mother of pearl and crystal<br />

into the design, at an affordable price point.<br />

Thomas Sabo watches also have a glamorous<br />

feel, targeting a slightly higher price point<br />

between $350 and $850. The designs<br />

complement Thomas Sabo jewellery and<br />

come in a wide variety of styles and finishes.<br />

In retail terms, that sense of ‘light luxury’<br />

as well as emotion and romance are great<br />

selling points.<br />

Dr Zoppos notes that “many consumers will<br />

seek a luxe experience without the luxury<br />

price tag, and also continue to complement<br />

their (mostly) High Street apparel and<br />

accessories with luxury high-end items.”<br />

For retail jewellers selling fashion watches, this<br />

presents the perfect opportunity to combine<br />

a mid-priced timepiece with complementary<br />

jewellery, such as bracelets, rings and cuffs.<br />

FROM LIKES TO BUYS<br />

Like luxury timepieces, consumers also<br />

love to show off their fashion watches by<br />

snapping photos to share with friends, family<br />

and followers online.<br />

The role of social media in fashion watch<br />

marketing can’t be overstated; it’s been the<br />

cornerstone of multiple companies, as this<br />

product category has matured at the same<br />

time as the explosion of its ideal marketing<br />

partner: Instagram. “For the younger<br />

generation, Instagram is the new Westfield –<br />

consumers look to Instagram to be inspired,<br />

informed and to shop,” says Edwards.<br />

In order to appeal to their target consumers,


fashion watch companies must be digitally engaged. The same holds<br />

true for the retailers who sell them.<br />

According to Dr Zoppos, consistency is key. “Retailers need to ensure<br />

that their physical and digital shopping channels complement each<br />

other and offer consumers a cohesive shopping experience. In doing<br />

so, it’s key that retailers understand exactly how consumers engage<br />

with each platform.”<br />

Clay has some succinct advice for those diving into Instagram. “We<br />

are educating all our clients that Instagram profiles are the new<br />

websites. Even up to a couple of years ago, if a consumer or brand<br />

fan wanted to know more about a product, they would Google it<br />

and go straight to the company’s website. Nowadays, they will more<br />

commonly search on Instagram first, and go straight to the company’s<br />

profile page – making the Instagram profile the first touch-point.”<br />

Indeed, the app has become a powerful tool for both brands and<br />

retailers to interact with their customers and drive sales – particularly<br />

with younger shoppers. Nearly three-quarters of Instagram users are<br />

under the age of 35 and 80 per cent follow at least one business. Even<br />

better, 75 per cent of users take action via Instagram – meaning they<br />

will click through a good-looking, shoppable post to the website<br />

where they can buy the product.<br />

When it comes to fashion watches, this form of social media works<br />

like an interactive catalogue. Retailers should post high quality images<br />

of fashion watches and always use the associated brand hashtags<br />

to boost traffic and sales through the Instagram platform, as well as<br />

making sure links to their online shop are visible and easily clicked.<br />

“With Instagram currently trialling in-app purchases in the US with 23<br />

brands, there is increasingly less difference in functionality between<br />

what you can do on an Instagram profile and what you can do on<br />

a website: you can showcase your full collection and also manage<br />

customer service,” Clay says.<br />

“Therefore Instagram profiles now need to be considered as a key<br />

online destination and branded with beautiful high-quality content,<br />

be well managed with a smart use of highlight albums to replicate<br />

website structure, and be super interactive,” she adds.<br />

Alongside how easy it is to display and shop for products, the other<br />

advantage of Instagram is the<br />

users themselves: influencers,<br />

who shape the taste and<br />

purchasing habits of their<br />

followers.<br />

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Cluse has attributed much of its success to social media, harnessing<br />

the power of European influencers. It may seem shallow, but<br />

partnering with highly engaged accounts with relevant audiences is<br />

one of the most useful tools in boosting product sales – and building<br />

brand loyalty. Clay calls it “the most powerful form of marketing for<br />

almost all sectors, and particularly fashion and accessories”.<br />

While luxury watch brands frequently partner with celebrity<br />

ambassadors, having a famous face attached doesn’t always translate<br />

to better recognition from consumers.<br />

Meanwhile, far from being household names, influencers have an<br />

undeniable power to boost fashion watch brands in the digital realm<br />

and increase sales. Put simply, to consumers influencers feel like real<br />

people rather than stars being paid to endorse a product.<br />

“Influencers offer key advantages over celebrities – most importantly,<br />

they offer peer-to-peer marketing to a self-selected, democratic<br />

audience who choose to follow them and engage with their content.<br />

The psychology as to why influencer marketing works is simple:<br />

people trust people more than they trust brands,” Clay explains.<br />

One of the first fashion watch companies to embrace the influencer<br />

trend was Swedish brand Daniel Wellington, which was founded in<br />

2011 – shortly after Instagram itself. Retailers were able to capitalise<br />

on Daniel Wellington’s growing social media presence, as it increased<br />

curiosity and demand for the watches off-line as well as online.<br />

The strategy was simple, Clay says. “There was no creative, long-term<br />

narrative to the campaign; instead influencers were gifted product<br />

in exchange for space on their feeds. At this time, when Daniel<br />

Wellington began, influencer marketing was in its infancy, which<br />

allowed the strategy to work. Nowadays, the industry has evolved.”<br />

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Rose notes this evolution in strategy, revealing, “West End Collection<br />

has an in-house marketing team who focus a great deal of attention<br />

on social media marketing. We work with over 200 Australian and<br />

New Zealand-based influencers with a combined reach of over 8<br />

million followers. We recently hosted influencer events in Sydney<br />

and Melbourne for Paul Hewitt, which was attended by high profile<br />

influencers such as Belle Lucia, Taleisha Bonora and Kristina Mendonca.”<br />

For retailers, it’s important to note that influencer content falls under<br />

copyright so cannot be reposted without permission. However, if<br />

brands have built strong social media partnerships, the consumer will<br />

seek out the product in person.<br />

There’s also nothing stopping retailers from building their own<br />

interactive community of followers; encouraging customers to post<br />

photos of themselves wearing their new fashion watch is a good place<br />

to start, ensuring they ‘tag’ the retailer and the brand, and use the<br />

retailer’s own hashtag in the caption.<br />

Whether online or offline, fashion watches have built a strong niche<br />

and a loyal consumer base through appealing design, competitive<br />

pricing and savvy marketing. i<br />

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CASTING REPORT<br />

casting<br />

AND<br />

refining<br />

continues to evolve<br />

WITH NEW TECHNOLOGY<br />

AND AN EMPHASIS ON<br />

CLEANER, GREENER AND MORE<br />

ECONOMICAL PRACTICES,<br />

ARABELLA RODEN DISCOVERS<br />

THE CASTING AND REFINING<br />

INDUSTRY IS IMPROVING<br />

EFFICIENCY ALL THE TIME<br />

hen it comes to casting and refining, technology is at the forefront.<br />

When <strong>Jeweller</strong> last reviewed the category 2017, the breakthroughs<br />

were focused on precious metal chemistry and new alloys, as well<br />

as the rise of 3D printing and CAD/CAM, induction melt pressure<br />

casting and acid-less separation (ALS).<br />

Today, the same themes are carrying through, with an added emphasis on faster,<br />

more efficient and – notably – more environmentally conscious processes.<br />

Chris Botha, operations manager jewellery division at Pallion, which is the parent<br />

company of custom jewellery manufacturing business Palloys, points to the<br />

use of “environmentally friendly precious metal that is responsibly sourced from<br />

guaranteed conflict-free areas”.<br />

In terms of technology, he cites Pallion’s use of ALS to refine precious metals,<br />

calling it “the most technologically advanced, environmentally-sound, non-toxic<br />

refining separation process that exists today”.<br />

Chemgold is equally committed to the environment. As well as utilising all<br />

available recycling techniques, the company has imported state-of-the-art<br />

PALLION<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong> <strong>Jeweller</strong> 23


CASTING REPORT<br />

furnaces from Japan and Germany, which then feed into a non-pollution exhaust<br />

system equipped with an advanced after-burner.<br />

New technologies surrounding ‘green’ or eco-friendly manufacturing processes is<br />

a major focus of local suppliers, with all making major investments in this area.<br />

The benefits of these improved processes – as well as steps like preventing<br />

packaging waste with biodegradable options, and reducing energy through solar<br />

power and more efficient machinery – are not only good for the planet, they also<br />

make economic sense.<br />

CAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE<br />

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There are two major developments in the casting sector. By far the biggest has<br />

been the increasing prominence of 3D printing, and by extension CAD/CAM. The<br />

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major driver has been the significant fall in cost, leading manufacturing jewellers<br />

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Ben Farago, production manager Rapid Casting, says, “We have gone from<br />

jewellers staring wide-eyed at the mention of 3D printing to it being common<br />

to have a low cost 3D printer in relatively small workshops,” adding that it’s now<br />

a prevalent and sustainable part of the jewellery trade. “We have seen jewellers<br />

go from seeing 3D printing as almost a threat and something they needed to<br />

compete with, to being widely accepted.”<br />

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This presents a marked change from previous years and while some anticipated<br />

it would have a negative impact on printing volumes for casting houses, the<br />

opposite has proved true. The process of jewellery manufacture is now more<br />

integrated between jewellers and casting houses.<br />

Darren Sher, director Chemgold, explains: “The majority of jewellers that buy 3D<br />

printers use them to create a prototype to show their customer, or send the wax<br />

or resin to a reputable casting company such as Chemgold. Whilst the prices of<br />

3D printers are becoming less, so are print fees and most of our customers prefer<br />

to leave the casting to us to ensure its at the absolute highest quality, and so they<br />

don’t have to worry about other fees such as courier costs. Emailing a file takes a<br />

few seconds compared to processing, packaging and sending!”<br />

“Previously I predicted the cost of 3D printers would be below $1,000 within ten<br />

years – it happened in seven,” says Botha.<br />

It’s not just jewellers that have embraced this new technology, with Farago noting,<br />

“A few years back, casting companies wouldn’t even accept third party castable<br />

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CASTING REPORT<br />

the multiple sprue tags, which George says cause additional clean-up time and<br />

lemel scrap.<br />

Botha agrees that printed wax has the edge as it casts more easily, with no support<br />

requirements. However, he points to the fact that the technology is extrusionbased,<br />

so wax prints tend to look rougher, at the same slicing profile, and need to<br />

be reduced – meaning it can take much longer for print cycles to complete.<br />

PALLION<br />

RAPID CASTING<br />

resins and if they did, they would take moulds from it, instead of changing<br />

their processes to try and burn the resin out. Today, most companies will generally<br />

use at least two different types of resin to print and cast from and will take<br />

on a number of others confidently knowing they can achieve good results<br />

casting them.”<br />

At Pallion, Botha says the volume of customer-printed material has “exponentially<br />

increased”, but while the cost of the printer itself is low, the labour and technical<br />

nature of getting a good print remains a learning curve, and manufacturing<br />

jewellers still have a financial incentive to use casting houses.<br />

“The largest cost centre for 3D printing is still the labour in running the CAD<br />

printer. In that regard, it’s not as simple or as time efficient as, say a photocopier.<br />

Many clients realise that for a small outlay they can outsource this function to a<br />

partner with a large printing capacity and keep their overall running costs low.”<br />

However, the process is not quite seamless. Burning out resin can be<br />

unpredictable, with Farago noting that Rapid Casting has had to “re-evaluate how<br />

the casting process works and slowly tweak and modify it”.<br />

Grant George, operations manager at Morris & Watson Group in New Zealand,<br />

has more than 30 years of experience in casting and says one solution his team<br />

has put in place is a rotating burnout furnace. “The latest models of control and<br />

the concept of the slow rotating air movement and differing positions of the<br />

flasks is crucial to managing difficult burnouts, like resins,” he says, adding that the<br />

machinery comes with an attractive green feature, it’s after-burner.<br />

Another upgrade at Morris & Watson has been the Projet 2500W CAD printer –<br />

which he calls the “one technical advance that stands heads above any other”,<br />

pointing to its “amazing advantages in quality, speed and efficiency”.<br />

Speaking of wax, while there’s consensus over the benefits of 3D printers, there’s<br />

more debate over the best material to use for creating cast prints – wax or resin?<br />

The advantage of resin is its ability to produce the best resolution from CAD<br />

for suitable designs, and therefore the best surface finish. However, Sher notes<br />

the reason resin may not always be suitable is it requires the printed parts to be<br />

supported by extra structures printed in the same material.<br />

“In certain cases the amount of extra structures supporting the part could make<br />

the cleaning very complex or alter the geometry of the parts. In these instances,<br />

the designs would be printed in traditional wax,” Sher explains.<br />

George sees even more drawbacks to using resin. Although the material has<br />

made “sizeable advances in castability” and come down in price, he says it “still<br />

can’t match the reliability and quality of the right wax printer”. It comes down to<br />

Yet wax, after sanding, beats resin’s divots and pips created by supporting, with<br />

Botha saying clients tend to insist on wax for general work, and resin “only for high<br />

finish parts”. “From a casting perspective, even the best resins are prone to casting<br />

issues as the parts get larger, and most large parts will be wax printed to ensure a<br />

good result,” he adds.<br />

Farago sees the pros and cons, saying that while resin printers will generally print<br />

smoother parts, they will be slightly inaccurate.<br />

“Resin can be problematic to cast and give inconsistent results but is generally<br />

quite solid material – easy to handle and work with. Wax, on the other hand will be<br />

very accurate which will make it seem like a bit of a rougher print as the digitising<br />

of the print process shows. It will cast consistently each time, but it is very fragile.”<br />

“FROM A CASTING PERSPECTIVE, EVEN THE<br />

BEST RESINS ARE PRONE TO CASTING ISSUES<br />

AS THE PARTS GET LARGER, AND MOST LARGE<br />

PARTS WILL BE WAX PRINTED TO ENSURE A<br />

GOOD RESULT.”<br />

Looking to the future, laser sintering and direct metal printing may well be<br />

possible but currently not commercially viable. Sher calls it “fantastic new<br />

technology” but cautions that the machines are still too expensive to run and the<br />

quality is not at the standards required.<br />

REFINING, REDEFINED<br />

CHRIS BOTHA, PALLION<br />

Refining technology has also been made more energy efficient, safer and cheaper<br />

by using more durable and accessible materials and electronics. In this sector,<br />

there’s an intersection between ‘green’ initiatives and economic decisions.<br />

“Traditional machinery has vastly improved and Palloys customers have been<br />

the beneficiary of that new machinery as part of our commitment to being a<br />

technological leader,” says Botha.<br />

The company does not use the traditional chemical processes, which involve acid<br />

or chlorine to refine gold and silver, but instead relies on vacuum pumps and<br />

chambers to separate gold from other metals. It’s claimed that ALS can achieve<br />

99.5 per cent pure gold with no chemical emissions, which means it’s safer for<br />

employees as well as the environment.<br />

Chemgold has moved towards non-destructive x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis,<br />

replacing some of the need for fire assay, which produces lead waste. XRF works<br />

by bombarding a sample with x-rays and using a spectrometer to determine the<br />

elements present based on their reaction.<br />

Meanwhile, Rapid Casting’s Farago says: “When it comes to the<br />

environment, we are on par with the industry standard and regulations.<br />

Anything that gets burnt out of a flask has to be captured and filtered<br />

26 <strong>Jeweller</strong> <strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong>


so you don’t put the environment, the public or your employees at risk.”<br />

Morris & Watson, too, holds environmental sustainability is a core value. “Every<br />

green initiative we have undertaken over the years has repaid us many times over<br />

via reduced production costs and higher yield returns,” says George. “For example<br />

our filter press and water recycle programs have ensured substantial reduction<br />

in water rates and acid removal costs along with a double check on any precious<br />

metal content of the spent acid.”<br />

Chemgold takes an extra step, ensuring all slurry waste is filtered so it doesn’t end<br />

up in the sewerage system. This waste is then collected and treated by a specialist<br />

environmentally friendly company.<br />

Across both the casting and refining industries, reducing packaging waste with<br />

biodegradable options is becoming mainstream, as is becoming energy conscious<br />

by upgrading to newer, more efficient plants powered by renewables like solar.<br />

Botha says there is an “emphasis on environmentally friendly precious metal that is<br />

responsibly sourced from guaranteed conflict free areas.”<br />

To ensure its supply chain is as ethical as possible, Botha says that Palloys sources<br />

from its sister company, ABC Refinery, which is accredited by the London Bullion<br />

Market Association (LBMA) and the Shanghai Gold Exchange (SGE). “This has a<br />

major benefit that no other precious metals group in Australia can offer,” says<br />

Botha. “All Palloys precious metals comply with the strictest of sourcing controls<br />

that guarantee our metals are responsibly sourced and conflict free.”<br />

MORRIS & WATSON GROUP<br />

Chemgold also has an ethical approach to gold, stating that it sources from its own<br />

refinery, Australian mines and reputed dealers locally and in Europe. The company<br />

also uses all current recycling methods available on the market. Additionally, the<br />

company uses steam dewaxing – removing wax by pouring boiling water into a<br />

steam chamber before loading flasks into the furnaces – in order to maintain a low<br />

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While the casting and refining may be an environmentally intensive part of<br />

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SWISS WATCHES<br />

A NEW DIRECTION FOR<br />

Baselworld<br />

NOW IN ITS 102ND YEAR, BASELWORLD IS – DESPITE THE DOUBTERS – STILL SETTING<br />

THE PACE AS THE HEART OF THE LUXURY WATCH INDUSTRY, WRITES MARTIN FOSTER<br />

nother Baselworld has come and gone in the midst of a torrent of<br />

industry speculation about its very survival.<br />

The show is navigating the shifting sands of evolution with its<br />

raison d’être under global scrutiny; it is enduring a fractured and<br />

partisan review of what it stands for, while the possibilities and outcomes of<br />

change are imperfectly understood.<br />

First and foremost, Baselworld is a trade show and the most important one for<br />

the watch industry. It’s where brands, buyers and the press congregate for a<br />

week to review the new products and give them the publicity they (mostly)<br />

richly deserve – even if some of the brand’s policies are a bit ungracious to those<br />

global resellers who have served them well over many years.<br />

It provides the only real opportunity to see the finest of Swiss production sideby-side<br />

with the quality and volume production from Europe, China and the rest<br />

of the world.<br />

And as it happens, the <strong>2019</strong> winnowing of the exhibitors – numbers were down<br />

20 per cent on 2018 – has produced a tighter and more manageable show.<br />

Eric Bertrand, president of the Exhibitors’ Committee, said, “This year’s event<br />

marks a fresh start for exhibitors, visitors and journalists.”<br />

Bertrand is convinced that Baselworld will remain the world’s most important<br />

meeting place for its industries, covering all categories from watches and<br />

jewellery to gemstones and precious metals. “Digital platforms cannot take the<br />

place of a physical trade show,” he added.<br />

At a subsequent panel discussion, Chopard’s CEO Karl-Friedrich Scheufele<br />

echoed his point, saying, “Baselworld has done its homework. We are heading in<br />

the right direction. A personal encounter cannot be replaced by digital formats.”<br />

Patek Philippe’s president Thierry Stern added, “I have a feeling that this will be a<br />

good edition. Business is picking up.”<br />

Jean-Daniel Pasche, president of the Federation of the Swiss Watch Industry FH,<br />

was also optimistic about the future – and based his optimism on solid data,<br />

revealing, “The Swiss watch industry’s exports increased 6.3 per cent in 2018. This<br />

is likely to exert a positive impact on the trade show.”<br />

However, there are many deep-seated problems that need to be faced<br />

by Baselworld’s organisers – and it will take time, money and patience<br />

from all the parties participating in this annual event, not to mention<br />

28 <strong>Jeweller</strong> <strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong>


flexibility, informed debate and the support of the press.<br />

Following the loss of Swatch last year, special diplomacy will be needed to hold<br />

the loyalty of the majors of Hall 1.0 – Rolex, Patek Philippe, Chopard and the<br />

LVMH group (Bulgari, TAG Heuer, Hublot and Zenith).<br />

If any of them even blink then the ongoing prospects for Baselworld will be<br />

dramatically compromised.<br />

Still, the most intractable issues are cultural, with a significant dose of political<br />

intransigence from competing Swiss interests. Baselworld 2020 will commence<br />

on 30 April 2020, immediately after the Salon International de la Haute<br />

Horlogerie (SIHH) Geneva Salon.<br />

This is a superficial move toward unity, but it will take more than playing with<br />

diary dates for the politics to recede, as they should have done 20 years ago.<br />

In stark contrast to the SIHH, Baselworld is actively promoting the public<br />

relations exposure of its exhibitors. Management properly recognises that<br />

supporting press representatives – 3,300 of which attended the show in <strong>2019</strong> –<br />

has been an integral part of the promotional scenario over many years.<br />

It’s part of the reason why trade shows exist at all, and why brands decide to<br />

exhibit at them.<br />

In contrast, SIHH has embraced what some have called a ‘film-set<br />

pretentiousness’, with the construction and deconstruction of its Carré des<br />

Horlogers – once a compelling talking point and publicity tool which is now<br />

inflating exhibitor costs far above the equivalent exposure.<br />

Even in these depressed times, Baselworld still represents more than 15 times<br />

the exhibitors as SIHH; aligning its dates could lead to defections back to the<br />

larger show, and at the very least will make the Geneva Salon look like a minor<br />

distraction before the main event.<br />

SIHH – which split from Baselworld in 1991 – would be well served by forgetting<br />

the original tiff. There are now empty halls in Basel begging for a useful occupant<br />

– and what a wonderful opportunity to slash exhibitor costs!<br />

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SWISS WATCHES<br />

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management need to seriously address price gouging in the city’s<br />

hotels and restaurants before anybody will believe there is a new<br />

outlook and recovery prospect for the trade show.<br />

For decades, Baselworld has been taken for granted as a local cash<br />

cow by the city – population less than 200,000 – and the visitors to<br />

Basel have taken it on the chin because they had no choice.<br />

In a brave – if perhaps overdue – move, the MCH attempted to<br />

address the price gouging in <strong>2019</strong> but with ho-hum results. Put<br />

simply, it did not get taken seriously.<br />

Despite these issues, there are still very strong reasons why<br />

Baselworld should survive the current turmoil. The task of<br />

restructuring falls to Michel Loris-Melikoff, the new managing<br />

director of Baselworld, who has proposed a three-year timeframe for<br />

the rejuvenation of the show.<br />

Loris-Melikoff has introduced himself as a watch industry novice, but<br />

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Fortunately, we know from years of history that if the event is<br />

sympathetically managed, the industry participants will certainly do<br />

the rest.<br />

The changes needed have nothing to do with dividends to MCH<br />

shareholders, and everything to do with the high standing of the<br />

Swiss luxury industry with the cashed-up buyers of the world.<br />

It is only through this industry recognition that there is support for<br />

some of the astronomic sums buyers will pay for watches made with<br />

quality, history and style.<br />

Would a buyer be more likely to spend say, $50,000 on a high-class<br />

watch made in South Asia, or one made in Switzerland? Yet, the<br />

Swiss are under much closer scrutiny these days – and not always<br />

with positive outcomes. ‘Made in Switzerland’ used to represent<br />

exceptional design, trust and value. Does it represent this today?<br />

In a world beset by Cold War-esque posturing, corruption and<br />

mistrust, the coming years may produce another round of caution,<br />

with buyers bypassing luxury timepieces.<br />

There are also distortions in the market that make long-term<br />

assessments a bit pointless – for example, Brexit uncertainty has<br />

produced significant forward ordering from UK resellers, as they have<br />

reason to believe prices will spike if the political divorce is achieved.<br />

But when will that happen, and in what form?<br />

For many reasons it is important that Baselworld’s reconstruction –<br />

its ‘Phoenix Moment’ – is successful, as many smaller brands rely on it<br />

for taking orders for their yearly production programme.<br />

It will take strength and determination to address the depths of the<br />

problems, and we have to hope that Loris-Melikoff is the right man<br />

for the job. i<br />

1800MINRES<br />

www.minres.com.au<br />

MARTIN FOSTER is a freelance journalist and<br />

<strong>Jeweller</strong>’s resident watch ‘guru’. Based in Sydney, Martin<br />

attends major international exhibitions covering the<br />

watch and timepieces categories.


BANGKOK REPORT<br />

Thailand’s time to<br />

shine<br />

THE THAI GEMS AND JEWELLERY INDUSTRY IS EXPECTING GROWTH DESPITE AN<br />

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC SLOWDOWN. COLEBY NICHOLSON REPORTS<br />

here’s positive news for the Thai gems and jewellery industry following<br />

last month’s Bangkok Gems and <strong>Jeweller</strong>y Fair (BGJF) which, according<br />

the organiser, boasted more than 14,000 visitors from 118 countries.<br />

This represented an increase of 5.4 per cent over the 2018 event.<br />

Banjongjitt Angsusingh, director-general of the International Trade Promotion<br />

Department, said the fair “experienced great success, with sales generated at the<br />

event totalling more than 2 billion baht (AU$87.7 million).”<br />

She said the department remains positive that overall gem and jewellery<br />

shipments (including gold) will increase by 1–3 per cent this year from last year’s<br />

US$2 billion, which was an increase of 4.7 per cent from 2017.<br />

A post-Fair report stated that the trade generated at the BGJF was nearly 2.1<br />

billion baht, with immediate sales worth 700 million baht (AU$30.7 million), up<br />

85.2 percent compared to the February 2018 fair, while public days saw sales of<br />

approximately 360 million baht (AU$15.8 million).<br />

Chutima Boonyaprapatsorn, Thailand’s Deputy Commerce Minister, added that in<br />

the past year, Thai exports of gems and jewellery have been expanding in almost<br />

all markets.<br />

“Last year, export of gems and jewellery products excluding unwrought gold was<br />

worth US$7.6 billion, up 6.96 per cent, with high-growth products including gold<br />

jewellery, silver jewellery, imitation jewellery, and diamonds,” she said.<br />

Unsurprisingly, the products with the highest value of trade at the fair were<br />

gemstones, followed by fine jewellery, silver jewellery, machinery, and gold<br />

jewellery, respectively.<br />

The Thai jewellery industry is recognised for its intricate craftsmanship as well as<br />

high-quality production, which has led Thailand to be recognised worldwide as<br />

one of the world’s gem and jewellery hubs.<br />

This craftsmanship-style approach was evident to first-time fair visitor Helen<br />

Thompson-Carter, director Fabuleux Vous.<br />

“Thailand promotes itself with an ‘artisan’ approach to their jewellery craft,<br />

embracing tradition and use of ‘magic hands’ to deliver fine jewellery – versus the<br />

mass-machine production that we see from countries such as China,” the New<br />

Zealand-based supplier said.<br />

“The future of the Bangkok fair was often questioned, but by all accounts it does<br />

have a future,” Thompson-Carter added. “Like most international exhibitions,<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong> <strong>Jeweller</strong> 31


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especially in the jewellery industry, the<br />

challenge is enticing the exhibitor and then<br />

the visitors! It’s no different to what we<br />

experience in New Zealand and Australia.”<br />

Thompson-Carter noted that the Thai<br />

jewellery and gem industry is the country’s<br />

third largest export sector, employing 1.2<br />

million people.<br />

“The ASEAN countries are growing stronger<br />

together and there is economic confidence<br />

that the jewellery industry will continue<br />

to grow and thrive. While one in three<br />

diamonds are polished in India, the majority<br />

of the jewellery setting is done in Thailand,”<br />

she added.<br />

Her aim in visiting the fair was for “pure craft<br />

and workmanship; to see different products<br />

and styles and to see design and individuality<br />

– and I found it all. I loved my Bangkok Fair<br />

experience and definitely have it on the<br />

radar for 2020.”<br />

Brendan McCreesh, director O’Neils Affiliated,<br />

is a frequent visitor to the Bangkok show and<br />

attends at least one of the two fairs each year,<br />

depending on how the dates align with the<br />

Hong Kong <strong>Jeweller</strong>y Fair.<br />

“There are exhibitors, and visitors, who<br />

obviously can’t attend both [Bangkok and<br />

Hong Kong], which can sometimes affect<br />

the Thai show. That said, there were a few<br />

pleasant surprises this year and I met some<br />

interesting new suppliers.”<br />

McCreesh lists one of the benefits of Bangkok<br />

as the ability to travel to visit dealers and<br />

cutting factories directly.<br />

“Immersing ourselves in the world gemstone<br />

community and engaging in important<br />

conversations about quality, supply and<br />

demand is so important. A lot of it is about<br />

maintaining good relationships. We also do<br />

our best to source special, single pieces –<br />

often-crazy requests – for our customers.<br />

It’s frequently the case that a lot of shoe<br />

leather goes on a special request. An<br />

international show can be the only way<br />

to fulfil these orders.”<br />

One of the highlights for the local visitors<br />

this year was the arrival HRH Princess<br />

Sirivannavari Nariratana, who chaired the<br />

opening ceremony before visiting the gems<br />

and jewellery exhibitions to show support<br />

for manufacturers in the trade as well as to<br />

inspire a new generation of designers.<br />

One of the trademarks of the Thai jewellery<br />

shows is the promotion and attention given<br />

to up-and-coming designers. For example,<br />

The New Faces exhibition showcased<br />

products from 123 small and medium-sized<br />

manufacturers and designers from<br />

21 Thai provinces.<br />

The Niche Showcase featured five product<br />

groups: high jewellery (jewellery associated<br />

with royals), heritage and craftsmanship<br />

(jewellery representing arts and culture),<br />

spiritual power (jewellery of belief and<br />

opulence), luxe men (jewellery for men) and<br />

beyond jewellery (other lifestyle products<br />

with an emphasis on gems and jewellery<br />

materials).<br />

The <strong>Jeweller</strong>s & Innovation and Design<br />

Zone was another avenue for designers to<br />

present innovative products. According to<br />

the organiser, this area alone reported 120<br />

million baht (AU$5.3 million) in sales during<br />

the event.<br />

Of the more than 800 exhibitors occupying<br />

1,852 booths, 579 were Thai suppliers. i<br />

Coleby Nicholson attended the BGJF courtesy of<br />

the organiser, the Department of International<br />

Trade Promotion (DITP), Ministry of Commerce.


GEMS<br />

ORGANIC GEMS PART II: PEARLS<br />

pearls, and Pteria penguin pinkish pearls with<br />

the mabé shape.<br />

The iridescence of the nacre can create<br />

overtones of pink, green, purple or blue.<br />

While the perfectly spherical pearl is highly<br />

prized, each shape has its own beauty and<br />

suits particular jeweller settings. These shapes<br />

include button, oval, drop and baroque, as<br />

well as mabé, which is a pearl that is flattened<br />

on one side.<br />

Keshi pearls are a little surprise of nature and<br />

highly sought after due to their exquisite<br />

lustre and unique freeform shapes. These<br />

small baroque pearls are typically formed as<br />

by-products of pearl cultivation.<br />

Natural pearls are produced without any<br />

human intervention and are extremely rare,<br />

with almost all available pearls in the market<br />

today being cultured by man. Culturing<br />

involves ‘seeding’ live molluscs with a small<br />

shell bead, upon which the creature forms a<br />

nucleus and begins to secrete its nacre.<br />

Known as ‘The Queen of Gems’, pearls<br />

are our gems of the sea. These lustrous<br />

creations have been loved and admired<br />

throughout different cultures across<br />

thousands of years. This organic gem is<br />

produced within the soft tissue of certain<br />

species of molluscs and is found in a<br />

variety of hues and forms.<br />

Pearls are rounded concretions composed<br />

of calcium carbonate – specifically aragonite<br />

and calcite – and organic matrix, secreted<br />

from particular marine and freshwater<br />

molluscs. There are two kinds: nacreous and<br />

non-nacreous.<br />

The surface of a nacreous pearl is formed<br />

from thin layers of nacre, or mother-of- pearl,<br />

that are deposited as microscopic, tile-like<br />

crystals. The iridescence produced by a pearl’s<br />

nacre is caused by the diffraction of white<br />

light as it interacts with the arrangement of<br />

these aragonite crystals.<br />

Non-nacreous pearls may be produced by<br />

the pink or queen conch (Strombus gigas),<br />

the giant clam (Tridacna gigas) and several<br />

species of edible oyster. They do not display<br />

an iridescent surface. Instead, these pearls<br />

commonly have a porcelain-like appearance<br />

due to their calcite or mixed calciticaragonitic<br />

composition. They are still admired<br />

for their pale colours and lustrous surfaces<br />

and are used for both jewellery and art.<br />

The quality factors of a pearl may be<br />

broken down to: shape and size, body<br />

colour, iridescence, lustre and the presence<br />

and intensity of the ‘orient’ – a dramatic,<br />

multicoloured iridescent sheen.<br />

The body colour of a pearl is thought to be<br />

caused by organic pigments present in the<br />

matrix. The most familiar colours of nacreous<br />

pearls are white and cream. They may also<br />

be black, grey and silver. Pinctada maxima<br />

oysters tend to produce silver or champagne<br />

pearls, Pinctada margaritifera produce black<br />

A GEM THAT<br />

DOES NOT<br />

REQUIRE FURTHER<br />

POLISHING<br />

OR FACETING<br />

TO ENHANCE<br />

ITS BEAUTY, A<br />

PEARL IS SIMPLY<br />

PERFECTION IN ITS<br />

NATURAL FORM<br />

– THEIR DELICATE<br />

IRIDESCENT SHEEN<br />

IS CAPTIVATING<br />

Commercial production of cultured pearls<br />

began in the early 20th Century and has<br />

changed a great deal since. Whilst there is a<br />

level of control over the size and shape of<br />

the pearls cultivated, the mollusc is still very<br />

much in charge of the process, alongside the<br />

forces of nature.<br />

A gem that does not require further polishing<br />

or faceting to enhance its beauty, a pearl is<br />

simply perfection in its natural form. Their<br />

delicate iridescent sheen is captivating<br />

and can be enhanced by the presence of<br />

other gems or simply dazzle on its own.<br />

Beautiful as single spherical shapes, baroque<br />

forms or long strands, pearls are a classic<br />

jewellery staple. i<br />

STACEY LIM FGAA BA Design, is a qualified<br />

gemmologist and gemmology teacher/assistant.<br />

She is a jewellery designer, marketing manager<br />

and passionate communicator on gemmology.<br />

For information on gemstones, visit: gem.org.au<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong> <strong>Jeweller</strong> 33


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BUSINESS<br />

LOGGING ON TO THE INTERNET OF THINGS<br />

The internet of things can offer insights<br />

into what customers really care<br />

about. CHRIS PETERSEN reveals how<br />

retailers can leverage this emerging<br />

technology sector for a more effective<br />

selling strategy.<br />

The ‘Internet of Things’ (IoT) has to go<br />

down as one of the worst-named product<br />

categories ever. A recent study indicated that<br />

79 per cent of consumers had no idea what<br />

IoT stands for or what it means; however, the<br />

path to purchase requires that retailers have<br />

some understanding of what it is and the<br />

opportunities it presents.<br />

According to Wikipedia, a British entrepreneur<br />

named Kevin Aston first coined the term<br />

Internet of Things in 1999 while working with<br />

radio-frequency identification devices.<br />

Hard to believe that there wasn’t another<br />

name but IoT seems to have emerged as the<br />

catch-all term to describe any object that can<br />

collect, share and transmit data.<br />

The IoT is a network of seemingly-everyday<br />

items like appliances, cars and even buildings<br />

that are connected to the internet. These<br />

devices can be connected in ‘smart grids’ to<br />

monitor a wide variety of machines<br />

and people.<br />

The result is that IoT devices can churn out<br />

a mountain of monitoring data, as well as<br />

creating a seamless experience for the user,<br />

group or business using them.<br />

Each IoT object is designed to work in concert<br />

with the others. For example, if a woman is<br />

returning home from work, her car could<br />

send a signal to her smart-home device,<br />

which would then set the air-conditioner to<br />

her preferred temperature so the house is<br />

cool when she steps inside.<br />

The garage door is also connected so it would<br />

know when she is arriving and open just as<br />

her car is pulling into the driveway.<br />

Enter smart jewellery. Combining society’s<br />

obsession with connectivity and style,<br />

smart jewellery refers to an assortment of<br />

rings, bracelets, necklaces and earrings that<br />

aim to improve health, productivity and<br />

communications, all while maintaining a<br />

fashion-first stance. The latest iterations are<br />

less gimmicky and more wearable, shattering<br />

STORIES MAKE<br />

PRODUCTS<br />

REAL AND<br />

RELEVANT TO<br />

CONSUMERS.<br />

WHEN<br />

CONSUMERS<br />

CAN’T SEE THE<br />

TECHNOLOGY<br />

OR FEATURES,<br />

THEY NEED TO<br />

SEE AND HEAR<br />

HOW IT THESE<br />

FEATURES ARE<br />

PERSONALLY<br />

RELEVANT<br />

the notion that they can’t be worn daily and<br />

making a strong case for the title of jewellery.<br />

The IoT also includes wearable ‘smart’<br />

jewellery, which combines society’s obsession<br />

with connectivity and style. Smart jewellery<br />

refers to an assortment of rings, bracelets,<br />

necklaces and earrings that aim to improve<br />

health, productivity and communications, all<br />

while maintaining a fashion-first stance. The<br />

latest iterations are less gimmicky and more<br />

wearable, shattering the notion that they can’t<br />

be worn daily and making a strong case for<br />

the title of jewellery.<br />

UNLIMITED POTENTIAL<br />

Estimates predict that there will be 25-billion<br />

IoT devices on this planet by 2020 – and this<br />

estimate may be conservative. All of these<br />

devices will be wirelessly connected to the<br />

Internet of Things, each transmitting data.<br />

There are untold uses for IoT and applications<br />

for every industry. Devices could monitor<br />

everything from manufacturing machines to<br />

planes and track the movement of products<br />

across every step of distribution.<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong> <strong>Jeweller</strong> 35


BUSINESS<br />

IoT devices can also monitor critical health<br />

functions in wearers and alert them to<br />

visit the closest doctor in the event of an<br />

irregularity. Wearable IoT devices – wristbands<br />

and even clothing – can already track<br />

exercise, sleep patterns and even intimate<br />

moments if required.<br />

In Australia, Melbourne researcher and<br />

jewellery designer Leah Heiss has created<br />

a range of ‘diabetes jewellery’ which can<br />

painlessly monitor and administer insulin as<br />

well as the Smart Heart necklace to collect<br />

and transmit heart data for cardiac patients.<br />

The role of IoT in documenting the lives<br />

of consumers would seem to be a perfect<br />

opportunity for retailers yet selling IoT devices<br />

in retail stores has thus far been a challenge.<br />

Why? Well, most consumers simply aren’t<br />

aware of IoT.<br />

As IoT sensors are embedded into their<br />

respective devices and not easily seen,<br />

consumers might not even know their<br />

appliances are IoT capable. Unless consumers<br />

are wearing Fitbits or similar devices, they also<br />

rarely use any of the information coming out<br />

of their devices to improve their daily lives.<br />

THE CHALLENGE FOR RETAIL<br />

Recent surveys indicate that four out of<br />

five consumers don’t have an<br />

understanding of IoT or appreciate the<br />

value of owning an IoT device. These<br />

findings are remarkable because most<br />

consumers already own a device with IoT<br />

capability – smartphones, smart TVs and<br />

most recent cars, which usually integrate<br />

Bluetooth connectivity, online radio and<br />

navigation, if not web browsing.<br />

Wearable technology has become<br />

mainstream too but there remains great<br />

potential to expand this category. Consumers<br />

are naturally cautious about products like<br />

Google Home and Amazon Echo. Voice<br />

activation makes these devices easy to use<br />

but also plays into wariness that people have<br />

about being recorded.<br />

Indeed, concerns about privacy and who can<br />

access this personal data are at the forefront<br />

of consumers’ minds. This is something<br />

retailers should address.<br />

Consumers don’t have any perceived value<br />

of how IoT can benefit them. A considered<br />

purchase requires that the buyer sees<br />

personal value before spending a significant<br />

amount of money on an item.<br />

When it comes to IoT, factors such as price<br />

aren’t the barrier to purchase; the problem is<br />

that people just don’t see how these devices<br />

can satisfy their needs or requirements.<br />

The bottom line is that consumers don’t buy<br />

what they don’t know, use or trust.<br />

ENCOURAGING ADOPTION<br />

IoT could represent a significant<br />

retail opportunity if retailers can shift<br />

focus. Retailers are stuck in a legacy of<br />

merchandising and selling things but IoT is<br />

not about selling things at all.<br />

If retailers are going to crack the code<br />

on selling IoT, they need to change their<br />

behaviours with consumers. Today’s<br />

consumers aren’t buying objects just because<br />

they connect to the internet so IoT devices<br />

will not sell well unless retailers change the<br />

customer experience (CX).<br />

With all the other objects competing for a<br />

share of the consumer’s wallet, IoT has largely<br />

been a non-starter because consumers can’t<br />

‘see’ the features in action. hey can’t see<br />

the embedded IoT technology and they<br />

especially can’t see the personal value in their<br />

daily life. This is a tailor-made scenario for<br />

retailers and consumer brands to leverage CX.<br />

THE POWER OF STORIES<br />

Stories make products real and relevant<br />

to consumers. When consumers can’t see<br />

the technology or features, they need to<br />

see and hear how it these features are<br />

personally relevant.<br />

The ability to watch other consumers use IoT<br />

products and benefit from them would be an<br />

excellent place to start. Since the consumer<br />

journey starts online, the IoT benefits stories<br />

need to be there to showcase value and ease<br />

of use. Retailers should focus on terms like<br />

‘personal’ and ‘use’. Nothing sounds more<br />

impersonal than data and network talk.<br />

Consumers don’t care so much about what<br />

makes something work; they are interested<br />

in what the IoT device does for them, how<br />

it makes their life better. For example,<br />

consumers need to be able to see how they<br />

can check if their garage door is open after<br />

they leave the house with an IoT device.<br />

This is real, practical value that gives<br />

IT’S A PARADOX<br />

THAT ALL THIS<br />

CONNECTIVITY<br />

STILL REQUIRES A<br />

HUMAN TOUCH<br />

TO SELL IT. AN<br />

ACCENTURE<br />

STUDY FOUND<br />

THAT 83 PER<br />

CENT OF<br />

CONSUMERS<br />

WOULD RATHER<br />

WORK WITH A<br />

PERSON THAN<br />

GET DIGITAL HELP<br />

consumers peace of mind and can also save<br />

them a trip home. Part of the experience<br />

comes from allowing consumers to see,<br />

touch, feel and drive.IoT devices by their very<br />

nature must connect to networks and the<br />

internet. Consumers need to see how IoT<br />

devices work and connect.<br />

They also need to know how simple these<br />

devices are to use. One reason Fitbit stylewearables<br />

are being sold is that consumers<br />

can put one on for a test drive in store.<br />

Retailers must emphasise the ways in which<br />

devices can make life better. A refrigerator<br />

that can keep track of its contents is certainly<br />

a novelty but do shoppers really want the<br />

refrigerator to send a report or even place a<br />

grocery order?<br />

That’s a question for the individual but there<br />

are devices that everyone can appreciate.<br />

For example, show a customer how an IoT<br />

smart-home device can send them a text<br />

alert if there is an intruder or if there is smoke<br />

detected in the house and they’ll probably<br />

agree that alleviating safety concerns is of real<br />

value in their personal lives.<br />

It’s a paradox that all this connectivity<br />

still requires a human touch to sell it.<br />

An Accenture study found that 83 per cent<br />

of consumers would rather work with a<br />

person than get digital help. If that isn’t a<br />

case for the power of customer service in<br />

store then what is?<br />

In addition to floor staff, another<br />

differentiation opportunity is support after<br />

the sale. US appliance store Best Buy’s Geek<br />

Squad has created a very profitable enterprise<br />

offering technical support to customers on<br />

the phone and also in their homes. Why not<br />

expand to include IoT devices designed for<br />

smart homes and security?<br />

Today’s retailers have to be more than a<br />

source of the product – much more! The<br />

retailers who differentiate value via CX have<br />

boundless opportunities for both sales and<br />

service with the billions of IoT devices due to<br />

enter the market in the next few years. i<br />

CHRIS PETERSEN is<br />

founder and CEO of retail<br />

consultancy Integrated<br />

Marketing Solutions (IMS).<br />

imsresultscount.com<br />

36 <strong>Jeweller</strong> <strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong>


SELLING<br />

HOW TO LOSE A SALE – BEFORE YOU GET IT<br />

IT’S SURPRISINGLY EASY TO LOSE A SALE. FROM INADEQUATE COMMUNICATION TO BAD TIMING, BRIAN JEFFREY EXPLORES<br />

THE COMMON PITFALLS, OVERSIGHTS AND MISTAKES SELLERS MAKE WHEN INTERACTING WITH PROSPECTIVE CLIENTS.<br />

It’s a shame but there are salespeople who<br />

are losing sales before they even have the<br />

chance to begin them.<br />

That’s right – sales staff are reaching into<br />

their holsters, pulling out their pistols<br />

and shooting themselves in the foot<br />

before they even have a chance to talk to<br />

their prospect.<br />

SLOW OFF THE MARK<br />

A slow reaction time can annoy a prospect<br />

even at the very beginning of a sales pitch.<br />

As a case in point, I recently decided to enlist<br />

a company to revamp my website – to give it<br />

a face-lift, so to speak.<br />

I couldn’t do it myself because I have the<br />

creativity of a pebble. I also don’t speak or<br />

understand HTML, the language of the web.<br />

I contacted a couple of recommended web<br />

designers and waited for them to call me<br />

and here’s where my problem began. I<br />

waited and waited. Obviously, they didn’t<br />

need any more business as I’m still waiting<br />

for some of them to call!<br />

What goes through my mind is that<br />

if a business takes this long to make<br />

initial contact, how long will I have to wait<br />

for them to actually do the job?<br />

If your response time to a prospect’s initial<br />

request is too long, he or she might write<br />

you off before you even get a chance to<br />

start the process.<br />

Even if you do get to commence your pitch,<br />

you’ve got an uphill climb to recapture that<br />

prospect’s trust.<br />

FROM BAD TO WORSE<br />

It’s a safe bet that if a sales pitch is going<br />

badly during the early stages, it isn’t going to<br />

get much better. In fact, it’s more likely that it<br />

will get even worse still!<br />

You’ve undoubtedly had similar situations as<br />

a salesperson. You’ve got the prospect from<br />

hell and the sale is a bigger challenge than it<br />

really should be.<br />

IF YOUR<br />

RESPONSE<br />

TIME TO A<br />

PROSPECT’S<br />

INITIAL REQUEST<br />

IS TOO LONG, HE<br />

OR SHE MIGHT<br />

WRITE YOU<br />

OFF BEFORE<br />

YOU EVEN GET<br />

A CHANCE<br />

TO START THE<br />

PROCESS<br />

IF A PITCH STARTS BADLY, IT WON’T IMPROVE<br />

He doesn’t return your calls, wants to bicker<br />

over every little detail and, in general, he<br />

wants to jerk you around.<br />

If you think it’s going to be better after<br />

you’ve got his money, think again. It usually<br />

gets worse. After a sale, the prospect from<br />

hell can turn into the customer from hell.<br />

No salesperson wants a bad sale and no<br />

prospect wants a bad buy. Bad sales and<br />

bad buys are the same; they don’t start off<br />

well and they both degenerate into even<br />

worse situations.<br />

If your prospect even smells a hint of<br />

problems at the early stages of a sale,<br />

he’s going to be wary and start looking<br />

for alternate sources of whatever it is<br />

you’re selling.<br />

SENDING THE WRONG MESSAGE<br />

So what makes a prospect wary? Lack of<br />

hustle, for one! If it takes you too long to get<br />

back to a potential customer after his initial<br />

inquiry, you’re on your way to a bad sale.<br />

You’re sending the message that you don’t<br />

care and if you don’t care, maybe the rest of<br />

the company doesn’t care either.<br />

Little things can make a big difference. If you<br />

don’t think that little things matter, consider<br />

this – you’re sitting in a plane waiting for<br />

take-off and the tray in front of you pops<br />

open. You notice that it’s dirty and warped.<br />

Wouldn’t you then wonder about the<br />

engines?<br />

If they can’t fix and clean something as<br />

simple as a tray, how well do they maintain<br />

the rest of the aircraft?!<br />

Another thing that makes a person wary<br />

is when a salesperson fails to keep their<br />

promises. Remember when you told your<br />

potential customer that you’d call her back<br />

before the end of the day?<br />

Okay so you say you didn’t promise her<br />

and that you were just telling her what you<br />

intended to do, right?<br />

You may have been busy or unable to get<br />

the information she wants.<br />

Telling someone you’ll call at a specific time<br />

is perceived promise in the prospect’s mind,<br />

and prospects don’t differentiate between<br />

perceived promises and real ones.<br />

KEEP YOUR WORD<br />

Your ability – or inability – to respond<br />

quickly to inquiries or to get back to<br />

someone as promised are both measures<br />

of your reliability. People want to deal with<br />

and buy from reliable people.<br />

Make sure you start every sales opportunity<br />

on the right foot by being timely and<br />

proving yourself to be reliable.<br />

Do this and you’ll stand out by a country<br />

mile because your competition probably<br />

isn’t doing it.<br />

It’s the tiniest of things that can make the<br />

biggest impact. Remember this the next<br />

time you see a dirty tray on the plane. i<br />

BRIAN JEFFREY has more<br />

than 40 years’ experience in<br />

sales management, training<br />

and business consulting.<br />

quintarra.com<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong> <strong>Jeweller</strong> 37


MANAGEMENT<br />

THE POWER OF VISION AND CERTAINTY<br />

WHEN IT COMES TO SUCCESS, THERE ARE TWO MAGIC INGREDIENTS – EMPLOYED BY LEGENDARY STATESMEN AND TITANS OF<br />

INDUSTRY – THAT WILL TRANSFORM YOUR LEADERSHIP STYLE AND HELP YOU ACHIEVE YOUR GOALS. DAVID BROWN REPORTS.<br />

All great leaders, from George Washington<br />

to Martin Luther King Jr, Winston Churchill<br />

to Steve Jobs, have an elusive quality that<br />

defines their success.<br />

of customers sit. These businesses are so<br />

careful to avoid offence that they become<br />

vanilla, indistinguishable from those around<br />

them on anything other than price.<br />

It’s something that lifts those around them<br />

and takes their cause to the upper reaches<br />

of achievement.<br />

As this is where the majority of the<br />

competition sits, everyone is left fighting<br />

for scraps.<br />

A SURE THING<br />

We often mistake this quality for charisma or<br />

confidence but it goes much deeper than<br />

that. These leaders have a belief that carries<br />

them through adversity and past the failures<br />

of those who doubt.<br />

Churchill is a classic case in point; despite<br />

the odds, he believed Britain would win over<br />

Germany during World War Two.<br />

Even after every European ally had fallen<br />

and Britain was left alone, protected only<br />

by the narrow English Channel, Churchill<br />

was fervent in his belief that Britain would<br />

be victorious.<br />

This belief provided the people of England<br />

with the confidence to withstand attack and<br />

eventually win through.<br />

George Washington also faced seemingly<br />

insurmountable odds.<br />

Heavily outnumbered in most encounters<br />

and using a ragtag group of militia to<br />

oppose the strongest military in the world,<br />

Washington was able to inspire confidence<br />

not only in his soldiers but in the leaders<br />

and politicians who would go on to form<br />

Western society’s first true democracy.<br />

The victories of the American revolutionary<br />

forces stemmed from Washington’s belief<br />

that they would be victorious.<br />

A shared quality of these leaders, and those<br />

business leaders who have grown their<br />

companies to incredible heights, has been<br />

certainty – a deep, unyielding belief that<br />

what they are doing is the right thing and<br />

that they will succeed no matter what.<br />

Look at any successful business of the last<br />

HOW DO YOU<br />

MEASURE UP ON<br />

THE CERTAINTY<br />

SCALE? DO YOU<br />

HAVE A CLEAR<br />

VISION OF WHAT<br />

YOU HOPE TO<br />

OFFER THE<br />

WORLD? THOSE<br />

WHO ARE CERTAIN<br />

ARE NOT ‘ME<br />

TOO’ OPERATORS;<br />

THEIR BELIEF IS IN<br />

SOMETHING THAT<br />

MANY OTHERS<br />

FAIL TO BELIEVE IN<br />

DEFINE YOUR GOAL – AND BELIEVE IN IT<br />

100 years and you’ll find a leader standing<br />

with certainty, one who has a vision and a<br />

certainty to match.<br />

This level of certainty transfers to small<br />

business as well.<br />

SEEING THE GOAL CLEARLY<br />

Look around at the businesses in your city<br />

that are successful and you will find they are<br />

led by people with a vision and a level of<br />

certainty in that vision.<br />

The success of these entities will be directly<br />

related to the certainty they have that they<br />

are offering something worth having and<br />

that people will want it.<br />

How do you measure up on the certainty<br />

scale? Do you have a clear vision of what<br />

you hope to offer the world?<br />

Those who are certain are not ‘me too’<br />

operators; their belief is in something that<br />

many others fail to believe in.<br />

It’s not hard to believe that world is round<br />

today but it took some certainty 600 years<br />

ago when everyone else thought it was flat.<br />

Sadly, there are business owners who<br />

are willing to believe only in what the<br />

mainstream believes. As a result, they try<br />

to be all things to all people, playing it<br />

safely down the middle where the majority<br />

In politics, we see figures like Donald<br />

Trump, Bernie Sanders and Alexandria<br />

Ocasio-Cortez gaining support because<br />

they don’t water down their message to<br />

appeal to everyone.<br />

Love them or hate them, they have carved<br />

out their own powerful place – and gained<br />

plenty of followers – by not competing for<br />

the centre ground.<br />

There’s profit on the fringes where the<br />

audience is often ignored but where the<br />

competition is thinner. If you play in this<br />

area, you will find yourself outside the<br />

needs of the majority but with a profitable<br />

audience you can have all to yourself.<br />

Are you being all things to all people? Is<br />

there a profitable fringe to your business<br />

that could be explored? Are you positioning<br />

yourself where others can’t or won’t go but<br />

where there is an untapped market waiting<br />

to be heard?<br />

Elon Musk has become successful because<br />

of his willingness to go into markets where<br />

others fear to tread. Are you SpaceX or<br />

Chrysler?<br />

Think about it for a few minutes and it<br />

becomes clear – doing what everyone else<br />

does won’t bring you different results.<br />

A unique vision combined with an<br />

uncompromising certainty will win through<br />

in the end. i<br />

DAVID BROWN is<br />

co-founder and<br />

business mentor of<br />

Retail Edge Consultants.<br />

retailedgeconsultants.com<br />

38 <strong>Jeweller</strong> <strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong>


MARKETING & PR<br />

SALES TIPS YOU CAN APPLY TO EVERYDAY LIFE<br />

THE KEY SKILLS AND INSIGHTS OF THE SALESPERSON AREN’T JUST LIMITED TO THE SHOP FLOOR; THEY CAN ALSO HELP<br />

YOU NAVIGATE TRICKY SOCIAL SITUATIONS AND UNCERTAIN INTERACTIONS OUTSIDE OF WORK, WRITES SUE BARRETT.<br />

Humans are social animals who need<br />

to engage with others in some way in<br />

order to be able to live effectively and have<br />

a meaningful existence.<br />

I didn’t know, I said, “Hi, I’m your neighbour<br />

from up the street. We have an abundance<br />

of fresh plums we cannot use and I was<br />

wondering if you would like to have some?”<br />

Whether you’re a salesperson or not, there<br />

are times in your daily life when knowing<br />

how to sell can turn an awkward situation<br />

into a positive one.<br />

THE FEAR OF REJECTION<br />

Consider the new school year as an<br />

example. There are often many new faces<br />

and new people to meet across the year.<br />

Whether you want to or not, you will<br />

find yourself in new situations. These<br />

could include setting up play dates for<br />

your children, welcoming new neighbours<br />

into your community, forming a parent<br />

group, meeting your child’s teachers<br />

and so on.<br />

For some, social scenarios like these are<br />

second nature but not everyone finds<br />

these types of tasks easy to do.<br />

Some parents might even consider it<br />

daunting. What if you arrange a playdate<br />

between two children and the other<br />

parent says no?<br />

People don’t like to be rejected, which is<br />

why it can be intimidating to break into a<br />

new tribe.<br />

But as it turns out, igniting new social<br />

relationships is just like setting up new<br />

client relationships at work.<br />

Both raise various questions and fear in<br />

our minds such as how do I get accepted?<br />

How do I make a good impression? How<br />

do I get along with these people? How<br />

do I build a trusting relationship with them,<br />

going forward?<br />

All of these tasks require us to know how<br />

to plan, prospect, enquire, understand<br />

others and find ways to engage in<br />

meaningful exchanges for the purpose<br />

of making a strong connection.<br />

PEOPLE DON’T<br />

LIKE TO BE<br />

REJECTED, WHICH<br />

IS WHY IT CAN<br />

BE INTIMIDATING<br />

TO BREAK INTO<br />

A NEW TRIBE –<br />

BUT AS IT TURNS<br />

OUT, IGNITING<br />

NEW SOCIAL<br />

RELATIONSHIPS IS<br />

JUST LIKE SETTING<br />

UP NEW CLIENT<br />

RELATIONSHIPS<br />

AT WORK<br />

MEETING A NEW PERSON IS JUST LIKE A SALE<br />

STRANGERS TO FRIENDS<br />

Let me share a specific example to<br />

illustrate my point. Recently I was<br />

harvesting our annual crop of plums. It<br />

has been a good season and we have<br />

harvested around 30kg.<br />

What we normally like to do is make<br />

a pflaumenmus, which is plum butter,<br />

and we also preserve the plums; however,<br />

given previous harvests, we had more<br />

than enough produce already.<br />

We didn’t need to cook anything this year<br />

but we also didn’t want to have these<br />

delicious plums go to waste.<br />

I devised a plan – I would take some excess<br />

plums door-to-door and offer them to my<br />

neighbours for free, some of whom I know<br />

well and others whom I do not know.<br />

Have you ever tried to go door-to-door<br />

selling something? It’s not easy, even if<br />

what you have won’t cost them anything.<br />

People can be wary because they are<br />

caught off guard; they’re wondering who<br />

you are and what you want.<br />

To address this and before I left for my plum<br />

distribution drive, I developed my VBR or<br />

valid business reason for calling on them.<br />

It went something like this: to people<br />

Immediately everyone knew why I was<br />

there and what I was offering.<br />

When they said yes to the offer, I instructed<br />

them to get a large bowl so I could give<br />

them plenty of plums.<br />

To people I did know, I said the same thing<br />

except I used their names. ,<br />

“Hi [person’s name], we have an abundance<br />

of fresh plums we cannot use and I was<br />

wondering if you would like to have some?”<br />

I managed to visit 12 houses, which<br />

took me three hours because, besides<br />

distributing my plums, I got to have<br />

some wonderful conversations with<br />

my neighbours.<br />

I even got some corn and chillies in return<br />

and it was a lovely way to spend a Saturday<br />

afternoon.<br />

STRANGERS TO FRIENDS<br />

There are real skills involved here –<br />

knowing how to introduce yourself;<br />

helping people to quickly understand<br />

why you are there; giving neighbours<br />

a choice to say yes or no; being open,<br />

friendly and welcoming.<br />

All of these were integral to the success<br />

of the venture but having a clear plan and<br />

the right intentions made the biggest<br />

difference, helping me to build all sorts of<br />

relationships in the community. i<br />

SUE BARRETT is founder<br />

and managing director of<br />

sales advisory, consulting<br />

and education firm Barrett.<br />

barrett.com.au<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong> <strong>Jeweller</strong> 39


LOGGED ON<br />

HOW TO STAND OUT IN THE ONLINE MARKET<br />

JUST A FEW SIMPLE STEPS WILL GET THE ATTENTION OF PROSPECTS ONLINE AND BLOW AWAY THE COMPETITION. SIMON DELL<br />

REPORTS ON THE EASIEST TECHNIQUES FOR BOOSTING YOUR WEB PROFILE IN ORDER TO INCREASE TRAFFIC AND SALES.<br />

Standing out from the competition in the<br />

market is crucial to your business’ growth<br />

and success. With today’s technology<br />

upgrades, your online presence can be a<br />

great way to attract customers.<br />

If you’re looking to improve your virtual<br />

presence to enable your business to gain<br />

exposure online, here are a few tips to<br />

consider from the very beginning.<br />

START A BUSINESS WEBSITE<br />

If you want to have a place in a competitive<br />

market, creating a simple, well-designed<br />

website is a good idea to boost your virtual<br />

presence. The site helps customers know<br />

more about your business and the products<br />

or services you’re selling.<br />

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF SEO<br />

If you want your business to be well-known,<br />

you should make sure your website is<br />

designed to increase your online visibility<br />

– think about incorporating search engine<br />

optimisation (SEO) components such as<br />

meta tags and keywords so people can<br />

find you fast. This will give you an edge<br />

on search-engine results.<br />

Build a smart strategy from the start to<br />

make sure you get favourable results. Talk<br />

to an SEO specialist to get started with your<br />

digital marketing strategy.<br />

MAKE YOUR SITE MOBILE-FRIENDLY<br />

There are many potential customers<br />

online and almost all of them use mobile<br />

devices at least occasionally to search for<br />

a particular product or service. Tap this<br />

market by ensuring your website is mobilefriendly.<br />

With so many jewellery stores in the market,<br />

you need to be one step ahead at all times.<br />

To do this, you should know how your<br />

website is performing within your local area.<br />

Having a mobile-friendly site is beneficial<br />

for your search-engine rankings and for<br />

your customers too.<br />

BUILD A BUSINESS PROFILE ON GOOGLE<br />

As an entrepreneur, you should be listing<br />

a business profile on Google and ensuring<br />

it is verified and updated. Make sure it<br />

includes all the important information,<br />

including the services you provide, your<br />

location and store hours, some relevant<br />

product photos and any links to blog posts,<br />

if you have one.<br />

Update this information regularly as the<br />

more you update your Google business<br />

profile, the higher you will appear in the<br />

search engine’s results.<br />

GENERATE USEFUL CONTENT<br />

You’ll stand out from competitors if you<br />

become a trusted expert in your industry.<br />

Apart from having a website, you can<br />

establish a good profile for your company<br />

by producing relevant content.<br />

If you want to communicate with online<br />

shoppers, start creating newsletters and/<br />

or blogs. That way, you can share ideas<br />

about the industry, offer practical advice or<br />

discuss new product. This also encourages<br />

prospects to express themselves by posting<br />

comments, which you can use to build<br />

relationships.<br />

The more you communicate with potential<br />

customers while they are researching their<br />

purchases, the more they realise you are<br />

human. This builds trust, shows passion, and<br />

creates a veneer of authenticity across all<br />

your business dealings.<br />

BE SOCIAL<br />

Like other online platforms, social media<br />

can be a great way to introduce products<br />

and services to the online market. If you’re<br />

looking to spread the word about your<br />

business, become active on social media.<br />

Gaining leverage in the market means<br />

using social media for announcements<br />

and promotions, as well as to respond<br />

to questions and even criticism in a<br />

public forum.<br />

WHEN IT COMES TO THE WEB, IT’S ALL ABOUT STANDING OUT<br />

THE MORE YOU<br />

COMMUNICATE<br />

WITH PROSPECTS,<br />

THE MORE THEY<br />

REALISE YOU ARE<br />

HUMAN. THIS<br />

BUILDS TRUST,<br />

SHOWS PASSION,<br />

AND CREATES<br />

A VENEER OF<br />

AUTHENTICITY<br />

ACROSS ALL<br />

YOUR BUSINESS<br />

DEALINGS<br />

NARROW DOWN YOUR NICHE<br />

Your business can’t serve everyone, especially<br />

if you’re running a service-based company.<br />

Using a complicated approach is not always<br />

an effective way to service your customers. It’ll<br />

only make it difficult for people to determine<br />

whether your service is what they’re seeking.<br />

Instead, defining who it is that you serve<br />

can be the best way to stand out in the<br />

commodity market. For example, a New-York<br />

business called Movers NYC only targets those<br />

people who are moving within or out of New<br />

York City. Just by looking, customers will know<br />

immediately if that service is the right fit for<br />

their needs.<br />

CLOSING THOUGHTS<br />

Growing your business isn’t easy. You<br />

may have to undergo a few setbacks that<br />

will test your determination, courage,<br />

and skills; however, by following the tips<br />

above, you can begin to build your business’<br />

online presence as well as differentiate it<br />

from other similar brands in the online<br />

commodity market. i<br />

SIMON DELL operates his<br />

own agency, focusing on<br />

digital marketing strategies<br />

and customer engagement.<br />

simondell.com<br />

40 <strong>Jeweller</strong> <strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong>


MY STORE<br />

SMALL SPACE<br />

JEWELLERY<br />

LOCATION: Melbourne, Australia<br />

NAME: Robyn Wernicke<br />

POSITION: Owner and manager<br />

When was the renovated space<br />

completed? Small Space opened in<br />

2000, and in 2017 I decided it was well<br />

overdue for a face-lift. It was completed<br />

in April 2018. The renovation included<br />

new timber bench tops, floor sanding<br />

and staining in “Black Japan”, the addition<br />

of the feature pegboard, painting and last<br />

but definitely not least, a custom-made<br />

jeweller’s bench by Sam Johnson. After<br />

sitting at the same bench for more than<br />

30 years I have this schmick new one!<br />

Who is the target market, and how did<br />

they influence the store design?Our<br />

customer base is someone who likes<br />

to shop locally and knows what they<br />

purchase from us is unique, original and<br />

made by hand. I think the fact that the<br />

workshop is open to the customer and<br />

not hidden out the back holds intrigue.<br />

They can clearly see us working away; this<br />

reinforces that what we do is made by<br />

hand on the premises. So much of what’s<br />

on offer to the public is either imported<br />

or CAD or both, so l believe this is our<br />

point of differentiation.<br />

With the relationship between store<br />

ambience and consumer purchasing<br />

in mind, which features in the store<br />

encourage sales? Customers always<br />

comment on are the floor boxes which<br />

we use to display jewellery and other<br />

things that might relate to a new series<br />

of work or exhibition happening at the<br />

time. They are illuminated so they make<br />

a great contrast to the dark timber floors.<br />

Customers often comment, “Oh, l’m<br />

walking on the jewellery,” when they look<br />

down. The boxes are unexpected and a<br />

great starting point for a conversation.<br />

What is the wow factor? The expanse<br />

of pegboard, which spans the upper<br />

mezzanine level and displays a series of<br />

vintage tools that were my father’s. After<br />

he passed away l couldn’t bear to throw<br />

them away. I knew they would come in<br />

handy. They make a great impact when<br />

you walk in and Dad would’ve been very<br />

proud that they’ve got a second life! i<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong> <strong>Jeweller</strong> 41


10 YEARS AGO<br />

WHAT WAS MAKING NEWS 10 YEARS AGO?<br />

A SNAPSHOT OF THE INDUSTRY EVENTS THAT MADE NEWS HEADLINES IN THE MAY 2009 ISSUE OF JEWELLER<br />

JAA asks for input on<br />

terminology debate<br />

Enhanced<br />

gemstones alert<br />

The story: A spate of treated and enhanced<br />

gemstones, thought to have originated<br />

in Afghanistan, has recently appeared on<br />

the local market, sparking concerns for<br />

consumer confidence.<br />

Customers possessing the loose and unset<br />

gemstones have approached several jewellers<br />

for valuation and appraisal, according to the<br />

JAA. The clients claimed they’d obtained the<br />

gemstones – among them star sapphires,<br />

rubies and diamonds – from overseas<br />

and are interested in reselling, rather than<br />

manufacturing them into jewellery items.<br />

NATIONWIDE VISITS<br />

PANDORA HQ<br />

The story: Over 120 members of the<br />

Nationwide <strong>Jeweller</strong>s group recently<br />

visited the Pandora headquarters at<br />

Mona Vale in Sydney for the inaugural<br />

“Day at Pandora”.<br />

Nationwide’s in-house travel agency<br />

co-ordinated the arrangements, with<br />

members coming from all parts of<br />

Australia and New Zealand.<br />

The members, all Pandora stockists,<br />

were split into groups and allocated a<br />

Pandora staff member as a guide for<br />

the day.<br />

Activities included a tour of<br />

each department, a marketing<br />

presentation, training with the<br />

Pandora International Sales Coach<br />

and viewing the new product range.<br />

The story: The JAA has called on its members to<br />

help nominate the correct descriptive term for a<br />

synthetic or laboratory-grown gemstone.<br />

A memo and survey was issued to members, asking<br />

whether retailers should use terms like ‘synthetic’,<br />

‘laboratory-grown’, ‘laboratory-created’ or ‘manmade’.<br />

The survey also asked whether members and<br />

consumers understood what synthetic meant. The<br />

JAA said the naming debate had raged for 20 years.<br />

“The ‘purists’ are only prepared to accept the word<br />

‘synthetic’,” read the release. “The more commercially<br />

minded wish to use the words laboratory-created,<br />

laboratory-grown or just created.”<br />

The issue was raised at the 2008 CIBJO conference<br />

and will be discussed at the next one in <strong>May</strong> 2009,<br />

with the JAA speaking on behalf of the Australian<br />

jewellery industry.<br />

“Our members really enjoyed the<br />

whole experience,” Colin Pocklington,<br />

managing director Nationwide<br />

<strong>Jeweller</strong>s, said. “They had no idea<br />

of the huge size of the Pandora<br />

operation, and just as importantly,<br />

the plans that Pandora has in place in<br />

terms of products and marketing, to<br />

maintain strong growth.” Pocklington<br />

said the success of the day meant it<br />

could become an annual event.<br />

Skagen watches celebrates 20 years<br />

The story: Designer watch company Skagen recently<br />

celebrated its 20th birthday, releasing a limitededition<br />

Anniversary Collection for the occasion. The<br />

brand is now distributed in 60 countries, offering<br />

more than 250 watch designs in more than 5,000<br />

retailers worldwide.<br />

Charlotte Jorst, co-founder Skagen, said, “Given the<br />

challenging economy we are in, it’s an extra special<br />

time to be honouring how our small business<br />

venture began from just a simple idea to what is<br />

now a global design company with continued<br />

opportunity for growth.”<br />

The Australian distributor of Skagen, Jarass, planned<br />

a special event to mark the milestone at the<br />

International <strong>Jeweller</strong>y Fair in Sydney.<br />

42 <strong>Jeweller</strong> <strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong>


EVENTS<br />

JEWELLERY AND WATCH CALENDAR<br />

A GUIDE TO THE LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL JEWELLERY AND WATCH EVENTS SCHEDULED TO TAKE PLACE IN THE YEAR AHEAD.<br />

MAY <strong>2019</strong><br />

JEWELRY SHANGHAI<br />

Shanghai, China<br />

<strong>May</strong> 8 – 12<br />

newayfairs.com/EN<br />

PALAKISS VICENZA<br />

SPRING SHOW<br />

Vicenza, Italy<br />

<strong>May</strong> 10 – 12<br />

palakisstore.com<br />

INTERNATIONAL<br />

JEWELLERY KOBE<br />

Kobe, Japan<br />

<strong>May</strong> 16 – 18<br />

ijk-fair.jp/en<br />

INTERNATIONAL JEWELRY<br />

AND WATCH FAIR VIETNAM<br />

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam<br />

<strong>May</strong> 16 – 20<br />

jewelrytradefair.com/vietnam<br />

JCK LAS VEGAS<br />

Las Vegas, US<br />

<strong>May</strong> 31 – June 3<br />

lasvegas.jckonline.com<br />

JUNE <strong>2019</strong><br />

JUBINALE INTERNATIONAL<br />

JEWELLERY AND WATCHES<br />

TRADE FAIR<br />

Krakow, Poland<br />

June 13 – 15<br />

jubinale.com/en<br />

HONG KONG JEWELLERY<br />

& GEM FAIR<br />

Hong Kong, China<br />

June 20 – 23<br />

exhibitions.jewellerynet.com<br />

JULY <strong>2019</strong><br />

WINTON OPAL<br />

TRADESHOW<br />

Winton, Australia<br />

July 12 – 13<br />

qboa.com.au<br />

LIGHTNING RIDGE OPAL<br />

& GEM FESTIVAL<br />

Lightning Ridge, Australia<br />

July 24 – 27<br />

lightningridgeopalfestival.com.au<br />

AUGUST <strong>2019</strong><br />

AUSTRALIAN OPAL<br />

EXHIBITION<br />

Gold Coast, QLD<br />

August 1 – 2<br />

austopalexpo.com.au<br />

INDIA INTERNATIONAL<br />

JEWELLERY SHOW<br />

Mumbai, India<br />

August 9 – 12<br />

iijs.org<br />

INTERNATIONAL<br />

JEWELLERY FAIR<br />

Sydney, Australia<br />

August 24 – 26<br />

jewelleryfair.com.au<br />

JAPAN JEWELLERY FAIR<br />

Tokyo, Japan<br />

August 28 – 30<br />

japanjewelleryfair.com/en<br />

SEPTEMBER <strong>2019</strong><br />

INTERNATIONAL<br />

JEWELLERY LONDON<br />

London, UK<br />

September 1 – 3<br />

jewellerylondon.com<br />

HONG KONG WATCH<br />

& CLOCK FAIR<br />

Hong Kong, China<br />

September 3 – 7<br />

m.hktdc.com/fair/hkwatchfair-en/<br />

BIJORHCA PARIS<br />

Paris, France<br />

September 6 – 9<br />

bijorhca.com<br />

VICENZAORO<br />

Vicenza, Italy<br />

September 7 – 11<br />

vicenzaoro.com/en<br />

PALAKISS VICENZA<br />

SUMMER SHOW<br />

Vicenza, Italy<br />

September 7 – 11<br />

palakisstore.com<br />

BANGKOK GEMS<br />

& JEWELRY FAIR<br />

Bangkok, Thailand<br />

September 10 – 12<br />

bkkgems.com<br />

SHENZHEN INTERNATIONAL<br />

JEWELLERY FAIR<br />

Shenzhen, China<br />

September 12 – 16<br />

newayfairs.com/EN<br />

HONG KONG JEWELLERY &<br />

GEM FAIR<br />

Hong Kong, China<br />

September 16 – 29<br />

exhibitions.jewellerynet.com<br />

OCTOBER <strong>2019</strong><br />

BHARAT DIAMOND WEEK<br />

Mumbai, India<br />

October 14 – 16<br />

bharatdiamondweek.com<br />

INTERNATIONAL<br />

JEWELLERY TOKYO<br />

AUTUMN<br />

Yokohama, Japan<br />

October 23 – 25<br />

ijt-aki.jp<br />

NOVEMBER <strong>2019</strong><br />

CHINA INTERNATIONAL<br />

GOLD, JEWELLERY & GEM<br />

FAIR SHANGHAI<br />

Shanghai, China<br />

November 28 – December 1<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong> <strong>Jeweller</strong> 43


MY BENCH<br />

Thomas<br />

Meihofer<br />

WORKS AT: Thomas Meihofer<br />

<strong>Jeweller</strong>y Design, Perth<br />

AGE: 58<br />

YEARS IN TRADE: 31<br />

TRAINING: Apprenticeship<br />

in Switzerland.<br />

FIRST JOB: Carlo Pagani<br />

Goldsmith.<br />

OTHER QUALIFICATIONS:<br />

Gemmologist.<br />

Favourite gemstone:<br />

I adore most of them!<br />

Favourite metal:<br />

Gold – I’m a goldsmith,<br />

after all. It can’t be<br />

substituted and it appeals<br />

to people’s ancient desire<br />

to adorn themselves.<br />

Favourite tool:<br />

My trusty 18-year-old<br />

KAVO K11 Micro Motor<br />

Handpiece. It gets used<br />

on almost every job, one<br />

way or another, and it is<br />

combined with a dust<br />

extractor system.<br />

Best part of job:<br />

Coming up with a design<br />

concept for an interesting<br />

and beautiful gemstone<br />

and seeing it become<br />

a piece of jewellery. It’s<br />

a great platform for the<br />

creative mind.<br />

Worst part of job:<br />

Having to scrap the above<br />

mentioned piece after<br />

years of it being admired<br />

but not sold!<br />

Best tip from a jeweller:<br />

Try to use all of your talents.<br />

Best tip to a jeweller:<br />

Know what your talents are.<br />

Biggest health concern<br />

on the bench:<br />

A sore back and shoulders.<br />

Get up from your bench<br />

and stretch regularly.<br />

What frustrates you most<br />

about the industry?<br />

Don’t get me started! i


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SOAPBOX<br />

THE LUXURY WATCH MARKET CAN’T<br />

SUPPORT COMPETING TRADE SHOWS<br />

With new CEO Michel Loris-Melikoff<br />

set to the task of rebuilding Baselworld,<br />

now is the time for the Salon<br />

International de la Haute Horlogerie<br />

(SIHH) to set aside petty historical<br />

differences and return under the<br />

umbrella of the Baselworld show.<br />

In her opening address of the SIHH in<br />

January, Fabienne Lupo, CEO of organiser<br />

Fondation de la Haute Horlogerie,<br />

announced a concession to industry<br />

solidarity by aligning the calendar dates of<br />

the two shows.<br />

In forming the ‘Swiss Shows Week’ from<br />

2020, she said their one objective was to<br />

serve the greater good of the industry.<br />

‘Serving the greater good of the industry’ is<br />

indeed a noble sentiment, but might it not<br />

be truly and genuinely demonstrated by<br />

bringing the shows under the one umbrella<br />

– instead of just superficially fooling around<br />

with dates of the calendar?<br />

Baselworld currently has unused halls, any<br />

one of which would easily adapt to the<br />

exclusive use of the SIHH.<br />

This would enable the latter to make big<br />

cost savings in an environment of unity – a<br />

feature of the MCH Basel management that<br />

SIHH imprudently abandoned back in 1991.<br />

It is critically important for Baselworld to<br />

focus and survive this cyclic crisis; many<br />

of the medium and smaller Baselworld<br />

exhibitors seriously rely on exhibiting for<br />

their annual production orders.<br />

By comparison, the SIHH is a distraction<br />

pursuing a political existence whilst<br />

attracting less than 10 per cent of the<br />

exhibitor numbers of Baselworld.<br />

Now that the two shows are together<br />

on the calendar, there will be a logical<br />

defection of the specialist exhibitors from<br />

the SIHH to Baselworld, even if simply on<br />

the basis of upfront rental costs.<br />

But there are more potent reasons than<br />

rent alone. Why, for example, would anyone<br />

stay in the SIHH’s Carré des Horlogers<br />

when the cost is significantly higher<br />

than a Baselworld exhibition space – and<br />

particularly where the cost of its press and<br />

publicity is artificially pumped up by its<br />

show-pony pretentiousness?<br />

This SIHH film-set environment was<br />

originally a talking point, a focus of<br />

difference from Baselworld. Now, it is<br />

a millstone around the neck of the<br />

exhibitors as the cost of annual<br />

construction and deconstruction<br />

pushes their fees way above the<br />

equivalent exposure in Baselworld.<br />

In Basel, the public relations policies do,<br />

at least, support the very reasons for<br />

exhibiting in the first place which is why<br />

the brands exhibit and it is why trade<br />

fairs exist at all.<br />

To avoid its own irrelevancy, the SIHH can<br />

return under the umbrella of the Baselworld<br />

Show and be a part of openly reuniting the<br />

Swiss industry.<br />

With his event implementation experience,<br />

Loris-Melikoff is probably a good choice to<br />

rebuild Baselworld loyalty.<br />

At least he can ignore the recalcitrant<br />

OF COURSE THERE<br />

ARE ALWAYS<br />

POLITICAL<br />

PROBLEMS. BUT<br />

THIS IS AN IDEAL,<br />

PERHAPS UNIQUE,<br />

OPPORTUNITY<br />

TO MEND THE<br />

POLITICS AND<br />

GENUINELY WORK<br />

TOWARDS POSITIVE<br />

GAINS FOR ALL<br />

STAKEHOLDERS<br />

Swatch Group and Nick Hayek can throw<br />

his toys out of the cot as far as he likes!<br />

Breitling has appeared nervous and<br />

stressed for this last year or so; even as<br />

we go to print, it has announced a trial<br />

separation in 2020 but is keeping the<br />

option open to return.<br />

In a further new development, Rolex sister<br />

brand Tudor will showcase at its own stand<br />

in Hall 1.0 in 2020 and Rolex will expand its<br />

stand to include the previous Tudor area.<br />

Loris-Melikoff has proposed that three years<br />

are required for the restructure of the show.<br />

This will allow a deeper understanding of<br />

the structural issues – which will surely<br />

come into clearer focus with the passing of<br />

a little time.<br />

As well, the cost of the planned changes will<br />

be very high if there is any correlation with<br />

the current spray of promo buzzwords and<br />

wordy platitudes.<br />

And of course there are always political<br />

problems. But this is an ideal, perhaps<br />

unique, opportunity to mend the politics<br />

and genuinely work towards positive gains<br />

for all stakeholders.<br />

SIHH could strongly support a<br />

single Baselworld Show otherwise ‘the<br />

greater good of the industry’ is simply<br />

empty chatter. i<br />

Name: Martin Foster FBHI<br />

Position: Freelance journalist<br />

Location: Sydney, NSW<br />

Years in the industry: 61<br />

46 <strong>Jeweller</strong> <strong>May</strong> <strong>2019</strong>


Where passion meets creativity<br />

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